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Sample records for acid diffusion length

  1. How fatty acids of different chain length enter and leave cells by free diffusion.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Frits; Hamilton, James A

    2006-09-01

    Opposing views exist as to how unesterified fatty acids (FA) enter and leave cells. It is commonly believed that for short- and medium-chain FA free diffusion suffices whereas it is questioned whether proteins are required to facilitate transport of long-chain fatty acid (LCFA). Furthermore, it is unclear whether these proteins facilitate binding to the plasma membrane, trans-membrane movement, dissociation into the cytosol and/or transport in the cytosol. In this mini-review we approach the controversy from a different point of view by focusing on the membrane permeability constant (P) of FA with different chain length. We compare experimentally derived values of the P of short and medium-chain FA with values of apparent permeability coefficients for LCFA calculated from their dissociation rate constant (k(off)), flip-flop rate constant (k(flip)) and partition coefficient (Kp) in phospholipid bilayers. It was found that Overton's rule is valid as long as k(flip)length, the permeability increases according to increasing Kp and reaches a maximum for LCFA with chain length of 18 carbons or longer. For fast flip-flop (e.g. k(flip)=15s(-1)), the apparent permeability constant for palmitic acid is very high (P(app)=1.61 cm/s). Even for a slow flip-flop rate constant (e.g. k(flip)=0.3s(-1)), the permeability constant of LCFA is still several orders of magnitude larger than the P of water and other small non-electrolytes. Since polyunsaturated FA have basically the same physico-chemical properties as LCFA, they have similar membrane permeabilities. The implications for theories involving proteins to facilitate uptake of FA are discussed. PMID:16829065

  2. The Influence of Spatial Variations of Diffusion Length on Charge Collected by Diffusion from Ion Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, L. D.

    1996-01-01

    Charge collected by diffusion from ion tracks in a semiconductor substrate may be influenced by the substrate diffusion length, which is related to recombination losses. A theoretical analysis shows that, excluding some extreme cases, charge collection is insensitive to spatial variations in the diffusion length funciton, so it is possible to define an effective diffusion length having the property that collected charge can be approximated by assuming a uniform diffusion length equal to this effective value.

  3. Diffusion lengths in amphoteric GaAs heteroface solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, K. L.; Beal, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    Minority-carrier diffusion lengths in amphoteric GaAs:Si were investigated. Electron and hole diffusion lengths in p- and n-type, respectively, were determined to be 13 microns and 7 microns. Preliminary efficiency measurements on heteroface structures based on amphoteric GaAs:Si p-n junctions indicated that these devices should make excellent solar cells.

  4. A novel method to evaluate spin diffusion length of Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-qing; Sun, Niu-yi; Che, Wen-ru; Shan, Rong; Zhu, Zhen-gang

    2016-05-01

    Spin diffusion length of Pt is evaluated via proximity effect of spin orbit coupling (SOC) and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in Pt/Co2FeAl bilayers. By varying the thicknesses of Pt and Co2FeAl layer, the thickness dependences of AHE parameters can be obtained, which are theoretically predicted to be proportional to the square of the SOC strength. According to the physical image of the SOC proximity effect, the spin diffusion length of Pt can easily be identified from these thickness dependences. This work provides a novel method to evaluate spin diffusion length in a material with a small value.

  5. Acid diffusion through polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P. Linda; Eckert, Andrew R.; Willson, C. Grant; Webber, Stephen E.; Byers, Jeffrey D.

    1997-07-01

    In order to perform 0.2 micrometer processes, one needs to study the diffusion of photoacid generators within the photoresist system, since diffusion during post exposure bake time has an influence on the critical dimension (CD). We have developed a new method to study the diffusion of photoacid generators within a polymer film. This new method is based on monitoring the change of the fluorescence intensity of a pH- sensitive fluorescent dye caused by the reaction with photoacid. A simplified version of this experiment has been conducted by introducing acid vapor to quench the fluorescence intensity of this pH sensor. A thin polymer film is spin cast onto the sensor to create a barrier to the acid diffusion process. During the acid diffusion process, the fluorescence intensity of this pH sensor is measured in situ, using excitation and emission wavelengths at 466 nm and 516 nm, respectively. Fluoresceinamine, the pH sensitive fluorescent dye, is covalently bonded onto the treated quartz substrate to form a single dye layer. Poly(hydroxystyrene) (Mn equals 13k, Tg equals 180 degrees Celsius) in PGMEA (5% - 18% by weight) is spin cast onto this quartz substrate to form films with varying thickness. The soft bake time is 60 seconds at 90 degrees Celsius and a typical film has a thickness of 1.4 micrometers. Trifluoroacetic acid is introduced into a small chamber while the fluorescence from this quartz window is observed. Our study focuses on finding the diffusion constant of the vaporized acid (trifluoroacetic acid) in the poly(hydroxystyrene) polymer film. By applying the Fick's second law, (It - Io)/(I(infinity ) - Io) equals erfc [L/(Dt)1/2] is obtained. The change of fluorescence intensity with respect to the diffusion time is monitored. The above equation is used for the data analysis, where L represents the film thickness and t represents the average time for the acid to diffuse through the film. The diffusion constant is calculated to be at the order of 10

  6. Diffusion lengths of silicon solar cells from luminescence images

    SciTech Connect

    Wuerfel, P.; Trupke, T.; Puzzer, T.; Schaeffer, E.; Warta, W.; Glunz, S. W.

    2007-06-15

    A method for spatially resolved measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length in silicon wafers and in silicon solar cells is introduced. The method, which is based on measuring the ratio of two luminescence images taken with two different spectral filters, is applicable, in principle, to both photoluminescence and electroluminescence measurements and is demonstrated experimentally by electroluminescence measurements on a multicrystalline silicon solar cell. Good agreement is observed with the diffusion length distribution obtained from a spectrally resolved light beam induced current map. In contrast to the determination of diffusion lengths from one single luminescence image, the method proposed here gives absolute values of the diffusion length and, in comparison, it is much less sensitive to lateral voltage variations across the cell area as caused by local variations of the series resistance. It is also shown that measuring the ratio of two luminescence images allows distinguishing shunts or surface defects from bulk defects.

  7. Measurement of radon diffusion length in thin membranes.

    PubMed

    Malki, A; Lavi, N; Moinester, M; Nassar, H; Neeman, E; Piasetzky, E; Steiner, V

    2012-07-01

    Building regulations in Israel require the insulating of buildings against radon (222)Rn penetration from soil. In radon-prone areas membranes stretched between the soil and the building foundation are used, together with sealing other possible penetration routes. Designing the radon mitigation procedure requires checking that all sealing materials are practically, radon tight, having a thickness of at least three times the radon diffusion length. In this work, a very simple technique to evaluate the radon diffusion length in thin membranes, using a radon source of known activity and an activated charcoal canister as radon detector is presented. The theoretical formalism and measurement results for polyethylene membranes of different densities obtained in a recent comparison exercise are presented. PMID:22232779

  8. Thirty years since diffuse sound reflection by maximum length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Trevor J.; D'Antonio, Peter

    2005-09-01

    This year celebrates the 30th anniversary of Schroeder's seminal paper on sound scattering from maximum length sequences. This paper, along with Schroeder's subsequent publication on quadratic residue diffusers, broke new ground, because they contained simple recipes for designing diffusers with known acoustic performance. So, what has happened in the intervening years? As with most areas of engineering, the room acoustic diffuser has been greatly influenced by the rise of digital computing technologies. Numerical methods have become much more powerful, and this has enabled predictions of surface scattering to greater accuracy and for larger scale surfaces than previously possible. Architecture has also gone through a revolution where the forms of buildings have become more extreme and sculptural. Acoustic diffuser designs have had to keep pace with this to produce shapes and forms that are desirable to architects. To achieve this, design methodologies have moved away from Schroeder's simple equations to brute force optimization algorithms. This paper will look back at the past development of the modern diffuser, explaining how the principles of diffuser design have been devised and revised over the decades. The paper will also look at the present state-of-the art, and dreams for the future.

  9. The Reactive-Diffusive Length of OH Radical in Squalane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L.; Wilson, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    With the technique of core-shell particle configuration, we have measured the radical penetration length in a reactive matrix by observing the transmission efficiency of OH radical through squalane shell of various thickness ranging from 0 nm (without coating) to 16 nm. The result indicates a penetration depth of 2.2 nm. Our data suggest that the OH concentration profile in squalane as a function of the distance from the squalane/air interface can be satisfactorily described by the analytical solution to diffusion equation with an added chemical loss term experienced by the OH radical. This allowed an almost unambiguous determination of either OH diffusivity or OH reactivity given that one of the value is known in systems where radical chain propagation is not a significant factor and can shed new lights on the lifetime alteration of particulate matters in the atmosphere where possible coating processes are abundant.

  10. Diffusion length measurements of thin amorphous silicon layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, J. C.; van Oort, R. C.; Geerts, M. J.

    1989-02-01

    A new method for the analysis of diffusion length measurements by the Surface Photovoltage (SPV) method is presented. It takes into account the effect of the reflection of light from the back contact in thin layers and the effect of a finite bandwidth of the used interference filters. The model was found to agree with experiments on thin amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers. It is shown that in the region were these effects are negligible this method is equivalent to the standard method.

  11. Exciton diffusion lengths of organic semiconductor thin films measured by spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Richard R.; Giebink, Noel C.; Belak, Anna A.; Benziger, Jay B.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching as a means to determine the exciton diffusion length of several archetype organic semiconductors used in thin film devices. We show that aggregation and crystal orientation influence the anisotropy of the diffusion length for vacuum-deposited polycrystalline films. The measurement of the singlet diffusion lengths is found to be in agreement with diffusion by Förster transfer, whereas triplet diffusion occurs primarily via Dexter transfer.

  12. Diffusion length in nanoporous TiO{sub 2} films under above-band-gap illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. D.; Son, B. H.; Park, J. K.; Kim, Sang Yong; Park, Ji-Yong; Lee, Soonil; Ahn, Y. H.

    2014-06-15

    We determined the carrier diffusion lengths in TiO{sub 2} nanoporous layers of dye-sensitized solar cells by using scanning photocurrent microscopy using an ultraviolet laser. Here, we excited the carrier directly in the nanoporous layers where the diffusion lengths were found to 140 μm as compared to that of visible illumination measured at 90 μm. The diffusion length decreased with increasing laser modulation frequency, in which we determined the electron lifetimes and the diffusion coefficients for both visible and UV illuminations. The diffusion lengths have been studied in terms of the sintering temperatures for both cells with and without binding molecules. We found a strong correlation between the diffusion length and the overall light-to-current conversion efficiency, proving that improving the diffusion length and hence the interparticle connections, is key to improving cell efficiency.

  13. Scale length of mantle heterogeneities: Constraints from helium diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. R.; Kurz, M. D.; Wang, Z.

    2008-05-01

    A model of coupled He production/diffusion is used to constrain the question of whether Earth's peridotitic mantle contains ubiquitous mesoscale veins or slabs of other lithologies. The high diffusion rates of helium preclude survival of He isotope heterogeneities on scales smaller than a few tens of meters, especially if they represent long term in-growth of 4He in the mantle. For 1.5 Gyr residence times, and a diffusion coefficient of 10 - 10 m 2/s, 0.5 km slabs or 2 km cylinders will lose > 90% of in-grown 4He. However, substantial 3He/ 4He variations may persist in slabs or be induced in adjacent mantle, depending on initial He, U and Th contents. We have modeled three cases of 3He/ 4He equilibration between mantle domains: an ocean crust (OC) slab in depleted upper mantle (DMM) or in enriched mantle (BSE), and a BSE slab in DMM. For a 1 km OC slab in DMM (8 Ra today), the slab today will have 3He/ 4He of only 3 Ra, and will have influenced the surrounding mantle with 4He for > 7 km on either side. The average 3He/ 4He of this mixed zone will be < 7 Ra, even when sampled by melts over a total width of 20-50 km. For the case of a 1 km BSE slab in DMM (8 Ra today), the slab will be 37 Ra today, and will have infected a mantle domain > 16 km wide. Even with a 60 km melt sampling width, the average 3He/ 4He will be > 15 Ra. Slabs may lose their He signature by diffusion, but their presence will be recorded in the surrounding mantle. We have evaluated 3 along-axis N-MORB ridge-crest data sets in this context (MAR 25.7-26.5°S; EPR 19-23°S; SWIR 16-24° E), with a view to defining scale-lengths of He isotope variability. The average 3He/ 4He variability for these 3 areas is very small, and independent of spreading rate: 0.13, 0.19 and 0.21 Ra (± 1 σ). Since these ridges range from ultra-slow to very fast-spreading, the variability in size of along-axis magma chambers will lead inevitably to various scales of melt averaging. We conclude that these ridge areas are

  14. Changes in diffusion path length with old age in diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnéry, Clément; Leclerc, Paul-Olivier; Desjardins, Michèle; Hoge, Rick; Bherer, Louis; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2012-05-01

    Diffuse, optical near infrared imaging is increasingly being used in various neurocognitive contexts where changes in optical signals are interpreted through activation maps. Statistical population comparison of different age or clinical groups rely on the relative homogeneous distribution of measurements across subjects in order to infer changes in brain function. In the context of an increasing use of diffuse optical imaging with older adult populations, changes in tissue properties and anatomy with age adds additional confounds. Few studies investigated these changes with age. Duncan et al. measured the so-called diffusion path length factor (DPF) in a large population but did not explore beyond the age of 51 after which physiological and anatomical changes are expected to occur [Pediatr. Res. 39(5), 889-894 (1996)]. With increasing interest in studying the geriatric population with optical imaging, we studied changes in tissue properties in young and old subjects using both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided Monte-Carlo simulations and time-domain diffuse optical imaging. Our results, measured in the frontal cortex, show changes in DPF that are smaller than previously measured by Duncan et al. in a younger population. The origin of these changes are studied using simulations and experimental measures.

  15. Scale Length of Mantle Heterogeneities: Helium Diffusion Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S.; Kurz, M.; Wang, Z.

    2007-12-01

    will be >20 Ra. In essence, slabs may lose their He signature by diffusion, but it will remain recorded in the surrounding mantle; i.e. veins may run but they can't hide! For both enriched and depleted upper mantle slabs, sampled along a spreading ridge, the 3/4He variability on 10-20 km scale lengths would be easily observed; even massive along-axis melt mixing (50-100 km) would not hide these signatures. We have evaluated 3 extant ridge-crest data sets in this context (MAR 0-47S; EPR 19-23S; SWIR 16- 24E), with a view to defining scale-lengths of He isotope variability. The average 3/4He variability for these 3 areas is 0.47, 0.19 and 0.21 Ra (±1 sigma); a well-sampled sub-area on the MAR (25.7-26.5S) is 0.13 Ra. There is a monotonic variation along the SWIR, from 6.6 to 7.3 Ra; variability about a best fit line is 0.09 Ra (maximum deviation is only 0.20 Ra). At the smallest scale, a single 20 km EPR flow field shows similar variability (0.29 Ra) to the above examples. Since these ridges range from slow to very fast-spreading, the variability in size of along- axis magma chambers will lead inevitably to various scales of melt averaging. We conclude that these ridge areas are not sampling mantle that contains enriched veins or recycled oceanic crust slabs of any significant size. This is especially clear for the 500 km domain on the SWIR, where very small He variability is observed, superimposed on a large scale He gradient. In particular, the view of the upper mantle as a ubiquitous mixture of veins and depleted matrix, with MORB always representing an averaging of this mixture, appears untenable.

  16. Diffusion of sulfuric acid in concentrated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Umino, S.; Newman, J. )

    1993-08-01

    Aqueous sulfuric acid is an economically important chemical reagent. It is one of the largest volume chemical commodities, finding uses in fertilizer production, petroleum refining, extraction of metals from their ores, production of inorganic pigments, pickling of iron and steel, synthesis of surface-active agents, and as a reactant in the lead-acid storage battery. The restricted diffusion method was used to measure the differential diffusion coefficient of sulfuric acid in water at 25 C for the concentration range from 0.3 to 7.5 molar. The concentration gradients of diffusing species were observed by Rayleigh interferometry. Experimental transport data are analyzed with concentrated solution theory of electrolytes in order to elucidate macroscopic transport characteristics of sulfuric acid in terms of specific binary interactions in solution. Results indicate that the transport properties of sulfuric acid are determined by the hydrogen ion-water molecule.

  17. Role of acid diffusion in matrix acidizing of carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefner, M.L.; Fogler, H.S.; Stenius, P.; Sjoblom, J.

    1987-02-01

    To increase the efficiency of matrix treatments in carbonates, a new type of retarded acid-in-oil microemulsion system has ben developed. The microemulsion is of low viscosity but can exhibit acid diffusion rates two orders of magnitude lower than aqueous HCl. Decreased acid diffusion delays spending and allows live acid to penetrate the rock matrix more uniformly and to greater distances. Coreflood results show that the microemulsion can stimulate cores in fewer PV's and under conditions of low injection rates where aqueous HCl fails completely. The microemulsion could also conceivably increase acid penetration along any natural fractures and fissures that may be present, thus increasing acidizing efficiency in this type of treatment. The relationship between the acid diffusion rate and the ability of the fluid to matrix-stimulate limestone is investigated.

  18. Waste acid recycling via diffusion dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.

    1995-05-26

    Inorganic acids are commonly used for surface cleaning and finishing of metals. The acids become unuseable due to contamination with metals or diluted and weakened. Diffusion dialysis has become a way to recover the useable acid and allow separation of the metals for recovery and sale to refineries. This technique is made possible by the use of membranes that are strong enough to withstand low ph and have long service life.

  19. Studies of minority carrier diffusion length increase in p-type ZnO:Sb

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O.; Chernyak, L.; Xiu, F. X.; Liu, J. L.; Jang, S.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Gartsman, K.; Feldman, Y.; Osinsky, A.; Chow, P.

    2006-10-15

    Minority electron diffusion length was measured in p-type, Sb-doped ZnO as a function of temperature using the electron beam induced current technique. A thermally induced increase of electron diffusion length was determined to have an activation energy of 184{+-}10 meV. Irradiation with a low energy (5 kV) electron beam also resulted in an increase of diffusion length with a similar activation energy (219{+-}8 meV). Both phenomena are suggested to involve a Sb{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} acceptor complex. Saturation and relaxation dynamics of minority carrier diffusion length are explored. Details of a possible mechanism for diffusion length increase are presented.

  20. Fossil rocks of slow earthquake detected by thermal diffusion length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Morita, Kiyohiko; Okubo, Makoto; Hamada, Yohei; Lin, Weiren; Hirose, Takehiro; Kitamura, Manami

    2016-04-01

    Fault motion has been estimated by diffusion pattern of frictional heating recorded in geology (e.g., Fulton et al., 2012). The same record in deeper subduction plate interface can be observed from micro-faults in an exhumed accretionary complex. In this study, we focused on a micro-fault within the Cretaceous Shimanto Belt, SW Japan to estimate fault motion from the frictional heating diffusion pattern. A carbonaceous material concentrated layer (CMCL) with ~2m of thickness is observed in study area. Some micro-faults cut the CMCL. Thickness of a fault is about 3.7mm. Injection veins and dilatant fractures were observed in thin sections, suggesting that the high fluid pressure was existed. Samples with 10cm long were collected to measure distribution of vitrinite reflectance (Ro) as a function of distance from the center of micro-fault. Ro of host rock was ~1.0%. Diffusion pattern was detected decreasing in Ro from ~1.2%-~1.1%. Characteristic diffusion distance is ~4-~9cm. We conducted grid search to find the optimal frictional heat generation per unit area per second (Q (J/m^2/s), the product of friction coefficient, normal stress and slip velocity) and slip duration (t(s)) to fit the diffusion pattern. Thermal diffusivity (0.98*10^8m^2/s) and thermal conductivity (2.0 w/mK) were measured. In the result, 2000-2500J/m^2/s of Q and 63000-126000s of t were estimated. Moment magnitudes (M0) of slow earthquakes (slow EQs) follow a scaling law with slip duration and its dimension is different from that for normal earthquakes (normal EQ) (Ide et al., 2007). The slip duration estimated in this study (~10^4-~10^5s) consistent with 4-5 of M0, never fit to the scaling law for normal EQ. Heat generation can be inverted from 4-5 of M0, corresponding with ~10^8-~10^11J, which is consistent with rupture area of 10^5-10^8m2 in this study. The comparisons in heat generation and slip duration between geological measurements and geophysical remote observations give us the

  1. Measurement of minority carrier diffusion lengths in GaAs nanowires by a nanoprobe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbandi, A.; Watkins, S. P.

    2016-07-01

    Minority carrier diffusion lengths in both p-type and n-type GaAs nanowires were studied using electron beam induced current by means of a nanoprobe technique without lithographic processing. The diffusion lengths were determined for Au/GaAs rectifying junctions as well as axial p-n junctions. By incorporating a thin lattice-matched InGaP passivating shell, a 2-fold enhancement in the minority carrier diffusion lengths and one order of magnitude reduction in the surface recombination velocity were achieved.

  2. Investigation of diffusion length distribution on polycrystalline silicon wafers via photoluminescence methods.

    PubMed

    Lou, Shishu; Zhu, Huishi; Hu, Shaoxu; Zhao, Chunhua; Han, Peide

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the diffusion length of solar cells in space has been widely studied using various methods, but few studies have focused on a fast, simple way to obtain the quantified diffusion length distribution on a silicon wafer. In this work, we present two different facile methods of doing this by fitting photoluminescence images taken in two different wavelength ranges or from different sides. These methods, which are based on measuring the ratio of two photoluminescence images, yield absolute values of the diffusion length and are less sensitive to the inhomogeneity of the incident laser beam. A theoretical simulation and experimental demonstration of this method are presented. The diffusion length distributions on a polycrystalline silicon wafer obtained by the two methods show good agreement. PMID:26364565

  3. Investigation of diffusion length distribution on polycrystalline silicon wafers via photoluminescence methods

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Shishu; Zhu, Huishi; Hu, Shaoxu; Zhao, Chunhua; Han, Peide

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the diffusion length of solar cells in space has been widely studied using various methods, but few studies have focused on a fast, simple way to obtain the quantified diffusion length distribution on a silicon wafer. In this work, we present two different facile methods of doing this by fitting photoluminescence images taken in two different wavelength ranges or from different sides. These methods, which are based on measuring the ratio of two photoluminescence images, yield absolute values of the diffusion length and are less sensitive to the inhomogeneity of the incident laser beam. A theoretical simulation and experimental demonstration of this method are presented. The diffusion length distributions on a polycrystalline silicon wafer obtained by the two methods show good agreement. PMID:26364565

  4. Effect of short wavelength illumination on the characteristic bulk diffusion length in ribbon silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. T.; Mathias, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of short wavelength light on the characteristic bulk minority carrier diffusion length of the ribbon silicon photovoltaic cell has been investigated. We have measured the intensity and wavelength dependence of the diffusion length in an EFG ribbon cell, and compared it with a standard Czochralski grown silicon cell. While the various short wavelength illuminations have shown no influence on the diffusion length in the CZ cell, the diffusion lengths in the ribbon cell exhibit a strong dependence on the volume generation rate as well as on the wavelength of the superimposed lights. We have concluded that the trap-filling phenomenon at various depths in the bulk neutral region of the cell is consistent with the experimental observation.

  5. Study on surface photovoltage measurement of long diffusion length silicon: Simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anttila, O. J.; Hahn, S. K.

    1993-07-01

    The limitations of surface photovoltage method (SPV), using the analytical solution for the minority-carrier distribution, are studied in detail. The principal source of error in thin wafers of long diffusion length material is the back surface recombination. The possibility of measuring large diffusion lengths in a reliable manner is discussed. With proper back surface passivation, diffusion lengths as long as several times the sample thickness can be measured. Evaluation of minor amounts of iron contamination in p-type material is possible even if the back surface recombination velocity is high, but a correction factor is required for the traditionally used relationship to convert the observed diffusion length change to iron concentration. The value of the correction factor varies between 1 and 1.5 for high back surface recombination velocity; the magnitude depends on the ratio between wafer thickness and the diffusion length of the minority carriers. The detection limit for iron is in the 109-1011 at/cm3 range, depending on the quality of the instrumentation and on the sample preparation; low back surface recombination gives better sensitivity. The use of SPV to measure the denuded zone width in precipitated material is briefly analyzed. It is shown that in heavily precipitated material an SPV measurement underestimates the denuded zone width, and the result will be very sensitive to the diffusion length in the bulk of the sample. Finally, the sensitivity of the measured diffusion length to different sources of errors and requirements for the sample preparation are discussed. The use of constant-flux method introduces some potential errors, which can be avoided through the use of constant bias illumination during the measurement.

  6. Estimation and calibration of the water isotope differential diffusion length in ice core records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wel, G.; Fischer, H.; Oerter, H.; Meyer, H.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-08-01

    Palaeoclimatic information can be retrieved from the diffusion of the stable water isotope signal during firnification of snow. The diffusion length, a measure for the amount of diffusion a layer has experienced, depends on the firn temperature and the accumulation rate. We show that the estimation of the diffusion length using power spectral densities (PSDs) of the record of a single isotope species can be biased by uncertainties in spectral properties of the isotope signal prior to diffusion. By using a second water isotope and calculating the difference in diffusion lengths between the two isotopes, this problem is circumvented. We study the PSD method applied to two isotopes in detail and additionally present a new forward diffusion method for retrieving the differential diffusion length based on the Pearson correlation between the two isotope signals. The two methods are discussed and extensively tested on synthetic data which are generated in a Monte Carlo manner. We show that calibration of the PSD method with this synthetic data is necessary to be able to objectively determine the differential diffusion length. The correlation-based method proves to be a good alternative for the PSD method as it yields precision equal to or somewhat higher than the PSD method. The use of synthetic data also allows us to estimate the accuracy and precision of the two methods and to choose the best sampling strategy to obtain past temperatures with the required precision. In addition to application to synthetic data the two methods are tested on stable-isotope records from the EPICA (European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica) ice core drilled in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, showing that reliable firn temperatures can be reconstructed with a typical uncertainty of 1.5 and 2 °C for the Holocene period and 2 and 2.5 °C for the last glacial period for the correlation and PSD method, respectively.

  7. Photo-generated Acid Diffusion in Polymer Photoresist Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Eric; Soles, Christopher; Wu, Wen-Li; Lin, Qinghuang

    2000-03-01

    Advanced photoresist formulations make use of photosensitive molecules, photoacid generators (PAGs), which decompose to form acids after illumination with UV radiation. The photo-generated acids then catalytically alter the solubility of the resist polymer during a post-exposure bake so that the exposed areas of an image can be removed with an appropriate solvent. One of the limitations in resist performance is the diffusion of small molecules such as the photoacid generators (PAG), photo-generated acids (PGAs), solvents, and performance enhancing additives, in the photoresist formulation. We utilize the high spatial resolution of neutron reflectometry over length scales relevant to line width broadening (10 nm to 20 nm) to measure the diffusion rates of PAGs, PGAs, and polymers in model resist materials. In this study, the model polymer matrix material is monodisperse poly(hydroxystyrene)(PHS) and the photoacid generator is bis(p-tert-butylphenyl) iodonium perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS). By measuring the profiles of the PGAs in the PHS layer and into an overlaying poly(methyl methacrylate) layer as a function of post-exposure bake temperature and time, the initial rates of diffusion may be determined.

  8. Estimation of minority carrier diffusion lengths in InP/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier diffusion length is one of the most important parameters affecting the solar cell performance. An attempt is made to estimate the minority carrier diffusion lengths is the emitter and base of InP/GaAs heteroepitaxial solar cells. The PC-1D computer model was used to simulate the experimental cell results measured at NASA Lewis under AMO (air mass zero) spectrum at 25 C. A 16 nm hole diffusion length in the emitter and a 0.42 micron electron diffusion length in the base gave very good agreement with the I-V curve. The effect of varying minority carrier diffusion lengths on cell short current, open circuit voltage, and efficiency was studied. It is also observed that the front surface recombination velocity has very little influence on the cell performance. The poor output of heteroepitaxial cells is caused primarily by the large number of dislocations generated at the interfaces that propagate through the bulk indium phosphide layers. Cell efficiency as a function of dislocation density was calculated and the effect of improved emitter bulk properties on cell efficiency is presented. It is found that cells with over 16 percent efficiencies should be possible, provided the dislocation density is below 10(exp 6)/sq cm.

  9. The Reactive-Diffusive Length of OH and Ozone in Model Organic Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lance; Wilson, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    A key step in the heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric aerosols is the reaction of ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) at the gas-particle interface. The formation of reaction products and free radical intermediates and their spatial distribution inside the particle is a sensitive function of the length over which these oxidants diffuse prior to reaction. The reactive-diffusive length of OH and ozone at organic aerosol interfaces is determined by observing the change in the effective uptake coefficient for size-selected model aerosols comprising a reactive core and a thin nanometer-sized (0-12 nm) organic shell. The core and shell materials are selected so that they are immiscible and adopt an assumed core-shell configuration. The results indicate a reactive-diffusive length of 1.4 nm for hydroxyl (OH) radicals in squalane and 1.0 nm for ozone in squalene. Measurements for a purely diffusive system allow for an estimate for diffusion constant (1.6 × 10(-6) cm(2)/s) of ozone in squalane to be determined. The reactive-diffusive length offers a simple first order estimate of how shielding of aerosols by immiscible layers can alter estimates of oxidative lifetimes of aerosols in the atmosphere. PMID:27509443

  10. Study of acid diffusion behaves form PAG by using top coat method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko

    2014-03-01

    Our past research on measurements of simulation parameters for ArF resists focused on establishing methods for measuring the following parameters:[1]-[4] • Development parameters[1] • PEB parameters[2] • Dill's ABC parameters[3] • Quencher parameter[4] We entered these parameters into a lithography simulator and performed ArF resist simulations.We then explored ways to optimize the ArF resist material and process. This paper reports on our study of methods for measuring the diffusion length of acid generated from PAG during exposures. In our experiment, we applied a PAG-containing top coat (TC) material (second layer) to a PAG-free ArF resist (first layer), then performed the exposure and PEB processes. The acid generated in the TC during the exposure diffused into the ArF resist in the lower layer (first layer) when PEB was performed. The process of developing this sample removed the TC in the second layer and the parts of the first layer into which the acid had diffused.We obtained the acid diffusion length based on the quantity of film removed by the development. We calculated the acid diffusion coefficient after varying the exposure value and repeating the measurement. For this report, we also performed measurements to determine how differences in PAG anion size, amount of quencher additive, and PEB temperature affected the acid diffusion coefficient.We entered the measurements obtained into the PROLITH simulator and explored the effects of acid diffusion on pattern profile.

  11. Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othmer, S.; Chen, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plate arrays. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results are compared with those obtained using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

  12. Determination of the Pt spin diffusion length by spin-pumping and spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Vlaminck, Vincent; Colegio de Ciencias e Ingenería, Universidad San Fransciso de Quito, Quito ; Divan, Ralu; Bader, Samuel D.; Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439

    2013-12-09

    The spin diffusion length of Pt at room temperature and at 8 K is experimentally determined via spin pumping and spin Hall effect in permalloy/Pt bilayers. Voltages generated during excitation of ferromagnetic resonance from the inverse spin Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance effect were investigated with a broadband approach. Varying the Pt layer thickness gives rise to an evolution of the voltage line shape due to the superposition of the above two effects. By studying the ratio of the two voltage components with the Pt layer thickness, the spin diffusion length of Pt can be directly extracted. We obtain a spin diffusion length of ∼1.2 nm at room temperature and ∼1.6 nm at 8 K.

  13. Electron beam induced current measurements of minority carrier diffusion length in gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, Leonid; Osinsky, Andrei; Temkin, Henryk; Yang, J. W.; Chen, Q.; Asif Khan, M.

    1996-10-01

    Minority carrier diffusion length in epitaxial GaN layers was measured as a function of majority carrier concentration and temperature. The diffusion length of holes in n-type GaN is found to decrease from 3.4 to 1.2 μm in the doping range of 5×1015-2×1018 cm-3. The experimental results can be fitted by assuming the Einstein relation and by the experimental dependence of hole mobilities on carrier concentration. The low injection carrier lifetime of ˜15 ns, used in the fit, is largely independent of the doping level. The diffusion length, measured for ˜5×1015 and 2×1018 cm-3 dopant concentrations, shows an increase with increasing temperature, characterized by an activation energy Ea of ˜90 meV, independent of the impurity concentration.

  14. Laser interferometric method for determining the carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Manukhov, V. V.; Fedortsov, A. B.; Ivanov, A. S.

    2015-09-15

    A new laser interferometric method for measuring the carrier diffusion length in semiconductors is proposed. The method is based on the interference–absorption interaction of two laser radiations in a semiconductor. Injected radiation generates additional carriers in a semiconductor, which causes a change in the material’s optical constants and modulation of the probing radiation passed through the sample. When changing the distance between carrier generation and probing points, a decrease in the carrier concentration, which depends on the diffusion length, is recorded. The diffusion length is determined by comparing the experimental and theoretical dependences of the probe signal on the divergence of the injector and probe beams. The method is successfully tested on semiconductor samples with different thicknesses and surface states and can be used in scientific research and the electronics industry.

  15. Diffusion length and resistivity distribution characteristics of silicon wafer by photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Dohyun; Lee, Jaehyeong; Choi, Byoungdeog

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Analytical photoluminescence efficiency calculation and PL intensity ratio method are developed. • Wafer resistivity and diffusion length characteristics are investigated by PL intensity ratio. • PL intensity is well correlated with resistivity, diffusion length or defect density on wafer measurement. - Abstract: Photoluminescence is a convenient, contactless method to characterize semiconductors. Its use for room-temperature silicon characterization has only recently been implemented. We have developed the PL efficiency theory as a function of substrate doping densities, bulk trap density, photon flux density, and reflectance and compared it with experimental data initially for bulk Si wafers. New developed PL intensity ratio method is able to predict the silicon wafer properties, such as doping densities, minority carrier diffusion length and bulk trap density.

  16. Probing sub-alveolar length scales with hyperpolarized-gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Wilson; Carl, Michael; Mooney, Karen; Mugler, John; Cates, Gordon

    2009-05-01

    Diffusion MRI of the lung is a promising technique for detecting alterations of normal lung microstructure in diseases such as emphysema. The length scale being probed using this technique is related to the time scale over which the helium-3 or xenon-129 diffusion is observed. We have developed new MR pulse sequence methods for making diffusivity measurements at sub-millisecond diffusion times, allowing one to probe smaller length scales than previously possible in-vivo, and opening the possibility of making quantitative measurements of the ratio of surface area to volume (S/V) in the lung airspaces. The quantitative accuracy of simulated and experimental measurements in microstructure phantoms will be discussed, and preliminary in-vivo results will be presented.

  17. Electron-Hole Diffusion Lengths Exceeding 1 Micrometer in an Organometal Trihalide Perovskite Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel; Eperon, Giles; Grancini, Giulia; Menelaou, Christopher; Alcocer, Marcelo; Leijtens, Tomas; Herz, Laura; Petrozza, Annamaria; Snaith, Henry

    2014-03-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites have shown promise as high-performance absorbers in solar cells, first as a coating on a mesoporous metal oxide scaffold and more recently as a solid layer in planar heterojunction architectures. Here, we report transient absorption and photoluminescence-quenching measurements to determine the electron-hole diffusion lengths, diffusion constants, and lifetimes in mixed halide (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) and triiodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite absorbers. We found that the diffusion lengths are greater than 1 micrometer in the mixed halide perovskite, which is an order of magnitude greater than the absorption depth. In contrast, the triiodide absorber has electron-hole diffusion lengths of order 100 nanometers. Finally, we fabricated solution-processed thin-film planar heterojunction devices, achieving power conversion efficiencies of over 12% using the mixed halide absorber but only 4% with the triiodide perovskite. Our results show that the long diffusion lengths justify the high efficiency of planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells, and identify a critical parameter to optimize for future perovskite absorber development.

  18. Two Birds with One Stone: Tailoring Singlet Fission for Both Triplet Yield and Exciton Diffusion Length.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tong; Wan, Yan; Guo, Zhi; Johnson, Justin; Huang, Libai

    2016-09-01

    By direct imaging of singlet and triplet populations with ultrafast microscopy, it is shown that the triplet diffusion length and singlet fission yield can be simultaneously optimized for tetracene and its derivatives, making them ideal structures for application in bilayer solar cells. PMID:27348847

  19. Diffusion length measurements in solar cells: An analysis and comparison of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Khan, A. A.; Soukup, R. J.; Hermann, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief review of the major techniques for measuring minority carrier diffusion lengths in solar cells is given. Emphasis is placed on comparing limits of applicability for each method, especially as applied to silicon cells or to gallium arsenide cells, including the effects of radiation damage.

  20. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  1. Effective defect diffusion lengths in Ar-ion bombarded 3C-SiC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bayu Aji, L. B.; Wallace, J. B.; Shao, L.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2016-04-14

    Above room temperature, SiC exhibits pronounced processes of diffusion and interaction of radiation-generated point defects. Here, we use the recently developed pulsed ion beam method to measure effective defect diffusion lengths in 3C-SiC bombarded in the temperature range of 25–200 °C with 500 keV Ar ions. Results reveal a diffusion length of ~10 nm, which exhibits a weak temperature dependence, changing from 9 to 13 nm with increasing temperature. Lastly, these results have important implications for understanding and predicting radiation damage in SiC and for the development of radiation-resistant materials via interface-mediated defect reactions.

  2. Experimental determination of diffusion length in SWIR HgCdTe photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jia; Chen, Guibin; Li, Xiangyang; Gong, Haimei

    2005-01-01

    Minority carrier diffusion length is a key parameter of material quality and gives an indication of diode performance. It is also one important parameter when considering the increase of the effective optical sensitive area caused by the lateral diffusion and the crosstalk between individual detectors on a focal plane array (FPA). In this paper, we perform diffusion length measurements with two methods on short wavelength infrared (SWIR) HgCdTe photovoltaic devices. One method is based on the different behaviors of electrons and holes in a variation magnetic field B and their effects on the saturation current density J0. The other method is an optical characterization technique called Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC). The results were in good agreement with each other.

  3. Effective defect diffusion lengths in Ar-ion bombarded 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayu Aji, L. B.; Wallace, J. B.; Shao, L.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2016-05-01

    Above room temperature, SiC exhibits pronounced processes of diffusion and interaction of radiation-generated point defects. Here, we use the recently developed pulsed ion beam method to measure effective defect diffusion lengths in 3C-SiC bombarded in the temperature range of 25–200 °C with 500 keV Ar ions. Results reveal a diffusion length of  ∼10 nm, which exhibits a weak temperature dependence, changing from 9 to 13 nm with increasing temperature. These results have important implications for understanding and predicting radiation damage in SiC and for the development of radiation-resistant materials via interface-mediated defect reactions.

  4. Study of minority carrier diffusion lengths in photoactive layers of multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mintairov, S. A. Andreev, V. M.; Emelyanov, V. M.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. A.; Timoshina, N. K.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Lantratov, V. M.

    2010-08-15

    A technique for determining a minority carrier's diffusion length in photoactive III-V layers of solar cells by approximating their spectral characteristics is presented. Single-junction GaAs, Ge and multi-junction GaAs/Ge, GaInP/GaAs, and GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells fabricated by hydride metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (H-MOVPE) have been studied. The dependences of the minority carrier diffusion length on the doping level of p-Ge and n-GaAs are determined. It is shown that the parameters of solid-state diffusion of phosphorus atoms to the p-Ge substrate from the n-GaInP nucleation layer are independent of the thickness of the latter within 35-300 nm. It is found that the diffusion length of subcells of multijunction structures in Ga(In)As layers is smaller in comparison with that of single-junction structures.

