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Sample records for acid diffusion length

  1. Characterizing acid diffusion lengths in chemically amplified resists from measurements of deprotection kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Abhijit A.; Pandey, Yogendra Narayan; Doxastakis, Manolis; Stein, Gila E.

    2014-10-01

    The acid-catalyzed deprotection of glassy poly(4-hydroxystyrene-co-tertbutyl acrylate) films was studied with infrared absorbance spectroscopy and stochastic simulations. Experimental data were interpreted with a simple description of subdiffusive acid transport coupled to second-order acid loss. This model predicts key attributes of observed deprotection rates, such as fast reaction at short times, slow reaction at long times, and a nonlinear dependence on acid loading. Fickian diffusion is approached by increasing the postexposure bake temperature or adding plasticizing agents to the polymer resin. These findings demonstrate that acid mobility and overall deprotection kinetics are coupled to glassy matrix dynamics. To complement the analysis of bulk kinetics, acid diffusion lengths were calculated from the anomalous transport model and compared with nanopattern line widths. The consistent scaling between experiments and simulations suggests that the anomalous diffusion model could be further developed into a predictive lithography tool.

  2. Acid Diffusion Length Corresponding to Post Exposure Bake Time and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Back; Kim, Sung-Hyuck; Kim, Sung-Jin; Cho, Jung-Hyuk; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2007-01-01

    The post exposure bake (PEB) step in lithography is important for fabricating good patterns when a chemically amplified resist is used. Hydrogen ions or acid is generated by a photoacid generator through light exposure. The generated acid diffuses and acts as a catalyst for chemical amplification during the PEB step. Acid diffusion length (ADL) affects the deprotection of a resist polymer, such that linewidth is affected by ADL. The common parameter that determines ADL is the acid diffusion coefficient D; thus, we must determine D accurately in order to obtain the actual linewidth. However, D cannot be unambiguously determined for the actual PEB temperature and time. ADL has become a critical factor for 100 nm patterns and below. Thus, the accurate ADL determination becomes an important issue for better linewidth prediction by simulation. To match ADL and PEB time and temperature, we attempted to determine the relationship between the PEB parameters and ADL. As a result, we obtained a reasonable ADL.

  3. Comparison of the electron work function, hole concentration and exciton diffusion length for P3HT and PT prepared by thermal or acid cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toušek, J.; Toušková, J.; Ludvík, J.; Liška, A.; Remeš, Z.; Kylián, O.; Kousal, J.; Chomutová, R.; Heckler, I. M.; Bundgaard, E.; Krebs, F. C.

    2016-02-01

    The electron work function, hole concentration and diffusion length were compared for poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymer (P3HT) that is commonly used for construction of solar cells, and two types of native polythiophene (PT) samples which are prospective candidates for this purpose. The polythiophene samples were prepared from 2 different precursors by thermal or chemical treatment at room temperature. Cyclic voltammetry and work function measurements were used for estimating the concentration of holes. The measured data were evaluated assuming the validity of band theory based on the tight-binding model. Published data on the valence bandwidth were used for calculating the value of the overlap integral which is related to the hole effective mass. Energy band diagrams were constructed for all 3 materials. Finally, the exciton diffusion length, which is a critical parameter for the application of conjugated polymer materials in solar cells, was measured by a modified surface photovoltage method. The approach allowed us to identify the differences in the material properties related to the processing method. Morphology of the samples determined by AFM was another tool showing these differences. It is stated that a native polythiophene prepared by treatment with acids is a prospective material for solar cells and shows a similar quality as that produced by a thermal process.

  4. Connecting molecular structure and exciton diffusion length in rubrene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mullenbach, Tyler K; McGarry, Kathryn A; Luhman, Wade A; Douglas, Christopher J; Holmes, Russell J

    2013-07-19

    Connecting molecular structure and exciton diffusion length in rubrene derivatives demonstrates how the diffusion length of rubrene can be enhanced through targeted functionalization aiming to enhance self-Förster energy transfer. Functionalization adds steric bulk, forcing the molecules farther apart on average, and leading to increased photoluminescence efficiency. A diffusion length enhancement greater than 50% is realized over unsubstituted rubrene.

  5. Diffusion lengths in amphoteric GaAs heteroface solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, K. L.; Beal, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    Minority-carrier diffusion lengths in amphoteric GaAs:Si were investigated. Electron and hole diffusion lengths in p- and n-type, respectively, were determined to be 13 microns and 7 microns. Preliminary efficiency measurements on heteroface structures based on amphoteric GaAs:Si p-n junctions indicated that these devices should make excellent solar cells.

  6. Acid diffusion through polyaniline membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Su, T.M.; Huang, S.C.; Conklin, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    Polyaniline membranes in the undoped (base) and doped (acid) forms are studied for their utility as pervaporation membranes. The separation of water from mixtures of propionic acid, acetic acid and formic acid have been demonstrated from various feed compositions. Doped polyaniline displays an enhanced selectivity of water over these organic acids as compared with undoped polyaniline. For as-cast polyaniline membranes a diffusion coefficient (D) on the order of 10{sup -9} cm{sup 2}/sec has been determined for the flux of protons through the membranes using hydrochloric acid.

  7. Thirty years since diffuse sound reflection by maximum length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Trevor J.; D'Antonio, Peter

    2005-09-01

    This year celebrates the 30th anniversary of Schroeder's seminal paper on sound scattering from maximum length sequences. This paper, along with Schroeder's subsequent publication on quadratic residue diffusers, broke new ground, because they contained simple recipes for designing diffusers with known acoustic performance. So, what has happened in the intervening years? As with most areas of engineering, the room acoustic diffuser has been greatly influenced by the rise of digital computing technologies. Numerical methods have become much more powerful, and this has enabled predictions of surface scattering to greater accuracy and for larger scale surfaces than previously possible. Architecture has also gone through a revolution where the forms of buildings have become more extreme and sculptural. Acoustic diffuser designs have had to keep pace with this to produce shapes and forms that are desirable to architects. To achieve this, design methodologies have moved away from Schroeder's simple equations to brute force optimization algorithms. This paper will look back at the past development of the modern diffuser, explaining how the principles of diffuser design have been devised and revised over the decades. The paper will also look at the present state-of-the art, and dreams for the future.

  8. Long Spin Diffusion Length in Few-Layer Graphene Flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, W.; Phillips, L. C.; Barbone, M.; Hämäläinen, S. J.; Lombardo, A.; Ghidini, M.; Moya, X.; Maccherozzi, F.; van Dijken, S.; Dhesi, S. S.; Ferrari, A. C.; Mathur, N. D.

    2016-09-01

    We report a spin valve with a few-layer graphene flake bridging highly spin-polarized La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 electrodes, whose surfaces are kept clean during lithographic definition. Sharp magnetic switching is verified using photoemission electron microscopy with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism contrast. A naturally occurring high interfacial resistance ˜12 M Ω facilitates spin injection, and a large resistive switching (0.8 M Ω at 10 K) implies a 70 - 130 μ m spin diffusion length that exceeds previous values obtained with sharp-switching electrodes.

  9. Beyond the mixing-length theory - A turbulent diffusivity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unno, W.

    The use of single mode theory and Xiong's (1979, 1981) theory is considered for approximating the dynamics of convection. In the largest eddy limit, the simulation of turbulent convection is reduced to Xiong's nonlocal mixing-length theory, with application to the construction of stellar convection zones. The spectral theory is valid for large wave numbers and provides correct estimates for the eddy diffusivities. Using nonlinear convection theory, the single mode simulation with an effective Reynolds number of about 10 is shown to correctly simulate the dynamics of large scale flow. It is noted that the single mode simulation also has application to the study of the hydrodynamical properties of steller convection zones.

  10. Diffusion of isolated DNA molecules: dependence on length and topology.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Rae M; Laib, Stephan; Smith, Douglas E

    2006-05-09

    The conformation and dynamics of circular polymers is a subject of considerable theoretical and experimental interest. DNA is an important example because it occurs naturally in different topological states, including linear, relaxed circular, and supercoiled circular forms. A fundamental question is how the diffusion coefficients of isolated polymers scale with molecular length and how they vary for different topologies. Here, diffusion coefficients D for relaxed circular, supercoiled, and linear DNA molecules of length L ranging from approximately 6 to 290 kbp were measured by tracking the Brownian motion of single molecules. A topology-independent scaling law D approximately L(-nu) was observed with nu(L) = 0.571 +/- 0.014, nu(C) = 0.589 +/- 0.018, and nu(S) = 0.571 +/- 0.057 for linear, relaxed circular, and supercoiled DNA, respectively, in good agreement with the scaling exponent of nu congruent with 0.588 predicted by renormalization group theory for polymers with significant excluded volume interactions. Our findings thus provide evidence in support of several theories that predict an effective diameter of DNA much greater than the Debye screening length. In addition, the measured ratio D(Circular)/D(Linear) = 1.32 +/- 0.014 was closer to the value of 1.45 predicted by using renormalization group theory than the value of 1.18 predicted by classical Kirkwood hydrodynamic theory and agreed well with a value of 1.31 predicted when incorporating a recently proposed expression for the radius of gyration of circular polymers into the Zimm model.

  11. Exciton diffusion lengths of organic semiconductor thin films measured by spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Richard R.; Giebink, Noel C.; Belak, Anna A.; Benziger, Jay B.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching as a means to determine the exciton diffusion length of several archetype organic semiconductors used in thin film devices. We show that aggregation and crystal orientation influence the anisotropy of the diffusion length for vacuum-deposited polycrystalline films. The measurement of the singlet diffusion lengths is found to be in agreement with diffusion by Förster transfer, whereas triplet diffusion occurs primarily via Dexter transfer.

  12. Diffusion length in nanoporous TiO{sub 2} films under above-band-gap illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. D.; Son, B. H.; Park, J. K.; Kim, Sang Yong; Park, Ji-Yong; Lee, Soonil; Ahn, Y. H.

    2014-06-15

    We determined the carrier diffusion lengths in TiO{sub 2} nanoporous layers of dye-sensitized solar cells by using scanning photocurrent microscopy using an ultraviolet laser. Here, we excited the carrier directly in the nanoporous layers where the diffusion lengths were found to 140 μm as compared to that of visible illumination measured at 90 μm. The diffusion length decreased with increasing laser modulation frequency, in which we determined the electron lifetimes and the diffusion coefficients for both visible and UV illuminations. The diffusion lengths have been studied in terms of the sintering temperatures for both cells with and without binding molecules. We found a strong correlation between the diffusion length and the overall light-to-current conversion efficiency, proving that improving the diffusion length and hence the interparticle connections, is key to improving cell efficiency.

  13. Waste acid recycling via diffusion dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.

    1995-05-26

    Inorganic acids are commonly used for surface cleaning and finishing of metals. The acids become unuseable due to contamination with metals or diluted and weakened. Diffusion dialysis has become a way to recover the useable acid and allow separation of the metals for recovery and sale to refineries. This technique is made possible by the use of membranes that are strong enough to withstand low ph and have long service life.

  14. Studies of minority carrier diffusion length increase in p-type ZnO:Sb

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O.; Chernyak, L.; Xiu, F. X.; Liu, J. L.; Jang, S.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Gartsman, K.; Feldman, Y.; Osinsky, A.; Chow, P.

    2006-10-15

    Minority electron diffusion length was measured in p-type, Sb-doped ZnO as a function of temperature using the electron beam induced current technique. A thermally induced increase of electron diffusion length was determined to have an activation energy of 184{+-}10 meV. Irradiation with a low energy (5 kV) electron beam also resulted in an increase of diffusion length with a similar activation energy (219{+-}8 meV). Both phenomena are suggested to involve a Sb{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} acceptor complex. Saturation and relaxation dynamics of minority carrier diffusion length are explored. Details of a possible mechanism for diffusion length increase are presented.

  15. Decoupled length scales for diffusivity and viscosity in glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. L.; Voigtmann, Th.

    2016-10-01

    The growth of the characteristic length scales both for diffusion and viscosity is investigated by molecular dynamics utilizing the finite-size effect in a binary Lennard-Jones mixture. For those quantities relevant to the diffusion process (e.g., the hydrodynamic value and the spatial correlation function), a strong system-size dependence is found. In contrast, it is weak or absent for the shear relaxation process. Correlation lengths are estimated from the decay of the spatial correlation functions. We find the length scale for viscosity decouples from the one of diffusivity, featured by a saturated length even in high supercooling. This temperature-independent behavior of the length scale is reminiscent of the unapparent structure change upon supercooling, implying the manifestation of configuration entropy. Whereas for the diffusion process, it is manifested by relaxation dynamics and dynamic heterogeneity. The Stokes-Einstein relation is found to break down at the temperature where the decoupling of these lengths happens.

  16. First working group meeting on the minority carrier diffusion length/lifetime measurement: Results of the round robin lifetime/diffusion length tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cudzinovic, M; Sopori, B

    1995-11-01

    As was noted in the cover letter that accompanied the samples, the eleven bare silicon samples were from various manufacturers. Table I lists the codes for the samples and the manufacturer of each sample. It also notes if the sample was single or poly-crystalline. The samples had been polished on one side before being sent out for measurements, but no further processing was done. The participants of the study were asked to measure either the lifetime or diffusion length of each of the samples using their standard procedure. Table II shows the experimental conditions used by the groups who measured diffusion length. All the diffusion length measurements were performed using the Surface Photovoltage method (SPV). Table M shows the experimental conditions for the lifetime measurements. All the lifetime measurements were made using the Photoconductance Decay method (PCD) under low level injection. These tables show the diameter of the spot size used during the measurement (the effective sampling area), the locations where measurements were taken, and the number of measurements taken at each location. Table N shows the results of the measurements. The table is divided into diffusion length and lifetime measurements for each sample. The values listed are the average values reported by each group. One of the immediate artifacts seen in the data is the large variation in the lifetime measurements. The values from MIT and Mobil are generally close. However, the measurements from NCSU are typically an order of magnitude lower.

  17. Investigation of diffusion length distribution on polycrystalline silicon wafers via photoluminescence methods.

    PubMed

    Lou, Shishu; Zhu, Huishi; Hu, Shaoxu; Zhao, Chunhua; Han, Peide

    2015-09-14

    Characterization of the diffusion length of solar cells in space has been widely studied using various methods, but few studies have focused on a fast, simple way to obtain the quantified diffusion length distribution on a silicon wafer. In this work, we present two different facile methods of doing this by fitting photoluminescence images taken in two different wavelength ranges or from different sides. These methods, which are based on measuring the ratio of two photoluminescence images, yield absolute values of the diffusion length and are less sensitive to the inhomogeneity of the incident laser beam. A theoretical simulation and experimental demonstration of this method are presented. The diffusion length distributions on a polycrystalline silicon wafer obtained by the two methods show good agreement.

  18. Tracer diffusion through F-actin: effect of filament length and cross-linking.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J D; Luby-Phelps, K

    1996-01-01

    We have determined diffusion coefficients for small (50- to 70-nm diameter) fluorescein-thiocarbamoyl-labeled Ficoll tracers through F-actin as a function of filament length and cross-linking. fx45 was used to regulate filament length and avidin/biotinylated actin or ABP-280 was used to prepare cross-linked actin gels. We found that tracer diffusion was generally independent of filament length in agreement with theoretical predictions for diffusion through solutions of rods. However, in some experiments diffusion was slower through short (< or = 1.0 micron) filaments, although this result was not consistently reproducible. Measured diffusion coefficients through unregulated F-actin and filaments of lengths > 1.0 micron were more rapid than predicted by theory for tracer diffusion through rigid, random networks, which was consistent with some degree of actin bundling. Avidin-induced cross-linking of biotinylated F-actin did not affect diffusion through unregulated F-actin, but in cases where diffusion was slower through short filaments this cross-linking method resulted in enhanced tracer diffusion rates indistinguishable from unregulated F-actin. This finding, in conjunction with increased turbidity of 1.0-micron filaments upon avidin cross-linking, indicated that this cross-linking method induces F-actin bundling. By contrast, ABP-280 cross-linking retarded diffusion through unregulated F-actin and decreased turbidity. Tracer diffusion under these conditions was well approximated by the diffusion theory. Both cross-linking procedures resulted in gel formation as determined by falling ball viscometry. These results demonstrate that network microscopic geometry is dependent on the cross-linking method, although both methods markedly increase F-actin macroscopic viscosity. PMID:8913611

  19. Estimation of minority carrier diffusion lengths in InP/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier diffusion length is one of the most important parameters affecting the solar cell performance. An attempt is made to estimate the minority carrier diffusion lengths is the emitter and base of InP/GaAs heteroepitaxial solar cells. The PC-1D computer model was used to simulate the experimental cell results measured at NASA Lewis under AMO (air mass zero) spectrum at 25 C. A 16 nm hole diffusion length in the emitter and a 0.42 micron electron diffusion length in the base gave very good agreement with the I-V curve. The effect of varying minority carrier diffusion lengths on cell short current, open circuit voltage, and efficiency was studied. It is also observed that the front surface recombination velocity has very little influence on the cell performance. The poor output of heteroepitaxial cells is caused primarily by the large number of dislocations generated at the interfaces that propagate through the bulk indium phosphide layers. Cell efficiency as a function of dislocation density was calculated and the effect of improved emitter bulk properties on cell efficiency is presented. It is found that cells with over 16 percent efficiencies should be possible, provided the dislocation density is below 10(exp 6)/sq cm.

  20. Excitation and temperature dependent exciton-carrier transport in CVD diamond: Diffusion coefficient, recombination lifetime and diffusion length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ščajev, Patrik

    2017-04-01

    Time-resolved induced absorption (IA) and light induced transient grating (LITG) techniques were applied for the investigation of nonequilibrium exciton-carrier diffusion and recombination processes in a high-purity CVD diamond. Injection range from 1015 to 1020 cm-3 carrier density was achieved by combining one photon and two photon excitations. The measurements were performed in the 10-750 K temperature range. The LITG diffusion coefficient peaked at 44 cm2/s value at room temperature under low injection conditions. At lower temperatures it transferred to much lower exciton diffusion coefficient. A strong decrease of diffusion coefficient under higher injection conditions was explained by exciton formation with a low diffusion coefficient and many body effects, as polyexciton and electron-hole droplet formation. High temperature phonon-limited diffusion coefficient was weakly injection dependent. Low excitation carrier lifetime was about 700 ns above 200 K. At lower temperatures, the decay time reduced by two orders of magnitude, which was explained by the formation of biexcitons. At lowest temperatures, an increase of the carrier recombination rate at high injection was attributed to Auger recombinations of polyexcitons and electron-hole droplets. While at high temperatures, the increase of the recombination rate with 490 meV activation energy was observed. The combination of IA and LITG measurements provided effective diffusion lengths in a 0.3-50 μm range, being strongly dependent on the excess carrier density and temperature.

  1. Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othmer, S.; Chen, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plate arrays. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results are compared with those obtained using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

  2. Laser interferometric method for determining the carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Manukhov, V. V.; Fedortsov, A. B.; Ivanov, A. S.

    2015-09-15

    A new laser interferometric method for measuring the carrier diffusion length in semiconductors is proposed. The method is based on the interference–absorption interaction of two laser radiations in a semiconductor. Injected radiation generates additional carriers in a semiconductor, which causes a change in the material’s optical constants and modulation of the probing radiation passed through the sample. When changing the distance between carrier generation and probing points, a decrease in the carrier concentration, which depends on the diffusion length, is recorded. The diffusion length is determined by comparing the experimental and theoretical dependences of the probe signal on the divergence of the injector and probe beams. The method is successfully tested on semiconductor samples with different thicknesses and surface states and can be used in scientific research and the electronics industry.

  3. Determination of the Pt spin diffusion length by spin-pumping and spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Vlaminck, Vincent; Divan, Ralu; Bader, Samuel D.

    2013-12-09

    The spin diffusion length of Pt at room temperature and at 8 K is experimentally determined via spin pumping and spin Hall effect in permalloy/Pt bilayers. Voltages generated during excitation of ferromagnetic resonance from the inverse spin Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance effect were investigated with a broadband approach. Varying the Pt layer thickness gives rise to an evolution of the voltage line shape due to the superposition of the above two effects. By studying the ratio of the two voltage components with the Pt layer thickness, the spin diffusion length of Pt can be directly extracted. We obtain a spin diffusion length of ∼1.2 nm at room temperature and ∼1.6 nm at 8 K.

  4. Probing sub-alveolar length scales with hyperpolarized-gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Wilson; Carl, Michael; Mooney, Karen; Mugler, John; Cates, Gordon

    2009-05-01

    Diffusion MRI of the lung is a promising technique for detecting alterations of normal lung microstructure in diseases such as emphysema. The length scale being probed using this technique is related to the time scale over which the helium-3 or xenon-129 diffusion is observed. We have developed new MR pulse sequence methods for making diffusivity measurements at sub-millisecond diffusion times, allowing one to probe smaller length scales than previously possible in-vivo, and opening the possibility of making quantitative measurements of the ratio of surface area to volume (S/V) in the lung airspaces. The quantitative accuracy of simulated and experimental measurements in microstructure phantoms will be discussed, and preliminary in-vivo results will be presented.

  5. Measurement of acid diffusion from PAG in photoresists by using TOF-SIMS with GCIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Naoki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko

    2015-03-01

    The role of photoresist has become more important for down scaling of electric devises. One of the key factors which identify the photoresist is a diffusion of acid through the lithography process. The `top coat method' was proposed for measuring the distance of diffusion of acid which was generated from PAG and calculating the diffusion coefficient1-3. In this method, top coat material containing PAG (2nd layer) is coated on a PAG-free resist (1st layer), then the exposure and PEB processes are performed. The generated acid in 2nd layer during the exposure diffuses into 1st layer when the PEB is performed. After that, we can obtain the acid diffusion length based on the quantity of film removed by the development. In this work, we applied TOF-SIMS measurement with gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) etching to the samples that were prepared for top coat method. This measurement has revealed the distribution of diffusing PAG and residual protecting groups of the resin in the resist (1st layer). The diffusion length of the acid which is obtained by the top coat method has corresponded to the depth profile of the acid and the deprotection rate which is acquired by TOFSIMS with GCIB. We can estimate the marginal deprotection rate which is needed for the development by the result of these two methods. It has also been clear that the distributions of acid shifted into the resist according to the PEB temperature.

  6. Study of acid diffusion behaves form PAG by using top coat method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko

    2014-03-01

    Our past research on measurements of simulation parameters for ArF resists focused on establishing methods for measuring the following parameters:[1]-[4] • Development parameters[1] • PEB parameters[2] • Dill's ABC parameters[3] • Quencher parameter[4] We entered these parameters into a lithography simulator and performed ArF resist simulations.We then explored ways to optimize the ArF resist material and process. This paper reports on our study of methods for measuring the diffusion length of acid generated from PAG during exposures. In our experiment, we applied a PAG-containing top coat (TC) material (second layer) to a PAG-free ArF resist (first layer), then performed the exposure and PEB processes. The acid generated in the TC during the exposure diffused into the ArF resist in the lower layer (first layer) when PEB was performed. The process of developing this sample removed the TC in the second layer and the parts of the first layer into which the acid had diffused.We obtained the acid diffusion length based on the quantity of film removed by the development. We calculated the acid diffusion coefficient after varying the exposure value and repeating the measurement. For this report, we also performed measurements to determine how differences in PAG anion size, amount of quencher additive, and PEB temperature affected the acid diffusion coefficient.We entered the measurements obtained into the PROLITH simulator and explored the effects of acid diffusion on pattern profile.

  7. Determination of the spin diffusion length in germanium by spin optical orientation and electrical spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, C.; Bertoli, S.; Asa, M.; Baldrati, L.; Manzoni, C.; Marangoni, M.; Cerullo, G.; Bianchi, M.; Sordan, R.; Bertacco, R.; Cantoni, M.

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of the spin diffusion length and/or lifetime in semiconductors is a key issue for the realisation of spintronic devices, exploiting the spin degree of freedom of carriers for storing and manipulating information. In this paper, we address such parameters in germanium (0 0 1) at room temperature (RT) by three different measurement methods. Exploiting optical spin orientation in the semiconductor and spin filtering across an insulating MgO barrier, the dependence of the resistivity on the spin of photo-excited carriers in Fe/MgO/Ge spin photodiodes (spin-PDs) was electrically detected. A spin diffusion length of 0.9  ±  0.2 µm was obtained by fitting the photon energy dependence of the spin signal by a mathematical model. Electrical techniques, comprising non-local four-terminal and Hanle measurements performed on CoFeB/MgO/Ge lateral devices, led to spin diffusion lengths of 1.3  ±  0.2 µm and 1.3  ±  0.08 µm, respectively. Despite minor differences due to experimental details, the order of magnitude of the spin diffusion length is the same for the three techniques. Although standard electrical methods are the most employed in semiconductor spintronics for spin diffusion length measurements, here we demonstrate optical spin orientation as a viable alternative for the determination of the spin diffusion length in semiconductors allowing for optical spin orientation.

  8. Effect of chain length on binding of fatty acids to Pluronics in microemulsions.

    PubMed

    James-Smith, Monica A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Cheung, Sally; Moudgil, Brij M; Shah, Dinesh O

    2008-03-15

    We investigated the effect of fatty acid chain length on the binding capacity of drug and fatty acid to Pluronic F127-based microemulsions. This was accomplished by using turbidity experiments. Pluronic-based oil-in-water microemulsions of various compositions were synthesized and titrated to turbidity with concentrated Amitriptyline, an antidepressant drug. Sodium salts of C(8), C(10), or C(12) fatty acid were used in preparation of the microemulsion and the corresponding binding capacities were observed. It has been previously determined that, for microemulsions prepared with sodium caprylate (C(8) fatty acid soap), a maximum of 11 fatty acid molecules bind to the microemulsion per 1 molecule of Pluronic F127 and a maximum of 12 molecules of Amitriptyline bind per molecule of F127. We have found that with increasing the chain length of the fatty acid salt component of the microemulsion, the binding capacity of both the fatty acid and the Amitriptyline to the microemulsion decreases. For sodium salts of C(8), C(10) and C(12) fatty acids, respectively, a maximum of approximately 11, 8.4 and 8.3 molecules of fatty acid molecules bind to 1 Pluronic F127 molecule. We propose that this is due to the decreasing number of free monomers with increasing chain length. As chain length increases, the critical micelle concentration (cmc) decreases, thus leading to fewer monomers. Pluronics are symmetric tri-block copolymers consisting of propylene oxide (PO) and ethylene oxide (EO). The polypropylene oxide block, PPO is sandwiched between two polyethylene oxide (PEO) blocks. The PEO blocks are hydrophilic while PPO is hydrophobic portion in the Pluronic molecule. Due to this structure, we propose that the fatty acid molecules that are in monomeric form most effectively diffuse between the PEO "tails" and bind to the hydrophobic PPO groups.

  9. Two Birds with One Stone: Tailoring Singlet Fission for Both Triplet Yield and Exciton Diffusion Length.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tong; Wan, Yan; Guo, Zhi; Johnson, Justin; Huang, Libai

    2016-09-01

    By direct imaging of singlet and triplet populations with ultrafast microscopy, it is shown that the triplet diffusion length and singlet fission yield can be simultaneously optimized for tetracene and its derivatives, making them ideal structures for application in bilayer solar cells.

  10. Two Birds with One Stone: Tailoring Singlet Fission for Both Triplet Yield and Exciton Diffusion Length

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Tong; Wan, Yan; Guo, Zhi; Johnson, Justin; Huang, Libai

    2016-06-27

    By direct imaging of singlet and triplet populations with ultrafast microscopy, it is shown that the triplet diffusion length and singlet fission yield can be simultaneously optimized for tetracene and its derivatives, making them ideal structures for application in bilayer solar cells.

  11. Diffusion length measurements in solar cells: An analysis and comparison of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Khan, A. A.; Soukup, R. J.; Hermann, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief review of the major techniques for measuring minority carrier diffusion lengths in solar cells is given. Emphasis is placed on comparing limits of applicability for each method, especially as applied to silicon cells or to gallium arsenide cells, including the effects of radiation damage.

  12. Effective defect diffusion lengths in Ar-ion bombarded 3C-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Bayu Aji, L. B.; Wallace, J. B.; Shao, L.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2016-04-14

    Above room temperature, SiC exhibits pronounced processes of diffusion and interaction of radiation-generated point defects. Here, we use the recently developed pulsed ion beam method to measure effective defect diffusion lengths in 3C-SiC bombarded in the temperature range of 25–200 °C with 500 keV Ar ions. Results reveal a diffusion length of ~10 nm, which exhibits a weak temperature dependence, changing from 9 to 13 nm with increasing temperature. Lastly, these results have important implications for understanding and predicting radiation damage in SiC and for the development of radiation-resistant materials via interface-mediated defect reactions.

  13. Determination of the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity: Two simple methods

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, J.C.; Venier, G.L.; Tamasi, M.J.L.; Bolzi, C.G.; Pla, J.C.; Godfrin, E.M.

    1997-12-31

    The present paper analyzes two new methods for the estimation of the diffusion length (L{sub d}) and surface recombination velocity (S) through simple and inexpensive equipment. The first one is based on the behavior of the short circuit current (J{sub sc}) under rear illumination, as a function of the cell width (d). In a general case, this model allows one to determine L{sub d} and the effective rear S by a numerical fitting. The second method uses crystalline silicon cells with localized diffusions. A geometry with linear diffusions is considered and the dependence of J{sub sc} with the distance between those diffusions is analyzed by means of a one dimensional model. The second method is applied to n{sup +}pp{sup +} solar cells fabricated in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA).

  14. Chain-length-dependent autocatalytic hydrolysis of fatty acid anhydrides in polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Cao, Cao; Wang, Qing-Biao; Tang, Lin-Jun; Ge, Bing-Qiang; Chen, Zhong-Xiu; Deng, Shao-Ping

    2014-03-27

    Autocatalytic hydrolysis of fatty acid anhydrides induced by the spontaneously formed vesicles has been studied for years. However, whether the reaction autocatalyzed by vesicles formed in diluted solutions applies also to macromolecular crowded conditions remains unknown. The aim of this study is to characterize hydrolysis behavior of fatty acid anhydrides and formation of vesicles in crowded media. Inert macromolecular crowding agents such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Dextran were used to probe the impact of external crowding on the autocatalytic hydrolysis of fatty acid anhydrides with varied hydrophobic chain length. Under stringent conditions of crowding, hydrolysis rates of octanoic anhydride, nonanoic anhydride, and decanoic anhydride were found to decrease, but the rates of lauric anhydride and oleic anhydride increased. These results suggest that the effect of the crowding agent on the hydrolysis of fatty acid anhydrides was chain-length-dependent. Characterization of the size and polydispersity of vesicles formed from hydrolyzed fatty acid anhydrides in crowding revealed that long-chain fatty acids formed monodisperse vesicles easier at lower concentrations of PEG. Measurement of the critical aggregation concentration of ionized fatty acid in the presence of PEG showed that crowding media promoted vesicle formation from long-chain fatty acids but inhibited those from fatty acids with fewer carbon atoms. Further investigation of the diffusion property of ionized fatty acids in crowding agents suggested that PEG might create more hydrophobic areas for long-chain fatty acids anhydrides, which subsequently promoted the unreacted anhydride in the aqueous phase to be solubilized in the formed vesicles. This research provides information for understanding the autocatalytic reaction accompanied by self-producing aggregates and the behavior of fatty acids in crowding media.

  15. Diffusion length measurements of thin GaAs solar cells by means of energetic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonross, O.

    1980-01-01

    A calculation of the short circuit current density (j sub sc) of a thin GaAs solar cell induced by fast electrons is presented. It is shown that in spite of the disparity in thickness between the N-type portion of the junction and the P-type portion of the junction, the measurement of the bulk diffusion length L sub p of the N-type part of the junction is seriously hampered due to the presence of a sizable contribution to the j sub sc from the P-type region of the junction. Corrections of up to 50% had to be made in order to interpret the data correctly. Since these corrections were not amenable to direct measurements it is concluded that the electron beam method for the determination of the bulk minority carrier diffusion length, which works so well for Si solar cells, is a poor method when applied to thin GaAs cells.

  16. Length distributions of nanowires: Effects of surface diffusion versus nucleation delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.

    2017-04-01

    It is often thought that the ensembles of semiconductor nanowires are uniform in length due to the initial organization of the growth seeds such as lithographically defined droplets or holes in the substrate. However, several recent works have already demonstrated that most nanowire length distributions are broader than Poissonian. Herein, we consider theoretically the length distributions of non-interacting nanowires that grow by the material collection from the entire length of their sidewalls and with a delay of nucleation of the very first nanowire monolayer. The obtained analytic length distribution is controlled by two parameters that describe the strength of surface diffusion and the nanowire nucleation rate. We show how the distribution changes from the symmetrical Polya shape without the nucleation delay to a much broader and asymmetrical one for longer delays. In the continuum limit (for tall enough nanowires), the length distribution is given by a power law times an incomplete gamma-function. We discuss interesting scaling properties of this solution and give a recipe for analyzing and tailoring the experimental length histograms of nanowires which should work for a wide range of material systems and growth conditions.

  17. Minority carrier diffusion length measurements - A review and comparison of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, A. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Hermann, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the major techniques for measuring minority carrier diffusion lengths in solar cells is given. Limits of applicability are indicated for each method, as relevant to indirect bandgap materials such as silicon, and direct bandgap materials like gallium arsenide. A discussion and bibliography is presented for the following techniques: uniform generation, electron beam induced current, Schottky barrier (and other steady-state) photocurrent, surface photovoltage, transient decay, and luminescence.

  18. Minority carrier diffusion length and edge surface-recombination velocity in InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1993-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used to obtain the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) profiles in InP specimens containing a Schottky barrier perpendicular to the scanned (edge) surface. An independent technique was used to measure the edge surface-recombination velocity. These values were used in a fit of the experimental EBIC data with a theoretical expression for normalized EBIC (Donolato, 1982) to obtain the electron (minority carrier) diffusion length.

  19. Near Field Imaging for the Characterization of Diffusion Length and Waveguiding in Zinc Oxide Nanowires

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments...raster scan of the nanowire featured . Some diffusion length data are lost by starting the probe tip far away from the cathodoluminescence... featured . By placing the probe tip close to the electron beam, the chances of incidental contact increase. The risk increases that photons would

  20. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  1. Diffusion of Nanoparticles in Semidilute Polymer Solutions: The Effect of Different Length Scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, Indermeet; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2012-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were used to investigate the length-scale dependent dynamics in semidilute poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-water solutions. Fluctuation correlation spectroscopy was used to measure the diffusion coefficients (D) of the NPs as a function of their radius, Ro (2.5-10 nm), PEG volume fraction, φ (0-0.37) and molecular weight, Mw (5 kg/mol and 35 kg/mol). Our results indicate that the radius of gyration, Rg of the polymer chain is the crossover length scale for the NPs experiencing nanoviscosity or macroviscosity. The reduced diffusivity can be plotted on a single master curve as Do/D= exp (α(Ro/ξ)^δ) for Rg > Ro and as Do/D= exp (α(Rg/ξ)^δ) for Rg <= Ro, where Do is diffusion coefficient in the neat solvent, ξ is the correlation length, α = 1.63 and δ = 0.89. In the intermediate size regime, ξ < Ro < a(φ), where `a(φ)' is the tube diameter for entangled polymer liquid, we found that D ˜ φ-1.45 and independent of Mw. For Ro > a(φ), D˜φ-4 was obtained. The results were compared with currently available theories.

  2. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Bernard; Dresner, Joseph; Szostak, Daniel J.

    1983-07-12

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant-magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. An unmodulated illumination provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV. A vibrating Kelvin method-type probe electrode couples the SPV to a measurement system. The operating optical wavelength of an adjustable monochromator to compensate for the wavelength dependent sensitivity of a photodetector is selected to measure the illumination intensity (photon flux) on the silicon. Measurements of the relative photon flux for a plurality of wavelengths are plotted against the reciprocal of the optical absorption coefficient of the material. A linear plot of the data points is extrapolated to zero intensity. The negative intercept value on the reciprocal optical coefficient axis of the extrapolated linear plot is the diffusion length of the minority carriers.

  3. Improvement of carrier diffusion length in silicon nanowire arrays using atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinya; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Yuya; Yamada, Akira; Ohta, Yoshimi; Niwa, Yusuke; Hirota, Masaki

    2013-08-23

    To achieve a high-efficiency silicon nanowire (SiNW) solar cell, surface passivation technique is very important because a SiNW array has a large surface area. We successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) high-quality aluminum oxide (Al2O3) film for passivation on the whole surface of the SiNW arrays. The minority carrier lifetime of the Al2O3-depositedSiNW arrays with bulk silicon substrate was improved to 27 μs at the optimum annealing condition. To remove the effect of bulk silicon, the effective diffusion length of minority carriers in the SiNW array was estimated by simple equations and a device simulator. As a result, it was revealed that the effective diffusion length in the SiNW arrays increased from 3.25 to 13.5 μm by depositing Al2O3 and post-annealing at 400°C. This improvement of the diffusion length is very important for application to solar cells, and Al2O3 deposited by ALD is a promising passivation material for a structure with high aspect ratio such as SiNW arrays.

  4. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  5. Taylor-Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry of Varying Lengths Simulated by Reaction-Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Halmstad, Andrew; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Previously, we have observed chaotic formation of Taylor-Vortex pairs in Modified Taylor- Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry. In the experiment, the chaotic formation in a shorter system has been restricted to a narrow band about the waist of the hourglass. Such behavior has been modeled by The Reaction-Diffusion equation, which has been previously studied, by Riecke and Paap. Their calculation suggested that quadrupling length of the system would lead to spatial chaos in the vortex formation. We present a careful recreation of this result and consider an intermediate length. We demonstrate that doubling the length should be sufficient to observe spatially chaotic behavior. Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997). H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991).

  6. Charge Transfer Fluorescence and 34 nm Exciton Diffusion Length in Polymers with Electron Acceptor End Traps.

    PubMed

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R; Miller, John R

    2015-06-18

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17-127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence, and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps, the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF), and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization, and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ∼50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length is LD = 34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. The efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length but not on trap depth, solvent polarity, or which trap group is present.

  7. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    SciTech Connect

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.

  8. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    DOE PAGES

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; ...

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are asmore » large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.« less

  9. A novel diffusion-tensor MRI approach for skeletal muscle fascicle length measurements.

    PubMed

    Oudeman, Jos; Mazzoli, Valentina; Marra, Marco A; Nicolay, Klaas; Maas, Mario; Verdonschot, Nico; Sprengers, Andre M; Nederveen, Aart J; Strijkers, Gustav J; Froeling, Martijn

    2016-12-01

    Musculoskeletal (dys-)function relies for a large part on muscle architecture which can be obtained using Diffusion-Tensor MRI (DT-MRI) and fiber tractography. However, reconstructed tracts often continue along the tendon or aponeurosis when using conventional methods, thus overestimating fascicle lengths. In this study, we propose a new method for semiautomatic segmentation of tendinous tissue using tract density (TD). We investigated the feasibility and repeatability of this method to quantify the mean fascicle length per muscle. Additionally, we examined whether the method facilitates measuring changes in fascicle length of lower leg muscles with different foot positions. Five healthy subjects underwent two DT-MRI scans of the right lower leg, with the foot in 15° dorsiflexion, neutral, and 30° plantarflexion positions. Repeatability of fascicle length measurements was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis. Changes in fascicle lengths between the foot positions were tested using a repeated multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between repeated measurements. The coefficients of variation in neutral position were 8.3, 16.7, 11.2, and 10.4% for soleus (SOL), fibularis longus (FL), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and tibialis anterior (TA), respectively. The plantarflexors (SOL and FL) showed significant increase in fascicle length from plantarflexion to dorsiflexion, whereas the dorsiflexors (EDL and TA) exhibited a significant decrease. The use of a tract density for semiautomatic segmentation of tendinous structures provides more accurate estimates of the mean fascicle length than traditional fiber tractography methods. The method shows moderate to good repeatability and allows for quantification of changes in fascicle lengths due to passive stretch.

  10. Surface recombination velocity and diffusion length of minority carriers in heavily doped silicon layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam-induced current and the dependence of the effective diffusion length of the minority carriers on the penetration depth of the electron beam were employed for the analysis of the carrier recombination characteristics in heavily doped silicon layers. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of P-diffused Si layers will be presented together with a three dimensional mapping of minority carrier lifetime in ion implanted Si. Layers heavily doped with As exhibit improved recombination characteristics as compared to those of the layers doped with P.

  11. Diffusion length variation in 0.5- and 3-MeV-proton-irradiated, heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide (GaAs) and silicon (Si) solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of light weight, mechanically strong, and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5- and 3-MeV proton irradiations have been explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence was calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient, K(sub L), was also plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  12. Lab on a chip Canada--rapid diffusion over large length scales.

    PubMed

    Juncker, David; Wheeler, Aaron R; Sinton, David

    2013-07-07

    The roots of lab on a chip in Canada are deep, comprising of some of the earliest contributions and first demonstrations of the potential of microfluidic chips. In an editorial leading off this special issue, Jed Harrison of University of Alberta reflects on these early days and Canada's role in the field's development (DOI: 10.1039/c3lc50522g). Over the last decade, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip research efforts grew exponentially - rapidly diffusing across the vast Canadian length scales.

  13. Diffusion lengths in irradiated N/P InP-on-Si solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Colerico, Claudia; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Walters, Robert J.; Burke, Edward A.

    1996-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells were made on silicon (Si) wafers (InP/Si) by to take advantage of both the radiation-hardness properties of the InP solar cell and the light weight and low cost of Si wafers. The InP/Si cell application is for long duration and/or high radiation orbit space missions. Spire has made N/P InP/Si cells of sizes up to 2 cm by 4 cm with beginning-of-life (BOL) AM0 efficiencies over 13% (one-sun, 28C). These InP/Si cells have higher absolute efficiency and power density after a high radiation dose than gallium arsenide (GaAs) or silicon (Si) solar cells after a fluence of about 2e15 1 MeV electrons/sq. cm. In this work, we investigate the minority carrier (electron) base diffusion lengths in the N/P InP/Si cells. A quantum efficiency model was constructed for a 12% BOL AM0 N/P InP/Si cell which agreed well with the absolutely measured quantum efficiency and the sun-simulator measured AM0 photocurrent (30.1 mA/sq. cm). This model was then used to generate a table of AM0 photocurrents for a range of base diffusion lengths. AM0 photocurrents were then measured for irradiations up to 7.7e16 1 MeV electrons/sq. cm (the 12% BOL cell was 8% after the final irradiation). By comparing the measured photocurrents with the predicted photocurrents, base diffusion lengths were assigned at each fluence level. A damage coefficient K of 4e-8 and a starting (unirradiated) base electron diffusion length of 0.8 microns fits the data well. The quantum efficiency was measured again at the end of the experiment to verify that the photocurrent predicted by the model (25.5 mA/sq. cm) agreed with the simulator-measured photocurrent after irradiation (25.7 mA/sq. cm).

  14. Diffusion length and grain boundary recombination activity determination by means of induced current methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabelnikova, Yana; Yakimov, Eugene

    2016-11-01

    The application of induced current methods for a quantitative description of multicrystalline silicon solar cell properties is demonstrated. For the minority carriers' diffusion length (L) and grain boundary recombination velocity (Vs) determination three types of measurements were used. They included the measurement of EBIC signal dependence on electron beam energy and of EBIC and XBIC grain boundary contrast profiles. The L and Vs values obtained by means of minimization the residual function between measured and model induced current curves are presented. The inaccuracy of obtained parameters is discussed for each of three types of measurements.

  15. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Arnold R.

    1984-02-21

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon, which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. Steady or modulated illumination at several wavelengths provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV for each wavelength. A probe electrode immersed in an electrolyte solution containing redox couples (preferably quinhydrone) having an oxidation-reduction potential (E) in the order of +0.6 to -1.65 volts couples the SPV to a measurement system. The redox couple solution functions to create a liquid Schottky barrier at the surface of the material. The Schottky barrier is contacted by merely placing the probe in the solution. The redox solution is placed over and in contact with the material to be tested and light is passed through the solution to generate the SPV. To compensate for colored redox solutions a portion of the redox solution not over the material is also illuminated for determining the color compensated light intensity. Steady red light is also used as an optical bias to reduce deleterious space-charge effects that occur in amorphous silicon.

  16. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Arnold R.

    1984-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. Steady or modulated illumination at several wavelengths provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV for each wavelength. A drop of a transparent electrolyte solution containing redox couples (preferably quinhydrone) having an oxidation-reduction potential (E) in the order of +0.6 to -1.65 volts couples the SPV to a measurement system. The drop of redox couple solution functions to create a liquid Schottky barrier at the surface of the material. Illumination light is passed through a transparent rod supported over the surface and through the drop of transparent electrolyte. The drop is held in the gap between the rod and the surface. Steady red light is also used as an optical bias to reduce deleterious space-charge effects that occur in amorphous silicon.

  17. Diffusion lengths in irradiated N/P InP-on-Si solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Colerico, Claudia; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Walters, Robert J.; Burke, Edward A.

    1995-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are being made on silicon (Si) wafers (InP/Si) to take advantage of both the radiation-hardness properties of the InP solar cell and the light weight and low cost of Si wafers compared to InP or germanium (Ge) wafers. The InP/Si cell application is for long duration and/or high radiation orbit space missions. InP/Si cells have higher absolute efficiency after a high radiation dose than gallium arsenide (GaAs) or silicon (Si) solar cells. In this work, base electron diffusion lengths in the N/P cell are extracted from measured AM0 short-circuit photocurrent at various irradiation levels out to an equivalent 1 MeV fluence of 1017 1 MeV electrons/sq cm for a 1 sq cm 12% BOL InP/Si cell. These values are then checked for consistency by comparing measured Voc data with a theoretical Voc model that includes a dark current term that depends on the extracted diffusion lengths.

  18. Butyric acid esterification kinetics over Amberlyst solid acid catalysts: the effect of alcohol carbon chain length.

    PubMed

    Pappu, Venkata K S; Kanyi, Victor; Santhanakrishnan, Arati; Lira, Carl T; Miller, Dennis J

    2013-02-01

    The liquid phase esterification of butyric acid with a series of linear and branched alcohols is examined. Four strong cation exchange resins, Amberlyst™ 15, Amberlyst™ 36, Amberlyst™ BD 20, and Amberlyst™ 70, were used along with para-toluenesulfonic acid as a homogeneous catalyst. The effect of increasing alcohol carbon chain length and branching on esterification rate at 60°C is presented. For all catalysts, the decrease in turnover frequency (TOF) with increasing carbon chain length of the alcohol is described in terms of steric hindrance, alcohol polarity, and hydroxyl group concentration. The kinetics of butyric acid esterification with 2-ethylhexanol using Amberlyst™ 70 catalyst is described with an activity-based, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model that includes autocatalysis by butyric acid.

  19. Diffusion of acid from resist to Si-hardmask layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Masamitsu; Takeda, Hiroki; Hatsuse, Tatsuya; Okamura, Haruyuki; Wakayama, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Makoto

    2012-03-01

    In a chemically amplified (CA) resist process, photochemically generated acid can diffuse in the resist matrix, inducing the de-protection reactions. The concentration of acid in resist matrix should be constant during the post-exposure-bake (PEB) treatment. In the practical resist processes, bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) is essentially important to provide reflectivity control for resist patterning. In some cases, however, the photochemically generated acid in resist layer can diffuse into BARC layer, which causes the footing for resist patterns. In this work, we have studied the diffusion of acid from CA resist layer to Si-hardmask (Si-HM) layer. The Si-HM is essential for the multi-layer patterning process. The acid concentration in the resist layer was estimated based on the de-protection reaction kinetics for the CA resist using rapid scan FT-IR spectroscopy. It was found that the acid in resist layer diffused into the Si-HM layer. The diffusion efficiency of the acid was dependent on the crosslinking density of the Si-HM and the chemical structure of the resist.

  20. Enhancing Cation Diffusion and Suppressing Anion Diffusion via Lewis-Acidic Polymer Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Brett M; Webb, Michael A; Miller, Thomas F

    2017-02-02

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have the potential to increase both the energy density and stability of lithium-based batteries, but low Li(+) conductivity remains a barrier to technological viability. SPEs are designed to maximize Li(+) diffusivity relative to the anion while maintaining sufficient salt solubility. It is thus remarkable that poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), the most widely used SPE, exhibits Li(+) diffusivity that is an order of magnitude smaller than that of typical counterions at moderate salt concentrations. We show that Lewis-basic polymers like PEO favor slow cation and rapid anion diffusion, while this relationship can be reversed in Lewis-acidic polymers. Using molecular dynamics, polyboranes are identified that achieve up to 10-fold increases in Li(+) diffusivities and significant decreases in anion diffusivities, relative to PEO in the dilute-ion regime. These results illustrate a general principle for increasing Li(+) diffusivity and transference number with chemistries that exhibit weaker cation and stronger anion coordination.

  1. Relative irritancy of free fatty acids of different chain length.

    PubMed

    Stillman, M A; Maibach, H I; Shalita, A R

    1975-01-01

    Free fatty acids of human skin surface lipids have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris because of their apparent irritant and comedogenic properties. Prior studies on the relative irritancy of free fatty acids revealed the saturated C8 to C14 fatty acids and a C18 dienoic unsaturated fatty acid (linoleic) to be most irritating. Saturated free fatty acids from C3 to C18, and unsaturated C18 free fatty acids were applied daily under occlusive patch tests to human skin until detectable erythema appeared. The most irritating fatty acids were C8 through C12. Of the unsaturated fatty acids tested, only linoleic acid produced irritation.

  2. Transition to Spatio-Temporal Chaos with Increasing Length in the Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trail, Collin; Tomlin, Brett; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard J.

    2003-11-01

    Calculations based up the Reaction-Diffusion model (H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14), 1235 (1991).have proven to be suggestive for a wide variety of pattern forming systems, including Taylor-Couette flow with hourglass geometry(Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997).. Seeking insight to guide experimental investigations, we extend these calculations. Previous calculations indicated that in smaller systems, only temporal chaos, located in a small region, would be observed, while in longer systems instabilities would form over a wide region. Our simulations explore this transition from purely temporal chaos to spatio-temporal chaos as the length of the system is increased.

  3. Minority carrier diffusion lengths and absorption coefficients in silicon sheet material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, K. A.; Swimm, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the methods which have been developed for the measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length of silicon wafers require that the material have either a Schottky or an ohmic contact. The surface photovoltage (SPV) technique is an exception. The SPV technique could, therefore, become a valuable diagnostic tool in connection with current efforts to develop low-cost processes for the production of solar cells. The technique depends on a knowledge of the optical absorption coefficient. The considered investigation is concerned with a reevaluation of the absorption coefficient as a function of silicon processing. A comparison of absorption coefficient values showed these values to be relatively consistent from sample to sample, and independent of the sample growth method.

  4. Diffusion length damage coefficient and annealing studies in proton-irradiated InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Bailey, Sheila G.; Williams, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the diffusion length damage coefficient (K(sub L)) and the annealing characteristics of the minority carrier diffusion length (L(sub n)) in Czochralski-grown zinc-doped indium phosphide (InP), with a carrier concentration of 1 x 10(exp l8) cm(exp -3). In measuring K(sub L) irradiations were made with 0.5 MeV protons with fluences ranging from 1 x 10(exp 11) to 3 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Pre- and post-irradiation electron-beam induced current (EBIC) measurements allowed for the extraction of L(sub n) from which K(sub L) was determined. In studying the annealing characteristics of L(sub n) irradiations were made with 2 MeV protons with fluence of 5 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Post-irradiation studies of L(sub n) with time at room temperature, and with minority carrier photoinjection and forward-bias injection were carried out. The results showed that recovery under Air Mass Zero (AMO) photoinjection was complete. L(sub n) was also found to recover under forward-bias injection, where recovery was found to depend on the value of the injection current. However, no recovery of L(sub n) after proton irradiation was observed with time at room temperature, in contrast to the behavior of 1 MeV electron-irradiated InP solar cells reported previously.

  5. Role of impurities in determining the exciton diffusion length in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, Ian J.; Blaylock, D. Wayne; Holmes, Russell J.