  5. Length of intact plasma membrane determines the diffusion properties of cellular water

    PubMed Central

    Eida, Sato; Van Cauteren, Marc; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Katayama, Ikuo; Sasaki, Miho; Obara, Makoto; Okuaki, Tomoyuki; Sumi, Misa; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Molecular diffusion in a boundary-free medium depends only on the molecular size, the temperature, and medium viscosity. However, the critical determinant of the molecular diffusion property in inhomogeneous biological tissues has not been identified. Here, using an in vitro system and a high-resolution MR imaging technique, we show that the length of the intact plasma membrane is a major determinant of water diffusion in a controlled cellular environment and that the cell perimeter length (CPL) is sufficient to estimate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water in any cellular environment in our experimental system (ADC = −0.21 × CPL + 1.10). We used this finding to further explain the different diffusion kinetics of cells that are dying via apoptotic or non-apoptotic cell death pathways exhibiting characteristic changes in size, nuclear and cytoplasmic architectures, and membrane integrity. These results suggest that the ADC value can be used as a potential biomarker for cell death. PMID:26750342

  6. Diffusion length measurements of thin GaAs solar cells by means of energetic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonross, O.

    1980-01-01

    A calculation of the short circuit current density (j sub sc) of a thin GaAs solar cell induced by fast electrons is presented. It is shown that in spite of the disparity in thickness between the N-type portion of the junction and the P-type portion of the junction, the measurement of the bulk diffusion length L sub p of the N-type part of the junction is seriously hampered due to the presence of a sizable contribution to the j sub sc from the P-type region of the junction. Corrections of up to 50% had to be made in order to interpret the data correctly. Since these corrections were not amenable to direct measurements it is concluded that the electron beam method for the determination of the bulk minority carrier diffusion length, which works so well for Si solar cells, is a poor method when applied to thin GaAs cells.

  7. Minority carrier diffusion length and edge surface-recombination velocity in InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1993-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used to obtain the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) profiles in InP specimens containing a Schottky barrier perpendicular to the scanned (edge) surface. An independent technique was used to measure the edge surface-recombination velocity. These values were used in a fit of the experimental EBIC data with a theoretical expression for normalized EBIC (Donolato, 1982) to obtain the electron (minority carrier) diffusion length.

  8. Study of the spatial distribution of minority carrier diffusion length in epiplanar detector structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, T.; Węgrzecki, M.; Stolarski, M.; Krajewski, T.

    2015-12-01

    One of the key parameters determining detection properties of silicon PIN detector structures (p+-ν-n+ or n+-ν-p+) is minority carrier diffusion length in p-n junction regions p-n (p+-ν or n+-ν). The parameter concerned strongly depends on quality of the starting material and technological processes conducted and has a significant impact on detector parameters, in particular dark current intensity. Thus, the parameter must be determined in order to optimise the design and technology of detectors. The paper presents a method for measuring the spatial distribution of effective carrier diffusion length in silicon detector structures, based on the measurement of photoelectric current of a non-polarised structure illuminated (spot diameter of 250 μm) with monochromatic radiation of two wavelengths λ1 = 500 nm (silicon penetration depth of around 0.9 μm) and λ2 = 900 nm (silicon penetration depth of around 33 μm). The value of diffusion length was determined by analysing the spatial distribution of optical carrier generation and values of photoelectric currents.

  9. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Bernard; Dresner, Joseph; Szostak, Daniel J.

    1983-07-12

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant-magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. An unmodulated illumination provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV. A vibrating Kelvin method-type probe electrode couples the SPV to a measurement system. The operating optical wavelength of an adjustable monochromator to compensate for the wavelength dependent sensitivity of a photodetector is selected to measure the illumination intensity (photon flux) on the silicon. Measurements of the relative photon flux for a plurality of wavelengths are plotted against the reciprocal of the optical absorption coefficient of the material. A linear plot of the data points is extrapolated to zero intensity. The negative intercept value on the reciprocal optical coefficient axis of the extrapolated linear plot is the diffusion length of the minority carriers.

  10. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  11. Taylor-Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry of Varying Lengths Simulated by Reaction-Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Halmstad, Andrew; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Previously, we have observed chaotic formation of Taylor-Vortex pairs in Modified Taylor- Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry. In the experiment, the chaotic formation in a shorter system has been restricted to a narrow band about the waist of the hourglass. Such behavior has been modeled by The Reaction-Diffusion equation, which has been previously studied, by Riecke and Paap. Their calculation suggested that quadrupling length of the system would lead to spatial chaos in the vortex formation. We present a careful recreation of this result and consider an intermediate length. We demonstrate that doubling the length should be sufficient to observe spatially chaotic behavior. Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997). H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991).

  12. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are asmore » large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.« less

  13. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    SciTech Connect

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.

  14. Diffusion length measurements in bulk and epitaxially grown 3-5 semiconductors using charge collection microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Diffusion lengths and surface recombination velocities were measured in GaAs diodes and InP finished solar cells. The basic techniques used was charge collection microscopy also known as electron beam induced current (EBIC). The normalized currents and distances from the pn junction were read directly from the calibrated curves obtained while using the line scan mode in an SEM. These values were then equated to integral and infinite series expressions resulting from the solution of the diffusion equation with both extended generation and point generation functions. This expands previous work by examining both thin and thick samples. The surface recombination velocity was either treated as an unknown in a system of two equations, or measured directly using low e(-) beam accelerating voltages. These techniques give accurate results by accounting for the effects of surface recombination and the finite size of the generation volume.

  15. Surface recombination velocity and diffusion length of minority carriers in heavily doped silicon layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam-induced current and the dependence of the effective diffusion length of the minority carriers on the penetration depth of the electron beam were employed for the analysis of the carrier recombination characteristics in heavily doped silicon layers. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of P-diffused Si layers will be presented together with a three dimensional mapping of minority carrier lifetime in ion implanted Si. Layers heavily doped with As exhibit improved recombination characteristics as compared to those of the layers doped with P.

  16. Diffusion length variation in 0.5- and 3-MeV-proton-irradiated, heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide (GaAs) and silicon (Si) solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of light weight, mechanically strong, and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5- and 3-MeV proton irradiations have been explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence was calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient, K(sub L), was also plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  17. Enhancement of minority carrier diffusion length in grains of cast Si by hydrogen heat treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimila-Arroyo, J.; Duenas-Santos, F.; del Valle, J. L.

    Minority carrier diffusion length (mcdl) enhancement in the bulk of grains of cast poly-silicon for solar cells has been produced by hydrogen heat treatments. Measurements made by LBIC method, showed an increase of mcdl in the bulk of grains from a mean value of 53 microns to a mean value of 69 microns, before and after the hydrogen heat treatments, respectively, under white light illumination. A mean increase ratio of 33% in the mcdl was obtained in a reproducible way and it was verified that hydrogen was effectively responsible. This result clearly establishes the hydrogen passivating role in this material

  18. On the determination of diffusion lengths by means of angle-lapped p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1979-01-01

    A standard procedure for determining the minority carrier diffusion length by means of SEM consists of scanning an angle-lapped surface of a p-n junction and measuring the resulting short circuit current as a function of beam position. The present paper points out that the usual expression linking the short circuit current induced by the electron beam to the angle between the semiconductor surface and the junction plane is incorrect. The correct expression is discussed and it is noted that, for angles less than 10 deg, the new and the old expression are practically indistinguishable.

  19. Diffusion length measurement using the scanning electron microscope. [for silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.

    1975-01-01

    The present work describes a measuring technique employing the scanning electron microscope in which values of the true bulk diffusion length are obtained. It is shown that surface recombination effects can be eliminated through application of highly doped surface field layers. The effects of high injection level and low-high junction current generation are investigated. Results obtained with this technique are compared to those obtained by a penetrating radiation (X-ray) method, and a close agreement is found. The SEM technique is limited to cells that contain a back surface field layer.

  20. Diffusion lengths in irradiated N/P InP-on-Si solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Colerico, Claudia; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Walters, Robert J.; Burke, Edward A.

    1996-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells were made on silicon (Si) wafers (InP/Si) by to take advantage of both the radiation-hardness properties of the InP solar cell and the light weight and low cost of Si wafers. The InP/Si cell application is for long duration and/or high radiation orbit space missions. Spire has made N/P InP/Si cells of sizes up to 2 cm by 4 cm with beginning-of-life (BOL) AM0 efficiencies over 13% (one-sun, 28C). These InP/Si cells have higher absolute efficiency and power density after a high radiation dose than gallium arsenide (GaAs) or silicon (Si) solar cells after a fluence of about 2e15 1 MeV electrons/sq. cm. In this work, we investigate the minority carrier (electron) base diffusion lengths in the N/P InP/Si cells. A quantum efficiency model was constructed for a 12% BOL AM0 N/P InP/Si cell which agreed well with the absolutely measured quantum efficiency and the sun-simulator measured AM0 photocurrent (30.1 mA/sq. cm). This model was then used to generate a table of AM0 photocurrents for a range of base diffusion lengths. AM0 photocurrents were then measured for irradiations up to 7.7e16 1 MeV electrons/sq. cm (the 12% BOL cell was 8% after the final irradiation). By comparing the measured photocurrents with the predicted photocurrents, base diffusion lengths were assigned at each fluence level. A damage coefficient K of 4e-8 and a starting (unirradiated) base electron diffusion length of 0.8 microns fits the data well. The quantum efficiency was measured again at the end of the experiment to verify that the photocurrent predicted by the model (25.5 mA/sq. cm) agreed with the simulator-measured photocurrent after irradiation (25.7 mA/sq. cm).

  1. Multiwavelength analyzer for the determination of diffusion lengths. [in solar cell base region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stafsudd, O. M.; Davis, G. E.; Jansen, M.

    1983-01-01

    The minority carrier diffusion length Ln in the base or substrate region is an important parameter which governs a solar cell's performance. The present investigation is concerned with the development of a multiwavelength analyzer (MWA) technique for the nondestructive spatial testing of polycrystalline solar cells. The MWA method is based on the utilization of the short-circuit current generated by two or more light-emitting diodes (LEDs) operating at different wavelengths and modulated 180 deg out-of-phase. For a determination of Ln by the MWA technique, it is necessary to know the value of the absorption coefficient.

  2. Mapping of minority carrier diffusion length and heavy metal contamination with ultimate surface photovoltage method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J.; Aleynikov, A.; Savtchouk, A.; Edelman, P.

    2004-07-01

    The Ultimate surface photovoltage method of minority carrier diffusion length measurements reffered to as Ultimate SPV, replaces a sequential “one wavelength at a time” approach with simultaneous illumination with the entire set of wavelengths. In this multiwavelength beam, each monochromatic component is chopped with slightly different frequency. This enables simultaneous monitoring of all component SPV signals corresponding to different wavelengths using multi-frequency signal processing. The amplitude and phase of each component signals are then analyzed and used to calculate the diffusion length and surface lifetime. In-flight Ultimate SPV measurement, whereby the wafer continuously moves under SPV probe, is used for fast whole wafer mapping. In addition to speed advantages, Ultimate SPV offers a fundemental accuracy advantage due to elimination of differences in wafer condition during sequential illumination with individual wavelengths. High-speed measurements make it possible to add additional wafer treatments and perform multi-mapping required for separation of Fe and Cu in the silicon bulk. Wafer mapping in time of 2 minutes realized with Ultimate SPV is critical for monitoring of cobalt in silicon.

  3. Diffusion lengths in irradiated N/P InP-on-Si solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Colerico, Claudia; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Walters, Robert J.; Burke, Edward A.

    1995-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are being made on silicon (Si) wafers (InP/Si) to take advantage of both the radiation-hardness properties of the InP solar cell and the light weight and low cost of Si wafers compared to InP or germanium (Ge) wafers. The InP/Si cell application is for long duration and/or high radiation orbit space missions. InP/Si cells have higher absolute efficiency after a high radiation dose than gallium arsenide (GaAs) or silicon (Si) solar cells. In this work, base electron diffusion lengths in the N/P cell are extracted from measured AM0 short-circuit photocurrent at various irradiation levels out to an equivalent 1 MeV fluence of 1017 1 MeV electrons/sq cm for a 1 sq cm 12% BOL InP/Si cell. These values are then checked for consistency by comparing measured Voc data with a theoretical Voc model that includes a dark current term that depends on the extracted diffusion lengths.

  4. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Arnold R.

    1984-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. Steady or modulated illumination at several wavelengths provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV for each wavelength. A drop of a transparent electrolyte solution containing redox couples (preferably quinhydrone) having an oxidation-reduction potential (E) in the order of +0.6 to -1.65 volts couples the SPV to a measurement system. The drop of redox couple solution functions to create a liquid Schottky barrier at the surface of the material. Illumination light is passed through a transparent rod supported over the surface and through the drop of transparent electrolyte. The drop is held in the gap between the rod and the surface. Steady red light is also used as an optical bias to reduce deleterious space-charge effects that occur in amorphous silicon.

  5. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Arnold R.

    1984-02-21

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon, which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. Steady or modulated illumination at several wavelengths provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV for each wavelength. A probe electrode immersed in an electrolyte solution containing redox couples (preferably quinhydrone) having an oxidation-reduction potential (E) in the order of +0.6 to -1.65 volts couples the SPV to a measurement system. The redox couple solution functions to create a liquid Schottky barrier at the surface of the material. The Schottky barrier is contacted by merely placing the probe in the solution. The redox solution is placed over and in contact with the material to be tested and light is passed through the solution to generate the SPV. To compensate for colored redox solutions a portion of the redox solution not over the material is also illuminated for determining the color compensated light intensity. Steady red light is also used as an optical bias to reduce deleterious space-charge effects that occur in amorphous silicon.

  6. Effect of grain boundaries in silicon on minority-carrier diffusion length and solar-cell efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Koliwad, K. M.; Allen, F. G.

    1978-01-01

    The spatial variation of minority-carrier diffusion length in the vicinity of a grain boundary for a polycrystalline silicon sheet has been measured by the use of the EBIC technique. The effect of such a variation on solar-cell output has then been computed as a function of grain size. Calculations show that the cell output drops considerably for grain size smaller than three times the bulk diffusion length.

  7. Determination of the diffusion length and the optical self absorption coefficient using EBIC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guermazi, S.; Guermazi, H.; Mlik, Y.; El Jani, B.; Grill, C.; Toureille, A.

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a model of calculation of the induced current due to an electron beam. The expression for the electron beam induced current (EBIC) with an extended generation profile is obtained via the resolution of a steady state continuity equation by the Green function method, satisfying appropriated boundary conditions to the physical model. The generation profile takes into account the lateral diffusion, the effect of defects, dislocations and recombination surfaces besides the number of absorbed electrons and that of diffuse electrons as a function of the depth. In the case of a Schottky diode Au/GaAs obtained by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) method, the theoretical induced current profile is compared to the experimental one and to theoretical profiles whose analytical expressions are given by van Roosbroeck and Bresse. The minority carriers diffusion length L_n = 2 μm and the optical self-absorption coefficient a=0.034 μm^{-1} can be deduced from the experimental current profile, measured by scanning electron microscopy. The theoretical curve, obtained from the proposed model is in a good agreement with the experimental one for surface recombination velocity 10^6 cm s^{-1} except for distances far from the depletion layer (x_0 > 2.3 μm) where the photocurrent produced by the multiple process of the reabsorbed recombination radiation is preponderant. Our results are in agreement with those obtained by other experimental techniques on the same samples.

  8. The values of minority carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes in GaN and their implications for bipolar devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandić, Z. Z.; Bridger, P. M.; Piquette, E. C.; McGill, T. C.

    2000-02-01

    The wide bandgap semiconductors GaN and AlGaN show promise as the high voltage standoff layers in high power heterostructure bipolar transistors and thyristors due to their electric breakdown characteristics. Material properties which significantly influence the design and performance of these devices are electron and hole diffusion lengths and recombination lifetimes. We report direct measurements of minority carrier diffusion lengths for both holes and electrons by electron beam induced current. For planar Schottky diodes on unintentionally doped n-type and p-type GaN grown by metal organic vapor phase deposition (MOCVD), the diffusion lengths were found to be (0.28±0.03) μm for holes and (0.2±0.05) μm for electrons. Minority carrier lifetimes of approximately 7 ns for holes and 0.1 ns for electrons were estimated from these measured diffusion lengths and mobilities. In the case of GaN grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) diffusion lengths in the 1-2 μm range were found. We attempt to correlate the measured diffusion lengths and lifetimes with the structural properties of GaN and to explain why linear dislocations might act as a recombination centers. We calculate the performance of nitride based bipolar devices, in particular thyristor switches. The forward voltage drop across standoff layer of the nitride based thyristor switch is shown to significantly depend on the minority carrier (hole) lifetime.

  9. SPENT ACID RECOVERY USING DIFFUSION DIALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, several million gallons of acid solutions are used by the Department of Defense (DoD) and its support contractors in various metal finishing operations such as stripping, etching, activation, passivation and pickling. Over time, these acids become contaminated with met...

  10. Transition to Spatio-Temporal Chaos with Increasing Length in the Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trail, Collin; Tomlin, Brett; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard J.

    2003-11-01

    Calculations based up the Reaction-Diffusion model (H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14), 1235 (1991).have proven to be suggestive for a wide variety of pattern forming systems, including Taylor-Couette flow with hourglass geometry(Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997).. Seeking insight to guide experimental investigations, we extend these calculations. Previous calculations indicated that in smaller systems, only temporal chaos, located in a small region, would be observed, while in longer systems instabilities would form over a wide region. Our simulations explore this transition from purely temporal chaos to spatio-temporal chaos as the length of the system is increased.

  11. Temperature dependence of diffusion length, lifetime and minority electron mobility in GaInP

    SciTech Connect

    Schultes, F. J.; Haegel, N. M.; Christian, T.; Alberi, K.; Fluegel, B.; Jones-Albertus, R.; Pickett, E.; Liu, T.; Misra, P.; Sukiasyan, A.; Yuen, H.

    2013-12-09

    The mobility of electrons in double heterostructures of p-type Ga{sub 0.50}In{sub 0.50}P has been determined by measuring minority carrier diffusion length and lifetime. The minority electron mobility increases monotonically from 300 K to 5 K, limited primarily by optical phonon and alloy scattering. Comparison to majority electron mobility over the same temperature range in comparably doped samples shows a significant reduction in ionized impurity scattering at lower temperatures, due to differences in interaction of repulsive versus attractive carriers with ionized dopant sites. These results should be useful in modeling and optimization for multi-junction solar cells and other optoelectronic devices.

  12. Unambiguous distinction between diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of solar cells at different excitation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawer, P.; Rochel, M.; Wagemann, H.-G.

    1999-06-01

    In this work we present a conclusive separation of bulk and surface recombination properties of solar cells. For this purpose, bifacial silicon solar cells were fabricated. The backside differential spectral response of the cells has been measured in the presence of bias light, both with and without backside passivation by means of corona charging on top of a thermal oxide. Employing the common one-dimensional Shockley model, the measurement curves have been simulated. This enables the base diffusion length to be distinguished from the backside surface recombination velocity. As such, their values have been determined individually. Repeating this procedure for different intensities of bias light has yielded the nonlinear behavior of the recombination mechanisms. By applying the Schockley-Read-Hall recombination theory, it was deduced that Fe interstitials presumably are the predominant bulk recombination centers.

  13. Minority carrier diffusion lengths and absorption coefficients in silicon sheet material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, K. A.; Swimm, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the methods which have been developed for the measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length of silicon wafers require that the material have either a Schottky or an ohmic contact. The surface photovoltage (SPV) technique is an exception. The SPV technique could, therefore, become a valuable diagnostic tool in connection with current efforts to develop low-cost processes for the production of solar cells. The technique depends on a knowledge of the optical absorption coefficient. The considered investigation is concerned with a reevaluation of the absorption coefficient as a function of silicon processing. A comparison of absorption coefficient values showed these values to be relatively consistent from sample to sample, and independent of the sample growth method.

  14. Diffusion length damage coefficient and annealing studies in proton-irradiated InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Bailey, Sheila G.; Williams, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the diffusion length damage coefficient (K(sub L)) and the annealing characteristics of the minority carrier diffusion length (L(sub n)) in Czochralski-grown zinc-doped indium phosphide (InP), with a carrier concentration of 1 x 10(exp l8) cm(exp -3). In measuring K(sub L) irradiations were made with 0.5 MeV protons with fluences ranging from 1 x 10(exp 11) to 3 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Pre- and post-irradiation electron-beam induced current (EBIC) measurements allowed for the extraction of L(sub n) from which K(sub L) was determined. In studying the annealing characteristics of L(sub n) irradiations were made with 2 MeV protons with fluence of 5 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Post-irradiation studies of L(sub n) with time at room temperature, and with minority carrier photoinjection and forward-bias injection were carried out. The results showed that recovery under Air Mass Zero (AMO) photoinjection was complete. L(sub n) was also found to recover under forward-bias injection, where recovery was found to depend on the value of the injection current. However, no recovery of L(sub n) after proton irradiation was observed with time at room temperature, in contrast to the behavior of 1 MeV electron-irradiated InP solar cells reported previously.

  15. Role of impurities in determining the exciton diffusion length in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, Ian J.; Blaylock, D. Wayne; Holmes, Russell J.

    2016-04-01

    The design and performance of organic photovoltaic cells is dictated, in part, by the magnitude of the exciton diffusion length (LD). Despite the importance of this parameter, there have been few investigations connecting LD and materials purity. Here, we investigate LD for the organic small molecule N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine as native impurities are systematically removed from the material. Thin films deposited from the as-synthesized material yield a value for LD, as measured by photoluminescence quenching, of (3.9 ± 0.5) nm with a corresponding photoluminescence efficiency (ηPL) of (25 ± 1)% and thin film purity of (97.1 ± 1.2)%, measured by high performance liquid chromatography. After purification by thermal gradient sublimation, the value of LD is increased to (4.7 ± 0.5) nm with a corresponding ηPL of (33 ± 1)% and purity of (98.3 ± 0.8)%. Interestingly, a similar behavior is also observed as a function of the deposition boat temperature. Films deposited from the purified material at a high temperature give LD = (5.3 ± 0.8) nm with ηPL = (37 ± 1)% for films with a purity of (99.0 ± 0.3)% purity. Using a model of diffusion by Förster energy transfer, the variation of LD with purity is predicted as a function of ηPL and is in good agreement with measurements. The removal of impurities acts to decrease the non-radiative exciton decay rate and increase the radiative decay rate, leading to increases in both the diffusivity and exciton lifetime. The results of this work highlight the role of impurities in determining LD, while also providing insight into the degree of materials purification necessary to achieve optimized exciton transport.

  16. Electric Field Enhanced Diffusion of Salicylic Acid through Polyacrylamide Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niamlang, Sumonman; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2008-03-01

    The release mechanisms and the diffusion coefficients of salicylic acid -loaded polyacrylamide hydrogels were investigated experimentally by using a modified Franz-diffusion cell at 37 ^oC to determine the effects of crosslinking ratio and electric field strength. A significant amount of salicylic acid is released within 48 hours from the hydrogels of various crosslinking ratios, with and without electric field. The release characteristic follows the Q vs. t^1/2 linear relationship. Diffusion coefficient initially increases with increasing electric field strength and reaches the maximum value at electric field strength of 0.1 V; beyond that it decreases with electric field strength and becomes saturated at electric field strength of 5 V. The diffusion coefficient increases at low electric field strength (less 0.1 V) as a result of the electrophoresis of the salicylic acid, the expansion of pore size, and the induced pathway in pigskin. For electric field strength higher than 0.1 V, the decrease in the diffusion coefficient is due to the reduction of the polyacrylamide pore size. The diffusion coefficient obeys the scaling behavior D/Do=(drug size/pore size)^m, with the scaling exponent m equal to 0.93 and 0.42 at electric fields of 0 and 0.1 V, respectively.

  17. Determination of the positron diffusion length in Kapton by analysing the positronium emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio, C. A.; De Baerdemaeker, J.; Dauwe, C.

    2008-10-01

    Doppler profile spectroscopy and Compton-to-peak ratio analysis have been used to study the positronium (Ps) emission from the Kapton surface as a function of the positron implantation energy E. Two different positions for the sample have been performed in the experiment. In the first case the sample and the Ge-detector are perpendicular to the positron beam. With this geometry the emission of para-positronium (p-Ps) is detected as a narrow central peak. In the second case, by rotating the sample 45° with respect to the beam axis, the emission of p-Ps is detected as a blue-shifted fly away peak. The implantation of the positrons is described by the Makhov profile, where we used the modified median implantation for polymers as given by Algers et al. [J. Algers, P. Sperr, W. Egger, G. Kögel, F.H.J. Maurer, Phys. Rev. B 67 (2003) 125404]. Thermalised positrons can diffuse to the surface and may pick up an electron to be emitted as Ps. We found a thermal and or epithermal positron diffusion length L+ = 5.43 ± 0.71 nm and L+ = 5.51 ± 0.28 nm correspondingly for both cases, which is much more than the one found by Brusa et al. [R.S. Brusa, A. Dupasquier, E. Galvanetto, A. Zecca, Appl. Phys. A 54 (1992) 233]. The respective efficiency for the emission of Ps by picking up an electron from the surface is found to be fpu = 0.247 ± 0.012 and fpu = 0.156 ± 0.003.

  18. The narrow pulse approximation and long length scale determination in xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of model porous media.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Sen, P N; Hürlimann, M D; Patz, S; Cory, D G; Walsworth, R L

    2002-06-01

    We report a systematic study of xenon gas diffusion NMR in simple model porous media, random packs of mono-sized glass beads, and focus on three specific areas peculiar to gas-phase diffusion. These topics are: (i) diffusion of spins on the order of the pore dimensions during the application of the diffusion encoding gradient pulses in a PGSE experiment (breakdown of the narrow pulse approximation and imperfect background gradient cancellation), (ii) the ability to derive long length scale structural information, and (iii) effects of finite sample size. We find that the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times in small beads is significantly affected by the gas pressure. In particular, as expected, we find smaller deviations between measured D(t) and theoretical predictions as the gas pressure is increased, resulting from reduced diffusion during the application of the gradient pulse. The deviations are then completely removed when water D(t) is observed in the same samples. The use of gas also allows us to probe D(t) over a wide range of length scales and observe the long time asymptotic limit which is proportional to the inverse tortuosity of the sample, as well as the diffusion distance where this limit takes effect (approximately 1-1.5 bead diameters). The Padé approximation can be used as a reference for expected xenon D(t) data between the short and the long time limits, allowing us to explore deviations from the expected behavior at intermediate times as a result of finite sample size effects. Finally, the application of the Padé interpolation between the long and the short time asymptotic limits yields a fitted length scale (the Padé length), which is found to be approximately 0.13b for all bead packs, where b is the bead diameter. PMID:12165255

  19. The narrow pulse approximation and long length scale determination in xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of model porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Sen, P. N.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report a systematic study of xenon gas diffusion NMR in simple model porous media, random packs of mono-sized glass beads, and focus on three specific areas peculiar to gas-phase diffusion. These topics are: (i) diffusion of spins on the order of the pore dimensions during the application of the diffusion encoding gradient pulses in a PGSE experiment (breakdown of the narrow pulse approximation and imperfect background gradient cancellation), (ii) the ability to derive long length scale structural information, and (iii) effects of finite sample size. We find that the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times in small beads is significantly affected by the gas pressure. In particular, as expected, we find smaller deviations between measured D(t) and theoretical predictions as the gas pressure is increased, resulting from reduced diffusion during the application of the gradient pulse. The deviations are then completely removed when water D(t) is observed in the same samples. The use of gas also allows us to probe D(t) over a wide range of length scales and observe the long time asymptotic limit which is proportional to the inverse tortuosity of the sample, as well as the diffusion distance where this limit takes effect (approximately 1-1.5 bead diameters). The Pade approximation can be used as a reference for expected xenon D(t) data between the short and the long time limits, allowing us to explore deviations from the expected behavior at intermediate times as a result of finite sample size effects. Finally, the application of the Pade interpolation between the long and the short time asymptotic limits yields a fitted length scale (the Pade length), which is found to be approximately 0.13b for all bead packs, where b is the bead diameter. c. 2002 Elsevier Sciences (USA).

  20. Studies of deep level centers determining the diffusion length in epitaxial layers and crystals of undoped n-GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Hwan; Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Yakimov, E. B.; Tarelkin, S. A.; Turutin, A. V.; Shemerov, I. V.; Pearton, S. J.

    2016-05-01

    A wide variety of parameters were measured for undoped n-GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy and compared to n-GaN films grown by conventional and lateral overgrowth metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The parameters included deep level electron and hole trap spectra, microcathodoluminescence, electron beam induced current, diffusion length, and electron capture cross section from the dependence of the low temperature persistent photocapacitance on forward bias injection pulse duration. The results show a prominent role of electron traps with levels near Ec-0.56 eV in limiting the lifetime and diffusion length values in all these materials.

  1. Exciton diffusion length and concentration of holes in MEH-PPV polymer using the surface voltage and surface photovoltage methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toušek, J.; Toušková, J.; Remeš, Z.; Čermák, J.; Kousal, J.; Kindl, D.; Kuřitka, I.

    2012-11-01

    Novelized method of the surface photovoltage (SPV) measurement convenient for evaluation of exciton diffusion length and thickness of the space charge region (SCR) in organic semiconductors is applied to poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) polymer. Exciton diffusion length and thickness of the SCR was found. The experiment is complemented by measurements of surface potential by the Kelvin probe force microscopy yielding the work function and concentration of free holes. The latter value is much lower than the concentration of ionized states determined from the thickness of the space charge region, which can be ascribed to the presence of traps.

  2. Method and apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes and bulk diffusion length in P-N junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Carrier lifetimes and bulk diffusion length are qualitatively measured as a means for qualification of a P-N junction photovoltaic solar cell. High frequency (blue) monochromatic light pulses and low-frequency (red) monochromatic light pulses were alternately applied to the cell while it was irradiated by light from a solar simulator, and synchronously displaying the derivative of the output voltage of the cell on an oscilloscope. The output voltage is a measure of the lifetimes of the minority carriers (holes) in the diffused N layer and majority carriers (electrons) in the bulk P material, and of the diffusion length of the bulk silicon. By connecting a reference cell in this manner with a test cell to be tested in reverse parallel, the display of a test cell that matches the reference cell will be a substantially zero output.

  3. n-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Barden, Anne; O'Callaghan, Nathan; Burke, Valerie; Mas, Emile; Beilin, Lawrence J; Fenech, Michael; Irish, Ashley B; Watts, Gerald F; Puddey, Ian B; Huang, Rae-Chi; Mori, Trevor A

    2016-03-01

    DNA telomere shortening associates with the age-related increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Reducing oxidative stress, could modify telomere erosion during cell replication, and CVD risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The effect of n-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) on telomere length was studied in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial in CKD. Eighty-five CKD patients were randomized to: n-3 fatty acids (4 g); CoQ (200 mg); both supplements; or control (4 g olive oil), daily for 8 weeks. Telomere length was measured in neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at baseline and 8 weeks, with and without correction for cell counts. Main and interactive effects of n-3 fatty acids and CoQ on telomere length were assessed adjusting for baseline values. F₂-isoprostanes were measured as markers of oxidative stress. There was no effect of n-3 fatty acids or CoQ on neutrophil or PBMC telomere length. However, telomere length corrected for neutrophil count was increased after n-3 fatty acids (p = 0.015). Post-intervention plasma F₂-isoprostanes were negative predictors of post-intervention telomere length corrected for neutrophil count (p = 0.025).The effect of n-3 fatty acids to increased telomere length corrected for neutrophil count may relate to reduced oxidative stress and increased clearance of neutrophils with shorter telomeres from the circulation. This may be a novel mechanism of modifying CVD risk in CKD patients. PMID:27007392

  4. n-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barden, Anne; O’Callaghan, Nathan; Burke, Valerie; Mas, Emile; Beilin, Lawrence J.; Fenech, Michael; Irish, Ashley B.; Watts, Gerald F.; Puddey, Ian B.; Huang, Rae-Chi; Mori, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA telomere shortening associates with the age-related increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Reducing oxidative stress, could modify telomere erosion during cell replication, and CVD risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The effect of n-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) on telomere length was studied in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial in CKD. Eighty-five CKD patients were randomized to: n-3 fatty acids (4 g); CoQ (200 mg); both supplements; or control (4 g olive oil), daily for 8 weeks. Telomere length was measured in neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at baseline and 8 weeks, with and without correction for cell counts. Main and interactive effects of n-3 fatty acids and CoQ on telomere length were assessed adjusting for baseline values. F2-isoprostanes were measured as markers of oxidative stress. There was no effect of n-3 fatty acids or CoQ on neutrophil or PBMC telomere length. However, telomere length corrected for neutrophil count was increased after n-3 fatty acids (p = 0.015). Post-intervention plasma F2-isoprostanes were negative predictors of post-intervention telomere length corrected for neutrophil count (p = 0.025).The effect of n-3 fatty acids to increased telomere length corrected for neutrophil count may relate to reduced oxidative stress and increased clearance of neutrophils with shorter telomeres from the circulation. This may be a novel mechanism of modifying CVD risk in CKD patients. PMID:27007392

  5. Characterization of Tissue Structure at Varying Length Scales Using Temporal Diffusion Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gore, John C.; Xu, Junzhong; Colvin, Daniel C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Parsons, Edward C.; Does, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The concepts, theoretical behavior and experimental applications of temporal diffusion spectroscopy are reviewed and illustrated. Temporal diffusion spectra are obtained by using oscillating gradient waveforms in diffusion-weighted measurements, and represent the manner in which various spectral components of molecular velocity correlations vary in different geometrical structures that restrict or hinder free movements. Measurements made at different gradient frequencies reveal information on the scale of restrictions or hindrances to free diffusion, and the shape of a spectrum reveals the relative contributions of spatial restrictions at different distance scales. Such spectra differ from other so-called diffusion spectra which depict spatial frequencies and are defined at a fixed diffusion time. Experimentally, oscillating gradients at moderate frequency are more feasible for exploring restrictions at very short distances, which in tissues correspond to structures smaller than cells. We describe the underlying concepts of temporal diffusion spectra and provide analytical expressions for the behavior of the diffusion coefficient as a function of gradient frequency in simple geometries with different dimensions. Diffusion in more complex model media that mimic tissues has been simulated using numerical methods. Experimental measurements of diffusion spectra have been obtained in suspensions of particles and cells, as well as in vivo in intact animals. An observation of particular interest is the increased contrast and heterogeneity observed in tumors using oscillating gradients at moderate frequency compared to conventional pulse gradient methods, and the potential for detecting changes in tumors early in their response to treatment. Computer simulations suggest that diffusion spectral measurements may be sensitive to intracellular structures such as nuclear size, and that changes in tissue diffusion properties may be measured before there are changes in cell

  6. Determination of carrier diffusion length in MOCVD-grown GaN epilayers on sapphire by optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsenko, E. V.; Gurskii, A. L.; Pavlovskii, V. N.; Yablonskii, G. P.; Malinauskas, T.; Jarainas, K.; Schineller, B.; Heuken, M.

    2006-06-01

    Two optical techniques for the determination of a bipolar diffusion length LD of optically excited carriers in GaN epitaxial layers, namely a time-resolved picosecond four-wave mixing (FWM) on free carrier grating and time-integrated photoluminescence (PL) are presented and examined. The PL technique is based on time-integrated photoluminescence (PL) spectra measurements from the front and back sides of the sample under cw and nanosecond pulsed laser excitation. The another method utilizes time-resolved picosecond four-wave mixing (FWM) at various light-induced grating periods to extract diffusion coefficient and carrier recombination lifetime. The value of the diffusion length derived by means of FWM decreases with GaN layer thickness from LD = 260 nm (for 1.7 m-thick layer) to LD = 100 nm (for 0.3 m-thick layer). The integral PL measurements give the value of LD = 120-130 nm for the 620 nm layer under pulsed excitation intensities up to 200 kW/cm2. It increases to 150-170 nm at the excitation intensity enhancement to 1 MW/cm2. These values are close to the value of the diffusion length equal to 160 nm obtained using FWM for this layer thickness evidencing the compatibility of both methods. The changes in the value of LD are discussed in terms of the defect distribution in the epitaxial GaN layer.

  7. Increasing polymer diffusivity by increasing the contour length: The surprising effect of YOYO-1 on DNA dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seunghwan; Dorfman, Kevin; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) labeled with cyanine dyes such as YOYO-1 has been extensively used as a model to study equilibrium and dynamic properties of semiflexible polyelectrolytes. The ability to directly visualize the polymer dynamics is an attractive feature of these experiments, but positively charged cyanine dyes affect the physical properties of dsDNA, distorting the double helix and counterbalancing the intrinsic negative charge of the backbone. A variety of studies have been conducted to reveal the effect of the dye on the contour length and the persistence length of dsDNA. However, fewer efforts have been made to directly quantify the effect of dye on the diffusion behavior of dsDNA. In order to resolve this issue, we measured the in-plane diffusion coefficient of unconfined dsDNA using confocal microscopy. Although there is widespread consensus that intercalation increases the contour length of dsDNA, we find that increasing the dye:base pair ratio for YOYO-1 actually enhances the diffusion of dsDNA. This enhancement is more significant at lower ionic strengths, which implies that the increase in the diffusion coefficient by dye-DNA intercalation is mainly due to a reduction of excluded volume effect resulting from charge neutralization on the backbone.

  8. Biosynthesis and Elongation of Short- and Medium-Chain-Length Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoeven, Rutger S.; Steffens, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Short- and medium-chain-length fatty acids (FAs) are important constituents of a wide array of natural products. Branched and straight short-chain-length FAs originate from branched chain amino acid metabolism, and serve as primers for elongation in FA synthase-like reactions. However, a recent model proposes that the one-carbon extension reactions that utilize 2-oxo-3-methylbutyric acid in leucine biosynthesis also catalyze a repetitive one-carbon elongation of short-chain primers to medium-chain-length FAs. The existence of such a mechanism would require a novel form of regulation to control carbon flux between amino acid and FA biosynthesis. A critical re-analysis of the data used to support this pathway fails to support the hypothesis for FA elongation by one-carbon extension cycles of α-ketoacids. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis experimentally using criteria that distinguish between one- and two-carbon elongation mechanisms: (a) isotopomer patterns in terminal carbon atom pairs of branched and straight FAs resulting from differential labeling with [13C]acetate; (b) [13C]threonine labeling patterns in odd- and even chain length FAs; and (c) differential sensitivity of elongation reactions to inhibition by cerulenin. All three criteria indicated that biosynthesis of medium-chain length FAs is mediated primarily by FA synthase-like reactions. PMID:10631271

  9. The spin Hall angle and spin diffusion length of Pd measured by spin pumping and microwave photoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, X. D.; Feng, Z.; Miao, B. F.; Sun, L.; You, B.; Wu, D.; Du, J.; Zhang, W.; Ding, H. F.

    2014-05-07

    We present the experimental study of the spin Hall angle (SHA) and spin diffusion length of Pd with the spin pumping and microwave photoresistance effects. The Py/Pd bilayer stripes are excited with an out-of-plane microwave magnetic field. The pure spin current is thus pumped and transforms into charge current via the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in Pd layer, yielding an ISHE voltage. The ISHE voltage can be distinguished from the unwanted signal caused by the anisotropic magnetoresistance according to their different symmetries. Together with Pd thickness dependent measurements of in and out-of-plane precessing angles and effective spin mixing conductance, the SHA and spin-diffusion length of Pd are quantified as 0.0056 ± 0.0007 and 7.3 ± 0.7 nm, respectively.