    2016-04-01

    The design and performance of organic photovoltaic cells is dictated, in part, by the magnitude of the exciton diffusion length (LD). Despite the importance of this parameter, there have been few investigations connecting LD and materials purity. Here, we investigate LD for the organic small molecule N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine as native impurities are systematically removed from the material. Thin films deposited from the as-synthesized material yield a value for LD, as measured by photoluminescence quenching, of (3.9 ± 0.5) nm with a corresponding photoluminescence efficiency (ηPL) of (25 ± 1)% and thin film purity of (97.1 ± 1.2)%, measured by high performance liquid chromatography. After purification by thermal gradient sublimation, the value of LD is increased to (4.7 ± 0.5) nm with a corresponding ηPL of (33 ± 1)% and purity of (98.3 ± 0.8)%. Interestingly, a similar behavior is also observed as a function of the deposition boat temperature. Films deposited from the purified material at a high temperature give LD = (5.3 ± 0.8) nm with ηPL = (37 ± 1)% for films with a purity of (99.0 ± 0.3)% purity. Using a model of diffusion by Förster energy transfer, the variation of LD with purity is predicted as a function of ηPL and is in good agreement with measurements. The removal of impurities acts to decrease the non-radiative exciton decay rate and increase the radiative decay rate, leading to increases in both the diffusivity and exciton lifetime. The results of this work highlight the role of impurities in determining LD, while also providing insight into the degree of materials purification necessary to achieve optimized exciton transport.

  6. Studies of deep level centers determining the diffusion length in epitaxial layers and crystals of undoped n-GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Hwan; Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Yakimov, E. B.; Tarelkin, S. A.; Turutin, A. V.; Shemerov, I. V.; Pearton, S. J.

    2016-05-01

    A wide variety of parameters were measured for undoped n-GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy and compared to n-GaN films grown by conventional and lateral overgrowth metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The parameters included deep level electron and hole trap spectra, microcathodoluminescence, electron beam induced current, diffusion length, and electron capture cross section from the dependence of the low temperature persistent photocapacitance on forward bias injection pulse duration. The results show a prominent role of electron traps with levels near Ec-0.56 eV in limiting the lifetime and diffusion length values in all these materials.

  7. Coordinate Variation in Lengths of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules and Head Lengths in Morphological Variants of Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, Gisela; Carnighan, Janet Renshaw; Bibring, Jane Baxandall; Cole, Robert; Bock, Hans-Georg Otto; Bock, Susan

    1972-01-01

    We have investigated three classes of small bacteriophage T4 particles which differ from normal T4 particles in length of their deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), in head length, in protein content, and in density. The different particles contain DNA molecules measuring 0.90, 0.77, or 0.67, respectively, of the normal T4 length. An additional class of viable particles contains DNA molecules of 1.1 unit length. These discrete differences in DNA length correspond to discrete differences in length (but not width) of the respective heads and are roughly proportional to the resulting differences in head volumes. The measured relative dimensions of the different heads fit best the relative dimensions predicted by a quasi-icosahedral model in which the smallest T4 head corresponds to an icosahedron with a triangulation number T = 21. The mid-portion of this structure is thought to be elongated by adding successive rows of gene 23 protein hexamers, the normal T4 head having three added rows. Different mutants produce small particles of the three classes in varying proportions, but no mutant produces exclusively particles of a single class. Particles of each class, with indistinguishable DNA content, show additional minor differences in protein content, as measured by differences in buoyant density and in the relative ratio of 32P to 35S. Images PMID:5025493

  8. Enhancing electron collection efficiency and effective diffusion length in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Daniel Kwan-Pang; Ku, Chen-Hao; Chen, Yen-Ru; Chen, Guan-Ren; Wu, Jih-Jen

    2009-10-19

    Intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy and intensity-modulated photovoltage spectroscopy are employed to measure the dynamics of electron transport and recombination in the ZnO nanowire (NW) array-ZnO/layered basic zinc acetate (LBZA) nanoparticle (NP) composite dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The roles of the vertical ZnO NWs and insulating LBZA in the electron collection and transport in DSSCs are investigated by comparing the results to those in the TiO(2)-NP, horizontal TiO(2)-NW and vertical ZnO-NW-array DSSCs. The electron transport rate and electron lifetime in the ZnO NW/NP composite DSSC are superior to those in the conventional TiO(2)-NP cell due to the existence of the vertical ZnO NWs and insulating LBZA. It indicates that the ZnO NW/NP composite anode is able to sustain efficient electron collection over much greater thickness than the TiO(2)-NP cell does. Consequently, a larger effective electron diffusion length is available in the ZnO composite DSSC.

  9. Spin-Diffusion Lengths in Ag(4%Sn) and Cu(2%Ge) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amit; Richard, Brandon; Fowler, Quinton; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, William, Jr.; Bass, Jack

    2008-03-01

    Alloying Ag with a little Sn, or Cu with a little Ge, greatly increases elastic scattering of electrons---i.e., greatly decreases the electron mean-free-path (mfp), but does not produce much spin-flipping---i.e., leaves the electron spin-diffusion length, l, relatively long. Thus, dilute AgSn and CuGe alloys were used to study effects of changing the mfp on current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) magnetoresistance [1] and current-induced magnetization switching (CIMS) [2], while leaving spin-flipping weak. Published transport data in dilute AgSn and CuGe alloys give only lower bounds for l [3-5]. We find l = 34 ± 4 nm for Ag(4%Sn) and l = 125 ± 10 nm for Cu(2%Ge). [1] K. Eid et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mat. 224, L205 (2001). [2] N. Theodoropoulou et al., Phys. Rev. B (rapid comm.) in press. [3] S.-F.Lee et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mat. 118, L1 (993). [4] J. Bass et al, Mat. Sci. and Eng. B31, 77 (1995). [5] J. Bass and W.P. Pratt Jr., J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 19, 183201 (2007).

  10. Roughness distribution of multiple hit and long surface diffusion length noise reduced discrete growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disrattakit, P.; Chanphana, R.; Chatraphorn, P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventionally, the universality class of a discrete growth model is identified via the scaling of interface width. This method requires large-scale simulations to minimize finite-size effects on the results. The multiple hit noise reduction techniques (m > 1 NRT) and the long surface diffusion length noise reduction techniques (ℓ > 1 NRT) have been used to promote the asymptotic behaviors of the growth models. Lately, an alternative method involving comparison of roughness distribution in the steady state has been proposed. In this work, the roughness distribution of the (2 +1)-dimensional Das Sarma-Tamborenea (DT), Wolf-Villain (WV), and Larger Curvature (LC) models, with and without NRTs, are calculated in order to investigate effects of the NRTs on the roughness distribution. Additionally, effective growth exponents of the noise reduced (2 +1)-dimensional DT, WV and LC models are also calculated. Our results indicate that the NRTs affect the interface width both in the growth and the saturation regimes. In the steady state, the NRTs do not seem to have any impact on the roughness distribution of the DT model, but it significantly changes the roughness distribution of the WV and LC models to the normal distribution curves.

  11. Levitation effect: role of symmetry and dependence of diffusivity on the bond length of homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic species.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manju; Yashonath, S

    2011-04-07

    Molecular dynamics investigation of model diatomic species confined to the α-cages of zeolite NaY is reported. The dependence of self-diffusivity on the bond length of the diatomic species has been investigated. Three different sets of runs have been carried out. In the first set, the two atoms of the diatomic molecule interact with the zeolite atoms with equal strength (example, O(2), the symmetric case). In the second and third sets which correspond to asymmetric cases, the two atoms of the diatomic molecule interact with unequal strengths (example, CO). The result for the symmetric case exhibits a well-defined maximum in self-diffusivity for an intermediate bond length. In contrast to this, the intermediate asymmetry leads to a less pronounced maximum. For the large asymmetric case, the maximum is completely absent. These findings are analyzed by computing a number of related properties. These results provide a direct confirmation at the microscopic level of the suggestion by Derouane that the supermobility observed experimentally by Kemball has its origin in the mutual cancellation of forces. The maximum in diffusivity from molecular dynamics is seen at the value predicted by the levitation effect. Further, these findings suggest a role for symmetry in the existence of a diffusivity maximum as a function of diameter of the diffusant often referred to as the levitation effect. The nature of the required symmetry for the existence of anomalous diffusivity is interaction symmetry which is different from that normally encountered in crystallography.

  12. Method to extract diffusion length from solar cell parameters—Application to polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taretto, K.; Rau, U.; Werner, J. H.

    2003-05-01

    A closed form, analytical expression for the interdependence of the effective diffusion length Leff and the open-circuit voltage of solar cells is derived for the parallel connection of recombination in the space-charge region and in the neutral base region. This expression allows for the calculation of Leff from the open-circuit voltage, the short-circuit current, and the base doping of the solar cell as the only quantities that need to be determined experimentally. Values of Leff calculated with our method match with an accuracy of 35% values that are determined experimentally by quantum-efficiency measurements of silicon solar cells. The agreement holds in a range 0.3 μm

  13. Effects of acid diffusibility and affinity to cellulose on strength loss of polycarboxylic acid crosslinked fabrics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bolin; Zhao, Cunyi; Yan, Kelu; Sun, Gang

    2016-06-25

    1,2,3,4-Butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) imparts good anti-wrinkle property to cotton fabrics and results in significant strength loss due to cross-linking and acid degradation of cellulose simultaneously. However, benzophenone-3,3',4,4'- tetracarboxylic acid (BPTCA), an aromatic acid, crosslinks cellulose effectively but causes less strength loss to the products under similar conditions. The difference in damages to cellulose fibers was analyzed by using diffusibility and corresponding affinity of the acids to cellulose fibers, which were estimated by their molecular sizes and Hansen solubility parameters (HSP). Both experimental results and theoretical speculations revealed consistent agreement, indicating that smaller acid molecules could diffuse into cellulose fiber more rapidly and deeply, resulting in more acid degradation. Besides, the aliphatic acid such as BTCA has higher molecular affinity than BPTCA to cellulose, causing additional more degradation of cellulose. Both factors are potential reasons of the observed more severe tensile strength loss of the BTCA treated cotton fabrics.

  14. Tracer counterpermeation analysis of diffusivity in finite-length nanopores with and without single-file dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, David M.; Evans, James W.

    2017-01-01

    We perform a tracer counterpermeation (TCP) analysis for a stochastic model of diffusive transport through a narrow linear pore where passing of species within the pore is inhibited or even excluded (single-file diffusion). TCP involves differently labeled but otherwise identical particles from two decoupled infinite reservoirs adsorbing into opposite ends of the pore, and desorbing from either end. In addition to transient behavior, we assess steady-state concentration profiles, spatial correlations, particle number fluctuations, and diffusion fluxes through the pore. From the profiles and fluxes, we determine a generalized tracer diffusion coefficient Dtr(x ) , at various positions x within the pore. Dtr(x ) has a plateau value in the pore center scaling inversely with the pore length, but it is enhanced near the pore openings. The latter feature reflects the effect of fluctuations in adsorption and desorption, and it is also associated with a nontrivial scaling of the concentration profiles near the pore openings.

  15. Measurement of minority carrier lifetime, mobility and diffusion length in heavily doped silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swirhun, S. E.; Swanson, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Carrier transport and recombination parameters in heavily doped silicon were examined. Data were presented for carrier diffusivity in both p- and n-type heavily doped silicon covering a broad range of doping concentrations from 10 to the 15th power to 10 to the 20th power atoms/cu cm. One of the highlights of the results showed that minority carrier diffusivities are higher by a factor of 2 in silicon compared to majority carrier diffusivities.

  16. Exciton diffusion length in complex quantum systems: the effects of disorder and environmental fluctuations on symmetry-enhanced supertransfer.

    PubMed

    Abasto, D F; Mohseni, M; Lloyd, S; Zanardi, P

    2012-08-13

    Symmetric couplings among aggregates of n chromophores increase the transfer rate of excitons by a factor n(2), a quantum-mechanical phenomenon called 'supertransfer'. In this work, we demonstrate how supertransfer effects induced by geometrical symmetries can enhance the exciton diffusion length by a factor n along cylindrically symmetric structures, consisting of arrays of rings of chromophores, and along spiral arrays. We analyse both closed-system dynamics and open quantum dynamics, modelled by combining a random bosonic bath with static disorder. In the closed-system case, we use the symmetries of the system within a short-time approximation to obtain a closed analytical expression for the diffusion length that explicitly reveals the supertransfer contribution. When subject to disorder, we show that supertransfer can enhance excitonic diffusion lengths for small disorders and characterize the crossover from coherent to incoherent motion. Owing to the quasi-one-dimensional nature of the model, disorder ultimately localizes the excitons, diminishing but not destroying the effects of supertransfer. When dephasing effects are included, we study the scaling of diffusion with both time and number of chromophores and observe that the transition from a coherent, ballistic regime to an incoherent, random-walk regime occurs at the same point as the change from supertransfer to classical scaling.

  17. Measurement of diffusion length and surface recombination velocity in Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) and Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinden, Pierre; Van de Wiele, Fernand

    1985-03-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cells by means of a simple linear regression on experimental quantum efficiency values versus the inverse of the absorption coefficient. This method is extended to the case of Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells. Under certain conditions, the real or the effective surface recombination velocity may be measured.

  18. Direct determination of minority carrier diffusion lengths at axial GaAs nanowire p-n junctions.

    PubMed

    Gutsche, Christoph; Niepelt, Raphael; Gnauck, Martin; Lysov, Andrey; Prost, Werner; Ronning, Carsten; Tegude, Franz-Josef

    2012-03-14

    Axial GaAs nanowire p-n diodes, possibly one of the core elements of future nanowire solar cells and light emitters, were grown via the Au-assisted vapor-liquid-solid mode, contacted by electron beam lithography, and investigated using electron beam induced current measurements. The minority carrier diffusion lengths and dynamics of both, electrons and holes, were determined directly at the vicinity of the p-n junction. The generated photocurrent shows an exponential decay on both sides of the junction and the extracted diffusion lengths are about 1 order of magnitude lower compared to bulk material due to surface recombination. Moreover, the observed strong diameter-dependence is well in line with the surface-to-volume ratio of semiconductor nanowires. Estimating the surface recombination velocities clearly indicates a nonabrupt p-n junction, which is in essential agreement with the model of delayed dopant incorporation in the Au-assisted vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Surface passivation using ammonium sulfide effectively reduces the surface recombination and thus leads to higher minority carrier diffusion lengths.

  19. Study on flow instability in a diffuser with swirling flow under several conditions of pipe length and swirl intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaka, R.; Nakashima, T.; Miyagawa, K.

    2016-11-01

    A swirling flow in a diffuser such as a draft tube of a hydro turbine may induce the flow instabilities accompanied by pressure fluctuations known as vortex rope behaviour and cavitation surge. Cavitation surge is the self-excited oscillation, which induces the large flow rate fluctuation that results from the change of the cavity volume. In this research, the investigation of the effect of the pipe length and the swirl intensity on the flow instabilities in a diffuser was performed by experiments and numerical analyses using the draft tube component experimental facility. The length of the pipe was modified by up to about 25 times as long as the diameter of the throat in order to validate the one-dimensional analyses. In addition, the swirl intensity was changed by replacing another swirl generator. The frequency of cavitation surge was changed with regard to the swirl intensity as the one-dimensional analyses in the previous study has predicted it. Unsteady numerical simulations of the swirling flow with cavitation in the diffuser was performed. The results of experiments and numerical analyses correspond qualitatively with the result of the one-dimensional analyses, which suggested that the coupling with the experiments, CFD analyses and the one-dimensional analyses is the more effective way in order to predict the flow instabilities in the diffuser.

  20. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Measurements of the Membrane Protein TetA in Escherichia coli Suggest Rapid Diffusion at Short Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Chow, David; Guo, Lin; Gai, Feng; Goulian, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Structural inhomogeneities in biomembranes can lead to complex diffusive behavior of membrane proteins that depend on the length or time scales that are probed. This effect is well studied in eukaryotic cells, but has been explored only recently in bacteria. Here we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study diffusion of the membrane protein TetA-YFP in E. coli. We find that the diffusion constant determined from FRAP is comparable to other reports of inner membrane protein diffusion constants in E. coli. However, FCS, which probes diffusion on shorter length scales, gives a value that is almost two orders of magnitude higher and is comparable to lipid diffusion constants. These results suggest there is a population of TetA-YFP molecules in the membrane that move rapidly over short length scales (∼ 400 nm) but move significantly more slowly over the longer length scales probed by FRAP. PMID:23119068

  1. Amide Proton Transfer Imaging of Diffuse Gliomas: Effect of Saturation Pulse Length in Parallel Transmission-Based Technique

    PubMed Central

    Hiwatashi, Akio; Keupp, Jochen; Yamashita, Koji; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yoneyama, Masami; Kruiskamp, Marijn J.; Sagiyama, Koji; Takahashi, Masaya; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the dependence of saturation pulse length on APT imaging of diffuse gliomas using a parallel transmission-based technique. Twenty-two patients with diffuse gliomas (9 low-grade gliomas, LGGs, and 13 high-grade gliomas, HGGs) were included in the study. APT imaging was conducted at 3T with a 2-channel parallel transmission scheme using three different saturation pulse lengths (0.5 s, 1.0 s, 2.0 s). The 2D fast spin-echo sequence was used for imaging. Z-spectrum was obtained at 25 frequency offsets from -6 to +6 ppm (step 0.5 ppm). A point-by-point B0 correction was performed with a B0 map. Magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) and ΔMTRasym (contrast between tumor and normal white matter) at 3.5 ppm were compared among different saturation lengths. A significant increase in MTRasym (3.5 ppm) of HGG was found when the length of saturation pulse became longer (3.09 ± 0.54% at 0.5 s, 3.83 ± 0.67% at 1 s, 4.12 ± 0.97% at 2 s), but MTRasym (3.5 ppm) was not different among the saturation lengths in LGG. ΔMTRasym (3.5 ppm) increased with the length of saturation pulse in both LGG (0.48 ± 0.56% at 0.5 s, 1.28 ± 0.56% at 1 s, 1.88 ± 0.56% at 2 s and HGG (1.72 ± 0.54% at 0.5 s, 2.90 ± 0.49% at 1 s, 3.83 ± 0.88% at 2 s). In both LGG and HGG, APT-weighted contrast was enhanced with the use of longer saturation pulses. PMID:27227746

  2. Derivation of effective fission gas diffusivities in UO2 from lower length scale simulations and implementation of fission gas diffusion models in BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar; Pastore, Giovanni; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Perriot, Romain Thibault; Tonks, Michael; Stanek, Christopher Richard

    2014-11-07

    This report summarizes the development of new fission gas diffusion models from lower length scale simulations and assessment of these models in terms of annealing experiments and fission gas release simulations using the BISON fuel performance code. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe) in UO2 were derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. The importance of the large XeU3O cluster (a Xe atom in a uranium + oxygen vacancy trap site with two bound uranium vacancies) is emphasized, which is a consequence of its high mobility and stability. These models were implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe diffusivities for various irradiation conditions. The effective diffusivities were used in BISON to calculate fission gas release for a number of test cases. The results are assessed against experimental data and future directions for research are outlined based on the conclusions.

  3. n-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Barden, Anne; O'Callaghan, Nathan; Burke, Valerie; Mas, Emile; Beilin, Lawrence J; Fenech, Michael; Irish, Ashley B; Watts, Gerald F; Puddey, Ian B; Huang, Rae-Chi; Mori, Trevor A

    2016-03-19

    DNA telomere shortening associates with the age-related increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Reducing oxidative stress, could modify telomere erosion during cell replication, and CVD risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The effect of n-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) on telomere length was studied in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial in CKD. Eighty-five CKD patients were randomized to: n-3 fatty acids (4 g); CoQ (200 mg); both supplements; or control (4 g olive oil), daily for 8 weeks. Telomere length was measured in neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at baseline and 8 weeks, with and without correction for cell counts. Main and interactive effects of n-3 fatty acids and CoQ on telomere length were assessed adjusting for baseline values. F₂-isoprostanes were measured as markers of oxidative stress. There was no effect of n-3 fatty acids or CoQ on neutrophil or PBMC telomere length. However, telomere length corrected for neutrophil count was increased after n-3 fatty acids (p = 0.015). Post-intervention plasma F₂-isoprostanes were negative predictors of post-intervention telomere length corrected for neutrophil count (p = 0.025).The effect of n-3 fatty acids to increased telomere length corrected for neutrophil count may relate to reduced oxidative stress and increased clearance of neutrophils with shorter telomeres from the circulation. This may be a novel mechanism of modifying CVD risk in CKD patients.

  4. Effect of Crystal Defects on Minority Carrier Diffusion Length in 6H SiC Measured Using the Electron Beam Induced Current Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1997-01-01

    We report values of minority carrier diffusion length in n-type 6H SiC measured using a planar Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) method. Values of hole diffusion length in defect free regions of n-type 6H SiC, with a doping concentration of 1.7El7 1/cu cm, ranged from 1.46 microns to 0.68 microns. We next introduce a novel variation of the planar method used above. This 'planar mapping' technique measured diffusion length along a linescan creating a map of diffusion length versus position. This map is then overlaid onto the EBIC image of the corresponding linescan, allowing direct visualization of the effect of defects on minority carrier diffusion length. Measurements of the above n-type 6H SiC resulted in values of hole diffusion length ranging from 1.2 micron in defect free regions to below 0.1 gm at the center of large defects. In addition, measurements on p-type 6H SiC resulted in electron diffusion lengths ranging from 1.42 micron to 0.8 micron.

  5. Diffusion length of photo-generated charge carriers in layers and powders of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Th.; Lang, F.; Shargaieva, O.; Rappich, J.; Nickel, N. H.; Unger, E.; Rech, B.

    2016-08-01

    The diffusion or transport lengths of photo-generated charge carriers in CH3NH3PbI3 layers (thickness up to 1 μm) and powders have been directly measured with high accuracy by modulated surface photovoltage after Goodman. The values of the diffusion lengths of photo-generated charge carriers ranged from 200 nm to tenths of μm. In thin CH3NH3PbI3 layers, the transport lengths corresponded to the layer thickness whereas in thicker layers and in crystallites of CH3NH3PbI3 powders the grain size limited the diffusion length. For grains, the diffusion length of photo-generated charge carriers depended on the measurement conditions.

  6. Diffusion-coupled molecular assembly: structuring of coordination polymers across multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Kenji; Reboul, Julien; Morone, Nobuhiro; Heuser, John E; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2014-10-22

    Porous coordination polymers (PCPs) are an intriguing class of molecular-based materials because of the designability of framework scaffolds, pore sizes and pore surface functionalities. Besides the structural designability at the molecular scale, the structuring of PCPs into mesoscopic/macroscopic morphologies has attracted much attention due to the significance for the practical applications. The structuring of PCPs at the mesoscopic/macroscopic scale has been so far demonstrated by the spatial localization of coordination reactions on the surface of templates or at the phase boundaries. However, these methodologies have never been applied to the fabrication of solid-solution or multivariate metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), in which multiple components are homogeneously mixed. Herein, we demonstrate the structuring of a box-type superstructure comprising of a solid-solution PCP by integrating a bidirectional diffusion of multiple organic ligands into molecular assembly. The parent crystals of [Zn2(ndc)2(bpy)]n were placed in the DMF solution of additional organic component of H2bdc, and the temperature was rapidly elevated up to 80 °C (ndc = 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate, bpy = 4,4'-bipyridyl, bdc = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate). The dissolution of the parent crystals induced the outward diffusion of components; contrariwise, the accumulation of the other organic ligand of H2bdc induced the inward diffusion toward the surface of the parent crystals. This bidirectional diffusion of multiple components spatially localized the recrystallization at the surface of cuboid parent crystals; therefore, the nanocrystals of a solid-solution PCP ([Zn2(bdc)1.5(ndc)0.5(bpy)]n) were organized into a mesoscopic box superstructure. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the box superstructures enhanced the mass transfer kinetics for the separation of hydrocarbons.

  7. Electrochemical measurement of lateral diffusion coefficients of ubiquinones and plastoquinones of various isoprenoid chain lengths incorporated in model bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Marchal, D; Boireau, W; Laval, J M; Moiroux, J; Bourdillon, C

    1998-01-01

    The long-range diffusion coefficients of isoprenoid quinones in a model of lipid bilayer were determined by a method avoiding fluorescent probe labeling of the molecules. The quinone electron carriers were incorporated in supported dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine layers at physiological molar fractions (<3 mol%). The elaborate bilayer template contained a built-in gold electrode at which the redox molecules solubilized in the bilayer were reduced or oxidized. The lateral diffusion coefficient of a natural quinone like UQ10 or PQ9 was 2.0 +/- 0.4 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) at 30 degrees C, two to three times smaller than the diffusion coefficient of a lipid analog in the same artificial bilayer. The lateral mobilities of the oxidized or reduced forms could be determined separately and were found to be identical in the 4-13 pH range. For a series of isoprenoid quinones, UQ2 or PQ2 to UQ10, the diffusion coefficient exhibited a marked dependence on the length of the isoprenoid chain. The data fit very well the quantitative behavior predicted by a continuum fluid model in which the isoprenoid chains are taken as rigid particles moving in the less viscous part of the bilayer and rubbing against the more viscous layers of lipid heads. The present study supports the concept of a homogeneous pool of quinone located in the less viscous region of the bilayer. PMID:9545054

  8. Tracer counterpermeation analysis of diffusivity in finite-length nanopores with and without single-file dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Ackerman, David M.; Evans, James W.

    2017-01-19

    Here, we perform a tracer counterpermeation (TCP) analysis for a stochastic model of diffusive transport through a narrow linear pore where passing of species within the pore is inhibited or even excluded (single-file diffusion). TCP involves differently labeled but otherwise identical particles from two decoupled infinite reservoirs adsorbing into opposite ends of the pore, and desorbing from either end. In addition to transient behavior, we assess steady-state concentration profiles, spatial correlations, particle number fluctuations, and diffusion fluxes through the pore. From the profiles and fluxes, we determine a generalized tracer diffusion coefficient Dtr(x), at various positions x within the pore.more » Dtr(x) has a plateau value in the pore center scaling inversely with the pore length, but it is enhanced near the pore openings. The latter feature reflects the effect of fluctuations in adsorption and desorption, and it is also associated with a nontrivial scaling of the concentration profiles near the pore openings.« less

  9. Diffusion length variation and proton damage coefficients for InP/In(x)Ga(1-x)As/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of lighter, mechanically strong and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5 and 3 MeV proton irradiations are explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence is calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient K(L) is plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  10. Measurement of N-Type 6H SiC Minority-Carrier Diffusion Lengths by Electron Bombardment of Schottky Barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, S. M.; Tabib-Azar, M.; Balley, S.; Rybickid, G.; Neudeck, P.; Raffaelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    Minority-Carrier diffusion lengths of n-type 6H-SiC were measured using the electron-beam induced current (EBIC) technique. Experimental values of primary beam current, EBIC, and beam voltage were obtained for a variety of SIC samples. This data was used to calculate experimental diode efficiency vs. beam voltage curves. These curves were fit to theoretically calculated efficiency curves, and the diffusion length and metal layer thickness were extracted. The hole diffusion length in n-6H SiC ranged from 0.93 +/- 0.15 microns.

  11. Electron beam induced current study of minority carrier diffusion length in homoepitaxial GaN (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talin, A. Alec; Collins, Kimberlee C.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Léonard, François

    2016-09-01

    GaN is a promising material for a range of high power, high frequency, and high temperature device applications. The wide bandgap of GaN leads to high breakdown voltages and low switching losses. Recently, large HVPE grown GaN substrates have become available for homoepitaxial growth leading to 103 reduction in dislocation density compared to similarly grown heteroepitaxial films. Device performance, however, is ultimately limited by the transport properties of minority carriers. Measured values for minority carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes in GaN vary widely1-3, and a recent report suggests flaws in the commonly adopted electron beam induced current (EBIC) method in the planar-collection geometry.1 Here we report on EBIC measurements performed on 8 micrometer thick GaN grown by MOCVD on 2 inch GaN substrates with a n-type dopant density of 5×1016 cm-3. We determine the carrier diffusion length using both the conventional EBIC method by varying the electron beam-to-contact lateral distance as well as by varying the electron beam penetration depth and find the extracted values differ by 10×, with the latter technique yielding the lower diffusion length. We rationalize these results in light of other materials characteristics including Raman and photoluminescence. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length and edge surface-recombination velocity in InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Hakimzadeh, Roshanak

    1993-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to measure the electron (minority carrier) diffusion length (L(sub n)) and the edge surface-recombination velocity (V(sub s)) in zinc-doped Czochralski-grown InP wafers. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) profiles were obtained in specimens containing a Schottky barrier perpendicular to the scanned (edge) surface. An independent technique was used to measure V(sub s), and these values were used in a theoretical expression for normalized EBIC. A fit of the experimental data with this expression enabled us to determine L(sub n).

  13. Reaction-Diffusion Model Simulations relevant to Modified Taylor-Couette Flow in Systems of Varying Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halmstad, Andrew; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Previously, we have observed a period-doubling cascade to chaos in Modified Taylor-Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry. Such behavior had been predicted by The Reaction-Diffusion model simulations. The chaotic formation of Taylor-Vortex pair formation was restricted to a very narrow band about the waist of the hourglass. It was suggested that with increasing lengths of systems, the chaotic region would expand. We present a battery of simulations to determine the variation of the size of the chaotic region with length, seeking the transition to spatio- temporal chaos. Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997). H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991).

  14. Gestation length and birth weight in relation to intake of marine n-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S F; Hansen, H S; Secher, N J; Jensen, B; Sandström, B

    1995-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that marine n-3 fatty acids ingested during pregnancy prolong duration of pregnancy and increase fetal growth rate in humans. By a combined self-administered questionnaire and interview applied in the 30th week of gestation we assessed dietary intake of marine n-3 fatty acids and energy in a population-based sample of 965 pregnant Danish women; in a random 14% subsample we also measured marine n-3 fatty acids relative to arachidonic acid (FA-ratio) in erythrocytes. Mean intake of marine n-3 fatty acids was 0.25 (95% range 0-0.75) g/d. We could detect no association between n-3 fatty acid intake and FA-ratio on the one hand, and gestation length, birth weight and birth length on the other. The analyses were adjusted for maternal height, prepregnant weight, parity and smoking. The conclusion from the study was that within the intake range of this population, marine n-3 fatty acids ingested in the weeks prior to the 30th week of pregnancy seem not to be a predictor of gestation length or fetal growth rate.

  15. Recovery of hydrochloric acid from the waste acid solution by diffusion dialysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Lu, Shuguang; Fu, Dan

    2009-06-15

    Diffusion dialysis using a series of anion exchange membranes was employed to recover HCl acid from the waste acid solution. Effects of flow rate, flow rate ratio of water to feed, and Fe ion concentration on the recovery of HCl were investigated. It was found that the flow rate ratio was an important factor in the diffusion dialysis operation, and the recovered HCl concentration and Fe ion concentration in diffusate decreased significantly with the change of flow rate ratio from 0.4 to 1.7. In addition, the higher the Fe ion concentration in the feed, the higher the Fe leakage in the recovered acid solution. The HCl recovery efficiency was influenced not only by the recovered acid concentration, but also the outlet flow rate. While using the actual pot galvanizing waste HCl solution with the co-existence of 2.70 mol/L of Fe and 0.07 mol/L of Zn ions, over 88% HCl recovery efficiency could be achieved and Fe leakage was within the range of 11-23%. However, over 56% of Zn leakage was found due to the formation of negative Zn complexes in solution, which was unfavorable for the recovered acid reuse.

  16. Identifying ergodicity breaking for fractional anomalous diffusion: Criteria for minimal trajectory length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch-Olszewska, Hanna; Sikora, Grzegorz; Janczura, Joanna; Weron, Aleksander

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study ergodic properties of α -stable autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average (ARFIMA) processes which form a large class of anomalous diffusions. A crucial practical question is how long trajectories one needs to observe in an experiment in order to claim that the analyzed data are ergodic or not. This will be solved by checking the asymptotic convergence to 0 of the empirical estimator F (n ) for the dynamical functional D (n ) defined as a Fourier transform of the n -lag increments of the ARFIMA process. Moreover, we introduce more flexible concept of the ɛ -ergodicity.

  17. Terahertz Conductivity within Colloidal CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals: Remarkably High Carrier Mobilities and Large Diffusion Lengths.

    PubMed

    Yettapu, Gurivi Reddy; Talukdar, Debnath; Sarkar, Sohini; Swarnkar, Abhishek; Nag, Angshuman; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Mandal, Pankaj

    2016-08-10

    Colloidal CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as an excellent light emitting material in last one year. Using time domain and time-resolved THz spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we establish 3-fold free carrier recombination mechanism, namely, nonradiative Auger, bimolecular electron-hole recombination, and inefficient trap-assisted recombination in 11 nm sized colloidal CsPbBr3 NCs. Our results confirm a negligible influence of surface defects in trapping charge carriers, which in turn results into desirable intrinsic transport properties, from the perspective of device applications, such as remarkably high carrier mobility (∼4500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), large diffusion length (>9.2 μm), and high luminescence quantum yield (80%). Despite being solution processed and possessing a large surface to volume ratio, this combination of high carrier mobility and diffusion length, along with nearly ideal photoluminescence quantum yield, is unique compared to any other colloidal quantum dot system.

  18. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, E. Arciprete, F.; Latini, V.; Latini, S.; Patella, F.; Magri, R.

    2014-09-15

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surface occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.

  19. Measuring the Minority-Carrier Diffusion Length of n-Type In0.53Ga0.47As Epilayers Using Surface Photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Tao; Li, Xue; Shao, Xiumei; Pavelka, Tibor; Huang, Li; Gong, Haimei

    2017-04-01

    We report measurements of the minority-carrier diffusion length of n-type In0.53Ga0.47As epilayer samples using the surface photovoltage (SPV) method, and the minority-carrier lifetime of the same samples obtained by the microwave photoconductivity decay ( μ-PCD) method. The minority-carrier diffusion length was determined from the surface photovoltage and the optical absorption coefficient of the material. By scanning the SPV probe over the sample, the difference in surface photovoltage could be measured, as well as enabling surface photovoltage mapping. Samples having two different doping concentrations were used: sample A with 3 × 1016 cm-3 and sample B with 1 × 1016 cm-3, having minority-carrier diffusion length at room temperature of 5.59 μm and 6.3 μm, respectively. Meanwhile, sample uniformity was investigated using SPV for the first time. Lifetime measurements were performed on the n-type In0.53Ga0.47As epilayer samples using the μ-PCD technique, obtaining the minority-carrier diffusion length indirectly. Comparison of the minority-carrier diffusion length values obtained from SPV versus μ-PCD showed good consistency. Therefore, the presented method could be useful for characterization of the minority-carrier diffusion length of wafers.

  20. Average Path-Length Parameter of Diffuse Light in Scattering Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arancibia-Bulnes, Camilo A.; Ruiz-Suárez, Jesús C.

    1999-03-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to study in detail the propagation of light in a plane-parallel medium containing scattering particles. In particular, we compute the forward and backward average path-length parameters (FAPP and BAPP, respectively) of four-flux radiative transfer models as functions of the optical depth. Strong dependence on the single scattering albedo and phase function asymmetry is found for both quantities. In general the values of the FAPP decrease with increasing absorption, whereas the opposite occurs for the BAPP. A similar effect is produced when changing from isotropic phase functions to phase functions with a large asymmetry in the forward direction. We present analytical results for the asymptotic values of the FAPP and BAPP as functions of albedo for the particular case of isotropic scattering. Our results differ markedly from the predictions obtained recently with two multiple-scattering models by Vargas and Niklasson J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 14, 2243 (1997); Appl. Opt. 36, 3735 (1997) . The differences found point out the intrinsic limitations of these models.

  1. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadi, V. Nihtianov, S.

    2016-02-15

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, L{sub B}, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is reported. The value of L{sub B} is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and confirmed analytically in the boron deposition temperature range from 700 °C down to 400 °C. For this temperature range the local loading effect of the boron deposition is investigated on the micro scale. A L{sub B} = 2.2 mm was determined for boron deposition at 700 °C, while a L{sub B} of less than 1 mm was observed at temperatures lower than 500 °C.

  2. Spin Torque Study of the Spin Hall Conductivity and Spin Diffusion Length in Platinum Thin Films with Varying Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh-Hai; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    We report measurements of the spin torque efficiencies in perpendicularly magnetized Pt /Co bilayers where the Pt resistivity ρPt is strongly dependent on thickness tPt . The dampinglike spin Hall torque efficiency per unit current density ξDLj varies significantly with tPt , exhibiting a peak value ξDLj=0.12 at tPt=2.8 - 3.9 nm . In contrast, ξDLj/ρPt increases monotonically with tPt and saturates for tPt>5 nm , consistent with an intrinsic spin Hall effect mechanism, in which ξDLj is enhanced by an increase in ρPt . Assuming the Elliott-Yafet spin scattering mechanism dominates, we estimate that the spin diffusion length λs=(0.77 ±0.08 )×10-15 Ω .m2/ρPt .

  3. Determination of minority carrier diffusion length of sprayed-Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courel, Maykel; Valencia-Resendiz, E.; Pulgarín-Agudelo, F. A.; Vigil-Galán, O.

    2016-04-01

    Despite Cu2ZnSnS4(CZTS) is a potential candidate for solar cell applications, so far, low efficiency values have been reported. In particular, for spray-deposited CZTS, efficiencies lower than 2% are commonly achieved. It is well known that one of the most important parameters governing solar cell performance is minority carrier diffusion length (Ln). In this work, CZTS thin film solar cells with different compositional ratios are fabricated in order to study its impact on Ln values. The Ln parameter is calculated for sprayed-CZTS layers using external quantum efficiency measurements in conjunction with optical absorption coefficient versus wavelength measurements - for the first time. Values in the range of 0.11-0.17 μm are obtained emphasizing the need for improving sprayed-CZTS crystalline quality.

  4. Temperature dependence of the magnon spin diffusion length and magnon spin conductivity in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, L. J.; Shan, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-11-01

    We present a systematic study of the temperature dependence of diffusive magnon spin transport using nonlocal devices fabricated on a 210-nm yttrium iron garnet film on a gadolinium gallium garnet substrate. In our measurements, we detect spin signals arising from electrical and thermal magnon generation, and we directly extract the magnon spin diffusion length λm for temperatures from 2 to 293 K. Values of λm obtained from electrical and thermal generation agree within the experimental error with λm=9.6 ±0.9 μ m at room temperature to a minimum of λm=5.5 ±0.7 μ m at 30 K. Using a two-dimensional finite element model to fit the data obtained for electrical magnon generation we extract the magnon spin conductivity σm as a function of temperature, which is reduced from σm=3.7 ±0.3 ×105S /m at room temperature to σm=0.9 ±0.6 ×104S /m at 5 K. Finally, we observe an enhancement of the signal originating from thermally generated magnons for low temperatures where a maximum is observed around T =7 K . An explanation for this low-temperature enhancement is however still missing and requires additional investigation.

  5. NEXAFS Chemical State and Bond Lengths of p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Solution and Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Suljoti, E.; Xiao, J.; Golnak, R.; Aziz, E. F.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state and solution pH-dependent NEXAFS studies allow direct observation of the electronic state of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as a function of its chemical environment, revealing the chemical state and bonding of the chemical species. Variations in the ionization potential (IP) and 1s→π* resonances unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic, or anionic) present and the varying local environment. Shifts in σ* shape resonances relative to the IP in the NEXAFS spectra vary with C-N bond length, and the important effect of minor alterations in bond length is confirmed with nitrogen FEFF calculations, leading to the possibility of bond length determination in solution.

  6. Influence of chain lengths of liquid crystals on cholic acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Sihui; Liang, Wenlang; Fang, Jiyu; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2013-09-01

    The concentration level of bile acids is a useful indicator for the diagnosis of liver diseases since individual suffering from liver diseases often has a sharp increase in bile acid concentration. Here we present a sensor platform based on the anchoring transition of nematic liquid crystal (LC), 4', 4-alkylcyanobiphenyls (nCB, n=5-8), at the surfactant-laden LC/aqueous interfaces for the detection of cholic acid (CA) in aqueous solution. In the sensor platform, the competitive adsorption of CA at the surfactant-laden LC/aqueous interface triggers a homeotropic-to-planar anchoring transition of the LC at the interface. We find the detection limit, which is the minimum concentration of CA required to trigger the LC transition, increases with the increase of the chain length of nCB.

  7. Palladium Catalysts for Fatty Acid Deoxygenation: Influence of the Support and Fatty Acid Chain Length on Decarboxylation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, JP; Immer, JG; Lamb, HH

    2012-03-29

    Supported metal catalysts containing 5 wt% Pd on silica, alumina, and activated carbon were evaluated for liquid-phase deoxygenation of stearic (octadecanoic), lauric (dodecanoic), and capric (decanoic) acids under 5 % H-2 at 300 A degrees C and 15 atm. On-line quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was used to measure CO + CO2 yield, CO2 selectivity, H-2 consumption, and initial decarboxylation rate. Post-reaction analysis of liquid products by gas chromatography was used to determine n-alkane yields. The Pd/C catalyst was highly active and selective for stearic acid (SA) decarboxylation under these conditions. In contrast, SA deoxygenation over Pd/SiO2 occurred primarily via decarbonylation and at a much slower rate. Pd/Al2O3 exhibited high initial SA decarboxylation activity but deactivated under the test conditions. Similar CO2 selectivity patterns among the catalysts were observed for deoxygenation of lauric and capric acids; however, the initial decarboxylation rates tended to be lower for these substrates. The influence of alkyl chain length on deoxygenation kinetics was investigated for a homologous series of C-10-C-18 fatty acids using the Pd/C catalyst. As fatty acid carbon number decreases, reaction time and H-2 consumption increase, and CO2 selectivity and initial decarboxylation rate decrease. The increase in initial decarboxylation rates for longer chain fatty acids is attributed to their greater propensity for adsorption on the activated carbon support.

  8. Determination of charge-carrier diffusion length in the photosensing layer of HgCdTe n-on-p photovoltaic infrared focal plane array detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnyakov, A. V.; Stuchinsky, V. A. Brunev, D. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2014-03-03

    In the present paper, we propose a method for evaluating the bulk diffusion length of minority charge carriers in the photosensing layer of photovoltaic focal plane array (FPA) photodetectors. The method is based on scanning a strip-shaped illumination spot with one of the detector diodes at a low level of photocurrents j{sub ph} being registered; such scanning provides data for subsequent analysis of measured spot-scan profiles within a simple diffusion model. The asymptotic behavior of the effective (at j{sub ph} ≠ 0) charge-carrier diffusion length l{sub d} {sub eff} as a function of j{sub ph} for j{sub ph} → 0 inferred from our experimental data proved to be consistent with the behavior of l{sub d} {sub eff} vs j{sub ph} as predicted by the model, while the obtained values of the bulk diffusion length of minority carriers (electrons) in the p-HgCdTe film of investigated HgCdTe n-on-p FPA photodetectors were found to be in a good agreement with the previously reported carrier diffusion-length values for HgCdTe.

  9. Determination of charge-carrier diffusion length in the photosensing layer of HgCdTe n-on-p photovoltaic infrared focal plane array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, A. V.; Stuchinsky, V. A.; Brunev, D. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2014-03-01

    In the present paper, we propose a method for evaluating the bulk diffusion length of minority charge carriers in the photosensing layer of photovoltaic focal plane array (FPA) photodetectors. The method is based on scanning a strip-shaped illumination spot with one of the detector diodes at a low level of photocurrents jph being registered; such scanning provides data for subsequent analysis of measured spot-scan profiles within a simple diffusion model. The asymptotic behavior of the effective (at jph ≠ 0) charge-carrier diffusion length ld eff as a function of jph for jph → 0 inferred from our experimental data proved to be consistent with the behavior of ld eff vs jph as predicted by the model, while the obtained values of the bulk diffusion length of minority carriers (electrons) in the p-HgCdTe film of investigated HgCdTe n-on-p FPA photodetectors were found to be in a good agreement with the previously reported carrier diffusion-length values for HgCdTe.

  10. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; ...

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals thanmore » in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.« less

  11. Chain-length heterogeneity allows for the assembly of fatty acid vesicles in dilute solutions.

    PubMed

    Budin, Itay; Prwyes, Noam; Zhang, Na; Szostak, Jack W

    2014-10-07

    A requirement for concentrated and chemically homogeneous pools of molecular building blocks would severely restrict plausible scenarios for the origin of life. In the case of membrane self-assembly, models of prebiotic lipid synthesis yield primarily short, single-chain amphiphiles that can form bilayer vesicles only at very high concentrations. These high critical aggregation concentrations (cacs) pose significant obstacles for the self-assembly of single-chain lipid membranes. Here, we examine membrane self-assembly in mixtures of fatty acids with varying chain lengths, an expected feature of any abiotic lipid synthesis. We derive theoretical predictions for the cac of mixtures by adapting thermodynamic models developed for the analogous phenomenon of mixed micelle self-assembly. We then use several complementary methods to characterize aggregation experimentally, and find cac values in close agreement with our theoretical predictions. These measurements establish that the cac of fatty acid mixtures is dramatically lowered by minor fractions of long-chain species, thereby providing a plausible route for protocell membrane assembly. Using an NMR-based approach to monitor aggregation of isotopically labeled samples, we demonstrate the incorporation of individual components into mixed vesicles. These experiments suggest that vesicles assembled in dilute, mixed solutions are depleted of the shorter-chain-length lipid species, a finding that carries implications for the composition of primitive cell membranes.

  12. Macromolecular Crowding Studies of Amino Acids Using NMR Diffusion Measurements and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Amninder; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Willis, Scott; Torres, Allan; Price, William

    2015-02-01

    Molecular crowding occurs when the total concentration of macromolecular species in a solution is so high that a considerable proportion of the volume is physically occupied and therefore not accessible to other molecules. This results in significant changes in the solution properties of the molecules in such systems. Macromolecular crowding is ubiquitous in biological systems due to the generally high intracellular protein concentrations. The major hindrance to understanding crowding is the lack of direct comparison of experimental data with theoretical or simulated data. Self-diffusion is sensitive to changes in the molecular weight and shape of the diffusing species, and the available diffusion space (i.e., diffusive obstruction). Consequently, diffusion measurements are a direct means for probing crowded systems including the self-association of molecules. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the self-diffusion of four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine and phenylalanine) up to their solubility limit in water were compared directly with molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental data were then analyzed using various models of aggregation and obstruction. Both experimental and simulated data revealed that the diffusion of both water and the amino acids were sensitive to the amino acid concentration. The direct comparison of the simulated and experimental data afforded greater insights into the aggregation and obstruction properties of each amino acid.

  13. Parallel pore and surface diffusion of levulinic acid in basic polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baojian; Yang, Yiwen; Ren, Qilong

    2006-11-03

    The equilibrium and kinetics of levulinic acid (LA) adsorption on two basic polymeric adsorbents, 335 (highly porous gel) and D315 (macroreticular), were investigated. Experimental adsorption rates in batch stirred vessels under a variety of operating conditions were described successfully by the parallel pore and surface diffusion model taking into account external mass transfer and nonlinear Toth isotherm. The film-pore diffusion model was matched with the rate data and the resulting apparent pore diffusivities were strongly concentration-dependent and approached to a constant value for 335 adsorbent. Thus, the constant value was taken as the accurate pore diffusivity, while the pore diffusivity in D315 was estimated from the particle porosity. The surface diffusivities decreased with increasing initial bulk concentration for both adsorbents. The inverse concentration dependence was correlated reasonably well to the change of isosteric heat of adsorption as amount adsorbed.

  14. Arabidopsis ECERIFERUM2 is a component of the fatty acid elongation machinery required for fatty acid extension to exceptional lengths.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Tegan M; Mañas-Fernández, Aurora; Zhao, Lifang; Kunst, Ljerka

    2012-11-01

    Primary aerial surfaces of land plants are coated by a lipidic cuticle, which forms a barrier against transpirational water loss and protects the plant from diverse stresses. Four enzymes of a fatty acid elongase complex are required for the synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) precursors of cuticular waxes. Fatty acid elongase substrate specificity is determined by a condensing enzyme that catalyzes the first reaction carried out by the complex. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), characterized condensing enzymes involved in wax synthesis can only elongate VLCFAs up to 28 carbons (C28) in length, despite the predominance of C29 to C31 monomers in Arabidopsis stem wax. This suggests additional proteins are required for elongation beyond C28. The wax-deficient mutant eceriferum2 (cer2) lacks waxes longer than C28, implying that CER2, a putative BAHD acyltransferase, is required for C28 elongation. Here, we characterize the cer2 mutant and demonstrate that green fluorescent protein-tagged CER2 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum, the site of VLCFA biosynthesis. We use site-directed mutagenesis to show that the classification of CER2 as a BAHD acyltransferase based on sequence homology does not fit with CER2 catalytic activity. Finally, we provide evidence for the function of CER2 in C28 elongation by an assay in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

  15. Determination of critical diameters for intrinsic carrier diffusion-length of GaN nanorods with cryo-scanning near-field optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y. T.; Karlsson, K. F.; Birch, J.; Holtz, P. O.

    2016-01-01

    Direct measurements of carrier diffusion in GaN nanorods with a designed InGaN/GaN layer-in-a-wire structure by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) were performed at liquid-helium temperatures of 10 K. Without an applied voltage, intrinsic diffusion lengths of photo-excited carriers were measured as the diameters of the nanorods differ from 50 to 800 nm. The critical diameter of nanorods for carrier diffusion is concluded as 170 nm with a statistical approach. Photoluminescence spectra were acquired for different positions of the SNOM tip on the nanorod, corresponding to the origins of the well-defined luminescence peaks, each being related to recombination-centers. The phenomenon originated from surface oxide by direct comparison of two nanorods with similar diameters in a single map has been observed and investigated. PMID:26876009

  16. Diffusion Coefficient of Tin(II) Methanesulfonate in Ionic Liquid and Methane Sulfonic Acid (MSA) Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kok Kee; Mahmoudian, M. R.; Ebadi, Mehdi; Koay, Hun Lee; Basirun, Wan Jeffrey

    2011-12-01

    Voltammetry and chronoamperometry for the electrodeposition of tin from Tin(II) methane sulfonate mixed with ionic liquid and methane sulfonate acid at room temperature was studied. Cyclic voltammetry shows redox waves of Tin(II), which proves that the electrodeposition of tin from Tin(II) methane sulfonate is a diffusion-controlled process. The diffusion coefficient of Tin(II) ions in the solvent mixture showed good agreement from both voltammetry and chronoamperometry results. The diffusion coefficient of Tin(II) in the mixture was much smaller than in aqueous solution, and it depends on the anion of the ionic liquid.

  17. Cellular differentiation and I-FABP protein expression modulate fatty acid uptake and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Atshaves, B P; Foxworth, W B; Frolov, A; Roths, J B; Kier, A B; Oetama, B K; Piedrahita, J A; Schroeder, F

    1998-03-01

    The effect of cellular differentiation on fatty acid uptake and intracellular diffusion was examined in transfected pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells stably expressing intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP). Control ES cells, whether differentiated or undifferentiated, did not express I-FABP. The initial rate and maximal uptake of the fluorescent fatty acid, 12-(N-methyl)-N-[(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-octadec anoic acid (NBD-stearic acid), was measured in single cells by kinetic digital fluorescence imaging. I-FABP expression in undifferentiated ES cells increased the initial rate and maximal uptake of NBD-stearic acid 1.7- and 1.6-fold, respectively, as well as increased its effective intracellular diffusion constant (Deff) 1.8-fold as measured by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. In contrast, ES cell differentiation decreased I-FABP expression up to 3-fold and decreased the NBD-stearic acid initial rate of uptake, maximal uptake, and Deff by 10-, 4.7-, and 2-fold, respectively. There were no significant differences in these parameters between the differentiated control and differentiated I-FABP-expressing ES cell lines. In summary, differentiation and expression of I-FABP oppositely modulated NBD-stearic acid uptake parameters and intracellular diffusion in ES cells.

  18. Monitoring the sorption of propanoic acid by montmorillonite using Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. W.; Frost, R. L.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes how Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (DRIFT) spectroscopy was used to monitor the sorption behavior of a short chain fatty acid, propanoic acid, on the clay mineral, montmorillonite. Organic acids bind to montmorillonite in two ways, either by dipole interaction with the oxygens in the interlayer space, or by bonding of the carboxylate anions to exposed aluminum ions. The DRIFT spectra of propanoic acid-montmorillonite complexes have bands at 1728 and 1554 cm-1, which are attributed to the symmetric, and antisymmetric stretching vibrations, respectively, of the C=O, ν(C=O)s, and O-C-O, ν(O-C-O)a, bonds of the carboxylic acid group. Each band represents one of the two different binding modes. These bands can be used to monitor the physical and chemical adsorption of the acid by the montmorillonite. When the peak area of each vibration is plotted against increasing acid concentration, both increase to a maximum. However the peak area for the ν(O-C-O)a vibration reaches a maximum at a much lower acid concentration than the ν(O=O)s vibration. The former maximum corresponds to saturation of the available binding sites on the edge surface aluminum ions. This concentration can be used to calculate the number of binding sites on the clay crystal. Where propanoic acid is allowed to diffuse from the clay, the bound fraction remains on the montmorillonite reducing the available acid that can be desorbed or leached from the clay.

  19. Diffusion dialysis. Effect of membrane composition on acid/salt separation

    SciTech Connect

    Narebska, A.; Warszawski, A. )

    1992-05-01

    Diffusion dialysis is an energy-saving separation technique. In order to highlight the relationship between membrane composition and ability to separate acid/salt mixtures by diffusion dialysis, a few anion-exchange membranes were examined. Experiments on solubility/diffusivity phenomena were carried out in contact with hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride solutions (single- and two-solute experiments). Computations using Glueckauf and Tye models have indicated high nonuniformity in the distribution of fixed charged within the membranes and different accessibilities of the internal membrane volumes for the acid and salt. The Neosepta AFN-7 membrane (Tokuymam Soda Co.) has proved effective in differentiating the permeants by sorption (k{sub HCl}/k{sub NaCl} {approx} 2) and diffusivity ({bar D}{sub HCl}/{bar D}{sub NaCl} up to 10). This membrane is also the only one which, when in contact with two-solutes solutions, absorbs the acid preferentially to the salt. For this membrane the preferential sorption and transport of the acid depends not only on the physical structure of the membrane but also on the chemical nature of the polymer which contains pyridine moieties.

  20. Evaluation of a multimode fiber optic low coherence interferometer for path length resolved Doppler measurements of diffuse light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Babu; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; Van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2007-12-01

    The performance of a graded index multimode fiber optic low coherence Mach-Zehnder interferometer with phase modulation is analyzed. Investigated aspects were its ability to measure path length distributions and to perform path length resolved Doppler measurements of multiple scattered photons in a turbid suspension of particles undergoing Brownian and translational motion. The path length resolution of this instrument is compared with a system using single mode fibers for illumination and detection. The optical path lengths are determined from the zero order moment of the phase modulation peak in the power spectrum. The weighted first moment, which is equal to the average Doppler shift, shows a linear response for different mean flow velocities within the physiological range.

  1. Diffusion of U(VI) in Opalinus Clay: Influence of temperature and humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, C.; Van Loon, L. R.; Jakob, A.; Steudtner, R.; Schmeide, K.; Sachs, S.; Bernhard, G.

    2013-05-01

    The diffusion of U(VI) (c0 = 1 × 10-6 mol/L) in compacted Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri underground laboratory, Switzerland, was studied in the absence and presence of humic acid (10 mg/L) at two different temperatures (25 °C, 60 °C) under anaerobic conditions. As background electrolyte synthetic Opalinus Clay pore water (pH 7.6, I = 0.36 mol/L) was used. The diffusion-accessible porosity, ɛ, was determined for each Opalinus Clay bore core sample by through-diffusion experiments with tritiated water (HTO) before the U(VI) diffusion experiments were carried out. The values for the effective diffusion and distribution coefficients De and Kd obtained for U(VI) and humic acid at 25 °C as well as at 60 °C showed that humic acid has no significant influence on the U(VI) diffusion. The diffusion profiles of humic acid in Opalinus Clay at 25 and 60 °C indicate the contributions of two different humic acid particle size fractions (<1 kDa and 10-100 kDa). The small-sized humic acid fraction diffused through the whole Opalinus Clay samples at both temperatures within the 3 month duration of the U(VI) diffusion experiments. At 60 °C, diffusion profiles of two different U(VI) species were observed. In a separate experiment the U(VI) speciation in the source reservoir solution at 60 °C was analyzed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray detector. The two diffusion profiles could be attributed to an unknown colloidal and a known aquatic U(VI) species (Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq)). The diffusion results showed that the interaction of U(VI) and of the large-sized humic acid colloid fraction with the clay is stronger at 60 °C. An increase of Kd from 0.025 ± 0.003 m3/kg at 25 °C to 0.25 ± 0.05 m3/kg for U(VI)colloidal at 60 °C was determined. In addition, the value for De of U(VI) increased with increasing temperature. Using the De values at 25 and 60 °C, a preliminary

  2. The Effect of Limited Diffusion and Wet–Dry Cycling on Reversible Polymerization Reactions: Implications for Prebiotic Synthesis of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing problem for the origins of life is that polymerization of many biopolymers, including nucleic acids and peptides, is thermodynamically unfavourable in aqueous solution. If bond making and breaking is reversible, monomers and very short oligomers predominate. Recent experiments have shown that wetting and drying cycles can overcome this problem and drive the formation of longer polymers. In the dry phase, bond formation is favourable, but diffusion is restricted, and bonds only form between monomers that are initially close together. In the wet phase, some of the bonds are hydrolyzed. However, repositioning of the molecules allows new bonds to form in the next dry phase, leading to an increase in mean polymer length. Here, we consider a simple theoretical model that explains the effect of cycling. There is an equilibrium length distribution with a high mean length that could be achieved if diffusion occurred freely in the dry phase. This equilibrium is inaccessible without diffusion. A single dry cycle without diffusion leads to mean lengths much shorter than this. Repeated cycling leads to a significant increase in polymerization relative to a single cycle. In the most favourable case, cycling leads to the same equilibrium length distribution as would be achieved if free diffusion were possible in the dry phase. These results support the RNA World scenario by explaining a potential route to synthesis of long RNAs; however, they also imply that cycling would be beneficial to the synthesis of other kinds of polymers, including peptides, where bond formation involves a condensation reaction. PMID:27338479

  3. Detailed atomistic simulation of the nano-sorption and nano-diffusivity of water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid in single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Anastassiou, Alexandros; Karahaliou, Elena K; Alexiadis, Orestis; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G

    2013-10-28

    We report results from a detailed computer simulation study for the nano-sorption and mobility of four different small molecules (water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid) inside smooth single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Most of the results have been obtained with the molecular dynamics (MD) method, but especially for the most narrow of the CNTs considered, the results for one of the molecules addressed here (water) were further confirmed through an additional Grand Canonical (μVT) Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation using a value for the water chemical potential μ pre-computed with the particle deletion method. Issues addressed include molecular packing and ordering inside the nanotube for the four molecules, average number of sorbed molecules per unit length of the tube, and mean residence time and effective axial diffusivities, all as a function of tube diameter and tube length. In all cases, a strong dependence of the results on tube diameter was observed, especially in the way the different molecules are packed and organized inside the CNT. For water for which predictions of properties such as local structure and packing were computed with both methods (MD and GCMC), the two sets of results were found to be fully self-consistent for all types of SWCNTs considered. Water diffusivity inside the CNT (although, strongly dependent on the CNT diameter) was computed with two different methods, both of which gave identical results. For large enough CNT diameters (larger than about 13 Å), this was found to be higher than the corresponding experimental value in the bulk by about 55%. Surprisingly enough, for the rest of the molecules simulated (phenolic), the simulations revealed no signs of mobility inside nanotubes with a diameter smaller than the (20, 20) tube. This is attributed to strong phenyl-phenyl attractive interactions, also to favorable interactions of these molecules with the CNT walls, which cause them to form highly ordered, very stable

  4. Detailed atomistic simulation of the nano-sorption and nano-diffusivity of water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid in single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastassiou, Alexandros; Karahaliou, Elena K.; Alexiadis, Orestis; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G.

    2013-10-01

    We report results from a detailed computer simulation study for the nano-sorption and mobility of four different small molecules (water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid) inside smooth single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Most of the results have been obtained with the molecular dynamics (MD) method, but especially for the most narrow of the CNTs considered, the results for one of the molecules addressed here (water) were further confirmed through an additional Grand Canonical (μVT) Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation using a value for the water chemical potential μ pre-computed with the particle deletion method. Issues addressed include molecular packing and ordering inside the nanotube for the four molecules, average number of sorbed molecules per unit length of the tube, and mean residence time and effective axial diffusivities, all as a function of tube diameter and tube length. In all cases, a strong dependence of the results on tube diameter was observed, especially in the way the different molecules are packed and organized inside the CNT. For water for which predictions of properties such as local structure and packing were computed with both methods (MD and GCMC), the two sets of results were found to be fully self-consistent for all types of SWCNTs considered. Water diffusivity inside the CNT (although, strongly dependent on the CNT diameter) was computed with two different methods, both of which gave identical results. For large enough CNT diameters (larger than about 13 Å), this was found to be higher than the corresponding experimental value in the bulk by about 55%. Surprisingly enough, for the rest of the molecules simulated (phenolic), the simulations revealed no signs of mobility inside nanotubes with a diameter smaller than the (20, 20) tube. This is attributed to strong phenyl-phenyl attractive interactions, also to favorable interactions of these molecules with the CNT walls, which cause them to form highly ordered, very stable

  5. Citric acid traps to replace sulphuric acid in the ammonia diffusion of dilute water samples for 15N analysis.

    PubMed

    Schleppi, Patrick; Bucher-Wallin, Inga; Saurer, Matthias; Jäggi, Maya; Landolt, Werner

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of 15N in aqueous samples requires the concentration of dissolved nitrogen (N) into a small volume that can be analysed by mass spectrometry. This is conveniently achieved by the NH3 diffusion technique, where NH4+ is captured on small acidified filters enclosed in PTFE. NO3- can be analysed the same way by reducing it to NH4+ with Devarda's alloy. H2SO4 is commonly used for the acidification of the filters. During combustion, however, this acid leads to the production of SO2 and elemental sulphur, which both have detrimental effects on the mass spectrometer. We propose here to replace H2SO4 with citric acid because it is combusted completely to CO2 and H2O in the elemental analyser before entering the mass spectrometer. Citric acid was found to give comparable results in terms of N recovery and 15N values, both for NH4+ and for NO3- samples. Blank samples revealed that N contamination was slightly lower using citric instead of sulphuric acid as acidifier of the glass filters. NH4+ samples first concentrated over cation-exchange columns were strongly acidic and several methods were tested to raise the pH for the subsequent diffusion. These samples gave incomplete N recoveries, but this problem was independent of the acid used on the filters and of the final pH of the sample. Complete recovery was achieved only by increasing the volume of the eluate from the columns. Citric acid can thus generally be recommended instead of H2SO4 for ammonia diffusion.

  6. A Study of the Correlation Between Dislocations and Diffusion Length in In(49)Ga(51)P Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Length in In49Ga51P 6. AUTHOR(S) Scott Edward Williams 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate...1 B. PURPOSE OF THESIS................................................................................... 5 C. MILITARY...RELEVANCE............................................................................. 5 D. THESIS OVERVIEW

  7. Observational Estimates of the Horizontal Eddy Diffusivity and Mixing Length in the Low-Level Region of Intense Hurricanes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    372 statistical analysis (t- test ) shows that the difference between the mean mixing length and 373 energy/flux containing scale is significantly...and R. W. Burpee , 2008: Structure of the eye and 521 eyewall of Hurricane Hugo (1989). Mon. Wea. Rev., 136, 1237-1259. 522 Montgomery, T. M., and R

  8. Inhibition of Ileal Water Absorption by Intraluminal Fatty Acids INFLUENCE OF CHAIN LENGTH, HYDROXYLATION, AND CONJUGATION OF FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Ammon, Helmut V.; Phillips, Sidney F.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of fatty acids on ileal absorption of water, electrolytes, glucose, and taurocholate was examined in Thirty-Vella fistulas in five mongrel dogs. Fatty acid absorption also was measured. Segments of terminal ileum were perfused at steady state with isotonic electrolyte solutions containing 11.2 mM glucose, 4.5 mM taurocholate, and 0.1-5.0 mM fatty acid. Three C18 fatty acids, oleic acid, 10(9)-hydroxystearic acid, and ricinoleic acid, completely inhibited water absorption at 5 mM. Sodium, chloride, and potassium absorptions were inhibited in parallel with absorption of water. Differences between the potencies of C18 fatty acids were apparent when lesser concentrations were perfused. Dodecanoic and decanoic acids were as effective as C18 fatty acids at 5 mM but octanoic and hexanoic acids were ineffective. The polar group of C18 fatty acids was modified by conjugating oleic and ricinoleic acids with taurine. When these compounds and a substituted C18 fatty acid, p-n-decylbenzenesulfonate, were perfused, water absorption was also inhibited. Short-chain fatty acids (C3 and C4) and their hydroxylated derivatives were ineffective at 5 mM. When water absorption was inhibited, absorption of glucose and taurocholate was decreased. We speculate that the phenomenon of inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption by fatty acids may be relevant to steatorrhea and diarrhea in man. Images PMID:4808636

  9. Global Identification of the Full-Length Transcripts and Alternative Splicing Related to Phenolic Acid Biosynthetic Genes in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhichao; Luo, Hongmei; Ji, Aijia; Zhang, Xin; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acids are among the main bioactive components in Salvia miltiorrhiza, and their biosynthesis has attracted widespread interest. However, previous studies on the biosynthesis of phenolic acids using next-generation sequencing platforms are limited with regard to the assembly of full-length transcripts. Based on hybrid-seq (next-generation and single molecular real-time sequencing) of the S. miltiorrhiza root transcriptome, we experimentally identified 15 full-length transcripts and four alternative splicing events of enzyme-coding genes involved in the biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid. Moreover, we herein demonstrate that lithospermic acid B accumulates in the phloem and xylem of roots, in agreement with the expression patterns of the identified key genes related to rosmarinic acid biosynthesis. According to co-expression patterns, we predicted that six candidate cytochrome P450s and five candidate laccases participate in the salvianolic acid pathway. Our results provide a valuable resource for further investigation into the synthetic biology of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26904067

  10. Fatty acid-induced injury in developing piglet intestine: effect of degree of saturation and carbon chain length.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, O R; Tso, P; Crissinger, K D

    1993-06-01

    Luminal perfusion with the long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) oleate in concentrations similar to that found in premature infant formula produces a dose- and age-dependent mucosal injury in developing intestine. To investigate whether this lipid-induced phenomenon is a function of the degree of saturation and/or chain length of the fatty acid, 51Cr-EDTA plasma-to-lumen clearance was measured in jejunum and ileum of 1-d-, 3-d-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets after perfusion with 5-mM solutions of different medium-chain saturated fatty acids and saturated and unsaturated LCFA. Mono- and polyunsaturated LCFA produced significant increases in jejunal permeability. In general, this effect was greater in piglets < or = 2 wk old compared with 1-mo-old animals, but no differences were observed among the unsaturated LCFA within an age group. In contrast, the alterations in mucosal permeability induced by medium-chain fatty acids were overall more attenuated than those induced by LCFA. Our results suggest that developing intestine is vulnerable to the injurious effect of dietary fatty acids and that the lipid-induced changes in mucosal permeability appear to be a function of the fatty acid chain length. The degree of saturation of the fatty acid does not alter its cytotoxic effects.

  11. Evaluation of the minority carrier diffusion length and surface-recombination velocity in GaAs p/n solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Moeller, Hans J.; Bailey, Sheila

    1991-01-01

    The minority carrier diffusion length (Lp) and the surface recombination velocity (Vs) were measured as a function of distance (x) from the p-n junction in GaAs p/n concentrator solar cells. The measured Vs values were used in a theoretical expression for the normalized electron-beam-induced current. A fitting procedure was then used to fit this expression with experimental values to obtain Lp. The results show that both Vs and Lp vary with x. Lp measured in irradiated cells showed a marked reduction. These values were compared to those measured previously which did not account for Vs.

  12. A case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Basora, Jose F.; Fernandez, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Modesto; Adorno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage Symptoms: Cough dry • short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Hyaluronic acid is a substance that is naturally present in the human body, especially in joints and eyes. Hyaluronic acid injectable gels have been available for the general market since 2003 as cosmetic dermal fillers and skin boosters. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an acute event that threatens the life of the patient and can lead to pulmonary fibrosis. Alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers is an entity that to the best of our knowledge has never been described in the medical literature. Case Report: We describe a patient who presented with dyspnea and cough after a subcutaneous injection of hyaluronic acid, with radiographic abnormalities including ground glass opacities and consolidation. The patient underwent flexible bronchoscopy and was diagnosed with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Conclusions: This case emphasizes that this life threatening condition may occur with the use of this medication and physicians must be aware of this disorder, as early recognition and management can reduce morbidity. PMID:24826208

  13. [Detection of erucic acid and glucosinolate in intact rapeseed by near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Riu, Yu-kui; Huang, Kun-lun; Wang, Wei-min; Guo, Jing; Jin, Yin-hua; Luo, Yun-bo

    2006-12-01

    With the rapid development of transgenic food, more and more transgenic food has been pouring into the market, raising great concern about transgenic food' s edible safety. To analyze the content of erucic acid and glucosinolate in transgenic rapeseed and its parents, all the seeds were scanned intact by continuous wave of near infrared diffuse reflectance spectrometry ranging from 12 000 to 4 000 cm(-1) with a resolution of 4 cm(-1) and 64 times of scanning. Bruker OPUS software package was applied for quantification, while the results were compared with the standard methods. The results showed that the method of NIRS was very precise, which proved that infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can be applied to detect the toxins in transgenic food. On the other hand, the results also showed that the content of erucic acid in transgenic rapeseeds is 0. 5-1. 0 times

  14. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Based Method for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Sadik, Mohamed M.; Mauk, Michael G.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Gross, Robert; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, such as HIV, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assess disease progression and effectiveness of drug therapy. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low-resource settings. This paper describes a simple, low-cost, reaction-diffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. The method was tested for HIV viral load monitoring and performed on par with conventional benchtop methods. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. PMID:25477046

  15. Cytoplasmic tail length influences fatty acid selection for acylation of viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Veit, M; Reverey, H; Schmidt, M F

    1996-01-01

    We report remarkable differences in the fatty acid content of thioester-type acylated glycoproteins of enveloped viruses from mammalian cells. The E2 glycoprotein of Semliki Forest virus contains mainly palmitic acid like most other palmitoylated proteins analysed so far. However, the other glycoprotein (E1) of the same virus, as well as the HEF (haemagglutinin esterase fusion) glycoprotein of influenza C virus, are unique in this respect because they are acylated primarily with stearic acid. Comparative radiolabelling of uninfected cells with different fatty acids suggests that stearate may also be the prevailing fatty acid in some cellular acylproteins. To look for further differences between palmitoylated and stearoylated glycoproteins we characterized stearoylation in more detail. We identified the acylation site of HEF as a cysteine residue located at the boundary between the transmembrane region and the cytoplasmic tail. The attachment of stearate to HEF and E1 occurs post-translationally in a pre-Golgi compartment. Thus, stearoylated and palmitoylated proteins cannot be discriminated on the basis of the fatty acid linkage site or the intracellular compartment, where acylation occurs. However, stearoylated acylproteins contain a very short, positively charged cytoplasmic tail, whereas in palmitoylated proteins this molecular region is longer. Replacing the short cytoplasmic tail of stearoylated HEF with the long influenza A virus haemagglutinin (HA) tail in an HEF-HA chimera, and subsequent vaccinia T7 expression in CV-1 cells, yielded proteins with largely palmitic acid bound. The reverse chimera, HA-HEF with a short cytoplasmic tail was not fatty acylated at all during expression, indicating that conformational or topological constraints control fatty acid transfer. PMID:8761467

  16. Hexavalent uranium diffusion into soils from concentrated acidic and alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Pena, Jasquelin; Sutton, Stephen R.; Newville, Matthew

    2004-03-29

    Uranium contamination of soils and sediments often originates from acidic or alkaline waste sources, with diffusion being a major transport mechanism. Measurements of U(VI) diffusion from initially pH 2 and pH 11 solutions into a slightly alkaline Altamont soil and a neutral Oak Ridge soil were obtained through monitoring uptake from boundary reservoirs and from U concentration profiles within soil columns. The soils provided pH buffering, resulting in diffusion at nearly constant pH. Micro x-ray absorption near edge structure spectra confirmed that U remained in U(VI) forms in all soils. Time trends of U(VI) depletion from reservoirs, and U(VI) concentration profiles within soil columns yielded K{sub d} values consistent with those determined in batch tests at similar concentrations ({approx} 1 mM), and much lower than values for sorption at much lower concentrations (nM to {mu}M). These results show that U(VI) transport at high concentrations can be relatively fast at non-neutral pH, with negligible surface diffusion, because of weak sorption.

  17. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA) Status in Pregnant Women: Associations with Sleep Quality, Inflammation, and Length of Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Lisa M.; Blair, Lisa M.; Porter, Kyle; Lower, Mary; Cole, Rachel M.; Belury, Martha A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic pathways linking maternal polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status with gestational length are poorly delineated. This study examined whether inflammation and sleep quality serve as mediators, focusing on the antiinflammatory ω-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) and proinflammatory ω-6 arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n6). Pregnant women (n = 135) provided a blood sample and completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at 20–27 weeks gestation. Red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid levels were determined by gas chromatography and serum inflammatory markers [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein] by electrochemiluminescence using high sensitivity kits. Both higher serum IL-8 (95% CI = 0.10,3.84) and poor sleep (95% CI = 0.03,0.28) served as significant mediators linking lower DHA:AA ratios with shorter gestation. Further, a serial mediation model moving from the DHA:AA ratio → sleep → IL-8 → length of gestation was statistically significant (95% CI = 0.02, 0.79). These relationships remained after adjusting for depressive symptoms, age, BMI, income, race, and smoking. No interactions with race were observed in relation to length of gestation as a continuous variable. However, a significant interaction between race and the DHA:AA ratio in predicting preterm birth was observed (p = 0.049); among African Americans only, odds of preterm birth decreased as DHA:AA increased (p = 0.048). These data support a role for both inflammatory pathways and sleep quality in linking less optimal RBC PUFA status with shorter gestation in African American and European American women and suggest that African-Americans have greater risk for preterm birth in the context of a low DHA:AA ratio. PMID:26859301

  18. The chain length of lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls is determined by the incorporation of coumaric acid glucosides and ferulic acid glucosides.

    PubMed

    Struijs, Karin; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Doeswijk, Timo G; Voragen, Alphons G J; Gruppen, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls is composed of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) and herbacetin diglucoside (HDG) moieties ester-linked by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric acid (HMGA), and of p-coumaric acid glucoside (CouAG) and ferulic acid glucoside (FeAG) moieties ester-linked directly to SDG. The linker molecule HMGA was found to account for 11% (w/w) of the lignan macromolecule. Based on the extinction coefficients and RP-HPLC data, it was determined that SDG contributes for 62.0% (w/w) to the lignan macromolecule, while CouAG, FeAG, and HDG contribute for 12.2, 9.0, and 5.7% (w/w), respectively. Analysis of fractions of lignan macromolecule showed that the higher the molecular mass, the higher the proportion of SDG was. An inverse relation between the molecular mass and the proportion (%) CouAG+FeAG was found. Together with the structural information of oligomers of lignan macromolecule obtained after partial saponification, it is hypothesized that the amount of CouAG+FeAG present during biosynthesis determines the chain length of lignan macromolecule. Furthermore, the chain length was estimated from a model describing lignan macromolecule based on structural and compositional data. The average chain length of the lignan macromolceule was calculated to be three SDG moieties with CouAG or FeAG at each of the terminal positions, with a variation between one and seven SDG moieties.

  19. Synthesis of medium chain length fatty acid ethyl esters in engineered Escherichia coli using endogenously produced medium chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liping; Liu, Junfeng; Nie, Kaili; Liu, Luo; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei; Deng, Li

    2013-07-10

    Microbial biosynthesis of fatty acid-derived biofuels from renewable carbon sources has attracted significant attention in recent years. Free fatty acids (FFAs) can be used as precursors for the production of micro-diesel. The expression of codon optimized two plants (Umbellularia californica and Cinnamomum camphora) medium-chain acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase genes (ucFatB and ccFatB) in Escherichia coli resulted in a very high level of extractable medium-chain-specific hydrolytic activity and caused large accumulation of medium-chain free fatty acids. By heterologous co-expression of acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase from Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, specific plant thioesterases in E. coli, with supplementation of exogenous ethanol, resulted in drastic changes in fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) composition ranging from 12:0 to 18:1. Through an optimized microbial shake-flask fermentation of two modified E. coli strains, yielded FFAs and FAEEs in the concentration of approximately 500 mg L(-1)/250 mg L(-1) and 2.01 mg g(-1)/1.99 mg g(-1), respectively. The optimal ethanol level for FAEEs yield in the two recombinant strains was reached at the 3% ethanol concentration, which was about 5.4-fold and 1.93-fold higher than that of 1% ethanol concentration.

  20. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Constant Behavior: IV. Diffuse Layer Charge/Potential Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most current electrostatic surface complexation models describing ionic binding at the particle/water interface rely on the use of Poisson - Boltzmann (PB) theory for relating diffuse layer charge densities to diffuse layer electrostatic potentials. PB theory is known to contain ...

  1. Quantifying the effect of metal-rich precipitates on minority carrier diffusion length in multicrystalline silicon using synchrotron-based spectrally resolved x-ray beam-induced current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonassisi, T.; Istratov, A. A.; Pickett, M. D.; Marcus, M. A.; Hahn, G.; Riepe, S.; Isenberg, J.; Warta, W.; Willeke, G.; Ciszek, T. F.; Weber, E. R.

    2005-07-01

    Synchrotron-based, spectrally resolved x-ray beam-induced current (SR-XBIC) is introduced as a technique to locally measure the minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductor devices. Equivalence with well-established diffusion length measurement techniques is demonstrated. The strength of SR-XBIC is that it can be combined in situ with other synchrotron-based analytical techniques, such as x-ray fluorescence microscopy (μ-XRF) and x-ray absorption microspectroscopy (μ-XAS), yielding information about the distribution, elemental composition, chemical nature, and effect on minority carrier diffusion length of individual transition metal species in multicrystalline silicon. SR-XBIC, μ-XRF, and μ-XAS measurements were performed on intentionally contaminated multicrystalline silicon, revealing a strong correlation between local concentrations of copper and nickel silicide precipitates and a decrease of minority carrier diffusion length. In addition, the reduction of minority carrier diffusion length due to submicron-sized Cu3Si and NiSi2 precipitates could be decoupled from the influence of homogeneously distributed nanoprecipitates and point defects.

  2. Breathing spiral waves in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenstein, Igal; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.; Yang, Lingfa; Dolnik, Milos; Zhabotinsky, Anatol M.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2008-08-01

    Breathing spiral waves are observed in the oscillatory chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system. The breathing develops within established patterns of multiple spiral waves after the concentration of polyvinyl alcohol in the feeding chamber of a continuously fed, unstirred reactor is increased. The breathing period is determined by the period of bulk oscillations in the feeding chamber. Similar behavior is obtained in the Lengyel-Epstein model of this system, where small amplitude parametric forcing of spiral waves near the spiral wave frequency leads to the formation of breathing spiral waves in which the period of breathing is equal to the period of forcing.

  3. Barcode DNA length polymorphisms vs fatty acid profiling for adulteration detection in olive oil.

    PubMed

    Uncu, Ali Tevfik; Uncu, Ayse Ozgur; Frary, Anne; Doganlar, Sami

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of a DNA-barcode assay with fatty acid profile analysis to authenticate the botanical origin of olive oil. To achieve this aim, we performed a PCR-capillary electrophoresis (PCR-CE) approach on olive oil: seed oil blends using the plastid trnL (UAA) intron barcode. In parallel to genomic analysis, we subjected the samples to gas chromatography analysis of fatty acid composition. While the PCR-CE assay proved equally efficient as gas chromatography analysis in detecting adulteration with soybean, palm, rapeseed, sunflower, sesame, cottonseed and peanut oils, it was superior to the widely utilized analytical chemistry approach in revealing the adulterant species and detecting small quantities of corn and safflower oils in olive oil. Moreover, the DNA-based test correctly identified all tested olive oil: hazelnut oil blends whereas it was not feasible to detect hazelnut oil adulteration through fatty acid profile analysis. Thus, the present research has shown the feasibility of a PCR-CE barcode assay to detect adulteration in olive oil.

  4. Pectin functionalised by fatty acids: Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopic characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Calce, Enrica; Tarantilis, Petros A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Chemically modified pectin derivatives obtained by partial esterification of its hydroxyl moieties with fatty acids (FA; oleic, linoleic and palmitic acids), as well as the initial apple peel pectin were comparatively characterised using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Characteristic changes observed in DRIFT spectra in going from pectin to its FA esters are related to the corresponding chemical modifications. Comparing the DRIFT spectra with some reported data on FTIR spectra of the same materials measured in KBr or NaCl matrices has revealed noticeable shifts of several polar functional groups both in pectin and in its FA-esterified products induced by the halide salts. The results obtained have implications for careful structural analyses of biopolymers with hydrophilic functional groups by means of different FTIR spectroscopic methodologies.

  5. Quantifying diffuse and point inputs of perfluoroalkyl acids in a nonindustrial river catchment.

    PubMed

    Müller, Claudia E; Spiess, Nora; Gerecke, Andreas C; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2011-12-01

    Recently, the role of diffuse inputs of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) into surface waters has been investigated. It has been observed that river loads increased during rain and that street runoff contained considerable loads of PFAAs. This study aims at quantifying these diffuse inputs and identifying the initial sources in a small nonindustrial river catchment. The river was sampled in three distinct subcatchments (rural, urban, and wastewater treatment plant) at high temporal resolution during two rain events and samples were analyzed for perfluorocarboxylates and perfluorosulfonates. Additionally, rain, stormwater runoff, wastewater effluent, and drinking water were sampled. PFAA concentrations in river water were all low (e.g., < 10 ng/L for perfluorooctanoate, PFOA), but increased during rainfall. PFAA concentrations and water discharge data were integrated into a mass balance assessment that shows that 30-60% of PFAA loads can be attributed to diffuse inputs. Rain contributed 10-50% of the overall loads, mobilization of dry deposition and outdoor release of PFAA from products with 20-60%. We estimated that within a year 2.5-5 g of PFOA originating from rain and surface runoff are emitted into this small catchment (6 km(2), 12,500 persons).

  6. Increase in the diffusion length of minority carriers in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}N alloys ({sub x} = 0–0.1) fabricated by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, T. V. Gilinsky, A. M.; Mansurov, V. G.; Protasov, D. Yu.; Kozhuhov, A. S.; Yakimov, E. B.; Zhuravlev, K. S.

    2015-10-15

    The room-temperature diffusion length of minority carriers in n-Al{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N layers grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire (0001) substrates used in structures for ultraviolet photodetectors is studied. Measurements were performed using the spectral dependence of the photocurrent recorded in a built-in p–n junction for thin samples and using the induced electron-current procedure for films up to 2 µm thick. The results show that the hole diffusion length in n-AlGaN films is 120–150 nm, which is larger than in GaN films grown under similar growth conditions by a factor of 3–4. This result can be associated with the larger lateral sizes characteristic of hexagonal columns in AlGaN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. No increase in the hole diffusion length is observed for thicker films.

  7. The adjuvant activity of fatty acid esters. The role of acyl chain length and degree of saturation.

    PubMed Central

    Bomford, R

    1981-01-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions of metabolizable fatty acid esters, with the non-toxic surfactant Pluronic L122 as emulsifying agent, potentiated the humoral response to bovine serum albumin and staphylococcal toxoid in the mouse. Adjuvant activity was increased by changing the chemical nature of the esters as follows: (i) using a series of ethyl esters, adjuvant activity appeared when the acyl chain length of the fatty acid component was 16 or greater; (ii) isobutyl and isopropyl esters of palmitic acid (C16:0) were superior to ethyl; (iii) the ethyl esters of oleic (C18:1) and linoleic (C18:2) acids were better than stearic (C18:0). Since emulsions prepared with longer chain saturated esters are very viscous or solid at room temperature, and unsaturated esters are chemically reactive, emulsions were prepared with differing proportions of ethyl caprate (C10:0) and butyl stearate. At a ratio of 9:1 the emulsions possessed the low viscosity of ethyl caprate, but gained the adjuvant activity of butyl stearate. 125I-labelled BSA was retained in the footpad to a significantly greater extent than with a caprate emulsion, but reasons are given for believing that slow release of antigen is not the only mechanism of adjuvant activity. The ester emulsions caused more acute but less chronic local inflammation (footpad swelling) than Freund's incomplete adjuvant. PMID:7275184

  8. Hepatic fatty acid uptake is regulated by the sphingolipid acyl chain length

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woo-Jae; Park, Joo-Won; Merrill, Alfred H.; Storch, Judith; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Futerman, Anthony H.

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) null mice cannot synthesize very-long acyl chain (C22-C24) ceramides resulting in significant alterations in the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids. We now demonstrate that hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) levels are reduced in liver but not in adipose tissue or skeletal muscle in the CerS2 null mouse, both before and after feeding with a high fat diet (HFD), where no weight gain was observed and large hepatic nodules appeared. Uptake of both BODIPY-palmitate and [3H]-palmitate were also abrogated in hepatocytes and liver. The role of a number of key proteins involved in fatty acid uptake was examined, including FATP5, CD36/FAT, FABPpm and cytoplasmic FABP1. Levels of FATP5 and FABP1 were decreased in CerS2 null mouse liver, whereas CD36/FAT levels were significantly elevated and CD36/FAT was also mislocalized upon insulin treatment. Moreover, treatment of hepatocytes with C22-C24-ceramides down-regulated CD36/FAT levels. Infection of CerS2 null mice with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-CerS2 restored normal TG levels and corrected the mislocalization of CD36/FAT, but had no effect on the intracellular localization or levels of FATP5 or FABP1. Together, these results demonstrate that hepatic fatty acid uptake via CD36/FAT can be regulated by altering the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids. PMID:25241943

  9. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase during infusion of fatty acids of varying chain lengths in the perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Latipää, P M; Peuhkurinen, K J; Hiltunen, J K; Hassinen, I E

    1985-12-01

    The effects of a homologous series of fatty acids with a chain length of two to eight on the rate of pyruvate oxidation and covalent interconversions of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) were studied in isolated perfused rat hearts. In the Langendorff-perfused heart beating at 5 Hz against an aortic pressure of 59 mmHg (7.85 kPa), a positive linear correlation was found between the fraction of PDH existing in the active non-phosphorylated form of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHa) and the pyruvate oxidation rate until the PDHa fraction increased to 48%. This value resulted in a saturation of the citric acid cycle and further activation did not increase the metabolic flux. The PDHa content of the tissue was higher during infusion of odd carbon number fatty acids than during infusion of even carbon number fatty acids. Propionate caused an almost maximal (93%) activation of PDH. A negative correlation was found between the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ ratio and the PDHa content. A negative correlation was also found between the acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio and the tissue PDHa content. The rate of labelled CO2 production, the specific radioactivity of tissue alanine and the metabolic balance sheet demonstrated that the alanine aminotransferase reaction in the total tissue does not reach equilibrium with the mitochondrial pyruvate pool during propionate oxidation, but the equilibrium is reached during the oxidation of even-number carbon fatty acids. This suggests that pyruvate is formed from propionate-derived metabolites also in the cytosol, although the primary metabolism of propionate occurs in the mitochondria. The results indicate that the rate of pyruvate oxidation in the myocardium is mainly regulated by covalent interconversion of PDH. During propionate oxidation the PDHa content in the tissue can increase beyond the point of saturation of the citric acid cycle and this indicates that feedback inhibition of the enzyme is rate-determining under these conditions.

  10. Intake of small-to-medium-chain saturated fatty acids is associated with peripheral leukocyte telomere length in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; You, Nai-Chieh Y; Song, Yiqing; Kang, Mo K; Hou, Lifang; Wallace, Robert; Eaton, Charles B; Tinker, Lesley F; Liu, Simin

    2013-06-01

    Dietary factors, including dietary fat, may affect the biological aging process, as reflected by the shortening of telomere length (TL), by affecting levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. We examined the direct relations of total and types of dietary fats and fat-rich foods to peripheral leukocyte TL. In 4029 apparently healthy postmenopausal women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative, intakes of total fat, individual fatty acids, and fat-rich foods were assessed by a questionnaire. TL was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Intake of short-to-medium-chain saturated fatty acids (SMSFAs; aliphatic tails of ≤ 12 carbons) was inversely associated with TL. Compared with participants in other quartiles of SMSFA intake, women who were in the highest quartile (median: 1.29% of energy) had shorter TLs [mean: 4.00 kb (95% CI: 3.89, 4.11 kb)], whereas women in the lowest quartile of intake (median: 0.29% of energy) had longer TLs [mean: 4.13 kb (95% CI: 4.03, 4.24 kb); P-trend = 0.046]. Except for lauric acid, all other individual SMSFAs were inversely associated with TL (P < 0.05). In isoenergetic substitution models, the substitution of 1% of energy from SMSFAs with any other energy source was associated with 119 bp longer TLs (95% CI: 21, 216 bp). Intakes of nonskim milk, butter, and whole-milk cheese (major sources of SMSFAs) were all inversely associated with TL. No significant associations were found with long-chain saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. In conclusion, we found that higher intakes of SMSFAs and SMSFA-rich foods were associated with shorter peripheral leukocyte TL among postmenopausal women. These findings suggest the potential roles of SMSFAs in the rate of biological aging.

  11. Turing pattern formation in the chlorine dioxide-iodine- malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setayeshgar, Sima

    The formation of localized structures in the chlorine dioxide-idodine-malonic acid (CDIMA) reaction-diffusion system is investigated numerically using a realistic model of this system. We analyze the one-dimensional patterns formed along the gradients imposed by boundary feeds, and study their linear stability to symmetry- breaking perturbations (the Turing instability) in the plane transverse to these gradients. We establish that an often-invoked simple local linear analysis which neglects longitudinal diffusion is inappropriate for predicting the linear stability of these patterns. Using a fully nonuniform analysis, we investigate the structure of the patterns formed along the gradients and their stability to transverse Turing pattern formation as a function of the values of two control parameters: the malonic acid feed concentration and the size of the reactor in the dimension along the gradients. The results from this investigation are compared with existing experimental results. We also verify that the two-variable reduction of the chemical model employed in the linear stability analysis is justified. Finally, we present numerical solution of the CDIMA system in two dimensions which is in qualitative agreement with experiments. This result also confirms our linear stability analysis, while demonstrating the feasibility of numerical exploration of realistic chemical models.

  12. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Column for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Haim; Liu, Changchun; Killawala, Chitvan; Sadik, Mohamed; Mauk, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in many medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assessing disease progression, effectiveness of drug therapy, and emergence of drug-resistance. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires sophisticated and expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low resource settings. We describe a simple, low-cost, reactiondiffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. We model the process with the Fisher Kolmogoroff Petrovskii Piscounoff (FKPP) Equation and compare theoretical predictions with experimental observations. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at the point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. C.L. was supported by NIH/NIAID K25AI099160; M.S. was supported by the Pennsylvania Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority; C.K. and H.B. were funded, in part, by NIH/NIAID 1R41AI104418-01A1.

  13. Lambda bacteriophage-mediated transduction of ColE1 deoxyribonucleic acid having a lambda bacteriophage-cohesive end site: selection of packageable-length deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Umene, K; Shimada, K; Tsuzuki, T; Mori, R; Takagi, Y

    1979-01-01

    An in vitro recombinant ColE1-cos lambda deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule, pKY96, has 70% of the length of lambda phage DNA. The process of lambda phage-mediated transduction of pKY96 generated a small amount of transducing phage particles containing ColE1-cos lambda DNA molecules of 80 or 101% of the length of lambda phage DNA, in addition to those containing original pKY96 DNA molecules. The newly isolated larger plasmid DNAs were transduced 100 times more efficiently than pKY96 DNA. Their structures were compared with that of a prototype pKY96 DNA, and the mechanism of the formation of these molecules is discussed. Images PMID:158007

  14. Effect of alkyl chain length on the rotational diffusion of nonpolar and ionic solutes in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imides.

    PubMed

    Gangamallaiah, V; Dutt, G B

    2013-10-10

    Rotational diffusion of a nonpolar solute 9-phenylanthracene (9-PA) and a cationic solute rhodamine 110 (R110) has been examined in a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium (alkyl = octyl, decyl, dodecyl, tetradecyl, hexadecyl, and octadecyl) bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imides to understand the influence of alkyl chain length on solute rotation. In this study, reorientation times (τr) have been measured as a function of viscosity (η) by varying the temperature (T) of the solvents. These results have been analyzed using the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) hydrodynamic theory along with the ones obtained for the same solutes in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium (alkyl = methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, and hexyl) bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imides (Gangamallaiah and Dutt, J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 12819-12825). It has been noticed that the data for 9-PA and R110 follows the relation τr = A(η/T)(n) with A being the ratio of hydrodynamic volume of the solute to the Boltzmann constant and n = 1 as envisaged by the SED theory. However, upon increasing the alkyl chain length from methyl to octadecyl significant deviations from the SED theory have been observed especially from the octyl derivative onward. From methyl to octadecyl derivatives, the value of A decreases by a factor of 3 for both the solutes and n by a factor of 1.4 and 1.6 for 9-PA and R110, respectively. These observations have been rationalized by taking into consideration the organized structure of the ionic liquids, whose influence appears to be pronounced when the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain attached to the imidazolium cation exceeds eight.

  15. A novel diffusion-biphasic hydrolysis coupled kinetic model for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longjian; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Junbao; Lu, Minsheng; Guo, Xiaomiao; Han, Lujia

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic experiments on the dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover were performed. A high xylan removal and a low inhibitor concentration were achieved by acid pretreatment. A novel diffusion-hydrolysis coupled kinetic model was proposed. The contribution to the xylose yield was analyzed by the kinetic model. Compared with the inhibitor furfural negatively affecting xylose yield, the fast and slow-hydrolyzing xylan significantly contributed to the xylose yield, however, their dominant roles were dependent on reaction temperature and time. The impact of particle size and acid concentration on the xylose yield were also investigated. The diffusion process may significantly influence the hydrolysis of large particles. Increasing the acid concentration from 0.15 M to 0.30 M significantly improved the xylose yield, whereas the extent of improvement decreased to near-quantitative when further increasing acid loading. These findings shed some light on the mechanism for dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of corn stover.

  16. Translational and rotational diffusion of flexible PEG and rigid dendrimer probes in sodium caseinate dispersions and acid gels.

    PubMed

    Salami, Souad; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Barhoum, Myriam; van Duynhoven, John; Mariette, François

    2014-09-01

    The dynamics of rigid dendrimer and flexible PEG probes in sodium caseinate dispersions and acid gels, including both translational diffusion and rotational diffusion, were studied by NMR. Above the onset of the close-packing limit (C ∼ 10 g/100 g H2 O), translational diffusion of the probe depended on its flexibility and on the fluctuations of the matrix chains. The PEG probe diffused more rapidly than the spherical dendrimer probe of corresponding hydrodynamic radius. The greater conformational flexibility of PEG facilitated its motion through the crowded casein matrix. Rotational diffusion was, however, substantially less hindered than the translational diffusion and depended on the local protein-probe friction which became high when the casein concentration increased. The coagulation of the matrix led to the formation of large voids, which resulted in an increase in the translational diffusion of the probes, whereas the rotational diffusion of the probes was retarded in the gel, which could be attributed to the immobilized environment surrounding the probe. Quantitative information from PFG-NMR and SEM micrographs have been combined for characterizing microstructural details in SC acid gels.

  17. Solid-State Mesostructured Perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 Solar Cells: Charge Transport, Recombination, and Diffusion Length.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Nardes, Alexandre M; Zhu, Kai

    2014-02-06

    We report on the effect of TiO2 film thickness on charge transport and recombination in solid-state mesostructured perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (via one-step coating) solar cells using spiro-MeOTAD as the hole conductor. Intensity-modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopies show that the transport and recombination properties of solid-state mesostructured perovskite solar cells are similar to those of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Charge transport in perovskite cells is dominated by electron conduction within the mesoporous TiO2 network rather than from the perovskite layer. Although no significant film-thickness dependence is found for transport and recombination, the efficiency of perovskite cells increases with TiO2 film thickness from 240 nm to about 650-850 nm owing primarily to the enhanced light harvesting. Further increasing film thickness reduces cell efficiency associated with decreased fill factor or photocurrent density. The electron diffusion length in mesostructured perovskite cells is longer than 1 μm for over four orders of magnitude of light intensity.

  18. Recovery of H2SO4 from an acid leach solution by diffusion dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chang; Li, Xingbin; Deng, Zhigan; Fan, Gang; Li, Minting; Li, Cunxiong

    2010-04-15

    Diffusion dialysis with a series of anion exchange membranes was used to recover H(2)SO(4) from an acid leach solution produced during the vanadium manufacturing process. The effects of sulfuric acid, FeSO(4) and VOSO(4) concentration, flow rate and flow rate ratio on the recovery of H(2)SO(4) were investigated. The results showed that sulfuric acid permeated well through the membranes used, while metal ions were efficiently rejected. The recovery of H(2)SO(4) increased as the sulfate concentration of the feed increased and the flow rate ratio of water to feed increased. More than 80% of the H(2)SO(4) could be recovered from the leach solution which contained 61.7 g/L free H(2)SO(4), 11.2 g/L Fe and 4.60 g/L V at a flow rate of 0.19x10(-3) m(3)/h m(2). V and Fe ion rejection were within 93-95 and 92-94%, respectively. A preliminary economic evaluation revealed that an investment in this process could be recovered within 27 months.

  19. Formulation of oil-in-water β-carotene microemulsions: effect of oil type and fatty acid chain length.

    PubMed

    Roohinejad, Shahin; Oey, Indrawati; Wen, Jingyuan; Lee, Sung Je; Everett, David W; Burritt, David J

    2015-05-01

    The impact of oil type and fatty acid chain length on the development of food-grade microemulsions for the entrapment of β-carotene was investigated. The microemulsion region of a ternary phase diagram containing short chain monoglycerides was larger than for di- and triglycerides when Tween 80 was used as surfactant. The cytotoxicity of microemulsions composed of a 30% monoglyceride oil, 20% Tween 80 and 50% aqueous buffer were evaluated using an in vitro cell culture model (human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma, Caco-2). The cytotoxicity test showed that the viability of Caco-2 cells against β-carotene microemulsions at concentrations of 0.03125% (v/v) was higher than 90%. This study suggests that short chain monoglycerides could be used with Tween 80 to prepare transparent β-carotene-encapsulated O/W microemulsions in the particle size range of 12-100 nm.

  20. Production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with fatty acids and alternative carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pui-Ling; Yu, Vincent; Wai, Lam; Yu, Hoi-Fu

    2006-01-01

    In this study, medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs) were produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa using different carbon sources. Decanoic acid induced the highest (9.71% [+/- 0.7]) mcl-PHAs accumulation in bacterial cells at 47 h. The cells preferred to accumulate and degrade the polyhydroxyoctanoate than polyhydroxydecanoate (PHD) during early stage and final stage of the growth, respectively. The production cost of mcl-PHAs can be reduced by using edible oils as the carbon source. The bacteria accumulated 6% (+/- 0.7) of mcl-PHAs in the presence of olive oil. Besides, reused oil was another potential carbon source for the reduction of the production cost of mcl-PHAs. Overall, PHD was the major constituent in the accumulated mcl-PHAs.

  1. Feasibility for quantitative determination of deoxyribonucleic acid by using near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yafei; Tu, Jiarun; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2012-09-15

    A method for quantitative determination of fish sperm deoxyribonucleic acid (fsDNA) in solutions was developed by using adsorption preconcentration and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRDRS). A high capacity adsorbent of amino-modified silica particle (AMSP) was prepared for preconcentration of fsDNA in solutions. Under the optimized conditions, the adsorption rate can be above 90% within 3 min. After adsorbing the DNA onto the adsorbent, near-infrared (NIR) spectra in diffuse reflectance mode were measured and partial least squares (PLS) model was established for fast quantitative prediction. The results show that the correlation coefficient (R) between the predicted and the reference concentration is 0.9894 and the recoveries are in the range of 92.9-123.4% for the validation samples in the concentration range of 3.00-29.38 mg L(-1). Therefore, the feasibility for quantitative analysis of DNA in solutions by NIRDRS is proved. This may provide an alternative way for fast determination of DNA in solutions.

  2. Gas diffusion electrode setup for catalyst testing in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, Gustav K. H. E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk; Fleige, Michael; Arenz, Matthias E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk

    2015-02-15

    We present a detailed description of the construction and testing of an electrochemical cell setup allowing the investigation of a gas diffusion electrode containing carbon supported high surface area catalysts. The setup is designed for measurements in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperature, i.e., very close to the actual conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). The cell consists of a stainless steel flow field and a PEEK plastic cell body comprising the electrochemical cell, which exhibits a three electrode configuration. The cell body and flow field are braced using a KF-25 vacuum flange clamp, which allows an easy assembly of the setup. As demonstrated, the setup can be used to investigate temperature dependent electrochemical processes on high surface area type electrocatalysts, but it also enables quick screening tests of HT-PEMFC catalysts under realistic conditions.

  3. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells via inducing proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianping; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Chong; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zang, Dan; Liao, Yuning; Zhang, Peiquan; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2015-04-08

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a great challenge to improving the survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially those with activated B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL). Therefore it is urgent to search for novel agents for the treatment of DLBCL. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for Phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by Chinese FDA. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA on cell survival and apoptosis in DLBCL cells including both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells. We found that GA induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, which is associated with proteasome malfunction. These findings provide significant pre-clinical evidence for potential usage of GA in DLBCL therapy particularly in ABC-DLBCL treatment.

  4. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Mulligan, Padhraic; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals than in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.

  5. A viscous solvent enables information transfer from gene-length nucleic acids in a model prebiotic replication cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Christine; Gállego, Isaac; Laughlin, Brandon; Grover, Martha A.; Hud, Nicholas V.

    2016-10-01

    Many hypotheses concerning the nature of early life assume that genetic information was once transferred through the template-directed synthesis of RNA, before the emergence of coded enzymes. However, attempts to demonstrate enzyme-free, template-directed synthesis of nucleic acids have been limited by 'strand inhibition', whereby transferring information from a template strand in the presence of its complementary strand is inhibited by the stability of the template duplex. Here, we use solvent viscosity to circumvent strand inhibition, demonstrating information transfer from a gene-length template (>300 nt) within a longer (545 bp or 3 kb) duplex. These results suggest that viscous environments on the prebiotic Earth, generated periodically by water evaporation, could have facilitated nucleic acid replication—particularly of long, structured sequences such as ribozymes. Our approach works with DNA and RNA, suggesting that viscosity-mediated replication is possible for a range of genetic polymers, perhaps even for informational polymers that may have preceded RNA.

  6. A viscous solvent enables information transfer from gene-length nucleic acids in a model prebiotic replication cycle.

    PubMed

    He, Christine; Gállego, Isaac; Laughlin, Brandon; Grover, Martha A; Hud, Nicholas V

    2017-04-01

    Many hypotheses concerning the nature of early life assume that genetic information was once transferred through the template-directed synthesis of RNA, before the emergence of coded enzymes. However, attempts to demonstrate enzyme-free, template-directed synthesis of nucleic acids have been limited by 'strand inhibition', whereby transferring information from a template strand in the presence of its complementary strand is inhibited by the stability of the template duplex. Here, we use solvent viscosity to circumvent strand inhibition, demonstrating information transfer from a gene-length template (>300 nt) within a longer (545 bp or 3 kb) duplex. These results suggest that viscous environments on the prebiotic Earth, generated periodically by water evaporation, could have facilitated nucleic acid replication-particularly of long, structured sequences such as ribozymes. Our approach works with DNA and RNA, suggesting that viscosity-mediated replication is possible for a range of genetic polymers, perhaps even for informational polymers that may have preceded RNA.

  7. Quantitative analysis of binary polymorphs mixtures of fusidic acid by diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance FT-NIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Canyong; Luo, Xuefang; Zhou, Xiaohua; Shi, Beijia; Wang, Juanjuan; Zhao, Jinqi; Zhang, Xiaoxia

    2017-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as infrared, near-infrared and Raman spectroscopy have become popular in detecting and quantifying polymorphism of pharmaceutics since they are fast and non-destructive. This study assessed the ability of three vibrational spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis to quantify a low-content undesired polymorph within a binary polymorphic mixture. Partial least squares (PLS) regression and support vector machine (SVM) regression were employed to build quantitative models. Fusidic acid, a steroidal antibiotic, was used as the model compound. It was found that PLS regression performed slightly better than SVM regression in all the three spectroscopic techniques. Root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) were ranging from 0.48% to 1.17% for diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy and 1.60-1.93% for diffuse reflectance FT-NIR spectroscopy and 1.62-2.31% for Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy offers significant advantages in providing accurate measurement of polymorphic content in the fusidic acid binary mixtures, while Raman spectroscopy is the least accurate technique for quantitative analysis of polymorphs.