  10. Nicotine carboxylate insecticide emulsions: effect of the fatty acid chain length.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Herley; Araque, Pedronel; Ortiz, Carlos

    2005-12-28

    The effect of fatty acid chain length on nicotine carboxylate insecticide emulsions has been studied in terms of particle size, interfacial tension, nicotine encapsulation on emulsion droplets, and bioactivity. The particle size of the nicotine emulsion and the interfacial tension at the nicotine carboxylate oil phase (0.03 M)--Tween 80 aqueous phase (0.001 M) were affected in a similar way by the change in the fatty acid chain length, which was correlated by the packing conformation of Tween 80 and nicotine carboxylate molecules as obtained by AM1 theoretical calculations. The amount of encapsulated nicotine inside the nicotine carboxylate emulsion droplets influenced the insecticide bioactivity of nicotine; this relationship was explained in terms of the acid value of the different fatty acids used to prepare the nicotine formulation. PMID:16366679

  11. Measurement of diffusion length and surface recombination velocity in Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) and Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinden, Pierre; Van de Wiele, Fernand

    1985-03-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cells by means of a simple linear regression on experimental quantum efficiency values versus the inverse of the absorption coefficient. This method is extended to the case of Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells. Under certain conditions, the real or the effective surface recombination velocity may be measured.

  12. Amide Proton Transfer Imaging of Diffuse Gliomas: Effect of Saturation Pulse Length in Parallel Transmission-Based Technique

    PubMed Central

    Hiwatashi, Akio; Keupp, Jochen; Yamashita, Koji; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yoneyama, Masami; Kruiskamp, Marijn J.; Sagiyama, Koji; Takahashi, Masaya; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the dependence of saturation pulse length on APT imaging of diffuse gliomas using a parallel transmission-based technique. Twenty-two patients with diffuse gliomas (9 low-grade gliomas, LGGs, and 13 high-grade gliomas, HGGs) were included in the study. APT imaging was conducted at 3T with a 2-channel parallel transmission scheme using three different saturation pulse lengths (0.5 s, 1.0 s, 2.0 s). The 2D fast spin-echo sequence was used for imaging. Z-spectrum was obtained at 25 frequency offsets from -6 to +6 ppm (step 0.5 ppm). A point-by-point B0 correction was performed with a B0 map. Magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) and ΔMTRasym (contrast between tumor and normal white matter) at 3.5 ppm were compared among different saturation lengths. A significant increase in MTRasym (3.5 ppm) of HGG was found when the length of saturation pulse became longer (3.09 ± 0.54% at 0.5 s, 3.83 ± 0.67% at 1 s, 4.12 ± 0.97% at 2 s), but MTRasym (3.5 ppm) was not different among the saturation lengths in LGG. ΔMTRasym (3.5 ppm) increased with the length of saturation pulse in both LGG (0.48 ± 0.56% at 0.5 s, 1.28 ± 0.56% at 1 s, 1.88 ± 0.56% at 2 s and HGG (1.72 ± 0.54% at 0.5 s, 2.90 ± 0.49% at 1 s, 3.83 ± 0.88% at 2 s). In both LGG and HGG, APT-weighted contrast was enhanced with the use of longer saturation pulses. PMID:27227746

  13. The effect of the cation alkyl chain length on density and diffusion in dialkylpyrrolidinium bis(mandelato)borate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Andrei; Taher, Mamoun; Shah, Faiz Ullah; Glavatskih, Sergei; Antzutkin, Oleg N

    2014-12-28

    The physicochemical properties of ionic liquids are strongly affected by the selective combination of the cations and anions comprising the ionic liquid. In particular, the length of the alkyl chains of ions has a clear influence on the ionic liquid's performance. In this paper, we study the self-diffusion of ions in a series of halogen-free boron-based ionic liquids (hf-BILs) containing bis(mandelato)borate anions and dialkylpyrrolidinium cations with long alkyl chains CnH2n+1 with n from 4 to 14 within a temperature range of 293-373 K. It was found that the hf-BILs with n = 4-7 have very similar diffusion coefficients, while hf-BILs with n = 10-14 exhibit two liquid sub-phases in almost the entire temperature range studied (293-353 K). Both liquid sub-phases differ in their diffusion coefficients, while values of the slower diffusion coefficients are close to those of hf-BILs with shorter alkyl chains. To explain the particular dependence of diffusion on the alkyl chain length, we examined the densities of the hf-BILs studied here. It was shown that the dependence of the density on the number of CH2 groups in long alkyl chains of cations can be accurately described using a "mosaic type" model, where regions of long alkyl chains of cations (named 'aliphatic' regions) and the residual chemical moieties in both cations and anions (named 'ionic' regions) give additive contributions. Changes in density due to an increase in temperature and the number of CH2 groups in the long alkyl chains of cations are determined predominantly by changes in the free volume of the 'ionic' regions, while 'aliphatic' regions are already highly compressed by van der Waals forces, which results in only infinitesimal changes in their free volumes with temperature. PMID:25372279

  14. Derivation of effective fission gas diffusivities in UO2 from lower length scale simulations and implementation of fission gas diffusion models in BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar; Pastore, Giovanni; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Perriot, Romain Thibault; Tonks, Michael; Stanek, Christopher Richard

    2014-11-07

    This report summarizes the development of new fission gas diffusion models from lower length scale simulations and assessment of these models in terms of annealing experiments and fission gas release simulations using the BISON fuel performance code. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe) in UO2 were derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. The importance of the large XeU3O cluster (a Xe atom in a uranium + oxygen vacancy trap site with two bound uranium vacancies) is emphasized, which is a consequence of its high mobility and stability. These models were implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe diffusivities for various irradiation conditions. The effective diffusivities were used in BISON to calculate fission gas release for a number of test cases. The results are assessed against experimental data and future directions for research are outlined based on the conclusions.

  15. Effects of acid diffusibility and affinity to cellulose on strength loss of polycarboxylic acid crosslinked fabrics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bolin; Zhao, Cunyi; Yan, Kelu; Sun, Gang

    2016-06-25

    1,2,3,4-Butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) imparts good anti-wrinkle property to cotton fabrics and results in significant strength loss due to cross-linking and acid degradation of cellulose simultaneously. However, benzophenone-3,3',4,4'- tetracarboxylic acid (BPTCA), an aromatic acid, crosslinks cellulose effectively but causes less strength loss to the products under similar conditions. The difference in damages to cellulose fibers was analyzed by using diffusibility and corresponding affinity of the acids to cellulose fibers, which were estimated by their molecular sizes and Hansen solubility parameters (HSP). Both experimental results and theoretical speculations revealed consistent agreement, indicating that smaller acid molecules could diffuse into cellulose fiber more rapidly and deeply, resulting in more acid degradation. Besides, the aliphatic acid such as BTCA has higher molecular affinity than BPTCA to cellulose, causing additional more degradation of cellulose. Both factors are potential reasons of the observed more severe tensile strength loss of the BTCA treated cotton fabrics. PMID:27083819

  16. Polymer length of teichuronic acid released from cell walls of Micrococcus luteus.

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, P J; Hildebrandt, K M; Dickie, J P; Anderson, J S

    1990-01-01

    Teichuronic acid released from its phosphodiester linkage to peptidoglycan in the cell walls of Micrococcus luteus by mild acid treatment is resolved into a ladderlike series of bands by electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels in the presence of borate. Each band of the ladder differs from its nearest neighbor by one disaccharide repeat unit, ----4)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-mannopyranuronosyl-(1----6)- alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-. Acid-fragmented teichuronic acid, after conversion to the phenylamine derivative, was fractionated by preparative-scale molecular sieve column chromatography, which produced a series of elution peaks. Fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of the smallest member of the series determined its molecular weight and established its identity as the phenylamine derivative of one disaccharide repeat unit of teichuronic acid. Homologous fractions of the same series were used to index the ladder of bands obtained by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from samples containing a more extensive distribution of polymer lengths. Nearly native teichuronic acid consists of polymers with a broad range of molecular sizes ranging from 20 to 55 disaccharide units. The most abundant species are those which have 25 to 40 repeat units. Prolonged treatment of teichuronic acid with the acid conditions used to release it from peptidoglycan causes gradual fragmentation of the teichuronic acid. Images PMID:2394683

  17. Effect of Crystal Defects on Minority Carrier Diffusion Length in 6H SiC Measured Using the Electron Beam Induced Current Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1997-01-01

    We report values of minority carrier diffusion length in n-type 6H SiC measured using a planar Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) method. Values of hole diffusion length in defect free regions of n-type 6H SiC, with a doping concentration of 1.7El7 1/cu cm, ranged from 1.46 microns to 0.68 microns. We next introduce a novel variation of the planar method used above. This 'planar mapping' technique measured diffusion length along a linescan creating a map of diffusion length versus position. This map is then overlaid onto the EBIC image of the corresponding linescan, allowing direct visualization of the effect of defects on minority carrier diffusion length. Measurements of the above n-type 6H SiC resulted in values of hole diffusion length ranging from 1.2 micron in defect free regions to below 0.1 gm at the center of large defects. In addition, measurements on p-type 6H SiC resulted in electron diffusion lengths ranging from 1.42 micron to 0.8 micron.

  18. Short deoxyribonucleic acid repair patch length in Escherichia coli is determined by the processive mechanism of deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Matson, S W; Bambara, R A

    1981-01-01

    The lengths of ultraviolet irradiation-induced repair resynthesis patches were measured in repair-competent extracts of Escherichia coli. Extracts containing wild-type deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase I introduced a patch 15 to 20 nucleotides in length during repair of ColE1 plasmid DNA; extracts containing the polA5 mutant form of DNA polymerase I introduced a patch only about 5 nucleotides in length in a similar reaction. The repair patch length in the presence of either DNA polymerase corresponded to the processivity of that polymerase (the average number of nucleotides added per enzyme-DNA binding event) as determined with purified enzymes and DNA treated with a nonspecific endonuclease. The base composition of the repair patch inserted by the wild-type DNA polymerase was similar to that of the bacterial genome, whereas the patch inserted by the mutant enzyme was skewed toward greater pyrimidine incorporation. This skewing is expected, considering the predominance of pyrimidine incorporation occurring at the ultraviolet lesion and the short patch made by the mutant enzyme. Since the defect in the polA5 DNA polymerase which causes premature dissociation from DNA is reflected exactly in the repair patch length, the processive mechanism of the polymerase must be a central determinant of patch length. PMID:7012116

  19. Insight from molecular modelling: does the polymer side chain length matter for transport properties of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes?

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

    2012-08-28

    We present a detailed analysis of the nanostructure of short side chain (SSC) perfluorosulfonic acid membrane and its effect on H{sub 2}O network percolation, H{sub 3}O{sup +} and H{sub 2}O diffusion, and mean residence times of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and H{sub 2}O near SO{sub 3}{sup -} groups based on molecular dynamics simulations. We studied a range of hydration levels ({lambda}) at temperatures of 300 and 360 K, and compare the results to our previous findings in the benchmark Nafion membrane at 300 K. The water channel diameter is about 20% larger in Nafion, while the extent of SO3- clustering is more in SSC membrane. The calculated channel diameter is in excellent agreement with the recently proposed cylindrical water channel model of these membranes. The H{sub 2}O network percolation occurs at comparable hydration levels, and the diffusion coefficients of H{sub 2}O and H{sub 3}O{sup +} are similar in SSC and Nafion membranes. Raising the temperature of the SSC membrane from 300 to 360 K provides a much bigger increase in proton vehicular diffusion coefficient (by a factor of about 4) than changing the side chain length. H3O+ ions are found to exchange more frequently with SO{sub 3}{sup -} partners at the higher temperature. Our key findings are that (a) the hydrophobic-hydrophilic separation in the two membranes is surprisingly similar; (b) at all hydration levels studied, the longer side chain of Nafion is bent and is effectively equivalent to a short side chain in terms of extension into the water domain; and (c) proton transport along the centre of the channel is improbable and vehicular proton transport occurs between SO{sub 3}{sup -} groups. The simulations are validated by good agreement with corresponding experimental values for the simulated membrane density and diffusion coefficients of H{sub 2}O.

  20. Diffusion length variation and proton damage coefficients for InP/In(x)Ga(1-x)As/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of lighter, mechanically strong and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5 and 3 MeV proton irradiations are explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence is calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient K(L) is plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  1. Measurement of N-Type 6H SiC Minority-Carrier Diffusion Lengths by Electron Bombardment of Schottky Barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, S. M.; Tabib-Azar, M.; Balley, S.; Rybickid, G.; Neudeck, P.; Raffaelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    Minority-Carrier diffusion lengths of n-type 6H-SiC were measured using the electron-beam induced current (EBIC) technique. Experimental values of primary beam current, EBIC, and beam voltage were obtained for a variety of SIC samples. This data was used to calculate experimental diode efficiency vs. beam voltage curves. These curves were fit to theoretically calculated efficiency curves, and the diffusion length and metal layer thickness were extracted. The hole diffusion length in n-6H SiC ranged from 0.93 +/- 0.15 microns.

  2. Measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length and edge surface-recombination velocity in InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Hakimzadeh, Roshanak

    1993-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to measure the electron (minority carrier) diffusion length (L(sub n)) and the edge surface-recombination velocity (V(sub s)) in zinc-doped Czochralski-grown InP wafers. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) profiles were obtained in specimens containing a Schottky barrier perpendicular to the scanned (edge) surface. An independent technique was used to measure V(sub s), and these values were used in a theoretical expression for normalized EBIC. A fit of the experimental data with this expression enabled us to determine L(sub n).

  3. Cathodoluminescence of stacking fault bound excitons for local probing of the exciton diffusion length in single GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Nogues, Gilles Den Hertog, Martien; Auzelle, Thomas; Gayral, Bruno; Daudin, Bruno

    2014-03-10

    We perform correlated studies of individual GaN nanowires in scanning electron microscopy combined to low temperature cathodoluminescence, microphotoluminescence, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We show that some nanowires exhibit well localized regions emitting light at the energy of a stacking fault bound exciton (3.42 eV) and are able to observe the presence of a single stacking fault in these regions. Precise measurements of the cathodoluminescence signal in the vicinity of the stacking fault give access to the exciton diffusion length near this location.

  4. NEXAFS Chemical State and Bond Lengths of p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Solution and Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Suljoti, E.; Xiao, J.; Golnak, R.; Aziz, E. F.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state and solution pH-dependent NEXAFS studies allow direct observation of the electronic state of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as a function of its chemical environment, revealing the chemical state and bonding of the chemical species. Variations in the ionization potential (IP) and 1s→π* resonances unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic, or anionic) present and the varying local environment. Shifts in σ* shape resonances relative to the IP in the NEXAFS spectra vary with C-N bond length, and the important effect of minor alterations in bond length is confirmed with nitrogen FEFF calculations, leading to the possibility of bond length determination in solution.

  5. Reaction-Diffusion Model Simulations relevant to Modified Taylor-Couette Flow in Systems of Varying Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halmstad, Andrew; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Previously, we have observed a period-doubling cascade to chaos in Modified Taylor-Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry. Such behavior had been predicted by The Reaction-Diffusion model simulations. The chaotic formation of Taylor-Vortex pair formation was restricted to a very narrow band about the waist of the hourglass. It was suggested that with increasing lengths of systems, the chaotic region would expand. We present a battery of simulations to determine the variation of the size of the chaotic region with length, seeking the transition to spatio- temporal chaos. Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997). H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991).

  6. Fatty Acid Chain Length Dependence of Phase Separation Kinetics in Stratum Corneum Models by IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Rabie, Emann; Walters, Russel M; Flach, Carol R

    2015-07-30

    The main barrier to permeability in human skin resides in the stratum corneum (SC), a layered structure consisting of anucleated, flattened cells (corneocytes) embedded in a heterogeneous lamellar lipid matrix. While lipid structures and packing propensities in the SC and in SC models have been extensively investigated, only limited data are available concerning the kinetics and mechanism of formation of lamellar phases and particular lipid packing motifs. In our prior investigation, kinetic IR spectroscopy measurements probed the temporal sequence of phase separation leading to ordered structures in a three component SC model of equimolar structurally heterogeneous ceramide[NS], chain perdeuterated stearic acid, and cholesterol. In the current work, the phase separation kinetic effects of specific fatty acid chain lengths with a synthetic structurally homogeneous ceramide[NS] in similar ternary mixtures are examined. These are compared with a mixture containing ceramide[NS] with an unsaturated acid chain. The kinetic events are sensitive to the difference in chain lengths between the ceramide acid chain and the fatty acid as well as to the presence of unsaturation in the former. The observed kinetic behaviors span a wide range of phase separation times, ranging from the formation of a solid solution stable for at least 200 h, to a system in which an orthorhombic fatty acid structure is essentially completely formed within the time resolution of the experiment (15 min). The data seem to offer some features of a spinodal phase separation at relatively short times. Overall the approach offers a possible means for addressing several unanswered questions pertinent to skin pharmacology, such as the roles of a wide variety of ceramide and fatty acid species and the design of therapeutic interventions for repair of pathological conditions of the SC. PMID:26131756

  7. Terahertz Conductivity within Colloidal CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals: Remarkably High Carrier Mobilities and Large Diffusion Lengths.

    PubMed

    Yettapu, Gurivi Reddy; Talukdar, Debnath; Sarkar, Sohini; Swarnkar, Abhishek; Nag, Angshuman; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Mandal, Pankaj

    2016-08-10

    Colloidal CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as an excellent light emitting material in last one year. Using time domain and time-resolved THz spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we establish 3-fold free carrier recombination mechanism, namely, nonradiative Auger, bimolecular electron-hole recombination, and inefficient trap-assisted recombination in 11 nm sized colloidal CsPbBr3 NCs. Our results confirm a negligible influence of surface defects in trapping charge carriers, which in turn results into desirable intrinsic transport properties, from the perspective of device applications, such as remarkably high carrier mobility (∼4500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), large diffusion length (>9.2 μm), and high luminescence quantum yield (80%). Despite being solution processed and possessing a large surface to volume ratio, this combination of high carrier mobility and diffusion length, along with nearly ideal photoluminescence quantum yield, is unique compared to any other colloidal quantum dot system. PMID:27367476

  8. Comparison of Three E-Beam Techniques for Electric Field Imaging and Carrier Diffusion Length Measurement on the Same Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Donatini, F; de Luna Bugallo, Andres; Tchoulfian, Pierre; Chicot, Gauthier; Sartel, Corinne; Sallet, Vincent; Pernot, Julien

    2016-05-11

    Whereas nanowire (NW)-based devices offer numerous advantages compared to bulk ones, their performances are frequently limited by an incomplete understanding of their properties where surface effect should be carefully considered. Here, we demonstrate the ability to spatially map the electric field and determine the exciton diffusion length in NW by using an electron beam as the single excitation source. This approach is performed on numerous single ZnO NW Schottky diodes whose NW radius vary from 42.5 to 175 nm. The dominant impact of the surface on the NW properties is revealed through the comparison of three different physical quantities recorded on the same NW: electron-beam induced current, cathodoluminescence, and secondary electron signal. Indeed, the space charge region near the Schottky contact exhibits an unusual linear variation with reverse bias whatever the NW radius. On the contrary, the exciton diffusion length is shown to be controlled by the NW radius through surface recombination. This systematic comparison performed on a single ZnO NW demonstrates the power of these complementary techniques in understanding NW properties. PMID:27105083

  9. Determination of minority-carrier diffusion length by integral properties of electron-beam-induced current profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcoli, D.; Cavallini, A.; Castaldini, A.

    1991-08-01

    The diffusion length of minority carriers in n-type floating-zone Si samples is obtained with the electron-beam-induced current technique in planar configuration. The charge collection current data as a function of the beam-junction distance are analyzed on the basis of the ``moment method'' developed by Donolato [C. Donolato, Solid-State Electron. 28, 1143 (1985)], which is based on the calculation of the variance of the derivative of the current profile. With respect to other methods reported in literature, this has the advantage that it requires no assumptions on the surface recombination velocity and thus provides a diffusion length value free from its influence. The data are also analyzed with the asymptotic method, which requires conventional assumptions on the surface recombination velocity. The comparison between the results has allowed us to test the capabilities of the above-mentioned method. Particular attention is paid to the injection level and its influence on bulk and surface properties.

  10. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, E. Arciprete, F.; Latini, V.; Latini, S.; Patella, F.; Magri, R.

    2014-09-15

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surface occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.

  11. Palladium Catalysts for Fatty Acid Deoxygenation: Influence of the Support and Fatty Acid Chain Length on Decarboxylation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, JP; Immer, JG; Lamb, HH

    2012-03-29

    Supported metal catalysts containing 5 wt% Pd on silica, alumina, and activated carbon were evaluated for liquid-phase deoxygenation of stearic (octadecanoic), lauric (dodecanoic), and capric (decanoic) acids under 5 % H-2 at 300 A degrees C and 15 atm. On-line quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was used to measure CO + CO2 yield, CO2 selectivity, H-2 consumption, and initial decarboxylation rate. Post-reaction analysis of liquid products by gas chromatography was used to determine n-alkane yields. The Pd/C catalyst was highly active and selective for stearic acid (SA) decarboxylation under these conditions. In contrast, SA deoxygenation over Pd/SiO2 occurred primarily via decarbonylation and at a much slower rate. Pd/Al2O3 exhibited high initial SA decarboxylation activity but deactivated under the test conditions. Similar CO2 selectivity patterns among the catalysts were observed for deoxygenation of lauric and capric acids; however, the initial decarboxylation rates tended to be lower for these substrates. The influence of alkyl chain length on deoxygenation kinetics was investigated for a homologous series of C-10-C-18 fatty acids using the Pd/C catalyst. As fatty acid carbon number decreases, reaction time and H-2 consumption increase, and CO2 selectivity and initial decarboxylation rate decrease. The increase in initial decarboxylation rates for longer chain fatty acids is attributed to their greater propensity for adsorption on the activated carbon support.

  12. Characterization of light transport in scattering media at sub-diffusion length scales with Low-coherence Enhanced Backscattering

    PubMed Central

    Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    Low-coherence enhanced backscattering (LEBS) is a technique that has recently shown promise for tissue characterization and the detection of early pre-cancer. Although several Monte Carlo models of LEBS have been described, these models have not been accurate enough to predict all of the experimentally observed LEBS features. We present an appropriate Monte Carlo model to simulate LEBS peak properties from polystyrene microsphere suspensions in water. Results show that the choice of the phase function greatly impacts the accuracy of the simulation when the transport mean free path (ls*) is much greater than the spatial coherence length (LSC). When ls* < LSC, a diffusion approximation based model of LEBS is sufficiently accurate. We also use the Monte Carlo model to validate that LEBS can be used to measure the radial scattering probability distribution (radial point spread function), p(r), at small length scales and demonstrate LEBS measurements of p(r) from biological tissue. In particular, we show that pre-cancerous and benign mucosal tissues have different small length scale light transport properties. PMID:21037980

  13. Length-Dependent Formation of Transmembrane Pores by 310-Helical α-Aminoisobutyric Acid Foldamers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jennifer E; Diemer, Vincent; Adam, Catherine; Raftery, James; Ruscoe, Rebecca E; Sengel, Jason T; Wallace, Mark I; Bader, Antoine; Cockroft, Scott L; Clayden, Jonathan; Webb, Simon J

    2016-01-20

    The synthetic biology toolbox lacks extendable and conformationally controllable yet easy-to-synthesize building blocks that are long enough to span membranes. To meet this need, an iterative synthesis of α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) oligomers was used to create a library of homologous rigid-rod 310-helical foldamers, which have incrementally increasing lengths and functionalizable N- and C-termini. This library was used to probe the inter-relationship of foldamer length, self-association strength, and ionophoric ability, which is poorly understood. Although foldamer self-association in nonpolar chloroform increased with length, with a ∼ 14-fold increase in dimerization constant from Aib6 to Aib11, ionophoric activity in bilayers showed a stronger length dependence, with the observed rate constant for Aib11 ∼ 70-fold greater than that of Aib6. The strongest ionophoric activity was observed for foldamers with >10 Aib residues, which have end-to-end distances greater than the hydrophobic width of the bilayers used (∼ 2.8 nm); X-ray crystallography showed that Aib11 is 2.93 nm long. These studies suggest that being long enough to span the membrane is more important for good ionophoric activity than strong self-association in the bilayer. Planar bilayer conductance measurements showed that Aib11 and Aib13, but not Aib7, could form pores. This pore-forming behavior is strong evidence that Aibm (m ≥ 10) building blocks can span bilayers. PMID:26699898

  14. Length-Dependent Formation of Transmembrane Pores by 310-Helical α-Aminoisobutyric Acid Foldamers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic biology toolbox lacks extendable and conformationally controllable yet easy-to-synthesize building blocks that are long enough to span membranes. To meet this need, an iterative synthesis of α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) oligomers was used to create a library of homologous rigid-rod 310-helical foldamers, which have incrementally increasing lengths and functionalizable N- and C-termini. This library was used to probe the inter-relationship of foldamer length, self-association strength, and ionophoric ability, which is poorly understood. Although foldamer self-association in nonpolar chloroform increased with length, with a ∼14-fold increase in dimerization constant from Aib6 to Aib11, ionophoric activity in bilayers showed a stronger length dependence, with the observed rate constant for Aib11 ∼70-fold greater than that of Aib6. The strongest ionophoric activity was observed for foldamers with >10 Aib residues, which have end-to-end distances greater than the hydrophobic width of the bilayers used (∼2.8 nm); X-ray crystallography showed that Aib11 is 2.93 nm long. These studies suggest that being long enough to span the membrane is more important for good ionophoric activity than strong self-association in the bilayer. Planar bilayer conductance measurements showed that Aib11 and Aib13, but not Aib7, could form pores. This pore-forming behavior is strong evidence that Aibm (m ≥ 10) building blocks can span bilayers. PMID:26699898

  15. Chain length, temperature and solvent effects on the structural properties of α-aminoisobutyric acid homooligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Grubišić, Sonja; Chandramouli, Balasubramanian; Barone, Vincenzo; Brancato, Giuseppe

    2016-07-27

    Non-coded α-amino acids, originally exploited by nature, have been successfully reproduced by recent synthetic strategies to confer special structural and functional properties to small peptides. The most known and well-studied atypical residue is α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib), which is contained in a fairly large number of peptides with known antibiotic effects. Here, we report on a molecular dynamics (MD) study of a series of homooligopeptides based on α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) with increasing length (Ac-(Aib)n-NMe, n = 5, 6, 7 and 10) and at various temperatures, employing a recent extension of the AMBER force field tailored for the Aib residue. Solvent effects have been analyzed by comparative MD simulations of a heptapeptide in water and dimethylsulfoxide at different temperatures. Our results show that the preference for the 310- and/or α-helix structures, which typically characterize Aib based peptides, is finely tuned by several factors including the chain length, temperature and solvent nature. While the transitions between intra-molecular i → i + 3 and i → i + 4 hydrogen bonds characterizing 310 and α-helices, respectively, are rather fast in small peptides (in the picosecond timescale), our analysis shows that the above physical and chemical factors modulate the relative equilibrium populations of the two helical structures. The obtained results nicely agree with available experimental data and support the use of the new force field for modeling Aib containing peptides. PMID:27402118

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Oxidative Stress, and Leukocyte Telomere Length: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.; Epel, Elissa S.; Belury, Martha A.; Andridge, Rebecca; Lin, Jue; Glaser, Ronald; Malarkey, William B.; Hwang, Beom Seuk; Blackburn, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Shorter telomeres have been associated with poor health behaviors, age-related diseases, and early mortality. Telomere length is regulated by the enzyme telomerase, and is linked to exposure to proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress. In our recent randomized controlled trial, omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation lowered the concentration of serum proinflammatory cytokines. This study assessed whether n-3 PUFA supplementation also affected leukocyte telomere length, telomerase, and oxidative stress. In addition to testing for group differences, changes in the continuous n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio were assessed to account for individual differences in adherence, absorption, and metabolism. The double-blind 4-month trial included 106 healthy sedentary overweight middle-aged and older adults who received (1) 2.5 g/day n-3 PUFAs, (2) l.25 g/day n-3 PUFAs, or (3) placebo capsules that mirrored the proportions of fatty acids in the typical American diet. Supplementation significantly lowered oxidative stress as measured by F2-isoprostanes (p=0.02). The estimated geometric mean log-F2-isoprostanes values were 15% lower in the two supplemented groups compared to placebo. Although group differences for telomerase and telomere length were nonsignificant, changes in the n-6:n-3 PUFA plasma ratios helped clarify the intervention’s impact: telomere length increased with decreasing n-6:n-3 ratios, p=0.02. The data suggest that lower n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios can impact cell aging. The triad of inflammation, oxidative stress, and immune cell aging represents important pre-disease mechanisms that may be ameliorated through nutritional interventions. This translational research broadens our understanding of the potential impact of the n-6:n-3 PUFA balance. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00385723 PMID:23010452

  17. Determination of minority carrier diffusion length of sprayed-Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courel, Maykel; Valencia-Resendiz, E.; Pulgarín-Agudelo, F. A.; Vigil-Galán, O.

    2016-04-01

    Despite Cu2ZnSnS4(CZTS) is a potential candidate for solar cell applications, so far, low efficiency values have been reported. In particular, for spray-deposited CZTS, efficiencies lower than 2% are commonly achieved. It is well known that one of the most important parameters governing solar cell performance is minority carrier diffusion length (Ln). In this work, CZTS thin film solar cells with different compositional ratios are fabricated in order to study its impact on Ln values. The Ln parameter is calculated for sprayed-CZTS layers using external quantum efficiency measurements in conjunction with optical absorption coefficient versus wavelength measurements - for the first time. Values in the range of 0.11-0.17 μm are obtained emphasizing the need for improving sprayed-CZTS crystalline quality.

  18. Spin Torque Study of the Spin Hall Conductivity and Spin Diffusion Length in Platinum Thin Films with Varying Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh-Hai; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    We report measurements of the spin torque efficiencies in perpendicularly magnetized Pt /Co bilayers where the Pt resistivity ρPt is strongly dependent on thickness tPt . The dampinglike spin Hall torque efficiency per unit current density ξDLj varies significantly with tPt , exhibiting a peak value ξDLj=0.12 at tPt=2.8 - 3.9 nm . In contrast, ξDLj/ρPt increases monotonically with tPt and saturates for tPt>5 nm , consistent with an intrinsic spin Hall effect mechanism, in which ξDLj is enhanced by an increase in ρPt . Assuming the Elliott-Yafet spin scattering mechanism dominates, we estimate that the spin diffusion length λs=(0.77 ±0.08 )×10-15 Ω .m2/ρPt .

  19. Diversion of phagosome trafficking by pathogenic Rhodococcus equi depends on mycolic acid chain length.

    PubMed

    Sydor, Tobias; von Bargen, Kristine; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Huth, Gitta; Holst, Otto; Wohlmann, Jens; Becken, Ulrike; Dykstra, Tobias; Söhl, Kristina; Lindner, Buko; Prescott, John F; Schaible, Ulrich E; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2013-03-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a close relative of Mycobacterium spp. and a facultative intracellular pathogen which arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages before the late endocytic stage. We have screened a transposon mutant library of R. equi for mutants with decreased capability to prevent phagolysosome formation. This screen yielded a mutant in the gene for β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein)-synthase A (KasA), a key enzyme of the long-chain mycolic acid synthesizing FAS-II system. The longest kasA mutant mycolic acid chains were 10 carbon units shorter than those of wild-type bacteria. Coating of non-pathogenic E. coli with purified wild-type trehalose dimycolate reduced phagolysosome formation substantially which was not the case with shorter kasA mutant-derived trehalose dimycolate. The mutant was moderately attenuated in macrophages and in a mouse infection model, but was fully cytotoxic.Whereas loss of KasA is lethal in mycobacteria, R. equi kasA mutant multiplication in broth was normal proving that long-chain mycolic acid compounds are not necessarily required for cellular integrity and viability of the bacteria that typically produce them. This study demonstrates a central role of mycolic acid chain length in diversion of trafficking by R. equi. PMID:23078612

  20. Chain-length heterogeneity allows for the assembly of fatty acid vesicles in dilute solutions.

    PubMed

    Budin, Itay; Prwyes, Noam; Zhang, Na; Szostak, Jack W

    2014-10-01

    A requirement for concentrated and chemically homogeneous pools of molecular building blocks would severely restrict plausible scenarios for the origin of life. In the case of membrane self-assembly, models of prebiotic lipid synthesis yield primarily short, single-chain amphiphiles that can form bilayer vesicles only at very high concentrations. These high critical aggregation concentrations (cacs) pose significant obstacles for the self-assembly of single-chain lipid membranes. Here, we examine membrane self-assembly in mixtures of fatty acids with varying chain lengths, an expected feature of any abiotic lipid synthesis. We derive theoretical predictions for the cac of mixtures by adapting thermodynamic models developed for the analogous phenomenon of mixed micelle self-assembly. We then use several complementary methods to characterize aggregation experimentally, and find cac values in close agreement with our theoretical predictions. These measurements establish that the cac of fatty acid mixtures is dramatically lowered by minor fractions of long-chain species, thereby providing a plausible route for protocell membrane assembly. Using an NMR-based approach to monitor aggregation of isotopically labeled samples, we demonstrate the incorporation of individual components into mixed vesicles. These experiments suggest that vesicles assembled in dilute, mixed solutions are depleted of the shorter-chain-length lipid species, a finding that carries implications for the composition of primitive cell membranes. PMID:25296310

  1. Chain-Length Heterogeneity Allows for the Assembly of Fatty Acid Vesicles in Dilute Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Itay; Prwyes, Noam; Zhang, Na; Szostak, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    A requirement for concentrated and chemically homogeneous pools of molecular building blocks would severely restrict plausible scenarios for the origin of life. In the case of membrane self-assembly, models of prebiotic lipid synthesis yield primarily short, single-chain amphiphiles that can form bilayer vesicles only at very high concentrations. These high critical aggregation concentrations (cacs) pose significant obstacles for the self-assembly of single-chain lipid membranes. Here, we examine membrane self-assembly in mixtures of fatty acids with varying chain lengths, an expected feature of any abiotic lipid synthesis. We derive theoretical predictions for the cac of mixtures by adapting thermodynamic models developed for the analogous phenomenon of mixed micelle self-assembly. We then use several complementary methods to characterize aggregation experimentally, and find cac values in close agreement with our theoretical predictions. These measurements establish that the cac of fatty acid mixtures is dramatically lowered by minor fractions of long-chain species, thereby providing a plausible route for protocell membrane assembly. Using an NMR-based approach to monitor aggregation of isotopically labeled samples, we demonstrate the incorporation of individual components into mixed vesicles. These experiments suggest that vesicles assembled in dilute, mixed solutions are depleted of the shorter-chain-length lipid species, a finding that carries implications for the composition of primitive cell membranes. PMID:25296310

  2. Free fatty acids chain length distribution affects the permeability of skin lipid model membranes.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Masayuki; Oguri, Masashi; Mojumdar, Enamul H; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2016-09-01

    The lipid matrix in the stratum corneum (SC) plays an important role in the barrier function of the skin. The main lipid classes in this lipid matrix are ceramides (CERs), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFAs). The aim of this study was to determine whether a variation in CER subclass composition and chain length distribution of FFAs affect the permeability of this matrix. To examine this, we make use of lipid model membranes, referred to as stratum corneum substitute (SCS). We prepared SCS containing i) single CER subclass with either a single FFA or a mixture of FFAs and CHOL, or ii) a mixture of various CER subclasses with either a single FFA or a mixture of FFAs and CHOL. In vitro permeation studies were performed using ethyl-p-aminobenzoic acid (E-PABA) as a model drug. The flux of E-PABA across the SCS containing the mixture of FFAs was higher than that across the SCS containing a single FA with a chain length of 24 C atoms (FA C24), while the E-PABA flux was not effected by the CER composition. To select the underlying factors for the changes in permeability, the SCSs were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). All lipid models demonstrated a similar phase behavior. However, when focusing on the conformational ordering of the individual FFA chains, the shorter chain FFA (with a chain length of 16, 18 or 20 C atoms forming only 11m/m% of the total FFA level) had a higher conformational disordering, while the conformational ordering of the chains of the CER and FA C24 and FA C22 hardly did not change irrespective of the composition of the SCS. In conclusion, the conformational mobility of the short chain FFAs present only at low levels in the model SC lipid membranes has a great impact on the permeability of E-PABA. PMID:27287726

  3. Suppression of Acid Diffusion in Chemical Amplification Resists by Molecular Control of Base Matrix Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Toshiyuki; Shiraishi, Hiroshi; Okazaki, Shinji

    1995-12-01

    Suppression of acid diffusion during post-exposure baking (PEB) of chemical amplification resists is investigated from the standpoint of molecular control of base matrix polymers. Negative-type chemical amplification resists composed of cresol novolak-based matrix polymers, acid-catalyzed crosslinkers of melamine resins, and acid generators of onium salts are prepared. The molecular weight distributions of the base matrix polymers are controlled by means of a precipitation method. The resists are exposed with electron beams in isolated lines to evaluate the acid diffusion characteristics. Dependence of pattern sizes on the PEB time clearly shows that acid diffusion determines the resist pattern sizes based on Fick's law. The diffusion coefficients of resists with base matrix polymers with small polydispersities are smaller than those of resists with base matrix polymers with large polydispersities. Acid diffusion can still be suppressed by applying base matrix polymers with small weight-average molecular weights and small polydispersities. Diffusion coefficients can be further decreased by using base matrix polymers with more p-cresol components. A diffusion mechanism is proposed based on acid diffusion channels composed of active OH-groups and vacancies in the base matrix polymers.

  4. Position and length of fatty acids strongly affect receptor selectivity pattern of human pancreatic polypeptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Mäde, Veronika; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Kaiser, Anette; Meiler, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2014-11-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is a satiety-inducing gut hormone targeting predominantly the Y4 receptor within the neuropeptide Y multiligand/multireceptor family. Palmitoylated PP-based ligands have already been reported to exert prolonged satiety-inducing effects in animal models. Here, we suggest that other lipidation sites and different fatty acid chain lengths may affect receptor selectivity and metabolic stability. Activity tests revealed significantly enhanced potency of long fatty acid conjugates on all four Y receptors with a preference of position 22 over 30 at Y1 , Y2 and Y5 receptors. Improved Y receptor selectivity was observed for two short fatty acid analogues. Moreover, [K(30)(E-Prop)]hPP2-36 (15) displayed enhanced stability in blood plasma and liver homogenates. Thus, short chain lipidation of hPP at key residue 30 is a promising approach for anti-obesity therapy because of maintained selectivity and a sixfold increased plasma half-life. PMID:25156249

  5. Determination of charge-carrier diffusion length in the photosensing layer of HgCdTe n-on-p photovoltaic infrared focal plane array detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnyakov, A. V.; Stuchinsky, V. A. Brunev, D. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2014-03-03

    In the present paper, we propose a method for evaluating the bulk diffusion length of minority charge carriers in the photosensing layer of photovoltaic focal plane array (FPA) photodetectors. The method is based on scanning a strip-shaped illumination spot with one of the detector diodes at a low level of photocurrents j{sub ph} being registered; such scanning provides data for subsequent analysis of measured spot-scan profiles within a simple diffusion model. The asymptotic behavior of the effective (at j{sub ph} ≠ 0) charge-carrier diffusion length l{sub d} {sub eff} as a function of j{sub ph} for j{sub ph} → 0 inferred from our experimental data proved to be consistent with the behavior of l{sub d} {sub eff} vs j{sub ph} as predicted by the model, while the obtained values of the bulk diffusion length of minority carriers (electrons) in the p-HgCdTe film of investigated HgCdTe n-on-p FPA photodetectors were found to be in a good agreement with the previously reported carrier diffusion-length values for HgCdTe.