  8. Calibration of fusidic acid disk diffusion susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus areus.

    PubMed

    Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Kõljalg, Siiri; Karlsson, Inga; Kronvall, Göran

    2002-10-01

    Single strain regression analysis, SRA, was used to calibrate disk diffusion fusidic acid susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus in two laboratories using different standard methods but the same interpretative MIC limits. SRA equation constants were calculated using five different fusidic acid disk contents (1.5, 5, 15, 50, 150 microg). These disks were tested on five separate occasions against quality control strain S. aureus ATCC 29213. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) method was employed in Tartu, Estonia (TE) and the Swedish Reference Group for Antibiotics (SRGA) method in Sweden at the Karolinska Hospital (KS). SRA constants obtained were used for calculating zone breakpoints corresponding to MIC breakpoints recommended by the SRGA (S < or = 0.5 mg/L, R > or = 1 mg/L). Zone diameter histograms from KS, performed with a 50 microg disk, and from TE, using a 10 microg disk, showed a clustering of wild type strains around 41 mm and 30 mm, respectively, reflecting differences in methodology. Zone breakpoints calculated from the equations were validated by comparison with the histograms. Breakpoints were also calculated for a suggested lower disk content in Sweden, 10 microg, and validated in tests of clinical isolates and by histogram analysis.

  9. Recovery of H2SO4 from waste acid solution by a diffusion dialysis method.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jinki; Kim, Min-Seuk; Kim, Byung-Su; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Won-Baek; Lee, Jae-Chun

    2005-09-30

    A diffusion dialysis method using anion exchange membrane was used to recover H2SO4 from waste sulfuric acid solution produced at the diamond manufacturing process. Effects of flow rate, operation temperature, and metal ion concentration on the recovery of H2SO4 were investigated. The recovery of H2SO4 increased with the concentration of H2SO4 and operation temperature. It also increased with the flow rate ratio of water/H2SO4 solution up to 1, above which no further increase was observed. The flow rate did not affect the rejection of Fe and Ni ions. About 80% of H2SO4 could be recovered from waste sulfuric acid which contained 4.5M free-H2SO4 at the flow rate of 0.26x10(-3) m3/hm3. The concentration of recovered H2SO4 was 4.3M and the total impurity was 2000 ppm. Preliminary economic evaluation has revealed that the dialysis system is highly attractive one that has payback period of only few months.

  10. Experimental investigation of benzoic acid diffusion coefficient in γ-Al2O3 nanofluids at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manouchehrian Fard, Manouchehr; Beiki, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    An experimental study was performed to measure benzoic acid diffusion coefficient in water-based γ-Al2O3 nanofluids at different temperatures. Measurements were carried out at 15, 20 and 25 °C. γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles with an average diameter of 10-20 nm were added into de-ionized water as the based fluid. Nanoparticles volume fractions used in the based fluid were 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 %. Measurements showed that the diffusion coefficients was not changed with nanoparticles concentration and no enhancement was found. Dependence of diffusion coefficients on nanoparticles concentration followed the same trend in all temperatures investigated in this work. Nano stirring and nano-obstacles could be regarded as two reasons for mass diffusivity changes in nanofluids.

  11. Effect of perfluoroalkyl chain length on monolayer behavior of partially fluorinated oleic acid molecules at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Baba, Teruhiko; Takai, Katsuki; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    A series of oleic acid (OA) analogs containing terminal perfluoroalkyl groups (CF3, C2F5, n-C3F7, n-C4F9 or n-C8F17) was synthesized to clarify how the fluorinated chain length affects the stability and molecular packing of liquid-expanded OA monolayers at the air-water interface. Although the substitution of terminal CF3 group for CH3 in OA had no effect on monolayer stability, further fluorination led to a gradual increase in monolayer stability at 25 °C. Surface pressure-area isotherm revealed that partially fluorinated OA analogs form more expanded monolayers than OA at low surface pressures, and that the monolayer behavior of OA analogs with the even-carbon numbered fluorinated chain is almost the same as that of OA upon monolayer compression, whereas the behavior of OA analogs with the odd-carbon numbered fluorinated chain significantly differs from that of OA. These results indicate: (i) the terminal short part (at least C2 residue) in OA predominantly determines the liquid-expanded monolayer stability; (ii) the molecular packing state of OA may be perturbed by the substitution of a short odd-carbon numbered fluorinated chain; (iii) hence, OA analogs with even-carbon numbered chain are considered to be preferable as hydrophobic building blocks for the synthesis of fluorinated phospholipids.

  12. Morphology and electrochemical properties of perfluorosulfonic acid ionomers for vanadium flow battery applications: effect of side-chain length.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cong; Zhang, Huamin; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Hongzhang; Yao, Chuan; Shi, Dingqin

    2013-07-01

    Perfluorosulfonic acid ionomers (PFSI) with different side-chain lengths have been investigated with respect to their morphology and electrochemical properties in vanadium flow batteries (VFB). The results indicated that the membrane with the shortest side chains (SSC-M2) displayed small ion clusters and a low degree of hydrophobic-hydrophilic separation, which is favourable to reduce the cross-over of vanadium ions in the VFB. SSC-M2 shows a similar proton conductivity to Nafion, which carries longer ionic side chains but with much lower ion permeability. As a result, the VFB assembled with SSC-M2 exhibited a superior coulombic efficiency and a voltage efficiency close to that of Nafion115. In situ mass transfer revealed that SSC-M2 had a remarkably low degree of vanadium and water transfer across the membrane, which resulted in lower capacity fading than in the case of Nafion115. These results indicate that a membrane with short side chains is an ideal option in the fabrication of high-performance VFBs with low capacity loss.

  13. Lack of activation of UCP1 in isolated brown adipose tissue mitochondria by glucose-O-ω-modified saturated fatty acids of various chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Breen, Eamon P; Pilgrim, Wayne; Clarke, Kieran J; Yssel, Cristy; Farrell, Mark; Zhou, Jian; Murphy, Paul V; Porter, Richard K

    2013-03-27

    We previously demonstrated that uncoupling protein 1 activity, as measured in isolated brown adipose tissue mitochondria (and as a native protein reconstituted into liposome membranes), was not activated by the non-flippable modified saturated fatty acid, glucose-O-ω-palmitate, whereas activity was stimulated by palmitate alone (40 nM free final concentration). In this study, we investigated whether fatty acid chain length had any bearing on the ability of glucose-O-ω-fatty acids to activate uncoupling protein 1. Glucose-O-ω-saturated fatty acids of various chain lengths were synthesized and tested for their potential to activate GDP-inhibited uncoupling protein 1-dependent oxygen consumption in brown adipose tissue mitochondria, and the results were compared with equivalent non-modified fatty acid controls. Here we demonstrate that laurate (12C), palmitate (16C) and stearate (18C) could activate GDP-inhibited uncoupling protein 1-dependent oxygen consumption in brown adipose tissue mitochondria, whereas there was no activation with glucose-O-ω-laurate (12C), glucose-O-ω-palmitate (16C), glucose-O-ω-stearate (18C), glucose-O-ω-arachidate (20C) or arachidate alone. We conclude that non-flippable fatty acids cannot activate uncoupling protein 1 irrespective of chain length. Our data further undermine the cofactor activation model of uncoupling protein 1 function but are compatible with the model that uncoupling protein 1 functions by flipping long-chain fatty acid anions.

  14. Continuous measurement of nitrous acid (HONO) in indoor environment using a diffusion scrubber and chemiluminescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Hong, J.; Lee, J.; Cho, S.

    2006-12-01

    Recent study has demonstrated that the use of combustion appliances in indoor environments, e.g., gas stoves and heaters, results in significant concentrations of NO2 and nitrous acid (HONO). Indoor HONO is formed by both direct emissions from combustion processes and the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with water vapor on surfaces present indoors. In this study in-situ instrument was constructed for measuring HONO concentration in both indoor and outdoor environments, utilizing diffusion scrubber and peroxynitrite-induced luminol chemiluminescent methods. We measured the HONO concentration under the conditions existing in living room of an apartment, along with NO, NO2, temperature, and relative humidity, to investigate the sources, chemical transformation, and lifetimes of nitrogen oxides and HONO. Some experiments investigated the emissions and transformations of nitrogen species from operation of unvented or vented gas appliance. Measurement data of NO, NO2, and HONO will be reported, and formation pathway of the HONO under the experimental conditions will also be discussed. In addition to measurement of indoor HONO, comparison of HONO measurements by luminol chemiluminescence and annular denuder integrated samples was made in outdoor environment. HONO in ambient air was sampled with annular denuders (Teflon-coated PM2.5 cyclone inlet followed by two Na2CO3-coated denuders coupled in series) operated at 16.7 L/min. Acknowledgement This study was supported by grant No. (# R01-2005-000-10775-0) from the Basic Research Program of the Korea Science and Engineering Foundation (KOSEF).

  15. Modeling of diffusion behavior of humic acid and Nd in the presence of humic acid in compacted bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Kazuki; Kurosawa, Seiichi; Kibe, Satoshi; Tobita, Minoru; Ouchi, Yuji

    The diffusion behavior of HA and Nd in the presence of HA in compacted bentonite was investigated experimentally by means of the through-diffusion method. Breakthrough of HA is observed in 1 and 0.1 mol dm-3 NaCl solution and is more significant with a lower dry density such as 1.2 Mg m-3. The one dimensional diffusion model taking parallel complexation equilibrium into account was fitted to the experimentally obtained breakthrough curves and concentration profiles, and the diffusion parameters, such as effective diffusivity and rock capacity factor, were evaluated. The obtained effective diffusivity, around 10-11 m2 s-1, for HA and Nd-HA is comparable to the previously reported value. Using these parameters, predictive calculations were performed to evaluate the effect of HA concentration and sorption distribution coefficient. It is indicated that the effect of sorption distribution coefficient is significant only for a short period and that relatively low HA concentrations might bring higher diffused mass depending on the diffusion behavior of dominant species.

  16. The Length of the Bound Fatty Acid Influences the Dynamics of the Acyl Carrier Protein and the Stability of the Thioester Bond†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis have been shown to exhibit a high degree of conformational flexibility, in that they are able to sequester fatty acid intermediates between 4 and 18 carbons in length. This flexibility has been observed in X-ray and NMR structures of acyl carrier proteins attached to different fatty acids. NMR studies comparing decanoyl-ACP and stearoyl-ACP indicated that ACP exhibits more dynamic motions when bound to longer fatty acids. We have used complementary chemical and NMR methods as an approach to improving our understanding of the effect of fatty acid length on the dynamics of acyl carrier protein. A chemical assay of the accessibility of the acyl thioester to solvent revealed a positive correlation between chain length and rate of hydrolysis. Surprisingly, this linear correlation was biphasic, with accelerated hydrolysis observed for fatty acids longer than 15 carbons. To further understand the motions associated with this acceleration, we collected 15N relaxation dispersion data for 14:0-, 15:0-, and 16:0-ACP. The greatest dispersions were exhibited by residues that form the entrance to the fatty acid binding pocket. In addition, these dispersions were observed to increase with the length of the fatty acid. Because the exchange rates derived from fitting the data to a two-state model varied from residue to residue, a more complex motional model appears to be required to adequately explain the dynamics. Thus, acyl-ACP offers an interesting system for future investigations of complex protein motions on the micro- and millisecond time scales. PMID:20014832

  17. Rates and mechanisms of conversion of ice nanocrystals to hydrates of HCl and HBr: acid diffusion in the ionic hydrates.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul; Gulluru, Dheeraj B; Buch, Victoria

    2005-03-03

    This FTIR study focuses on solid-state chemistry associated with formation and interconversion of the ionic HX (X = Cl, Br) hydrates. Kinetic data are reported for conversions of ice nanocrystal arrays exposed to the saturation pressure of the acids in the 110 approximately 125 K range. The product is amorphous acid dihydrate in the case of HBr, and amorphous monohydrate for HCl. The rate-determining step is identified as HX diffusion through the hydrate product crust toward the interfacial reaction zone, rather than diffusion through ice, as commonly believed. Slowing of the conversion process is thus observed with increasing thickness of the crust. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) and activation energy values for HX diffusion through the hydrates were evaluated with the help of the shrinking-core model. Hydrate crystallization occurs as a separate step, upon heating above 130 K. Subsequently, rates of reversible transitions between crystal di- and monohydrates were observed upon exposure to acid vapor and acid evacuation. In conversion from di- to monohydrate, the rate slows after fast formation of several layers; subsequently, diffusion through the product crust appears to be the rate-controlling step. The activation energy for HBr diffusion through crystal dihydrate is found to be significantly higher than that for the amorphous analogue. Conjecture is offered for a molecular mechanism of HX transport through the crystal hydrate, based on (i) spectroscopic/computational evidence for the presence of molecular HX bonded to X(-) in each of the ionic hydrate phases and (ii) the relative E(a) values found for HBr and HCl diffusion. Monte Carlo modeling suggests acid transport to the reaction zone along boundaries between "nanocrystallites" generated by multiple hydrate nucleation events at the particle surfaces. The reverse conversion, of crystalline monohydrate particles to the dihydrate phase, as well as dihydrate to trihydrate, displays nearly constant rate

  18. Limiting values of diffusion coefficients of glycine, alanine, [Formula: see text]-amino butyric acid, norvaline and norleucine in a relevant physiological aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Diana M; Verissimo, Luis M P; Barros, Marisa C F; Rodrigues, Daniela F S L; Rodrigo, Maria Melia; Esteso, Miguel A; Romero, Carmen M; Ribeiro, Ana C F

    2017-02-01

    The side chain effect on transport in ionic aqueous salt solutions was investigated for [Formula: see text]-amino acids glycine, alanine, [Formula: see text]-amino butyric acid, norvaline, and norleucine --that together define a chemical homologous series based on the length of the characteristic side chain which increases from zero to four carbons, respectively. Binary mutual diffusion coefficients at infinitesimal concentration in aqueous solutions of NaCl (0.15 mol kg (-1)) are measured by means of Taylor dispersion technique for this series and significant differences were found against previous published results for identical systems in pure water. In this way, NaCl effect on the transport of each amino acid is thus assessed and discussed in terms of salting-out effects. Also, solvated Stokes hydrodynamic radii were computed for the series showing comparable results in water and NaCl solution. The new information should prove useful in the design and characterization of transport-controlled systems in physiological and pharmacological studies.

  19. Cysteamine-induced inhibition of acid neutralization and the increase in hydrogen ion back-diffusion in duodenal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ohe, K.; Okada, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Inoue, M.; Miyoshi, A.

    1982-03-01

    To investigate the possible impairment of defensive mechanisms in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulceration, the effect of cysteamine on the neutralization of acid by the duodenum and the back-diffusion of hydrogen ions into the duodenal mucosa has been studied. The results obtained were as follows. (1) The intraduodenal pH started to decrease between 3 and 4 hr after cysteamine injection. (2) By perfusion of the duodenal loop excluding the opening of bile and pancreatic ducts, the amount of hydrogen ions (H+) neutralized was found to be significantly lower in cysteamine-treated animals than in the controls. (3) the back-diffusion of luminal H+ into the duodenal mucosa, estimated by measuring the H+ disappearance from the test solution including 100 mM HCl, was significantly increased by cysteamine. From these findings, it has been concluded that cysteamine reduces the resistance of duodenal mucosa to acid coming from the stomach.

  20. Molecular surface area based predictive models for the adsorption and diffusion of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suxin; Chen, Jiangang; Wang, Bijia; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-15

    Two predictive models were presented for the adsorption affinities and diffusion coefficients of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix. Quantitative structure-sorption behavior relationship would not only provide insights into sorption process, but also enable rational engineering for desired properties. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for three disperse dyes were measured. The predictive model for adsorption affinity was based on two linear relationships derived by interpreting the experimental measurements with molecular structural parameters and compensation effect: ΔH° vs. dye size and ΔS° vs. ΔH°. Similarly, the predictive model for diffusion coefficient was based on two derived linear relationships: activation energy of diffusion vs. dye size and logarithm of pre-exponential factor vs. activation energy of diffusion. The only required parameters for both models are temperature and solvent accessible surface area of the dye molecule. These two predictive models were validated by testing the adsorption and diffusion properties of new disperse dyes. The models offer fairly good predictive ability. The linkage between structural parameter of disperse dyes and sorption behaviors might be generalized and extended to other similar polymer-penetrant systems.

  1. Criteria for the interpretation of the pipemidic acid agar diffusion test by the Kirby-Bauer method.

    PubMed

    Grimm, H

    1983-01-01

    The antibiotic sensitivity of 296 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 294 isolates of other species was measured by the agar diffusion test with 20 micrograms pipemidic acid (Deblaston) discs on Mueller-Hinton agar by the Kirby-Bauer method. The correlation between inhibition zone diameter and minimal inhibitory concentration was worked out by regression analysis. In all bacterial species investigated, an inhibition zone of 14 mm or more indicates sensitivity to pipemidic acid. For Pseudomonas aeruginosa an intermediate zone of 11 to 13 mm is recommended.

  2. Acid diffusion into rice boluses is influenced by rice type, variety, and presence of α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Mennah-Govela, Yamile A; Bornhorst, Gail M; Singh, R Paul

    2015-02-01

    Breakdown of rice during gastric digestion may be influenced by rice structure, presence of salivary α-amylase, and hydrolysis by gastric acid. During mastication, saliva is mixed with rice, allowing α-amylase to begin starch hydrolysis. This hydrolysis may continue in the gastric environment depending on the rate at which gastric acid penetrates into the rice bolus. The objective of this study was to determine the acid uptake into rice boluses with and without α-amylase in saliva. Two types each of brown and white rice (medium and long grain), were formed into a cylindrical-shaped bolus. Each bolus was sealed on all sides except one to allow one-dimensional mass transfer, and incubated by immersion in simulated gastric juice at 37 °C under static conditions. Acidity of the boluses was measured by titration after 1 to 96 h of incubation. Effective diffusivity of the gastric juice through the bolus was estimated using MATLAB. Average acidity values ranged from 0.04 mg HCl/g dry matter (medium grain white rice, no incubation) to 10.01 mg HCl/g dry matter (long-grain brown rice, 72 h incubation). The rice type, presence of α-amylase, and incubation time all significantly influenced rice bolus acidity (P < 0.001). Effective diffusivity of gastric juice into the bolus was greater in brown rice than in white rice. These results indicate that starch hydrolysis by α-amylase may continue in the stomach before the gastric acid penetrates the rice bolus, and the rate of acid uptake will depend on the type of rice consumed.

  3. Localization of fatty acids with selective chain length by imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Nygren, Håkan; Malmberg, Per; Hagenhoff, Birgit

    2007-07-01

    Localization of fatty acids in biological tissues was made by using TOF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry). Two cell-types with a specific fatty acid distribution are shown. In rat cerebellum, different distribution patterns of stearic acid (C18:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), and oleic acid (C18:1) were found. Stearic acid signals were observed accumulated in Purkinje cells with high intensities inside the cell, but not in the nucleus region. The signals colocalized with high intensity signals of the phosphocholine head group, indicating origin from phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin. In mouse intestine, high palmitic acid signals were found in the secretory crypt cells together with high levels of phosphorylinositol colocalized in the crypt region. Palmitic acid was also seen in the intestinal lumen that contains high amounts of mucine, which is known to be produced in the crypt cells. Linoleic acid signals (C18:2) were low in the crypt region and high in the villus region. Oleic acid signals were seen in the villi and stearic acid signals were ubiquitous with no specific localization in the intestine. We conclude that the results obtained by using imaging TOF-SIMS are consistent with known brain and intestine biochemistry and that the localization of fatty acids is specific in differentiated cells.

  4. Use of agar diffusion assay to measure bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric acid. Solu...

  5. Effect of dicarboxylic acid chain length on the self-cleaning property of Nano-TiO2-coated cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Ramin; Berendjchi, Amirhosein

    2014-11-12

    In this study, the effect of dicarboxylic acid chain length on the amount of TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) adsorption-produced self-cleaning property and washing durability on cotton fabrics were investigated. First, cotton fabric samples were treated with three kinds of dicarboxylic acids--oxalic, succinic, and adipic acids--and then dipped in TiO2NP solution with a certain concentration. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to investigate bonds formation between dicarboxylic acid groups and hydroxyl groups of cellulose, and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was applied for the analysis of surface morphology in specimens. Drop absorbency time was determined for samples using the AATCC TM 79:2000. Washing stability and the amount absorption of TiO2NPs were determined by weighing and absorption spectrophotometry procedures, and the stain removal evaluation was conducted to assess the self-cleaning property. Results showed that all of the dicarboxylic acids used in this experiment improved the amount of TiO2NPs absorbed onto cotton samples and their durability to washing. In addition, color variation of samples treated with oxalic acid after 180 min of UV irradiation and drop absorbency time for samples treated with succinic acid were significantly increased by about 126 and 600%, respectively. The best durability was obtained from adipic acid, while a better self-cleaning property was obtained from oxalic acid.

  6. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  7. The relative diffusive transport rate of SrI2 in water changes over the nanometer length scale as measured by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Faraone, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to provide insight into the structures of ionic solutions for over a century, but the probes have covered distances shorter than 8 Å. For the non-hydrolyzing salt SrI2 in aqueous solution, a locally ordered lattice of ions exists that scatters slow neutrons coherently down to at least 0.1 mol L(-1) concentration, where the measured average distance between scatterers is over 18 Å. To investigate the motions of these scatterers, coherent quasielastic neutron scattering (CQENS) data on D2O solutions with SrI2 at 1, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mol L(-1) concentrations was obtained to provide an experimental measure of the diffusive transport rate for the motion between pairs of ions relative to each other. Because CQENS measures the motion of one ion relative to another, the frame of reference is centered on an ion, which is unique among all diffusion measurement methods. We call the measured quantity the pairwise diffusive transport rate Dp. In addition to this ion centered frame of reference, the diffusive transport rate can be measured as a function of the momentum transfer q, where q = (4π/λ)sin θ with a scattering angle of 2θ. Since q is related to the interion distance (d = 2π/q), for the experimental range 0.2 Å(-1)≤q≤ 1.0 Å(-1), Dp is, then, measured over interion distances from 40 Å to ≈6 Å. We find the measured diffusional transport rates increase with increasing distance between scatterers over the entire range covered and interpret this behavior to be caused by dynamic coupling among the ions. Within the model of Fickian diffusion, at the longer interionic distances Dp is greater than the Nernst-Hartley value for an infinitely dilute solution. For these nm-distance diffusional transport rates to conform with the lower, macroscopically measured diffusion coefficients, we propose that local, coordinated counter motion of at least pairs of ions is part of the transport process.

  8. Effects of dielectric saturation and ionic screening on the proton self-diffusion coefficients in perfluorosulfonic acid membranes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Reginald; Paddison, Stephen J

    2005-12-08

    Proton transport in perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes is investigated through a statistical mechanical model that includes the effects of the interaction of the tethered sulfonate groups with both the water and solvated protons. We first derive a potential that describes the electrostatic field due to the dissociated sulfonic acid groups by extending the work of Gronbech-Jensen et al. [ Mol. Phys. 92, 941 (1997)] to a finite array of point charges. A highly convergent series is obtained which includes the effects of screening due to the protons. We then investigate the effects of both dielectric saturation and two distinct formulations of ionic screening on the proton self-diffusion coefficient in Nafion membranes over a range of water contents. Our computations show that the two phenomena (i.e., dielectric saturation and ionic screening) under constant temperature conditions result in canceling affects. Our calculations provide a radial dependence of the proton mobility suggesting that the dominant self-diffusion occurs in the central region of the pores, well separated from the sulfonate groups. Through comparison of our calculated diffusion coefficients with the experimental values we derived a slightly smaller average separation distance of the hydronium ion from the sulfonate ions than suggested by either electronic structure calculations or multistate empirical valence bond molecular-dynamics simulations.

  9. Discrepancies between disk diffusion and broth susceptibility studies of the activity of ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid against ticarcillin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Manian, F A; Alford, R H

    1986-01-01

    Ticarcillin and clavulanic acid in combination were tested against 40 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates resistant to ticarcillin by disk diffusion. A total of 21 isolates (53%) were susceptible to ticarcillin-clavulanate by disk diffusion, under currently recommended criteria for ticarcillin susceptibility. Macro-broth dilution tests (ticarcillin plus clavulanic acid, 2 micrograms/ml) confirmed susceptibility (MIC less than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml) of only 8 (38%) of 21 isolates. Time-kill studies of disk diffusion susceptible isolates indicated 2 log10 or greater killing of most isolates at 6 h in broth containing ticarcillin (64 micrograms/ml) combined with clavulanic acid (1, 2, 5, or 10 micrograms/ml). After 6 h, regrowth was common in all concentrations of clavulanic acid except 10 micrograms/ml. Regrowth populations were resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate by MIC determination. Poor bactericidal activity of ticarcillin-clavulanate against ticarcillin-resistant P. aeruginosa was confirmed, as most isolates did not undergo 99.9% or greater killing at 24 h in all concentrations of clavulanic acid. Serotype O-11 was our most common serotype and was associated with disk diffusion "pseudosusceptibility." Concomitant disk diffusion testing of ticarcillin-clavulanate and ticarcillin is recommended for testing the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to ticarcillin-clavulanate by disk diffusion. P. aeruginosa isolates resistant to ticarcillin should as a rule be considered also resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate, despite apparent susceptibility by disk diffusion. PMID:3092732

  10. Genetic replacement of tesB with PTE1 affects chain-length proportions of 3-hydroxyalkanoic acids produced through β-oxidation of oleic acid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yoshiaki; Kang, Junkyu; Ming, Li; Habu, Naoto; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Ueda, Shunsaku; Maeda, Isamu

    2010-10-01

    Acyl-CoA thioesterase II (TesB), which catalyzes hydrolysis of acyl-CoAs to free fatty acids and CoA, is involved in 3-hydroxyalkanoic acid production in Escherichia coli. Effects of genetic replacement of tesB with Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl-CoA thioesterase gene PTE1 on 3-hydroxyalkanoic acid production from oleic acid through β-oxidation were examined. Kinetic analyses using β-oxidation intermediates showed that hydrolyses of C4-acyl substrates are more efficient by PTE1 than by TesB. Deletion of tesB in E. coli decreased 3-hydroxybutyric acid, 3-hydroxyhexanoic acid, 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid, and hexanoic acid in medium after cultivation with oleic acid as a sole carbon source. Hexanoic acid concentration was much lower than those of 3-hydroxyacids. In genetic complementation of tesB deletion, use of PTE1, instead of tesB, affected proportions of the 3-hydroxyalkanoic acids. Proportion of 3-hydroxybutyric acid was higher in a PTE1-complemented strain than in a tesB-complemented strain, while proportions of 3-hydroxyhexanoic acid and 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid markedly increased in the tesB-complemented strain. Proportion of 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid did not significantly increase in the PTE1-complemented strain. These data indicate possibilities of 3-hydroxyalkanoic acid production from oleic acid through β-oxidation and customization of their chain-length proportions by genetic replacement of tesB with a gene encoding acyl-CoA thioesterase with a different kinetic property.

  11. The evolution of proteins from random amino acid sequences: II. Evidence from the statistical distributions of the lengths of modern protein sequences.

    PubMed

    White, S H

    1994-04-01

    This paper continues an examination of the hypothesis that modern proteins evolved from random heteropeptide sequences. In support of the hypothesis, White and Jacobs (1993, J Mol Evol 36:79-95) have shown that any sequence chosen randomly from a large collection of nonhomologous proteins has a 90% or better chance of having a lengthwise distribution of amino acids that is indistinguishable from the random expectation regardless of amino acid type. The goal of the present study was to investigate the possibility that the random-origin hypothesis could explain the lengths of modern protein sequences without invoking specific mechanisms such as gene duplication or exon splicing. The sets of sequences examined were taken from the 1989 PIR database and consisted of 1,792 "super-family" proteins selected to have little sequence identity, 623 E. coli sequences, and 398 human sequences. The length distributions of the proteins could be described with high significance by either of two closely related probability density functions: The gamma distribution with parameter 2 or the distribution for the sum of two exponential random independent variables. A simple theory for the distributions was developed which assumes that (1) protoprotein sequences had exponentially distributed random independent lengths, (2) the length dependence of protein stability determined which of these protoproteins could fold into compact primitive proteins and thereby attain the potential for biochemical activity, (3) the useful protein sequences were preserved by the primitive genome, and (4) the resulting distribution of sequence lengths is reflected by modern proteins. The theory successfully predicts the two observed distributions which can be distinguished by the functional form of the dependence of protein stability on length. The theory leads to three interesting conclusions. First, it predicts that a tetra-nucleotide was the signal for primitive translation termination. This prediction is

  12. Postprandial concentrations of free and conjugated bile acids down the length of the normal human small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Northfield, T. C.; McColl, I.

    1973-01-01

    Small intestinal samples were obtained by intubation from multiple sites along the small intestine in 11 subjects with no known gastrointestinal disease eating a normal diet and at laparotomy in a further three subjects. Free (unconjugated) bile acids were consistently demonstrated in ileal samples, and occasionally in lower jejunal samples, by thin-layer chromatography, supplemented in some cases by gas/liquid chromatography and by infrared spectroscopy. The free bile acid concentration, measured enzymically following thin-layer chromatography, reached a maximum (1 mM) in the lower ileum, where it represented half the total bile acid concentration. Following ampicillin, the concentration of free bile acids decreased markedly, suggesting that they resulted from bacterial deconjugation; at the same time the total bile acid concentration increased, suggesting impaired absorption due to the reduced concentration of the more rapidly absorbed free bile acids. Our results indicate that the presence of free bile acids in lower jejunal and ileal samples is a normal finding, and cannot be taken as evidence of abnormal bacterial overgrowth. They also suggest that bacterial deconjugation at these sites may be a factor contributing to the remarkable efficiency of bile salt reabsorption. ImagesFig 2 PMID:4729918

  13. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  14. Multifold Increases in Turing Pattern Wavelength in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskins, Delora K.; Pruc, Emily E.; Epstein, Irving R.; Dolnik, Milos

    2016-07-01

    Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction were modified through additions of sodium halide salt solutions. The range of wavelengths obtained is several times larger than in the previously reported literature. Pattern wavelength was observed to significantly increase with sodium bromide or sodium chloride. A transition to a uniform state was found at high halide concentrations. The observed experimental results are qualitatively well reproduced in numerical simulations with the Lengyel-Epstein model with an additional chemically realistic kinetic term to account for the added halide and an adjustment of the activator diffusion rate to allow for interhalogen formation.

  15. Galerkin analysis of light-induced patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Sen, Shrabani; Riaz, Syed Shahed; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2009-05-01

    The photosensitive chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system has been an experimental paradigm for the study of Turing pattern over the last several years. When subjected to illumination of varied intensity by visible light the patterns undergo changes from spots to stripes, vice versa, and their mixture. We carry out a nonlinear analysis of the underlying model in terms of a Galerkin scheme with finite number of modes to explore the nature of the stability and existence of various modes responsible for the type and crossover of the light-induced patterns.

  16. Multifold Increases in Turing Pattern Wavelength in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction-Diffusion System.

    PubMed

    Gaskins, Delora K; Pruc, Emily E; Epstein, Irving R; Dolnik, Milos

    2016-07-29

    Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction were modified through additions of sodium halide salt solutions. The range of wavelengths obtained is several times larger than in the previously reported literature. Pattern wavelength was observed to significantly increase with sodium bromide or sodium chloride. A transition to a uniform state was found at high halide concentrations. The observed experimental results are qualitatively well reproduced in numerical simulations with the Lengyel-Epstein model with an additional chemically realistic kinetic term to account for the added halide and an adjustment of the activator diffusion rate to allow for interhalogen formation.

  17. Screening of Israeli Holstein-Friesian cattle for restriction fragment length polymorphisms using homologous and heterologous deoxyribonucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Hallerman, E M; Nave, A; Soller, M; Beckmann, J S

    1988-12-01

    Genomic DNA of Israeli Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle were screened with a battery of 17 cloned or subcloned DNA probes in an attempt to document restriction fragment length polymorphisms at a number of genetic loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were observed at the chymosin, oxytocin-neurophysin I, lutropin beta, keratin III, keratin VI, keratin VII, prolactin, and dihydrofolate reductase loci. Use of certain genomic DNA fragments as probes produced hybridization patterns indicative of satellite DNA at the respective loci. Means for distinguishing hybridizations to coding sequences for unique genes from those to satellite DNA were developed. Results of this study are discussed in terms of strategy for the systematic development of large numbers of bovine genomic polymorphisms.

  18. Activation of mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha by perfluoroalkyl acids of different functional groups and chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Cynthia J; Takacs, Margy L; Schmid, Judith E; Lau, Christopher; Abbott, Barbara D

    2008-11-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are surfactants used in consumer products and persist in the environment. Some PFAAs elicit adverse effects on rodent development and survival. PFAAs can activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and may act via PPARalpha to produce some of their effects. This study evaluated the ability of numerous PFAAs to induce mouse and human PPARalpha activity in a transiently transfected COS-1 cell assay. COS-1 cells were transfected with either a mouse or human PPARalpha receptor-luciferase reporter plasmid. After 24 h, cells were exposed to either negative controls (water or dimethyl sulfoxide, 0.1%); positive control (WY-14643, PPARalpha agonist); perfluorooctanoic acid or perfluorononanoic acid at 0.5-100 microM; perfluorobutanoic acid, perfluorohexanoic acid, perfluorohexane sulfonate, or perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) at 5-100 microM; or perfluorobutane sulfonate or perfluorooctane sulfonate at 1-250 microM. After 24 h of exposure, luciferase activity from the plasmid was measured. Each PFAA activated both mouse and human PPARalpha in a concentration-dependent fashion, except PFDA with human PPARalpha. Activation of PPARalpha by PFAA carboxylates was positively correlated with carbon chain length, up to C9. PPARalpha activity was higher in response to carboxylates compared to sulfonates. Activation of mouse PPARalpha was generally higher compared to that of human PPARalpha. We conclude that, in general, (1) PFAAs of increasing carbon backbone chain lengths induce increasing activity of the mouse and human PPARalpha with a few exceptions, (2) PFAA carboxylates are stronger activators of mouse and human PPARalpha than PFAA sulfonates, and (3) in most cases, the mouse PPARalpha appears to be more sensitive to PFAAs than the human PPARalpha in this model.

  19. Effect of chain length of alcohol on the lipase-catalyzed esterification of propionic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Varma, Mahesh N; Madras, Giridhar

    2010-04-01

    The esterification of propionic acid was investigated using three different alcohols, namely, isopropyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, and isoamyl alcohol. The variation of conversion with time for the synthesis of isoamyl propionate was investigated in the presence of five enzymes. Novozym 435 showed the highest activity, and this was used as the enzyme for investigating the various parameters that influence the esterification reaction. The Ping-Pong Bi-Bi model with inhibition by both acid and alcohol was used to model the experimental data and determine the kinetics of the esterification reaction.

  20. Engineering of FRT-lacZ fusion constructs: induction of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fadAB1 operon by medium and long chain-length fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mike S.; Nguyen, David T.; Kang, Yun; Hoang, Tung T.

    2008-01-01

    Without prior knowledge of the promoters of various genes in bacteria, it can be difficult to study gene regulation using reporter-gene fusions. Regulation studies of promoters are ideal at their native locus, which do not require prior knowledge of promoter regions. Based on a previous study with FRT-lacZ-KmR constructs, we constructed two novel FRT-lacZ-GmR plasmids. This allows easy engineering of P. aeruginosa reporter-gene fusions, post-mutant construction with the Flp-FRT system. We demonstrate the usefulness of one of these FRT-lacZ-GmR plasmids to study the regulation of the fadAB1 operon in P. aeruginosa at its native locus. The fadAB1 operon, involved in fatty acid (FA) degradation, was significantly induced in the presence of several medium chain-length fatty acids (MCFA) and, to a lesser degree, long chain-length fatty acids (LCFA). In addition to the previous work on the FRT-lacZ-KmR tools, these new constructs increase the repertoire of tools that can be applied to P. aeruginosa or other species and strains of bacteria where kanamycin resistance may not be appropriate. PMID:18221997

  1. Diffusion and reaction of pollutants in stratus clouds: application to nocturnal acid formation in plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Seigneur, C.; Saxena, P.; Mirabella, V.A.

    1985-09-01

    A mathematical model is presented that describes the transport, turbulent diffusion, and chemical reactions of air pollutants in stratus clouds. The chemical kinetic mechanism treats 97 gaseous, heterogeneous, and aqueous reactions between 54 species. The dispersion and night-time chemistry of a power plant plume in a stratus cloud is simulated. The contributions of various chemical pathways to the formation of sulfate and nitrate, the differences between plume and background concentrations, and the effect of reduced primary emissions on secondary pollutants are discussed. Calculated sulfate and nitrate concentrations are commensurate with measured atmospheric concentrations.

  2. Salicylic acid transport in Ricinus communis involves a pH-dependent carrier system in addition to diffusion.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Françoise; Chollet, Jean-François; Legros, Sandrine; Jousse, Cyril; Lemoine, Rémi; Faucher, Mireille; Bush, Daniel R; Bonnemain, Jean-Louis

    2009-08-01

    Despite its important functions in plant physiology and defense, the membrane transport mechanism of salicylic acid (SA) is poorly documented due to the general assumption that SA is taken up by plant cells via the ion trap mechanism. Using Ricinus communis seedlings and modeling tools (ACD LogD and Vega ZZ softwares), we show that phloem accumulation of SA and hydroxylated analogs is completely uncorrelated with the physicochemical parameters suitable for diffusion (number of hydrogen bond donors, polar surface area, and, especially, LogD values at apoplastic pHs and Delta LogD between apoplast and phloem sap pH values). These and other data (such as accumulation in phloem sap of the poorly permeant dissociated form of monohalogen derivatives from apoplast and inhibition of SA transport by the thiol reagent p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid [pCMBS]) lead to the following conclusions. As in intestinal cells, SA transport in Ricinus involves a pH-dependent carrier system sensitive to pCMBS; this carrier can translocate monohalogen analogs in the anionic form; the efficiency of phloem transport of hydroxylated benzoic acid derivatives is tightly dependent on the position of the hydroxyl group on the aromatic ring (SA corresponds to the optimal position) but moderately affected by halogen addition in position 5, which is known to increase plant defense. Furthermore, combining time-course experiments and pCMBS used as a tool, we give information about the localization of the SA carrier. SA uptake by epidermal cells (i.e. the step preceding the symplastic transport to veins) insensitive to pCMBS occurs via the ion-trap mechanism, whereas apoplastic vein loading involves a carrier-mediated mechanism (which is targeted by pCMBS) in addition to diffusion.

  3. Channel orientation anisotropy in perfluorosulfonic acid/SiO 2 composite proton exchange membranes: Water self-diffusion study using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipoi, Carmen; Demco, Dan E.; Zhu, Xiaomin; Vinokur, Rostislav; Conradi, Oliver; Fechete, Radu; Möller, Martin

    2011-09-01

    A diffusion-exchange model with the assumption of two water pools was applied to describe the water transport in perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA)/SiO 2 nanocomposites. The water diffusivity in-plane and through-plane in solution cast films was measured by NMR revealing higher in-plane mobility. Both diffusion coefficients reached maxima at ˜3%-wt. concentration in SiO 2. The anisotropy of the PFSA channels orientation reflected in the diffusivity anisotropy decreased with the increase in the nanofiller content. Water exchange rates reached a maximum at low concentration of silica. Gaussian displacement distribution for water diffusion was detected in PFSA membrane at 40 °C independent of the direction of gradient for small concentration in silica.

  4. Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectral Properties of Forages with Varied Fatty Acid Content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminant diet can affect the fatty acid (FA) content of meat and dairy products, which indicates that managing forage consumption is important in determining the quality of the animal products. Mid-infrared spectroscopy is sensitive to changes in forage FA and has been used successfully to quantify ...

  5. Molecular design of boronic acid-functionalized squarylium cyanine dyes for multiple discriminant analysis of sialic acid in biological samples: selectivity toward monosaccharides controlled by different alkyl side chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Kazuki; Colyer, Christa L; Sebaiy, Mahmoud; Zhou, Jin; Maeda, Takeshi; Nakazumi, Hiroyuki; Shibukawa, Masami; Saito, Shingo

    2015-02-03

    We designed a new series of boronic acid-functionalized squarylium cyanine dyes (SQ-BA) with different lengths of alkyl chain residues, suitable for multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) of sialic acid (Neu5Ac) in biological samples. The SQ-BA dyes form aggregates based on hydrophobic interactions, which result in quenched fluorescence in aqueous solutions. When the boronic acid binds with saccharides, the fluorescence intensity increases as a result of dissociation to the emissive monomeric complex. We inferred that different dye aggregate structures (H-aggregates and J-aggregates) were induced depending on the alkyl chain length, so that monosaccharides would be recognized in different ways (especially, multipoint interaction with J-aggregates). A distinctive emission enhancement of SQ-BA dyes with shorter-alkyl-chains in the presence of Neu5Ac was observed (2.4-fold fluorescence enhancement; with formation constant 10(1.7) M(-1)), with no such enhancement for SQ-BA dyes with longer-alkyl-chain. In addition, various enhancement factors for other monosaccharides were observed depending on the alkyl chain length. Detailed thermodynamic and NMR studies of the SQ-BA complexes revealed the unique recognition mechanism: the dye aggregate with a shorter-alkyl-chain causes the slipped parallel structure and forms a stable 2:1 complex with Neu5Ac, as distinct from longer-alkyl-chain dyes, which form a 1:1 monomeric complex. MDA using the four SQ-BA dyes was performed for human urine samples, resulting in the successful discrimination between normal and abnormal Neu5Ac levels characteristic of disease. Thus, we successfully controlled various responses to similar monosaccharides with a novel approach that chemically modified not the boronic acid moiety itself but the length of the alkyl chain residue attached to the dye in order to generate specificity.

  6. Dye-sensitized solar cells using retinoic acid and carotenoic acids: Dependence of performance on the conjugation length and the dye concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Fujii, Ritsuko; Ito, Seigo; Koyama, Yasushi; Yamano, Yumiko; Ito, Masayoshi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Yanagida, Shozo

    2005-11-01

    Titanium oxide-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) were fabricated by the use of retinoic acid and carotenoic acids having the number of conjugated double bonds, n = 5-13. The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency, the photocurrent density and the solar energy-to-electricity conversion efficiency exhibited the highest values at n = 7, and then decreased toward both sides. The effects of dilution of CA7 with deoxycholic acid were also examined. The above parameters per unit CA7 concentration progressively increased toward the lowest concentration, which is ascribed to the isolated excitation free from singlet-triplet annihilation in the dye molecules on the TiO 2 layer.

  7. Interaction of ferulic acid derivatives with human erythrocytes monitored by pulse field gradient NMR diffusion and NMR relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Bernardi, Francesca; Centini, Marisanna; Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Valensin, Daniela; Valensin, Gianni

    2005-04-01

    Ferulic acid (Fer), a natural anti-oxidant and chemo-protector, is able to suppress experimental carcinogenesis in the forestomach, lungs, skin, tongue and colon. Several Fer derivatives have been suggested as promising candidates for cancer prevention, being the biological activity related also to the capacity of partitioning between aqueous and lipid phases. In the present work, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurement and NMR relaxation rates have been adopted for investigating the interaction of three Fer derivatives (Fer-C11, Fer-C12 and Fer-C13) with human erythrocytes. Binding to the erythrocyte membrane has been shown for all derivatives, which displayed a similar interaction mode such that the aromatic moiety and the terminal part of the alkyl chain were the most affected. Quantitative analysis of the diffusion coefficients was used to show that Fer-C12 and Fer-C13 display higher affinity for the cell membrane when compared with Fer-C11. These findings agree with the higher anti-oxidant activity of the two derivatives.

  8. Contribution of diffuse inputs to the aqueous mass load of perfluoroalkyl acids in river and stream catchments in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Kyu; Li, Dong-Hao; Shoeib, Mahiba; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies disagree regarding the contributions of point versus non-point sources to the aqueous mass loads of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). This study investigated the longitudinal change in PFAA mass load from upstream to downstream stations along rivers and/or streams to assess the relative contributions of point versus nonpoint inputs. With concentrations 10 to 100 times higher than running water, point sources such as wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) effluent and airport ditch-outlet (ADO) water were separated from neighboring upstream and downstream running waters using principal component analysis. Source waters were characterized by certain predominant components [e.g., perfluorobutylsulfonate (PFBS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in WWTP effluent and perfluorohexylsulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctylsulfonate (PFOS) in ADO water], which were minor components of running water. From a mass balance assessment of PFAA mass load, certain compounds such as PFOA and PFBS dominated the contribution of point sources to the mass load in the running water at downstream stations or in small catchment basins with high levels of industrial activity. Most of the mass load in the investigated catchments was attributable to upstream running water with a minor influence from industrial, commercial, and domestic human activities. Furthermore, the negative relationship of per capita emission factors (hereafter, EFs) with population density and a lower contribution of PFAA from WWTPs (~30% on average) compared to the running water-derived mass load at the national level indicated that diffuse inputs were more important contributors to aqueous PFAA contamination in each catchment basin as well as the entire watershed of the country (Korea). Volatile precursor compounds, which are readily dispersed to neighboring basins and transformed to PFAAs in the ambient environment, can be an important source of these diffuse inputs and will become more significant over time.

  9. Assessing the Impact of Backbone Length and Capping Agent on the Conformational Preferences of a Model Peptide: Conformation Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy of 2-AMINOISOBUTYRIC Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gord, Joseph R.; Hewett, Daniel M.; Kubasik, Matthew A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    2-Aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) is an achiral, α-amino acid having two equivalent methyl groups attached to C_α. Extended Aib oligomers are known to have a strong preference for the adoption of a 310-helical structure in the condensed phase. Here, we have taken a simplifying step and focused on the intrinsic folding propensities of Aib by looking at a series of capped Aib oligomers in the gas phase, free from the influence of solvent molecules and cooled in a supersonic expansion. Resonant two-photon ionization and IR-UV holeburning have been used to record single-conformation UV spectra using the Z-cap as the UV chromophore. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy provides single-conformation IR spectra in the OH stretch and NH stretch regions. Data have been collected on a set of Z-(Aib)n-X oligomers with n = 1, 2, 4, 6 and X = -OH and -OMethyl. The impacts of these capping groups and differences in backbone length have been found to dramatically influence the conformational space accessed by the molecules studied here. Oligomers of n=4 have sufficient backbone length for a full turn of the 310-helix to be formed. Early interpretation of the data collected shows clear spectroscopic markers signaling the onset of 310-helix formation as well as evidence of structures incorporating C7 and C14 hydrogen bonded rings. Toniolo, C.; Bonora, G. M.; Barone, V.; Bavoso, A.; Benedetti, E.; Di Blasio, B.; Grimaldi, P.; Lelj, F.; Pavone, V.; Pedone, C., Conformation of Pleionomers of α-Aminoisobutyric Acid. Macromolecules 1985, 18, 895-902.

  10. Characterization and Determination of Origin of Lactic Acid Bacteria from a Sorghum-Based Fermented Weaning Food by Analysis of Soluble Proteins and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Kunene, Nokuthula F.; Geornaras, Ifigenia; von Holy, Alexander; Hastings, John W.

    2000-01-01

    The group that includes the lactic acid bacteria is one of the most diverse groups of bacteria known, and these organisms have been characterized extensively by using different techniques. In this study, 180 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from sorghum powder (44 strains) and from corresponding fermented (93 strains) and cooked fermented (43 strains) porridge samples that were prepared in 15 households were characterized by using biochemical and physiological methods, as well as by analyzing the electrophoretic profiles of total soluble proteins. A total of 58 of the 180 strains were Lactobacillus plantarum strains, 47 were Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains, 25 were Lactobacillus sake-Lactobacillus curvatus strains, 17 were Pediococcus pentosaceus strains, 13 were Pediococcus acidilactici strains, and 7 were Lactococcus lactis strains. L. plantarum and L. mesenteroides strains were the dominant strains during the fermentation process and were recovered from 87 and 73% of the households, respectively. The potential origins of these groups of lactic acid bacteria were assessed by amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprint analysis. PMID:10698775

  11. The variation of volatile fatty acid compositions in sewer length, and its effect on the process design of biological nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Yun, Z; Yun, G H; Lee, H S; Yoo, T U

    2013-01-01

    The potential of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) in biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems critically depends on the availability and types of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in sewage. Although the characteristics of VFAs in sewage are strongly related with the biochemical transformations in the sewer system, they have not been studied thoroughly in terms of BNR process design. We have investigated the characteristics of VFAs in influent of nine sewage treatment plants which represent typical small to very large sewer systems in Korea. We found that influent total VFACOD (VFA as chemical oxygen demand) concentrations ranged from 20.4 to 65.2 mg/L. Acetic acid was a predominant VFA in sewage, and the propionic acid (HPr) portion averaged 38.7% of total VFACOD. However the sewage from longer sewer systems showed more HPr content, indicating that type of VFA varied with the total sewer length. The finding is a particularly important consideration for BNR process design since availability of HPr positively behaved to suppress the unfavorable growth of glycogen-accumulating organisms. The implication of these findings for BNR process design is discussed in this paper.

  12. Restriction fragment length analysis of the cytochrome b gene and muscle fatty acid composition differentiate the cryptic flatfish species Solea solea and Solea aegyptiaca.

    PubMed

    Boukouvala, Evridiki; Cariani, Alessia; Maes, Gregory E; Sevilla, Rafael G; Verrez-Bagnis, Véronique; Jérôme, Marc; Guarniero, Ilaria; Monios, Georgios; Tinti, Fausto; Volckaert, Filip A M; Bautista, José M; Krey, Grigorios

    2012-08-15

    Overlapping external morphometric characters easily confound the flatfishes Solea aegyptiaca and Solea solea (Soleidae) in areas of the Mediterranean Sea where both species live in sympatry. This leads to uncertainties in the fisheries and marketing of the species, in addition to misinterpretations in biogeography and conservation studies. This paper describes a simple restriction fragment length-based diagnostic test that differentiates S. solea from S. aegyptiaca, as well as from other species of the Soleidae family. Furthermore, the two species living in sympatry in the Gulf of Kavala (North Aegean Sea, Greece) present significant qualitative differences in muscle fatty acid composition, a property that can also be used to distinguish the two cryptic species.

  13. Chemical Speciation and Bond Lengths of Organic Solutes by Core-Level Spectroscopy: pH and Solvent Influence on p -Aminobenzoic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Joanna S.; Gainar, Adrian; Suljoti, Edlira; Xiao, Jie; Golnak, Ronny; Aziz, Emad F.; Schroeder, Sven L. M.

    2015-03-18

    Through X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies, the chemical, electronic and structural properties of organic species in solution can be observed. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements at the nitrogen K-edge of para-aminobenzoic acid reveal both pH- and solvent-dependent variations in the ionisation potential (IP), 1s→π* resonances and HOMO–LUMO gap. These changes unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic or anionic) present in solution. It is shown how this incisive chemical state sensitivity is further enhanced by the possibility of quantitative bond length determination, based on the analysis of chemical shifts in IPs and σ* shape resonances in the NEXAFS spectra. Finally, this provides experimental access to detecting even minor variations in the molecular structure of solutes in solution, thereby providing an avenue to examining computational predictions of solute properties and solute–solvent interactions.

  14. Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in infancy increases length- and weight-for-age but not BMI to 6 years when controlling for effects of maternal smoking.

    PubMed

    Currie, L M; Tolley, E A; Thodosoff, J M; Kerling, E H; Sullivan, D K; Colombo, J; Carlson, S E

    2015-07-01

    Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) are added to infant formula but their effect on long-term growth of children is under studied. We evaluated the effects of feeding LCPUFA-supplemented formula (n = 54) compared to control formula (n = 15) throughout infancy on growth from birth-6 years. Growth was described using separate models developed with the MIXED procedure of SAS(®) that included maternal smoking history and gender. Compared to children fed control formula, children who consumed LCPUFA supplemented formula had higher length-/stature-/and weight-for-age percentiles but not body mass index (BMI) percentile from birth to 6 years. Maternal smoking predicted lower stature (2-6 years), higher weight-for-length (birth-18 months) and BMI percentile (2-6 years) independent of LCPUFA effects. Gender interacted with the effect of LCPUFA on stature, and the relationship between smoking and BMI, with a larger effect for boys. Energy intake did not explain growth differences. A relatively small control sample is a limitation.

  15. Highlighting the Role of Polymer Length, Carbohydrate Size, and Nucleic Acid Type in Potency of Glycopolycation Agents for pDNA and siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Lian; Ingle, Nilesh P.; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    While nucleic acids such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) and plasmid DNA (pDNA) are promising research tools and therapeutic modalities, their potential in medical applications is limited by a fundamental mechanistic understanding and inadequate efficiency. Herein, two series of carbohydrate-based polycations were synthesized and examined that varied in the degree of polymerization (n)—one containing trehalose [Tr4(n) series: Tr4(23), Tr4(55), Tr4(77)] and the other containing beta-cyclodextrin [CD4(n) series: CD4(10), CD4(26), CD4(39), CD4(143), CD4(239)]. In addition, two monosaccharide models were examined for comparison that contain tartaramidoamine (T4) and galactaramidoamine (G4 or Glycofect) repeats. Delivery profiles for pDNA were compared with those obtained for siRNA delivery and reveal that efficacy differs significantly as a function of carbohydrate type, nucleic acid type and dose, polymer length, and presence of excess polymer in the formulation. The Tr4 polymers yielded higher efficacy for pDNA delivery, yet, the CD4 polymers achieved higher siRNA delivery and gene down regulation. The T4 and Glycofect derivatives, while efficient for pDNA delivery, were completely ineffective for siRNA delivery. A strong polymer length and dose dependence on target gene knockdown was observed for all polymers tested. Also, free polymer in solution (uncomplexed) was demonstrated to be a key factor in promoting siRNA uptake and gene down regulation. PMID:24028685

  16. A disc diffusion assay for detection of class A, B and OXA-48 carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae using phenyl boronic acid, dipicolinic acid and temocillin.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, K; Voets, G M; Scharringa, J; Voskuil, S; Fluit, A C; Rottier, W C; Leverstein-Van Hall, M A; Cohen Stuart, J W T

    2014-04-01

    Class A and B carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae may be detected using carbapenemase inhibition tests with boronic acid derivatives (BA) and dipicolinic acid (DPA)/EDTA, respectively. However, for OXA-48 (like) carbapenemases, no specific inhibitor is available. Because OXA-48 confers high-level temocillin resistance, a disc diffusion assay using temocillin as well as BA and DPA inhibition tests was evaluated for detection of class A, B and OXA-48 carbapenemases. The test collection included 128 well-characterized non-repeat Enterobacteriaceae isolates suspected of carbapenemase production; that is, with meropenem MICs ≥ 0.5 mg/L, including 99 carbapenemase producers (36 KPC, one GES, 31 MBL, four KPC plus VIM, 25 OXA-48, two OXA-162), and 29 ESBL and/or AmpC-producing isolates. PCR and sequencing of beta-lactamase genes was used as a reference test. Phenotypic carbapenemase detection was performed with discs (Rosco) containing meropenem (10 μg), temocillin (30 μg), meropenem + phenyl boronic acid (PBA), meropenem + DPA, meropenem + BA + DPA, and meropenem + cloxacillin (CL). Absence of synergy between meropenem and BA and/or DPA and a temocillin zone ≤10 mm was used to identify OXA-48. The sensitivity for identification of class A, B and OXA-48 carbapenemases was 95%, 90% and 100%, with 96-100% specificity. In non-Proteus species, the sensitivity for class B carbapenemase detection was 97%. All isolates without PBA or DPA synergy and a temocillin disc zone ≤10 mm were OXA-48 (like) positive. In conclusion, carbapenemase inhibition tests with PBA and DPA combined with a temocillin disc provide a reliable phenotypic confirmation method for class A, B and OXA-48 carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae.

  17. Use of agar diffusion assay to evaluate bactericidal activity of formulations of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids (FA). Wells in agar media seeded with bacteria were filled with FA-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions, plates were incubated, and zones of inhibition were measured. The relationship between bacteric...

  18. Δ6-fatty acid desaturase and fatty acid elongase mRNA expression, phagocytic activity and weight-to-length relationships in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fed alternative diets with soy oil and a probiotic.

    PubMed

    Santerre, A; Téllez-Bañuelos, M C; Casas-Solís, J; Castro-Félix, P; Huízar-López, M R; Zaitseva, G P; Horta-Fernández, J L; Trujillo-García, E A; de la Mora-Sherer, D; Palafox-Luna, J A; Juárez-Carrillo, E

    2015-09-22

    A time-course feeding trial was conducted for 120 days on juvenile channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) to study the effects of diets differing in oil source (fish oil or soy oil) and supplementation with a commercial probiotic. Relative levels of Δ6-fatty acid desaturase (Δ6-FAD) and fatty acid elongase (FAE) expression were assessed in brain and liver tissues. Both genes showed similar expression levels in all groups studied. Fish weight-to-length relationships were evaluated using polynomial regression analyses, which identified a burst in weight and length in the channel catfish on day 105 of treatment; this increase was related to an increase in gene expression. Mid-intestinal lactic acid bacterium (LAB) count was determined according to morphological and biochemical criteria using API strips. There was no indication that intestinal LAB count was affected by the modified diets. The Cunningham glass adherence method was applied to evaluate phagocytic cell activity in peripheral blood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed through the respiratory burst activity of spleen macrophages by the NBT reduction test. Probiotic-supplemented diets provided a good substrate for innate immune system function; the phagocytic index was significantly enhanced in fish fed soy oil and the probiotic, and at the end of the experimental period, ROS production increased in fish fed soy oil. The substitution of fish oil by soy oil is recommended for food formulation and will contribute to promoting sustainable aquaculture. Probiotics are also recommended for channel catfish farming as they may act as immunonutrients.

  19. Dissociation of a strong acid in neat solvents: diffusion is observed after reversible proton ejection inside the solvent shell.

    PubMed

    Veiga-Gutiérrez, Manoel; Brenlla, Alfonso; Carreira Blanco, Carlos; Fernández, Berta; Kovalenko, Sergey A; Rodríguez-Prieto, Flor; Mosquera, Manuel; Lustres, J Luis Pérez

    2013-11-14

    Strong-acid dissociation was studied in alcohols. Optical excitation of the cationic photoacid N-methyl-6-hydroxyquinolinium triggers proton transfer to the solvent, which was probed by spectral reconstruction of picosecond fluorescence traces. The process fulfills the classical Eigen-Weller mechanism in two stages: (a) solvent-controlled reversible dissociation inside the solvent shell and (b) barrierless splitting of the encounter complex. This can be appreciated only when fluorescence band integrals are used to monitor the time evolution of the reactant and product concentrations. Band integrals are insensitive to solvent dynamics and report relative concentrations directly. This was demonstrated by first measuring the fluorescence decay of the conjugate base across the full emission band, independently of the proton-transfer reaction. Multiexponential decay curves at single wavelengths result from a dynamic red shift of fluorescence in the course of solvent relaxation, whereas clean single exponential decays are obtained if the band integral is monitored instead. The extent of the shift is consistent with previously reported femtosecond transient absorption measurements, continuum theory of solvatochromism, and molecular properties derived from quantum chemical calculations. In turn, band integrals show clean biexponential decay of the photoacid and triexponential evolution of the conjugate base in the course of the proton transfer to solvent reaction. The dissociation step follows the slowest stage of solvation, which was measured here independently by picosecond fluorescence spectroscopy in five aliphatic alcohols. Also, the rate constant of the encounter-complex splitting stage is compatible with proton diffusion. Thus, for this photoacid, both stages reach the highest possible rates: solvation and diffusion control. Under these conditions, the concentration of the encounter complex is substantial during the earliest nanosecond.

  20. The seed's protein and oil content, fatty acid composition, and growing cycle length of a single genotype of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) as affected by environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Ayerza, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    As a botanical source, variability in chia seed composition could be expected between growing locations, and between years within a location, due to genotype and environment effects as well genetic x environment's interactions. The objective of the present study was to determine the location effect on the growing cycle length, and seed's protein content, lipid content, and fatty acid profiles, of a single chia genotype. Seeds of chia genotype Tzotzol grown on eight sites in five different ecosystems were tested. One site was in Argentina, in the Semi-Arid Chaco ecosystem (T(5)); one was in Bolivia, in the Sub-Humid Chaco ecosystem (T(4)); and six in Ecuador, one in the Coastal Desert (T(3)), two on the Tropical Rain Forest (T(2)), and three in the Inter-Andean Dry Valley ecosystem (T(1)). Seeds from plants grown in T(4) and in T(3) contained significantly (P <0.05) more protein percentage than did seeds from the other three ecosystems. No significant (P <0.05) differences in protein content were found between T(3) and T(4), and between T(1), T(2), and T(5). Seeds from T(1) and T(5) ecosystems, with 33.5 and 32.2%, respectively, were the numerically highest oil content producers, but their results were only significantly (P <0.05) higher when compared with the T(2) seeds. Significant (P <0.05) differences in palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and alpha-linolenic fatty acids between oils from seeds grown in different ecosystems were detected, however. Oil of seeds grown in the T(3) ecosystem had the palmitic, stearic and oleic fatty acids' highest contents. Palmitic and oleic fatty acid levels were significantly (P <0.05) higher when were compared to that of seeds grown in the T(1) ecosystem, and stearic when was compared to that of seeds grown in the T(5) ecosystem; omega-6 linoleic fatty acid content was significantly (P <0.05) lower in oils of seeds produced in T(1), and T(2) than in those produced in T(3), T(4), and T(5) ecosystems; omega-3 alpha-linolenic fatty

  1. Genotypic identification of some lactic acid bacteria by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis and investigation of their potential usage as starter culture combinations in Beyaz cheese manufacture.

    PubMed

    Karahan, A G; Başyiğit Kiliç, G; Kart, A; Sanlidere Aloğlu, H; Oner, Z; Aydemir, S; Erkuş, O; Harsa, S

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 2 different starter culture combinations were prepared for cheesemaking. Starter culture combinations were formed from 8 strains of lactic acid bacteria. They were identified as Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis (2 strains), Lactobacillus plantarum (5 strains), and Lactobacillus paraplantarum (1 strain) by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. The effects of these combinations on the physicochemical and microbiological properties of Beyaz cheeses were investigated. These cheeses were compared with Beyaz cheeses that were produced with a commercial starter culture containing Lc. lactis ssp. lactis and Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris as control. All cheeses were ripened in brine at 4 degrees C for 90 d. Dry matter, fat in dry matter, titratable acidity, pH, salt in dry matter, total N, water-soluble N, and ripening index were determined. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE patterns of cheeses showed that alpha(S)-casein and beta-casein degraded slightly during the ripening period. Lactic acid bacteria, total mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeast, molds, and coliforms were also counted. All analyses were repeated twice during d 7, 30, 60, and 90. The starter culture combinations were found to be significantly different from the control group in pH, salt content, and lactobacilli, lactococci, and total mesophilic aerobic bacteria counts, whereas the cheeses were similar in fat, dry matter content, and coliform, yeast, and mold counts. The sensory analysis of cheeses indicated that textural properties of control cheeses presented somewhat lower scores than those of the test groups. The panelists preferred the tastes of treatment cheeses, whereas cheeses with starter culture combinations and control cheeses had similar scores for appearance and flavor. These results indicated that both starter culture combinations are suitable for Beyaz cheese production.

  2. Quantitative ‘Omics Analyses of Medium Chain Length Polyhydroxyalkanaote Metabolism in Pseudomonas putida LS46 Cultured with Waste Glycerol and Waste Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jilagamazhi; Sharma, Parveen; Spicer, Vic; Krokhin, Oleg V.; Zhang, Xiangli; Fristensky, Brian; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David. B.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes and proteomes of Pseudomonas putida LS46 cultured with biodiesel-derived waste glycerol or waste free fatty acids, as sole carbon sources, were compared under conditions that were either permissive or non-permissive for synthesis of medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA). The objectives of this study were to elucidate mechanisms that influence activation of biopolymer synthesis, intra-cellular accumulation, and monomer composition, and determine if these were physiologically specific to the carbon sources used for growth of P. putida LS46. Active mcl-PHA synthesis by P. putida LS46 was associated with high expression levels of key mcl-PHA biosynthesis genes and/or gene products including monomer-supplying proteins, PHA synthases, and granule-associated proteins. ‘Omics data suggested that expression of these genes were regulated by different genetic mechanisms in P. putida LS46 cells in different physiological states, when cultured on the two waste carbon sources. Optimal polymer production by P. putida LS46 was primarily limited by less efficient glycerol metabolism during mcl-PHA synthesis on waste glycerol. Mapping the ‘Omics data to the mcl-PHA biosynthetic pathway revealed significant variations in gene expression, primarily involved in: 1) glycerol transportation; 2) enzymatic reactions that recycle reducing equivalents and produce key mcl-PHA biosynthesis pathway intermediates (e.g. NADH/NADPH, acetyl-CoA). Active synthesis of mcl-PHAs was observed during exponential phase in cultures with waste free fatty acids, and was associated with the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. A putative Thioesterase in the beta-oxidation pathway that may regulate the level of fatty acid beta-oxidation intermediates, and thus carbon flux to mcl-PHA biosynthesis, was highly up-regulated. Finally, the data suggested that differences in expression of selected fatty acid metabolism and mcl-PHA monomer-supplying enzymes may play a role in determining

  3. Quantitative 'Omics Analyses of Medium Chain Length Polyhydroxyalkanaote Metabolism in Pseudomonas putida LS46 Cultured with Waste Glycerol and Waste Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jilagamazhi; Sharma, Parveen; Spicer, Vic; Krokhin, Oleg V; Zhang, Xiangli; Fristensky, Brian; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes and proteomes of Pseudomonas putida LS46 cultured with biodiesel-derived waste glycerol or waste free fatty acids, as sole carbon sources, were compared under conditions that were either permissive or non-permissive for synthesis of medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA). The objectives of this study were to elucidate mechanisms that influence activation of biopolymer synthesis, intra-cellular accumulation, and monomer composition, and determine if these were physiologically specific to the carbon sources used for growth of P. putida LS46. Active mcl-PHA synthesis by P. putida LS46 was associated with high expression levels of key mcl-PHA biosynthesis genes and/or gene products including monomer-supplying proteins, PHA synthases, and granule-associated proteins. 'Omics data suggested that expression of these genes were regulated by different genetic mechanisms in P. putida LS46 cells in different physiological states, when cultured on the two waste carbon sources. Optimal polymer production by P. putida LS46 was primarily limited by less efficient glycerol metabolism during mcl-PHA synthesis on waste glycerol. Mapping the 'Omics data to the mcl-PHA biosynthetic pathway revealed significant variations in gene expression, primarily involved in: 1) glycerol transportation; 2) enzymatic reactions that recycle reducing equivalents and produce key mcl-PHA biosynthesis pathway intermediates (e.g. NADH/NADPH, acetyl-CoA). Active synthesis of mcl-PHAs was observed during exponential phase in cultures with waste free fatty acids, and was associated with the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. A putative Thioesterase in the beta-oxidation pathway that may regulate the level of fatty acid beta-oxidation intermediates, and thus carbon flux to mcl-PHA biosynthesis, was highly up-regulated. Finally, the data suggested that differences in expression of selected fatty acid metabolism and mcl-PHA monomer-supplying enzymes may play a role in determining the

  4. Cross-diffusion in a water-in-oil microemulsion loaded with malonic acid or ferroin. Taylor dispersion method for four-component systems.

    PubMed

    Vanag, Vladimir K; Rossi, Federico; Cherkashin, Alexander; Epstein, Irving R

    2008-07-31

    We describe an improved Taylor dispersion method for four-component systems, which we apply to measure the main- and cross-diffusion coefficients in an Aerosol OT water-in-oil microemulsion loaded with one of the reactants of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, water(1)/AOT(2)/R(3)/octane(4) system, where R is malonic acid or ferroin. With [H(2)O]/[AOT] = 11.8 and volume droplet fraction phi d = 0.18, when the microemulsion is below the percolation transition, the cross-diffusion coefficients D(13) and D(23) are large and positive ( D(13)/ D(33) congruent with 14, D(23)/ D(33) congruent with 3) for malonic acid and large and negative for ferroin ( D(13)/ D(33) congruent with -112, D(23)/ D(33) congruent with -30) while coefficients D(31) and D(32) are small and negative for malonic acid ( D(31)/ D(33) congruent with -0.01, D(32)/ D(33) congruent with -0.14) and small and positive for ferroin ( D(31)/ D(33) congruent with 5 x 10(-4), D(32)/ D(33) congruent with 8 x 10(-3)). These data represent the first direct determination of cross-diffusion effects in a pattern-forming system and of the full matrix of diffusion coefficients for a four-component system. The results should provide a basis for modeling pattern formation in the BZ-AOT system.

  5. [Acid phosphatase of leukocytes in patients with diffuse toxic goiter in evaluating the stage of the disease].

    PubMed

    Vaiuta, N P; Livshits, A Kh; Mendeleev, I M

    1987-01-01

    Acid phosphatase (AP) of lymphocytes and neutrophils was examined cytochemically in 23 patients with associated diffuse toxic goiter (DTG) and thyrotoxicosis during thiamazol treatment, in 20 persons with a DTG remission, and in 5 patients with postradiation and postoperative hypothyroses. AP activity with multiple-granule distribution of the enzyme was high in the majority of the patients with thyrotoxicosis, decreasing with thiamazol treatment. Thyrotoxicosis recurred in 4 out of 11 patients whose lymphocytes had an increased amount of AP during a DTG remission. In 9 patients with normal AP content, no relapses were noted during a DTG remission. Two patients with iatrogenic hypothyroses associated with high lymphocytic AP activity manifested elevated titres of antithyroglobulin immunoglobulins (ATI). In 3 patients with normal content of cellular AP, the ATI titre was low. Cellular AP, a non-specific marker of immunogenesis activity, makes it possible to presumably differentiate the stages of DTG and to evaluate to a definite degree the character of a remission. The preserved high activity of lymphocytic AP in patients with a DTG remission is a prognostically unfavourable factor as regards thyrotoxicosis relapses. The high titre of ATI and activity of lymphocytic AP attest to the predominant autoimmune component of such hypothyroses in part of DTG patients. The authors stress that such patients should receive combined thyroid and glucocorticoid therapy.

  6. Synergistic efficacy of salicylic acid with a penetration enhancer on human skin monitored by OCT and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qingliang; Dai, Cuixia; Fan, Shanhui; Lv, Jing; Nie, Liming

    2016-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been frequently used as a facial chemical peeling agent (FCPA) in various cosmetics for facial rejuvenation and dermatological treatments in the clinic. However, there is a tradeoff between therapeutic effectiveness and possible adverse effects caused by this agent for cosmetologists. To optimize the cosmetic efficacy with minimal concentration, we proposed a chemical permeation enhancer (CPE) azone to synergistically work with SA on human skin in vivo. The optical properties of human skin after being treated with SA alone and SA combined with azone (SA@azone) were successively investigated by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Our results revealed that as the SA concentration increased, the light reflectance decreased and the absorption increased. We also found that SA@azone exhibited a synergistic effect on enhancing light penetration and OCT imaging depth. We demonstrated that the combination of DRS and OCT techniques could be used as a noninvasive, rapid and accurate measurement method to monitor the subtle changes of skin tissue after treatment with FCPA and CPE. The approach will greatly benefit the development of clinical cosmetic surgery, dermatosis diagnosis and therapeutic effect inspection in related biomedical studies.

  7. Direct determination of rosmarinic acid in Lamiaceae herbs using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Saltas, Dimitrios; Pappas, Christos S; Daferera, Dimitra; Tarantilis, Petros A; Polissiou, Moschos G

    2013-04-03

    For the determination of rosmarinic acid (RA) directly in pulverized plant material, a method is developed using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) without any physicochemical pretreatment of samples. The RA content of 11 samples of eight different Lamiaceae herbs, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), varied between 86 ± 1 mg/g (in lemon balm) and 12.0 ± 0.8 mg/g (in hyssop) of dried plant material. The 11 samples and 50 other additional samples, which were prepared by mixing initial samples with KBr, were measured using DRIFTS. The second derivative of the spectral region 1344-806 cm(-1) was used and the corresponding data were analyzed using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The correlation between infrared spectral analysis and HPLC measurements shows that the DRIFTS method is sufficiently accurate, simple, and rapid. The RA content of the 11 Lamiaceae samples determined by DRIFTS ranged from 81 ± 4 mg/g (in lemon balm) to 12 ± 3 mg/g (in hyssop) of dried plant material.

  8. Synergistic efficacy of salicylic acid with a penetration enhancer on human skin monitored by OCT and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingliang; Dai, Cuixia; Fan, Shanhui; Lv, Jing; Nie, Liming

    2016-10-10

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been frequently used as a facial chemical peeling agent (FCPA) in various cosmetics for facial rejuvenation and dermatological treatments in the clinic. However, there is a tradeoff between therapeutic effectiveness and possible adverse effects caused by this agent for cosmetologists. To optimize the cosmetic efficacy with minimal concentration, we proposed a chemical permeation enhancer (CPE) azone to synergistically work with SA on human skin in vivo. The optical properties of human skin after being treated with SA alone and SA combined with azone (SA@azone) were successively investigated by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Our results revealed that as the SA concentration increased, the light reflectance decreased and the absorption increased. We also found that SA@azone exhibited a synergistic effect on enhancing light penetration and OCT imaging depth. We demonstrated that the combination of DRS and OCT techniques could be used as a noninvasive, rapid and accurate measurement method to monitor the subtle changes of skin tissue after treatment with FCPA and CPE. The approach will greatly benefit the development of clinical cosmetic surgery, dermatosis diagnosis and therapeutic effect inspection in related biomedical studies.

  9. Synergistic efficacy of salicylic acid with a penetration enhancer on human skin monitored by OCT and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qingliang; Dai, Cuixia; Fan, Shanhui; Lv, Jing; Nie, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been frequently used as a facial chemical peeling agent (FCPA) in various cosmetics for facial rejuvenation and dermatological treatments in the clinic. However, there is a tradeoff between therapeutic effectiveness and possible adverse effects caused by this agent for cosmetologists. To optimize the cosmetic efficacy with minimal concentration, we proposed a chemical permeation enhancer (CPE) azone to synergistically work with SA on human skin in vivo. The optical properties of human skin after being treated with SA alone and SA combined with azone (SA@azone) were successively investigated by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Our results revealed that as the SA concentration increased, the light reflectance decreased and the absorption increased. We also found that SA@azone exhibited a synergistic effect on enhancing light penetration and OCT imaging depth. We demonstrated that the combination of DRS and OCT techniques could be used as a noninvasive, rapid and accurate measurement method to monitor the subtle changes of skin tissue after treatment with FCPA and CPE. The approach will greatly benefit the development of clinical cosmetic surgery, dermatosis diagnosis and therapeutic effect inspection in related biomedical studies. PMID:27721398

  10. Chemical Speciation and Bond Lengths of Organic Solutes by Core-Level Spectroscopy: pH and Solvent Influence on p -Aminobenzoic Acid

    DOE PAGES

    Stevens, Joanna S.; Gainar, Adrian; Suljoti, Edlira; ...

    2015-03-18

    Through X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies, the chemical, electronic and structural properties of organic species in solution can be observed. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements at the nitrogen K-edge of para-aminobenzoic acid reveal both pH- and solvent-dependent variations in the ionisation potential (IP), 1s→π* resonances and HOMO–LUMO gap. These changes unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic or anionic) present in solution. It is shown how this incisive chemical state sensitivity is further enhanced by the possibility of quantitative bond length determination, based on the analysis of chemical shifts in IPs andmore » σ* shape resonances in the NEXAFS spectra. Finally, this provides experimental access to detecting even minor variations in the molecular structure of solutes in solution, thereby providing an avenue to examining computational predictions of solute properties and solute–solvent interactions.« less

  11. Nonideal mixing and phase separation in phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidic acid mixtures as a function of acyl chain length and pH.

    PubMed Central

    Garidel, P; Johann, C; Blume, A

    1997-01-01

    The miscibilities of phosphatidic acids (PAs) and phosphatidylcholines (PCs) with different chain lengths (n = 14, 16) at pH 4, pH 7, and pH 12 were examined by differential scanning calorimetry. Simulation of heat capacity curves was performed using a new approach that incorporates changes of cooperativity of the transition in addition to nonideal mixing in the gel and the liquid-crystalline phase as a function of composition. From the simulations of the heat capacity curves, first estimates for the nonideality parameters for nonideal mixing as a function of composition were obtained, and phase diagrams were constructed using temperatures for onset and end of melting, which were corrected for the broadening effect caused by a decrease in cooperativity. In all cases the composition dependence of the nonideality parameters indicated nonsymmetrical mixing behavior. The phase diagrams were therefore further refined by simulations of the coexistence curves using a four-parameter approximation to account for nonideal and nonsymmetrical mixing in the gel and the liquid-crystalline phase. The mixing behavior was studied at three different pH values to investigate how changes in headgroup charge of the PA influences the miscibility. The experiments showed that at pH 7, where the PA component is negatively charged, the nonideality parameters are in most cases negative, indicating that electrostatic effects favor a mixing of the two components. Partial protonation of the PA component at pH 4 leads to strong changes in miscibility; the nonideality parameters for the liquid-crystalline phase are now in most cases positive, indicating clustering of like molecules. The phase diagram for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid:1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine mixtures at pH 4 indicates that a fluid-fluid immiscibility is likely. The results show that a decrease in ionization of PAs can induce large changes in mixing behavior. This occurs because of a

  12. Phase singularity diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Lockerman, Yitzchak; Genack, Azriel Z

    2014-06-01

    We follow the trajectories of phase singularities at nulls of intensity in the speckle pattern of waves transmitted through random media as the frequency of the incident radiation is scanned in microwave experiments and numerical simulations. Phase singularities are observed to diffuse with a linear increase of the square displacement 〈R2〉 with frequency shift. The product of the diffusion coefficient of phase singularities in the transmitted speckle pattern and the photon diffusion coefficient through the random medium is proportional to the square of the effective sample length. This provides the photon diffusion coefficient and a method for characterizing the motion of dynamic material systems.

  13. Regulation of Turing patterns in a spatially extended chlorine-iodine-malonic-acid system with a local concentration-dependent diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Shen; Hu, Wen-Yong; Pang, Ya-Chun; Liu, Tai-Ran; Zhong, Wei-Rong; Shao, Yuan-Zhi

    2012-06-01

    A chlorine-iodine-malonic-acid Turing system involving a local concentration-dependent diffusivity (LCDD) has fundamental significance for physical, chemical, and biological systems with inhomogeneous medium. We investigated such a system by both numerical computation and mathematical analysis. Our research reveals that a variable local diffusivity has an evident effect on regulating the Turing patterns for different modes. An intrinsic square-root law is given by λ ∼ (c(1)+c(2)k)(1/2), which relates the pattern wavelength (λ) with the LCDD coefficient (k). This law indicates that the system pattern has the properties of an equivalent Turing pattern. The current study confirms that, for the Turing system with LCDD, the system pattern form retains the basic characteristics of a traditional Turing pattern in a wide range of LCDD coefficients.

  14. Electro-fenton and photoelectro-fenton degradation of sulfanilic acid using a boron-doped diamond anode and an air diffusion cathode.

    PubMed

    El-Ghenymy, Abdellatif; Garrido, José Antonio; Centellas, Francesc; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Brillas, Enric

    2012-04-05

    The mineralization of sulfanilic acid has been studied by electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) reaction with UVA light using an undivided electrochemical cell with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air diffusion cathode able to generate H(2)O(2). Organics were then oxidized by hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between generated H(2)O(2) and added Fe(2+). The UVA irradiation in PEF enhanced the production of hydroxyl radicals in the bulk, accelerating the removal of organics and photodecomposed intermediates like Fe(III)-carboxylate complexes. Partial decontamination of 1.39 mM sulfanilic acid solutions was achieved by EF until 100 mA cm(-2) at optimum conditions of 0.4 mM Fe(2+) and pH 3.0. The increase in current density and substrate content led to an almost total mineralization. In contrast, the PEF process was more powerful, yielding almost complete mineralization in less electrolysis time under comparable conditions. The kinetics for sulfanilic acid decay always followed a pseudo-first-order reaction. Hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone were detected as aromatic intermediates, whereas acetic, maleic, formic, oxalic, and oxamic acids were identified as generated carboxylic acids. NH(4)(+) ion was preferentially released in both treatments, along with NO(3)(-) ion in smaller proportion.

  15. The role of alkyl chain length of monothiol-terminated alkyl carboxylic acid in the synthesis, characterization, and application of gelatin-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) carriers for antiglaucoma drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li-Jyuan; Lai, Jui-Yang

    2017-02-01

    To improve ocular bioavailability and extend pharmacological response, this study aims to investigate the role of alkyl chain length of monothiol-terminated alkyl carboxylic acids in the synthesis, characterization, and application of gelatin-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (GN) biodegradable in situ gelling carriers for antiglaucoma drug delivery. In the presence of mercaptoacetic acid (MAA), mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), mercaptobutyric acid (MBA), or mercaptohexanoic acid (MHA) as a chain transfer agent, the carboxylic end-capped poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) samples were prepared by free radical polymerization technique. Our results showed that with increasing alkyl chain length, the hydrophobicity of thermo-responsive polymer segments significantly increased, mainly due to an increase in CH stretching frequencies. In addition, the greater hydrophobic association favored the decrease in both phase transition temperature and weight loss of GN copolymers, thereby accelerating their temperature-triggered gelation process and retarding the degradation progress under physiological conditions. The benefits from these features allowed the pilocarpine carriers to increase drug payload and extend drug release. Irrespective of carbon number of monothiol-terminated alkyl carboxylic acid, the synthesized GN materials exhibited high tolerance to corneal endothelial cells without any evidence of inhibited proliferation, viability loss, inflammatory stimulation, and functional abnormality, indicating good biocompatibility. Results of clinical observations and histological examinations demonstrated that the therapeutic efficacies in treating glaucomatous damage are in response to in vivo drug release profiles from various intracamerally injected GN carriers. The research findings suggest the influence of alkyl chain length of chain transfer agent-mediated polymer hydrophobicity and degradability on pharmacological bioavailability and action of pilocarpine in a glaucomatous rabbit

  16. Probe diffusion in phase-separated bicontinuous biopolymer gels.

    PubMed

    Wassén, Sophia; Bordes, Romain; Gebäck, Tobias; Bernin, Diana; Schuster, Erich; Lorén, Niklas; Hermansson, Anne-Marie

    2014-11-07

    Probe diffusion was determined in phase separated bicontinuous gels prepared by acid-induced gelation of the whey protein isolate-gellan gum system. The topological characterization of the phase-separated gel systems is achieved by confocal microscopy and the diffusion measurements are performed using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR and fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP). These two techniques gave complementary information about the mass transport at different time- and length scales, PFG NMR provided global diffusion rates in the gel systems, while FRAP enabled the measurements of diffusion in different phases of the phase-separated gels. The results revealed that the phase-separated gel with the largest characteristic wavelength had the fastest diffusion coefficient, while the gel with smaller microstructures had a slower probe diffusion rate. By using the diffusion data obtained by FRAP and the structural data from confocal microscopy, modelling through the lattice-Boltzmann framework was carried out to simulate the global diffusion and verify the validity of the experimental measurements. With this approach it was found that discrepancies between the two experimental techniques can be rationalized in terms of probe distribution between the different phases of the system. The combination of different techniques allowed the determination of diffusion in a phase-separated biopolymer gel and gave a clearer picture of this complex system. We also illustrate the difficulties that can arise if precautions are not taken to understand the system-probe interactions.

  17. A mass transfer model for the fixed-bed adsorption of ferulic acid onto a polymeric resin: axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion.

    PubMed

    Davila-Guzman, Nancy E; Cerino-Córdova, Felipe J; Soto-Regalado, Eduardo; Loredo-Cancino, Margarita; Loredo-Medrano, José A; García-Reyes, Refugio B

    2016-08-01

    In this study, amberlite XAD-16 (XAD-16) bed column system was used to remove ferulic acid (FA) from aqueous solutions. Laboratory-scale column experiments were conducted in downflow fixed bed at initial FA concentration of 1 g/L, initial pH 3, and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbent bed under different flow rates (1.3-7.7 mL/min) was studied. The bed utilization efficiency was in the range of 64.64-72.21% at the studied flow rates. A mass transfer model considering both axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion was developed to predict the breakthrough curves of FA adsorption on XAD-16. This model predicted the experimental data better than Bohart-Adams model and Thomas model, based on the low deviation between predicted and experimental data. The axial dispersion coefficient value varied from 6.45 × 10(-6) to 1.10 × 10(-6) m(2)/s at flow rate from 1.3 to 7.7 mL/min, whereas the intraparticle diffusion coefficient was 1.04 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, being this last resistance the rate-limiting step. In conclusion, axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion phenomena play the major role in predicting the adsorption of FA onto XAD-16 in fixed-bed columns.

  18. Grain processing, forage-to-concentrate ratio, and forage length effects on ruminal nitrogen degradation and flows of amino acids to the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Yang, W Z; Beauchemin, K A

    2004-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate effects of dietary factors that alter ruminal fermentability on rumen N degradation, microbial protein synthesis, duodenal flows, and digestibility of amino acids (AA) in the intestines and the total tract. The experiment was a double 4 x 4 quasi-Latin square with a 2(3) factorial arrangement of treatments. The dietary factors were extent of barley grain processing, coarse (processing index; PI = 75.5%) or flat (PI = 60.2%); forage-to-concentrate (F:C) ratio, low (35:65) or high (55:45) on a DM basis; and forage particle length (FPL), long (7.59 mm) or short (6.08 mm). Eight lactating cows with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were offered ad libitum access to a total mixed diet. There were no significant interactions between dietary treatments for ruminal N degradation or its duodenal flow and digestibility in the intestines. Passage of microbial protein to the duodenum was improved with increased F:C ratio of the diet but was not affected by grain processing or FPL. Ruminal digestibility of N was increased with increased F:C ratio (49 vs. 60%) and with reduced FPL (59 vs. 50%). Increased grain processing improved N digestibility both in the intestine (15%) and in the total tract (8%). Reduction in the FPL of the diets reduced intestinal N digestion by 14% without affecting the N digestion in the total tract. Increased extent of grain processing tended to enhance duodenal flows of AA. In contrast, reducing FPL lowered flows of dietary AA to the duodenum because of lowered flows of feed plus endogenous N. Increased F:C ratio of the diet did not change the flow of total AA, but there was a reduced flow of dietary AA and increased flow of microbial AA. Flows of several individual AA were increased by feeding flatly rolled barley with limited effects of F:C ratio or FPL. An interaction between grain processing and FPL was detected for flows of some AA. Diets formulated with flatly rolled barley plus long FPL increased Arg

  19. Three-Tesla magnetic resonance elastography for hepatic fibrosis: Comparison with diffusion-weighted imaging and gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Young Jun; Yu, Mi Hye; Choe, Won Hyeok; Jung, Sung Il; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for hepatic fibrosis and to compare that with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. METHODS: Forty-two patients were included in the study. On MRE, mean stiffness values were measured on the elastograms in kilopascals. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the liver was measured using DWI. On gadoxetic acid enhanced MR, the contrast enhancement index (CEI) was calculated as signal intensity (SI)post/SIpre, where SIpost is liver-to-muscle SI ratio on hepatobiliary phase images and SIpre is that on nonenhanced images. Correlation between aspartate aminotransferase to the platelet ratio index (APRI) and three MR parameters was assessed. Each MR parameter was compared between a hepatic fibrosis (HF) group and non-hepatic fibrosis (nHF) group. RESULTS: Liver stiffness showed strong positive correlation with APRI [Spearman correlation coeffiecient (r) = 0.773, P < 0.0001], while ADC and CEI showed weak or prominent negative correlation (r = -0.28 and -0.321, respectively). In the HF group, only liver stiffness showed strong correlation with APRI (r = 0.731, P < 0.0001). Liver stiffness, ADC, and APRI were significantly different between the HF group and nHF group. CONCLUSION: MRE at 3-Tesla could be a feasible method for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:25516671

  20. Effect of N-acetylaspartic acid on the diffusion coefficient of water: a proton magnetic resonance phantom method for measurement of osmolyte-obligated water.

    PubMed

    Baslow, Morris H; Guilfoyle, David N

    2002-12-15

    N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid (NAA) is an amino acid present in the vertebrate brain that is synthesized and stored primarily in neurons, although it cannot be hydrolyzed in these cells. Nonetheless, neuronal NAA is dynamic and turns over more than once each day by cycling, via extracellular fluids (ECF), between neurons and catabolic compartments in oligodendrocytes. One important role of the NAA intercompartmental cycle appears to be osmoregulatory, and in this role it may be the primary mechanism for the removal of metabolic water, against a water gradient, from myelinated neurons. However, the number of water molecules that might be cotransported to ECF per NAA molecule released is as yet unclear. In this investigation, using a proton nuclear magnetic resonance method and diffusion measurements at two magnetic field strengths on water and NAA phantoms in vitro, the effect of NAA on the diffusion coefficient of water has been measured, and a ratio (K) of obligated water molecules per molecule of NAA has been determined. For NAA measured at 100mM and 3 Tesla K=24 and at 7 Tesla K=14. Based on these results, apparent K(NAA) varies inversely with field strength, and with a computed field strength factor of 2.55mmol water/unit Tesla, K(NAA) in the absence of any applied magnetic field strength would be 32.

  1. Combustor diffuser interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Ram; Thorp, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Advances in gas turbine engine performance are achieved by using compressor systems with high stage loading and low part count, which result in high exit Mach numbers. The diffuser and combustor systems in such engines should be optimized to reduce system pressure loss and to maximize the engine thrust-to-weight ratio and minimize length. The state-of-the-art combustor-diffuser systems do not meet these requirements. Detailed understanding of the combustor-diffuser flow field interaction is required for designing advanced gas turbine engines. An experimental study of the combustor-diffuser interaction (CDI) is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of analytical models applicable to a wide variety of diffuser designs. The CDI program consists of four technical phases: Literature Search; Baseline Configuration; Parametric Configurations; and Performance Configurations. Phase 2 of the program is in progress.

  2. Effect of level of acidification by phosphoric acid, storage temperature, and length of storage on the chemical and biological stability of ground poultry mortality carcasses.

    PubMed

    Middleton, T F; Ferket, P R

    2001-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the addition of feed-grade H3PO4 in comparison to lactic acid fermentation as a means of preserving ground poultry mortality carcasses. Mortality silage quality in both experiments was evaluated by measuring the rise in pH after initial acidification (deltapH) and the content of nonprotein N (NPN), volatile nitrogen (VN), NH3-N, and fecal coliform bacteria in the silage treatments. Preliminary work in Experiment 1 evaluated the preservative effects of six initial levels of acidification with H3PO4 (pH 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 4.0, or 5.0) at two storage temperatures (21 and 45 C). Experiment 2 compared silages preserved with different levels of feed-grade 74.5% H3PO4 (4.13, 5.52, 6.90, and 8.28% wt/wt, concentrated acid basis) to silages made by lactic acid fermentation. Based on the evaluations in Experiment 1, acidification with H3PO4 to pH < or = 3.0, when incubated at 45 C, or pH < or = 2.0, when incubated at ambient temperatures, produced the most biologically favorable poultry mortality silage for subsequent use as a feed ingredient. In Experiment 2, mortality silages containing 8.28% H3PO4 (wt/wt, concentrated acid basis) contained significantly (P < 0.05) lower levels of the protein degradation by-products VN and NH3-N than silages prepared by lactic acid fermentation. Therefore, feedstuffs manufactured from mortality silages prepared using 8.28% H3PO4 would be expected to result in improved animal performance vs. feedstuffs manufactured using silages prepared by lactic acid fermentation.

  3. Effects of micronutrient antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid) on skin thickening and lung function in patients with early diffuse systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Predrag; Damjanov, Nemanja

    2011-08-01

    To assess the effects of alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid on skin thickening and lung function in patients with early diffuse systemic sclerosis (SSc), thirteen patients with early diffuse SSc, with positive anti-topoisomerase-I antibody, high skin thickening progression rate (STPR ≥ 12/year) and decreased lung diffusing capacity (DLCO ≤ 75%) were included in this study. Patients were randomized into two subgroups: Subgroup A-six patients, treated with intravenous cyclophosphamide (CyP) (500 mg/m(2) of body surface monthly) and antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol 400 IU/day and ascorbic acid 1,000 mg/day), and Subgroup B-seven patients, who received CyP without antioxidants. In both subgroups, effects of treatment on skin thickening and lung function were evaluated by comparison of the modified Rodnan skin score (MRSS), STPR, forced vital capacity (FVC), transfer-factor (DLCO) and diffusing coefficient for carbon monoxide (DLCO/VA) at baseline and 1 month after the sixth pulse of CyP. The mean MRSS did not change from baseline to the end of the follow-up in subgroup A (15.7 vs. 16.4, P = 0.50), but it increased significantly in subgroup B (17.9 vs. 23.6, P = 0.03). Although the mean STPR decreased notably in both subgroups of patients (in subgroup A-from 18.9/year to 2.2/year, P = 0.03, and in subgroup B-from 17.5/year to 8.6/year, P = 0.03), the mean STPR at the end of the treatment period was significantly lower in subgroup A (2.2/year vs. 8.6/year, P = 0.04). The mean value of FVC did not change either in subgroup A (91.0-87%, P = 0.2) or in subgroup B (from 101.2 to 99.7%, P = 0.7). Parameters of lung diffusing capacity improved somewhat in subgroup A (DLCO from 55.7 to 62.0% and DLCO/VA from 68.7 to 74.2%) and decreased in subgroup B (DLCO from 66.2 to 60.6% and DLCO/VA from 76.9 to 71.6%), but differences were not statistically significant. After 6 months of therapy, patients treated with CyP and antioxidants had a significantly lower STPR, compared to

  4. Intramolecular general acid catalysis of the hydrolysis of 2-(2'-imidazolium)phenyl phosphate, and bond length-reactivity correlations for reactions of phosphate monoester monoanions.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Tiago A S; Orth, Elisa S; Rocha, Willian R; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Bunton, Clifford A; Nome, Faruk

    2007-05-11

    Rate constants for the hydrolysis of 2-(2'-imidazolium)phenyl hydrogen phosphate (IMPP) in water at pH<6 indicate that activation by the imidazolium moiety disappears with the deprotonation of the phosphate group, and the reaction involves the hydrogen-bonding of the imidazolium NH with the aryl oxygen leaving group. The reaction should involve a near-planar conformation of the imidazolium and the phenyl groups in the activated complex, which favors proton-transfer. The crystal structure of IMPP was solved, and a bond length-reactivity correlation for reactions of phosphate monoester monoanions is described.

  5. Internode length in Pisum. Gene na may block gibberellin synthesis between ent-7. cap alpha. -hydroxykaurenoic acid and biggerellin A/sub 12/-aldehyde. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, T.J.; Reid, J.B.

    1987-04-01

    The elongation response of the gibberellin (GA) deficient genotypes na, ls, and lh of peas (Pisum sativum L.) to a range of GA-precursors was examined. Plants possessing gene na did not respond to precursors in the GA biosynthetic pathway prior to GA/sub 12/-aldehyde. In contrast, plants possessing lh and ls responded as well as wild-type plants (dwarfed with AMO-1618) to these compounds. The results suggest that GA biosynthesis is blocked prior to ent-kaurene in the lh and ls mutants and between ent-7..cap alpha..-hydroxykaurenoic acid and GA/sub 12/-aldehyde in the na mutant. Feeds of ent(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid and (/sup 2/H)GA/sub 12/-aldehyde to a range of genotypes supported the above conclusions. The na line WL1766 was shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to metabolize(/sup 2/H)GA/sub 12/-aldehyde to a number of (/sup 2/H)C/sub 19/-GAs including GA/sub 1/. However, there was no indication in na genotypes for the metabolism of ent-(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid to these GAs. In contrast, the expanding shoot tissue of all Na genotypes examined metabolized ent-(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid to radioactive compounds that co-chromatographed with GA/sub 1/, GA/sub 8/, GA/sub 20/, and GA/sub 29/. However, insufficient material was present for unequivocal identification of the metabolites. The radioactive profiles from HPLC of extracts of the node treated with ent-(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid were similar for both Na and na plants and contained ent-16..cap alpha..,17-dihydroxykaurenoic acid and ent-6..cap alpha..,7..cap alpha..,16..beta..,17-tetrahydroxykaurenoic acid (both characterized by GC-MS), suggesting that the metabolites arose from side branches of the main GA-biosynthetic pathway. Thus, both Na and na plants appear capable of ent-7..cap alpha..-hydroxylation.

  6. Xanthomonas campestris diffusible factor is 3-hydroxybenzoic acid and is associated with xanthomonadin biosynthesis, cell viability, antioxidant activity, and systemic invasion.

    PubMed

    He, Ya-Wen; Wu, Ji'en; Zhou, Lian; Yang, Fan; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Bai, Linquan; Xu, Yuquan; Deng, Zixin; Tang, Ji-Liang; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2011-08-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces a membrane-bound yellow pigment called xanthomonadin. A diffusible factor (DF) has been reported to regulate xanthomonadin biosynthesis. In this study, DF was purified from bacterial culture supernatants using a combination of solvent extraction, flash chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses resolved the DF chemical structure as 3-hydroxybenzoic acid (3-HBA), which was further confirmed by synthetic 3-HBA. Significantly, bioassay and in silico analysis suggest that DF production is widely conserved in a range of bacterial species. Analysis of DF derivatives established the hydroxyl group and its position as the key structural features for the role of DF in xanthomonadin biosynthesis. In addition, we showed that DF is also associated with bacterial survival, H2O2 resistance, and systemic invasion. Furthermore, evidence was also presented that DF and diffusible signaling factor have overlapping functions in modulation of bacterial survival, H2O2 resistance, and virulence. Utilization of different mechanisms to modulate similar virulence traits may provide X. campestris pv. campestris with plasticity in response to various environmental cues.

  7. Both total chain length and position of dimethyl-branching effect the myocardial uptake and retention of radioiodinated analogues of 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3,3-dimethylpentadecanoic acid (DMIPP).

    PubMed

    Knapp, F F; Goodman, M M; Kirsch, G; Reske, S N; Kropp, J; Biersack, H J; Ambrose, K R; Lambert, C R; Goudonnet, A

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of geminal dimethyl-branching into the 3-position of 15-(p-iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) significantly delays myocardial clearance in rats and dogs following intravenous administration. Several new analogues of DMIPP have been synthesized and evaluated in fasted rats. The effects of both the position of dimethyl-branching and the total chain-length of 3, 3-dimethyl analogues on heart uptake and clearance kinetics have been studied. In the first series of compounds, two methyl groups were introduced into the 3-, 4-, 6-, or 9- position. Tissue distribution studies of the 15-(p-[I-125] iodophenyl)-analogues demonstrated that the position of dimethyl-branching is an important factor affecting both myocardial specificity and retention. The [I-125] labeled 3,3- and 4,4-DMIPP analogues showed higher myocardial uptake and faster blood clearance than the 6,6- and 9,9-DMIPP analogues [heart, % dose/gm heart: blood), 30 min: 3,3-DMIPP = 5.06 (12:1); 4,4-DMIPP = 8.03 (16.7: 1); 6,6-DMIPP = 2.26 (3.1:1); 9,9-DMIPP = 3.06 (2.77)]. In the second series, the effects of total fatty acid chain length were evaluated with 3,3-dimethyl-substituted analogues with C11, C12, C13, C14, C15, and C19 chain lengths. The C14 and C15 chain length analogues showed the best properties [global heart: blood ratios): 30 min: C11, 0.70 (0.82); C12, 1.25 (0.68); C13, 0.47 (0.90); C14, 1.63 (3.54); C15, 5.06 (12); C19. 1.29 (0.82). These detailed studies have demonstrated that both total chain length and the position of geminal dimethyl-branching are important structural parameters which affect myocardial specificity and retention of omega-(p-iodophenyl)-substituted fatty acid analogues and that 3,3-DMIPP and 4,4-DMIPP are the best candidates with optimal properties for further study.

  8. Rapid nuclear import of short nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Mai; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2016-10-01

    Exogenous short-chain nucleic acids undergo rapid import into the nucleus. Fluorescence-labeled dT1-13 DNA microinjected into the cytoplasm domain of a HeLa cell was rapidly imported into the nucleus domain within 1min. This is much more rapid than what has been observed for intracellular diffusion of small molecules. In contrast, import of longer nucleic acids with a length of over 30nt into the nucleus was suppressed.

  9. Structure-related aspects on water diffusivity in fatty acid-soap and skin lipid model systems.

    PubMed

    Norlén, L; Engblom, J

    2000-01-03

    Simplified skin barrier models are necessary to get a first hand understanding of the very complex morphology and physical properties of the human skin barrier. In addition, it is of great importance to construct relevant models that will allow for rational testing of barrier perturbing/occlusive effects of a large variety of substances. The primary objective of this work was to study the effect of lipid morphology on water permeation through various lipid mixtures (i.e., partly neutralised free fatty acids, as well as a skin lipid model mixture). In addition, the effects of incorporating Azone((R)) (1-dodecyl-azacycloheptan-2-one) into the skin lipid model mixture was studied. Small- and wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used for structure determinations. It is concluded that: (a) the water flux through a crystalline fatty acid-sodium soap-water mixture (s) is statistically significantly higher than the water flux through the corresponding lamellar (L(alpha)) and reversed hexagonal (H(II)) liquid crystalline phases, which do not differ between themselves; (b) the water flux through mixtures of L(alpha)/s decreases statistically significantly with increasing relative amounts of lamellar (L(alpha)) liquid crystalline phase; (c) the addition of Azone((R)) to a skin lipid model system induces a reduction in water flux. However, further studies are needed to more closely characterise the structural basis for the occlusive effects of Azone((R)) on water flux.

  10. Optimizing the models for rapid determination of chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin in plant samples by near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhiyi; Shan, Ruifeng; Wang, Jiajun; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2014-07-01

    Polyphenols in plant samples have been extensively studied because phenolic compounds are ubiquitous in plants and can be used as antioxidants in promoting human health. A method for rapid determination of three phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin) in plant samples using near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRDRS) is studied in this work. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used for building the calibration models, and the effects of spectral preprocessing and variable selection on the models are investigated for optimization of the models. The results show that individual spectral preprocessing and variable selection has no or slight influence on the models, but the combination of the techniques can significantly improve the models. The combination of continuous wavelet transform (CWT) for removing the variant background, multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) for correcting the scattering effect and randomization test (RT) for selecting the informative variables was found to be the best way for building the optimal models. For validation of the models, the polyphenol contents in an independent sample set were predicted. The correlation coefficients between the predicted values and the contents determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis are as high as 0.964, 0.948 and 0.934 for chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin, respectively.

  11. Optimizing the models for rapid determination of chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin in plant samples by near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhiyi; Shan, Ruifeng; Wang, Jiajun; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2014-07-15

    Polyphenols in plant samples have been extensively studied because phenolic compounds are ubiquitous in plants and can be used as antioxidants in promoting human health. A method for rapid determination of three phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin) in plant samples using near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRDRS) is studied in this work. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used for building the calibration models, and the effects of spectral preprocessing and variable selection on the models are investigated for optimization of the models. The results show that individual spectral preprocessing and variable selection has no or slight influence on the models, but the combination of the techniques can significantly improve the models. The combination of continuous wavelet transform (CWT) for removing the variant background, multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) for correcting the scattering effect and randomization test (RT) for selecting the informative variables was found to be the best way for building the optimal models. For validation of the models, the polyphenol contents in an independent sample set were predicted. The correlation coefficients between the predicted values and the contents determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis are as high as 0.964, 0.948 and 0.934 for chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin, respectively.

  12. Novel Diffusivity Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser

    2001-01-01

    A common-path interferometer (CPI) system was developed to measure the diffusivity of liquid pairs. The CPI is an optical technique that can be used to measure changes in the gradient of the refraction index of transparent materials. This system uses a shearing interferometer that shares the same optical path from a laser light source to the final imaging plane. Hence, the molecular diffusion coefficient of liquids can be determined using the physical relations between changes in the optical path length and the liquid phase properties. The data obtained with this interferometer were compared with similar results from other techniques and demonstrated that the instrument is superior in measuring the diffusivity of miscible liquids while keeping the system very compact and robust. CPI can also be used for studies in interface dynamics and other diffusion-dominated-process applications.

  13. Repeat length variation in the 5'UTR of myo-inositol monophosphatase gene is related to phytic acid content and contributes to drought tolerance in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Joshi-Saha, Archana; Reddy, Kandali S

    2015-09-01

    Myo-inositol metabolism plays a significant role in plant growth and development, and is also used as a precursor for many important metabolites, such as ascorbate, pinitol, and phytate. Phytate (inositol hexakisphosphate) is the major storage pool for phosphate in the seeds. It is utilized during seed germination and growth of the developing embryo. In addition, it is implicated in protection against oxidative stress. In the present study, a panel of chickpea accessions was used for an association analysis. Association analysis accounting for population structure and relative kinship identified alleles of a simple sequence repeat marker, NCPGR90, that are associated with both phytic acid content and drought tolerance. These alleles varied with respect to the dinucleotide CT repeats present within the marker. NCPGR90 located to the 5'UTR of chickpea myo-inositol monophosphatase gene (CaIMP) and showed transcript length variation in drought-tolerant and drought-susceptible accessions. CaIMP from a drought-tolerant accession with a smaller repeat was almost 2-fold upregulated as compared to a susceptible accession having a longer repeat, even under control non-stressed conditions. This study suggests an evolution of simple sequence repeat length variation in CaIMP, which might be regulating phytic acid levels to confer drought tolerance in natural populations of chickpea.

  14. Exact and efficient calculation of Lagrange multipliers in biological polymers with constrained bond lengths and bond angles: proteins and nucleic acids as example cases.