  6. Carrier diffusion length measured by optical method in GaN epilayers grown by MOCVD on sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yablonskii, G. P.; Gurskii, A. L.; Pavlovskii, V. N.; Lutsenko, E. V.; Zubialevich, V. Z.; Shulga, T. S.; Stognij, A. I.; Kalisch, H.; Szymakowski, A.; Jansen, R. H.; Alam, A.; Schineller, B.; Heuken, M.

    2005-02-01

    The carrier ambipolar diffusion length L of optically excited carriers in GaN epitaxial layers grown on sapphire substrate was estimated by an optical method using fitting of the experimental photoluminescence spectra recorded from the front and back sides of the samples by the theoretical equation describing light reflection, light absorption and carrier profile in the medium. The estimations were carried out in the range of excitation intensities from 5 W/cm 2 CW up to 1 MW/cm 2 (pulsed), using excitation at the wavelengths of 325, and 337.1 nm in order to vary the excited layer depth. It has been found that in the samples under study the value of L is about 120-130 nm and does not depend significantly on the excitation intensity up to 200 kW/cm 2. Further increase of excitation level leads to higher values of L about 150-170 nm, probably because of the electron-hole plasma expansion.

  7. Effects of different fatty acid chain lengths on fatty acid oxidation-related protein expression levels in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, Rie; Masuda, Kazumi; Sakata, Susumu; Nakatani, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscles can adapt to dietary interventions that affect energy metabolism. Dietary intake of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) enhances mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids (FAO) in type IIa skeletal muscle fibers. However, the effect of MCFAs diet on mitochondrial or cytoplasmic FAO-related protein expression levels in different types of muscle fibers remains unclear. This study aims to examine the effects of a high-fat diet, containing MCFAs, on mitochondrial enzyme activities and heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) levels in different types of skeletal muscle fibers. Five-week-old male Wistar rats were assigned to one of the following three dietary conditions: standard chow (SC, 12% of calories from fat), high-fat MCFA, or high-fat long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) diet (60% of calories from fat for both). The animals were provided food and water ad libitum for 4 weeks, following which citrate synthase (CS) activity and H-FABP concentration were analyzed. The epididymal fat pads (EFP) were significantly smaller in the MCFA group than in the LCFA group (p < 0.05). MCFA-fed group displayed an increase in CS activity compared with that observed in SC-fed controls in all types of skeletal muscle fibers (triceps, surface portion of gastrocnemius (gasS), deep portion of gastrocnemius (gasD), and soleus; p < 0.05,). H-FABP concentration was significantly higher in the LCFA group than in both the SC-fed and MCFA-fed groups (triceps, gasS, gasD, and soleus; p < 0.05,). However, no significant difference was observed in the H-FABP concentrations between the SC-fed and MCFA-fed groups. The results of this study showed that the MCFA diet can increase the expression of the mitochondrial enzyme CS, but not that of H-FABP, in both fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers, suggesting that H-FABP expression is dependent on the chain length of fatty acids in the cytoplasm of skeletal muscles cells. PMID:25766930

  8. NITRIC ACID-NITRATE AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS BY A DIFFUSION DENUDER: A PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A nitric acid diffusion denuder made of nylon was operated in Riverside, CA, Houston, TX, and Claremont, CA. The pre-exponential and diffusion coefficients for the first term of the Gormley-Kennedy equation were estimated by regressing the log (mass deposited) against the axial d...

  9. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Mulligan, Padhraic; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals thanmore » in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.« less

  10. Effective spin Hall properties of a mixture of materials with and without spin-orbit coupling: Tailoring the effective spin diffusion length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Z.; Prestgard, M. C.; Tiwari, A.; Raikh, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically the effective spin Hall properties of a composite consisting of two materials with and without spin-orbit (SO) coupling. In particular, we assume that SO material represents a system of grains in a matrix with no SO. We calculate the effective spin Hall angle and the effective spin diffusion length of the mixture. Our main qualitative finding is that, when the bare spin diffusion length is much smaller than the radius of the grain, the effective spin diffusion length is strongly enhanced, well beyond the "geometrical" factor. The physical origin of this additional enhancement is that, with small diffusion length, the spin current mostly flows around the grain without suffering much loss. We also demonstrate that the voltage, created by a spin current, is sensitive to a very weak magnetic field directed along the spin current, and even reverses sign in a certain domain of fields. The origin of this sensitivity is that the spin precession, caused by magnetic field, takes place outside the grains where SO is absent.

  11. Diffusion battery sampling of sulfuric acid aerosols formed in oleum spill experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I N; Wong, W T; Munkelwitz, H R

    1980-01-01

    Fuming sulfuric acid (oleum) is one of several hazardous chemicals routinely transported in bulk quantities on US waterways. In the event of a marine accident, a large amount of the cargo acid could suddenly be released into water, resulting in the formation of a dense sulfuric acid cloud. Experiments were carried out in the laboratory to study the factors controlling the extent of acid aerosol formation under conditions likely to occur in maritime spill accidents. A Sinclair-type diffusion battery was used for aerosol sizing. In this presentation, a brief discussion of an improved nonlinear iterative inversion method for the analysis of diffusion battery data is given. Experimental results obtained with monodisperse test aerosols and sulfuric acid aerosols formed during oleum spills are presented. It is shown that the diffusion battery, coupled with the inversion technique, is capable of sizing particles up to 0.8 ..mu..m in diameter.

  12. On the possibility of using short chain length mono-carboxylic acids for stabilization of magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Bica, Doina; Vékás, Ladislau; Marinica, Oana; Balasoiu, Maria; Aksenov, Victor L.; Rosta, László; Garamus, Vasil M.; Schreyer, Andreas

    2007-04-01

    Short chain length mono-carboxylic acids (lauric and myristic acids) are used to coat magnetite nanoparticles in non-polar organic liquids, which results in highly stable magnetic fluids. The new fluids are compared with classical organic fluids stabilized by oleic acid (OA). Magnetic granulometry and small-angle neutron scattering (polarized mode) reveal a great difference in the particle size distribution function for the studied magnetic fluids, particularly a decrease in the characteristic particle radius of magnetite when lauric and myristic acids are used instead of OA.

  13. Macromolecular Crowding Studies of Amino Acids Using NMR Diffusion Measurements and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Amninder; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Willis, Scott; Torres, Allan; Price, William

    2015-02-01

    Molecular crowding occurs when the total concentration of macromolecular species in a solution is so high that a considerable proportion of the volume is physically occupied and therefore not accessible to other molecules. This results in significant changes in the solution properties of the molecules in such systems. Macromolecular crowding is ubiquitous in biological systems due to the generally high intracellular protein concentrations. The major hindrance to understanding crowding is the lack of direct comparison of experimental data with theoretical or simulated data. Self-diffusion is sensitive to changes in the molecular weight and shape of the diffusing species, and the available diffusion space (i.e., diffusive obstruction). Consequently, diffusion measurements are a direct means for probing crowded systems including the self-association of molecules. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the self-diffusion of four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine and phenylalanine) up to their solubility limit in water were compared directly with molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental data were then analyzed using various models of aggregation and obstruction. Both experimental and simulated data revealed that the diffusion of both water and the amino acids were sensitive to the amino acid concentration. The direct comparison of the simulated and experimental data afforded greater insights into the aggregation and obstruction properties of each amino acid.

  14. Effect of basic additives on sensitivity and diffusion of acid in chemical amplification resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Koji; Ushirogouchi, Tohru; Nakase, Makoto

    1995-06-01

    The effect of amine additives in chemical amplification resists is discussed. Phenolic amines such as 4-aminophenol and 2-(4-aminophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propane were investigated as model compounds from the viewpoint of sensitivity, diffusion and resolution. Equal molar amounts of acid and amine deactivated at the very beginning of post-exposure bake, and could not participate in decomposing the inhibitor as a catalyst. Only the acid which survived from the deactivation diffuses in the resist, decomposing the inhibitors from the middle to late stage of PEB. The basic additives reduce the diffusion range of the acid, especially for long-range diffusion, resulting in higher contrast at the interfaces between the exposed and unexposed areas. In addition, the amine concentration required is found to be less than the concentration which causes the resist sensitivity to start decreasing.

  15. Global Identification of the Full-Length Transcripts and Alternative Splicing Related to Phenolic Acid Biosynthetic Genes in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhichao; Luo, Hongmei; Ji, Aijia; Zhang, Xin; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acids are among the main bioactive components in Salvia miltiorrhiza, and their biosynthesis has attracted widespread interest. However, previous studies on the biosynthesis of phenolic acids using next-generation sequencing platforms are limited with regard to the assembly of full-length transcripts. Based on hybrid-seq (next-generation and single molecular real-time sequencing) of the S. miltiorrhiza root transcriptome, we experimentally identified 15 full-length transcripts and four alternative splicing events of enzyme-coding genes involved in the biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid. Moreover, we herein demonstrate that lithospermic acid B accumulates in the phloem and xylem of roots, in agreement with the expression patterns of the identified key genes related to rosmarinic acid biosynthesis. According to co-expression patterns, we predicted that six candidate cytochrome P450s and five candidate laccases participate in the salvianolic acid pathway. Our results provide a valuable resource for further investigation into the synthetic biology of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26904067

  16. Determination of critical diameters for intrinsic carrier diffusion-length of GaN nanorods with cryo-scanning near-field optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y. T.; Karlsson, K. F.; Birch, J.; Holtz, P. O.

    2016-01-01

    Direct measurements of carrier diffusion in GaN nanorods with a designed InGaN/GaN layer-in-a-wire structure by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) were performed at liquid-helium temperatures of 10 K. Without an applied voltage, intrinsic diffusion lengths of photo-excited carriers were measured as the diameters of the nanorods differ from 50 to 800 nm. The critical diameter of nanorods for carrier diffusion is concluded as 170 nm with a statistical approach. Photoluminescence spectra were acquired for different positions of the SNOM tip on the nanorod, corresponding to the origins of the well-defined luminescence peaks, each being related to recombination-centers. The phenomenon originated from surface oxide by direct comparison of two nanorods with similar diameters in a single map has been observed and investigated. PMID:26876009

  17. Determination of critical diameters for intrinsic carrier diffusion-length of GaN nanorods with cryo-scanning near-field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. T.; Karlsson, K. F.; Birch, J.; Holtz, P. O.

    2016-02-01

    Direct measurements of carrier diffusion in GaN nanorods with a designed InGaN/GaN layer-in-a-wire structure by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) were performed at liquid-helium temperatures of 10 K. Without an applied voltage, intrinsic diffusion lengths of photo-excited carriers were measured as the diameters of the nanorods differ from 50 to 800 nm. The critical diameter of nanorods for carrier diffusion is concluded as 170 nm with a statistical approach. Photoluminescence spectra were acquired for different positions of the SNOM tip on the nanorod, corresponding to the origins of the well-defined luminescence peaks, each being related to recombination-centers. The phenomenon originated from surface oxide by direct comparison of two nanorods with similar diameters in a single map has been observed and investigated.

  18. Parallel transport of an organic acid by solid-phase and macropore diffusion in a weakly basic ion exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takatsuji; Wataru

    2000-04-01

    The parallel transport of an organic acid by solid-phase and macropore diffusion within a porous ion exchanger was studied by measuring equilibrium isotherms and uptake curves for adsorption of acetic acid and lactic acid on a weakly basic ion exchanger, DIAION WA30. Experimental adsorption isotherms were correlated by the Langmuir equation. The Langmuir equilibrium constant of acetic acid was close to that of lactic acid, and the saturation capacity of acetic acid was about 84% that of lactic acid. Intraparticle effective diffusivity D{sub eff} was determined using the homogeneous Fickian diffusion model. The value of D{sub eff} for acetic acid was about 1.5 times lactic acid. Because D{sub eff} increased with linearly increasing bulk phase concentration C{sub 0}, D{sub eff} was separated to the solid-phase diffusivity D{sub s} and the macropore diffusivity D{sub P} by applying the parallel diffusion model. The model agreed well with the experimental curves. The values of D{sub S} and D{sub P} for acetic acid were about 2 and 1.5 times those of lactic acid, respectively. The acetic acid and the lactic acid may be separated by the difference of the diffusion rates.

  19. Diffusion dialysis. Effect of membrane composition on acid/salt separation

    SciTech Connect

    Narebska, A.; Warszawski, A. )

    1992-05-01

    Diffusion dialysis is an energy-saving separation technique. In order to highlight the relationship between membrane composition and ability to separate acid/salt mixtures by diffusion dialysis, a few anion-exchange membranes were examined. Experiments on solubility/diffusivity phenomena were carried out in contact with hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride solutions (single- and two-solute experiments). Computations using Glueckauf and Tye models have indicated high nonuniformity in the distribution of fixed charged within the membranes and different accessibilities of the internal membrane volumes for the acid and salt. The Neosepta AFN-7 membrane (Tokuymam Soda Co.) has proved effective in differentiating the permeants by sorption (k{sub HCl}/k{sub NaCl} {approx} 2) and diffusivity ({bar D}{sub HCl}/{bar D}{sub NaCl} up to 10). This membrane is also the only one which, when in contact with two-solutes solutions, absorbs the acid preferentially to the salt. For this membrane the preferential sorption and transport of the acid depends not only on the physical structure of the membrane but also on the chemical nature of the polymer which contains pyridine moieties.

  20. The Effect of Limited Diffusion and Wet-Dry Cycling on Reversible Polymerization Reactions: Implications for Prebiotic Synthesis of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing problem for the origins of life is that polymerization of many biopolymers, including nucleic acids and peptides, is thermodynamically unfavourable in aqueous solution. If bond making and breaking is reversible, monomers and very short oligomers predominate. Recent experiments have shown that wetting and drying cycles can overcome this problem and drive the formation of longer polymers. In the dry phase, bond formation is favourable, but diffusion is restricted, and bonds only form between monomers that are initially close together. In the wet phase, some of the bonds are hydrolyzed. However, repositioning of the molecules allows new bonds to form in the next dry phase, leading to an increase in mean polymer length. Here, we consider a simple theoretical model that explains the effect of cycling. There is an equilibrium length distribution with a high mean length that could be achieved if diffusion occurred freely in the dry phase. This equilibrium is inaccessible without diffusion. A single dry cycle without diffusion leads to mean lengths much shorter than this. Repeated cycling leads to a significant increase in polymerization relative to a single cycle. In the most favourable case, cycling leads to the same equilibrium length distribution as would be achieved if free diffusion were possible in the dry phase. These results support the RNA World scenario by explaining a potential route to synthesis of long RNAs; however, they also imply that cycling would be beneficial to the synthesis of other kinds of polymers, including peptides, where bond formation involves a condensation reaction. PMID:27338479

  1. The Effect of Limited Diffusion and Wet–Dry Cycling on Reversible Polymerization Reactions: Implications for Prebiotic Synthesis of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing problem for the origins of life is that polymerization of many biopolymers, including nucleic acids and peptides, is thermodynamically unfavourable in aqueous solution. If bond making and breaking is reversible, monomers and very short oligomers predominate. Recent experiments have shown that wetting and drying cycles can overcome this problem and drive the formation of longer polymers. In the dry phase, bond formation is favourable, but diffusion is restricted, and bonds only form between monomers that are initially close together. In the wet phase, some of the bonds are hydrolyzed. However, repositioning of the molecules allows new bonds to form in the next dry phase, leading to an increase in mean polymer length. Here, we consider a simple theoretical model that explains the effect of cycling. There is an equilibrium length distribution with a high mean length that could be achieved if diffusion occurred freely in the dry phase. This equilibrium is inaccessible without diffusion. A single dry cycle without diffusion leads to mean lengths much shorter than this. Repeated cycling leads to a significant increase in polymerization relative to a single cycle. In the most favourable case, cycling leads to the same equilibrium length distribution as would be achieved if free diffusion were possible in the dry phase. These results support the RNA World scenario by explaining a potential route to synthesis of long RNAs; however, they also imply that cycling would be beneficial to the synthesis of other kinds of polymers, including peptides, where bond formation involves a condensation reaction. PMID:27338479

  2. Detailed atomistic simulation of the nano-sorption and nano-diffusivity of water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid in single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastassiou, Alexandros; Karahaliou, Elena K.; Alexiadis, Orestis; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G.

    2013-10-01

    We report results from a detailed computer simulation study for the nano-sorption and mobility of four different small molecules (water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid) inside smooth single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Most of the results have been obtained with the molecular dynamics (MD) method, but especially for the most narrow of the CNTs considered, the results for one of the molecules addressed here (water) were further confirmed through an additional Grand Canonical (μVT) Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation using a value for the water chemical potential μ pre-computed with the particle deletion method. Issues addressed include molecular packing and ordering inside the nanotube for the four molecules, average number of sorbed molecules per unit length of the tube, and mean residence time and effective axial diffusivities, all as a function of tube diameter and tube length. In all cases, a strong dependence of the results on tube diameter was observed, especially in the way the different molecules are packed and organized inside the CNT. For water for which predictions of properties such as local structure and packing were computed with both methods (MD and GCMC), the two sets of results were found to be fully self-consistent for all types of SWCNTs considered. Water diffusivity inside the CNT (although, strongly dependent on the CNT diameter) was computed with two different methods, both of which gave identical results. For large enough CNT diameters (larger than about 13 Å), this was found to be higher than the corresponding experimental value in the bulk by about 55%. Surprisingly enough, for the rest of the molecules simulated (phenolic), the simulations revealed no signs of mobility inside nanotubes with a diameter smaller than the (20, 20) tube. This is attributed to strong phenyl-phenyl attractive interactions, also to favorable interactions of these molecules with the CNT walls, which cause them to form highly ordered, very stable

  3. Diffusion of U(VI) in Opalinus Clay: Influence of temperature and humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, C.; Van Loon, L. R.; Jakob, A.; Steudtner, R.; Schmeide, K.; Sachs, S.; Bernhard, G.

    2013-05-01

    The diffusion of U(VI) (c0 = 1 × 10-6 mol/L) in compacted Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri underground laboratory, Switzerland, was studied in the absence and presence of humic acid (10 mg/L) at two different temperatures (25 °C, 60 °C) under anaerobic conditions. As background electrolyte synthetic Opalinus Clay pore water (pH 7.6, I = 0.36 mol/L) was used. The diffusion-accessible porosity, ɛ, was determined for each Opalinus Clay bore core sample by through-diffusion experiments with tritiated water (HTO) before the U(VI) diffusion experiments were carried out. The values for the effective diffusion and distribution coefficients De and Kd obtained for U(VI) and humic acid at 25 °C as well as at 60 °C showed that humic acid has no significant influence on the U(VI) diffusion. The diffusion profiles of humic acid in Opalinus Clay at 25 and 60 °C indicate the contributions of two different humic acid particle size fractions (<1 kDa and 10-100 kDa). The small-sized humic acid fraction diffused through the whole Opalinus Clay samples at both temperatures within the 3 month duration of the U(VI) diffusion experiments. At 60 °C, diffusion profiles of two different U(VI) species were observed. In a separate experiment the U(VI) speciation in the source reservoir solution at 60 °C was analyzed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray detector. The two diffusion profiles could be attributed to an unknown colloidal and a known aquatic U(VI) species (Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq)). The diffusion results showed that the interaction of U(VI) and of the large-sized humic acid colloid fraction with the clay is stronger at 60 °C. An increase of Kd from 0.025 ± 0.003 m3/kg at 25 °C to 0.25 ± 0.05 m3/kg for U(VI)colloidal at 60 °C was determined. In addition, the value for De of U(VI) increased with increasing temperature. Using the De values at 25 and 60 °C, a preliminary

  4. Effect of charged amino acid side chain length on lateral cross-strand interactions between carboxylate- and guanidinium-containing residues in a β-hairpin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Liu, Shing-Lung; Chiu, Wen-Chieh; Fang, Chun-Jen; Chang, Hsien-Chen; Wang, Wei-Ren; Yang, Po-An; Li, Jhe-Hao; Huang, Shing-Jong; Huang, Shou-Ling; Cheng, Richard P

    2015-05-01

    β-Sheet is one of the major protein secondary structures. Oppositely charged residues are frequently observed across neighboring strands in antiparallel sheets, suggesting the importance of cross-strand ion pairing interactions. The charged amino acids Asp, Glu, Arg, and Lys have different numbers of hydrophobic methylenes linking the charged functionality to the backbone. To investigate the effect of side chain length of guanidinium- and carboxylate-containing residues on lateral cross-strand ion pairing interactions at non-hydrogen-bonded positions, β-hairpin peptides containing Zbb-Agx (Zbb = Asp, Glu, Aad in increasing length; Agx = Agh, Arg, Agb, Agp in decreasing length) sequence patterns were studied by NMR methods. The fraction folded population and folding energy were derived from the chemical shift deviation data. Peptides with high fraction folded populations involved charged residue side chain lengths that supported high strand propensity. Double mutant cycle analysis was used to determine the interaction energy for the potential lateral ion pairs. Minimal interaction was observed between residues with short side chains, most likely due to the diffused positive charge on the guanidinium group, which weakened cross-strand electrostatic interactions with the carboxylate side chain. Only the Aad-Arg/Agh interactions with long side chains clearly exhibited stabilizing energetics, possibly relying on hydrophobics. A survey of a non-redundant protein structure database revealed that the statistical sheet pair propensity followed the trend Asp-Arg < Glu-Arg, implying the need for matching long side chains. This suggested the need for long side chains on both guanidinium-bearing and carboxylate-bearing residues to stabilize the β-hairpin motif. PMID:25646959

  5. Medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoate (mcl-PHA) production from volatile fatty acids derived from the anaerobic digestion of grass.

    PubMed

    Cerrone, Federico; Choudhari, Santosh K; Davis, Reeta; Cysneiros, Denise; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Duane, Gearoid; Casey, Eoin; Guzik, Maciej W; Kenny, Shane T; Babu, Ramesh P; O'Connor, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A two step biological process for the conversion of grass biomass to the biodegradable polymer medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoate (mcl-PHA) was achieved through the use of anaerobic and aerobic microbial processes. Anaerobic digestion (mixed culture) of ensiled grass was achieved with a recirculated leach bed bioreactor resulting in the production of a leachate, containing 15.3 g/l of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) ranging from acetic to valeric acid with butyric acid predominating (12.8 g/l). The VFA mixture was concentrated to 732.5 g/l with a 93.3 % yield of butyric acid (643.9 g/l). Three individual Pseudomonas putida strains, KT2440, CA-3 and GO16 (single pure cultures), differed in their ability to grow and accumulate PHA from VFAs. P. putida CA-3 achieved the highest biomass and PHA on average with individual fatty acids, exhibited the greatest tolerance to higher concentrations of butyric acid (up to 40 mM) compared to the other strains and exhibited a maximum growth rate (μMAX = 0.45 h⁻¹). Based on these observations P. putida CA-3 was chosen as the test strain with the concentrated VFA mixture derived from the AD leachate. P. putida CA-3 achieved 1.56 g of biomass/l and accumulated 39 % of the cell dry weight as PHA (nitrogen limitation) in shake flasks. The PHA was composed predominantly of 3-hydroxydecanoic acid (>65 mol%). PMID:24162086

  6. The chain length of biologically produced (R)-3-hydroxyalkanoic acid affects biological activity and structure of anti-cancer peptides.

    PubMed

    Szwej, Emilia; Devocelle, Marc; Kenny, Shane; Guzik, Maciej; O'Connor, Stephen; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Radivojevic, Jelena; Maslak, Veselin; Byrne, Annete T; Gallagher, William M; Zulian, Qun Ren; Zinn, Manfred; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2015-06-20

    Conjugation of DP18L peptide with (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid, derived from the biopolymer polyhydroxyalkanoate, enhances its anti-cancer activity (O'Connor et al., 2013. Biomaterials 34, 2710-2718). However, it is unknown if other (R)-3-hydroxyalkanoic acids (R3HAs) can enhance peptide activity, if chain length affects enhancement, and what effect R3HAs have on peptide structure. Here we show that the degree of enhancement of peptide (DP18L) anti-cancer activity by R3HAs is carbon chain length dependent. In all but one example the R3HA conjugated peptides were more active against cancer cells than the unconjugated peptides. However, R3HAs with 9 and 10 carbons were most effective at improving DP18L activity. DP18L peptide variant DP17L, missing a hydrophobic amino acid (leucine residue 4) exhibited lower efficacy against MiaPaCa cells. Circular dichroism analysis showed DP17L had a lower alpha helix content and the conjugation of any R3HA ((R)-3-hydroxyhexanoic acid to (R)-3-hydroxydodecanoic acid) to DP17L returned the helix content back to levels of DP18L. However (R)-3-hydroxyhexanoic did not enhance the anti-cancer activity of DP17L and at least 7 carbons were needed in the R3HA to enhance activity of D17L. DP17L needs a longer chain R3HA to achieve the same activity as DP18L conjugated to an R3HA. As a first step to assess the synthetic potential of polyhydroxyalkanoate derived R3HAs, (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid was synthetically converted to (±)3-chlorodecanoic acid, which when conjugated to DP18L improved its antiproliferative activity against MiaPaCa cells. PMID:25820126

  7. Intraparticle diffusion limitations in the hydrogenation of monounsaturated edible oils and their fatty acid methyl esters

    SciTech Connect

    Jonker, G.H.; Veldsink, J.W.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M.

    1998-12-01

    Intraparticle diffusion limitation in the hydrogenation and isomerization of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and edible oils (triacylglycerol, TAG) in porous nickel catalyst was investigated both under reactive and under inert conditions. Under reactive conditions, the diffusion coefficients were determined from the best fits of the model simulations applying the intrinsic reacting kinetics of monounsaturated FAME hydrogenation to experiments under diffusion limited conditions. Due to the absence of reaction (hydrogenation of double bonds), the obtained effective H{sub z} diffusion coefficient (D{sub e}) with the HPLC technique is volume averaged and thereby determined by the larger intercrystalline pores (<30% of the total pore volume) only. Moreover, D{sub e} measured under reaction conditions reflected the influence of the micropores, resulting in a 10-fold lower value.

  8. Cytoplasmic tail length influences fatty acid selection for acylation of viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Veit, M; Reverey, H; Schmidt, M F

    1996-01-01

    We report remarkable differences in the fatty acid content of thioester-type acylated glycoproteins of enveloped viruses from mammalian cells. The E2 glycoprotein of Semliki Forest virus contains mainly palmitic acid like most other palmitoylated proteins analysed so far. However, the other glycoprotein (E1) of the same virus, as well as the HEF (haemagglutinin esterase fusion) glycoprotein of influenza C virus, are unique in this respect because they are acylated primarily with stearic acid. Comparative radiolabelling of uninfected cells with different fatty acids suggests that stearate may also be the prevailing fatty acid in some cellular acylproteins. To look for further differences between palmitoylated and stearoylated glycoproteins we characterized stearoylation in more detail. We identified the acylation site of HEF as a cysteine residue located at the boundary between the transmembrane region and the cytoplasmic tail. The attachment of stearate to HEF and E1 occurs post-translationally in a pre-Golgi compartment. Thus, stearoylated and palmitoylated proteins cannot be discriminated on the basis of the fatty acid linkage site or the intracellular compartment, where acylation occurs. However, stearoylated acylproteins contain a very short, positively charged cytoplasmic tail, whereas in palmitoylated proteins this molecular region is longer. Replacing the short cytoplasmic tail of stearoylated HEF with the long influenza A virus haemagglutinin (HA) tail in an HEF-HA chimera, and subsequent vaccinia T7 expression in CV-1 cells, yielded proteins with largely palmitic acid bound. The reverse chimera, HA-HEF with a short cytoplasmic tail was not fatty acylated at all during expression, indicating that conformational or topological constraints control fatty acid transfer. PMID:8761467

  9. Acid back-diffusion and mucosal H+ handling in the rat stomach under normal and stress-induced conditions.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Okabe, S

    1983-02-01

    We determined acid back-diffusion and pepsin output simultaneously in vagotomized rats after instillation of HCl into the stomach under normal and stress-induced conditions. With exposure to 6 ml of 100 mM HCl, spontaneous acid back-diffusion increased with the duration of the experiment under both conditions, and the magnitude of the acid back-diffusion was decreased significantly by stress. There was no change in the output of pepsin. While disappearance of luminal acid caused by aspirin or taurocholic acid was not altered by stress, the pepsin output in response to H+ increased significantly in the stressed rats. With exposure to various concentrations of HCl for 3 hr, disappearance of the luminal acid increased linearly with the grade of HCl under both conditions. Except for the concentration of 300 mM, the magnitude of the acid back-diffusion was triple in the normal condition, and the ratio of pepsin output/net flux of H+ was significantly increased by stress. Thus, (1) spontaneous acid back-diffusion decreased with stress, while diffusion induced by chemical barrier breakers remained the same; (2) the action of H+ diffused back into the mucosa did not always parallel the amount of diffusion determined from the loss of H+ in the lumen; (3) intramucosal H+ may be largely dissipated in normal mucosa; and (4) the initiation or aggravation of drug-induced mucosal damages by stress may be related to insufficiency of the H+ dissipating mechanisms. PMID:6410110

  10. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA) Status in Pregnant Women: Associations with Sleep Quality, Inflammation, and Length of Gestation.

    PubMed

    Christian, Lisa M; Blair, Lisa M; Porter, Kyle; Lower, Mary; Cole, Rachel M; Belury, Martha A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic pathways linking maternal polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status with gestational length are poorly delineated. This study examined whether inflammation and sleep quality serve as mediators, focusing on the antiinflammatory ω-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) and proinflammatory ω-6 arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n6). Pregnant women (n = 135) provided a blood sample and completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at 20-27 weeks gestation. Red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid levels were determined by gas chromatography and serum inflammatory markers [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein] by electrochemiluminescence using high sensitivity kits. Both higher serum IL-8 (95% CI = 0.10,3.84) and poor sleep (95% CI = 0.03,0.28) served as significant mediators linking lower DHA:AA ratios with shorter gestation. Further, a serial mediation model moving from the DHA:AA ratio → sleep → IL-8 → length of gestation was statistically significant (95% CI = 0.02, 0.79). These relationships remained after adjusting for depressive symptoms, age, BMI, income, race, and smoking. No interactions with race were observed in relation to length of gestation as a continuous variable. However, a significant interaction between race and the DHA:AA ratio in predicting preterm birth was observed (p = 0.049); among African Americans only, odds of preterm birth decreased as DHA:AA increased (p = 0.048). These data support a role for both inflammatory pathways and sleep quality in linking less optimal RBC PUFA status with shorter gestation in African American and European American women and suggest that African-Americans have greater risk for preterm birth in the context of a low DHA:AA ratio. PMID:26859301

  11. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA) Status in Pregnant Women: Associations with Sleep Quality, Inflammation, and Length of Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Lisa M.; Blair, Lisa M.; Porter, Kyle; Lower, Mary; Cole, Rachel M.; Belury, Martha A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic pathways linking maternal polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status with gestational length are poorly delineated. This study examined whether inflammation and sleep quality serve as mediators, focusing on the antiinflammatory ω-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) and proinflammatory ω-6 arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n6). Pregnant women (n = 135) provided a blood sample and completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at 20–27 weeks gestation. Red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid levels were determined by gas chromatography and serum inflammatory markers [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein] by electrochemiluminescence using high sensitivity kits. Both higher serum IL-8 (95% CI = 0.10,3.84) and poor sleep (95% CI = 0.03,0.28) served as significant mediators linking lower DHA:AA ratios with shorter gestation. Further, a serial mediation model moving from the DHA:AA ratio → sleep → IL-8 → length of gestation was statistically significant (95% CI = 0.02, 0.79). These relationships remained after adjusting for depressive symptoms, age, BMI, income, race, and smoking. No interactions with race were observed in relation to length of gestation as a continuous variable. However, a significant interaction between race and the DHA:AA ratio in predicting preterm birth was observed (p = 0.049); among African Americans only, odds of preterm birth decreased as DHA:AA increased (p = 0.048). These data support a role for both inflammatory pathways and sleep quality in linking less optimal RBC PUFA status with shorter gestation in African American and European American women and suggest that African-Americans have greater risk for preterm birth in the context of a low DHA:AA ratio. PMID:26859301

  12. Evaluation of the minority carrier diffusion length and surface-recombination velocity in GaAs p/n solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Moeller, Hans J.; Bailey, Sheila

    1991-01-01

    The minority carrier diffusion length (Lp) and the surface recombination velocity (Vs) were measured as a function of distance (x) from the p-n junction in GaAs p/n concentrator solar cells. The measured Vs values were used in a theoretical expression for the normalized electron-beam-induced current. A fitting procedure was then used to fit this expression with experimental values to obtain Lp. The results show that both Vs and Lp vary with x. Lp measured in irradiated cells showed a marked reduction. These values were compared to those measured previously which did not account for Vs.

  13. Production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates by activated sludge enriched under periodic feeding with nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Hee; Kim, Jae Hee; Mishra, Debaraj; Ni, Yu-Yang; Rhee, Young Ha

    2011-05-01

    The potential use of activated sludge for the production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (MCL-PHAs) was investigated. The enrichment of bacterial populations capable of producing MCL-PHAs was achieved by periodic feeding with nonanoic acid in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to be predominant in the bacterial community during the SBR process. The composition of PHA synthesized by the enriched biomass from nonanoic acid consisted of a large concentration (>89 mol%) of MCL monomer units and a small amount of short-chain-length monomer units. Under fed-batch fermentation with continuous feeding of nonanoic acid at a flow rate of 0.225 g/L/h and a C/N ratio of 40, a maximum PHA content of 48.6% dry cell weight and a conversion yield (Y(p/s)) of 0.94 g/g were achieved. These results indicate that MCL-PHA production by activated sludge is a promising alternative to typical pure culture approaches. PMID:21463934

  14. Effects of thermal annealing on deep-level defects and minority-carrier electron diffusion length in Be-doped InGaAsN

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S.Y.; Yoon, S.F.; Wang, S.Z.

    2005-04-01

    We report the effects of ex situ thermal annealing on the deep-level defects and the minority-carrier electron diffusion length in Be-doped, p-type In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}As{sub 0.99}N{sub 0.01} grown by solid source molecular-beam epitaxy. Deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements reveal two majority-carrier hole traps, HT1 (0.18 eV) and HT4 (0.59 eV), and two minority-carrier electron traps, ET1 (0.09 eV) and ET3 (0.41 eV), in the as-grown sample. For the sample with postgrowth thermal annealing, the overall deep-level defect-concentration is decreased. Two hole traps, HT2 (0.39 eV) and HT3 (0.41 eV), and one electron trap, ET2 (0.19 eV), are observed. We found that the minority-carrier electron diffusion length increases by {approx}30% and the leakage current of the InGaAsN/GaAs p-n junction decreases by 2-3 orders after thermal annealing. An increase of the net acceptor concentration after annealing is also observed and can be explained by a recently proposed three-center-complex model.

  15. Light-Induced Increase of Electron Diffusion Length in a p-n Junction Type CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Kedem, Nir; Brenner, Thomas M; Kulbak, Michael; Schaefer, Norbert; Levcenko, Sergiu; Levine, Igal; Abou-Ras, Daniel; Hodes, Gary; Cahen, David

    2015-07-01

    High band gap, high open-circuit voltage solar cells with methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr3) perovskite absorbers are of interest for spectral splitting and photoelectrochemical applications, because of their good performance and ease of processing. The physical origin of high performance in these and similar perovskite-based devices remains only partially understood. Using cross-sectional electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements, we find an increase in carrier diffusion length in MAPbBr3(Cl)-based solar cells upon low intensity (a few percent of 1 sun intensity) blue laser illumination. Comparing dark and illuminated conditions, the minority carrier (electron) diffusion length increases about 3.5 times from Ln = 100 ± 50 nm to 360 ± 22 nm. The EBIC cross section profile indicates a p-n structure between the n-FTO/TiO2 and p-perovskite, rather than the p-i-n structure, reported for the iodide derivative. On the basis of the variation in space-charge region width with varying bias, measured by EBIC and capacitance-voltage measurements, we estimate the net-doping concentration in MAPbBr3(Cl) to be 3-6 × 10(17) cm(-3). PMID:26266721

  16. Measurement of a long diffusion length in a GaAs film improved by metalorganic-chemical-vapor-deposition source purifications

    SciTech Connect

    Partain, L.D.; Cohen, M.J.; Cape, J.A.; Fraas, L.M.; McLeod, P.S.; Dean, C.S.; Ransom, R.A.

    1985-11-15

    The vacuum metalorganic-chemical-vapor-deposition (Vacuum MOCVD) process was combined with two source purifications to grow p-GaAs epitaxial films of high quality. Theoretical modeling of quantum yield spectra measured on a specially configured n/sup +/-p sample determined the minority-carrier electron diffusion length to be 10 ..mu..m to within a factor of 2 in the p layer. The p doping was reduced to the 5 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ level to avoid suppression of the diffusion length by Auger recombination. Multiple vacuum sublimations of dicyclopentadienyl magnesium (CP/sub 2/Mg), the source of Mg for p doping, reduced the contamination by air and by cyclopentadiene (CP) by an order of magnitude. A dry ice/acetone cold trap was operated at slightly below 180-Torr pressure to reduce the water vapor content of arsine, used as the As source, from the hundreds of ppm down level down to the 2 ppm range. The vacuum growth process reduced residual gas contamination. These techniques were combined to grow a p on n GaAs solar cell with an efficiency of 24% at air mass 1.5 (AM1.5).