    PubMed

    García-Risueño, Pablo; Echenique, Pablo; Alonso, J L

    2011-11-15

    To accelerate molecular dynamics simulations, it is common to impose holonomic constraints on the hardest degrees of freedom. In this way, the time step used to integrate the equations of motion can be increased, thereby allowing longer total simulation times. The imposition of such constraints results in an aditional set of N(c) equations (the equations of constraint) and unknowns (their associated Lagrange multipliers), whose solution is closely related to any algorithm implementing the constraints in Euclidean coordinates. In this work, it is shown that, due to the essentially linear structure of typical biological polymers the algebraic equations that need to be solved involve a matrix which is not only sparse, but also banded if the constraints are indexed in a skilful way. This allows the Lagrange multipliers to be obtained through a noniterative procedure, which can be considered exact up to machine precision, and which takes O(N(c)) operations, instead of the usual O(N c3) for generic molecular systems. We develop the formalism, and describe the appropriate indexing for a number of model molecules. Finally, we provide a numerical example of the technique in a series of polyalanine peptides of different lengths. Although a use of the Lagrange multipliers without any modification in the solution of the underlying ordinary differential equations yields unstable integration algorithms, the central role of these quantities makes their efficient calculation useful for the improvement of methods that correctly enforce the exact satisfaction of the constraints at each time step. We provide several examples of this.

  15. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  16. Co-drug strategy for promoting skin targeting and minimizing the transdermal diffusion of hydroquinone and tranexamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Chen, Wei-Yu; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Chen, Chun-Che; Fang, Jia-You

    2013-01-01

    Hydroquinone and tranexamic acids (TXA) are skin-lightening agents with a hydrophilic nature and low skin absorption. A high dose is needed for clinical use, resulting in a high incidence of skin irritation. Co-drugs formed by conjugating hydroquinone and TXA were synthesized and their in vitro and in vivo skin absorption characteristics were evaluated. The two synthesized co-drugs were 4-hydroxyphenyl 4-(aminomethyl)cyclohexanecarboxylate (HAC) and 1,4- phenylene bis(aminomethyl)cyclohexanecarboxylate (BAC). The co-drugs were chemically stable in aqueous solution, but rapidly degraded to the respective parent drug in esterases and skin homogenates. Compared to hydroquinone application, 7.2- and 2.4-fold increments in the hydroquinone skin deposition were obtained with the in vitro application of HAC and BAC. HAC and BAC led to 3- and 2-fold enhancements of equivalent TXA deposition compared to TXA administration. The in vivo experiment showed a further enhancement of co-drugs compared to the in vitro setup. The transdermal penetration of co-drugs, especially BAC, was much lower than that of hydroquinone and TXA. This indicated high-level skin targeting by the co-drugs. HAC and BAC revealed strong affinities for the viable epidermis/dermis. Hair follicles are important reservoirs for co-drug delivery. Daily administration of co-drugs to the skin did not generate irritation for up to 7 days. Both co-drugs are superior candidates for treating skin hyperpigmentation.

  17. On the reaction of D-amino acid oxidase with dioxygen: O2 diffusion pathways and enhancement of reactivity.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Elena; Molla, Gianluca; Ghisla, Sandro; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2011-02-01

    Evidence is accumulating that oxygen access in proteins is guided and controlled. We also have recently described channels that might allow access of oxygen to pockets at the active site of the flavoprotein D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) that have a high affinity for dioxygen and are in close proximity to the flavin. With the goal of enhancing the reactivity of DAAO with oxygen, we have performed site-saturation mutagenesis at three positions that flank the putative oxygen channels and high-affinity sites. The most interesting variants at positions 50, 201 and 225 were identified by a screening procedure at low oxygen concentration. The biochemical properties of these variants have been studied and compared with those of wild-type DAAO, with emphasis on the reactivity of the reduced enzyme species with dioxygen. The substitutions at positions 50 and 225 do not enhance this reaction, but mainly affect the protein conformation and stability. However, the T201L variant shows an up to a threefold increase in the rate constant for reaction of O(2) with reduced flavin, together with a fivefold decrease in the K(m) for dioxygen. This effect was not observed when a valine is located at position 201, and is thus attributed to a specific alteration in the micro-environment of one high-affinity site for dioxygen (site B) close to the flavin that plays an important role in the storage of oxygen. The increase in O(2) reactivity observed for T201L DAAO is of great interest for designing new flavoenzymes for biotechnological applications.

  18. In situ speciation of uranium in treated acid mine drainage using the diffusion gradients in thin films technique (DGT).

    PubMed

    Pedrobom, Jorge Henrique; Eismann, Carlos Eduardo; Menegário, Amauri A; Galhardi, Juliana Aparecida; Luko, Karen Silva; Dourado, Thiago de Araujo; Kiang, Chang Hung

    2017-02-01

    The exchange membranes P81 and DE81 and Chelex-100 resin were used to perform in situ speciation of uranium in treated acid mine drainage at the Osamu Utsumi mining site, Poços de Caldas city, Southeast Brazil. To investigate possible chemical modifications in the samples during analysis, the three ligands were deployed in situ and in a laboratory (in lab). The results obtained in situ were also compared to a speciation performed using Visual MINTEQ software. Chelex-100 retained total labile U for a period of up to 48 h. The labile U fraction determined by Chelex 100 ranged from 107 ± 6% to 147 ± 44% in situ and from 115 ± 22% to 191 ± 5% in lab. DE81 retained anionic U species up to 8 h, with labile fractions ranging from 37 ± 2% to 76 ± 3% in situ and 34 ± 12% to 180 ± 17% in lab. P81 exhibited a lower efficiency in retaining U species, with concentrations ranging from 6± 2% to 19± 2% in situ and 3± 2% to 18± 2% in lab. The speciation obtained from MINTEQ suggests that the major U species were UO2OH(+), UO2(OH)(3-), UO2(OH)2(aq), Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq), CaUO2(CO3)3(2-), UO2(CO3)2(2-), and UO2(CO3)3(4-). This result is in accordance with the results obtained in situ. Differences concerning speciation and the total and soluble U concentrations were observed between the deployments performed in situ and in the laboratory, indicating that U speciation must be performed in situ.

  19. A new type of thermoalkalophilic hydrolase of Paucimonas lemoignei with high specificity for amorphous polyesters of short chain-length hydroxyalkanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Handrick, R; Reinhardt, S; Focarete, M L; Scandola, M; Adamus, G; Kowalczuk, M; Jendrossek, D

    2001-09-28

    A novel type of hydrolase was purified from culture fluid of Paucimonas (formerly Pseudomonas) lemoignei. Biochemical characterization revealed an unusual substrate specificity of the purified enzyme for amorphous poly((R)-3-hydroxyalkanoates) (PHA) such as native granules of natural poly((R)-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) or poly((R)-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHV), artificial cholate-coated granules of natural PHB or PHV, atactic poly((R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate), and oligomers of (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) with six or more 3HB units. The enzyme has the unique property to recognize the physical state of the polymeric substrate by discrimination between amorphous PHA (good substrate) and denatured, partially crystalline PHA (no substrate). The pentamers of 3HB or 3HV were identified as the main products of enzymatic hydrolysis of native PHB or PHV, respectively. No activity was found with any denatured PHA, oligomers of (R)-3HB with five or less 3HB units, poly(6-hydroxyhexanoate), substrates of lipases such as tributyrin or triolein, substrates for amidases/nitrilases, DNA, RNA, casein, N-alpha-benzoyl-l-arginine-4-nitranilide, or starch. The purified enzyme (M(r) 36,209) was remarkably stable and active at high temperature (60 degrees C), high pH (up to 12.0), low ionic strength (distilled water), and in solvents (e.g. n-propyl alcohol). The depolymerase contained no essential SH groups or essential disulfide bridges and was insensitive to high concentrations of ionic (SDS) and nonionic (Triton and Tween) detergents. Characterization of the cloned structural gene (phaZ7) and the DNA-deduced amino acid sequence revealed no homologies to any PHB depolymerase or any other sequence of data banks except for a short sequence related to the active site serine of serine hydrolases. A classification of the enzyme into a new family (family 9) of carboxyesterases (Arpigny, J. L., and Jaeger, K.-E. (1999) Biochem. J. 343, 177-183) is suggested.

  20. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  1. The assessment of diffuse pollution from acid-mine drainage using an updated and revised diatom assessment procedure as an added-value bio-monitoring tool.

    PubMed

    Archibald, C G M; Taylor, J C

    2007-01-01

    Three data sources (physico-chemistry, bio-monitoring and eco-toxicology) are currently used in South Africa to establish environmental water quality conditions. Environmental water quality in turn is key information required for the "ecological reserve determination" of river reaches. Bio-monitoring in South Africa has been limited in recent times mostly to the use of the SASS procedure which relies on invertebrates only. This paper describes the re-introduction of a diatom-based water quality assessment as an added-value bio-monitoring tool. A specific example is discussed citing the response of diatom assemblages to diffuse pollution from acid mine drainage and how effective diatoms are as indicators of ecological integrity and river recovery measured downstream of the area of impact. The advantages of applying this bio-monitoring technique over other biological measures are presented in the context of technological advances in rapid image processing, species identification and software applications of diatom-based water quality indices. The valuable records of the diatom assemblages of the past, held in the South African Diatom Collection at the CSIR (KwaZulu-Natal), can now be accessed and interpreted as historical environmental water quality reference points for several rivers in South Africa.

  2. Effect of pectins on the mass transfer kinetics of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion in a Franz diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Restrepo-Sánchez, Luz-Patricia; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo

    2016-10-15

    The effect of high (HMP) and low (LMP) methoxylated pectins (2%w/w) on the rate and extent of the mass transfer of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion across a cellulose membrane was evaluated. A sigmoidal response kinetic analysis was used to calculate both the diffusion coefficients (rate) and the amount of nutrients transferred through the membrane (extent). In all cases, except for lysine, HMP was more effective than LMP in inhibiting both the rate and extent of the mass transfer of nutrients through the membrane. LMP and HMP, e.g., reduced 1.3 and 3.0times, respectively, the mass transfer rate of glucose, as compared to control (containing no pectin), and 1.3 and 1.5times, respectively, the amount of glucose transferred through the membrane. Viscosity, molecular interactions, and flocculation were the most important parameters controlling the mass transfer of electrically neutral nutrients, electrically charged nutrients, and emulsified lipids, respectively.

  3. The dynamics of unsteady detonation with diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq Dennis; Romick, Christopher; Powers, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Here we consider an unsteady detonation with diffusion included. This introduces an interaction between the reaction length scales and diffusion length scales. Detailed kinetics introduce multiple length scales as shown though the spatial eigenvalue analysis of hydrogen-oxygen system; the smallest length scale is {approx} 10{sup 7} m and the largest {approx} 10{sup -2} m; away from equilibrium, the breadth can be larger. In this paper, we consider a simpler set of model equations, similar to the inviscid reactive compressible fluid equations, but include diffusion (in the form of thermal/energy, momentum, and mass diffusion). We will seek to reveal how the complex dynamics already discovered in one-step systems in the inviscid limit changes with the addition of diffusion.

  4. Determination of in situ speciation of manganese in treated acid mine drainage water by using multiple diffusive gradients in thin films devices.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo Lopes F; Pedrobom, Jorge H; Menegário, Amauri A; Domingos, Roberto N; Py Júnior, Delcy A; Kiang, Chang Hung

    2013-10-17

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a serious environmental problem that creates acidic solution with high Mn concentrations. The speciation of residual Mn from AMD after an active treatment involving the addition of a neutralizing agent can reliably evaluate the treatment efficiency and provide knowledge of the Mn species being inputted into the environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ lability and speciation of Mn using the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique with treated drainage water from a uranium mine (TAMD). DGT devices with different binding phases (Chelex-100 and P81 and DE81 membranes) were used to perform the in situ speciation of Mn. A comparison of the results from deploying DGT in the laboratory and in situ shows that the speciation of Mn in TAMD should be performed in situ. Linear deployment curves (from in situ experiments) indicate that the DGT device containing the Chelex-100 binding phase can be used to evaluate Mn lability in TAMD. The labile Mn fraction (from in situ measurements) obtained using the device containing the Chelex-100 resin ranged from 63 to 81% of the total Mn concentration and, when compared to the speciation obtained using the CHEAQS software, indicated that this device was capable of uptaking the free Mn(2+) and a portion of the MnSO4(aq). The values obtained using the DGT technique were compared to those from on site solid phase extraction, and a good agreement was found between the results. The amount of negative Mn species sampled by DE81 device was insignificant (<1.5%) for all of the sites. Sites containing a relatively small amount of Ca (<40 mg L(-1)) and measured using devices containing the P81 membrane agreed with the concentration predicted by the CHEAQS software for positive Mn species (Mn(2+) and Mn(OH)(+)). Nevertheless, the speciation obtained using the CHEAQS software indicated that the concentrations of positive Mn species were underestimated for sites with relatively high Ca

  5. GEMAS: prediction of solid-solution phase partitioning coefficients (Kd) for oxoanions and boric acid in soils using mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Janik, Leslie J; Forrester, Sean T; Soriano-Disla, José M; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Michael J; Reimann, Clemens

    2015-02-01

    The authors' aim was to develop rapid and inexpensive regression models for the prediction of partitioning coefficients (Kd), defined as the ratio of the total or surface-bound metal/metalloid concentration of the solid phase to the total concentration in the solution phase. Values of Kd were measured for boric acid (B[OH]3(0)) and selected added soluble oxoanions: molybdate (MoO4(2-)), antimonate (Sb[OH](6-)), selenate (SeO4(2-)), tellurate (TeO4(2-)) and vanadate (VO4(3-)). Models were developed using approximately 500 spectrally representative soils of the Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural Soils of Europe (GEMAS) program. These calibration soils represented the major properties of the entire 4813 soils of the GEMAS project. Multiple linear regression (MLR) from soil properties, partial least-squares regression (PLSR) using mid-infrared diffuse reflectance Fourier-transformed (DRIFT) spectra, and models using DRIFT spectra plus analytical pH values (DRIFT + pH), were compared with predicted log K(d + 1) values. Apart from selenate (R(2)  = 0.43), the DRIFT + pH calibrations resulted in marginally better models to predict log K(d + 1) values (R(2)  = 0.62-0.79), compared with those from PSLR-DRIFT (R(2)  = 0.61-0.72) and MLR (R(2)  = 0.54-0.79). The DRIFT + pH calibrations were applied to the prediction of log K(d + 1) values in the remaining 4313 soils. An example map of predicted log K(d + 1) values for added soluble MoO4(2-) in soils across Europe is presented. The DRIFT + pH PLSR models provided a rapid and inexpensive tool to assess the risk of mobility and potential availability of boric acid and selected oxoanions in European soils. For these models to be used in the prediction of log K(d + 1) values in soils globally, additional research will be needed to determine if soil variability is accounted on the calibration.

  6. Neandertal clavicle length

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik; Holliday, Trenton W.; Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene archaic humans from western Eurasia (the Neandertals) have been described for a century as exhibiting absolutely and relatively long clavicles. This aspect of their body proportions has been used to distinguish them from modern humans, invoked to account for other aspects of their anatomy and genetics, used in assessments of their phylogenetic polarities, and used as evidence for Late Pleistocene population relationships. However, it has been unclear whether the usual scaling of Neandertal clavicular lengths to their associated humeral lengths reflects long clavicles, short humeri, or both. Neandertal clavicle lengths, along with those of early modern humans and latitudinally diverse recent humans, were compared with both humeral lengths and estimated body masses (based on femoral head diameters). The Neandertal do have long clavicles relative their humeri, even though they fall within the ranges of variation of early and recent humans. However, when scaled to body masses, their humeral lengths are relatively short, and their clavicular lengths are indistinguishable from those of Late Pleistocene and recent modern humans. The few sufficiently complete Early Pleistocene Homo clavicles seem to have relative lengths also well within recent human variation. Therefore, appropriately scaled clavicular length seems to have varied little through the genus Homo, and it should not be used to account for other aspects of Neandertal biology or their phylogenetic status. PMID:24616525

  7. Induction of anti-melanoma CTL response using DC transfected with mutated mRNA encoding full-length Melan-A/MART-1 antigen with an A27L amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Zeinab; Kalady, Matthew F; Emani, Sirisha; Onaitis, Mark W; Abdel-Wahab, Omar I; Cisco, Robin; Wheless, Lee; Cheng, Tsung-Yen; Tyler, Douglas S; Pruitt, Scott K

    2003-08-01

    Modification of the parental immunodominant Melan-A/MART-1 peptide (MART-1(26-35)) by replacing the alanine with leucine (A27L) enhances its immunogenicity. Because of the reported advantages of RNA over peptides in DC vaccines, we sought to mutate the MART-1 gene to encode a full-length MART-1 antigen with an A27L amino acid substitution. Human DC were transfected with A27L-mutated MART-1 RNA (A27L RNA) or native MART-1 RNA, and then used to stimulate autologous T cells from a series of 8 HLA-A2+ volunteers. After three stimulations, all CTL induced with DC/A27L RNA exhibited more tetramer+ cells, and demonstrated stronger antigen-specific IFNgamma-secreting activity compared to CTL induced with DC/native RNA. A potent MART-1-specific, and predominantly class-I-restricted lysis was detected in most CTL induced with DC/A27L RNA, while native RNA-induced CTL showed minimal and non-specific lysis. HLA-A2+ DC and MART-1 negative/A2+ melanoma cells transfected with the A27L RNA were recognized and killed by MART-1-specific CTL, suggesting that these APC efficiently processed the A27L RNA and presented correct MART-1-specific epitope(s). In summary, introducing an A27L mutation into the MART-1 full-length mRNA sequence enhanced the immunogenicity of the encoded MART-1 Ag. The ease with which such a mutation can be made in RNA presents another potential advantage of using RNA for immunotherapy. Our results support considering this strategy for enhancing the immunogenicity of DC-based RNA vaccines.

  8. Modeling acid transport in chemically amplified resist films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Abhijit A.; Doxastakis, Manolis; Stein, Gila E.

    2014-03-01

    The acid-catalyzed deprotection of glassy poly(4-hydroxystyrene-co-tert butyl acrylate) films was studied with infrared absorbance spectroscopy and stochastic simulations. Experimental data were interpreted with a simple description of subdiffusive acid transport coupled to second-order acid loss. This model predicts key attributes of observed deprotection rates, such as fast reaction at short times, slow reaction at long times, and a non-linear dependence on acid loading. The degree of anomalous character is reduced by increasing the post-exposure bake temperature or adding plasticizing agents to the polymer resin. These findings indicate that the acid mobility and overall deprotection kinetics are coupled to glassy matrix dynamics. Furthermore, the acid diffusion lengths were calculated from the anomalous transport model and compared with nanopattern line widths. The consistent scaling between experiments and simulations suggests that the anomalous diffusion model could be further developed into a predictive lithography tool.

  9. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  10. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  11. Ligand chain length conveys thermochromism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mainak; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Chandrakumar, K R S; Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-08-14

    Thermochromic properties of a series of non-ionic copper compounds have been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that Cu(II) ion with straight-chain primary amine (A) and alpha-linolenic (fatty acid, AL) co-jointly exhibit thermochromic properties. In the current case, we determined that thermochromism becomes ligand chain length-dependent and at least one of the ligands (A or AL) must be long chain. Thermochromism is attributed to a balanced competition between the fatty acids and amines for the copper(II) centre. The structure-property relationship of the non-ionic copper compounds Cu(AL)2(A)2 has been substantiated by various physical measurements along with detailed theoretical studies based on time-dependent density functional theory. It is presumed from our results that the compound would be a useful material for temperature-sensor applications.

  12. Knudsen Diffusion in Silicon Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruener, Simon; Huber, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Measurements on helium and argon gas flow through an array of parallel, linear channels of 12 nm diameter and 200μm length in a single crystalline silicon membrane reveal a Knudsen diffusion type transport from 102 to 107 in Knudsen number Kn. The classic scaling prediction for the transport diffusion coefficient on temperature and mass of diffusing species, DHe∝T, is confirmed over a T range from 40 K to 300 K for He and for the ratio of DHe/DAr∝mAr/mHe. Deviations of the channels from a cylindrical form, resolved with electron microscopy down to subnanometer scales, quantitatively account for a reduced diffusivity as compared to Knudsen diffusion in ideal tubular channels. The membrane permeation experiments are described over 10 orders of magnitude in Kn, encompassing the transition flow regime, by the unified flow model of Beskok and Karniadakis.

  13. Myofilament length dependent activation.

    PubMed

    de Tombe, Pieter P; Mateja, Ryan D; Tachampa, Kittipong; Ait Mou, Younss; Farman, Gerrie P; Irving, Thomas C

    2010-05-01

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca(2+) ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the "Frank-Starling law of the heart" constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  14. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  15. Myofilament length dependent activation

    SciTech Connect

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  16. Length Paradox in Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Roberto de A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thought experiment using a general analysis approach with Lorentz transformations to show that the apparent self-contradictions of special relativity concerning the length-paradox are really non-existant. (GA)

  17. Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, David H.

    1968-01-01

    Five methodologies for predicting hospital length of stay were developed and compared. Two—a subjective Bayesian forecaster and a regression forecaster—also measured the relative importance of the symptomatic and demographic factors in predicting length of stay. The performance of the methodologies was evaluated with several criteria of effectiveness and one of cost. The results should provide encouragement for those interested in computer applications to utilization review and to scheduling inpatient admissions. PMID:5673664

  18. Observations on oesophageal length.

    PubMed Central

    Kalloor, G J; Deshpande, A H; Collis, J L

    1976-01-01

    The subject of oesophageal length is discussed. The great variations in the length of the oesophagus in individual patients is noted, and the practical use of its recognition in oesophageal surgery is stressed. An apprasial of the various methods available for this measurement is made; this includes the use of external chest measurement, endoscopic measurement, and the measurement of the level of the electrical mucosal potential change. Correlative studies of these various methods are made, and these show a very high degree of significance. These studies involved simultaneous measurement of external and internal oesophageal length in 26 patients without a hiatal hernia or gastro-oesophageal length in 26 patients without a hiatal hernia or gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms, 42 patients with sliding type hiatal hernia, and 17 patients with a peptic stricture in association with hiatal hernia. The method of measuring oesophageal length by the use of the external chest measurement, that is, the distance between the lower incisor teeth and the xiphisternum, measured with the neck fully extended and the patient lying supine, is described in detail, its practical application in oesophageal surgery is illustrated, and its validity tested by internal measurements. The findings of this study demonstrate that the external chest measurement provides a mean of assessing the true static length of the oesophagus, corrected for the size of the individual. Images PMID:941114

  19. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2011-07-15

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  20. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  1. Degradation of bulk diffusion length in CZ silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, J.H.; King, R.R.; Mitchell, K.W.

    1995-08-01

    Commercially-produced, unencapsulated, CZ silicon solar cells can lose 3 to 4% of their initial efficiency after exposure to light. After this initial, rapid ( < 30 min.) decrease, the cell power output remains stable. The cell performance recovers in a matter of hours in the dark at room temperature, and degrades again under light exposure. The different conditions under which CZ silicon cells degrade, and the reverse process, annealing, are characterized with the methods of spectral response and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Iron impurities are a possible cause of this effect.

  2. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  3. Tracer diffusion in silica inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Cherdhirankorn, Thipphaya; Retsch, Markus; Jonas, Ulrich; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2010-06-15

    We employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the diffusion of small fluorescence tracers in liquid filled silica inverse opals. The inverse opals consisted of a nanoporous silica scaffold spanning a hexagonal crystal of spherical voids of 360 nm diameter connected by circular pores of 70 nm diameter. The diffusion of Alexa Fluor 488 in water and of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) in toluene was studied. Three diffusion modes could be distinguished: (1) Free diffusion limited by the geometric constraints given by the inverse opal, where, as compared to the free solution, this diffusion is slowed down by a factor of 3-4, (2) slow diffusion inside the nanoporous matrix of the silica scaffold, and (3) diffusion limited by adsorption. On the length scale of the focus of a confocal microscope of roughly 400 nm diffusion was non-Fickian in all cases.

  4. Upper Extremity Length Equalization

    PubMed Central

    DeCoster, Thomas A.; Ritterbusch, John; Crawford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Significant upper extremity length inequality is uncommon but can cause major functional problems. The ability to position and use the hand may be impaired by shortness of any of the long bones of the upper extremity. In many respects upper and lower extremity length problems are similar. They most commonly occur after injury to a growing bone and the treatment modalities utilized in the lower extremity may be applied to the upper extremity. These treatment options include epiphysiodesis, shortening osteotomy, angulatory correction osteotomy and lengthening. This report reviews the literature relative to upper extremity length inequality and equalization and presents an algorithm for evaluation and planning appropriate treatment for patients with this condition. This algorithm is illustrated by two clinical cases of posttraumatic shortness of the radius which were effectively treated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  5. Relativistic Length Agony Continued

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redzic, D. V.

    2014-06-01

    We made an attempt to remedy recent confusing treatments of some basic relativistic concepts and results. Following the argument presented in an earlier paper (Redzic 2008b), we discussed the misconceptions that are recurrent points in the literature devoted to teaching relativity such as: there is no change in the object in Special Relativity, illusory character of relativistic length contraction, stresses and strains induced by Lorentz contraction, and related issues. We gave several examples of the traps of everyday language that lurk in Special Relativity. To remove a possible conceptual and terminological muddle, we made a distinction between the relativistic length reduction and relativistic FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction, corresponding to a passive and an active aspect of length contraction, respectively; we pointed out that both aspects have fundamental dynamical contents. As an illustration of our considerations, we discussed briefly the Dewan-Beran-Bell spaceship paradox and the 'pole in a barn' paradox.

  6. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  7. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  8. Surface Roughness Lengths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    m trees 110 - 170 Thom 1972 Pine forest - 20 m trees 128 DeBruin and Moore 1985 Forested plateau, rolling 120 - 130 Ming et al. 1983 Rolling terrain...H. A. R., and C. J. Moore , 1985 , "Zero-Plane Displacement and Roughness Length for Tall Vegetation, Derived from a Simple Mass Conservation

  9. Sampling by Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of sampling methods used in information science research focuses on Fussler's method for sampling catalog cards and on sampling by length. Highlights include simple random sampling, sampling with probability equal to size without replacement, sampling with replacement, and examples of estimating the number of books on shelves in certain…

  10. Surface Acidity and Properties of TiO2/SiO2 Catalysts Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition: UV-visible Diffuse Reflectance, DRIFTS, and Visible Raman Spectroscopy Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-15

    the grafted TiO2 were in a highly dispersed amorphous form.19 Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film growth technique, which relies on self... Thin Films . U.S. Patent 4058430, 1977. (21) Ritala, M. Appl. Surf. Sci. 1997, 112, 223. TiO2 /SiO2 Catalysts Prepared by ALD J. Phys. Chem. C, Vol. 113...Surface Acidity and Properties of TiO2 /SiO2 Catalysts Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition: UV-visible Diffuse Reflectance, DRIFTS, and Visible Raman

  11. CFD analysis of a rocket exhaust diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Tarit K.; Thanawala, R. H.; Annamalai, K.

    1992-11-01

    The nature of the complex shock structure responsible for the pressure recovery phenomenon in supersonic diffusers is investigated by means of a theoretical CFD analysis using a newly developed computer program for Navier-Stokes solution of an ejector system, and the Prandtl mixing length to model the turbulent boundary layer. The pressure recovery characteristics of an ejector diffuser system was studied for various geometric and flow conditions. A comparison of the results with those of pressure measurements along the diffuser length in an experimental facility showed discrepancies, which are attributed to the boundary conditions imposed.

  12. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  13. Revealing mesoscopic structural universality with diffusion.

    PubMed

    Novikov, Dmitry S; Jensen, Jens H; Helpern, Joseph A; Fieremans, Els

    2014-04-08

    Measuring molecular diffusion is widely used for characterizing materials and living organisms noninvasively. This characterization relies on relations between macroscopic diffusion metrics and structure at the mesoscopic scale commensurate with the diffusion length. Establishing such relations remains a fundamental challenge, hindering progress in materials science, porous media, and biomedical imaging. Here we show that the dynamical exponent in the time dependence of the diffusion coefficient distinguishes between the universality classes of the mesoscopic structural complexity. Our approach enables the interpretation of diffusion measurements by objectively selecting and modeling the most relevant structural features. As an example, the specific values of the dynamical exponent allow us to identify the relevant mesoscopic structure affecting MRI-measured water diffusion in muscles and in brain, and to elucidate the structural changes behind the decrease of diffusion coefficient in ischemic stroke.

  14. Differentiating brown and white adipose tissues by high-resolution diffusion NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjay Kumar; Nagashima, Kaz; Yaligar, Jadegoud; Michael, Navin; Lee, Swee Shean; Xianfeng, Tian; Gopalan, Venkatesh; Sadananthan, Suresh Anand; Anantharaj, Rengaraj; Velan, S Sendhil

    2017-01-01

    There are two types of fat tissues, white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT), which essentially perform opposite functions in whole body energy metabolism. There is a large interest in identifying novel biophysical properties of WAT and BAT by a quantitative and easy-to-run technique. In this work, we used high-resolution pulsed field gradient diffusion NMR spectroscopy to study the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of fat molecules in rat BAT and WAT samples. The ADC of fat in BAT and WAT from rats fed with a chow diet was compared with that of rats fed with a high-fat diet to monitor how the diffusion properties change due to obesity-associated parameters such as lipid droplet size, fatty acid chain length, and saturation. Feeding a high-fat diet resulted in increased saturation, increased chain lengths, and reduced ADC of fat in WAT. The ADC of fat was lower in BAT relative to WAT in rats fed both chow and high-fat diets. Diffusion of fat was restricted in BAT due to the presence of small multilocular lipid droplets. Our findings indicate that in vivo diffusion might be a potential way for better delineation of BAT and WAT in both lean and obese states.

  15. The Diffusion of Charged Particles in Collisional Plasmas: Free and Ambipolar Diffusion at Low and Moderate Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, A. V.

    1990-01-01

    The interpretation of measurements of the properties of weakly ionized plasmas in terms of diffusion of electrons and ions is reviewed both critically and tutorially. A particular effort is made to tie together various aspects of charged particle diffusion phenomena in quiescent, partially ionized plasmas. The concepts of diffusion length and effective diffusion coefficient and the treatment of partially reflecting boundaries are developed in the limit of the space-charge-free motion of the electrons or ions. A simplified derivation of the screening length for space charge electric fields is followed by a review of the conventional derivation of diffusion in the ambipolar limit. A discussion of the scaling parameters of the ratio of the diffusion length to the screening length and the ratio of the diffusion length to the ion mean-free-path leads to a map used to correlate published models covering the complete range of these parameters. The models of measurements of the diffusion of electrons, several types of positive ions, and negative ions are reviewed. The role of diffusion in the decay of charged particle densities and wall currents during the afterglow of a discharge is then considered. The effects of collapse of the space charge field and of diffusion cooling are reviewed. Finally, the application of the diffusion models to a number of different discharges is discussed. PMID:28179784

  16. Micro-heterogeneity metrics for diffusion in soft matter†

    PubMed Central

    Mellnik, John; Vasquez, Paula A.; McKinley, Scott A.; Witten, Jacob; Hill, David B.; Forest, M. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Passive particle tracking of diffusive paths in soft matter, coupled with analysis of the path data, is firmly established as a fundamental methodology for characterization of both diffusive transport properties (the focus here) and linear viscoelasticity. For either focus, particle time series are typically analyzed by ensemble averaging over paths, a perfectly natural protocol for homogeneous materials or for applications where mean properties are sufficient. Many biological materials, however, are heterogeneous over length scales above the probe diameter, and the implications of heterogeneity for biologically relevant transport properties (e.g. diffusive passage times through a complex fluid layer) motivate this paper. Our goals are three-fold: first, to detect heterogeneity as reflected by the ensemble path data; second, to further decompose the ensemble of particle paths into statistically distinct clusters; and third, to fit the path data in each cluster to a model for the underlying stochastic process. After reviewing current best practices for detection and assessment of heterogeneity in diffusive processes, we introduce our strategy toward the first two goals with methods from the statistics and machine learning literature that have not found application thus far to passive particle tracking data. We apply an analysis based solely on the path data that detects heterogeneity and yields a decomposition of particle paths into statistically distinct clusters. After these two goals are achieved, one can then pursue model-fitting. We illustrate these heterogeneity metrics on diverse datasets: for numerically generated and experimental particle paths, with tunable and unknown heterogeneity, on numerical models for simple diffusion and anomalous sub-diffusion, and experimentally on sucrose, hyaluronic acid, agarose, and human lung culture mucus solutions. PMID:25144347

  17. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  18. Length of stain dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Payload customers for the Space Shuttle have recently expressed concerns about the possibility of their payloads at an adjacent pad being contaminated by plume effluents from a shuttle at an active pad as they await launch on an inactive pad. As part of a study to satisfy such concerns a ring of inexpensive dosimeters was deployed around the active pad at the inter-pad distance. However, following a launch, dosimeters cannot be read for several hours after the exposure. As a consequence factors such as different substrates, solvent systems, and possible volatilization of HCl from the badges were studied. This observation led to the length of stain (LOS) dosimeters of this invention. Commercial passive LOS dosimeters are sensitive only to the extent of being capable of sensing 2 ppm to 20 ppm if the exposure is 8 hours. To map and quantitate the HCl generated by Shuttle launches, and in the atmosphere within a radius of 1.5 miles from the active pad, a sensitivity of 2 ppm HCl in the atmospheric gases on an exposure of 5 minutes is required. A passive length of stain dosimeter has been developed having a sensitivity rendering it capable of detecting a gas in a concentration as low as 2 ppm on an exposure of five minutes.

  19. Iron Diffusivity in Water Saturated Rhyolite Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. C.; Bell, A.

    2007-12-01

    measured diffusion length indicating that the bulk diffusivity of iron is not affected by coupled diffusion with these major elements. The chlorine concentration in the melt, however, increases markedly toward the magnetite-glass interface. This finding suggests that iron and chlorine are associated strongly in the melt and that the presence of iron in the melt, owing to magnetite dissolution increases significantly the chlorine "solubility" in the melt. The new results constrain the growth and dissolution rates of iron-bearing minerals during the evolution of hydrous felsic melt, including magma mixing, and the apparent association of iron and chlorine in the melt provides important constraints on the mass transfer of iron, chlorine and other metals, to an exsolved volatile phase and how this impacts the acidity, hence metal-scavenging potential, of the volatile phase.

  20. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  1. Diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Iplikcioglu, A C; Bek, S; Gökduman, C A; Bikmaz, K; Cosar, M

    2006-06-01

    Diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus (DVHCP) is a rare condition which is characterized by the presence of diffuse enlargement of the entire choroid plexus throughout the length of the choroidal fissure and overproduction of CSF. The diagnosis of diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus can be established by the MR demonstration of diffusely large, contrast enhanced choroid plexus in the cases of overproduction hydrocephalus. Although some authors recommend choroid plexus excision or coagulation, ventriculo-atrial shunt insertion is a simple and effective treatment modality in cases of diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus. In this report we present a case of diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus and a short review of the literature. To our knowledge, in the CT and MRI era only 5 cases of DVHCP cases have been reported.

  2. Effects of solvent on the formation of the MUA monolayer on Si and its diffusion barrier properties for Cu metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mohammad Arifur; Han, Jung Suk; Jeong, Kyunghoon; Nam, Ho-seok; Lee, Jaegab

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the effects of solvents, such as ethanol and isooctane, on self-assembly of the mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) monolayer on Si and its diffusion barrier properties for Cu metallization. The use of isooctane as a solvent produced MUA self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) (˜1.3 nm thick) on Si. These acted as an effective diffusion barrier against Cu diffusion up to 200°C. In contrast, the MUA SAMs produced by ethanol allowed the diffusion of Cu to a MUA-Si interface at 200°C, stimulating the out-diffusion of Si into Cu and thus resulting in the degraded diffusion barrier properties. This was possibly due to the partial formation of interplane hydrogen bonding between the terminal groups of the bound acid and free thiol groups. This provided less dense thiol surface groups, thus leading to poor adhesion of Cu to MUA SAMs. The fabricated Cu/isooctane-assisted MUA source/drain electrode a-Si:H thin film transistors with a channel length of 10 µm exhibited an excellent electron mobility of 0.74 cm2/V-s, threshold voltage of -0.51 V, I on / I off ratio of 3.25 × 106, specific contact resistance of 4.24 Ω-cm2 after annealing at 200°C.

  3. Ambipolar diffusion in complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Losseva, T V; Popel, S I; Yu, M Y; Ma, J X

    2007-04-01

    A self-consistent model of the ambipolar diffusion of electrons and ions in complex (dusty) plasmas accounting for the local electric fields, the dust grain charging process, and the interaction of the plasma particles with the dust grains and neutrals is presented. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the interaction of the electrons and ions with the dust grains as well as with the neutrals are investigated. It is shown that increase of the dust density leads to a reduction of the diffusion scale length, and this effect is enhanced at higher electron densities. The dependence of the diffusion scale length on the neutral gas pressure is found to be given by a power law, where the absolute value of the power exponent decreases with increase of the dust density. The electric field gradient and its effects are shown to be significant and should thus be taken into account in studies of complex plasmas with not very small dust densities. The possibility of observing localized coherent dissipative nonlinear dust ion-acoustic structures in an asymmetrically discharged double plasma is discussed.

  4. Probing dark exciton diffusion using photovoltage

    PubMed Central

    Mullenbach, Tyler K.; Curtin, Ian J.; Zhang, Tao; Holmes, Russell J.

    2017-01-01

    The migration of weakly and non-luminescent (dark) excitons remains an understudied subset of exciton dynamics in molecular thin films. Inaccessible via photoluminescence, these states are often probed using photocurrent methods that require efficient charge collection. Here we probe exciton harvesting in both luminescent and dark materials using a photovoltage-based technique. Transient photovoltage permits a real-time measurement of the number of charges in an organic photovoltaic cell, while avoiding non-geminate recombination losses. The extracted exciton diffusion lengths are found to be similar to those determined using photocurrent. For the luminescent material boron subphthalocyanine chloride, the photovoltage determined diffusion length is less than that extracted from photoluminescence. This indicates that while photovoltage circumvents non-geminate losses, geminate recombination at the donor–acceptor interface remains the primary recombination pathway. Photovoltage thus offers a general approach for extracting a device-relevant diffusion length, while also providing insight in to the dominant carrier recombination pathways. PMID:28128206

  5. Probing dark exciton diffusion using photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullenbach, Tyler K.; Curtin, Ian J.; Zhang, Tao; Holmes, Russell J.

    2017-01-01

    The migration of weakly and non-luminescent (dark) excitons remains an understudied subset of exciton dynamics in molecular thin films. Inaccessible via photoluminescence, these states are often probed using photocurrent methods that require efficient charge collection. Here we probe exciton harvesting in both luminescent and dark materials using a photovoltage-based technique. Transient photovoltage permits a real-time measurement of the number of charges in an organic photovoltaic cell, while avoiding non-geminate recombination losses. The extracted exciton diffusion lengths are found to be similar to those determined using photocurrent. For the luminescent material boron subphthalocyanine chloride, the photovoltage determined diffusion length is less than that extracted from photoluminescence. This indicates that while photovoltage circumvents non-geminate losses, geminate recombination at the donor-acceptor interface remains the primary recombination pathway. Photovoltage thus offers a general approach for extracting a device-relevant diffusion length, while also providing insight in to the dominant carrier recombination pathways.

  6. Coaxial atomizer liquid intact lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, Hasan; Chigier, Norman; Farago, Zoltan

    1991-01-01

    Average intact lengths of round liquid jets generated by airblast coaxial atomizer were measured from over 1500 photographs. The intact lengths were studied over a jet Reynolds number range of 18,000 and Weber number range of 260. Results are presented for two different nozzle geometries. The intact lengths were found to be strongly dependent on Re and We numbers. An empirical equation was derived as a function of these parameters. A comparison of the intact lengths for round jets and flat sheets shows that round jets generate shorter intact lengths.

  7. Alternative hybrid electrolytes based on a series of bis(trialkoxysilyl)alkanes and 3-(trihydroxysilyl)-1-propane sulfonic acid applied in gas diffusion electrodes of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. W.; Chung, L. C.; Veerapur, R. S.; Yang, F. C.

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the electrolyte distribution in catalyst layers and enhancing the utilization of catalyst existing in primary pores. Bis(trialkoxysilyl)alkanes (BTAS-alkanes) and 3-(trihydroxysilyl)-1-propane sulfonic acid (THS)Pro-SO 3H) precursors have been used to prepare a series of hybrid electrolytes with various organic segment lengths of BTAS-alkanes and ratios of organic moiety and sulfonic acid groups. Investigations of BTAS-alkanes series includes bis(triethoxysilyl)octane (BTES-Oct), bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane (BTMS-Hex), and bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTES-Eth). Small angle X-ray spectroscopy (SAXS) identifies morphological phase separation in BTES-Oct and BTMS-Hex hybrid electrolytes. The results of mercury porosimetry and BET porosimetry show that the hybrid electrolytes have better capability than Nafion ionomer to penetrate into primary pores of the catalyst layers. Electrochemical measurements including electrode polarization, electrochemical active surface (EAS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are discussed. The BTES-Oct or BTMS-Hex hybrid electrolytes with higher ratio of organic moiety and sulfonic acid group have achieved better electrode performance. Oxygen benefit current (OBC) results indicate that higher ratios of BTES-Oct/(THS)Pro-SO 3H provides higher hydrophobicity with better gas transport properties. However, the hybrid electrodes exhibit lower cathode performance than Nafion ®-based electrodes due to excessive electrolyte incorporated in the catalyst layer.

  8. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  9. A submicrometer lifted diffused-layer MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokawa, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Toshio; Kiuchi, Kazuhide

    1987-03-01

    A new lifted diffused-layer (LID) MOSFET has been devised and fabricated, where the major portions of the source/drain (S/D) diffused layers are placed on top of the field insulator to reduce S/D parasitic capacitances. The primary feature of this MOSFET is that the structure and processing are especially developed for submicrometer gate lengths. The fabricated LID MOSFET with a 0.5-micron gate length and a 10-nm gate oxide thickness showed good electrical characteristics, such as a maximum transconductance of 115 mS/mm and an inverter delay time of 59 ps/stage.

  10. Effective diffusivity in active Brownian suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, Eric; Brady, John

    2016-11-01

    We study the single-particle diffusion of a Brownian probe of size R in a suspension comprised of a Newtonian solvent and a dilute dispersion of active Brownian particles (ABPs) with size a, characteristic swim velocity U0, and a reorientation time τR. These ABPs, or "swimmers," have a run length l =U0τR , and a mechanical activity ksTs =ζaU02τR / 6 , where ζa is the Stokes drag coefficient of a swimmer. When the swimmers are inactive, collisions between the probe and the swimmers sterically hinder the probe's diffusive motion. When the activity of the swimmers is greater than the Boltzmann energy, ksTs >kB T , rather than being sterically hindered, the probe diffusivity is actually greater than its Stokes-Einstein-Sutherland diffusivity due to the mechanical energy imparted to the probe upon collisions with the swimmers. The active contribution to the effective diffusivity is a non-monotonic function of the swimmers' run length compared to the contact length between the probe and a swimmer: l / (R + a) . Comparisons are made to previous theoretical and experimental investigations of the hydrodynamic diffusion of a colloidal particle in a dilute suspension of swimming bacteria. NSF Grant No. CBET 1437570.

  11. Diffusion of intracerebrally injected (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid and (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol in the mouse brain. Effects of ischemia and electroconvulsive shock

    SciTech Connect

    Pediconi, M.F.; Rodriguez de Turco, E.B.; Bazan, N.G.

    1982-12-01

    (2-/sup 3/H)Glycerol and (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid were injected into the region of the frontal horn of the left ventricle of mice and were distributed rapidly throughout the brain. After 10 sec, most of the radioactive fatty acid was found in the hemisphere near the injection site; after 10 min, it was recovered in similar proportions in the cerebellum and brain stem. (2-/sup 3/H)Glycerol showed a heterogeneous distribution, with most of the label remaining in the left hemisphere even after 10 min. On a fresh weight basis, cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem were found to contain similar amounts of labeled glycerol. However, the amount of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonate in cerebrum was only 50% of that recovered from cerebellum or brain stem. Brain ischemia or a single electroconvulsive shock reduced the spread of the label, producing an accumulation of radioactivity in the injected hemisphere, except for an increase in (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol in the brain stem during ischemia. Despite the significant decrease in available precursor in the cerebellum and brain stem after electroshock, the amount of label incorporated into lipids was not altered in these areas and only slightly diminished in the cerebrum.

  12. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  13. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  14. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  15. Resolving and measuring diffusion in complex interfaces: Exploring new capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.

    2015-09-01

    This exploratory LDRD targeted the use of a new high resolution spectroscopic diffusion capabilities developed at Sandia to resolve transport processes at interfaces in heterogeneous polymer materials. In particular, the combination of high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments were used to directly explore interface diffusion within heterogeneous polymer composites, including measuring diffusion for individual chemical species in multi-component mixtures. Several different types of heterogeneous polymer systems were studied using these HRMAS NMR diffusion capabilities to probe the resolution limitations, determine the spatial length scales involved, and explore the general applicability to specific heterogeneous systems. The investigations pursued included a) the direct measurement of the diffusion for poly(dimethyl siloxane) polymer (PDMS) on nano-porous materials, b) measurement of penetrant diffusion in additive manufactures (3D printed) processed PDMS composites, and c) the measurement of diffusion in swollen polymers/penetrant mixtures within nano-confined aluminum oxide membranes. The NMR diffusion results obtained were encouraging and allowed for an improved understanding of diffusion and transport processes at the molecular level, while at the same time demonstrating that the spatial heterogeneity that can be resolved using HRMAS NMR PFG diffusion experiment must be larger than ~μm length scales, expect for polymer transport within nanoporous carbons where additional chemical resolution improves the resolvable heterogeneous length scale to hundreds of nm.

  16. Fluid diffusion in porous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Lowell I.

    Fluid motion in porous media has received a great deal of theoretical and experimental attention due to its importance in systems as diverse as ground water aquifers, catalytic processes, and size separation schemes. Often, the motion of interest is the random thermal motion of molecules in a fluid undergoing no net flow. This diffusive motion is particularly important when the size of the pores is nearly the same as the size of the molecules. In this study, fluid diffusion is measured in several varieties of porous silica whose pore structure is determined by the process by which it is made. The samples in this study have porosities (φ, the ratio of the pore volume to the total sample volume) that vary from 0.3 to 0.75 and average pore radii that range from approximately 15 to 120 A. Determining the effect of the pore structure on the diffusion of a liquid in a porous material is complicated by the chemical interactions between the diffusing molecules and the pore surface. In this study, ions in a hydrophilic fluid are used to block the adsorption of the diffusing dye molecules to the hydroxyl groups covering the silica surface. This technique is unlike typical surface treatments of silica in that it does not permanently alter the pore geometry. In this work, fluid diffusion is measured with a transient holographic grating technique where interfering laser beams create a periodic refractive index modulation in the fluid. The diffraction of a third laser off this grating is monitored to determine how quickly the grating relaxes, thereby determining the diffusion coefficient of the molecules in the fluid. Varying the grating periodicity controls the length scale of the diffusion measurement from 1.2 to 100 μm which is much larger than the average pore sizes of the samples. Therefore, over these large scales, we measure 'normal' diffusion, where the mean squared displacement of a diffusing particle varies linearly with time. In one particular type of porous silica

  17. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  18. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  19. Anomalous diffusion in neutral evolution of model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-06-01

    Protein evolution is frequently explored using minimalist polymer models, however, little attention has been given to the problem of structural drift, or diffusion. Here, we study neutral evolution of small protein motifs using an off-lattice heteropolymer model in which individual monomers interact as low-resolution amino acids. In contrast to most earlier models, both the length and folded structure of the polymers are permitted to change. To describe structural change, we compute the mean-square distance (MSD) between monomers in homologous folds separated by n neutral mutations. We find that structural change is episodic, and, averaged over lineages (for example, those extending from a single sequence), exhibits a power-law dependence on n . We show that this exponent depends on the alignment method used, and we analyze the distribution of waiting times between neutral mutations. The latter are more disperse than for models required to maintain a specific fold, but exhibit a similar power-law tail.

  20. Marmot-Fission-Gas-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders; Matthews, Christopher

    2016-10-22

    The MARMOT-FISSION-GAS-DIFFUSION software solves a coupled set of partial differential equations describing fission gas evolution in UO2 nuclear fuel. It is part of the MARMOT code, which builds on the MOOSE framework. Both the MARMOT code and the MOOSE framework are developed and maintained by Idaho National Laboratory. The model in MARMOT-FISSION-GAS-DIFFUSION consists of a set of continuum reaction-diffusion equations capturing formation and annihilation of defects, reactions between defects, diffusion of defects and segregation of defects to grain boundaries. Defects refer to vacancies and interstitials as well fission gas atoms (Xe) occupying various trap sites such as uranium and oxygen vacancies and interstitials sites. The code can treat a large number of defect types. The model is formulated within the phase field framework to be compatible with other MARMOT kernels. The driving forces for all reactions, diffusion and segregation events are consistently formulated as a variational derivatives of the free energy of the system. The rates of the reactions are controlled by the corresponding kinetic coefficients. The free energy and the kinetic coefficients for UO2 have been parameterized by lower length scale simulations. The code can be used to simulate defect evolution in a prescribed UO2 microstructure as well as to solve defect clustering problems that control effective diffusivities under both thermal and irradiation conditions. It I possible to extend the current UO2 model to other fuel types such as accident tolerant fuels based on the U3Si2 compound. This would obviously require a new set of material properties describing the behavior of defects in U3Si2 rather than UO2. The framework is however designed to be generic.

  1. Line Lengths and Starch Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Sandra E.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates readability of different line lengths in advertising body copy, hypothesizing a normal curve with lower scores for shorter and longer lines, and scores above the mean for lines in the middle of the distribution. Finds support for lower scores for short lines and some evidence of two optimum line lengths rather than one. (SKC)

  2. A Systematic Comparison of Mathematical Models for Inherent Measurement of Ciliary Length: How a Cell Can Measure Length and Volume

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, William B.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Serebrenik, Yevgeniy V.; Ritter, Alex; Hernandez-Lopez, Rogelio A.; Gunzenhauser, Julia; Kannegaard, Elisa; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2015-01-01

    Cells control organelle size with great precision and accuracy to maintain optimal physiology, but the mechanisms by which they do so are largely unknown. Cilia and flagella are simple organelles in which a single measurement, length, can represent size. Maintenance of flagellar length requires an active transport process known as intraflagellar transport, and previous measurements suggest that a length-dependent feedback regulates intraflagellar transport. But the question remains: how is a length-dependent signal produced to regulate intraflagellar transport appropriately? Several conceptual models have been suggested, but testing these models quantitatively requires that they be cast in mathematical form. Here, we derive a set of mathematical models that represent the main broad classes of hypothetical size-control mechanisms currently under consideration. We use these models to predict the relation between length and intraflagellar transport, and then compare the predicted relations for each model with experimental data. We find that three models—an initial bolus formation model, an ion current model, and a diffusion-based model—show particularly good agreement with available experimental data. The initial bolus and ion current models give mathematically equivalent predictions for length control, but fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments rule out the initial bolus model, suggesting that either the ion current model or a diffusion-based model is more likely correct. The general biophysical principles of the ion current and diffusion-based models presented here to measure cilia and flagellar length can be generalized to measure any membrane-bound organelle volume, such as the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:25809250

  3. Experimental Evaluation of Rocket Exhaust Diffusers for Altitude Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, Joseph N.; Meyer, Carl L.; Peters, Daniel J.