  17. Adipose tissue fatty acid chain length and mono-unsaturation increases with obesity and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yew Tan, Chong; Virtue, Samuel; Murfitt, Steven; Robert, Lee D.; Phua, Yi Hui; Dale, Martin; Griffin, Julian L.; Tinahones, Francisco; Scherer, Philipp E.; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The non-essential fatty acids, C18:1n9, C16:0, C16:1n7, C18:0 and C18:1n7 account for over 75% of fatty acids in white adipose (WAT) triacylglycerol (TAG). The relative composition of these fatty acids (FA) is influenced by the desaturases, SCD1-4 and the elongase, ELOVL6. In knock-out models, loss of SCD1 or ELOVL6 results in reduced Δ9 desaturated and reduced 18-carbon non-essential FA respectively. Both Elovl6 KO and SCD1 KO mice exhibit improved insulin sensitivity. Here we describe the relationship between WAT TAG composition in obese mouse models and obese humans stratified for insulin resistance. In mouse models with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, there was an increase in scWAT Δ9 desaturated FAs (SCD ratio) and FAs with 18-carbons (Elovl6 ratio) in mice. Data from mouse models discordant for obesity and insulin resistance (AKT2 KO, Adiponectin aP2-transgenic), suggested that scWAT TAG Elovl6 ratio was associated with insulin sensitivity, whereas SCD1 ratio was associated with fat mass. In humans, a greater SCD1 and Elovl6 ratio was found in metabolically more harmful visceral adipose tissue when compared to subcutaneous adipose tissue. PMID:26679101

  18. Pulsed field capillary electrophoresis of multikilobase length nucleic acids in dilute methyl cellulose solutions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Morris, M D

    1994-10-01

    Pulsed field capillary gel electrophoresis in dilute methyl cellulose solutions is used to separate nucleic acid fragments in the size range 75-23,000 base pairs. Field inversion is shown to increase resolution for fragments longer than about 500 base pairs. Methyl cellulose solutions as dilute as 0.01% can be used. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding is suggested as the cause of apparent cellulose fiber entanglement at concentrations below the calculated entanglement limit. The 1-kb DNA ladder and the lambda DNA/HindIII restriction fragment mixtures are each baseline resolved in a 28-cm capillary in less than 9 min at 180 V/cm (dc component). PMID:7978303

  19. Hepatic fatty acid uptake is regulated by the sphingolipid acyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Jae; Park, Joo-Won; Merrill, Alfred H; Storch, Judith; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Futerman, Anthony H

    2014-12-01

    Ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) null mice cannot synthesize very-long acyl chain (C22-C24) ceramides resulting in significant alterations in the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids. We now demonstrate that hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) levels are reduced in the liver but not in the adipose tissue or skeletal muscle of the CerS2 null mouse, both before and after feeding with a high fat diet (HFD), where no weight gain was observed and large hepatic nodules appeared. Uptake of both BODIPY-palmitate and [VH]-palmitate was also abrogated in the hepa- tocytes and liver. The role of a number of key proteins involved in fatty acid uptake was examined, including FATP5, CD36/FAT, FABPpm and cytoplasmic FABP1. Levels of FATP5 and FABP1 were decreased in the CerS2 null mouse liver, whereas CD36/FAT levels were significantly elevated and CD36/FAT was also mislocalized upon insulin treatment. Moreover, treatment of hepatocytes with C22-C24-ceramides down-regulated CD36/FAT levels. Infection of CerS2 null mice with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-CerS2 restored normal TG levels and corrected the mislocalization of CD36/FAT, but had no effect on the intracellular localization or levels of FATP5 or FABP1. Together, these results demonstrate that hepatic fatty acid uptake via CD36/FAT can be regulated by altering the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids. PMID:25241943

  20. The adjuvant activity of fatty acid esters. The role of acyl chain length and degree of saturation.

    PubMed Central

    Bomford, R

    1981-01-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions of metabolizable fatty acid esters, with the non-toxic surfactant Pluronic L122 as emulsifying agent, potentiated the humoral response to bovine serum albumin and staphylococcal toxoid in the mouse. Adjuvant activity was increased by changing the chemical nature of the esters as follows: (i) using a series of ethyl esters, adjuvant activity appeared when the acyl chain length of the fatty acid component was 16 or greater; (ii) isobutyl and isopropyl esters of palmitic acid (C16:0) were superior to ethyl; (iii) the ethyl esters of oleic (C18:1) and linoleic (C18:2) acids were better than stearic (C18:0). Since emulsions prepared with longer chain saturated esters are very viscous or solid at room temperature, and unsaturated esters are chemically reactive, emulsions were prepared with differing proportions of ethyl caprate (C10:0) and butyl stearate. At a ratio of 9:1 the emulsions possessed the low viscosity of ethyl caprate, but gained the adjuvant activity of butyl stearate. 125I-labelled BSA was retained in the footpad to a significantly greater extent than with a caprate emulsion, but reasons are given for believing that slow release of antigen is not the only mechanism of adjuvant activity. The ester emulsions caused more acute but less chronic local inflammation (footpad swelling) than Freund's incomplete adjuvant. PMID:7275184

  1. Intake of small-to-medium-chain saturated fatty acids is associated with peripheral leukocyte telomere length in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; You, Nai-Chieh Y; Song, Yiqing; Kang, Mo K; Hou, Lifang; Wallace, Robert; Eaton, Charles B; Tinker, Lesley F; Liu, Simin

    2013-06-01

    Dietary factors, including dietary fat, may affect the biological aging process, as reflected by the shortening of telomere length (TL), by affecting levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. We examined the direct relations of total and types of dietary fats and fat-rich foods to peripheral leukocyte TL. In 4029 apparently healthy postmenopausal women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative, intakes of total fat, individual fatty acids, and fat-rich foods were assessed by a questionnaire. TL was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Intake of short-to-medium-chain saturated fatty acids (SMSFAs; aliphatic tails of ≤ 12 carbons) was inversely associated with TL. Compared with participants in other quartiles of SMSFA intake, women who were in the highest quartile (median: 1.29% of energy) had shorter TLs [mean: 4.00 kb (95% CI: 3.89, 4.11 kb)], whereas women in the lowest quartile of intake (median: 0.29% of energy) had longer TLs [mean: 4.13 kb (95% CI: 4.03, 4.24 kb); P-trend = 0.046]. Except for lauric acid, all other individual SMSFAs were inversely associated with TL (P < 0.05). In isoenergetic substitution models, the substitution of 1% of energy from SMSFAs with any other energy source was associated with 119 bp longer TLs (95% CI: 21, 216 bp). Intakes of nonskim milk, butter, and whole-milk cheese (major sources of SMSFAs) were all inversely associated with TL. No significant associations were found with long-chain saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. In conclusion, we found that higher intakes of SMSFAs and SMSFA-rich foods were associated with shorter peripheral leukocyte TL among postmenopausal women. These findings suggest the potential roles of SMSFAs in the rate of biological aging. PMID:23616516

  2. Effect of carbon chain length in acyl coenzyme A on the efficiency of enzymatic transformation of okadaic acid to 7-O-acyl okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Furumochi, Sachie; Onoda, Tatsuya; Cho, Yuko; Fuwa, Haruhiko; Sasaki, Makoto; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Konoki, Keiichi

    2016-07-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), a product of dinoflagellate Prorocentrum spp., is transformed into 7-O-acyl OA in various bivalve species. The structural transformation proceeds enzymatically in vitro in the presence of the microsomal fraction from the digestive gland of bivalves. We have been using LC-MS/MS to identify OA-transforming enzymes by detecting 7-O-acyl OA, also known as dinophysistoxin 3 (DTX3). However, an alternative assay for DTX3 is required because the OA-transforming enzyme is a membrane protein, and surfactants for solubilizing membrane proteins decrease the sensitivity of LC-MS/MS. The present study examined saturated fatty acyl CoAs with a carbon chain length of 10 (decanoyl), 12 (dodecanoyl), 14 (tetradecanoyl), 16 (hexadecanoyl) and 18 (octadecanoyl) as the substrate for the in vitro acylation reaction. Saturated fatty acyl CoAs with a carbon chain length of 14, 16 and 18 exhibited higher yields than those with a carbon chain length of 10 or 12. Acyl CoAs with carbon chain lengths from 14 to 18 and containing either a diene unit, an alkyne unit, or an azide unit in the carbon chain were synthesized and shown to provide the corresponding DTX3 with a yield comparable to that of hexadecanoyl CoA. The three functional units can be conjugated with fluorescent reagents and are applicable to the development of a novel assay for DTX3. PMID:27231127

  3. Association study between the gibberellic acid insensitive gene and leaf length in a Lolium perenne L. synthetic variety

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Association studies are of great interest to identify genes explaining trait variation since they deal with more than just a few alleles like classical QTL analyses. They are usually performed using collections representing a wide range of variability but which could present a genetic substructure. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that association studies can be performed using synthetic varieties obtained after several panmictic generations. This demonstration is based on an example of association between the gibberellic acid insensitive gene (GAI) polymorphism and leaf length polymorphism in 'Herbie', a synthetic variety of perennial ryegrass. Methods Leaf growth parameters, consisted of leaf length, maximum leaf elongation rate (LERmax) and leaf elongation duration (LED), were evaluated in spring and autumn on 216 plants of Herbie with three replicates. For each plant, a sequence of 370 bp in GAI was analysed for polymorphism. Results Genetic effect was highly significant for all traits. Broad sense heritabilities were higher for leaf length and LERmax with about 0.7 in each period and 0.5 considering both periods than for LED with about 0.4 in each period and 0.3 considering both periods. GAI was highly polymorphic with an average of 12 bp between two consecutive SNPs and 39 haplotypes in which 9 were more frequent. Linkage disequilibrium declined rapidly with distance with r 2 values lower than 0.2 beyond 150 bp. Sequence polymorphism of GAI explained 8-14% of leaf growth parameter variation. A single SNP explained 4% of the phenotypic variance of leaf length in both periods which represents a difference of 33 mm on an average of 300 mm. Conclusions Synthetic varieties in which linkage disequilibrium declines rapidly with distance are suitable for association studies using the "candidate gene" approach. GAI polymorphism was found to be associated with leaf length polymorphism which was more correlated to LERmax than to LED in Herbie. It is a

  4. Relation between acid back-diffusion and luminal surface hydrophobicity in canine gastric mucosa: Effects of salicylate and prostaglandin

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The stomach is thought to be protected from luminal acid by a gastric mucosal barrier that restricts the diffusion of acid into tissue. This study tested the hypothesis that the hydrophobic luminal surface of canine gastric mucosa incubated in Ussing chambers, impedes the back-diffusion of luminal acid into the tissue. Isolated sheets of mucosa were treated with cimetidine to inhibit spontaneous acid secretion, and incubated under conditions that prevented significant secretion of luminal bicarbonate. By measuring acid loss from the luminal compartment using the pH-stat technique, acid back-diffusion was continuously monitored; potential difference (PD) was measured as an index of tissue viability. Tissue luminal surface hydrophobicity was estimated by contact angle analysis at the end of each experiment. Addition of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E{sub 2} to the nutrient compartment enhanced luminal surface hydrophobicity, but did not reduce acid back-diffusion in tissues that maintained a constant PD. 10 mM salicylate at pH 4.00 in the luminal compartment reduced surface hydrophobicity, but this decrease did not occur if 1 ug/ml prostaglandin was present in the nutrient solution. Despite possessing relatively hydrophilic and relatively hydrophobic surface properties, respectively, acid back-diffusion in the absence of salicylate was not significantly different between these two groups. Neither group maintained a PD after incubation with salicylate. Lastly, radiolabeled salicylate was used to calculate the free (non-salicylate associated) acid loss in tissues incubated with salicylate and/or prostaglandin. No significant correlation was found between free acid back-diffusion and luminal surface hydrophobicity. These data do not support the hypothesis that acid back-diffusion in impeded by the hydrophobic surface presented by isolated canine gastric mucosa.

  5. Nuclemeter: a reaction-diffusion based method for quantifying nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changchun; Sadik, Mohamed M; Mauk, Michael G; Edelstein, Paul H; Bushman, Frederic D; Gross, Robert; Bau, Haim H

    2014-01-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, such as HIV, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assess disease progression and effectiveness of drug therapy. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low-resource settings. This paper describes a simple, low-cost, reaction-diffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. The method was tested for HIV viral load monitoring and performed on par with conventional benchtop methods. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. PMID:25477046

  6. Imbalance in Fatty-Acid-Chain Length of Gangliosides Triggers Alzheimer Amyloid Deposition in the Precuneus

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Naoto; Matsubara, Teruhiko; Fukuda, Ryoto; Yasumori, Hanaki; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Sato, Toshinori; Suzuki, Akemi; Yanagisawa, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid deposition, a crucial event of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), emerges in distinct brain regions. A key question is what triggers the assembly of the monomeric amyloid ß-protein (Aß) into fibrils in the regions. On the basis of our previous findings that gangliosides facilitate the initiation of Aß assembly at presynaptic neuritic terminals, we investigated how lipids, including gangliosides, cholesterol and sphingomyelin, extracted from synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) isolated from autopsy brains were involved in the Aß assembly. We focused on two regions of the cerebral cortex; precuneus and calcarine cortex, one of the most vulnerable and one of the most resistant regions to amyloid deposition, respectively. Here, we show that lipids extracted from SPMs isolated from the amyloid-bearing precuneus, but neither the amyloid-free precuneus nor the calcarine cortex, markedly accelerate the Aß assembly in vitro. Through liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of the lipids, we identified an increase in the ratio of the level of GD1b-ganglioside containing C20:0 fatty acid to that containing C18:0 as a cause of the enhanced Aß assembly in the precuneus. Our results suggest that the local glycolipid environment play a critical role in the initiation of Alzheimer amyloid deposition. PMID:25798597

  7. Hexavalent uranium diffusion into soils from concentrated acidic and alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Pena, Jasquelin; Sutton, Stephen R.; Newville, Matthew

    2004-03-29

    Uranium contamination of soils and sediments often originates from acidic or alkaline waste sources, with diffusion being a major transport mechanism. Measurements of U(VI) diffusion from initially pH 2 and pH 11 solutions into a slightly alkaline Altamont soil and a neutral Oak Ridge soil were obtained through monitoring uptake from boundary reservoirs and from U concentration profiles within soil columns. The soils provided pH buffering, resulting in diffusion at nearly constant pH. Micro x-ray absorption near edge structure spectra confirmed that U remained in U(VI) forms in all soils. Time trends of U(VI) depletion from reservoirs, and U(VI) concentration profiles within soil columns yielded K{sub d} values consistent with those determined in batch tests at similar concentrations ({approx} 1 mM), and much lower than values for sorption at much lower concentrations (nM to {mu}M). These results show that U(VI) transport at high concentrations can be relatively fast at non-neutral pH, with negligible surface diffusion, because of weak sorption.

  8. Sorption and diffusion of organic acids through clayrock: Comparison with inorganic anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagnelie, R. V. H.; Descostes, M.; Pointeau, I.; Klein, J.; Grenut, B.; Radwan, J.; Lebeau, D.; Georgin, D.; Giffaut, E.

    2014-04-01

    Organic complexing species are known to affect radionuclide mobility in the environment. The migration behaviour of several organic ligands was evaluated in the context of a proposed French radioactive waste repository in the Callovo-Oxfordian clayrock formation (COx). This study focuses on four anthropogenic acids (ethylenediaminetetraacetate, isosaccharinate, phthalate, oxalate) that are used in the nuclear fuel cycle or that occur as hydrosoluble degradation products of waste materials. Batch sorption and diffusion experiments were performed with COx clayrock samples using 14C-labelled radiotracers. The observed effective diffusion coefficients were low (De ∼ 1-6 × 10-12 m2 s-1), an order of magnitude lower than that of tritiated water in the same material, and roughly the same as values for inorganic anions such as I-, Cl- and SO42-. The observed correlation of De with molecular mass, M-1/3, differs significantly from that observed for cations. The organic ligands displayed significant affinity for the COx clayrock, with distribution ratios measured in batch experiments, Rd = 1-30 L kg-1, which are much higher than usually observed for anionic species. While this result was confirmed by through-diffusion experiments, the Kd values obtained by fitting diffusion modelling were significantly lower than those measured in the batch experiments.

  9. Solute transport through fractured rock: Radial diffusion into the rock matrix with several geological layers for an arbitrary length decay chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Batoul; Liu, Longcheng; Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a model development to derive a semi-analytical solution to describe reactive solute transport through a single channel in a fracture with cylindrical geometry. The model accounts for advection through the channel, radial diffusion into the adjacent heterogeneous rock matrix comprising different geological layers, adsorption on both the channel surface, and the geological layers of the rock matrix and radioactive decay chain. Not only an arbitrary-length decay chain, but also as many number of the rock matrix layers with different properties as observed in the field can be handled. The solution, which is analytical in the Laplace domain, is transformed back to the time domain numerically e.g. by use of de Hoog algorithm. The solution is verified against experimental data and analytical solutions of limiting cases of solute transport through porous media. More importantly, the relative importance and contribution of different processes on solute transport retardation in fractured rocks are investigated by simulating several cases of varying complexity. The simulation results are compared with those obtained from rectangular model with linear matrix diffusion. It is found that the impact of channel geometry on breakthrough curves increases markedly as the transport distance along the flow channel and away into the rock matrix increase. The effect of geometry is more pronounced for transport of a decay chain when the rock matrix consists of a porous altered layer.

  10. Formulation of oil-in-water β-carotene microemulsions: effect of oil type and fatty acid chain length.

    PubMed

    Roohinejad, Shahin; Oey, Indrawati; Wen, Jingyuan; Lee, Sung Je; Everett, David W; Burritt, David J

    2015-05-01

    The impact of oil type and fatty acid chain length on the development of food-grade microemulsions for the entrapment of β-carotene was investigated. The microemulsion region of a ternary phase diagram containing short chain monoglycerides was larger than for di- and triglycerides when Tween 80 was used as surfactant. The cytotoxicity of microemulsions composed of a 30% monoglyceride oil, 20% Tween 80 and 50% aqueous buffer were evaluated using an in vitro cell culture model (human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma, Caco-2). The cytotoxicity test showed that the viability of Caco-2 cells against β-carotene microemulsions at concentrations of 0.03125% (v/v) was higher than 90%. This study suggests that short chain monoglycerides could be used with Tween 80 to prepare transparent β-carotene-encapsulated O/W microemulsions in the particle size range of 12-100 nm. PMID:25529680

  11. Effects of amino acid starvation on RelA diffusive behavior in live Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenting; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Kuanqing; Wang, Jue D.; Weisshaar, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary During amino acid starvation, bacterial cells rapidly synthesize the nucleotides (p)ppGpp, causing a massive re-programming of the transcriptional profile known as the stringent response. The (p)ppGpp synthase RelA is activated by ribosomes harboring an uncharged tRNA at the A site. It is unclear whether synthesis occurs while RelA is bound to the ribosome or free in the cytoplasm. We present a study of three E. coli strains, each expressing a different RelA-fluorescent protein (RelA-FP) construct: RelA-YFP, RelA-mEos2, and RelA-Dendra2. Single-molecule localization and tracking studies were carried out under normal growth conditions and during amino acid starvation. Study of three labeling schemes enabled us to assess potential problems with FP labeling of RelA. The diffusive trajectories and axial spatial distributions indicate that amino acid starvation induces net binding of all three RelA-FP constructs to 70S ribosomes. The data are most consistent with a model in which RelA synthesizes (p)ppGpp while bound to the 70S ribosome. We suggest a “short hopping time” model of RelA activity during starvation. Our results contradict an earlier study of RelA-Dendra2 diffusion that inferred off-ribosome synthesis of (p)ppGpp. The reasons for the discrepancy remain unclear. PMID:26480956

  12. Effects of L-glutamine on acetylsalycylic acid induced gastric lesions and acid back diffusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hung, C R; Takeuchi, K; Okabe, S; Murata, T; Takagi, K

    1976-12-01

    Effects of L-glutamine on acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)-induced gastric mucosal lesions were studied in mongrel dogs. It was confirmed that when oral ASA at 1.0 or 2.0 g per dog is given in two divided doses, there is severe and consistent dose-dependent mucosal damage in the glandular portion of the stomach in fasted dogs. However, when L-glutamine 2.0 or 4.0 g per dog in two divided doses is given concomitantly with ASA 2.0 g per dog orally, the gastric irritation is significantly inhibited. Instillation of 20 mM of ASA in 100 mM HCl solution into the Heidenhain pouch of Beagle dogs produced a significant loss of H+ from the pouch and a gain of Na+ in the lumen compared with ASA-free controls. When L-glutamine (100 mM) was given concomitantly with ASA (20 mM) into the pouch, changes of electrolyte fluxes in response to ASA alone were significantly suppressed. However, 50 mM of L-glutamine had no appreciable effect on acid back diffusion caused by ASA 20 mM. The amino acid itself had little effect on the ionic movement in the pouch. Gross bleeding from the pouch treated with ASA was never observed with the concomitant dosing of ASA and L-glutamine 50 or 100 mM. PMID:15154

  13. Pectin functionalised by fatty acids: Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopic characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Calce, Enrica; Tarantilis, Petros A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Chemically modified pectin derivatives obtained by partial esterification of its hydroxyl moieties with fatty acids (FA; oleic, linoleic and palmitic acids), as well as the initial apple peel pectin were comparatively characterised using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Characteristic changes observed in DRIFT spectra in going from pectin to its FA esters are related to the corresponding chemical modifications. Comparing the DRIFT spectra with some reported data on FTIR spectra of the same materials measured in KBr or NaCl matrices has revealed noticeable shifts of several polar functional groups both in pectin and in its FA-esterified products induced by the halide salts. The results obtained have implications for careful structural analyses of biopolymers with hydrophilic functional groups by means of different FTIR spectroscopic methodologies.

  14. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Constant Behavior: IV. Diffuse Layer Charge/Potential Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most current electrostatic surface complexation models describing ionic binding at the particle/water interface rely on the use of Poisson - Boltzmann (PB) theory for relating diffuse layer charge densities to diffuse layer electrostatic potentials. PB theory is known to contain ...

  15. Focal nodular hyperplasia: characterisation at gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    An, H S; Kim, Y J; Jung, S I; Jeon, H J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the enhancement patterns of hepatic focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI. Methods: This retrospective study had institutional review board approval. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced and DW MR images were evaluated in 23 patients with 30 FNHs (26 histologically proven and 4 radiologically diagnosed). The lesion enhancement patterns of the hepatobiliary phase images were classified as heterogeneous or homogeneous signal intensity (SI), and as dominantly high/iso or low SI compared with those of adjacent liver parenchyma. Heterogeneous (any) SI lesions and homogeneous low SI lesions were categorised into the fibrosis group, whereas homogeneous high/iso SI lesions were categorised into the non-fibrosis group. Additionally, lesion SI on T2 weighted images, DW images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were compared between the two groups. Results: The lesions showed heterogeneous high/iso SI (n=16), heterogeneous low SI (n=5), homogeneous high/iso SI (n=7) or homogeneous low SI (n=2) at the hepatobiliary phase MR images. The fibrosis group lesions were more likely to show high SI on DW images and T2 weighted images compared with those in the non-fibrosis group (p<0.05). ADC values tended to be lower in the fibrosis group than those in the non-fibrosis group without significance. Conclusion: FNH showed variable enhancement patterns on hepatobiliary phase images during gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI. SI on DW and T2 weighted images differed according to the fibrosis component contained in the lesion. Advances in knowledge: FNH shows a wide spectrum of imaging findings on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DW MRI. PMID:23873903

  16. Increase in the diffusion length of minority carriers in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}N alloys ({sub x} = 0–0.1) fabricated by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, T. V. Gilinsky, A. M.; Mansurov, V. G.; Protasov, D. Yu.; Kozhuhov, A. S.; Yakimov, E. B.; Zhuravlev, K. S.

    2015-10-15

    The room-temperature diffusion length of minority carriers in n-Al{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N layers grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire (0001) substrates used in structures for ultraviolet photodetectors is studied. Measurements were performed using the spectral dependence of the photocurrent recorded in a built-in p–n junction for thin samples and using the induced electron-current procedure for films up to 2 µm thick. The results show that the hole diffusion length in n-AlGaN films is 120–150 nm, which is larger than in GaN films grown under similar growth conditions by a factor of 3–4. This result can be associated with the larger lateral sizes characteristic of hexagonal columns in AlGaN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. No increase in the hole diffusion length is observed for thicker films.

  17. Quantifying diffuse and point inputs of perfluoroalkyl acids in a nonindustrial river catchment.

    PubMed

    Müller, Claudia E; Spiess, Nora; Gerecke, Andreas C; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2011-12-01

    Recently, the role of diffuse inputs of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) into surface waters has been investigated. It has been observed that river loads increased during rain and that street runoff contained considerable loads of PFAAs. This study aims at quantifying these diffuse inputs and identifying the initial sources in a small nonindustrial river catchment. The river was sampled in three distinct subcatchments (rural, urban, and wastewater treatment plant) at high temporal resolution during two rain events and samples were analyzed for perfluorocarboxylates and perfluorosulfonates. Additionally, rain, stormwater runoff, wastewater effluent, and drinking water were sampled. PFAA concentrations in river water were all low (e.g., < 10 ng/L for perfluorooctanoate, PFOA), but increased during rainfall. PFAA concentrations and water discharge data were integrated into a mass balance assessment that shows that 30-60% of PFAA loads can be attributed to diffuse inputs. Rain contributed 10-50% of the overall loads, mobilization of dry deposition and outdoor release of PFAA from products with 20-60%. We estimated that within a year 2.5-5 g of PFOA originating from rain and surface runoff are emitted into this small catchment (6 km(2), 12,500 persons). PMID:22035097

  18. Diffusion length history over the last 16 ka based on a high resolution δ18O record from NGRIP. Implications for glaciological and paleoclimatic studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, Vasileios; Simonsen, Sebastian B.; Buchardt, Susanne L.; Vinther, Bo M.; White, James W. C.

    2013-04-01

    The Holocene epoch as seen in the water isotopic records of polar ice cores is described by a relatively stable climate characterized by minimal fluctuations in temperature. Arguably, the most commonly used proxy in ice core studies, the ratios of water's stable isotopes, provide an insight in past temperatures via a linear relationship with temperature, commonly referred to as the isotope slope. However, the validity of this slope has been extensively debated. Based on borehole thermometry and gas isotope fractionation studies, it has been shown that temperature changes over the Bølling - Allerød and Younger Dryas transitions as well as several interstadial events have been underestimated by the water isotope slope. Additionally, isotopic artifacts related to ice sheet elevation changes, apparent between 6 and 10 ka b2k, result in a poor or even absent representation of the Holocene climatic optimum in the δ18O record from Greenland ice cores, contrary to what other paleoclimatic records from Northern latitudes indicate. In this study we present ongoing work on the use of the firn isotopic diffusion lengths as a high resolution proxy of the snow and firn temperature. Our reconstruction is based on the high resolution δ18O dataset from NGRIP. Water isotope diffusion is a process that occurs after deposition of the precipitation and takes place in the porous space of the firn until the close off depth. Assuming a diffusivity parameterization and based on a densification and strain rate history, it is possible to investigate the effects of temperature and accumulation on the diffusion length. By inverting the model we produce a temperature reconstruction for the last 15 ka. This temperature signal is independent of factors like the water vapor source location and temperature, the intensity of the atmospheric inversion over the deposition site and the presence or not of clear sky precipitation. In order for the reconstruction to reproduce the long term climate

  19. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Column for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Haim; Liu, Changchun; Killawala, Chitvan; Sadik, Mohamed; Mauk, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in many medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assessing disease progression, effectiveness of drug therapy, and emergence of drug-resistance. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires sophisticated and expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low resource settings. We describe a simple, low-cost, reactiondiffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. We model the process with the Fisher Kolmogoroff Petrovskii Piscounoff (FKPP) Equation and compare theoretical predictions with experimental observations. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at the point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. C.L. was supported by NIH/NIAID K25AI099160; M.S. was supported by the Pennsylvania Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority; C.K. and H.B. were funded, in part, by NIH/NIAID 1R41AI104418-01A1.

  20. Uptake of HCl and HOCl onto sulfuric acid. Solubilities, diffusivities, and reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.R.; Ravishankara, A.R. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO )

    1993-11-25

    The interaction of HOCl and HCl vapors with liquid sulfuric acid surfaces was studied in a flow tube equipped with chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection. Time-dependent uptake of HCl and HOCl was measured. A methodology for deriving the value of the quantity H[radical]D[sub 1], (the product of the Henry's law coefficient and the square root of the liquid-phase diffusion coefficient) is discussed. The partial pressures of HCl over HCl-doped sulfuric acid solutions were also measured to directly determine H for HCl (H[sub HCl]*). Using the measured values of H[sub HCl]* and H[sub HCl]*[radical]D[sub 1], the value of D[sub 1] for HCl in 50 wt % sulfuric acid was extracted. Values for H[sub HOCl] and for the second-order rate coefficient for the reaction between dissolved HOCl and HCl were also obtained. The application of these results to modeling stratospheric heterogeneous processes in sulfuric acid aerosols is discussed. 31 refs., 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. A novel diffusion-biphasic hydrolysis coupled kinetic model for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longjian; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Junbao; Lu, Minsheng; Guo, Xiaomiao; Han, Lujia

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic experiments on the dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover were performed. A high xylan removal and a low inhibitor concentration were achieved by acid pretreatment. A novel diffusion-hydrolysis coupled kinetic model was proposed. The contribution to the xylose yield was analyzed by the kinetic model. Compared with the inhibitor furfural negatively affecting xylose yield, the fast and slow-hydrolyzing xylan significantly contributed to the xylose yield, however, their dominant roles were dependent on reaction temperature and time. The impact of particle size and acid concentration on the xylose yield were also investigated. The diffusion process may significantly influence the hydrolysis of large particles. Increasing the acid concentration from 0.15 M to 0.30 M significantly improved the xylose yield, whereas the extent of improvement decreased to near-quantitative when further increasing acid loading. These findings shed some light on the mechanism for dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of corn stover. PMID:25479388

  2. Conjugation of fatty acids with different lengths modulates the antibacterial and antifungal activity of a cationic biologically inactive peptide.

    PubMed

    Malina, Amir; Shai, Yechiel

    2005-09-15

    Many studies have shown that an amphipathic structure and a threshold of hydrophobicity of the peptidic chain are crucial for the biological function of AMPs (antimicrobial peptides). However, the factors that dictate their cell selectivity are not yet clear. In the present study, we show that the attachment of aliphatic acids with different lengths (10, 12, 14 or 16 carbon atoms) to the N-terminus of a biologically inactive cationic peptide is sufficient to endow the resulting lipopeptides with lytic activity against different cells. Mode-of-action studies were performed with model phospholipid membranes mimicking those of bacterial, mammalian and fungal cells. These include determination of the structure in solution and membranes by using CD and ATR-FTIR (attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared) spectroscopy, membrane leakage experiments and by visualizing bacterial and fungal damage via transmission electron microscopy. The results obtained reveal that: (i) the short lipopeptides (10 and 12 carbons atoms) are non-haemolytic, active towards both bacteria and fungi and monomeric in solution. (ii) The long lipopeptides (14 and 16 carbons atoms) are highly antifungal, haemolytic only at concentrations above their MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) values and aggregate in solution. (iii) All the lipopeptides adopt a partial alpha-helical structure in 1% lysophosphatidylcholine and bacterial and mammalian model membranes. However, the two short lipopeptides contain a significant fraction of random coil in fungal membranes, in agreement with their reduced antifungal activity. (iv) All the lipopeptides have a membranolytic effect on all types of cells assayed. Overall, the results reveal that the length of the aliphatic chain is sufficient to control the pathogen specificity of the lipopeptides, most probably by controlling both the overall hydrophobicity and the oligomeric state of the lipopeptides in solution. Besides providing us with basic

  3. Specific excitonic interactions in the aggregates of hyaluronic acid and cyanine dyes with different lengths of methine group.

    PubMed

    Tobata, H; Sagawa, T

    2016-03-01

    The absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra of three types of cyanine dyes with different lengths of methine group (3,3'-diethylthiadicarbocyanine iodide, DTDC; 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide, DTC; and 3,3'-diethylthiacyanine iodide, DTTHC) in an aqueous solution were compared with and without hyaluronic acid (HA), which has a helical structure. DTDC forms chiral H- and J-aggregates, whereas DTC and DTTHC are unable to form any aggregates. DTDC also forms H- and J-aggregates in the presence of sodium polyacrylate (PA) with a random-coil structure; however, the PA-DTDC aggregates exhibit no chirality. These results suggest that the chirality of HA-DTDC aggregates is induced by the helical structure of HA. In 2.4 vol% and 10 vol% methanol, HA-DTDC aggregates displayed different patterns of temperature dependence, whereas no aggregation was observed in 30 vol% methanol. The solubility of DTDC in a mixed solvent of water and methanol is generally improved by the addition of methanol, which prevents the aggregation of DTDC. PMID:26815728

  4. Gas diffusion electrode setup for catalyst testing in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, Gustav K. H. E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk; Fleige, Michael; Arenz, Matthias E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk

    2015-02-15

    We present a detailed description of the construction and testing of an electrochemical cell setup allowing the investigation of a gas diffusion electrode containing carbon supported high surface area catalysts. The setup is designed for measurements in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperature, i.e., very close to the actual conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). The cell consists of a stainless steel flow field and a PEEK plastic cell body comprising the electrochemical cell, which exhibits a three electrode configuration. The cell body and flow field are braced using a KF-25 vacuum flange clamp, which allows an easy assembly of the setup. As demonstrated, the setup can be used to investigate temperature dependent electrochemical processes on high surface area type electrocatalysts, but it also enables quick screening tests of HT-PEMFC catalysts under realistic conditions.

  5. [Diffuse x-ray wide-angle scattering of polyglutamic acid in solution].

    PubMed

    Fedorov, B A; Becker, M; Damaschun, G; Damaschun, H; Gedicke, C; Zirwer, D

    1977-01-01

    The diffuse wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) of polyglutamic acid (PGA) in solution was studied using an x-ray diffractometer with small aperture of the primary beam. The scattering curve was recorded at an angular interval from (article: see text). The experimental scattering intensity of PGA with alpha-helical CD spectrum showed a maximum at 14.4 nm-1. Unordered PGA in solution yielded no maximum at this scattering angle. The studies have proved that the scattering theory can be applied to globular proteins in solution as well as to chain molecules in solution in this angular interval. The differences between the calculated scattering curves and the experimental curves indicate minor movements of the side chains of PGA in solutions and slight structuring of the solvent at the surface of the polypeptide chain. PMID:25547

  6. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Mulligan, Padhraic; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals than in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.

  7. Use of weak acids to determine the bulk diffusion limitation of H+ ion conductance through the gramicidin channel.

    PubMed Central

    Decker, E R; Levitt, D G

    1988-01-01

    The addition of 2 M formic acid at pH 3.75 increased the single channel H+ ion conductance of gramicidin channels 12-fold at 200 mV. Other weak acids (acetic, lactic, oxalic) produce a similar, but smaller increase. Formic acid (and other weak acids) also blocks the K+ conductance at pH 3.75, but not at pH 6.0 when the anion form predominates. This increased H+ conductance and K+ block can be explained by formic acid (HF) binding to the mouth of the gramicidin channel (Km = 1 M) and providing a source of H+ ions. A kinetic model is derived, based on the equilibrium binding of formic acid to the channel mouth, that quantitatively predicts the conductance for different mixtures of H+, K+, and formic acid. The binding of the neutral formic acid to the mouth of the gramicidin channel is directly supported by the observation that a neutral molecule with a similar structure, formamide (and malonamide and acrylamide), blocks the K+ conductance at pH 6.0. The H+ conductance in the presence of formic acid provides a lower bound for the intrinsic conductance of the gramicidin channel when there is no diffusion limitation at the channel mouth. The 12-fold increase in conductance produced by formic acid suggests that greater than 90% of the total resistance to H+ results from diffusion limitation in the bulk solution. PMID:2449253

  8. Heterogeneity of the polyribocytidylic acid tract in aphthovirus: biochemical and biological studies of viruses carrying polyribocytidylic acid tracts of different lengths.

    PubMed Central

    Costa Giomi, M P; Bergmann, I E; Scodeller, E A; Augé de Mello, P; Gomez, I; La Torre, J L

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we report a study of a sample of foot-and-mouth disease virus carrying two polyribocytidylic acid [poly(C)] tracts of different lengths. By plaque purification in tissue culture, we isolated two populations of particles, one carrying the long poly(C) tract and the other carrying only the short homopolymer. The fingerprints of both viruses were indistinguishable from each other and from that of the virus present in the original sample, suggesting that the main difference between the two types of particles is limited to the poly(C) tracts of their genomic RNAs, to the flanking sequences of the poly(C) tract, or to both. In addition, some biological properties of these viruses are reported, such as stability upon serial passages in different cell lines, plaque size, and pathogenicity for cattle. The results indicate that the size of the poly(C) tract is not directly related to the virulence of these viruses. However, the size of the homopolymer could play a role in determining their efficiency of replication, and it appears that the particles with the short poly(C) tract might have some replicative advantage over those carrying the long one. Images PMID:6088803

  9. Identification and estimation of extra-framework aluminium in acidic mazzite by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanjanchi, M. A.; Razavi, A.

    2001-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been used to investigate structural modification of mazzite zeolite subjected to calcination, acid leaching and acetylacetone treatments. Extra-framework aluminium species, formed upon expulsion of aluminium from the framework, are detected by DRS because they are involved in aluminium-oxygen charge transfer transitions. Impregnation of the calcined ammonium-exchanged and acid leached samples with ethanolic acetylacetone will convert the broadened 260-280 nm band of extra-framework aluminium with distorted symmetry to a distinct well-defined 285 nm band. The appearance of this band is due to the transformation of the aluminium atoms with a different coordination number to structures with highly ordered octahedral symmetry. Washing the acetylacetone treated samples with hot ethanol leads to extraction of some of the complexed aluminium. The presence of an extracted aluminium triacetylacetonate complex in the eluant is verified by the same spectrophotometer used in its conventional mode. This suggests that a dual DR and UV-VIS spectrophotometry is an appropriate approach to study such topics.

  10. Influence of acid chain length on the properties of TiO2 prepared by sol-gel method and LC-MS studies of methylene blue photodegradation.

    PubMed

    Bakre, Pratibha V; Volvoikar, Prajesh S; Vernekar, Amit A; Tilve, S G

    2016-07-15

    Nano-sized titanium dioxide photocatalysts were synthesized by hybrid hydrolytic nonhydrolytic sol-gel method using aliphatic organic acid templates to study the effect of chain length on their properties. X-ray diffraction pattern indicated crystalline anatase phase. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda surface area measurement gave surface area ranging from 98.4 to 205.5m(2)/g and was found to be dependent on the chain length of the aliphatic acid. The longer chain acids rendered the material with high surface area. The organic acids acted as bidentate ligand and a surfactant in controlling the size and the mesoporosity. The size of the TiO2 nanoparticulate was found to be in the range of 10-18nm. The catalyst prepared by employing long chain acids octanoic acid and palmitic acid had smaller size, narrow pore radius, higher surface area and showed better photocatalytic activity than the commercially available Degussa P25 catalyst for the degradation of methylene blue dye. A new intermediate was identified by tandem liquid chromatography mass spectrometry studies during the degradation of methylene blue solution. PMID:27100905

  11. Complexation of carboxylate anions with the arginine gas-phase amino acid: Effects of chain length on the geometry of extended ion binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxford, Thomas F. M.; Milner, Edward M.; Yoshikawa, Naruo; Bullivant, Chad; Dessent, Caroline E. H.

    2013-07-01

    Complexation of deprotonated carboxylic acids with arginine was investigated using collision-induced dissociation to probe the nature of isolated carboxylate-amino acid interactions as a function of anion size. Monocarboxylic CH3(CH2)nCOO-·Arg (n = 3-7, 9, 10) and dicarboxylic acid COOH(CH2)nCOO-·Arg (n = 3-5, 7-10) complexes were investigated. For the dicarboxylic acid clusters, chain length has a significant effect on the %fragmentation energies with the n = 9, 10 systems fragmenting at significantly lower energies than the corresponding shorter chain systems. Molecular mechanics calculations suggest that this fragmentation energy shift is associated with the longer-chain dicarboxylic acid-Arg clusters switching to ring structures.

  12. Lateral diffusion of CO2 in leaves of the crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Heitor M; Jakovljevic, Ivona; Kaiser, Friedemann; Lüttge, Ulrich

    2005-04-01

    Dynamic patchiness of photosystem II (PSII) activity in leaves of the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier, which was independent of stomatal control and was observed during both the day/night cycle and circadian endogenous oscillations of CAM, was previously explained by lateral CO2 diffusion and CO2 signalling in the leaves [Rascher et al. (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98:11801-11805; Rascher and Luttge (2002) Plant Biol 4:671-681]. The aim here was to actually demonstrate the importance of lateral CO2 diffusion and its effects on localized PSII activity. Covering small sections of entire leaves with silicone grease was used for local exclusion of a contribution of atmospheric CO2 to internal CO2 via transport through stomata. A setup for combined measurement of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging was used for recording photosynthetic activity with a spatiotemporal resolution. When remobilization of malic acid from vacuolar storage and its decarboxylation in the CAM cycle caused increasing internal CO2 concentrations sustaining high PSII activity behind closed stomata, PSII activity was also increased in adjacent leaf sections where vacuolar malic acid accumulation was minimal as a result of preventing external CO2 supply due to leaf-surface greasing, and where therefore CO2 could only be supplied by diffusion from the neighbouring malic acid-remobilizing leaf tissue. This demonstrates lateral CO2 diffusion and its effect on local photosynthetic activity. PMID:15843962

  13. Experimental investigation of benzoic acid diffusion coefficient in γ-Al2O3 nanofluids at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manouchehrian Fard, Manouchehr; Beiki, Hossein

    2015-12-01

    An experimental study was performed to measure benzoic acid diffusion coefficient in water-based γ-Al2O3 nanofluids at different temperatures. Measurements were carried out at 15, 20 and 25 °C. γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles with an average diameter of 10-20 nm were added into de-ionized water as the based fluid. Nanoparticles volume fractions used in the based fluid were 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 %. Measurements showed that the diffusion coefficients was not changed with nanoparticles concentration and no enhancement was found. Dependence of diffusion coefficients on nanoparticles concentration followed the same trend in all temperatures investigated in this work. Nano stirring and nano-obstacles could be regarded as two reasons for mass diffusivity changes in nanofluids.

  14. Utilization of medium-chain triglycerides by neonatal piglets: chain length of even- and odd-carbon fatty acids and apparent digestion/absorption and hepatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Odle, J; Benevenga, N J; Crenshaw, T D

    1991-05-01

    Jugular plasma concentrations of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) and whole blood concentrations of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) were measured in 1-d-old pigs at 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after forcefeeding 12 mL of one of four triglycerides: tri-7:0, 8:0, 9:0 or 10:0. Both BHBA and MCFA were highest at 1 h. The MCFA measured at 1 h decreased (P less than 0.01) with increasing chain length. The BHBA was not different in pigs given tri-7:0, 8:0 or 9:0 but was lower (P less than 0.05) for pigs given tri-10:0. Isolated hepatocytes converted [1-14C] C7 or C9 to CO2 and acid soluble products more than 40% faster than cells given 8:0 or 10:0 and consumed 7% more O2. Even- and odd-MCFA were oxidized faster (P less than 0.01) than 18:1 (n-9). Theoretical calculations from fatty acid oxidation accounted for 96 to 142% of measured O2 consumption for the various fatty acids. In all instances, L-carnitine had no effect. Appearance of 14C in lipid products increased progressively with chain length from 7:0 to 18:1 (n-9). Collectively, these data suggest that changes in chain length within the medium-chain family may dramatically influence the rate and extent of digestion and/or absorption and metabolism of medium-chain triglycerides by neonates. This may be a consequence of increased hydrophobicity with increasing chain length or, for odd-chain fatty acids, a reflection of anaplerotic carbon effects from propionyl-CoA metabolism. PMID:2019870

  15. The synthesis of short- and medium-chain-length poly(hydroxyalkanoate) mixtures from glucose- or alkanoic acid-grown Pseudomonas oleovorans.

    PubMed

    Ashby, R D; Solaiman, D K Y; Foglia, T A

    2002-03-01

    Pseudomonas oleovorans NRRL B-778 accumulated mixtures of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and medium-chain-length poly(hydroxyalkanoates) (mcl-PHAs) when grown on glucose, octanoic acid or oleic acid, whereas growth on nonanoic acid or undecanoic acid resulted in copolymers of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHB-co-HV). Acetone fractionation verified the presence of PHB/mcl-PHA mixtures. The acetone-insoluble (AIS) fractions of the polymers derived from glucose (PHA-glucose), octanoic acid (PHA-octanoic) and oleic acid (PHA-oleic) were exclusively PHB while the acetone-soluble (AS) fractions contained mcl-PHA composed of differing ratios of 3-hydroxy-acid monomer units, which ranged in chain length from 6 to 14 carbon atoms. In contrast, both the AIS and AS fractions from the polymers derived from nonanoic acid (PHA-nonanoic) and undecanoic acid (PHA-undecanoic) were composed of comparable ratios of 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV). The unfractionated PHA-glucose, PHA-octanoic and PHA-oleic polymers had melting temperatures (Tm) between 177 and 179 degrees C, enthalpies of fusion (AHf) of 20 cal/g and glasstransition temperatures (Tg) of 3-4 degrees C. This was due to the large PHB content in the polymer mixtures. On the other hand, the PHA-nonanoic and PHA-undecanoic polymers had thermal properties that supported their copolymer nature. In both cases, the Tm values were 161 degrees C, deltaHf values were 7 cal/g and Tg values were - 3 degrees C. PMID:12074088

  16. Urinary loss of glucose, phosphate, and protein by diffusion into proximal straight tubules injured by D-serine and maleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Carone, F.A.; Nakamura, S.; Goldman, B.

    1985-06-01

    In several models of acute renal failure leakage of glomerular filtrate out of the tubule is an important pathogenetic mechanism; however, bidirectional diffusion of solute to account for certain pathophysiologic features of acute renal failure has received meager attention. Using micropuncture and clearance methods, the authors assessed sequentially leakage of solutes and inulin across proximal straight tubules (PST) injured by two nephrotoxins. In d-serine-treated rats with extensive necrosis of PST, the basis for glucosuria and tubular leakage of inulin was studied. Glucose absorption by the proximal convoluted tubule and glucose delivery to the PST were normal, but glucose delivery to the distal tubule was increased nearly 8-fold, indicating diffusion of glucose from interstitial to tubular luminal fluid across the necrotic PST. Total kidney inulin clearance was greatly reduced, but single nephron glomerular filtration rate, based on proximal convoluted tubule samples, was normal, indicating tubular loss of inulin. Urinary recovery of (/sup 14/C)inulin infused into tubular lumina revealed that proximal convoluted tubule and distal tubule were impermeable to inulin and that inulin diffused out of the necrotic PST. The progressive return over 6 days of tubular impermeability for inulin correlated with relining of PST with new cells. In maleic acid-treated rats the site and extent of tubular necrosis and the nature of urinary loss of solutes were studied. Microdissection revealed that maleic acid caused limited necrosis of PST which averaged 7.4% of total proximal tubular length. Increased urinary excretion of protein, phosphate, and glucose and increased tubular permeability to microinfused (/sup 14/C)inulin occurred with the onset of PST necrosis, and return of these abnormalities to normal correlated with the degree of cellular repair of the PST.

  17. Overcoming the equivalent-chain-length rule with pH-zone-refining countercurrent chromatography for the preparative separation of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Englert, Michael; Vetter, Walter

    2015-07-01

    Purification of individual fatty acids from vegetable oils by preparative liquid chromatography techniques such as countercurrent chromatography (CCC) is a challenging task due to the equivalent-chain-length (ECL) rule. It implies that one double bond equals two carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of a fatty acid and therefore causes co-elutions of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Accordingly, existing methods for the purification of individual fatty acids are cumbersome and time-consuming as two or more steps with different conditions are required. To avoid additional purification steps, we report a method utilizing pH-zone-refining CCC which enabled the purification of all major fatty acids from sunflower oil (purities >95 %) in one step by circumventing co-elutions caused by the ECL rule. This method is based on the involvement of acid strength and hydrophobicity of fatty acids during the separation process. By exploiting the preparative character of the pH-zone-refining mode, a tenfold sample amount of free fatty acids from sunflower oil could be separated in comparison to regular CCC. PMID:25943261

  18. Compositional effects on Si–OH bond length in hydrous silicates with implications for trends in the SiOH acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Zarubin, Dmitri P.

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical calculations of the structure and Brønsted acidity of SiOH groups in silica clusters have never addressed the question if these vary with the degree of SiOH deprotonation. In this connection, a statistical analysis is presented of Si–OH bond lengths in crystalline hydrogen silicates with well-determined structures with a special emphasis placed on effects of the silicate composition. It is found that among hydrogen silicates of large cations with low charges the Si–OH bonds are always longer than terminal Si–O bonds in the same anion and correlate in length with the anionic charge per tetrahedron. The findings are explained by steric limitations on charge balancing at oxygen atoms by hydrogen bonds and/or cations. It is suggested that similar limitations and imbalances may underlie the well-known trends in the Brønsted acidity of silicic acids and silicas in aqueous media: decreased acidity with increased SiOH deprotonation and increased acidity with increased tetrahedra connectivity. - Graphical abstract: Si–OH bonds in crystalline silicates lengthen with the anionic charge per tetrahedron, which is in parallel with the well-known trend of decreased acidity of silicic acids and silicas in solution with increased degree of deprotonation. - Highlights: • Si–OH bonds in alkali hydrogen silicates are always longer than terminal Si–O bonds. • Si–OH bonds in silicates lengthen with the anionic charge per tetrahedron. • The Si–OH bond elongation results from inherent underbonding of terminal O atoms. • The longer the Si–OH bond, the less acidic the OH group is.

  19. Rates and mechanisms of conversion of ice nanocrystals to hydrates of HCl and HBr: acid diffusion in the ionic hydrates.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul; Gulluru, Dheeraj B; Buch, Victoria

    2005-03-01

    This FTIR study focuses on solid-state chemistry associated with formation and interconversion of the ionic HX (X = Cl, Br) hydrates. Kinetic data are reported for conversions of ice nanocrystal arrays exposed to the saturation pressure of the acids in the 110 approximately 125 K range. The product is amorphous acid dihydrate in the case of HBr, and amorphous monohydrate for HCl. The rate-determining step is identified as HX diffusion through the hydrate product crust toward the interfacial reaction zone, rather than diffusion through ice, as commonly believed. Slowing of the conversion process is thus observed with increasing thickness of the crust. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) and activation energy values for HX diffusion through the hydrates were evaluated with the help of the shrinking-core model. Hydrate crystallization occurs as a separate step, upon heating above 130 K. Subsequently, rates of reversible transitions between crystal di- and monohydrates were observed upon exposure to acid vapor and acid evacuation. In conversion from di- to monohydrate, the rate slows after fast formation of several layers; subsequently, diffusion through the product crust appears to be the rate-controlling step. The activation energy for HBr diffusion through crystal dihydrate is found to be significantly higher than that for the amorphous analogue. Conjecture is offered for a molecular mechanism of HX transport through the crystal hydrate, based on (i) spectroscopic/computational evidence for the presence of molecular HX bonded to X(-) in each of the ionic hydrate phases and (ii) the relative E(a) values found for HBr and HCl diffusion. Monte Carlo modeling suggests acid transport to the reaction zone along boundaries between "nanocrystallites" generated by multiple hydrate nucleation events at the particle surfaces. The reverse conversion, of crystalline monohydrate particles to the dihydrate phase, as well as dihydrate to trihydrate, displays nearly constant rate

  20. Electrochemical reduction of CO₂ to organic acids by a Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guang; Wang, Hui; Bian, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Pd-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pd-MWNTs) catalysts for the conversion of CO₂ to organic acids were prepared by the ethylene glycol reduction and fully characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) technologies. The amorphous Pd particles with an average size of 5.7 nm were highly dispersed on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Functional groups of the MWNTs played a key role in the palladium deposition. The results indicated that Pd-MWNTs could transform CO₂ into organic acid with high catalytic activity and CO₂ could take part in the reduction reaction directly. Additionally, the electrochemical reduction of CO₂ was investigated by a diaphragm electrolysis device, using a Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode as a cathode and a Ti/RuO₂ net as an anode. The main products in present system were formic acid and acetic acid identified by ion chromatograph. The selectivity of the products could be achieved by reaction conditions changing. The optimum faraday efficiencies of formic and acetic acids formed on the Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode at 4₂V electrode voltages under 1 atm CO₂ were 34.5% and 52.3%, respectively. PMID:24453849

  1. Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to Organic Acids by a Pd-MWNTs Gas-Diffusion Electrode in Aqueous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guang; Bian, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Pd-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pd-MWNTs) catalysts for the conversion of CO2 to organic acids were prepared by the ethylene glycol reduction and fully characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) technologies. The amorphous Pd particles with an average size of 5.7 nm were highly dispersed on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Functional groups of the MWNTs played a key role in the palladium deposition. The results indicated that Pd-MWNTs could transform CO2 into organic acid with high catalytic activity and CO2 could take part in the reduction reaction directly. Additionally, the electrochemical reduction of CO2 was investigated by a diaphragm electrolysis device, using a Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode as a cathode and a Ti/RuO2 net as an anode. The main products in present system were formic acid and acetic acid identified by ion chromatograph. The selectivity of the products could be achieved by reaction conditions changing. The optimum faraday efficiencies of formic and acetic acids formed on the Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode at 4 V electrode voltages under 1 atm CO2 were 34.5% and 52.3%, respectively. PMID:24453849

  2. Molecular surface area based predictive models for the adsorption and diffusion of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suxin; Chen, Jiangang; Wang, Bijia; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-15

    Two predictive models were presented for the adsorption affinities and diffusion coefficients of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix. Quantitative structure-sorption behavior relationship would not only provide insights into sorption process, but also enable rational engineering for desired properties. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for three disperse dyes were measured. The predictive model for adsorption affinity was based on two linear relationships derived by interpreting the experimental measurements with molecular structural parameters and compensation effect: ΔH° vs. dye size and ΔS° vs. ΔH°. Similarly, the predictive model for diffusion coefficient was based on two derived linear relationships: activation energy of diffusion vs. dye size and logarithm of pre-exponential factor vs. activation energy of diffusion. The only required parameters for both models are temperature and solvent accessible surface area of the dye molecule. These two predictive models were validated by testing the adsorption and diffusion properties of new disperse dyes. The models offer fairly good predictive ability. The linkage between structural parameter of disperse dyes and sorption behaviors might be generalized and extended to other similar polymer-penetrant systems. PMID:26197108

  3. Use of agar diffusion assay to measure bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric acid. Solu...

  4. The relative diffusive transport rate of SrI2 in water changes over the nanometer length scale as measured by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Faraone, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to provide insight into the structures of ionic solutions for over a century, but the probes have covered distances shorter than 8 Å. For the non-hydrolyzing salt SrI2 in aqueous solution, a locally ordered lattice of ions exists that scatters slow neutrons coherently down to at least 0.1 mol L(-1) concentration, where the measured average distance between scatterers is over 18 Å. To investigate the motions of these scatterers, coherent quasielastic neutron scattering (CQENS) data on D2O solutions with SrI2 at 1, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mol L(-1) concentrations was obtained to provide an experimental measure of the diffusive transport rate for the motion between pairs of ions relative to each other. Because CQENS measures the motion of one ion relative to another, the frame of reference is centered on an ion, which is unique among all diffusion measurement methods. We call the measured quantity the pairwise diffusive transport rate Dp. In addition to this ion centered frame of reference, the diffusive transport rate can be measured as a function of the momentum transfer q, where q = (4π/λ)sin θ with a scattering angle of 2θ. Since q is related to the interion distance (d = 2π/q), for the experimental range 0.2 Å(-1)≤q≤ 1.0 Å(-1), Dp is, then, measured over interion distances from 40 Å to ≈6 Å. We find the measured diffusional transport rates increase with increasing distance between scatterers over the entire range covered and interpret this behavior to be caused by dynamic coupling among the ions. Within the model of Fickian diffusion, at the longer interionic distances Dp is greater than the Nernst-Hartley value for an infinitely dilute solution. For these nm-distance diffusional transport rates to conform with the lower, macroscopically measured diffusion coefficients, we propose that local, coordinated counter motion of at least pairs of ions is part of the transport process. PMID:27096293

  5. Increased Flow of Fatty Acids toward β-Oxidation in Developing Seeds of Arabidopsis Deficient in Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Activity or Synthesizing Medium-Chain-Length Fatty Acids1

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Yves; Ventre, Giovanni; Caldelari, Daniela

    1999-01-01

    Synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from intermediates of fatty acid β-oxidation was used as a tool to study fatty acid degradation in developing seeds of Arabidopsis. Transgenic plants expressing a peroxisomal PHA synthase under the control of a napin promoter accumulated PHA in developing seeds to a final level of 0.06 mg g−1 dry weight. In plants co-expressing a plastidial acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase from Cuphea lanceolata and a peroxisomal PHA synthase, approximately 18-fold more PHA accumulated in developing seeds. The proportion of 3-hydroxydecanoic acid monomer in the PHA was strongly increased, indicating a large flow of capric acid toward β-oxidation. Furthermore, expression of the peroxisomal PHA synthase in an Arabidopsis mutant deficient in the enzyme diacylglycerol acyltransferase resulted in a 10-fold increase in PHA accumulation in developing seeds. These data indicate that plants can respond to the inadequate incorporation of fatty acids into triacylglycerides by recycling the fatty acids via β-oxidation and that a considerable flow toward β-oxidation can occur even in a plant tissue primarily devoted to the accumulation of storage lipids. PMID:10594123

  6. Development of a bioprocess to convert PET derived terephthalic acid and biodiesel derived glycerol to medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoate.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Shane T; Runic, Jasmina Nikodinovic; Kaminsky, Walter; Woods, Trevor; Babu, Ramesh P; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2012-08-01

    Sodium terephthalate (TA) produced from a PET pyrolysis product and waste glycerol (WG) from biodiesel manufacture were supplied to Pseudomonas putida GO16 in a fed-batch bioreactor. Six feeding strategies were employed by altering the sequence of TA and WG feeding. P. putida GO16 reached 8.70 g/l cell dry weight (CDW) and 2.61 g/l PHA in 48 h when grown on TA alone. When TA and WG were supplied in combination, biomass productivity (g/l/h) was increased between 1.3- and 1.7-fold and PHA productivity (g/l/h) was increased 1.8- to 2.2-fold compared to TA supplied alone. The monomer composition of the PHA accumulated from TA or WG was predominantly composed of 3-hydroxydecanoic acid. PHA monomers 3-hydroxytetradeeanoic acid and 3-hydroxytetradecenoic acid were not present in PHA accumulated from TA alone but were present when WG was supplied to the fermentation. When WG was either the sole carbon source or the predominant carbon source supplied to the fermentation the molecular weight of PHA accumulated was lower compared to PHA accumulated when TA was supplied as the sole substrate. Despite similarities in data for the properties of the polymers, PHAs produced with WG present in the PHA accumulation phase were tacky while PHA produced where TA was the sole carbon substrate in the polymer accumulation phase exhibited little or no tackiness at room temperature. The co-feeding of WG to fermentations allows for increased utilisation of TA. The order of feeding of WG and TA has an effect on TA utilisation and polymer properties. PMID:22581066

  7. Dye-sensitized solar cells using retinoic acid and carotenoic acids: Dependence of performance on the conjugation length and the dye concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Fujii, Ritsuko; Ito, Seigo; Koyama, Yasushi; Yamano, Yumiko; Ito, Masayoshi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Yanagida, Shozo

    2005-11-01

    Titanium oxide-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) were fabricated by the use of retinoic acid and carotenoic acids having the number of conjugated double bonds, n = 5-13. The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency, the photocurrent density and the solar energy-to-electricity conversion efficiency exhibited the highest values at n = 7, and then decreased toward both sides. The effects of dilution of CA7 with deoxycholic acid were also examined. The above parameters per unit CA7 concentration progressively increased toward the lowest concentration, which is ascribed to the isolated excitation free from singlet-triplet annihilation in the dye molecules on the TiO 2 layer.

  8. Beware of Cocktails: Chain-Length Bidispersity Triggers Explosive Self-Assembly of Poly-l-Glutamic Acid β2-Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Hernik-Magoń, Agnieszka; Puławski, Wojciech; Fedorczyk, Bartłomiej; Tymecka, Dagmara; Misicka, Aleksandra; Szymczak, Piotr; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2016-04-11

    Chain-length polydispersity is among the least understood factors governing the fibrillation propensity of homopolypeptides. For monodisperse poly-l-glutamic acid (PLGA), the tendency to form fibrils depends of the main-chain length. Long-chained PLGA, so-called (Glu)200, fibrillates more readily than short (Glu)5 fragments. Here we show that conversion of α-helical (Glu)200 into amyloid-like β-fibrils is dramatically accelerated in the presence of intrinsically disordered (Glu)5. While separately self-assembled fibrils of (Glu)200 and (Glu)5 reveal distinct morphological and infrared characteristics, accelerated fibrillation in mixed (Glu)200 and (Glu)5 leads to aggregates similar to neat (Glu)200 fibrils, even in excess of (Glu)5. According to molecular dynamics simulations and circular dichroism measurements, local events of "misfolding transfer" from (Glu)5 to (Glu)200 may play a key role in the initial stages of conformational dynamics underlying the observed phenomenon. Our results highlight chain-length polydispersity as a potent, although so-far unrecognized factor profoundly affecting the fibrillation propensity of homopolypeptides. PMID:26909651

  9. The effect of the length and flexibility of the side chain of basic amino acids on the binding of antimicrobial peptides to zwitterionic and anionic membrane model systems.

    PubMed

    Russell, Amanda L; Williams, Brittany C; Spuches, Anne; Klapper, David; Srouji, Antoine H; Hicks, Rickey P

    2012-03-01

    The intent of this investigation was to determine the effect of varying the side chain length of the basic amino acids residues on the binding of a series of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) to zwitterionic and anionic LUVs, SUVs and micelles. These AMPs are based on the incorporation of three dipeptide units consisting of the unnatural amino acids Tic-Oic in the sequence, Ac-GF-Tic-Oic-GX-Tic-Oic-GF-Tic-Oic-GX-Tic-XXXX-CONH(2), where X (Spacer #2) may be one of the following amino acids, Lys, Orn, Dab, Dpr or Arg. A secondary focus of this study was to attempt to correlate the possible mechanisms of membrane binding of these AMPs to their bacterial strain potency and selectivity. These AMPs produced different CD spectra in the presence of zwitterionic DPC and anionic SDS micelles. This observation indicates that these AMPs adopt different conformations on binding to the surface of zwitterionic and anionic membrane model systems. The CD spectra of these AMPs in the presence of zwitterionic POPC and anionic 4:1 POPC/POPG LUVs and SUVs also were different, indicating that they adopt different conformations on interaction with the zwitterionic and anionic liposomes. This observation was supported by ITC and calcein leakage data that indicated that these AMPs interact via very different mechanisms with anionic and zwitterionic LUVs. The enthalpy for the binding of these AMPs to POPC directly correlates to the length of Spacer #2. The enthalpy of binding of these AMPs to 4:1 POPC/POPG, however do not correlate with the length of Spacer #2. Clear evidence exists that the AMP containing the Dpr residues (the shortest length spacer) interacts very differently with both POPC and 4:1 POPC/POPG LUVs compared to the other four compounds. Data indicates that both the hydrophobicity and the charge distribution of Spacer #2, contribute to defining antibacterial activity. These observations have major implications on the development of these analogs as potential therapeutic agents

  10. A supramolecular strategy to leverage the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphene in the presence of surfactants: unraveling the role of the length of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Haar, Sébastien; Ciesielski, Artur; Clough, Joseph; Yang, Huafeng; Mazzaro, Raffaello; Richard, Fanny; Conti, Simone; Merstorf, Nicolas; Cecchini, Marco; Morandi, Vittorio; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Samorì, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Achieving the full control over the production as well as processability of high-quality graphene represents a major challenge with potential interest in the field of fabrication of multifunctional devices. The outstanding effort dedicated to tackle this challenge in the last decade revealed that certain organic molecules are capable of leveraging the exfoliation of graphite with different efficiencies. Here, a fundamental understanding on a straightforward supramolecular approach for producing homogenous dispersions of unfunctionalized and non-oxidized graphene nanosheets in four different solvents is attained, namely N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, N,N-dimethylformamide, ortho-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. In particular, a comparative study on the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphene in the presence of linear alkanes of different lengths terminated by a carboxylic-acid head group is performed. These molecules act as graphene dispersion-stabilizing agents during the exfoliation process. The efficiency of the exfoliation in terms of concentration of exfoliated graphene is found to be proportional to the length of the employed fatty acid. Importantly, a high percentage of single-layer graphene flakes is revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy analyses. A simple yet effective thermodynamic model is developed to interpret the chain-length dependence of the exfoliation yield. This approach relying on the synergistic effect of a ad-hoc solvent and molecules to promote the exfoliation of graphene in liquid media represents a promising and modular strategy towards the rational design of improved dispersion-stabilizing agents. PMID:25504589

  11. Multifold Increases in Turing Pattern Wavelength in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskins, Delora K.; Pruc, Emily E.; Epstein, Irving R.; Dolnik, Milos

    2016-07-01

    Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction were modified through additions of sodium halide salt solutions. The range of wavelengths obtained is several times larger than in the previously reported literature. Pattern wavelength was observed to significantly increase with sodium bromide or sodium chloride. A transition to a uniform state was found at high halide concentrations. The observed experimental results are qualitatively well reproduced in numerical simulations with the Lengyel-Epstein model with an additional chemically realistic kinetic term to account for the added halide and an adjustment of the activator diffusion rate to allow for interhalogen formation.

  12. Multifold Increases in Turing Pattern Wavelength in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction-Diffusion System.

    PubMed

    Gaskins, Delora K; Pruc, Emily E; Epstein, Irving R; Dolnik, Milos

    2016-07-29

    Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction were modified through additions of sodium halide salt solutions. The range of wavelengths obtained is several times larger than in the previously reported literature. Pattern wavelength was observed to significantly increase with sodium bromide or sodium chloride. A transition to a uniform state was found at high halide concentrations. The observed experimental results are qualitatively well reproduced in numerical simulations with the Lengyel-Epstein model with an additional chemically realistic kinetic term to account for the added halide and an adjustment of the activator diffusion rate to allow for interhalogen formation. PMID:27517779

  13. Assessing the Impact of Backbone Length and Capping Agent on the Conformational Preferences of a Model Peptide: Conformation Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy of 2-AMINOISOBUTYRIC Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gord, Joseph R.; Hewett, Daniel M.; Kubasik, Matthew A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    2-Aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) is an achiral, α-amino acid having two equivalent methyl groups attached to C_α. Extended Aib oligomers are known to have a strong preference for the adoption of a 310-helical structure in the condensed phase. Here, we have taken a simplifying step and focused on the intrinsic folding propensities of Aib by looking at a series of capped Aib oligomers in the gas phase, free from the influence of solvent molecules and cooled in a supersonic expansion. Resonant two-photon ionization and IR-UV holeburning have been used to record single-conformation UV spectra using the Z-cap as the UV chromophore. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy provides single-conformation IR spectra in the OH stretch and NH stretch regions. Data have been collected on a set of Z-(Aib)n-X oligomers with n = 1, 2, 4, 6 and X = -OH and -OMethyl. The impacts of these capping groups and differences in backbone length have been found to dramatically influence the conformational space accessed by the molecules studied here. Oligomers of n=4 have sufficient backbone length for a full turn of the 310-helix to be formed. Early interpretation of the data collected shows clear spectroscopic markers signaling the onset of 310-helix formation as well as evidence of structures incorporating C7 and C14 hydrogen bonded rings. Toniolo, C.; Bonora, G. M.; Barone, V.; Bavoso, A.; Benedetti, E.; Di Blasio, B.; Grimaldi, P.; Lelj, F.; Pavone, V.; Pedone, C., Conformation of Pleionomers of α-Aminoisobutyric Acid. Macromolecules 1985, 18, 895-902.

  14. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding. PMID:17054116

  15. Sodium Chloride Diffusion in Low-Acid Foods during Thermal Processing and Storage.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Ellen R; Tang, Juming; Sablani, Shyam S

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed at modeling sodium chloride (NaCl) diffusion in foods during thermal processing using analytical and numerical solutions and at investigating the changes in NaCl concentrations during storage after processing. Potato, radish, and salmon samples in 1% or 3% NaCl solutions were heated at 90, 105, or 121 °C for 5 to 240 min to simulate pasteurization and sterilization. Selected samples were stored at 4 or 22 °C for up to 28 d. Radish had the largest equilibrium NaCl concentrations and equilibrium distribution coefficients, but smallest effective diffusion coefficients, indicating that a greater amount of NaCl diffused into the radish at a slower rate. Effective diffusion coefficients determined using the analytical solution ranged from 0.2 × 10(-8) to 2.6 × 10(-8) m²/s. Numerical and analytical solutions showed good agreement with experimental data, with average coefficients of determination for samples in 1% NaCl at 121 °C of 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. During storage, food samples equilibrated to a similar NaCl concentration regardless of the thermal processing severity. The results suggest that sensory evaluation of multiphase (solid and liquid) products should occur at least 14 d after processing to allow enough time for the salt to equilibrate within the product. PMID:27060992

  16. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  17. Analysis of the electron-beam-induced current of a polycrystalline p-n junction when the diffusion lengths of the material on either side of a grain boundary differ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.; Luke, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    The short circuit current generated by the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope in p-n junctions is reduced by enhanced recombination at grain boundaries in polycrystalline material. Frequently, grain boundaries separate the semiconductor into regions possessing different minority carrier life times. This markedly affects the short circuit current I(sc) as a function of scanning distance from the grain boundary. It will be shown theoretically that (1) the minimum of the I(sc) in crossing the grain boundary with the scanning electron beam is shifted away from the grain boundary toward the region with smaller life time (shorter diffusion length), (2) the magnitude of the minimum differs markedly from those calculated under the assumption of equal diffusion lengths on either side of the grain boundary, and (3) the minimum disappears altogether for small surface recombination velocities (s less than 10,000 cm/s). These effects become negligible, however, for large recombination velocities s at grain boundaries. For p-type silicon this happens for s not less than 100,000 cm/s.

  18. The alpha-helical domain of liver fatty acid binding protein is responsible for the diffusion-mediated transfer of fatty acids to phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Córsico, Betina; Liou, Heng Ling; Storch, Judith

    2004-03-30

    Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) and liver FABP (LFABP), homologous proteins expressed at high levels in intestinal absorptive cells, employ markedly different mechanisms for the transfer of fatty acids (FAs) to acceptor membranes. Transfer from IFABP occurs during protein-membrane collisional interactions, while for LFABP, transfer occurs by diffusion through the aqueous phase. Earlier, we had shown that the helical domain of IFABP is critical in determining its collisional FA transfer mechanism. In the study presented here, we have engineered a pair of chimeric proteins, one with the "body" (ligand binding domain) of IFABP and the alpha-helical region of LFABP (alphaLbetaIFABP) and the other with the ligand binding pocket of LFABP and the helical domain of IFABP (alphaIbetaLFABP). The objective of this work was to determine whether the change in the alpha-helical domain of each FABP would alter the rate and mechanism of transfer of FA from the chimeric proteins in comparison with those of the wild-type proteins. The fatty acid transfer properties of the FABP chimeras were examined using a fluorescence resonance transfer assay. The results showed a significant modification of the absolute rate of FA transfer from the chimeric proteins compared to that of the wild type, indicating that the slower rate of FA transfer observed for wild-type LFABP relative to that of wild-type IFABP is, in part, determined by the helical domain of the proteins. In addition to these quantitative changes, it was of great interest to observe that the apparent mechanism of FA transfer also changed when the alpha-helical domain was exchanged, with transfer from alphaLbetaIFABP occurring by aqueous diffusion and transfer from alphaIbetaLFABP occurring via protein-membrane collisional interactions. These results demonstrate that the alpha-helical region of LFABP is responsible for its diffusional mechanism of fatty acid transfer to membranes. PMID:15035630

  19. Valorization of fatty acids-containing wastes and byproducts into short- and medium-chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Madalena V; Freitas, Filomena; Paiva, Alexandre; Mano, Francisca; Dionísio, Madalena; Ramos, Ana Maria; Reis, Maria A M

    2016-01-25

    Olive oil distillate (OOD), biodiesel fatty acids-byproduct (FAB) and used cooking oil (UCO) were tested as inexpensive carbon sources for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) with different composition using twelve bacterial strains. OOD and FAB were exploited for the first time as alternative substrates for PHA production. UCO, OOD and FAB were used by Cupriavidus necator and Pseudomonas oleovorans to synthesize the homopolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, while Pseudomonas resinovorans and Pseudomonas citronellolis produced mcl-PHA polymers mainly composed of hydroxyoctanoate and hydroxydecanoate monomers. The highest polymer content in the biomass was obtained for C. necator (62 wt.%) cultivated on OOD. Relatively high mcl-PHA content (28-31 wt.%) was reached by P. resinovorans cultivated in OOD. This study shows, for the first time, that OOD is a promising substrate for PHA production since it gives high polymer yields and allows for the synthesis of different polymers (scl- or mcl-PHA) by selection of the adequate strains. PMID:26047553

  20. Characterization and Determination of Origin of Lactic Acid Bacteria from a Sorghum-Based Fermented Weaning Food by Analysis of Soluble Proteins and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Kunene, Nokuthula F.; Geornaras, Ifigenia; von Holy, Alexander; Hastings, John W.

    2000-01-01

    The group that includes the lactic acid bacteria is one of the most diverse groups of bacteria known, and these organisms have been characterized extensively by using different techniques. In this study, 180 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from sorghum powder (44 strains) and from corresponding fermented (93 strains) and cooked fermented (43 strains) porridge samples that were prepared in 15 households were characterized by using biochemical and physiological methods, as well as by analyzing the electrophoretic profiles of total soluble proteins. A total of 58 of the 180 strains were Lactobacillus plantarum strains, 47 were Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains, 25 were Lactobacillus sake-Lactobacillus curvatus strains, 17 were Pediococcus pentosaceus strains, 13 were Pediococcus acidilactici strains, and 7 were Lactococcus lactis strains. L. plantarum and L. mesenteroides strains were the dominant strains during the fermentation process and were recovered from 87 and 73% of the households, respectively. The potential origins of these groups of lactic acid bacteria were assessed by amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprint analysis. PMID:10698775

  1. Structural changes of polyacids initiated by their neutralization with various alkali metal hydroxides. Diffusion studies in poly(acrylic acid)s.

    PubMed

    Masiak, Michal; Hyk, Wojciech; Stojek, Zbigniew; Ciszkowska, Malgorzata

    2007-09-27

    The changes in the three-dimensional structure of the poly(acrylic acid), PAA, induced by incorporation of various alkali-metal counterions have been evaluated by studying diffusion of an uncharged probe (1,1'-ferrocenedimethanol) in the polymeric media. The studies are supported by the measurements of conductivity and viscosity of the polymeric media. Solutions of linear PAA of four different sizes (molecular weights: 450,000, 750,000, 1,250,000, 4,000,000) were neutralized with hydroxides of alkali metals of group 1 of the periodic table (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) to the desired neutralization degree. The transport properties of the obtained polyacrylates were monitored by measuring the changes in the probe diffusion coefficient during the titration of the polyacids. The probe diffusivity was determined from the steady-state current of the probe voltammetric oxidation at disk microelectrodes. Diffusivity of the probe increases with the increase in the degree of neutralization and with the increase in viscosity. It reaches the maximum value at about 60-80% of the polyacid neutralization. The way the probe diffusion coefficients change is similar in all polyacid solutions and gels. The increase in the size of a metal cation causes, in general, an enhancement in the transport of probe molecules. The biggest differences in the probe diffusivities are between lithium and cesium polyacrylates. The differences between the results obtained for cesium and rubidium are not statistically significant due to lack of good precision of the voltammetric measurements. The measurements of the electric conductivity of polyacrylates and the theoretical predictions supplemented the picture of electrostatic interactions between the polyanionic chains and the metal cations of increasing size. In all instances of the PAAs, the viscosity of the solutions rapidly increases in the 0-60% range of neutralization and then becomes constant in the 60-100% region. With the exception of the shortest

  2. Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in infancy increases length- and weight-for-age but not BMI to 6 years when controlling for effects of maternal smoking.

    PubMed

    Currie, L M; Tolley, E A; Thodosoff, J M; Kerling, E H; Sullivan, D K; Colombo, J; Carlson, S E

    2015-07-01

    Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) are added to infant formula but their effect on long-term growth of children is under studied. We evaluated the effects of feeding LCPUFA-supplemented formula (n = 54) compared to control formula (n = 15) throughout infancy on growth from birth-6 years. Growth was described using separate models developed with the MIXED procedure of SAS(®) that included maternal smoking history and gender. Compared to children fed control formula, children who consumed LCPUFA supplemented formula had higher length-/stature-/and weight-for-age percentiles but not body mass index (BMI) percentile from birth to 6 years. Maternal smoking predicted lower stature (2-6 years), higher weight-for-length (birth-18 months) and BMI percentile (2-6 years) independent of LCPUFA effects. Gender interacted with the effect of LCPUFA on stature, and the relationship between smoking and BMI, with a larger effect for boys. Energy intake did not explain growth differences. A relatively small control sample is a limitation. PMID:25936840

  3. The seed's protein and oil content, fatty acid composition, and growing cycle length of a single genotype of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) as affected by environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Ayerza, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    As a botanical source, variability in chia seed composition could be expected between growing locations, and between years within a location, due to genotype and environment effects as well genetic x environment's interactions. The objective of the present study was to determine the location effect on the growing cycle length, and seed's protein content, lipid content, and fatty acid profiles, of a single chia genotype. Seeds of chia genotype Tzotzol grown on eight sites in five different ecosystems were tested. One site was in Argentina, in the Semi-Arid Chaco ecosystem (T(5)); one was in Bolivia, in the Sub-Humid Chaco ecosystem (T(4)); and six in Ecuador, one in the Coastal Desert (T(3)), two on the Tropical Rain Forest (T(2)), and three in the Inter-Andean Dry Valley ecosystem (T(1)). Seeds from plants grown in T(4) and in T(3) contained significantly (P <0.05) more protein percentage than did seeds from the other three ecosystems. No significant (P <0.05) differences in protein content were found between T(3) and T(4), and between T(1), T(2), and T(5). Seeds from T(1) and T(5) ecosystems, with 33.5 and 32.2%, respectively, were the numerically highest oil content producers, but their results were only significantly (P <0.05) higher when compared with the T(2) seeds. Significant (P <0.05) differences in palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and alpha-linolenic fatty acids between oils from seeds grown in different ecosystems were detected, however. Oil of seeds grown in the T(3) ecosystem had the palmitic, stearic and oleic fatty acids' highest contents. Palmitic and oleic fatty acid levels were significantly (P <0.05) higher when were compared to that of seeds grown in the T(1) ecosystem, and stearic when was compared to that of seeds grown in the T(5) ecosystem; omega-6 linoleic fatty acid content was significantly (P <0.05) lower in oils of seeds produced in T(1), and T(2) than in those produced in T(3), T(4), and T(5) ecosystems; omega-3 alpha-linolenic fatty

  4. Diffusion and reaction of pollutants in stratus clouds: application to nocturnal acid formation in plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Seigneur, C.; Saxena, P.; Mirabella, V.A.

    1985-09-01

    A mathematical model is presented that describes the transport, turbulent diffusion, and chemical reactions of air pollutants in stratus clouds. The chemical kinetic mechanism treats 97 gaseous, heterogeneous, and aqueous reactions between 54 species. The dispersion and night-time chemistry of a power plant plume in a stratus cloud is simulated. The contributions of various chemical pathways to the formation of sulfate and nitrate, the differences between plume and background concentrations, and the effect of reduced primary emissions on secondary pollutants are discussed. Calculated sulfate and nitrate concentrations are commensurate with measured atmospheric concentrations.