    1960-01-01

    An experimental investigation of exhaust diffusers has been conducted to evaluate various methods of minimizing the overall pressure ratio (from chamber to ambient pressure) required to establish and maintain full expansion of the nozzle flow (altitude simulation). Exhaust-diffuser configurations investigated were (1) cylindrical diffusers, (2) diffusers with contraction, and (3) diffusers including a right-angle turn. Cylindrical diffusers were evaluated with primary nozzles of various area ratios and types, as well as two clustered configurations; the other diffusers were evaluated with individual nozzles of constant area ratio and varied type. Air was the working fluid, except for two check points obtained with JP-4 fuel and liquid-oxygen rocket engines and cylindrical diffusers. The minimum length-diameter ratio of cylindrical diffusers was about 6 for minimum pressure-ratio requirements. With cylindrical diffusers of adequate length, the pressure-ratio requirements were primarily a function of the ratio of diffuser to nozzle-throat areas and were essentially independent of primary-nozzle type (including two clustered configurations) or area ratio. The two check points obtained with rocket engines indicated the pressure-ratio requirements at given ratios of diffuser to nozzle-throat areas were lowered, as compared with the requirements with air, as a result of the reduced ratio of specific heats. The minimum length-diameter ratio of the contraction throat of convergent-divergent diffusers was also about 6 for minimum pressure-ratio requirements. With adequate contraction-throat length, the pressure-ratio requirements of such diffusers were appreciably below those of comparable cylindrical diffusers when used with conical and cutoff-isentropic nozzles, but not when used with a bell nozzle. Minimum pressure-ratio requirements of a diffuser including a simple long-radius right-angle turn at maximum diffuser area, obtained with the center of radius of the turn a

  4. Gestation length in farmed reindeer.

    PubMed

    Shipka, M P; Rowell, J E

    2010-01-01

    Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarundus) are the only cervids indigenous to the arctic environment. In Alaska, reindeer are a recognized agricultural species and an economic mainstay for many native populations. Traditionally raised in extensive free-ranging systems, a recent trend toward intensive farming requires a more in-depth knowledge of reproductive management. Reported gestation length in reindeer varies, ranging from 198 to 229 d in studies performed at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. A switchback study that manipulated only breeding date demonstrated a mean increase in gestation length of 8.5 d among females bred early in the season. The negative correlation between conception date and gestation length is consistent with reindeer research at other locations and reports of variable gestation length in a growing number of domestic and non-domestic species. This paper reviews the phenomenon in reindeer and discusses some of the factors known to affect gestation length as well as possible areas for future research.

  5. Double-diffusive layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaussinger, Florian; Kupka, Friedrich; Hücker, Sebastian; Egbers, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Double-diffusive convection plays an important role in geo- and astrophysical applications. The special case, where a destabilising temperature gradient counteracts a stabilising solute gradient leads to layering phenomena under certain conditions. Convectively mixed layers sandwiched in diffusive interfaces form a so-called stack. Well-known double-diffusive systems are observed in rift lakes in Africa and even from the coffee drink Latte Macciatto. Stacks of layers are also predicted to occur inside massive stars and inside giant planets. Their dynamics depend on the thermal, the solute and the momentum diffusivities, as well on the ratio of the gradients of the opposing stratifications. Since the layering process cannot be derived from linear stability analysis, the full nonlinear set of equations has to be investigated. Numerical simulations have become feasible for this task, despite the physical processes operate on a vast range of length and time scales, which is challenging for numerical hydrodynamical modelling. The oceanographically relevant case of fresh and salty water is investigated here in further details. The heat and mass transfer is compared with theoretical results and experimental measurements. Additionally, the initial dynamic of layering, the transient behaviour of a stack and the long time evolution are presented using the example of Lake Kivu and the interior of a giant planet.

  6. Nanoparticle Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Kalathi, Jagannathan; Yamamoto, Umi; Schweizer, Kenneth; Grest, Gary S.; Kumar, Sanat

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations show that nanoparticle (NP) diffusivity in weakly interacting mixtures of NPs and polymer melts has two very different classes of behavior depending on their size. NP relaxation times and their diffusivities are completely described by the local, Rouse dynamics of the polymer chains for NPs smaller than the polymer entanglement mesh size. The motion of larger NPs, which are comparable to the entanglement mesh size, is significantly slowed by chain entanglements, and is not describable by the Stokes-Einstein relationship. Our results are in essentially quantitative agreement with a force-level generalized Langevin equation theory for all the NP sizes and chain lengths explored, and imply that for these lightly entangled systems, activated NP hopping is not important.

  7. Review of HxPyOz-Catalyzed H + OH Recombination in Scramjet Nozzle Expansions; and Possible Phosphoric Acid Enhancement of Scramjet Flameholding, from Extinction of H3PO4 + H2 - Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Recent detailed articles by Twarowski indicate that small quantities of phosphorus oxides and acids in the fuel-rich combustion products of H2 + phosphine (PH3) + air should significantly catalyze H, OH and O recombination kinetics during high-speed nozzle expansions -- to reform H2O, release heat, and approach equilibrium more rapidly and closely than uncatalyzed kinetics. This paper is an initial feasibility study to determine (a) if addition of phosphoric acid vapor (H3PO4) to a H2 fuel jet -- which is much safer than using PH3 -- will allow combustion in a high-speed scramjet engine test without adverse effects on localized flameholding, and (b) if phosphorus-containing exhaust emissions are environmentally acceptable. A well-characterized axisymmetric straight-tube opposed jet burner (OJB) tool is used to evaluate H3PO4 addition effects on the air velocity extinction limit (flame strength) of a H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flame. Addition of nitric oxide (NO), also believed to promote catalytic H-atom recombination, was evaluated for comparison. Two to five mass percent H3PO4 in the H2 jet increased flame strength 4.2%, whereas airside addition decreased it 1%. Adding 5% NO to the H2 caused a 2% decrease. Products of H-atom attack on H3PO4 produced an intense green chemiluminescence near the stagnation point. The resultant exothermic production of phosphorus oxides and acids, with accelerated H-atom recombination, released sufficient heat near the stagnation point to increase flame strength. In conclusion, the addition of H3PO4 vapor (or more reactive P sources) to hydrogen in scramjet engine tests may positively affect flameholding stability in the combustor and thrust production during supersonic expansion -- a possible dual benefit with system design / performance implications. Finally, a preliminary assessment of possible environmental effects indicates that scramjet exhaust emissions should consist of phosphoric acid aerosol, with gradual

  8. Minimum length-maximum velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panes, Boris

    2012-03-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example, we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA on superluminal neutrinos.

  9. Definition of Magnetic Exchange Length

    SciTech Connect

    Abo, GS; Hong, YK; Park, J; Lee, J; Lee, W; Choi, BC

    2013-08-01

    The magnetostatic exchange length is an important parameter in magnetics as it measures the relative strength of exchange and self-magnetostatic energies. Its use can be found in areas of magnetics including micromagnetics, soft and hard magnetic materials, and information storage. The exchange length is of primary importance because it governs the width of the transition between magnetic domains. Unfortunately, there is some confusion in the literature between the magnetostatic exchange length and a similar distance concerning magnetization reversal mechanisms in particles known as the characteristic length. This confusion is aggravated by the common usage of two different systems of units, SI and cgs. This paper attempts to clarify the situation and recommends equations in both systems of units.

  10. Length Invisibilization of Tachyonic Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estakhr, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Faster than the speed of light particle such as tachyonic neutrino due to its superluminal nature disapper and is undetectable. L = iΩ-1Lo where, i =√{ - 1 } is imaginary Number, Ω = 1 /√{βs2 - 1 } is Estakhr's Omega factor, L is the Superluminal Length, Lo is the proper length, βs =Vs / c > 1 is superluminal speed parameter, Vs is Superluminal velocity and c is speed of light.

  11. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Michael; Yokota, Kenji; Antonova, Elena; Garcia, Angelica; Beaulieu, Ellen; Hayes, Terry; Iavarone, Anthony T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF). We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate host harboring X. fastidiosa RpfF (XfRpfF) is capable of producing a variety of both saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids. However, only 2-cis unsaturated acids were found to be biologically active in X. fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa produces, and is particularly responsive to, a novel DSF species, 2-cis-hexadecanoic acid that we term XfDSF2. It is also responsive to other, even longer 2-enoic acids to which other taxa such as Xanthomonas campestris are unresponsive. The 2-enoic acids that are produced by X. fastidiosa are strongly affected by the cellular growth environment, with XfDSF2 not detected in culture media in which 2-tetradecenoic acid (XfDSF1) had previously been found. X. fastidiosa is responsive to much lower concentrations of XfDSF2 than XfDSF1. Apparently competitive interactions can occur between various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that block the function of those agonistic 2-enoic fatty acids. By altering the particular 2-enoic acids produced and the relative balance of free enoic and saturated fatty acids, X. fastidiosa might modulate the extent of DSF-mediated quorum sensing. PMID:27435463

  12. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  13. Diffusion of oxygen in cork.

    PubMed

    Lequin, Sonia; Chassagne, David; Karbowiak, Thomas; Simon, Jean-Marc; Paulin, Christian; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2012-04-04

    This work reports measurements of effective oxygen diffusion coefficient in raw cork. Kinetics of oxygen transfer through cork is studied at 298 K thanks to a homemade manometric device composed of two gas compartments separated by a cork wafer sample. The first compartment contains oxygen, whereas the second one is kept under dynamic vacuum. The pressure decrease in the first compartment is recorded as a function of time. The effective diffusion coefficient D(eff) is obtained by applying Fick's law to transient state using a numerical method based on finite differences. An analytical model derived from Fick's law applied to steady state is also proposed. Results given by these two methods are in close agreement with each other. The harmonic average of the effective diffusion coefficients obtained from the distribution of 15 cork wafers of 3 mm thickness is 1.1 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1) with a large distribution over four decades. The statistical analysis of the Gaussian distribution obtained on a 3 mm cork wafer is extrapolated to a 48 mm cork wafer, which length corresponds to a full cork stopper. In this case, the probability density distribution gives a mean value of D(eff) equal to 1.6 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1). This result shows that it is possible to obtain the effective diffusion coefficient of oxygen through cork from short time (few days) measurements performed on a thin cork wafer, whereas months are required to obtain the diffusion coefficient for a full cork stopper. Permeability and oxygen transfer rate are also calculated for comparison with data from other studies.

  14. Search for selective ion diffusion through membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rates of several ions through some membranes developed as battery separators were measured. The ions investigated were Li(+), Rb(+), Cl(-), and So4. The members were crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol, crosslinked polyacrylic acid, a copolymer of the two, crosslinked calcium polyacrylate, cellulose, and several microporous polyphenylene oxide based films. No true specificity for diffusion of any of these ions was found for any of the membranes. But the calcium polyacrylate membrane was found to exhibit ion exchange with the diffusing ions giving rise to the leaching of the calcium ion and low reproducibility. These findings contrast earlier work where the calcium polyacrylate membrane did show specificity to the diffusion of the copper ion. In general, Fick's law appeared to be obeyed. Except for the microporous membranes, the coefficients for ion diffusion through the membranes were comparable with their values in water. For the microporous membranes, the values found for the coefficients were much less, due to the tortuosity of the micropores.

  15. Proton conduction in exchange membranes across multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Jorn, Ryan; Savage, John; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-11-20

    Concerns over global climate change associated with fossil-fuel consumption continue to drive the development of electrochemical alternatives for energy technology. Proton exchange fuel cells are a particularly promising technology for stationary power generation, mobile electronics, and hybrid engines in automobiles. For these devices to work efficiently, direct electrical contacts between the anode and cathode must be avoided; hence, the separator material must be electronically insulating but highly proton conductive. As a result, researchers have examined a variety of polymer electrolyte materials for use as membranes in these systems. In the optimization of the membrane, researchers are seeking high proton conductivity, low electronic conduction, and mechanical stability with the inclusion of water in the polymer matrix. A considerable number of potential polymer backbone and side chain combinations have been synthesized to meet these requirements, and computational studies can assist in the challenge of designing the next generation of technologically relevant membranes. Such studies can also be integrated in a feedback loop with experiment to improve fuel cell performance. However, to accurately simulate the currently favored class of membranes, perfluorosulfonic acid containing moieties, several difficulties must be addressed including a proper treatment of the proton-hopping mechanism through the membrane and the formation of nanophase-separated water networks. We discuss our recent efforts to address these difficulties using methods that push the limits of computer simulation and expand on previous theoretical developments. We describe recent advances in the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method that can probe proton diffusion at the nanometer-length scale and accurately model the so-called Grotthuss shuttling mechanism for proton diffusion in water. Using both classical molecular dynamics and coarse-grained descriptions that replace atomistic

  16. Translational diffusion of proteins in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Downton, Matthew T.

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions play an important role in the transport of analytes through nanoscale devices. Of particular note is the role that no-slip boundary conditions have on the drag coefficient of confined particles and molecules. In this work, we use a coarse grained molecular dynamics model to measure the diffusion coefficients of proteins confined within cylindrical nanochannels of similar dimension. Finite-size corrected bulk diffusion coefficients are found to agree with experimental data, while in channels, a good match is found between theoretical expressions based on continuum fluid mechanics and the reduction of the translational diffusion coefficient across a range of protein to channel size ratios. These results demonstrate that it is possible to directly use molecular simulation to make quantitative predictions of the effects of hydrodynamics on diffusion at length scales of order 1 nm.

  17. Bounds on the length of magnetic field lines in a two-dimensional plasma.

    PubMed

    Núñez, M

    2001-03-01

    Magnetic field lines in ideal turbulent plasmas tend to become quite complicated and their length to grow in time. Diffusivity allows for reconnection and possible shortening, but this fact has not so far been rigorously quantified. We show that in a two-dimensional diffusive plasma the mean length of field lines stays bounded for all time. Moreover, these estimates are local, in the sense that the mean values of magnetic field and velocity in the neighborhood of a ball determine bounds for length within the ball, without recourse to external magnitudes.

  18. Protein rejecting properties of PEG-grafted nanoparticles: influence of PEG-chain length and surface density evaluated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and bicinchoninic acid (BCA)-proteinassay.

    PubMed

    Gessner, A; Paulke, B R; Müller, R H; Göppert, T M

    2006-04-01

    Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted nanoparticles have been described as potential intravenously injectable, long-circulating drug carriers. The in vivo behaviour of intravenous administered nanoparticles is decisively influenced by the interaction of the particles with the blood proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was employed to study the protein rejecting properties of PEG-grafted polymer nanoparticles, possessing PEG-200 and PEG-400 chains, respectively. The calculated PEG-chain distances varied between 0.39/0.31 nm (PEG-200) and 0.39/0.34 nm (PEG-400), therefore it was possible to study the influence of high chain densities attained by the use of short PEG chains on the protein adsorption. Apart from a stronger protein rejection of small-MW proteins achieved by PEG-chain distance diminution, the affinity of several proteins for the PEG-chains are shown and discussed. Beside the study of protein adsorption patterns, the total protein mass adsorbed to the particles, as well as the extent of protein desorption prior to 2-DE, was investigated using the bicinchoninic acid (BCA)-protein assay.

  19. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  20. The Effect of Upstream Vane Wakes on Annular Diffuser Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Erica; Padilla, Angelina; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John

    2008-11-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the sensitivity to inlet conditions of the flow in two annular diffusers. One of the diffusers was a conservative design typical of a diffuser directly upstream of the combustor in a jet engine. The other had the same length and inlet shape as the first diffuser but a larger area ratio and was meant to operate on the verge of separation. Each diffuser was connected to two different inlets, one containing a fully-developed channel flow, the other containing wakes from a row of airfoils. Three-component velocity measurements were taken on the flow in each inlet/diffuser combination using Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry. Results will be presented on the 3D velocity fields in the two diffusers and the effect of the airfoil wakes on separation and secondary flows.

  1. Diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

  2. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  3. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  4. A Student Diffusion Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration toward low concentration.

  5. Handbook on atmospheric diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

  6. When Does Length Cause the Word Length Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J.; Surprenant, Aimee M.

    2011-01-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining…

  7. IMF Length Scales and Predictability: The Two Length Scale Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Szabo, Adam; Slavin, James A.; Lepping, R. P.; Kokubun, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a systematic study using simultaneous data from three spacecraft, Wind, IMP 8 (Interplanetary Monitoring Platform) and Geotail to examine interplanetary length scales and their implications on predictability for magnetic field parcels in the typical solar wind. Time periods were selected when the plane formed by the three spacecraft included the GSE (Ground Support Equipment) x-direction so that if the parcel fronts were strictly planar, the two adjacent spacecraft pairs would determine the same phase front angles. After correcting for the motion of the Earth relative to the interplanetary medium and deviations in the solar wind flow from radial, we used differences in the measured front angle between the two spacecraft pairs to determine structure radius of curvature. Results indicate that the typical radius of curvature for these IMF parcels is of the order of 100 R (Sub E). This implies that there are two important IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) scale lengths relevant to predictability: (1) the well-established scale length over which correlations observed by two spacecraft decay along a given IMF parcel, of the order of a few tens of Earth radii and (2) the scale length over which two spacecraft are unlikely to even observe the same parcel because of its curvature, of the order of a hundred Earth radii.

  8. Diffusion of photoacid generators by laser scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping L.; Webber, Stephen E.; Mendenhall, J.; Byers, Jeffrey D.; Chao, Keith K.

    1998-06-01

    Diffusion of the photogenerated acid during the period of time between exposure and development can cause contrast loss and ultimately loss of the latent image. This is especially relevant for chemically amplified photoresists that require a post-exposure baking step, which in turn facilitates acid diffusion due to the high temperature normally employed. It is thus important to develop techniques with good spatial resolution to monitor the photogeneration of acid. More precisely, we need techniques that provide two distinct types of information: spatial resolution on various length scales within the surface layer and also sufficient depth resolution so that one can observe the transition from very surface layer to bulk structure in the polymer blend coated on silicon substrate. Herein laser scanning confocal microscopy is used to evaluate the resist for the first time. We report the use of the confocal microscopy to map the pag/dye distribution in PHS matrices, with both reflectance images and fluorescence images. A laser beam is focused onto a small 3D volume element, termed a voxel. It is typically 200 nm X 200 nm laterally and 800 nm axially. The illuminated voxel is viewed such that only signals emanating from this voxel are detected, i.e., signal from outside the probed voxel is not detected. By adjusting the vertical position of the laser focal point, the voxel can be moved to the designated lateral plane to produce an image. Contrast caused by topology difference between the exposed and unexposed area can be eliminated. Bis-p-butylphenyl iodonium triflat (7% of polyhydroxystyrene) is used as photoacid generators. 5% - 18% (by weight, PHS Mn equals 13 k) resist in PGMEA solution is spin cast onto the treated quartz disk with thickness of 1.4 micrometers , 5 micrometers space/10 micrometers pitch chrome mask is used to generate the pattern with mercury DUV illumination. Fluoresceinamine, the pH-sensitive dye, is also used to enhance the contrast of

  9. CEBAF Upgrade Bunch Length Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Mahmoud

    2016-05-01

    Many accelerators use short electron bunches and measuring the bunch length is important for efficient operations. CEBAF needs a suitable bunch length because bunches that are too long will result in beam interruption to the halls due to excessive energy spread and beam loss. In this work, bunch length is measured by invasive and non-invasive techniques at different beam energies. Two new measurement techniques have been commissioned; a harmonic cavity showed good results compared to expectations from simulation, and a real time interferometer is commissioned and first checkouts were performed. Three other techniques were used for measurements and comparison purposes without modifying the old procedures. Two of them can be used when the beam is not compressed longitudinally while the other one, the synchrotron light monitor, can be used with compressed or uncompressed beam.

  10. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  11. Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2000-01-01

    A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

  12. Hydrodynamic length-scale selection in microswimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Dunkel, Jörn; Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Bär, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A universal characteristic of mesoscale turbulence in active suspensions is the emergence of a typical vortex length scale, distinctly different from the scale invariance of turbulent high-Reynolds number flows. Collective length-scale selection has been observed in bacterial fluids, endothelial tissue, and active colloids, yet the physical origins of this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we systematically derive an effective fourth-order field theory from a generic microscopic model that allows us to predict the typical vortex size in microswimmer suspensions. Building on a self-consistent closure condition, the derivation shows that the vortex length scale is determined by the competition between local alignment forces, rotational diffusion, and intermediate-range hydrodynamic interactions. Vortex structures found in simulations of the theory agree with recent measurements in Bacillus subtilis suspensions. Moreover, our approach yields an effective viscosity enhancement (reduction), as reported experimentally for puller (pusher) microorganisms.

  13. Critical waves and the length problem of biology

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction–diffusion with a small number substance. Min oscillations in Escherichia coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eukaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PMID:26240329

  14. Hydrodynamic length-scale selection in microswimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Dunkel, Jörn; Klapp, Sabine H L; Bär, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A universal characteristic of mesoscale turbulence in active suspensions is the emergence of a typical vortex length scale, distinctly different from the scale invariance of turbulent high-Reynolds number flows. Collective length-scale selection has been observed in bacterial fluids, endothelial tissue, and active colloids, yet the physical origins of this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we systematically derive an effective fourth-order field theory from a generic microscopic model that allows us to predict the typical vortex size in microswimmer suspensions. Building on a self-consistent closure condition, the derivation shows that the vortex length scale is determined by the competition between local alignment forces, rotational diffusion, and intermediate-range hydrodynamic interactions. Vortex structures found in simulations of the theory agree with recent measurements in Bacillus subtilis suspensions. Moreover, our approach yields an effective viscosity enhancement (reduction), as reported experimentally for puller (pusher) microorganisms.

  15. Critical waves and the length problem of biology.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Robert B

    2015-08-18

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction-diffusion with a small number substance. Min oscillations in Escherichia coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eukaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs.

  16. Generalized Drift-Diffusion Model In Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, S.; Bendib-Kalache, K.; Bendib, A.

    2008-09-23

    A new drift-diffusion model is proposed based on the computation of the stationary nonlocal current density. The semi classical Boltzmann equation is solved keeping all the anisotropies of the distribution function with the use of the continued fractions. The conductivity is calculated in the linear approximation and for arbitrary collision frequency with respect to Kv{sub t} where K{sup -1} is the characteristic length scale of the system and V{sub t} is the thermal velocity. The nonlocal conductivity can be used to close the generalized drift-diffusion equations valid for arbitrary collisionality.

  17. Radon Diffusion Measurement in Polyethylene based on Alpha Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, Wolfgang

    2011-04-27

    We present a method to measure the diffusion of Radon in solid materials based on the alpha decay of the radon daughter products. In contrast to usual diffusion measurements which detect the radon that penetrates a thin barrier, we let the radon diffuse into the material and then measure the alpha decays of the radon daughter products in the material. We applied this method to regular and ultra high molecular weight poly ethylene and find diffusion lengths of order of mm as expected. However, the preliminary analysis shows significant differences between two different approaches we have chosen. These differences may be explained by the different experimental conditions.

  18. Anomalous diffusion of poly(ethylene oxide) in agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Tom; Matsukawa, Shingo

    2016-11-01

    We report on the effect of probe size and diffusion time of poly(ethylene) oxide in agarose gels. Time-dependence of the diffusion coefficient, reflecting anomalous diffusion, was observed for poly(ethylene) oxide chains with hydrodynamic radii exceeding about 20nm at an agarose concentration of 2%. The main conclusion is that the pore distribution includes pores that are only several nm across, in agreement with scattering reports in the literature. Interpretation of the diffusion coefficient dependence on the probe size based on a model of entangled rigid rods yielded a rod length of 72nm.

  19. Simulations of singlet exciton diffusion in organic semiconductors: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorgaard, Josiah A.; Kose, Muhammet Erkan

    2014-12-22

    Our review describes the various aspects of simulation strategies for exciton diffusion in condensed phase thin films of organic semiconductors. Several methods for calculating energy transfer rate constants are discussed along with procedures for how to account for energetic disorder. Exciton diffusion can be modelled by using kinetic Monte-Carlo methods or master equations. Recent literature on simulation efforts for estimating exciton diffusion lengths of various conjugated polymers and small molecules are introduced. Moreover, these studies are discussed in the context of the effects of morphology on exciton diffusion and the necessity of accurate treatment of disorder for comparison of simulation results with those of experiment.

  20. Fibreoptic diffuse-light irradiators of biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Vladimir V; Loshchenov, V B; Konov, Vitalii I; Kononenko, Vitalii V

    2010-10-15

    We report techniques for the fabrication of laser radiation diffusers for interstitial photodynamic therapy. Using chemical etching of the distal end of silica fibre with a core diameter of 200 - 600 {mu}m, we have obtained long (up to 40 mm) diffusers with good scattering uniformity. Laser ablation has been used to produce cylindrical diffusers with high emission contrast and a scattering uniformity no worse than {approx}10 % in their middle part. The maximum length of the diffusers produced by this method is 20 - 25 mm. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Incubation length of dabbling ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells-Berlin, A. M.; Prince, H.H.; Arnold, T.W.

    2005-01-01

    We collected unincubated eggs from wild Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), Gadwall (A. strepera), Blue-winged Teal (A. discors), and Northern Shoveler (A. clypeata) nests and artificially incubated them at 37.5??C. Average incubation lengths of Mallard, Gadwall, and Northern Shoveler eggs did not differ from their wild-nesting counterparts, but artificially incubated Blue-winged Teal eggs required an additional 1.7 days to hatch, suggesting that wild-nesting teal incubated more effectively. A small sample of Mallard, Gadwall, and Northern Shoveler eggs artificially incubated at 38.3??C hatched 1 day sooner, indicating that incubation temperature affected incubation length. Mean incubation length of Blue-winged Teal declined by 1 day for each 11-day delay in nesting, but we found no such seasonal decline among Mallards, Gadwalls, or Northern Shovelers. There is no obvious explanation for the seasonal reduction in incubation length for Blue-winged Teal eggs incubated in a constant environment, and the phenomenon deserves further study. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2005.

  2. Finite length Taylor Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical solutions of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for flow between concentric rotating cylinders of finite length are obtained by a spectral collocation method. These representative results pertain to two-cell/one-cell exchange process, and are compared with recent experiments.

  3. Persistent Criminality and Career Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapanen, Rudy; Britton, Lee; Croisdale, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This study is an examination of persistent offending and its implications for the understanding and investigation of desistance and career length. Persistence, especially as it is operationalized using official measures, is characterized as fundamentally a measure of resistance to formal social control: continued crime in the face of increasingly…

  4. Characteristic length of glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donth, E.

    1996-03-01

    The characteristic length of the glass transition (ξ _α ) is based on the concept of cooperatively rearranging regions (CRR's) by Adam & Gibbs (1965): ξ _α is the diameter of one CRR. In the theoretical part of the talk a formula is derived how this length can be calculated from calorimetric data of the transformation interval. The approach is based on fluctuations in natural functional subsystems. The corresponding thermodynamics is represented e.g. in a book of the author (E. Donth, Relaxation and Thermodynamics in Polymers. Glass Transition, Akademie-Verlag, Berlin 1992). A typical value for this length is 3 nanometers. In the experimental part several examples are reported to enlarge the experimental evidence for such a length: Squeezing the glass transition in the amorphous layers of partially crystallized PET (C. Schick, Rostock), glass transition of small-molecule glass formers in a series of nanoscaled pores of porous glasses (F. Kremer, Leipzig), comparison with a concentration fluctuation model in homogeneous polymer mixtures (E.W. Fischer, Mainz), and, from our laboratory, backscaling to ξ _α across the main transition from the entanglement spacing in several amorphous polymers such as PVAC, PS, NR, and some polymer networks. Rouse backscaling was possible in the α β splitting region of several poly(n alkyl methacrylates) resulting in small characteristic lengths of order 1 nanometer near the onset of α cooperativity. In a speculative outlook a dynamic density pattern is presented, having a cellular structure with higher density and lower mobility of the cell walls. It will be explained, with the aid of different thermal expansion of wall and clusters, how the clusters within the cells maintain a certain mobility far below the glass temperature.

  5. Thermal diffusivity of some crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity data at room temperature and uniaxial pressure of 1 MPa are reported for five sets of crystalline rocks - granite, granodiorite, gabbro, basalt and gneiss. Diffusivity ranges between approximately 0.6 and 1.9 mm/sup 2//s, the lower end of the range being appropriate for basic rocks and the upper end for quartz-bearing acidic rocks. The scatter in diffusivity for each data set is significantly more than that of thermal conductivity, because the diffusivity of water is typically less than 10% of the diffusivity of most common minerals, whereas water conductivity is 25 - 30% of the conductivity of the minerals. For a sample set of uniform mineralogy in which porosity varies, a greater variation of diffusivity than of conductivity is therefore expected. For three of the sets sufficient mineralogical data were available to permit the assessment of methods of estimating thermal diffusivity from mineral content. All models tested yielded higher mean values of diffusivity than the means of the measured values. No model was found to be able to predict diffusivity to better than approximately 20%, but if that accuracy is sufficient, a simple geometrical model, for which only quartz content must be known, is adequate. The diffusivity data have been combined with measurements of thermal conductivity and density to provide estimates of specific heat. These all tend to be higher than those reported in the literature. For some rocks, such as the basalts, this can be explained in terms of relatively high water content and the very high specific heat of water compared with that of most common minerals. For the granites and granodiorites, the new specific heat data redefine the previously published means and ranges, by increasing the data base by approximately an order of magnitude.

  6. Polymer Diffusion in the Presence of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, Karen

    2014-03-01

    The center-of-mass diffusion of polymers within a polymer melt proceeds by the mechanism of reptation wherein the polymer is confined to a tube that is defined by neighboring entanglements and moves along its contour. Polymer diffusion is perturbed when the melt contains nanoparticles that are comparable in size to the radius of gyration (Rg) of the polymers. Within this talk, we will present tracer diffusion coefficients (D) results for three types of nanocomposite: spherical nanoparticles with surface functionalization, spherical nanoparticles with brushes, and cylindrical nanoparticles (aspect ratio = 5 to 50). When functionalized spherical nanoparticles have neutral or attractive interactions with the polymer matrix, a monotonic decrease in the diffusion coefficient is observed across a wide range of polymer molecular weight, nanoparticle size, and nanoparticle concentration. These data collapse onto a master curve when plotted as D normalized by the diffusion coefficient into a neat homopolymer (D/Do) versus our confinement parameter defined as the interparticle distance divided by 2Rg (ID/2Rg). Polymer diffusion in systems with grafted spherical nanoparticles exhibit the same D/Do versus ID/2Rg, when ID accounts for the extent to which the tracer polymer penetrates the polymer brush. For various cylindrical nanoparticles D/Do versus nanoparticle concentration exhibits a minimum when 2Rg is both larger than the nanoparticle diameter and smaller than the nanoparticle length. Complimentary molecular dynamics simulations and neutron scattering results will also be presented.

  7. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  8. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  9. Robustness of compound Dirichlet priors for Bayesian inference of branch lengths.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Rannala, Bruce; Yang, Ziheng

    2012-10-01

    We modified the phylogenetic program MrBayes 3.1.2 to incorporate the compound Dirichlet priors for branch lengths proposed recently by Rannala, Zhu, and Yang (2012. Tail paradox, partial identifiability and influential priors in Bayesian branch length inference. Mol. Biol. Evol. 29:325-335.) as a solution to the problem of branch-length overestimation in Bayesian phylogenetic inference. The compound Dirichlet prior specifies a fairly diffuse prior on the tree length (the sum of branch lengths) and uses a Dirichlet distribution to partition the tree length into branch lengths. Six problematic data sets originally analyzed by Brown, Hedtke, Lemmon, and Lemmon (2010. When trees grow too long: investigating the causes of highly inaccurate Bayesian branch-length estimates. Syst. Biol. 59:145-161) are reanalyzed using the modified version of MrBayes to investigate properties of Bayesian branch-length estimation using the new priors. While the default exponential priors for branch lengths produced extremely long trees, the compound Dirichlet priors produced posterior estimates that are much closer to the maximum likelihood estimates. Furthermore, the posterior tree lengths were quite robust to changes in the parameter values in the compound Dirichlet priors, for example, when the prior mean of tree length changed over several orders of magnitude. Our results suggest that the compound Dirichlet priors may be useful for correcting branch-length overestimation in phylogenetic analyses of empirical data sets.

  10. Effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiac muscle cell length, diameter, area, and sarcomere length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, R.; Barnes, M. A.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of anisosmotic stress on adult mammalian cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte) size. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length were measured in cardiocytes isolated from 10 normal rats and 10 normal cats. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 300 +/- 6 to 130 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 630 +/- 8 mosM. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length increased progressively when osmolarity was decreased, and there were no significant differences between cat and rat cardiocytes with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area or diameter; however, there were significant differences in cardiocyte length (2.8 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05) and sarcomere length (3.3 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05). To determine whether these species-dependent differences in length were related to diastolic interaction of the contractile elements or differences in relative passive stiffness, cardiocytes were subjected to the osmolarity gradient 1) during treatment with 7 mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), which inhibits cross-bridge interaction, or 2) after pretreatment with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), a bivalent Ca2+ chelator. Treatment with EGTA or BDM abolished the differences between cat and rat cardiocytes. Species-dependent differences therefore appeared to be related to the degree of diastolic cross-bridge association and not differences in relative passive stiffness. In conclusion, the osmolarity vs. cell size relation is useful in assessing the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress and may in future studies be useful in assessing changes in relative passive cardiocyte stiffness produced by pathological processes.

  11. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma.

  12. Critical Length Limiting Superlow Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  13. Critical length limiting superlow friction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-06

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  14. Heterogeneity of Alkane Chain Length in Freshwater and Marine Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Tabinda; Fatma, Zia; Fatma, Tasneem; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-01-01

    The potential utilization of cyanobacteria for the biological production of alkanes represents an exceptional system for the next generation of biofuels. Here, we analyzed a diverse group of freshwater and marine cyanobacterial isolates from Indian culture collections for their ability to produce both alkanes and alkenes. Among the 50 cyanobacterial isolates screened, 32 isolates; 14 freshwater and 18 marine isolates; produced predominantly alkanes. The GC-MS/MS profiles revealed a higher percentage of pentadecane and heptadecane production for marine and freshwater strains, respectively. Oscillatoria species were found to be the highest producers of alkanes. Among the freshwater isolates, Oscillatoria CCC305 produced the maximum alkane level with 0.43 μg/mg dry cell weight, while Oscillatoria formosa BDU30603 was the highest producer among the marine isolates with 0.13 μg/mg dry cell weight. Culturing these strains under different media compositions showed that the alkane chain length was not influenced by the growth medium but was rather an inherent property of the strains. Analysis of the cellular fatty acid content indicated the presence of predominantly C16 chain length fatty acids in marine strains, while the proportion of C18 chain length fatty acids increased in the majority of freshwater strains. These results correlated with alkane chain length specificity of marine and freshwater isolates indicating that alkane chain lengths may be primarily determined by the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of pentadecane-producing marine strains that was distinct from heptadecane-producing freshwater strains strongly suggesting a close association between alkane chain length and the cyanobacteria habitat. PMID:25853127

  15. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  16. Length dependence of carbon nanotube thermal conductivity and the "problem of long waves"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mingo, N.; Broido, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the first calculations of finite length carbon nanotube thermal conductivity that extend from the ballistic to the diffusive regime, throughout a very wide range of lengths and temperatures. The long standing problem of vanishing scattering of the "long wavelength phonf dramatically here, making the thermal conductivity diverge as the nanotube length increases. We show that the divergence disappears if 3-phonon scattering processes are considered to second or higher order. Nevertheless, for defect free nanotubes, the thermal conductivity keeps increasing up to very large lengths (10 gm at 300 K). Defects in the nanotube are also able to remove the long wavelength divergence.

  17. Thermal Diffusivity of Quartz and its Relation to Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefer, M.; Schilling, F. R.

    2001-12-01

    Thermal transport properties of minerals are fundamental for an understanding of heat transport in rocks and they are a prerequisite to model temperature distribution within the Earth. Besides its significance for crustal rocks, quartz and its physical properties are of interest in material science. Beyond that, quartz is of elementary importance due to its unique physical behavior, especially during low to high transformation. Quartz is characterized by a high anisotropy in thermal expansion, sound velocity, and thermal diffusivity. During the phase transition from low to high quartz the physical properties vary non-linearly, whereas sound velocity shows a distingued minimum, and average Poisson's ratio becomes negative. Moreover, quartz shows the highest thermal diffusivity and strongest temperature dependence of all silicates. Thermal diffusivity a and thermal conductivity l are interrelated by {l = cP ρ a}. Thermal diffusivity can be expressed by mean phonon (sound) velocity v and mean free path length l by a = 1/3 v l. By combining measured phononic velocity and thermal diffusivity the structure dependent mean free path length can be revealed. To determine thermal diffusivity of quartz especially during the low to high transition in the a- and c-direction we used a high precision transient technique (Schilling 1999) with high temperature resolution up to 800\\deg C. For temperatures below 500 \\deg C a pronounced 1/T dependence of thermal diffusivity is observed and is highest in the c-direction. A minimum in thermal diffusivity is observed during the phase transition. Above the transition thermal diffusivity increases and the highest diffusivity is observed in the a-direction. A similar cross over is observed for the maximum phononic velocity. Between 500\\deg and 800\\deg C velocity and thermal diffusivity show similar behavior. No significant contribution of radiative heat transport is detectable over the examined temperature range. The thermal diffusivity

  18. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  19. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  20. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOEpatents

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  1. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  2. A stirred bath technique for diffusivity measurements in cell matrices.

    PubMed

    Chresand, T J; Dale, B E; Hanson, S L; Gillies, R J

    1988-10-05

    A stirred bath technique was developed for determining effective diffusivities in cell matrices. The technique involves cell immobilization in a dilute gel which has negligible effect on solute diffusion. Agar and collagen were tested as immobilizing gels. Agar gel was shown to have minor interactions with the diffusion of various biological molecules, and was used for immobilization of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT) cells. Diffusivities of glucose and lactic acid were measured in EAT matrices for cell loadings between 20 and 45 vol %. Treatment with glutaraldehyde was effective in quenching the metabolic activity of the cells while preserving their physical properties and diffusive resistance. The measured data agree favorably with predictions based on Maxwell's equation for effective diffusion in a periodic composite material. The stirred bath technique is useful for diffusivity determinations in immobilized matrices or free slurries, and is applicable to both microbial and mammalian cell systems.

  3. Favorite Demonstrations: Gaseous Diffusion: A Demonstration of Graham's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.; Ebner, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid are used to illustrate rates of diffusion (Graham's Law). Simple equipment needed for the demonstration include a long tube, rubber stoppes, and cotton. Two related demonstrations are also explained. (DH)

  4. Applicability of Mixing Length Theory to a Turbulent Vortex System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, Robert G.

    1961-01-01

    The ability of mixing length theory to correlate vortex data is evaluated. Expressions are derived for eddy diffusivity by applying the techniques of von Karman and Prandtl which have been established for pipe flow. Total and static pressures were measured from the outer radius to the exhaust-nozzle radius of a vortex generator for a range of mass flows. These data are combined with Navier-Stokes solutions for this region of a compressible vortex to determine turbulent Reynolds numbers. The Reynolds number is related to Prandtl and Karman functions for various assumed boundary conditions, and the experimental data are used to determine the usefulness of these expressions. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Mixing length functions developed by applying von Karman's similarity hypothesis to vortex motion correlate the data better than do Prandtl functions obtained with the assumption that mixing length is proportional to radius. (2) Some of the expressions developed do not adequately represent the experimental data. (3) The data are correlated with acceptable scatter by evaluating the fluid radial inertia at the outer boundary and the shear stress at the inner boundary. The universal constant K was found to be 0.04 to 0.08, rather than the value of 0.4 which is accepted for rectilinear flow. (4) The data are best correlated by a modified Karman expression which includes an effect of radial inertia, as well as shear stress, on eddy diffusivity.

  5. A Simple Single Step diffusion and Emitter Etching Process for High Efficiency Gallium Antimonide Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rajagopalan; N.S. Reddy; E. Ehsani; I.B. Bhat; P.S. Dutta; R.J. Gutmann; G. Nichols; G.W. Charache; O. Sulima

    2003-08-29

    A single step diffusion followed by precise etching of the diffused layer has been developed to obtain a diffusion profile appropriate for high efficiency GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells. The junction depth was controlled through monitoring of light current-voltage (I-V) curves (photovoltaic response) during the post diffusion emitter etching process. The measured photoresponses (prior to device fabrication) have been correlated with the quantum efficiencies and the open circuit voltages in the fabricated devices. An optimum junction depth for obtaining highest quantum efficiency and open circuit voltage is presented based on diffusion lengths (or monitoring carrier lifetimes), carrier mobility and typical diffused impurity profile in GaSb.

  6. Perfluorooctanoic acid and environmental risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a member of the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) family of chemicals, which consist of a carbon backbone typically four to fourteen carbons in length and a charged functional moiety.

  7. The NIST Length Scale Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Beers, John S.; Penzes, William B.

    1999-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) interferometer for measuring graduated length scales has been in use since 1965. It was developed in response to the redefinition of the meter in 1960 from the prototype platinum-iridium bar to the wavelength of light. The history of the interferometer is recalled, and its design and operation described. A continuous program of modernization by making physical modifications, measurement procedure changes and computational revisions is described, and the effects of these changes are evaluated. Results of a long-term measurement assurance program, the primary control on the measurement process, are presented, and improvements in measurement uncertainty are documented.

  8. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  9. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Matthew A.; Swope, David M.; Grimes, David

    2012-01-01

    Background It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion. Methods This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method). It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB). Results Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others. Discussion Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected. PMID:23440162

  10. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  11. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  12. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  13. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hughto, J.; Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2011-07-15

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions ''hop'' in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter {Gamma}=175 to Coulomb parameters up to {Gamma}=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  14. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  15. Testable scenario for relativity with minimum length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelino-Camelia, G.

    2001-06-01

    I propose a general class of spacetimes whose structure is governed by observer-independent scales of both velocity (/c) and length (Planck length), and I observe that these spacetimes can naturally host a modification of FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction such that lengths which in their inertial rest frame are bigger than a ``minimum length'' are also bigger than the minimum length in all other inertial frames. With an analysis in leading order in the minimum length, I show that this is the case in a specific illustrative example of postulates for relativity with velocity and length observer-independent scales.

  16. Novel light diffusing fiber for use in medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klubben, W. Spencer; Logunov, Stephan L.; Fewkes, Edward J.; Mooney, Jeff; Then, Paul M.; Wigley, Peter G.; Schreiber, Horst; Matias, Kaitlyn; Wilson, Cynthia J.; Ocampo, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    Fiber-based cylindrical light diffusers are often used in photodynamic therapy to illuminate a luminal organ, such as the esophagus. The diffusers are often made of plastic and suffer from short diffusion lengths and low transmission efficiencies over a broad spectrum. We have developed FibranceTM, a glass-based fiber optic cylindrical diffuser which can illuminate a fiber from 0.5 cm to 10 meters over a broad wavelength range. With these longer illumination lengths, a variety of other medical applications are possible beyond photodynamic therapy. We present a number of applications for Fibrance ranging from in situ controllable illumination for Photodynamic Therapy to light guided anatomy highlighting for minimally invasive surgery to mitigating hospital acquired infections and more.

  17. High-power diffusing-tip fibers for interstitial photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinofsky, Edward L.; Farr, Norman; Baxter, Lincoln; Weiler, William

    1997-05-01

    A line of optical fiber based diffusing tips has been designed, developed, and tested that are capable of distributing tens of watts of cw laser power over lengths ranging from two millimeters to over 10 cm. The result is a flexible non-stick diffuser capable of coagulating large volumes of tissue in reasonably short exposures of 3 - 5 minutes. Sub-millimeter diameter devices have a distinct effect on reducing the force needed to insert the applicator interstitially into tissue. Utilizing our design approach, we have produced diffusers based on 200 micrometer core fiber that has delivered over 35 watts of Nd:YAG energy over diffusion lengths as short as 4 mm. These applicators are being tested for applications in oncology, cardiology, electrophysiology, urology and gynecology.

  18. Helium diffusion in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amidon, W. H.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-12-01

    The abundance and large grain size of carbonate minerals make them a potentially attractive target for 4He thermochronology and 3He cosmogenic dating, although the diffusive properties of helium in carbonates remain poorly understood. This work characterizes helium diffusion in calcite and dolomite to better understand the crystal-chemical factors controlling He transport and retentivity. Slabs of cleaved natural calcite and dolomite, and polished sections of calcite cut parallel or normal to c, were implanted with 3He at 3 MeV with a dose of 5x1015/cm2. Implanted carbonates were heated in 1-atm furnaces, and 3He distributions following diffusion anneals were profiled with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For 3He transport normal to cleavage surfaces in calcite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 78-300°C: Dcalcite = 9.0x10-9exp(-55 × 6 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. Diffusion in calcite exhibits marked anisotropy, with diffusion parallel to c about two orders of magnitude slower than diffusion normal to cleavage faces. He diffusivities for transport normal to the c-axis are similar in value to those normal to cleavage surfaces. Our findings are broadly consistent with helium diffusivities from step-heating measurements of calcite by Copeland et al. (2007); these bulk degassing data may reflect varying effects of diffusional anisotropy. Helium diffusion normal to cleavage surfaces in dolomite is significantly slower than diffusion in calcite, and has a much higher activation energy for diffusion. For dolomite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for He diffusion over the temperature range 150-400°C: Ddolomite = 9.0x10-8exp(-92 × 9 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. The role of crystallographic structure in influencing these differences among diffusivities was evaluated using the maximum aperture approach of Cherniak and Watson (2011), in which crystallographic structures are sectioned along possible diffusion

  19. Thorium Diffusion in Monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Diffusion of thorium has been characterized in synthetic monazite under dry conditions. The synthetic monazites (either pure CePO4, NdPO4, or a mixed LREE phosphate containing Ce, Nd, and Sm) were grown via a Na2CO3-MoO3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were either synthesized ThSiO4 or CaTh(PO4)2 powders. Experiments were performed by placing source and monazite in Pt capsules and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 10 days to a few hours, at temperatures from 1400 to 1550C. The Th distributions in the monazite were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for diffusion in monazite: DSm = 7.2x103 exp(-814 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1 The diffusivity of Th was similar for monazites containing a single REE and the mixed LREE phosphates. Th diffusion was also similar for experiments run using the Th silicate and Ca-Th phosphate sources, suggesting that the substitutional mechanism for Th in monazite, i.e, Th+4 + Si+4 for REE+3 + P+5 with the ThSiO4 source, and Th+4 + Ca+2 for 2REE+3 with the CaTh(PO4)2 source, does not significantly affect Th diffusivities, and that Th is likely the rate-limiting species. Th diffusion in monazite is about 4 orders of magnitude slower than Pb diffusion (Cherniak et al., 2004). This contrasts with findings of Gardes et al. (2005) who determined that Pb, Th and REE diffusivities in monazite are similar. Th diffusion in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997) is about an order of magnitude slower than in monazite, but with similar activation energy for diffusion. The smaller diffusivities in zircon may be a consequence of the larger disparity in size between Th and the Zr site in zircon as compared with Th and the REE site in monazite. Nonetheless, Th is essentially immobile in monazite with respect to exchange by volume diffusion under most geologic conditions; these findings may have implications for containment of high- level actinide

  20. Exact curvilinear diffusion coefficients in the repton model.

    PubMed

    Buhot, A

    2005-10-01

    The Rubinstein-Duke or repton model is one of the simplest lattice model of reptation for the diffusion of a polymer in a gel or a melt. Recently, a slightly modified model with hardcore interactions between the reptons has been introduced. The curvilinear diffusion coefficients of both models are exactly determined for all chain lengths. The case of periodic boundary conditions is also considered.

  1. Clustering method for estimating principal diffusion directions

    PubMed Central

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Davoodi-Bojd, Esmaeil; Jiang, Quan; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTMRI) is a non-invasive tool for the investigation of white matter structure within the brain. However, the traditional tensor model is unable to characterize anisotropies of orders higher than two in heterogeneous areas containing more than one fiber population. To resolve this issue, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) with a large number of diffusion encoding gradients is used along with reconstruction methods such as Q-ball. Using HARDI data, the fiber orientation distribution function (ODF) on the unit sphere is calculated and used to extract the principal diffusion directions (PDDs). Fast and accurate estimation of PDDs is a prerequisite for tracking algorithms that deal with fiber crossings. In this paper, the PDDs are defined as the directions around which the ODF data is concentrated. Estimates of the PDDs based on this definition are less sensitive to noise in comparison with the previous approaches. A clustering approach to estimate the PDDs is proposed which is an extension of fuzzy c-means clustering developed for orientation of points on a sphere. MDL (Minimum description length) principle is proposed to estimate the number of PDDs. Using both simulated and real diffusion data, the proposed method has been evaluated and compared with some previous protocols. Experimental results show that the proposed clustering algorithm is more accurate, more resistant to noise, and faster than some of techniques currently being utilized. PMID:21642005

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of fractal aggregate diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranami, Gaurav; Lamm, Monica H.; Vigil, R. Dennis

    2010-11-01

    The diffusion of fractal aggregates constructed with the method by Thouy and Jullien [J. Phys. A 27, 2953 (1994)10.1088/0305-4470/27/9/012] comprised of Np spherical primary particles was studied as a function of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that finite-size effects have a strong impact on the apparent value of the diffusion coefficient (D) , but these can be corrected by carrying out simulations using different simulation box sizes. Specifically, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the length of a cubic simulation box, and the constant of proportionality appears to be independent of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension. Using this result, it is possible to compute infinite dilution diffusion coefficients (Do) for aggregates of arbitrary size and fractal dimension, and it was found that Do∝Np-1/df , as is often assumed by investigators simulating Brownian aggregation of fractal aggregates. The ratio of hydrodynamic radius to radius of gyration is computed and shown to be independent of mass for aggregates of fixed fractal dimension, thus enabling an estimate of the diffusion coefficient for a fractal aggregate based on its radius of gyration.

  3. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  4. Size of diffusion pore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1988-01-01

    The diffusion pore of the outer membrane of Alcaligenes faecalis was shown to be substantially smaller than the Escherichia coli porin pore. In experiments with intact cells, pentoses and hexoses penetrated into the NaCl-expanded periplasm, whereas saccharides of Mr greater than 342 did not. Cells treated with 0.5 M saccharides of Mr greater than 342 weighed 33 to 38% less than cells treated with isotonic solution, suggesting that these saccharides do not permeate through the outer membrane. The diffusion rates of various solutes through the liposome membranes reconstituted from the Mr-43,000 outer membrane protein showed the following characteristics. (i) The relative diffusion rates of pentoses, hexoses, and methylhexoses appeared to be about 1.0, 0.6, and negligibly small, respectively. (ii) The diffusion rate of glucose appeared to be about 1/10th that with the E. coli B porin. (iii) The diffusion rate of gluconic acid was five to seven times higher than that of glucose. (iv) The diffusion rates of beta-lactam antibiotics appeared to be 40 to less than 10% of those with the E. coli B porin. Images PMID:2835003

  5. Fatty acid transport protein expression in human brain and potential role in fatty acid transport across human brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Ryan W; On, Ngoc H; Del Bigio, Marc R; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2011-05-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by the brain capillary endothelial cells, provides a protective barrier between the systemic blood and the extracellular environment of the CNS. Passage of fatty acids from the blood to the brain may occur either by diffusion or by proteins that facilitate their transport. Currently several protein families have been implicated in fatty acid transport. The focus of the present study was to identify the fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) expressed in the brain microvessel endothelial cells and characterize their involvement in fatty acid transport across an in vitro BBB model. The major fatty acid transport proteins expressed in human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC), mouse capillaries and human grey matter were FATP-1, -4 and fatty acid binding protein 5 and fatty acid translocase/CD36. The passage of various radiolabeled fatty acids across confluent HBMEC monolayers was examined over a 30-min period in the presence of fatty acid free albumin in a 1 : 1 molar ratio. The apical to basolateral permeability of radiolabeled fatty acids was dependent upon both saturation and chain length of the fatty acid. Knockdown of various fatty acid transport proteins using siRNA significantly decreased radiolabeled fatty acid transport across the HBMEC monolayer. Our findings indicate that FATP-1 and FATP-4 are the predominant fatty acid transport proteins expressed in the BBB based on human and mouse expression studies. While transport studies in HBMEC monolayers support their involvement in fatty acid permeability, fatty acid translocase/CD36 also appears to play a prominent role in transport of fatty acids across HBMEC.

  6. Phase-Length Optical Phase-Locked-Loop Sensor (PLOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Rogawski, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    PLOPS system designed to provide high-resolution measurement of change in optical length from optical-system source to any optical reflector, including diffuse reflector. Serves as adjustable optical ruler, providing high resolution in measurements of small and large changes in distance to target. Use is broad and includes most measurement situations requiring information on length, vibration, and their derivatives. Applications include building dynamics, remote sensing of vibrations in such systems as turbine-based machinery, monitoring of structural dynamics, noncontacting sensing of surface contours, measurement of large strains as in earthquake monitoring, measurement of atmospheric dynamics and turbulence, high-resolution sensing of humidity, detection of surface acoustic waves by optical microscopy, and related areas.

  7. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  8. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  9. Channeling and diffusion in dry-etch damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.

    1997-09-01

    At present channeling is accepted to be the primary mechanism causing defects deep within dry-etched material, with diffusion possibly modifying the final defect distribution. In this article detailed analytic expressions are presented incorporating both these mechanisms. The dominant parameter affecting damage depth is found to be the mean channeling length. We show how enhanced diffusion, e.g., by illumination, may increase the observed damage. We also study the effect of damage on depletion depths and suggest how the channeling length may be inferred from the etch-depth dependence of conductance or Raman spectroscopy measurements.

  10. Diffusion of water in cat ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The rates of diffusion of tritiated water (THO) and [14C]sucrose across cat right ventricular myocardium were studied at 23 degrees C in an Ussing-type diffusion cell, recording the time-course of increase in concentration of tracer in one chamber over 4--6 h after adding tracers to the other. Sucrose data were fitted with a model for a homogeneous sheet of uneven thickness in which the tissue is considered to be an array of parallel independent pathways (parallel pathway model) of varying length. The volume of the sucrose diffusion space, presumably a wholly extracellular pathway, was 23% of the tissue or 27.4 +/-1.7% (mean +/- SEM; n=11) of the tissue water. The effective intramyocardial sucrose diffusion coefficient, D8, was 1.51 +/- 0.19 X 10(-6)cm2.s-1 (n=11). Combining these data with earlier data, D8 was 22.6 +/- 1.1% (n=95) of the free diffusion coefficient in aqueous solution D degrees 8. The parallel pathway model and a dead-end pore model, which might have accounted for intracellular sequestration of water, gave estimates of DW/D degrees W (observed/free) of 15%. Because hindrance to water diffusion must be less than for sucrose (where D8/D degrees 8=22.6%), this showed the inadequacy of these models to account simultaneously for the diffusional resistance and the tissue water content. The third or cell-matrix model, a heterogeneous system of permeable cells arrayed in the extracellular matrix, allowed logical and geometrically reasonable interpretations of the steady-state data and implied estimates of DW in the cellular and extracellular fluid of approximately 25% of the aqueous diffusion coefficient. PMID:722277

  11. Delta-doping in diffusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénière, François; Chaplain, René; Gauneau, Marcel; Reddy, Viswanatha; Régrény, André

    1993-12-01

    The δ-doping where the dopant is confined on the length-scale of the lattice constant provides perfectly ideal conditions to study the atomic transport processes. We have studied MBE-grown GaAs samples δ-doped with Si and Al layers. Long time diffusion anneals have been performed in the temperature range 550 800 °C. The distribution profiles are examined by SIMS-profiling. We obtain Si diffusion coefficients in good agreement with the other recent studies using different techniques (rapid thermal annealing, capacitance-voltage profiling, sandwiched diffusion source). This contrasts with the earlier measurements based on diffusion of implanted dopants which were much more widely spread. We conclude that the more accurate data allowed with the δ-doping show that the diffusion coefficient is an intrinsic parameter provided that the amount of dopant and the dislocation density are kept sufficiently small. Le dopage-delta, où le dopant est confiné à l'échelle du paramètre du réseau, fournit les conditions parfaitement idéales pour étudier les processus de transport atomique. Nous avons étudié des échantillons de GaAs obtenus par épitaxie par jet moléculaire dopés par des couches-delta de Si et Al. Des traitements de diffusion de longue durée ont été réalisés dans l'intervalle de température 550 à 800°C. Les profils de distribution sont examinés par spectrométrie d'émission d'ions secondaires. Nous obtenons des coefficients de diffusion de Si en bon accord avec les autres études récentes utilisant des techniques différentes (traitement thermique ultrarapide, profil de distribution par la méthode capacité-voltage, diffusion d'une couche “ sandwich ”). Ceci diffère des mesures antérieures qui, basées sur la diffusion de dopants implantés, étaient beaucoup plus dispersées. Nous concluons que les données plus précises rendues possibles par le dopage-delta montrent que le coefficient de diffusion est un paramètre intrinsèque

  12. Mastocytosis, diffuse cutaneous (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of diffuse, cutaneous mastocytosis. Abnormal collections of cells in the skin (mast cells) produce this rash. Unlike bullous mastocytosis, rubbing will not lead to formation of blisters ( ...

  13. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation.

    PubMed

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework.

  14. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework. PMID:25309676

  15. Diffusion of eccentric microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Pulak K; Li, Yunyun; Marchesoni, Fabio; Li, Baowen

    2016-02-21

    We model the two-dimensional diffusive dynamics of an eccentric artificial microswimmer in a highly viscous medium. We assume that the swimmer's propulsion results from an effective force applied to a center distinct from its center of mass, both centers resting on a body's axis parallel to its average self-propulsion velocity. Moreover, we allow for angular fluctuations of the velocity about the body's axis. We prove, both analytically and numerically, that the ensuing active diffusion of the swimmer is suppressed to an extent that strongly depends on the model parameters. In particular, the active diffusion constant undergoes a transition from a quadratic to a linear dependence on the self-propulsion speed, with practical consequences on the interpretation of the experimental data. Finally, we extend our model to describe the diffusion of chiral eccentric swimmers.

  16. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, Simon J.; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M.; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-09-01

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour.

  17. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Simon J.; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M.; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour. PMID:27686622

  18. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Simon J; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-09-30

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour.

  19. Germanium nanowire growth controlled by surface diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtbauer, Jan; Bansen, Roman; Heimburger, Robert; Teubner, Thomas; Boeck, Torsten; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-07-23

    Germanium nanowires (NWs) were grown onto Ge(111) substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid process using gold droplets. The growth was carried out in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at substrate temperatures between 370 Degree-Sign C and 510 Degree-Sign C. The resulting nanowire growth rate turns out to be highly dependent on the substrate temperature exhibiting the maximum at T = 430 Degree-Sign C. The temperature dependence of growth rate can be attributed to surface diffusion both along the substrate and nanowire sidewalls. Analyzing the diffusive material transport yields a diffusion length of 126 nm at a substrate temperature of 430 Degree-Sign C.

  20. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  1. Diffusion length improvements in GaAs associated with Zn diffusion during Ga/1-x/Al/x/As growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovel, H. J.; Woodall, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Relatively good GaAs solar cells can be made from poor quality substrates by making the junction deep (more than 1 micron) instead of shallow and by leaching both the p and n GaAs regions during the growth process. Air-mass-zero efficiencies of 14.7% (19% AM1) have been obtained from substrates with starting substrate thickness of 0.6 micron.

  2. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  3. Normal and anomalous diffusion of Brownian particles on disordered potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado-García, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we study the transition from normal to anomalous diffusion of Brownian particles on disordered potentials. The potential model consists of a series of "potential hills" (defined on a unit cell of constant length) whose heights are chosen randomly from a given distribution. We calculate the exact expression for the diffusion coefficient in the case of uncorrelated potentials for arbitrary distributions. We show that when the potential heights have a Gaussian distribution (with zero mean and a finite variance) the diffusion of the particles is always normal. In contrast, when the distribution of the potential heights is exponentially distributed the diffusion coefficient vanishes when the system is placed below a critical temperature. We calculate analytically the diffusion exponent for the anomalous (subdiffusive) phase by using the so-called "random trap model". Our predictions are tested by means of Langevin simulations obtaining good agreement within the accuracy of our numerical calculations.

  4. Diffusion in natural ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhouse, Iona; O'Neill, Hugh; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Diffusion rates in natural ilmenite of composition Fe0.842+ Fe0.163+Mn0.07Mg0.01Ti 0.92O3 from the Vishnevye Mountains (Urals, Russia) have been measured at 1000° C. Experiments were carried out in a one atmosphere furnace with oxygen fugacity controlled by flow of a CO-CO2 gas mixture, over a period of four hours. The diffusant source was a synthetic ilmenite (FeTiO3) powder doped with trace amounts of Mg, Co, Ni, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Al, Cr, Ga and Y. Since, the natural ilmenite crystal contained Mn it was also possible to study diffusion of Mn from the ilmenite crystal. The experiments were analysed using the electron microprobe and scanning laser ablation ICP-MS. Diffusion profiles were measured for Al, Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Ga, and Y. Diffusion of Cr, Hf, Zr, V, Nb and Ta was too slow to allow diffusion profiles to be accurately measured for the times and temperatures studied so far. The preliminary results show that diffusion in ilmenite is fast, with the diffusivity determined in this study on the order of 10-13 to 10-16 m2s-1. For comparison, Chakraborty (1997) found interdiffusion of Fe and Mg in olivine at 1000° C on the order of 10-17 to 10-18m2s-1 and Dieckmann (1998) found diffusivity of Fe, Mg, Co in magnetite at 1200° C to be on the order of 10-13 to 10-14 m2s-1. The order in which the diffusivity of the elements decreases is Mn > Co > Mg ≥ Ni > Al ≥ Y ≥ Ga, that is to say that Mn diffuses the fastest and Ga the slowest. Overall, this study intends to determine diffusion parameters such as frequency factor, activation energy and activation volume as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. This research is taking place in the context of a larger study focusing on the use of the garnet-ilmenite system as a geospeedometer. Examination of the consequences of simultaneous diffusion of multiple elements is a necessity if we are to develop an understanding of the crystal-chemical controls on diffusion (cf Spandler & O'Neill, in press). Chakraborty

  5. Diffusion Regulation in the Vitreous Humor

    PubMed Central

    Käsdorf, Benjamin Tillmann; Arends, Fabienna; Lieleg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The efficient treatment of many ocular diseases depends on the rapid diffusive distribution of solutes such as drugs or drug delivery vehicles through the vitreous humor. However, this multicomponent hydrogel possesses selective permeability properties, which allow for the diffusion of certain molecules and particles, whereas others are immobilized. In this study, we perform an interspecies comparison showing that the selective permeability properties of the vitreous are conserved across several mammalian species. We identify the polyanionic glycosaminoglycans hyaluronic acid and heparan sulfate as two key macromolecules that establish this selective permeability. We show that electrostatic interactions between the polyanionic macromolecules and diffusing solutes can be weakened by charge screening or enzymatic glycosaminoglycan digestion. Furthermore, molecule penetration into the vitreous is also charge-dependent and only efficient as long as the net charge of the molecule does not exceed a certain threshold. PMID:26588575

  6. Length of Hospital Stay: Some Administrative Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffelmayr, Bertram E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared, during a two-year period, lengths of stay of patients on two admission wards that served the same community mental health center. Results showed a significant difference in length of stay for voluntary and involuntary patients. (BH)

  7. Flow Control in a Transonic Diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartner, Jeremy; Amitay, Michael

    2014-11-01

    In some airplanes such as fighter jets and UAV, short inlet ducts replace the more conventional ducts due to their shorter length. However, these ducts are associated with low length-to-diameter ratio and low aspect ratio and, thus, experience massive separation and the presence of secondary flow structures. These flow phenomena are undesirable as they lead to pressure losses and distortion at the Aerodynamic Interface Plane (AIP), where the engine face is located. It causes the engine to perform with a lower efficiency as it would with a straight duct diffuser. Different flow control techniques were studied on the short inlet duct, with the goal to reattach the flow and minimize the distortions at the AIP. Due to the complex interaction between the separation and the secondary flow structures, the necessity to understand the flow mechanisms, and how to control them at a more fundamental level, a new transonic diffuser with an upper ramp and a straight floor was designed and built. The objective of this project is to explore the effectiveness of different flow control techniques in a high subsonic (up to Mach 0.8) diffuser, so that the quasi two-dimensional separation and the formation of secondary flow structure can be isolated using a canonical flow field. Supported by Northrop Grumman.

  8. Water isotope diffusion in the WAIS Divide ice core during the Holocene and last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. R.; Cuffey, K. M.; White, J. W. C.; Steig, E. J.; Buizert, C.; Markle, B. R.; McConnell, J. R.; Sigl, M.

    2017-01-01

    We use a high-resolution water isotope record from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core (WDC) to evaluate the effects of water isotope diffusion for the last 29 ka B.P. Using spectral analysis of the data, we determine diffusion lengths in depth and time domains. The diffusion length quantifies the mean cumulative diffusive displacement of water molecules relative to their original location at time of deposition. We simulate the observed signal with models and find that our understanding of processes and conditions in the ice sheet is incomplete. With the effects of ice-deformational thinning removed, portions of the Holocene record show total diffusion lengths smaller than predicted for a lower limit case of diffusion through a single ice crystal. Such reduced diffusion is probably due to structural features such as crusts and tortuous porosity that inhibit vapor transport in the firn. In the late glacial portion of the record, diffusion lengths double between 19.5 and 17 ka B.P. Known dependencies of diffusion on climatic variables do not account for this enhancement in models, and we hypothesize that it could arise from thermal gradients in the firn column, impurity-driven enhancement of solid ice diffusion, or changes in firn grain properties that alter vapor access to open pores. Despite model uncertainties, the WDC diffusion length chronology will be an essential input to future studies of high-frequency variability in the water isotope climate record, as it allows for the effects of diffusion to be removed.

  9. Viscous diffusion of vorticity in unsteady wall layers using the diffusion velocity concept

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Kempka, S.N.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1995-03-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to provide a careful evaluation of the diffusion velocity concept with regard to its ability to predict the diffusion of vorticity near a moving wall. A computer code BDIF has been written which simulates the evolution of the vorticity field near a wall of infinite length which is moving in an arbitrary fashion. The simulations generated by this code are found to give excellent results when compared to several exact solutions. We also outline a two-dimensional unsteady viscous boundary layer model which utilizes the diffusion velocity concept and is compatible with vortex methods. A primary goal of this boundary layer model is to minimize the number of vortices generated on the surface at each time step while achieving good resolution of the vorticity field near the wall. Preliminary results have been obtained for simulating a simple two-dimensional laminar boundary layer.

  10. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  11. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  12. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  13. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  14. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  15. Study on length distribution of ramie fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extra-long length of ramie fibers and the high variation in fiber length has a negative impact on the spinning processes. In order to better study the feature of ramie fiber length, in this research, the probability density function of the mixture model applied in the characterization of cotton...

  16. New Chorus Diffusion Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Kersten, Tobias; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Boscher, Daniel; Sicard, Angelica; Maget, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves play a major role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. While high time resolution satellite data show that these waves are highly structured in frequency and time, at present their effects on the electron distribution can only be assessed on a global scale by using quasi-linear diffusion theory. Here we present new quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for upper and lower band chorus waves for use in global radiation belt models. Using data from DE 1 CRRES, Cluster 1, Double Star TC1 and THEMIS, we have constructed a database of wave properties and used this to construct new diffusion coefficients for L* = 1.5 to 10 in steps of 0.5, 10 latitude bins between 0o and 60o ,8 bins in MLT and 5 levels of geomagnetic activity as measured by Kp. We find that the peak frequency of lower band chorus is close to 0.2 fce, which is lower than that used in previous models. The combined upper and lower band chorus diffusion shows structure that should result in an energy dependent pitch angle anisotropy, particularly between 1 keV and 100 keV. The diffusion rates suggest that wave-particle interactions should still be very important outside geostationary orbit, out to at least L* = 8. We find significant energy diffusion near 1 keV near the loss cone, consistent with wave growth. By including the new chorus diffusion matrix into the BAS radiation belt (BRB) model we compare the effects on the evolution of the radiation belts against previous models.

  17. Analysis of the Fluorescence Correlation Function of Quantum Rods with Different Lengths.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeran; Kim, Sok Won

    2015-11-01

    We built a polarization fluorescence correlation spectroscopy system to analyze the variation of the correlation function in rotational diffusion based on the length of rod-like fluorescent particles. Because the rotational diffusion of particles in liquid depends on the relative polarization states of the laser source and particle fluorescence, we compared the amplitudes of the rotational diffusion using the autocorrelation function in different polarization states. For experiments that depend on the length of the fluorescent particles, we prepared three kinds of quantum rod samples with a width of 6.5 ± 0.5 nm and lengths of 17 ± 3, 40 ± 3, and 46 ± 3 nm. Through the experiment, we obtained the hydrodynamic radii of each particle using the rotational diffusion coefficient: 10.7 ± 0.8, 13.4 ± 0.7, and 14.1 ± 0.4 nm with the length of the particles. All the obtained values for radii are 3 nm larger than the calculated equivalent radii of spheres with the same volume as the rod samples. Through a fraction analysis by polarization state, we confirmed that the ratio of rotational fraction for polarization increases with the aspect ratio of the actual particle.

  18. Diffusion coefficient of an inclusion in a liquid membrane supported by a solvent of arbitrary thickness.

    PubMed

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Ramachandran, Sanoop; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2011-08-01

    The diffusion coefficient of an inclusion in a liquid membrane is investigated by taking into account the interaction between membranes and bulk solvents of arbitrary thickness. As illustrative examples, the diffusion coefficients of two types of inclusions, a circular domain composed of fluid with the same viscosity as the host membrane and that of a polymer chain embedded in the membrane, are studied. The diffusion coefficients are expressed in terms of the hydrodynamic screening lengths, which vary according to the solvent thickness. When the membrane fluid is dragged by the solvent of finite thickness, via stick boundary conditions, multiple hydrodynamic screening lengths together with the weight factors to the diffusion coefficients are obtained from the characteristic equation. The conditions for which the diffusion coefficients can be approximated by the expression including only a single hydrodynamic screening length are also shown.

  19. Changes in the Length of the Neuraminidase Stalk Region Impact H7N9 Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Haixia; Chen, Quanjiao; Wu, Yan; Fu, Lifeng; Quan, Chuansong; Wong, Gary; Liu, Jun; Haywood, Joel; Liu, Yingxia; Zhou, Boping; Yan, Jinghua; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    The neuraminidase stalk of the newly emerged H7N9 influenza virus possesses a 5-amino-acid deletion. This study focuses on characterizing the biological functions of H7N9 with varied neuraminidase stalk lengths. Results indicate that the 5-amino-acid deletion had no impact on virus infectivity or replication in vitro or in vivo compared to that of a virus with a full-length stalk, but enhanced virulence in mice was observed for H7N9 encoding a 19- to 20-amino-acid deletion, suggesting that N9 stalk length impacts virulence in mammals, as N1 stalk length does. PMID:26656694

  20. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  1. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  2. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju Hyung; Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Eui Hyun; Kang, Seok-Gu; Chang, Jong Hee

    2015-04-01

    Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDLG) is a rare condition with a fatal outcome, characterized by diffuse infiltration of the leptomeninges by neoplastic glial cells without evidence of primary tumor in the brain or spinal cord parenchyma. In particular, PDLG histologically diagnosed as gliosarcoma is extremely rare, with only 2 cases reported to date. We report a case of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. A 68-year-old man presented with fever, chilling, headache, and a brief episode of mental deterioration. Initial T1-weighted post-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement without a definite intraparenchymal lesion. Based on clinical and imaging findings, antiviral treatment was initiated. Despite the treatment, the patient's neurologic symptoms and mental status progressively deteriorated and follow-up MRI showed rapid progression of the disease. A meningeal biopsy revealed gliosarcoma and was conclusive for the diagnosis of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. We suggest the inclusion of PDLG in the potential differential diagnosis of patients who present with nonspecific neurologic symptoms in the presence of leptomeningeal involvement on MRI.

  3. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  4. Bacterial flagella grow through an injection-diffusion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Thibaud T; Abraham, Anthony O; Bergmiller, Tobias; Paradis, Guillaume; Rainville, Simon; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Guet, Călin C; Tu, Yuhai; Namba, Keiichi; Keener, James P; Minamino, Tohru; Erhardt, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a self-assembling nanomachine. The external flagellar filament, several times longer than a bacterial cell body, is made of a few tens of thousands subunits of a single protein: flagellin. A fundamental problem concerns the molecular mechanism of how the flagellum grows outside the cell, where no discernible energy source is available. Here, we monitored the dynamic assembly of individual flagella using in situ labelling and real-time immunostaining of elongating flagellar filaments. We report that the rate of flagellum growth, initially ∼1,700 amino acids per second, decreases with length and that the previously proposed chain mechanism does not contribute to the filament elongation dynamics. Inhibition of the proton motive force-dependent export apparatus revealed a major contribution of substrate injection in driving filament elongation. The combination of experimental and mathematical evidence demonstrates that a simple, injection-diffusion mechanism controls bacterial flagella growth outside the cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23136.001 PMID:28262091

  5. Diffuser for wellhead isolation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Surjaatmadja, J.B.

    1981-04-21

    An improved diffuser for a wellhead isolation tool which employs a combination of angles in its bore. This improvement reduces the incidence of erosion caused by the flow of fluids through the diffuser, in both the well production tubing adjacent the end of the diffuser and in the diffuser itself.

  6. Going up in time and length scales in modeling polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.

    Polymer properties depend on a wide range of coupled length and time scales, with unique macroscopic viscoelastic behavior stemming from interactions at the atomistic level. The need to probe polymers across time and length scales and particularly computational modeling is inherently challenging. Here new paths to probing long time and length scales including introducing interactions into traditional bead-spring models and coarse graining of atomistic simulations will be compared and discussed. Using linear polyethylene as a model system, the degree of coarse graining with two to six methylene groups per coarse-grained bead derived from a fully atomistic melt simulation were probed. We show that the degree of coarse graining affects the measured dynamic. Using these models we were successful in probing highly entangled melts and were able reach the long-time diffusive regime which is computationally inaccessible using atomistic simulations. We simulated the relaxation modulus and shear viscosity of well-entangled polyethylene melts for scaled times of 500 µs. Results for plateau modulus are in good agreement with experiment. The long time and length scale is coupled to the macroscopic viscoelasticity where the degree of coarse graining sets the minimum length scale instrumental in defining polymer properties and dynamics. Results will be compared to those obtained from simple bead-spring models to demonstrate the additional insight that can be gained from atomistically inspired coarse grained models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Load Diffusion in Composite and Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Ambur, D. (Technical Monitor); Nemeth, M. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for the multi-functional large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Some specific problems recently considered were those of end effects in smart materials and structures, study of the stress response of pressurized linear piezoelectric cylinders for both static and steady rotating configurations, an analysis of the effect of pre-stressing and pre-polarization on the decay of end effects in piezoelectric solids and investigation of constitutive models for hardening rubber-like materials. Our goal in the study of load diffusion is the development of readily applicable results for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses.

  8. Positron diffusion in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.; Vehanen, A.; Schultz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    Positron diffusion in Si(100) and Si(111) has been studied using a variable energy positron beam. The positron diffusion coefficient is found to be D/sub +/ = 2.7 +- 0.3 cm/sup 2//sec using a Makhov-type positron implantation profile, which is demonstrated to fit the data more reliably than the more commonly applied exponential profile. The diffusion related parameter, E/sub 0/, which results from the exponential profile, is found to be 4.2 +- 0.2 keV, significantly longer than previously reported values. A drastic reduction in E/sub 0/ is found after annealing the sample at 1300 K, showing that previously reported low values of E/sub 0/ are probably associated with the thermal history of the sample.

  9. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  10. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.; Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-08-10

    1. The method of testing the separation efficiency of porous permeable membranes which comprises causing a stream of a gaseous mixture to flow into contact with one face of a finely porous permeable membrane under such conditions that a major fraction of the mixture diffuses through the membrane, maintaining a rectangular cross section of the gaseous stream so flowing past said membrane, continuously recirculating the gas that diffuses through said membrane and continuously withdrawing the gas that does not diffuse through said membrane and maintaining the volume of said recirculating gas constant by continuously introducing into said continuously recirculating gas stream a mass of gas equivalent to that which is continuously withdrawn from said gas stream and comparing the concentrations of the light component in the entering gas, the withdrawn gas and the recirculated gas in order to determine the efficiency of said membrane.

  11. Imaging the Long Transport Lengths of Photo-generated Carriers in Oriented Perovskite Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuhao; Wang, Lili; Lin, Wei-Chun; Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Burda, Clemens; Gao, Xuan P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Organometal halide perovskite has emerged as a promising material for solar cells and optoelectronics. Although the long diffusion length of photo-generated carriers is believed to be a critical factor responsible for the material's high efficiency in solar cells, a direct study of carrier transport over long distances in organometal halide perovskites is still lacking. We fabricated highly oriented crystalline CH$_3$NH$_3$PbI$_3$ (MAPbI$_3$) thin film lateral transport devices with long channel length (~ 120 $\\mu$m). By performing spatially scanned photocurrent imaging measurements with local illumination, we directly show that the perovskite films prepared here have very long transport lengths for photo-generated carriers, with a minority carrier (electron) diffusion length on the order of 10 $\\mu$m. Our approach of applying scanning photocurrent microscopy to organometal halide perovskites may be further used to elucidate the carrier transport processes and vastly different carrier diffusion lengths (~ 100 nm to 100 $\\mu$m) in different types of organometal halide perovskites.

  12. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  13. [Microbial diffusion and antibiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vilain, R

    1982-01-01

    Cleaning leg ulcers depends on tissular and microbial enzymes, the production of which depends on good vascularization. When an aetiological treatment is started, the microbes ensure sufficient cleaning, leading to granulation and epidermization. Antibiotherapy is pointless. Sometimes it can be detrimental, replacing a natural growth with alien strains which cause diffusion. Very exceptionally, a short course of antibiotherapy may be necessary to cope with signs of diffusion, usually signifying a Group A streptococcal infection, with seasonal recrudescence. The Blue Pus Microbe has no special pathological significance. It merely indicates that the case has become chronic.

  14. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH- = U4+ + O2- + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  15. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  16. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10-100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS.

  17. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10–100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS. PMID:24089741

  18. Ergodicity breaking, ageing, and confinement in generalized diffusion processes with position and time dependent diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    We study generalized anomalous diffusion processes whose diffusion coefficient D(x, t) ∼ D0|x|αtβ depends on both the position x of the test particle and the process time t. This process thus combines the features of scaled Brownian motion and heterogeneous diffusion parent processes. We compute the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements of this generalized diffusion process. The scaling exponent of the ensemble averaged mean squared displacement is shown to be the product of the critical exponents of the parent processes, and describes both subdiffusive and superdiffusive systems. We quantify the amplitude fluctuations of the time averaged mean squared displacement as function of the length of the time series and the lag time. In particular, we observe a weak ergodicity breaking of this generalized diffusion process: even in the long time limit the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements are strictly disparate. When we start to observe this process some time after its initiation we observe distinct features of ageing. We derive a universal ageing factor for the time averaged mean squared displacement containing all information on the ageing time and the measurement time. External confinement is shown to alter the magnitudes and statistics of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements.

  19. Time and length scales within a fire and implications for numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-02

    A partial non-dimensionalization of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of the rate-controlling transport processes in the reacting portion of a fire plume as a function of length scale. Over continuum length scales, buoyant times scales vary as the square root of the length scale; advection time scales vary as the length scale, and diffusion time scales vary as the square of the length scale. Due to the variation with length scale, each process is dominant over a given range. The relationship of buoyancy and baroclinc vorticity generation is highlighted. For numerical simulation, first principles solution for fire problems is not possible with foreseeable computational hardware in the near future. Filtered transport equations with subgrid modeling will be required as two to three decades of length scale are captured by solution of discretized conservation equations. By whatever filtering process one employs, one must have humble expectations for the accuracy obtainable by numerical simulation for practical fire problems that contain important multi-physics/multi-length-scale coupling with up to 10 orders of magnitude in length scale.

  20. Experimental Mating of Trapped Vortex Diffusers with Large Area Ratio Thrust Augmentors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    the hump and greatly reduce the desired effect of the cavity. Consequently, the diffuser would not operate properly. It was also found that, due to...differences. Differences In laboratory constraints (wails, ceiling, etc.) can also have a small effect on the ejector flow. 2. TRAPPED VORTEX DIFFUSER...was farther from complete at the smaller lengths. The shift in peak locations seems to be a simple diffuser effect where the flow with the thinnest

  1. Room temperature spin diffusion in (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Transient spin grating experiments are used to investigate the electron spin diffusion in intrinsic (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well at room temperature. The measured spin diffusion length of optically excited electrons is about 4 μm at low spin density. Increasing the carrier density yields both a decrease of the spin relaxation time and the spin diffusion coefficient Ds. PMID:21711662

  2. Biased diffusion in three-dimensional comb-like structures.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Dagdug, Leonardo; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2015-04-07

    In this paper, we study biased diffusion of point Brownian particles in a three-dimensional comb-like structure formed by a main cylindrical tube with identical periodic cylindrical dead ends. It is assumed that the dead ends are thin cylinders whose radius is much smaller than both the radius of the main tube and the distance between neighboring dead ends. It is also assumed that in the main tube, the particle, in addition to its regular diffusion, moves with a uniform constant drift velocity. For such a system, we develop a formalism that allows us to derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the first two moments of the particle displacement along the main tube axis. Inverting these Laplace transforms numerically, one can find the time dependences of the two moments for arbitrary values of both the drift velocity and the dead-end length, including the limiting case of infinitely long dead ends, where the unbiased diffusion becomes anomalous at sufficiently long times. The expressions for the Laplace transforms are used to find the effective drift velocity and diffusivity of the particle as functions of its drift velocity in the main tube and the tube geometric parameters. As might be expected from common-sense arguments, the effective drift velocity monotonically decreases from the initial drift velocity to zero as the dead-end length increases from zero to infinity. The effective diffusivity is a more complex, non-monotonic function of the dead-end length. As this length increases from zero to infinity, the effective diffusivity first decreases, reaches a minimum, and then increases approaching a plateau value which is proportional to the square of the particle drift velocity in the main tube.

  3. Nanocrystal diffusion doping.

    PubMed

    Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Barrows, Charles J; Erickson, Christian S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2013-09-25

    A diffusion-based synthesis of doped colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals is demonstrated. This approach involves thermodynamically controlled addition of both impurity cations and host anions to preformed seed nanocrystals under equilibrium conditions, rather than kinetically controlled doping during growth. This chemistry allows thermodynamic crystal compositions to be prepared without sacrificing other kinetically trapped properties such as shape, size, or crystallographic phase. This doping chemistry thus shares some similarities with cation-exchange reactions, but proceeds without the loss of host cations and excels at the introduction of relatively unreactive impurity ions that have not been previously accessible using cation exchange. Specifically, we demonstrate the preparation of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se (0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.2) nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, unprecedentedly high Mn(2+) content, and very large magneto-optical effects by diffusion of Mn(2+) into seed CdSe nanocrystals grown by hot injection. Controlling the solution and lattice chemical potentials of Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) allows Mn(2+) diffusion into the internal volumes of the CdSe nanocrystals with negligible Ostwald ripening, while retaining the crystallographic phase (wurtzite or zinc blende), shape anisotropy, and ensemble size uniformity of the seed nanocrystals. Experimental results for diffusion doping of other nanocrystals with other cations are also presented that indicate this method may be generalized, providing access to a variety of new doped semiconductor nanostructures not previously attainable by kinetic routes or cation exchange.

  4. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  5. Osmosis and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    OsmoBeaker is a CD-ROM designed to enhance the learning of diffusion and osmosis by presenting interactive experimentation to the student. The software provides several computer simulations that take the student through different scenarios with cells, having different concentrations of solutes in them.

  6. Diffusion in random networks

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Padrino, Juan C.

    2017-06-01

    The ensemble averaging technique is applied to model mass transport by diffusion in random networks. The system consists of an ensemble of random networks, where each network is made of pockets connected by tortuous channels. Inside a channel, fluid transport is assumed to be governed by the one-dimensional diffusion equation. Mass balance leads to an integro-differential equation for the pocket mass density. The so-called dual-porosity model is found to be equivalent to the leading order approximation of the integration kernel when the diffusion time scale inside the channels is small compared to the macroscopic time scale. As a test problem,more » we consider the one-dimensional mass diffusion in a semi-infinite domain. Because of the required time to establish the linear concentration profile inside a channel, for early times the similarity variable is xt$-$1/4 rather than xt$-$1/2 as in the traditional theory. We found this early time similarity can be explained by random walk theory through the network.« less

  7. Enzyme localization, crowding, and buffers collectively modulate diffusion-influenced signal transduction: Insights from continuum diffusion modeling.

    PubMed

    Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J A

    2015-09-07

    Biochemical reaction networks consisting of coupled enzymes connect substrate signaling events with biological function. Substrates involved in these reactions can be strongly influenced by diffusion "barriers" arising from impenetrable cellular structures and macromolecules, as well as interactions with biomolecules, especially within crowded environments. For diffusion-influenced reactions, the spatial organization of diffusion barriers arising from intracellular structures, non-specific crowders, and specific-binders (buffers) strongly controls the temporal and spatial reaction kinetics. In this study, we use two prototypical biochemical reactions, a Goodwin oscillator, and a reaction with a periodic source/sink term to examine how a diffusion barrier that partitions substrates controls reaction behavior. Namely, we examine how conditions representative of a densely packed cytosol, including reduced accessible volume fraction, non-specific interactions, and buffers, impede diffusion over nanometer length-scales. We find that diffusion barriers can modulate the frequencies and amplitudes of coupled diffusion-influenced reaction networks, as well as give rise to "compartments" of decoupled reactant populations. These effects appear to be intensified in the presence of buffers localized to the diffusion barrier. These findings have strong implications for the role of the cellular environment in tuning the dynamics of signaling pathways.

  8. Enzyme localization, crowding, and buffers collectively modulate diffusion-influenced signal transduction: Insights from continuum diffusion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    Biochemical reaction networks consisting of coupled enzymes connect substrate signaling events with biological function. Substrates involved in these reactions can be strongly influenced by diffusion "barriers" arising from impenetrable cellular structures and macromolecules, as well as interactions with biomolecules, especially within crowded environments. For diffusion-influenced reactions, the spatial organization of diffusion barriers arising from intracellular structures, non-specific crowders, and specific-binders (buffers) strongly controls the temporal and spatial reaction kinetics. In this study, we use two prototypical biochemical reactions, a Goodwin oscillator, and a reaction with a periodic source/sink term to examine how a diffusion barrier that partitions substrates controls reaction behavior. Namely, we examine how conditions representative of a densely packed cytosol, including reduced accessible volume fraction, non-specific interactions, and buffers, impede diffusion over nanometer length-scales. We find that diffusion barriers can modulate the frequencies and amplitudes of coupled diffusion-influenced reaction networks, as well as give rise to "compartments" of decoupled reactant populations. These effects appear to be intensified in the presence of buffers localized to the diffusion barrier. These findings have strong implications for the role of the cellular environment in tuning the dynamics of signaling pathways.

  9. Nitrogen diffusion in hafnia and the impact of nitridation on oxygen and hydrogen diffusion: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh E-mail: rajesh.sathiyanarayanan@gmail.com; Pandey, R. K.; Murali, K. V. R. M.

    2015-01-21

    Using first-principles simulations, we have computed incorporation energies and diffusion barriers of ammonia, the nitrogen molecule and atomic nitrogen in monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO{sub 2}). Our calculations show that ammonia is likely to dissociate into an NH{sub 2} molecular unit, whereas the nitrogen molecule remains as a molecule either in the interstitial space or at an oxygen lattice site. The lowest energy pathway for the diffusion of atomic nitrogen interstitials consists of the hopping of the nitrogen interstitial between neighboring three-coordinated lattice oxygen atoms that share a single Hf atom, and the barrier for such hops is determined by a switching mechanism. The substitutional nitrogen atom shows a preference for diffusion through the doubly positive oxygen vacancy-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, we have investigated the impact of nitrogen atoms on the diffusion barriers of oxygen and hydrogen interstitials in m-HfO{sub 2}. Our results show that nitrogen incorporation has a significant impact on the barriers for oxygen and hydrogen diffusion: nitrogen atoms attract oxygen and hydrogen interstitials diffusing in the vicinity, thereby slowing down (reducing) their diffusion (diffusion length)

  10. Instabilities and patterns in coupled reaction-diffusion layers.

    PubMed

    Catllá, Anne J; McNamara, Amelia; Topaz, Chad M

    2012-02-01

    We study instabilities and pattern formation in reaction-diffusion layers that are diffusively coupled. For two-layer systems of identical two-component reactions, we analyze the stability of homogeneous steady states by exploiting the block symmetric structure of the linear problem. There are eight possible primary bifurcation scenarios, including a Turing-Turing bifurcation that involves two disparate length scales whose ratio may be tuned via the interlayer coupling. For systems of n-component layers and nonidentical layers, the linear problem's block form allows approximate decomposition into lower-dimensional linear problems if the coupling is sufficiently weak. As an example, we apply these results to a two-layer Brusselator system. The competing length scales engineered within the linear problem are readily apparent in numerical simulations of the full system. Selecting a sqrt[2]:1 length-scale ratio produces an unusual steady square pattern.

  11. Diffusion on Cu surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    1993-01-01

    Understanding surface diffusion is essential in understanding surface phenomena, such as crystal growth, thin film growth, corrosion, physisorption, and chemisorption. Because of its importance, various experimental and theoretical efforts have been directed to understand this phenomena. The Field Ion Microscope (FIM) has been the major experimental tool for studying surface diffusion. FIM have been employed by various research groups to study surface diffusion of adatoms. Because of limitations of the FIM, such studies are only limited to a few surfaces: nickel, platinum, aluminum, iridium, tungsten, and rhodium. From the theoretical standpoint, various atomistic simulations are performed to study surface diffusion. In most of these calculations the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) along with the molecular static (MS) simulation are utilized. The EAM is a semi-empirical approach for modeling the interatomic interactions. The MS simulation is a technique for minimizing the total energy of a system of particles with respect to the positions of its particles. One of the objectives of this work is to develop the EAM functions for Cu and use them in conjunction with the molecular static (MS) simulation to study diffusion of a Cu atom on a perfect as well as stepped Cu(100) surfaces. This will provide a test of the validity of the EAM functions on Cu(100) surface and near the stepped environments. In particular, we construct a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model and calculate the migration energies of an atom on a terrace, near a ledge site, near a kink site, and going over a descending step. We have also calculated formation energies of an atom on the bare surface, a vacancy in the surface, a stepped surface, and a stepped-kink surface. Our results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  12. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  13. Roughness Length Variability over Heterogeneous Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    System ( COAMPS ) model fields for selected times during Tropical Storm Fay. Figure 42. Contoured roughness length from (a) COAMPS and 16.5-m wind...passage of Tropical Storm Fay on 18–21 August 2008. Spatial and temporal variations in roughness lengths for a period of one year are compared to...the same height in the tropical storm case, for wind speeds exceeding 20 ms-1, evidence is presented that indicates roughness lengths are related to

  14. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  15. On the attached length of orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komkin, A. I.; Mironov, M. A.; Yudin, S. I.

    2012-11-01

    The attached length of orifices in reactive mufflers has been estimated based on numerical calculations by the finite-element method. The numerical results for a diaphragm in a duct are compared with the theoretical data obtained by Rayleigh, Fock, Karal, and Ingard. The dependence of the attached length on the diaphragm thickness is given. The results obtained are generalized for the case in which the orifice is a Helmholtz resonator neck. The effect of the resonator length on the attached length of the neck is analyzed.

  16. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  17. Generalizations of Brandl's theorem on Engel length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quek, S. G.; Wong, K. B.; Wong, P. C.

    2013-04-01

    Let n < m be positive integers such that [g,nh] = [g,mh] and assume that n and m are chosen minimal with respect to this property. Let gi = [g,n+ih] where i = 1,2,…,m-n. Then π(g,h) = (g1,…,gm-n) is called the Engel cycle generated by g and h. The length of the Engel cycle is m-n. A group G is said to have Engel length r, if all the length of the Engel cycles in G divides r. In this paper we discuss the Brandl's theorem on Engel length and give some of its generalizations.

  18. Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian; Jensen, R. V. Skougaard; Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2010-10-04

    Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

  19. Lateral Diffusion Length Changes in HgCdTe Detectors in a Proton Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbs, John E.; Marshall, Paul W.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Gramer, Mark E.; Maestas, Diana; Garcia, John P.; Dole, Gary A.; Anderson, Amber A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the performance degradation in a proton environment of very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) HgCdTe detectors. The energy dependence of the Non-Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) in HgCdTe provides a framework for estimating the responsivity degradation in VLWIR HgCdTe due to on orbit exposure from protons. Banded detector arrays that have different detector designs were irradiated at proton energies of 7, 12, and 63 MeV. These banded detector arrays allovedin sight into how the fundamental detector parameters degraded in a proton environment at the three different proton energies. Measured data demonstrated that the detector responsivity degradation at 7 MeV is 5 times larger than the degradation at 63 MeV. The comparison of the responsivity degradation at the different proton energies suggests that the atomic Columbic interaction of the protons with the HgCdTe detector is likely the primary mechanism responsible for the degradation in responsivity at proton energies below 30 MeV.

  20. Precise bacterial polyprenol length control fails in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Poznański, Jarosław; Szkopinska, Anna

    2007-06-05

    A comparison of amino acid sequences of yeast Rer2p and Srt1p Z-prenyltransferases shows that the spatial organization of their substrate tunnels agrees with that determined by X-ray for the E. coli undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPs). The observed trend in the maxima of product length distribution shifted from C(55) in UPPs to C(80) in Rer2p and to C(110) in Srt1p. This suggests a significant increase in the size of the enzyme hydrophobic tunnel from approximately 1000 A(3) of E. coli UPPs to approximately 1300 A(3) required to accommodate C(80) in Rer2p and to 1700 A(3) for C(110) in Srt1p. Moreover, Srt1p products reaching C(290) indicate the failure of a strict bacterial-like chain length control. On the basis of E. coli UPPs crystallographic structure the yeast Rer2p model was constructed. In the model three amino acid residues inserted into the sequence corresponding to the "floor" region of the tunnel extends the bottom loop what results in the required increase of the tunnel volume. Moreover, thermal fluctuations of this loop occasionally create a hole in the tunnel floor, making escape of polyprenol omega end out of the tunnel possible what switches off the control mechanism of product length thereby allowing a practically unlimited elongation process leading to an exponential distribution of longer chain polyprenols.

  1. Structures of diffusion regions in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takayuki; Togano, Kentaro; Ogino, Tatsuki

    2010-05-15

    Detailed structures of diffusion regions in two-dimensional collisionless magnetic reconnection are studied by using an electromagnetic Vlasov simulation. It has been well known that plasma number density decreases near the X-point of the reconnection. However, numerical thermal fluctuations exist in particle-in-cell simulations, and there is a possibility that detailed structures near the X-point diffuse numerically when the number of particles per cell is not enough. In the present study, a high-resolution two-dimensional Vlasov simulation is performed. It is found that electron number density in the electron diffusion region decreases to a hundredth of the initial value. Structures of electron diffusion region are determined by the local electron inertial length.

  2. Diffusion of water in bentonite clay: Neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V. K.; Prabhudesai, S. A.; Dessai, R. Raut; Erwin Desa, J. A.; Mitra, S.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2013-02-01

    Diffusion of water confined in natural bentonite clay is studied using the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. X-ray diffraction shows a well-defined crystalline structure of the clay with an interlayer spacing of 13 Å. The QENS experiment has been carried out on hydrated as well as dehydrated clay at 300 K. Significant quasi-elastic broadening was observed in case of hydrated bentonite clay whereas dehydrated clay did not show any broadening over the instrument resolution. Analysis of QENS data reveals that diffusion of water occurs through jump diffusion characterized by random distribution of jump lengths. Diffusion of water in clay is found to be hindered vis a vis bulk water.

  3. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Wan, M.; Montgomery, D.

    2013-12-01

    Study of the transport and diffusion of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider Diffusion of charged particles in fully three dimensional statistically isotropic magnetic field turbulence with no mean field which is pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We classify different regions of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius of the charged particle to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. We propose three different theoretical models to calculate the diffusion coefficient each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared with those from computer simulations, showing very good agreement.

  4. Simulations of singlet exciton diffusion in organic semiconductors: a review

    DOE PAGES

    Bjorgaard, Josiah A.; Kose, Muhammet Erkan

    2014-12-22

    Our review describes the various aspects of simulation strategies for exciton diffusion in condensed phase thin films of organic semiconductors. Several methods for calculating energy transfer rate constants are discussed along with procedures for how to account for energetic disorder. Exciton diffusion can be modelled by using kinetic Monte-Carlo methods or master equations. Recent literature on simulation efforts for estimating exciton diffusion lengths of various conjugated polymers and small molecules are introduced. Moreover, these studies are discussed in the context of the effects of morphology on exciton diffusion and the necessity of accurate treatment of disorder for comparison of simulationmore » results with those of experiment.« less

  5. Role of pressure diffusion in non-homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Lele, S. K.; Durbin, P.

    1994-01-01

    A non-local model is presented for approximating the pressure diffusion in calculations of turbulent free shear and boundary layer flows. It is based on the solution of an elliptic relaxation equation which enables local diffusion sources to be distributed over lengths of the order of the integral scale. The pressure diffusion model was implemented in a boundary layer code within the framework of turbulence models based on both the kappa-epsilon-(bar)upsilon(exp 2) system of equations and the full Reynolds stress equations. Model computations were performed for mixing layers and boundary layer flows. In each case, the pressure diffusion model enabled the well-known free-stream edge singularity problem to be eliminated. There was little effect on near-wall properties. Computed results agreed very well with experimental and DNS data for the mean flow velocity, the turbulent kinetic energy, and the skin-friction coefficient.

  6. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Blasi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.; Chuychai, P.; Dmitruk, P.; Wan, M.; Parashar, T. N.; Chhiber, R.

    2017-03-01

    The investigation of the diffusive transport of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider the diffusion of charged particles in fully three-dimensional isotropic turbulent magnetic fields with no mean field, which may be pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We identify different ranges of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. Two different theoretical models are proposed to calculate the diffusion coefficient, each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared to those from computer simulations, showing good agreement.

  7. Intermediate temperature proton conductors for PEM fuel cells based on phosphonic acid as protogenic group: a progress report.

    PubMed

    Steininger, H; Schuster, M; Kreuer, K D; Kaltbeitzel, A; Bingöl, B; Meyer, W H; Schauff, S; Brunklaus, G; Maier, J; Spiess, H W

    2007-04-21

    The melting behaviour and transport properties of straight chain alkanes mono- and difunctionalized with phosphonic acid groups have been investigated as a function of their length. The increase of melting temperature and decrease of proton conductivity with increasing chain length is suggested to be the consequence of an increasing ordering of the alkane segments which constrains the free aggregation of the phosphonic acid groups. However, the proton mobility is reduced to a greater extent than the proton diffusion coefficient indicating an increasing cooperativity of proton transport with increasing length of the alkane segment. The results clearly indicate that the "spacer concept", which had been proven successful in the optimization of the proton conductivity of heterocycle based systems, fails in the case of phosphonic acid functionalized polymers. Instead, a very high concentration of phosphonic acid functional groups forming "bulky" hydrogen bonded aggregates is suggested to be essential for obtaining very high proton conductivity. Aggregation is also suggested to reduce condensation reactions generally observed in phosphonic acid containing systems. On the basis of this understanding, the proton conductivities of poly(vinyl phosphonic acid) and poly(meta-phenylene phosphonic acid) are discussed. Though both polymers exhibit a substantial concentration of phosphonic acid groups, aggregation seems to be constrained to such an extent that intrinsic proton conductivity is limited to values below sigma = 10(-3) S cm(-1) at T = 150 degrees C. The results suggest that different immobilization concepts have to be developed in order to minimize the conductivity reduction compared to the very high intrinsic proton conductivity of neat phosphonic acid under quasi dry conditions. In the presence of high water activities, however, (as usually present in PEM fuel cells) the very high ion exchange capacities (IEC) possible for phosphonic acid functionalized ionomers (IEC

  8. Boundary-layer analysis for the convection/diffusion transition in dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The supercooling dependence of dendritic growth kinetics under the influence of convective heat transport is investigated theoretically and experimentally with emphasis on theoretical prediction of the supercooling level at which the transition from diffusion-controlled to convection-controlled dendritic growth occurs. It is shown that the crossover between diffusive and convective transport depends on the relative thickness of the Stefan length compared with the thermal boundary layer. These lengths become equal at a supercooling which may be calculated from diffusion theory and fluid mechanics. It is also shown that the crossover supercooling varies weakly with the gravitational acceleration, melt viscosity, and the volumetric expansion coefficient.

  9. LLNL SMP Light Diffuser Fabrication and Preliminary Data

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W

    2006-06-02

    We are developing a cylindrical light diffuser using shape memory polymer (SMP) whose diameter, length, stiffness, and diffusion profile can be tailored to suit a particular application. The cylindrical SMP diffuser is made by casting SMP around the end of a glass optical fiber using a teflon tube as the casting mold, and abrading the cured SMP surface to cause the light to leak radially outward. The inner diameter of the casting tube is slightly larger than the fiber diameter. A smaller teflon tube is positioned over the fiber (between the fiber and the casting tube) to approximately center the fiber tip in the casting tube. As the SMP cures, it bonds with the optical fiber, creating a strong joint without the need for additional adhesives or mechanical fixtures. A close-up of the SMP-fiber joint and the finished SMP diffuser are shown in Fig.1. The SMP formulation (developed in-house) was specifically designed to be optically transparent in the visible and near-infrared regions; the spectral absorption of the SMP is shown in Fig. 2. The low absorption is important because (1) it allows the light to travel the length of the diffuser without suffering excessive loss due to absorption and (2) it permits delivery of up to 7 W (300 {micro}m SMP rod on 100 {micro}m core multimode fiber) of laser power into the diffuser without damaging the diffuser. SMP is a good wave guiding material with a refractive index of approximately 1.5. Also, the SMP stiffness can be tailored from stiff (e.g. acrylic, Ea {approx} 10{sup 9} Pa) to very flexible (e.g. silicon rubber, Ea {approx} 10{sup 6} Pa). Finally, since SMP can self-actuate, the SMP diffuser could be designed to actuate into a shape other than a straight rod (e.g. 2D or 3D coil).

  10. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  11. Diffusion in Immiscible Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to measure the diffusion coefficients for molten Pb in Zn in the immiscible liquid-phase region. Diffusion couples of pure Pb and Zn were prepared using a shear cell. These have been placed in graphite crucibles and encapsulated in stainless steel cartridges and are awaiting the next Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA) flight opportunity. In flight, one couple will be soaked for 40 minutes at 440 deg C (just above the monotectic temperature) and the second couple will be soaked for 40 minutes 820 deg C (just above the consolute temperature). After the soak both samples will be rapidly quenched by flowing He to minimize redistribution of the immiscible phases. Post flight compositional analysis will be accomplished using X-ray fluorescence in the scanning electron microscopy.

  12. Amosphous diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, E.; So, F. C. T.; Nicolet, M-A.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous W-Zr and W-N alloys were investigated as diffusion barriers in silicon metallization schemes. Data were presented showing that amorphous W-Zr crystallizes at 900 C, which is 200 C higher than amorphous W-Ni films, and that both films react with metallic overlayers at temperatures far below the crystllization temperature. Also, W-N alloys (crystalline temperature of 600 C) were successfully incorporated as a diffusion barrier in contact structures with both Al and Ag overlayers. The thermal stability of the electrical characteristics of shallow n(+)p junctions significantly improved by incorporating W-N layers in the contact system. One important fact demonstated was the critical influence of the deposition parameters during formation of these carriers.

  13. Nonlocal electrical diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.; Olivares-Peregrino, V. H.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Calderón-Ramón, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0<β≤1 and for the time domain is 0<γ≤2. We present solutions for the full fractional equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

  14. Magnetic diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The diffuse scattering of neutrons from magnetic materials provides unique and important information regarding the spatial correlations of the atoms and the spins. Such measurements have been extensively applied to magnetically ordered systems, such as the ferromagnetic binary alloys, for which the observed correlations describe the magnetic moment fluctuations associated with local environment effects. With the advent of polarization analysis, these techniques are increasingly being applied to study disordered paramagnetic systems such as the spin-glasses and the diluted magnetic semiconductors. The spin-pair correlations obtained are essential in understanding the exchange interactions of such systems. In this paper, we describe recent neutron diffuse scattering results on the atom-pair and spin-pair correlations in some of these disordered magnetic systems. 56 refs.

  15. Segment lengths influence hill walking strategies.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2014-08-22

    Segment lengths are known to influence walking kinematics and muscle activity patterns. During level walking at the same speed, taller individuals take longer, slower strides than shorter individuals. Based on this, we sought to determine if segment lengths also influenced hill walking strategies. We hypothesized that individuals with longer segments would display more joint flexion going uphill and more extension going downhill as well as greater lateral gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis activity in both directions. Twenty young adults of varying heights (below 155 cm to above 188 cm) walked at 1.25 m/s on a level treadmill as well as 6° and 12° up and downhill slopes while we collected kinematic and muscle activity data. Subsequently, we ran linear regressions for each of the variables with height, leg, thigh, and shank length. Despite our population having twice the anthropometric variability, the level and hill walking patterns matched closely with previous studies. While there were significant differences between level and hill walking, there were few hill walking variables that were correlated with segment length. In support of our hypothesis, taller individuals had greater knee and ankle flexion during uphill walking. However, the majority of the correlations were between tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius activities and shank length. Contrary to our hypothesis, relative step length and muscle activity decreased with segment length, specifically shank length. In summary, it appears that individuals with shorter segments require greater propulsion and toe clearance during uphill walking as well as greater braking and stability during downhill walking.

  16. 23 CFR 658.13 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... power unit behind the cab and on an over-cab rack. No State shall impose an overall length limitation of... may carry boats on the power unit so long as the length and width restrictions of the vehicles and...) in 23 CFR 658.19. (6) Munitions carriers using dromedary equipment. A truck tractor equipped with...

  17. 7 CFR 29.6024 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Length. 29.6024 Section 29.6024 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6024 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from...

  18. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  19. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  20. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...