  5. Complex coacervation of hyaluronic acid and chitosan: effects of pH, ionic strength, charge density, chain length and the charge ratio.

    PubMed

    Kayitmazer, A B; Koksal, A F; Kilic Iyilik, E

    2015-11-28

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitosan (CH) can form nanoparticles, hydrogels, microspheres, sponges, and films, all with a wide range of biomedical applications. This variety of phases reflects the multiple pathways available to HA/CH complexes. Here, we use turbidimetry, dynamic light scattering, light microscopy and zeta potential measurements to show that the state of the dense phase depends on the molar ratio of HA carboxyl to CH amines, and is strongly dependent on their respective degrees of ionization, α and β. Due to the strong charge complementarity between HA and CH, electrostatic self-assembly takes place at very acidic pH, but is almost unobservable at ionic strength (I) ≥ 1.5 M NaCl. All systems display discontinuity in the I-dependence of the turbidity, corresponding to a transition from coacervates to flocculates. An increase in either polymer chain length or charge density enhances phase separation. Remarkably, non-stoichiometric coacervate suspensions form at zeta potentials far away from zero. This result is attributed to the entropic effects of chain semi-flexibility as well as to the charge mismatch between the two biopolymers. PMID:26406548

  6. Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Mid-infrared Spectral Properties of Forages with Varied Fatty Acid Content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminant diet can affect the fatty acid (FA) content of meat and dairy products, which indicates that managing forage consumption is important in determining the quality of the animal products. Mid-infrared spectroscopy is sensitive to changes in forage FA and has been used successfully to quantify ...

  7. Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectral Properties of Forages with Varied Fatty Acid Content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminant diet can affect the fatty acid (FA) content of meat and dairy products, which indicates that managing forage consumption is important in determining the quality of the animal products. Mid-infrared spectroscopy is sensitive to changes in forage FA and has been used successfully to quantify ...

  8. Diffusion length determination in n/+/-p-p/+/ structure based silicon solar cells from the intensity dependence of the short-circuit current for illumination from the p/+/ side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, G. C.; Singh, S. N.; Kotnala, R. K.

    1983-04-01

    A technique for measuring the diffusion length (L) of minority carriers in Si solar cells with base regions that feature a high-low junction at one end and a p-n junction at the other is presented. The p(+)-p-n(+) or n(+)-p-p(+) cell is illuminated by monochromatic light from the p(+) side and the short circuit current is measured as a function of the light intensity. The slope of the current in relation to the intensity is proportional to the ratio of the thickness of the cell (d) to L. The relationship is quantified and applied to the results of tests with Si cells with bifacial symmetry, cut from Czochralski-grown crystals. L is obtained directly, and the method is concluded to be applicable in cases where d/L is at least 0.6.

  9. Genotypic identification of some lactic acid bacteria by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis and investigation of their potential usage as starter culture combinations in Beyaz cheese manufacture.

    PubMed

    Karahan, A G; Başyiğit Kiliç, G; Kart, A; Sanlidere Aloğlu, H; Oner, Z; Aydemir, S; Erkuş, O; Harsa, S

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 2 different starter culture combinations were prepared for cheesemaking. Starter culture combinations were formed from 8 strains of lactic acid bacteria. They were identified as Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis (2 strains), Lactobacillus plantarum (5 strains), and Lactobacillus paraplantarum (1 strain) by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. The effects of these combinations on the physicochemical and microbiological properties of Beyaz cheeses were investigated. These cheeses were compared with Beyaz cheeses that were produced with a commercial starter culture containing Lc. lactis ssp. lactis and Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris as control. All cheeses were ripened in brine at 4 degrees C for 90 d. Dry matter, fat in dry matter, titratable acidity, pH, salt in dry matter, total N, water-soluble N, and ripening index were determined. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE patterns of cheeses showed that alpha(S)-casein and beta-casein degraded slightly during the ripening period. Lactic acid bacteria, total mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeast, molds, and coliforms were also counted. All analyses were repeated twice during d 7, 30, 60, and 90. The starter culture combinations were found to be significantly different from the control group in pH, salt content, and lactobacilli, lactococci, and total mesophilic aerobic bacteria counts, whereas the cheeses were similar in fat, dry matter content, and coliform, yeast, and mold counts. The sensory analysis of cheeses indicated that textural properties of control cheeses presented somewhat lower scores than those of the test groups. The panelists preferred the tastes of treatment cheeses, whereas cheeses with starter culture combinations and control cheeses had similar scores for appearance and flavor. These results indicated that both starter culture combinations are suitable for Beyaz cheese production. PMID:20059897

  10. Quantitative ‘Omics Analyses of Medium Chain Length Polyhydroxyalkanaote Metabolism in Pseudomonas putida LS46 Cultured with Waste Glycerol and Waste Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jilagamazhi; Sharma, Parveen; Spicer, Vic; Krokhin, Oleg V.; Zhang, Xiangli; Fristensky, Brian; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David. B.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes and proteomes of Pseudomonas putida LS46 cultured with biodiesel-derived waste glycerol or waste free fatty acids, as sole carbon sources, were compared under conditions that were either permissive or non-permissive for synthesis of medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA). The objectives of this study were to elucidate mechanisms that influence activation of biopolymer synthesis, intra-cellular accumulation, and monomer composition, and determine if these were physiologically specific to the carbon sources used for growth of P. putida LS46. Active mcl-PHA synthesis by P. putida LS46 was associated with high expression levels of key mcl-PHA biosynthesis genes and/or gene products including monomer-supplying proteins, PHA synthases, and granule-associated proteins. ‘Omics data suggested that expression of these genes were regulated by different genetic mechanisms in P. putida LS46 cells in different physiological states, when cultured on the two waste carbon sources. Optimal polymer production by P. putida LS46 was primarily limited by less efficient glycerol metabolism during mcl-PHA synthesis on waste glycerol. Mapping the ‘Omics data to the mcl-PHA biosynthetic pathway revealed significant variations in gene expression, primarily involved in: 1) glycerol transportation; 2) enzymatic reactions that recycle reducing equivalents and produce key mcl-PHA biosynthesis pathway intermediates (e.g. NADH/NADPH, acetyl-CoA). Active synthesis of mcl-PHAs was observed during exponential phase in cultures with waste free fatty acids, and was associated with the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. A putative Thioesterase in the beta-oxidation pathway that may regulate the level of fatty acid beta-oxidation intermediates, and thus carbon flux to mcl-PHA biosynthesis, was highly up-regulated. Finally, the data suggested that differences in expression of selected fatty acid metabolism and mcl-PHA monomer-supplying enzymes may play a role in determining

  11. Quantitative 'Omics Analyses of Medium Chain Length Polyhydroxyalkanaote Metabolism in Pseudomonas putida LS46 Cultured with Waste Glycerol and Waste Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jilagamazhi; Sharma, Parveen; Spicer, Vic; Krokhin, Oleg V; Zhang, Xiangli; Fristensky, Brian; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes and proteomes of Pseudomonas putida LS46 cultured with biodiesel-derived waste glycerol or waste free fatty acids, as sole carbon sources, were compared under conditions that were either permissive or non-permissive for synthesis of medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA). The objectives of this study were to elucidate mechanisms that influence activation of biopolymer synthesis, intra-cellular accumulation, and monomer composition, and determine if these were physiologically specific to the carbon sources used for growth of P. putida LS46. Active mcl-PHA synthesis by P. putida LS46 was associated with high expression levels of key mcl-PHA biosynthesis genes and/or gene products including monomer-supplying proteins, PHA synthases, and granule-associated proteins. 'Omics data suggested that expression of these genes were regulated by different genetic mechanisms in P. putida LS46 cells in different physiological states, when cultured on the two waste carbon sources. Optimal polymer production by P. putida LS46 was primarily limited by less efficient glycerol metabolism during mcl-PHA synthesis on waste glycerol. Mapping the 'Omics data to the mcl-PHA biosynthetic pathway revealed significant variations in gene expression, primarily involved in: 1) glycerol transportation; 2) enzymatic reactions that recycle reducing equivalents and produce key mcl-PHA biosynthesis pathway intermediates (e.g. NADH/NADPH, acetyl-CoA). Active synthesis of mcl-PHAs was observed during exponential phase in cultures with waste free fatty acids, and was associated with the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. A putative Thioesterase in the beta-oxidation pathway that may regulate the level of fatty acid beta-oxidation intermediates, and thus carbon flux to mcl-PHA biosynthesis, was highly up-regulated. Finally, the data suggested that differences in expression of selected fatty acid metabolism and mcl-PHA monomer-supplying enzymes may play a role in determining the

  12. Diffusion and location of hydorchloric acid in ice: Implications for polar stratosphere clouds and ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, E.W.; Mulvaney, R. ); Oates, K. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors have carried out experiments to study the incorporation and movement of HCl within the structure of ice. These involved freezing HCl solutions, and observing them in a scanning electron microscope fitted with an X-ray microanalysis system. The authors are able to show that HCl is not easily incorporated into ice crystals, but is strongly partitioned towards the grain boundaries. Furthermore, the diffusion of HCl through ice crystals is slow. These results contradict the interpretation of earlier experiments. They mean that if HCl is to be available for reaction on polar stratospheric cloud particles, as required by current theories of Antarctic ozone depletion, then it must be present in some form other than a solid solution.

  13. Effect of Structure on Transport Properties (Viscosity, Ionic Conductivity, and Self-Diffusion Coefficient) of Aprotic Heterocyclic Anion (AHA) Room Temperature Ionic Liquids. 2. Variation of Alkyl Chain Length in the Phosphonium Cation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyuan; Morales-Collazo, Oscar; Xia, Han; Brennecke, Joan F

    2016-06-30

    A series of room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) composed of triethyl(alkyl)phosphonium cations paired with three different aprotic heterocyclic anions (AHAs) (alkyl = butyl ([P2224](+)) and octyl ([P2228](+))) were prepared to investigate the effect of cationic alkyl chain length on transport properties. The transport properties and density of these ILs were measured from 283.15 to 343.15 K at ambient pressure. The dependence of the transport properties (viscosity, ionic conductivity, diffusivity, and molar conductivity) on temperature can be described by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT) equation. The ratio of the molar conductivity obtained from the molar concentration and ionic conductivity measurements to that calculated from self-diffusion coefficients (measured by pulsed gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) using the Nernst-Einstein equation was used to quantify the ionicity of these ILs. The molar conductivity ratio decreases with increasing number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain, indicating that the reduced Coulombic interactions resulting from lower density are more than balanced by the increased van der Waals interactions between the alkyl chains. The results of this study may provide insight into the design of ILs with enhanced dynamics that may be suitable as electrolytes in lithium ion batteries and other electrochemical applications. PMID:27243107

  14. Assessment of skin absorption and irritation potential of arachidonic acid and glyceryl arachidonate using in vitro diffusion cell techniques.

    PubMed

    Eppler, A R; Kraeling, M E K; Wickett, R R; Bronaugh, R L

    2007-11-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a precursor of pro-inflammatory mediators, and its glycerin ester, glyceryl arachidonate (GA), are reportedly used in cosmetic products. In vitro skin penetration of AA and GA and GA's ester hydrolysis was determined in flow-through diffusion cells. AA penetration with human and rat skin was 19.5% and 52.3% of the applied dose respectively, a substantial amount of which remained in the skin at 24h. Similar penetration results were obtained with GA in human skin. However, GA penetration through cultured skin (EpiDerm) was 51% of the applied dose, almost all of which appeared in the receptor fluid. At least 27.8% of GA penetrating skin was hydrolyzed to AA. In vitro methods were used to assess skin irritation in diffusion cells. Skin irritation of AA, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and Tween 80 was determined by changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin viability (3-(4,5-dimethylthiaxol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, MTT, formation), and cytokine release (IL-1alpha). SLS irritation was much less pronounced in an emulsion versus an aqueous vehicle. No significant irritation was observed in vitro from AA in an emulsion. This work predicts that AA would penetrate human skin in vivo and that it could be formed in skin from topically applied GA. PMID:17602815

  15. [Mechanism of inhibiting the cell growth in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by valproic acid combined with temsirolimus].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong; Zhao, Yan; Dong, Li-Hua; Wang, Li; Cheng, Shu; Zhao, Wei-Li

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the mechanism of inhibiting the cell growth in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) combined with mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus (TEM). MTT assay and Wright's stain were used to assess cell growth inhibition and to detect the cell morphological changes respectively. The cell apoptosis, cell cycle and cell autophagy were determined by flow cytometry. Ultrastructure changes were confirmed by electron microscopy. Protein changes were detected by Western blot. The results showed that both VPA and TEM alone inhibited cell proliferation and the effect was more obvious in the combination group. VPA combined with TEM induced cell arrest in G0/G1 phase and upregulated the expression of autophagy-related protein LC3, without cell apoptosis. Moreover, typical autophagosomes were observed, further confirming the presence of autophagy. Western blot showed the changes of proteins involved in autophagy signaling pathway. VPA decreased HDAC1 and HDAC3 expression and increased histone acetylation, suggesting that VPA also affected lymphoma cell proliferation through epigenetic modification. It is concluded that the combined treatment of VPA and TEM induces cell cycle arrest and cell autophagy, which provides a new clue for their clinical application in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:24370026

  16. Contribution of diffuse inputs to the aqueous mass load of perfluoroalkyl acids in river and stream catchments in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Kyu; Li, Dong-Hao; Shoeib, Mahiba; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies disagree regarding the contributions of point versus non-point sources to the aqueous mass loads of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). This study investigated the longitudinal change in PFAA mass load from upstream to downstream stations along rivers and/or streams to assess the relative contributions of point versus nonpoint inputs. With concentrations 10 to 100 times higher than running water, point sources such as wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) effluent and airport ditch-outlet (ADO) water were separated from neighboring upstream and downstream running waters using principal component analysis. Source waters were characterized by certain predominant components [e.g., perfluorobutylsulfonate (PFBS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in WWTP effluent and perfluorohexylsulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctylsulfonate (PFOS) in ADO water], which were minor components of running water. From a mass balance assessment of PFAA mass load, certain compounds such as PFOA and PFBS dominated the contribution of point sources to the mass load in the running water at downstream stations or in small catchment basins with high levels of industrial activity. Most of the mass load in the investigated catchments was attributable to upstream running water with a minor influence from industrial, commercial, and domestic human activities. Furthermore, the negative relationship of per capita emission factors (hereafter, EFs) with population density and a lower contribution of PFAA from WWTPs (~30% on average) compared to the running water-derived mass load at the national level indicated that diffuse inputs were more important contributors to aqueous PFAA contamination in each catchment basin as well as the entire watershed of the country (Korea). Volatile precursor compounds, which are readily dispersed to neighboring basins and transformed to PFAAs in the ambient environment, can be an important source of these diffuse inputs and will become more significant over time

  17. Δ6-fatty acid desaturase and fatty acid elongase mRNA expression, phagocytic activity and weight-to-length relationships in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fed alternative diets with soy oil and a probiotic.

    PubMed

    Santerre, A; Téllez-Bañuelos, M C; Casas-Solís, J; Castro-Félix, P; Huízar-López, M R; Zaitseva, G P; Horta-Fernández, J L; Trujillo-García, E A; de la Mora-Sherer, D; Palafox-Luna, J A; Juárez-Carrillo, E

    2015-01-01

    A time-course feeding trial was conducted for 120 days on juvenile channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) to study the effects of diets differing in oil source (fish oil or soy oil) and supplementation with a commercial probiotic. Relative levels of Δ6-fatty acid desaturase (Δ6-FAD) and fatty acid elongase (FAE) expression were assessed in brain and liver tissues. Both genes showed similar expression levels in all groups studied. Fish weight-to-length relationships were evaluated using polynomial regression analyses, which identified a burst in weight and length in the channel catfish on day 105 of treatment; this increase was related to an increase in gene expression. Mid-intestinal lactic acid bacterium (LAB) count was determined according to morphological and biochemical criteria using API strips. There was no indication that intestinal LAB count was affected by the modified diets. The Cunningham glass adherence method was applied to evaluate phagocytic cell activity in peripheral blood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed through the respiratory burst activity of spleen macrophages by the NBT reduction test. Probiotic-supplemented diets provided a good substrate for innate immune system function; the phagocytic index was significantly enhanced in fish fed soy oil and the probiotic, and at the end of the experimental period, ROS production increased in fish fed soy oil. The substitution of fish oil by soy oil is recommended for food formulation and will contribute to promoting sustainable aquaculture. Probiotics are also recommended for channel catfish farming as they may act as immunonutrients. PMID:26400353

  18. Measurement of nitrous acid in milan, italy, by doas and diffusion denuders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febo, A.; Perrino, C.; Allegrini, I.

    Measurements of the atmospheric mixing ratio of nitrous acid have been carried out by means of the differential optical absorption system (DOAS) during a wintertime field study carried out in the urban area of Milan (Italy). Preliminary laboratory calibration of the DOAS was carried out by making use of a standard source of pure HONO which provided an interference-free UV absorption spectrum of HONG and recalculation of the absorption cross-section of this compound. Very high HONO mixing ratios, up to values exceeding 10 ppb, were measured during the campaign. DOAS results were compared with those obtained by using the annular denuder technique and good agreement was observed during the whole measurement period. On the basis of these measurements, a study on the relationship between the dynamic conditions of the lower boundary layer and the temporal trend of HONG mixing ratio can be carried out, in order to obtain indications about the sources of this species in urban atmospheres.

  19. Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) Induces Colitis in Mice by Forming Nano-Lipocomplexes with Medium-Chain-Length Fatty Acids in the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Laroui, Hamed; Ingersoll, Sarah A.; Liu, Hong Chun; Baker, Mark T.; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Charania, Moiz A.; Laroui, Famina; Yan, Yutao; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), primarily ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are inflammatory disorders caused by multiple factors. Research on IBD has often used the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. DSS induces in vivo but not in vitro intestinal inflammation. In addition, no DSS-associated molecule (free glucose, sodium sulfate solution, free dextran) induces in vitro or in vivo intestinal inflammation. We find that DSS but not dextran associated molecules established linkages with medium-chain-length fatty acids (MCFAs), such as dodecanoate, that are present in the colonic lumen. DSS complexed to MCFAs forms nanometer-sized vesicles ∼200 nm in diameter that can fuse with colonocyte membranes. The arrival of nanometer-sized DSS/MCFA vesicles in the cytoplasm may activate intestinal inflammatory signaling pathways. We also show that the inflammatory activity of DSS is mediated by the dextran moieties. The deleterious effect of DSS is localized principally in the distal colon, therefore it will be important to chemically modify DSS to develop materials beneficial to the colon without affecting colon-targeting specificity. PMID:22427817

  20. Use of agar diffusion assay to evaluate bactericidal activity of formulations of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids (FA). Wells in agar media seeded with bacteria were filled with FA-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions, plates were incubated, and zones of inhibition were measured. The relationship between bacteric...

  1. Length and Amino Acid Sequence of Peptides Substituted for the 5-HT3A Receptor M3M4 Loop May Affect Channel Expression and Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Nicole K.; Bali, Moez; Akabas, Myles H.

    2012-01-01

    5-HT3A receptors are pentameric neurotransmitter-gated ion channels in the Cys-loop receptor family. Each subunit contains an extracellular domain, four transmembrane segments (M1, M2, M3, M4) and a 115 residue intracellular loop between M3 and M4. In contrast, the M3M4 loop in prokaryotic homologues is <15 residues. To investigate the limits of M3M4 loop length and composition on channel function we replaced the 5-HT3A M3M4 loop with two to seven alanine residues (5-HT3A-An = 2–7). Mutants were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized using two electrode voltage clamp recording. All mutants were functional. The 5-HT EC50's were at most 5-fold greater than wild-type (WT). The desensitization rate differed significantly among the mutants. Desensitization rates for 5-HT3A-A2, 5-HT3A-A4, 5-HT3A-A6, and 5-HT3A-A7 were similar to WT. In contrast, 5-HT3A-A3 and 5-HT3A-A5 had desensitization rates at least an order of magnitude faster than WT. The one Ala loop construct, 5-HT3A-A1, entered a non-functional state from which it did not recover after the first 5-HT application. These results suggest that the large M3M4 loop of eukaryotic Cys-loop channels is not required for receptor assembly or function. However, loop length and amino acid composition can effect channel expression and desensitization. We infer that the cytoplasmic ends of the M3 and M4 segments may undergo conformational changes during channel gating and desensitization and/or the loop may influence the position and mobility of these segments as they undergo gating-induced conformational changes. Altering structure or conformational mobility of the cytoplasmic ends of M3 and M4 may be the basis by which phosphorylation or protein binding to the cytoplasmic loop alters channel function. PMID:22539982

  2. Nonideal mixing and phase separation in phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidic acid mixtures as a function of acyl chain length and pH.

    PubMed Central

    Garidel, P; Johann, C; Blume, A

    1997-01-01

    The miscibilities of phosphatidic acids (PAs) and phosphatidylcholines (PCs) with different chain lengths (n = 14, 16) at pH 4, pH 7, and pH 12 were examined by differential scanning calorimetry. Simulation of heat capacity curves was performed using a new approach that incorporates changes of cooperativity of the transition in addition to nonideal mixing in the gel and the liquid-crystalline phase as a function of composition. From the simulations of the heat capacity curves, first estimates for the nonideality parameters for nonideal mixing as a function of composition were obtained, and phase diagrams were constructed using temperatures for onset and end of melting, which were corrected for the broadening effect caused by a decrease in cooperativity. In all cases the composition dependence of the nonideality parameters indicated nonsymmetrical mixing behavior. The phase diagrams were therefore further refined by simulations of the coexistence curves using a four-parameter approximation to account for nonideal and nonsymmetrical mixing in the gel and the liquid-crystalline phase. The mixing behavior was studied at three different pH values to investigate how changes in headgroup charge of the PA influences the miscibility. The experiments showed that at pH 7, where the PA component is negatively charged, the nonideality parameters are in most cases negative, indicating that electrostatic effects favor a mixing of the two components. Partial protonation of the PA component at pH 4 leads to strong changes in miscibility; the nonideality parameters for the liquid-crystalline phase are now in most cases positive, indicating clustering of like molecules. The phase diagram for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid:1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine mixtures at pH 4 indicates that a fluid-fluid immiscibility is likely. The results show that a decrease in ionization of PAs can induce large changes in mixing behavior. This occurs because of a

  3. Direct determination of rosmarinic acid in Lamiaceae herbs using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Saltas, Dimitrios; Pappas, Christos S; Daferera, Dimitra; Tarantilis, Petros A; Polissiou, Moschos G

    2013-04-01

    For the determination of rosmarinic acid (RA) directly in pulverized plant material, a method is developed using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) without any physicochemical pretreatment of samples. The RA content of 11 samples of eight different Lamiaceae herbs, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), varied between 86 ± 1 mg/g (in lemon balm) and 12.0 ± 0.8 mg/g (in hyssop) of dried plant material. The 11 samples and 50 other additional samples, which were prepared by mixing initial samples with KBr, were measured using DRIFTS. The second derivative of the spectral region 1344-806 cm(-1) was used and the corresponding data were analyzed using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The correlation between infrared spectral analysis and HPLC measurements shows that the DRIFTS method is sufficiently accurate, simple, and rapid. The RA content of the 11 Lamiaceae samples determined by DRIFTS ranged from 81 ± 4 mg/g (in lemon balm) to 12 ± 3 mg/g (in hyssop) of dried plant material. PMID:23496773

  4. A mechanistic model of wormhole growth in carbonate matrix acidizing and acid fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.; Hill, A.D.; Sepehrnoorl, K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during ann acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation was developed. The model is initialized with the distribution of largest pores. Wormhole characteristics (size, length, and distribution) were found too be controlled by acid-injection, diffusion, and fluid-loss rates.

  5. Deletion of 1-43 amino acids in cardiac myosin essential light chain blunts length dependency of Ca(2+) sensitivity and cross-bridge detachment kinetics.

    PubMed

    Michael, John Jeshurun; Gollapudi, Sampath K; Ford, Steven J; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Chandra, Murali

    2013-01-15

    The role of cardiac myosin essential light chain (ELC) in the sarcomere length (SL) dependency of myofilament contractility is unknown. Therefore, mechanical and dynamic contractile properties were measured at SL 1.9 and 2.2 μm in cardiac muscle fibers from two groups of transgenic (Tg) mice: 1) Tg-wild-type (WT) mice that expressed WT human ventricular ELC and 2) Tg-Δ43 mice that expressed a mutant ELC lacking 1-43 amino acids. In agreement with previous studies, Ca(2+)-activated maximal tension decreased significantly in Tg-Δ43 fibers. pCa(50) (-log(10) [Ca(2+)](free) required for half maximal activation) values at SL of 1.9 μm were 5.64 ± 0.02 and 5.70 ± 0.02 in Tg-WT and Tg-Δ43 fibers, respectively. pCa(50) values at SL of 2.2 μm were 5.70 ± 0.01 and 5.71 ± 0.01 in Tg-WT and Tg-Δ43 fibers, respectively. The SL-mediated increase in the pCa(50) value was statistically significant only in Tg-WT fibers (P < 0.01), indicating that the SL dependency of myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity was blunted in Tg-Δ43 fibers. The SL dependency of cross-bridge (XB) detachment kinetics was also blunted in Tg-Δ43 fibers because the decrease in XB detachment kinetics was significant (P < 0.001) only at SL 1.9 μm. Thus the increased XB dwell time at the short SL augments Ca(2+) sensitivity at short SL and thus blunts SL-mediated increase in myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. Our data suggest that the NH(2)-terminal extension of cardiac ELC not only augments the amplitude of force generation, but it also may play a role in mediating the SL dependency of XB detachment kinetics and myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. PMID:23144314

  6. The influence of hyaluronic acid hydrogel crosslinking density and macromolecular diffusivity on human MSC chondrogenesis and hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Liming; Hou, Chieh; Tous, Elena; Rai, Reena; Mauck, Robert L.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2012-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels formed via photocrosslinking provide stable 3D hydrogel environments that support the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Crosslinking density has a significant impact on the physical properties of hydrogels, including their mechanical stiffness and macromolecular diffusivity. Variations in the HA hydrogel crosslinking density can be obtained by either changes in the HA macromer concentration (1, 3, or 5% w/v at 15 min exposure) or the extent of reaction through light exposure time (5% w/v at 5, 10, or 15 min). In this work, increased crosslinking by either method resulted in an overall decrease in cartilage matrix content and more restricted matrix distribution. Increased crosslinking also promoted hypertrophic differentiation of the chondrogenically induced MSCs, resulting in more matrix calcification in vitro. For example, type X collagen expression in the high crosslinking density 5% 15 min group was ~156 and 285% higher when compared to the low crosslinking density 1% 15 min and 5% 5 min groups on day 42, respectively. Supplementation with inhibitors of the small GTPase pathway involved in cytoskeletal tension or myosin II had no effect on hypertrophic differentiation and matrix calcification, indicating that the differential response is unlikely to be related to force-sensing mechanotransduction mechanisms. When implanted subcutaneously in nude mice, higher crosslinking density again resulted in reduced cartilage matrix content, restricted matrix distribution, and increased matrix calcification. This study demonstrates that hydrogel properties mediated through alterations in crosslinking density must be considered in the context of the hypertrophic differentiation of chondrogenically induced MSCs. PMID:23084553

  7. The influence of hyaluronic acid hydrogel crosslinking density and macromolecular diffusivity on human MSC chondrogenesis and hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liming; Hou, Chieh; Tous, Elena; Rai, Reena; Mauck, Robert L; Burdick, Jason A

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels formed via photocrosslinking provide stable 3D hydrogel environments that support the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Crosslinking density has a significant impact on the physical properties of hydrogels, including their mechanical stiffness and macromolecular diffusivity. Variations in the HA hydrogel crosslinking density can be obtained by either changes in the HA macromer concentration (1, 3, or 5% w/v at 15 min exposure) or the extent of reaction through light exposure time (5% w/v at 5, 10, or 15 min). In this work, increased crosslinking by either method resulted in an overall decrease in cartilage matrix content and more restricted matrix distribution. Increased crosslinking also promoted hypertrophic differentiation of the chondrogenically induced MSCs, resulting in more matrix calcification in vitro. For example, type X collagen expression in the high crosslinking density 5% 15 min group was ~156 and 285% higher when compared to the low crosslinking density 1% 15 min and 5% 5 min groups on day 42, respectively. Supplementation with inhibitors of the small GTPase pathway involved in cytoskeletal tension or myosin II had no effect on hypertrophic differentiation and matrix calcification, indicating that the differential response is unlikely to be related to force-sensing mechanotransduction mechanisms. When implanted subcutaneously in nude mice, higher crosslinking density again resulted in reduced cartilage matrix content, restricted matrix distribution, and increased matrix calcification. This study demonstrates that hydrogel properties mediated through alterations in crosslinking density must be considered in the context of the hypertrophic differentiation of chondrogenically induced MSCs. PMID:23084553

  8. Negligible penetration of incidental amounts of alpha-hydroxy acid from rinse-off personal care products in human skin using an in vitro static diffusion cell model.

    PubMed

    Okuda, M; Donahue, D A; Kaufman, L E; Avalos, J; Simion, F A; Story, D C; Sakaguchi, H; Fautz, R; Fuchs, A

    2011-12-01

    Alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs), primarily glycolic and lactic acids, are widely used in cosmetics to alleviate dyspigmentation, photodamage, and other aging skin conditions and as pH adjusters. Glycolic acid reportedly enhances skin damage after repeated ultraviolet light exposure, e.g., increased sunburn cell formation. This study assessed potential in vitro skin penetration of lactic acid and malic acid incorporated into rinse-off personal care products, compared with rinse-off and leave-on exposures to glycolic acid (10%, pH 3.5) in a reference lotion. Radiolabeled AHA-fortified shampoo, conditioner, and lotion were evenly applied as single doses to human epidermal membranes mounted in static diffusion cells (not occluded). Exposures were 1-3 min (rinse-off) or 24 h (leave-on). Epidermal penetration of malic acid and lactic acid from the rinse-off shampoo and conditioner, respectively, was negligible, with >99% removed by rinsing, a negligible portion remaining in the stratum corneum (≤0.15%), and even less penetrating into the viable epidermis (≤0.04%). Glycolic acid penetration from the leave-on reference lotion was 1.42 μg equiv./cm2/h, with total absorbable dose recovery (receptor fluid plus epidermis) of 2.51%, compared to 0.009%, 0.003%, and 0.04% for the rinse-off reference lotion, shampoo (malic acid), and conditioner (lactic acid) exposures, respectively. Dermal penetration of AHAs into human skin is pH-, concentration-, and time-dependent. Alpha-hydroxy acids in rinse-off shampoos and conditioners are almost entirely removed from the skin within minutes by rinsing (resulting in negligible epidermal penetration). This suggests that ultraviolet radiation-induced skin effects of AHA-containing rinse-off products are negligible. PMID:21871557

  9. The Effect of Omega-3 Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation on Gestational Length: Randomized Trial of Supplementation Compared to Nutrition Education for Increasing n-3 Intake from Foods

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Mary A.; Reece, Melanie S.; McGregor, James A.; Wilson, John W.; Burke, Shannon M.; Wheeler, Marsha; Anderson, Jennifer E.; Auld, Garry W.; French, Janice I.; Allen, Kenneth G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. DHA supplementation was compared to nutrition education to increase DHA consumption from fish and DHA fortified foods. Design. This two-part intervention included a randomized double-blind placebo controlled DHA supplementation arm and a nutrition education arm designed to increase intake of DHA from dietary sources by 300 mg per day. Setting. Denver Health Hospitals and Clinics, Denver, Colorado, USA. Population. 871 pregnant women aged 18–40 were recruited between16 and 20 weeks of gestation of whom 564 completed the study and complete delivery data was available in 505 women and infants. Methods. Subjects received either 300 or 600 mg DHA or olive oil placebo or nutrition education. Main Outcome Variable. Gestational length. Results. Gestational length was significantly increased by 4.0–4.5 days in women supplemented with 600 mg DHA per day or provided with nutrition education. Each 1% increase in RBC DHA at delivery was associated with a 1.6-day increase in gestational length. No significant effects on birth weight, birth length, or head circumference were demonstrated. The rate of early preterm birth (1.7%) in those supplemented with DHA (combined 300 and 600 mg/day) was significantly lower than in controls. Conclusion. Nutrition education or supplementation with DHA can be effective in increasing gestational length. PMID:26413500

  10. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of a Single Amino-Acid Mutant of WzzBSF That Alters Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Chain Length in Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Wen; Tran, Elizabeth N H; Ericsson, Daniel J; Casey, Lachlan W; Lonhienne, Thierry; Benning, Friederike; Morona, Renato; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a surface polymer of Gram-negative bacteria, helps bacteria survive in different environments and acts as a virulence determinant of host infection. The O-antigen (Oag) component of LPS exhibits a modal chain-length distribution that is controlled by polysaccharide co-polymerases (PCPs). The molecular basis of the regulation of Oag chain-lengths remains unclear, despite extensive mutagenesis and structural studies of PCPs from Escherichia coli and Shigella. Here, we identified a single mutation (A107P) of the Shigella flexneri WzzBSF, by a random mutagenesis approach, that causes a shortened Oag chain-length distribution in bacteria. We determined the crystal structures of the periplasmic domains of wild-type WzzBSF and the A107P mutant. Both structures form a highly similar open trimeric assembly in the crystals, and show a similar tendency to self-associate in solution. Binding studies by bio-layer interferometry reveal cooperative binding of very short (VS)-core-plus-O-antigen polysaccharide (COPS) to the periplasmic domains of both proteins, but with decreased affinity for the A107P mutant. Our studies reveal that subtle and localized structural differences in PCPs can have dramatic effects on LPS chain-length distribution in bacteria, for example by altering the affinity for the substrate, which supports the role of the structure of the growing Oag polymer in this process. PMID:26378781

  11. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of a Single Amino-Acid Mutant of WzzBSF That Alters Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Chain Length in Shigella flexneri

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Lachlan W.; Lonhienne, Thierry; Benning, Friederike; Morona, Renato; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a surface polymer of Gram-negative bacteria, helps bacteria survive in different environments and acts as a virulence determinant of host infection. The O-antigen (Oag) component of LPS exhibits a modal chain-length distribution that is controlled by polysaccharide co-polymerases (PCPs). The molecular basis of the regulation of Oag chain-lengths remains unclear, despite extensive mutagenesis and structural studies of PCPs from Escherichia coli and Shigella. Here, we identified a single mutation (A107P) of the Shigella flexneri WzzBSF, by a random mutagenesis approach, that causes a shortened Oag chain-length distribution in bacteria. We determined the crystal structures of the periplasmic domains of wild-type WzzBSF and the A107P mutant. Both structures form a highly similar open trimeric assembly in the crystals, and show a similar tendency to self-associate in solution. Binding studies by bio-layer interferometry reveal cooperative binding of very short (VS)-core-plus-O-antigen polysaccharide (COPS) to the periplasmic domains of both proteins, but with decreased affinity for the A107P mutant. Our studies reveal that subtle and localized structural differences in PCPs can have dramatic effects on LPS chain-length distribution in bacteria, for example by altering the affinity for the substrate, which supports the role of the structure of the growing Oag polymer in this process. PMID:26378781

  12. Mechanisms by which saturated triacylglycerols elevate the plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration in hamsters. Differential effects of fatty acid chain length.

    PubMed Central

    Woollett, L A; Spady, D K; Dietschy, J M

    1989-01-01

    These studies were designed to elucidate how shorter (MCT) and longer (HCO) chain-length saturated triacylglycerols and cholesterol interact to alter steady-state plasma LDL-cholesterol levels. When either MCT or HCO was fed in the absence of cholesterol, there was little effect on receptor-dependent LDL transport but a 36-43% increase in LDL-cholesterol production. Cholesterol feeding in the absence of triacylglycerol led to significant suppression of receptor-dependent LDL transport and a 26-31% increase in LDL-cholesterol production. However, when the longer chain-length saturated triacylglycerol was fed together with cholesterol there was a marked increase in the suppression of receptor-dependent LDL transport and an 82% increase in production rate. Together, these two alterations accounted for the observed eightfold increase in plasma LDL-cholesterol concentration. In contrast, feeding the shorter chain-length saturated triacylglycerol with cholesterol actually enhanced receptor-dependent LDL transport while also causing a smaller increase (52%) in the LDL-cholesterol production rate. As a result of these two opposing events, MCT feeding had essentially no net effect on plasma LDL-cholesterol levels beyond that induced by cholesterol feeding alone. PMID:2738148

  13. Identification of acetic acid bacteria by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of a PCR-amplified fragment of the gene coding for 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Poblet, M; Rozès, N; Guillamón, J M; Mas, A

    2000-07-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) irreversibly spoil wines and represent a serious problem. Limited studies on the ecology of AAB during winemaking have been done due to the lack of rapid and precise techniques for their identification. RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified fragment of 16S rDNA was performed on AAB reference strains. The amplified rDNAs were approximately 870-bp long for all AAB species while no amplicons were detected for lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. Out of the four restriction enzymes tested, TaqI was the most efficient one and divided the studied AAB into six groups. However, complete differentiation among collection strains of Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconoacetobacter hansenii was not possible. PMID:10886617

  14. A mass transfer model for the fixed-bed adsorption of ferulic acid onto a polymeric resin: axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion.

    PubMed

    Davila-Guzman, Nancy E; Cerino-Córdova, Felipe J; Soto-Regalado, Eduardo; Loredo-Cancino, Margarita; Loredo-Medrano, José A; García-Reyes, Refugio B

    2016-08-01

    In this study, amberlite XAD-16 (XAD-16) bed column system was used to remove ferulic acid (FA) from aqueous solutions. Laboratory-scale column experiments were conducted in downflow fixed bed at initial FA concentration of 1 g/L, initial pH 3, and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbent bed under different flow rates (1.3-7.7 mL/min) was studied. The bed utilization efficiency was in the range of 64.64-72.21% at the studied flow rates. A mass transfer model considering both axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion was developed to predict the breakthrough curves of FA adsorption on XAD-16. This model predicted the experimental data better than Bohart-Adams model and Thomas model, based on the low deviation between predicted and experimental data. The axial dispersion coefficient value varied from 6.45 × 10(-6) to 1.10 × 10(-6) m(2)/s at flow rate from 1.3 to 7.7 mL/min, whereas the intraparticle diffusion coefficient was 1.04 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, being this last resistance the rate-limiting step. In conclusion, axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion phenomena play the major role in predicting the adsorption of FA onto XAD-16 in fixed-bed columns. PMID:26789835

  15. Dissolution of weak acids under laminar flow and rotating disk hydrodynamic conditions: application of a comprehensive convection-diffusion-migration-reaction transport model.

    PubMed

    Neervannan, Seshadri; Southard, Marylee Z; Stella, Valentino J

    2012-09-01

    A steady-state mass transfer model that incorporates convection, diffusion, ionic migration, and ionization reaction processes was extended to describe the dissolution of weak acids under laminar flow and a rotating disk hydrodynamics. The model accurately predicted the experimental dissolution rates of benzoic acid, 2-naphthoic acid, and naproxen in unbuffered and monoprotic buffers within the physiological pH range for both hydrodynamic systems. Simulations at various flow rates indicated a cube root dependency of dissolution rate on the flow rate for a given bulk pH value for the laminar hydrodynamic system, as proposed earlier by Shah and Nelson (1975. J Pharm Sci 64(9):1518-1520) for neutral compounds. The model has limitations in its ability to accurately predict the dissolution of weak acids under certain conditions that imposed steep concentration gradients, such as high pH values, and for polyprotic buffer systems that caused the numerical solution to be unstable, suggesting that alternative numerical techniques may be required to obtain a stable numerical solution at all conditions. The model presents many advantages, most notably the ability to successfully predict the complex process under physiological conditions without simplifying assumptions, and therefore accurately representing the system in a comprehensive manner. PMID:22623113

  16. A conformation and orientation model of the carboxylic group of fatty acids dependent on chain length in a Langmuir monolayer film studied by polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muro, Maiko; Itoh, Yuki; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    The conformation of the carboxylic group of fatty acids in a Langmuir (L) monolayer film on water is described in relation to the aggregation property of the hydrocarbon chain. Polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectra (PM-IRRAS) of L films of heptadecanoic acid (C(17)), octadecanoic acid (C(18)), and nonadecanoic acid (C(19)) exhibit systematic spectral changes in both the C-H and C=O stretching vibration regions. Through a stabilization analysis of the L films at a high surface pressure, the C(19) L film has been found outstandingly stable exhibiting no film shrink, while the other two compounds exhibit a large shrink at high surface pressure. By taking into account the uniquely high aggregation property of the hydrocarbon chains of C(19), the three major bands arising from the C=O stretching vibration mode propose three types of molecular conformations about the carboxylic group, which are elucidated by a balance of the hydration of the carboxylic group, the chain length of the hydrocarbon chain, and the surface pressure. PMID:20718412

  17. Reliable vibrational wavenumbers for C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and N-H stretchings of isolated and hydrogen-bonded nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Teresa; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2016-03-16

    The accurate prediction of vibrational wavenumbers for functional groups involved in hydrogen-bonded bridges remains an important challenge for computational spectroscopy. For the specific case of the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and N-H stretching modes of nucleobases and their oligomers, the paucity of experimental reference values needs to be compensated by reliable computational data, which require the use of approaches going beyond the standard harmonic oscillator model. Test computations performed for model systems (formamide, acetamide and their cyclic homodimers) in the framework of the second order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) confirmed that anharmonic corrections can be safely computed by global hybrid (GHF) or double hybrid (DHF) functionals, whereas the harmonic part is particularly challenging. As a matter of fact, GHFs perform quite poorly and even DHFs, while fully satisfactory for C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretchings, face unexpected difficulties when dealing with N-H stretchings. On these grounds, a linear regression for N-H stretchings has been obtained and validated for the heterodimers formed by 4-aminopyrimidine with 6-methyl-4-pyrimidinone (4APM-M4PMN) and by uracil with water. In view of the good performance of this computational model, we have built a training set of B2PLYP-D3/maug-cc-pVTZ harmonic wavenumbers (including linear regression scaling for N-H) for six-different uracil dimers and a validation set including 4APM-M4PMN, one of the most stable hydrogen-bonded adenine homodimers, as well as the adenine-uracil, adenine-thymine, guanine-cytosine and adenine-4-thiouracil heterodimers. Because of the unfavourable scaling of DHF harmonic wavenumbers with the dimensions of the investigated systems, we have optimized a linear regression of B3LYP-D3/N07D harmonic wavenumbers for the training set, which has been next checked against the validation set. This relatively cheap model, which shows very good agreement with

  18. Rapid nuclear import of short nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Mai; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2016-10-01

    Exogenous short-chain nucleic acids undergo rapid import into the nucleus. Fluorescence-labeled dT1-13 DNA microinjected into the cytoplasm domain of a HeLa cell was rapidly imported into the nucleus domain within 1min. This is much more rapid than what has been observed for intracellular diffusion of small molecules. In contrast, import of longer nucleic acids with a length of over 30nt into the nucleus was suppressed. PMID:27597250

  19. Structural transitions of polyadenylic acid due to protonation: the influence of the length of single strands on the polarographic behaviour of the double-helical form

    PubMed Central

    Paleček, Emil; Vetterl, Vladimír; Šponar, Jaroslav

    1974-01-01

    Transition of single-stranded poly(A) into its double-helical protonated form was followed by means of derivative pulse polarography, spectrophotometry, and other methods. It was found that properties of protonated poly(A) depended on the length of single strands from which the protonated double helix was formed. In contrary to longer poly(A) transition of short single-stranded molecules (s20,w lower than about 3) caused practically no decrease in the pulse-polarographic current. It was concluded that the formation of the protonated double helix of poly(A) did not result in the inaccesibility of the reduction sites (located in the vicinity of the surface of the molecule) for the electrode process, as it was in DNA-like double-helical polynucleotides. The current changes observed in the course of transition of longer poly(A) were explained as due to slower transport of long double-stranded molecules to the electrode. PMID:10793676

  20. High aspect ratio nanoimprinted grooves of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) control the length and direction of retraction fibers during fibroblast cell division.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi-Hsuan; Chiang, Po-Chieh; Cheng, Li-Jing; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Swami, Nathan S; Chou, Chia-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Retraction fibers (RFs) determine orientation of the cell division axis and guide the spreading of daughter cells. Long and unidirectional RFs, which are especially apparent during mitosis of cells in three-dimensional (3D) environments, enable improved control over cell fate, following division. However, 3D gel environments lack the cues necessary for predetermining the orientation of RFs to direct tissue architecture. While patterning of focal adhesion regions by microcontact printing can determine orientation of the RFs through enhancing focal adhesion numbers along particular directions, the RFs remain short due to the two-dimensional culture environment. Herein, the authors demonstrate that nanoimprinted grooves of polylactic acid glycolic acid (PLGA) with a high aspect ratio (A.R. of 2.0) can provide the cues necessary to control the direction of RFs, as well as enable the maintenance of long and unidirectional RFs as observed within 3D cultures, while the same is not possible with PLGA grooves of lower A.R. (1.0 or lower). Based on enhanced levels of contact guidance of premitotic fibroblast protrusions at high A.R. grooves and deeper levels of focal adhesion due to filopodia extensions into these grooves, it is suggested that submicron (800 nm width) PLGA grooves with A.R. of 2 are capable of supporting mechanical forces from cell protrusions to a greater depth, thereby enabling the maintenance of the protrusions as long and unidirectional RFs during cell division. Given the scalability and versatility of nanoimprint techniques, the authors envision a platform for designing nanostructures to direct tissue regeneration and developmental biology. PMID:26652706

  1. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Constant Behavior: II. Estimation of Intrinsic Acidity and Electrolyte Ion Site Binding Constants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-pK metal oxide surface acidity constant model relies on generic mass action expressions of the form: Ka = [>SOHx-1x-2]aH+EXP(-ΔGexcess/RT)/[>SOHxX-l] where x equals 1 or 2. While all current two-pK surface complexation models require numerical estimates of "intrinsic" aci...

  2. The 35-amino acid C2 protein of Cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus, Burewala, implicated in resistance breaking in cotton, retains some activities of the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Fazal; Iqbal, Zafar; Briddon, Rob W; Vazquez, Franck; Saeed, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    With one exception, all the begomoviruses characterized so far encode an ~134-amino acid (aa) (A)C2 protein. The exception is the "Burewala" strain of Cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV-Bu), associated with resistance breaking in cotton across Pakistan and northwestern India, that encodes a truncated 35-aa C2. The C2 protein encoded by begomoviruses performs multiple functions including suppression of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), modulating microRNA (miRNA) expression and may be a pathogenicity determinant. The study described here was designed to investigate whether the CLCuKoV-Bu 35-aa C2 retains the activities of the full-length C2 protein. The results showed the 35-aa C2 of CLCuKoV-Bu acts as a pathogenicity determinant, suppresses PTGS and upregulates miRNA expression when expressed from a Potato virus X vector in Nicotiana benthamiana. The symptoms induced by expression of full-length C2 were more severe than those induced by the 35-aa C2. The accumulation of most developmental miRNAs decreases with the full-length C2 protein and increases with the 35-aa peptide of CLCuKoV-Bu. The study also revealed that 35-aa peptide of CLCuKoV-Bu maintains suppressor of silencing activity at a level equal to that of full-length C2. The significance of the results with respect to virus fitness and resistance breaking is discussed. PMID:27209537

  3. A NOTE ON PERPENDICULAR SCATTERING LENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, R. C.

    2009-10-01

    The problem of cosmic ray diffusion in magnetostatic slab turbulence is revisited. It is known that, for large timescales, the perpendicular diffusion coefficient is subdiffusive. Although, for small timescales, the field line random walk limit should apply, it is shown that the perpendicular motion is dominated by the Larmor orbit, and that no constant scattering length can be seen. It is therefore concluded that, in magnetostatic slab turbulence, perpendicular transport is completely suppressed.

  4. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  5. Structure-related aspects on water diffusivity in fatty acid-soap and skin lipid model systems.

    PubMed

    Norlén, L; Engblom, J

    2000-01-01

    Simplified skin barrier models are necessary to get a first hand understanding of the very complex morphology and physical properties of the human skin barrier. In addition, it is of great importance to construct relevant models that will allow for rational testing of barrier perturbing/occlusive effects of a large variety of substances. The primary objective of this work was to study the effect of lipid morphology on water permeation through various lipid mixtures (i.e., partly neutralised free fatty acids, as well as a skin lipid model mixture). In addition, the effects of incorporating Azone((R)) (1-dodecyl-azacycloheptan-2-one) into the skin lipid model mixture was studied. Small- and wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used for structure determinations. It is concluded that: (a) the water flux through a crystalline fatty acid-sodium soap-water mixture (s) is statistically significantly higher than the water flux through the corresponding lamellar (L(alpha)) and reversed hexagonal (H(II)) liquid crystalline phases, which do not differ between themselves; (b) the water flux through mixtures of L(alpha)/s decreases statistically significantly with increasing relative amounts of lamellar (L(alpha)) liquid crystalline phase; (c) the addition of Azone((R)) to a skin lipid model system induces a reduction in water flux. However, further studies are needed to more closely characterise the structural basis for the occlusive effects of Azone((R)) on water flux. PMID:10640594

  6. Measuring Thermodynamic Length

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2007-09-07

    Thermodynamic length is a metric distance between equilibrium thermodynamic states. Among other interesting properties, this metric asymptotically bounds the dissipation induced by a finite time transformation of a thermodynamic system. It is also connected to the Jensen-Shannon divergence, Fisher information, and Rao's entropy differential metric. Therefore, thermodynamic length is of central interestin understanding matter out of equilibrium. In this Letter, we will consider how to denethermodynamic length for a small system described by equilibrium statistical mechanics and how to measure thermodynamic length within a computer simulation. Surprisingly, Bennett's classic acceptance ratio method for measuring free energy differences also measures thermodynamic length.

  7. Optimizing the models for rapid determination of chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin in plant samples by near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhiyi; Shan, Ruifeng; Wang, Jiajun; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2014-07-01

    Polyphenols in plant samples have been extensively studied because phenolic compounds are ubiquitous in plants and can be used as antioxidants in promoting human health. A method for rapid determination of three phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin) in plant samples using near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRDRS) is studied in this work. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used for building the calibration models, and the effects of spectral preprocessing and variable selection on the models are investigated for optimization of the models. The results show that individual spectral preprocessing and variable selection has no or slight influence on the models, but the combination of the techniques can significantly improve the models. The combination of continuous wavelet transform (CWT) for removing the variant background, multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) for correcting the scattering effect and randomization test (RT) for selecting the informative variables was found to be the best way for building the optimal models. For validation of the models, the polyphenol contents in an independent sample set were predicted. The correlation coefficients between the predicted values and the contents determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis are as high as 0.964, 0.948 and 0.934 for chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin, respectively.

  8. Combustor diffuser interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Ram; Thorp, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Advances in gas turbine engine performance are achieved by using compressor systems with high stage loading and low part count, which result in high exit Mach numbers. The diffuser and combustor systems in such engines should be optimized to reduce system pressure loss and to maximize the engine thrust-to-weight ratio and minimize length. The state-of-the-art combustor-diffuser systems do not meet these requirements. Detailed understanding of the combustor-diffuser flow field interaction is required for designing advanced gas turbine engines. An experimental study of the combustor-diffuser interaction (CDI) is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of analytical models applicable to a wide variety of diffuser designs. The CDI program consists of four technical phases: Literature Search; Baseline Configuration; Parametric Configurations; and Performance Configurations. Phase 2 of the program is in progress.

  9. Comparison of Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy with Grating-Based Near-Infrared for the Determination of Fatty Acids in Forages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid-infrared (FTMIR) and near infrared spectroscopy (FTNIR) were compared to scanning monochromator-grating-based near infrared spectroscopy (SMNIR), for their ability to quantify fatty acids (FA) in forages. Thirteen different forage cultivars belonging to 11 d...

  10. Chain-length dependency of interactions of medium-chain fatty acids with glucose metabolism in acini isolated from lactating rat mammary glands. A putative feed-back to control milk lipid synthesis from glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Heesom, K J; Souza, P F; Ilic, V; Williamson, D H

    1992-01-01

    The effects of a series of medium-chain fatty acids (C6-C12) on glucose metabolism in isolated acini from lactating rat mammary glands have been studied. Hexanoate (C6) octanoate (C8) and decanoate (C10), but not laurate (C12), decreased [1-14C]glucose conversion into [14C]lipid and the production of 14CO2 (an index of the pentose phosphate pathway). With hexanoate and octanoate, glucose utilization was decreased, whereas decanoate had a slight stimulatory effect on glucose utilization, but there was a large accumulation of lactate. Addition of dichloroacetate (an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase) decreased this accumulation of lactate and stimulated the conversion of [1-14C]glucose into [14C]lipid and 14CO2. Insulin had no effect on the rate of glucose utilization in the presence of hexanoate. It stimulated the rate in the presence of octanoate and laurate and increased the conversion of [1-14C]glucose into [14C]lipid in the presence of octanoate, decanoate or laurate. The major fate of 1-14C-labelled medium-chain fatty acids (C6, C8 and C12) was conversion into [14C]lipid. The proportion converted into 14CO2 decreased with increasing chain length, whereas the rate of [14C]lipid formation increased. It is concluded that the interactions between medium-chain fatty acids and glucose metabolism represent a feed-back mechanism to control milk lipid synthesis, and this may be important when milk accumulates in the gland. PMID:1731763

  11. Co-drug strategy for promoting skin targeting and minimizing the transdermal diffusion of hydroquinone and tranexamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Chen, Wei-Yu; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Chen, Chun-Che; Fang, Jia-You

    2013-01-01

    Hydroquinone and tranexamic acids (TXA) are skin-lightening agents with a hydrophilic nature and low skin absorption. A high dose is needed for clinical use, resulting in a high incidence of skin irritation. Co-drugs formed by conjugating hydroquinone and TXA were synthesized and their in vitro and in vivo skin absorption characteristics were evaluated. The two synthesized co-drugs were 4-hydroxyphenyl 4-(aminomethyl)cyclohexanecarboxylate (HAC) and 1,4- phenylene bis(aminomethyl)cyclohexanecarboxylate (BAC). The co-drugs were chemically stable in aqueous solution, but rapidly degraded to the respective parent drug in esterases and skin homogenates. Compared to hydroquinone application, 7.2- and 2.4-fold increments in the hydroquinone skin deposition were obtained with the in vitro application of HAC and BAC. HAC and BAC led to 3- and 2-fold enhancements of equivalent TXA deposition compared to TXA administration. The in vivo experiment showed a further enhancement of co-drugs compared to the in vitro setup. The transdermal penetration of co-drugs, especially BAC, was much lower than that of hydroquinone and TXA. This indicated high-level skin targeting by the co-drugs. HAC and BAC revealed strong affinities for the viable epidermis/dermis. Hair follicles are important reservoirs for co-drug delivery. Daily administration of co-drugs to the skin did not generate irritation for up to 7 days. Both co-drugs are superior candidates for treating skin hyperpigmentation. PMID:23931279

  12. Correlation length for interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.; Sari, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    It is argued that it is necessary to consider two correlation lengths for interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations. For particles with gyroradii large enough to encounter and be scattered by large-scale tangential discontinuities in the field (particles with energies of above several GeV/nucleon) the appropriate correlation length is simply the mean spatial separation between the discontinuities. Particles with gyroradii much less than this mean separation appear to be unaffected by the discontinuities and respond only to smaller-scale field fluctuations. With this system of two correlation lengths the cosmic ray diffusion tensor may be altered from what was predicted by, for example, Jokipii and Coleman, and the objections raised recently by Klimas and Sandri to the diffusion analysis of Jokipii may apply only at relatively low energies (about 50 MeV/nucleon).

  13. Diffusion limited aggregation. The role of surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ruiz, Juan M.; Otálora, Fermín

    1991-11-01

    We present a growth model in which the hitting particles are able to diffuse to more stable growth sites in the perimeter of a cluster growing by diffusion limited aggregation. By tuning the diffusion path Ls, the morphological output - from disordered fractal to perfect single crystals - can be controlled. Instabilities appear when the mean length of the crystal faces Lf are greater than 2 Ls.

  14. Neandertal clavicle length

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik; Holliday, Trenton W.; Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene archaic humans from western Eurasia (the Neandertals) have been described for a century as exhibiting absolutely and relatively long clavicles. This aspect of their body proportions has been used to distinguish them from modern humans, invoked to account for other aspects of their anatomy and genetics, used in assessments of their phylogenetic polarities, and used as evidence for Late Pleistocene population relationships. However, it has been unclear whether the usual scaling of Neandertal clavicular lengths to their associated humeral lengths reflects long clavicles, short humeri, or both. Neandertal clavicle lengths, along with those of early modern humans and latitudinally diverse recent humans, were compared with both humeral lengths and estimated body masses (based on femoral head diameters). The Neandertal do have long clavicles relative their humeri, even though they fall within the ranges of variation of early and recent humans. However, when scaled to body masses, their humeral lengths are relatively short, and their clavicular lengths are indistinguishable from those of Late Pleistocene and recent modern humans. The few sufficiently complete Early Pleistocene Homo clavicles seem to have relative lengths also well within recent human variation. Therefore, appropriately scaled clavicular length seems to have varied little through the genus Homo, and it should not be used to account for other aspects of Neandertal biology or their phylogenetic status. PMID:24616525

  15. Effect of pectins on the mass transfer kinetics of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion in a Franz diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Restrepo-Sánchez, Luz-Patricia; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo

    2016-10-15

    The effect of high (HMP) and low (LMP) methoxylated pectins (2%w/w) on the rate and extent of the mass transfer of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion across a cellulose membrane was evaluated. A sigmoidal response kinetic analysis was used to calculate both the diffusion coefficients (rate) and the amount of nutrients transferred through the membrane (extent). In all cases, except for lysine, HMP was more effective than LMP in inhibiting both the rate and extent of the mass transfer of nutrients through the membrane. LMP and HMP, e.g., reduced 1.3 and 3.0times, respectively, the mass transfer rate of glucose, as compared to control (containing no pectin), and 1.3 and 1.5times, respectively, the amount of glucose transferred through the membrane. Viscosity, molecular interactions, and flocculation were the most important parameters controlling the mass transfer of electrically neutral nutrients, electrically charged nutrients, and emulsified lipids, respectively. PMID:27173546

  16. Acid evaporation property in chemically amplified resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Itani, Toshiro; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Yamana, Mitsuharu; Samoto, Norihiko; Kasama, Kunihiko

    1997-07-01

    The lithographic performance of a chemically amplified resist system very much depends on the photo-generated acid structure. In a previous paper, we reported the molecular structure dependence of two typical photo-generated acids (aromatic sulfonic acid and alkyl sulfonic acid) from the viewpoints of lithographic performance and acid characteristics such as acid generation efficiency, acid diffusion behavior and acid evaporation property. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of the remaining solvent in a resist film on the acid evaporation property. Four types of two-component chemically amplified positive KrF resists were prepared consisting of tert-butoxycarbonyl (t-BOC) protected polyhydroxystyrene and sulfonic acid derivative photo-acid generator (PAG). Here, a different combination of two types of PAGs [2,4-dimethylbenzenesulfonic acid (aromatic sulfonic acid) derivative PAG and cyclohexanesulfonic acid (alkyl sulfonic acid) derivative PAG] and two types of solvents (propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate; PGMEA and ethyl lactate; EL) were evaluated. The aromatic sulfonic acid was able to evaporate easily during post exposure bake (PEB) treatment, but the alkyl sulfonic acid was not. The higher evaporation property of aromatic sulfonic acid might be due to the higher vapor pressure and the longer acid diffusion length. Furthermore, the amount of aromatic sulfonic acid in the PGMEA resist was reduced by more than that in the EL resist. The amount of acid loss also became smaller at a higher prebake temperature. The concentration of the remaining solvent in the resist film decreased with the increasing prebake temperature. We think that the acid evaporation property was affected by the remaining solvent in the resist, film; the large amount of remaining solvent promoted the acid diffusion and eventually accelerated the acid evaporation from the resist film surface in the PGMEA resist. In summary, the acid evaporation property depends on both the acid

  17. Ligand chain length conveys thermochromism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mainak; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Chandrakumar, K R S; Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-08-14

    Thermochromic properties of a series of non-ionic copper compounds have been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that Cu(II) ion with straight-chain primary amine (A) and alpha-linolenic (fatty acid, AL) co-jointly exhibit thermochromic properties. In the current case, we determined that thermochromism becomes ligand chain length-dependent and at least one of the ligands (A or AL) must be long chain. Thermochromism is attributed to a balanced competition between the fatty acids and amines for the copper(II) centre. The structure-property relationship of the non-ionic copper compounds Cu(AL)2(A)2 has been substantiated by various physical measurements along with detailed theoretical studies based on time-dependent density functional theory. It is presumed from our results that the compound would be a useful material for temperature-sensor applications. PMID:24943491

  18. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  19. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  20. Length Paradox in Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Roberto de A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thought experiment using a general analysis approach with Lorentz transformations to show that the apparent self-contradictions of special relativity concerning the length-paradox are really non-existant. (GA)

  1. [Sonographic leg length measurement].

    PubMed

    Holst, A; Thomas, W

    1989-03-01

    After brief presentation of the clinical and radiological methods to measure the leg length and the leg length difference the authors outline the new diagnostic method for measuring the leg length and the leg length difference by means of real time sonography. Postmortem tests and clinical examples show that ultrasound is ideal to determine exactly the length of femur and tibia. The joint gaps on the hip, knee and upper ankle joint can be demonstrated by means of a 5 MHz linear scanner. A 1 mm strong metal bar on the skin and under the scanner is placed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the body so that the bar can be seen in the centre. A measuring device gives the distances of the joint gaps in cm so that the difference correspond to the real length of femur and tibia. This standardised measuring is done by a particularly developed bearing and measuring device. The results of the sonographical measurements on 20 corpses and checking after consecutive dissections showed in 75% of cases a 100% sonographic measuring accuracy of the total leg length. The separately considered results for femur (85%) and tibia (90) were even better. The maximum sonographic measuring fault was 1.0 cm for the femur (in one case) and 0.5 cm for the tibia, respectively. All sonographic measurements were performed with the Sonoline SL-1 of the Siemens Company (Erlangen, W-Germany). Thus, sonographical measuring of the leg length offers a reliable, non-invasive method that can be repeated as often as necessary and is simply executed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2652268

  2. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2011-07-15

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  3. Holographic diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadle, Stephen; Wuest, Daniel; Cantalupo, John; Lakes, Roderic S.

    1994-01-01

    Holographic diffusers are prepared using silver halide (Agfa 8E75 and Kodak 649F) and photopolymer (Polaroid DMP 128 and DuPont 600, 705, and 150 series) media. It is possible to control the diffusion angle in three ways: by selection of the properties of the source diffuser, by control of its subtended angle, and by selection of the holographic medium. Several conventional diffusers based on refraction or scattering of light are examined for comparison.

  4. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  5. Document Length Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singhal, Amit; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated document retrieval relevance based on document length in an experimental text collection. Topics include term weighting and document ranking, retrieval strategies such as the vector-space cosine match, and a modified technique called the pivoted cosine normalization. (LRW)

  6. The dynamics of unsteady detonation with diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq Dennis; Romick, Christopher; Powers, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Here we consider an unsteady detonation with diffusion included. This introduces an interaction between the reaction length scales and diffusion length scales. Detailed kinetics introduce multiple length scales as shown though the spatial eigenvalue analysis of hydrogen-oxygen system; the smallest length scale is {approx} 10{sup 7} m and the largest {approx} 10{sup -2} m; away from equilibrium, the breadth can be larger. In this paper, we consider a simpler set of model equations, similar to the inviscid reactive compressible fluid equations, but include diffusion (in the form of thermal/energy, momentum, and mass diffusion). We will seek to reveal how the complex dynamics already discovered in one-step systems in the inviscid limit changes with the addition of diffusion.

  7. Degradation of bulk diffusion length in CZ silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, J.H.; King, R.R.; Mitchell, K.W.

    1995-08-01

    Commercially-produced, unencapsulated, CZ silicon solar cells can lose 3 to 4% of their initial efficiency after exposure to light. After this initial, rapid ( < 30 min.) decrease, the cell power output remains stable. The cell performance recovers in a matter of hours in the dark at room temperature, and degrades again under light exposure. The different conditions under which CZ silicon cells degrade, and the reverse process, annealing, are characterized with the methods of spectral response and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Iron impurities are a possible cause of this effect.

  8. Counterion Diffusion in Ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Russell; Winey, Karen; Kim, Joon-Seop; Composto, Russell

    2004-03-01

    Diffusion of Cs counterions to the air/ionomer film interface is followed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and results compared with the "sticky reptation" model[1]. The ionomer system is poly(styrene-ran-methacrylic acid) (Cs-SMAA) neutralized at 100% by Cs. The concentration profiles exhibit a surface excess, z*, of Cs followed by a depletion of Cs. The z* and depletion layer thickness grow as t1/2, consistent with diffusion limited growth. Annealing studies at 130 °C, 145 °C and 208 °C were used to extract the diffusion coefficient, D. In all cases, D is greater than that of the matrix chains. These results suggest that the diffusion rate is controlled by the fraction of counterions that disassociate from the acid groups and migrate through the matrix. Moreover, the "sticky reptation" model doesn't appear to predict the diffusion behavior in the Cs-SMAA system. [1] Leibler, L, Ludwick, L., Rubinstein, M., Colby, R.H., Macromolecules 24 (1991) 4701.

  9. Delayed Feedback Model of Axonal Length Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Karamched, Bhargav R.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in cell biology is how the sizes of cells and organelles are regulated at various stages of development. Size homeostasis is particularly challenging for neurons, whose axons can extend from hundreds of microns to meters (in humans). Recently, a molecular-motor-based mechanism for axonal length sensing has been proposed, in which axonal length is encoded by the frequency of an oscillating retrograde signal. In this article, we develop a mathematical model of this length-sensing mechanism in which advection-diffusion equations for bidirectional motor transport are coupled to a chemical signaling network. We show that chemical oscillations emerge due to delayed negative feedback via a Hopf bifurcation, resulting in a frequency that is a monotonically decreasing function of axonal length. Knockdown of either kinesin or dynein causes an increase in the oscillation frequency, suggesting that the length-sensing mechanism would produce longer axons, which is consistent with experimental findings. One major prediction of the model is that fluctuations in the transport of molecular motors lead to a reduction in the reliability of the frequency-encoding mechanism for long axons. PMID:25954897

  10. Length of stain dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Payload customers for the Space Shuttle have recently expressed concerns about the possibility of their payloads at an adjacent pad being contaminated by plume effluents from a shuttle at an active pad as they await launch on an inactive pad. As part of a study to satisfy such concerns a ring of inexpensive dosimeters was deployed around the active pad at the inter-pad distance. However, following a launch, dosimeters cannot be read for several hours after the exposure. As a consequence factors such as different substrates, solvent systems, and possible volatilization of HCl from the badges were studied. This observation led to the length of stain (LOS) dosimeters of this invention. Commercial passive LOS dosimeters are sensitive only to the extent of being capable of sensing 2 ppm to 20 ppm if the exposure is 8 hours. To map and quantitate the HCl generated by Shuttle launches, and in the atmosphere within a radius of 1.5 miles from the active pad, a sensitivity of 2 ppm HCl in the atmospheric gases on an exposure of 5 minutes is required. A passive length of stain dosimeter has been developed having a sensitivity rendering it capable of detecting a gas in a concentration as low as 2 ppm on an exposure of five minutes.

  11. Vaneless diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.

  12. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  13. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  14. Public Good Diffusion Limits Microbial Mutualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rajita; Korolev, Kirill S.

    2015-04-01

    Standard game theory cannot describe microbial interactions mediated by diffusible molecules. Nevertheless, we show that one can still model microbial dynamics using game theory with parameters renormalized by diffusion. Contrary to expectations, greater sharing of metabolites reduces the strength of cooperation and leads to species extinction via a nonequilibrium phase transition. We report analytic results for the critical diffusivity and the length scale of species intermixing. Species producing slower public good is favored by selection when fitness saturates with nutrient concentration.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of full-length and proteolytically activated pyruvate oxidase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, Annett; Neumann, Piotr; Wille, Georg; Stubbs, Milton T.; Tittmann, Kai

    2008-03-01

    The peripheral membrane flavoprotein pyruvate oxidase from E. coli has been crystallized in the full-length form and as a proteolytically activated truncation variant lacking the last 23 amino acids at the C-terminus. The thiamine diphosphate- and flavin-dependent peripheral membrane enzyme pyruvate oxidase from Escherichia coli (EcPOX) has been crystallized in the full-length form and as a proteolytically activated C-terminal truncation variant which lacks the last 23 amino acids (Δ23 EcPOX). Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using either protamine sulfate (full-length EcPOX) or 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (Δ23 EcPOX) as precipitants. Native data sets were collected at a X-ray home source to a resolution of 2.9 Å. The two forms of EcPOX crystallize in different space groups. Whereas full-length EcPOX crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 with two monomers per asymmetric unit, the crystals of Δ23 EcPOX belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and contain 12 monomers per asymmetric unit.

  16. Restricted Diffusion in Biophysical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Robert L.; Chang, David B.; Young, Allan C.; Martin, Carroll J.; Ancker-Johnson, Betsy

    1974-01-01

    The pulsed-gradient spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance (PGSENMR) technique was used to measure restricted diffusion of water in three types of animal tissue: human blood plasma and red cells; rat and rabbit heart; rat and rabbit liver. Characteristic lengths (L) for restriction of diffusion are estimated from dependence on the measuring time. Limitations on the range of observable restrictive lengths (1.5-15 μm) are discussed. The decrease in diffusivity due to 1 μm alumina powder (volume fraction = 0.18) in glycerin/water mixtures agrees with the Wang theory assuming spherical particles and no hydration. The characteristic length (L ≃ 4 μm) is larger than the particle size (1 μm) or separation (1.8 μm). Comparison of the diffusivities in tissues at short diffusion times with the Wang theory indicates some bound or trapped water. For packed red blood cells, a restriction (L ≃ 2.3 μm) was attributed tothe red cell membrane. A permeability p ≃ 0.014 cm/s may be estimated from the decrease in diffusivity. Average values of diffusivity ratio in heart were: 0.36 ± 0.02 for rat; and 0.26 ± 0.03 for rabbit; and in liver: 0.25 ± 0.01 for rat; 0.25 ± .04 for 10-day old rabbit; and 0.195 ± 0.03 for 2-yr old rabbit. A restriction (L ≃ 2.7 μm) in rat liver probably results from the mitochondria. PMID:4823458

  17. Intensity dependence of the minority-carrier difusion length in amorphous silicon based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, M.; Shur, M.

    1984-04-01

    Many of the recent measurements of the minority-carrier diffusion length (Lp) in amorphous silicon based alloys have been based on a utilization of the surface photovoltage (SPV). In this case an equation relating photon flux and Lp under ideal conditions has to be modified because of the back diffusion of carriers and the effects of high field regions. To account for the high field region, the 'aparent' diffusion length has been determined for varying intensities of bias light. In the present investigation, a theoretical analysis shows that the zero field diffusion length is indeed intensity dependent and that this dependence can be directly related to the slope of the density of states near the valence band edge. The intensity dependence of the minority carrier diffusion length and the energy slope of the density of states near the valence band edge are obtained on the basis of experimental results.

  18. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  19. Relativistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  20. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  1. Relativistic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed. PMID:19391727

  2. Diffuse sorption modeling.

    PubMed

    Pivovarov, Sergey

    2009-04-01

    This work presents a simple solution for the diffuse double layer model, applicable to calculation of surface speciation as well as to simulation of ionic adsorption within the diffuse layer of solution in arbitrary salt media. Based on Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Gaines-Thomas selectivity coefficient for uni-bivalent exchange on clay, K(GT)(Me(2+)/M(+))=(Q(Me)(0.5)/Q(M)){M(+)}/{Me(2+)}(0.5), (Q is the equivalent fraction of cation in the exchange capacity, and {M(+)} and {Me(2+)} are the ionic activities in solution) may be calculated as [surface charge, mueq/m(2)]/0.61. The obtained solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation was applied to calculation of ionic exchange on clays and to simulation of the surface charge of ferrihydrite in 0.01-6 M NaCl solutions. In addition, a new model of acid-base properties was developed. This model is based on assumption that the net proton charge is not located on the mathematical surface plane but diffusely distributed within the subsurface layer of the lattice. It is shown that the obtained solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation makes such calculations possible, and that this approach is more efficient than the original diffuse double layer model. PMID:19159896

  3. Micro-heterogeneity metrics for diffusion in soft matter†

    PubMed Central

    Mellnik, John; Vasquez, Paula A.; McKinley, Scott A.; Witten, Jacob; Hill, David B.; Forest, M. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Passive particle tracking of diffusive paths in soft matter, coupled with analysis of the path data, is firmly established as a fundamental methodology for characterization of both diffusive transport properties (the focus here) and linear viscoelasticity. For either focus, particle time series are typically analyzed by ensemble averaging over paths, a perfectly natural protocol for homogeneous materials or for applications where mean properties are sufficient. Many biological materials, however, are heterogeneous over length scales above the probe diameter, and the implications of heterogeneity for biologically relevant transport properties (e.g. diffusive passage times through a complex fluid layer) motivate this paper. Our goals are three-fold: first, to detect heterogeneity as reflected by the ensemble path data; second, to further decompose the ensemble of particle paths into statistically distinct clusters; and third, to fit the path data in each cluster to a model for the underlying stochastic process. After reviewing current best practices for detection and assessment of heterogeneity in diffusive processes, we introduce our strategy toward the first two goals with methods from the statistics and machine learning literature that have not found application thus far to passive particle tracking data. We apply an analysis based solely on the path data that detects heterogeneity and yields a decomposition of particle paths into statistically distinct clusters. After these two goals are achieved, one can then pursue model-fitting. We illustrate these heterogeneity metrics on diverse datasets: for numerically generated and experimental particle paths, with tunable and unknown heterogeneity, on numerical models for simple diffusion and anomalous sub-diffusion, and experimentally on sucrose, hyaluronic acid, agarose, and human lung culture mucus solutions. PMID:25144347

  4. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  5. IMPEDANCE OF FINITE LENGTH RESISTOR

    SciTech Connect

    KRINSKY, S.; PODOBEDOV, B.; GLUCKSTERN, R.L.

    2005-05-15

    We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor) of radius a, length g, and conductivity {sigma}, attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency, k >> 1/a. In the equilibrium regime, , the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity {sigma}. In the transient regime, ka{sup 2} >> g, we derive analytic expressions for the impedance and wakefield.

  6. A theoretical analysis of the effects of plaque thickness and initial salivary sucrose concentration on diffusion of sucrose into dental plaque and its conversion to acid during salivary clearance.

    PubMed

    Dawes, C; Dibdin, G H

    1986-02-01

    A mathematical model, written in FORTRAN, has been developed to simulate the interrelated processes of salivary sucrose clearance from the mouth, diffusion of sucrose into dental plaque, and conversion of sucrose to acid and glucan. Reaction of acid with enamel is not included in the model. A total of 28 parameters can be varied by the user, and the relative importance of the different factors affecting acid formation can be assessed. The output of the program gives sucrose and acid concentrations and pH at different depths within the plaque. The initial variables studied were plaque thickness, the salivary sucrose concentration, and the duration of exposure of the plaque to sucrose. Stephan curves typical of those recorded in vivo were generated by the model. With any particular salivary sucrose concentration, there was an optimum plaque thickness at which a minimum pH was achieved at the enamel surface, with very thin or thick plaque samples producing a smaller pH fall. With thick plaque, the minimum pH was often not achieved at the inner surface but at some intermediate depth, which may explain the location of early caries lesions in fissures. The extent of the pH fall at the inner surface and the duration of the pH-minimum region of the Stephan curve were directly related to the initial salivary sucrose concentration and to the duration of exposure to sucrose prior to normal salivary clearance. Simulation of a water rinse at as short a time as two min after the beginning of normal salivary sugar clearance showed that this procedure had only a very small effect on the shape of the Stephan curve.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3455974

  7. Line Lengths and Starch Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Sandra E.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates readability of different line lengths in advertising body copy, hypothesizing a normal curve with lower scores for shorter and longer lines, and scores above the mean for lines in the middle of the distribution. Finds support for lower scores for short lines and some evidence of two optimum line lengths rather than one. (SKC)

  8. Quantum diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, S.

    1994-10-01

    We consider a simple quantum system subjected to a classical random force. Under certain conditions it is shown that the noise-averaged Wigner function of the system follows an integro-differential stochastic Liouville equation. In the simple case of polynomial noise-couplings this equation reduces to a generalized Fokker-Planck form. With nonlinear noise injection new ``quantum diffusion`` terms rise that have no counterpart in the classical case. Two special examples that are not of a Fokker-Planck form are discussed: the first with a localized noise source and the other with a spatially modulated noise source.

  9. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  10. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  11. Ti Diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.

    2006-12-01

    Diffusion of Ti under anhydrous conditions at 1 atmosphere and under fluid-present conditions at 1.1-1.2 GPa has been measured in natural zircon. The source of diffusant for 1-atm experiments was a ZrO2- TiO2-ZrSiO4 mixture, with experiments run in Pt capsules. Diffusion experiments conducted in the presence of H2O-CO2 fluid were run in a piston-cylinder apparatus, using a source of ground TiO2, ZrSiO4 and SiO2, with oxalic acid added to produce H2O-CO2 vapor and partially melt the solid source material, yielding an assemblage of rutile + zircon + melt + vapor. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) with the nuclear reaction ^{48}Ti(p,Γ)^{49}V was used to measure diffusion profiles for both sets of experiments. The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for Ti diffusion normal to c over the temperature range 1350-1550C at one atmosphere: DTi = 3.3x102 exp(-754 ± 56 kJ mol-1 /RT) m2sec-1 Ti diffusivities were found to be similar for experiments run under fluid-present conditions. A fit to all of the data yields the Arrhenius relation D = 1.3x103 exp(-741 ± 46 kJ mol-1 /RT) m2sec-1. These data suggest that zircon should be extremely retentive of Ti chemical signatures, indicating that the recently developed Ti-in-zircon crystallization geothermometer (Watson and Harrison, 2005; Watson et al., 2006) will be quite robust in preserving temperatures of zircon crystallization. Titanium diffuses somewhat faster in zircon than larger tetravalent cations U, Th, and Hf, but considerably more slowly than Pb, the REE, and oxygen; hence Ti crystallization temperatures may be retained under circumstances when radiometric ages or other types of geochemical information are lost. Watson EB, Harrison TM (2005) Science 308, 841-844. Watson EB, Wark DA, Thomas JB (2006) CMP(in press).

  12. Diffusion of intracerebrally injected (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid and (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol in the mouse brain. Effects of ischemia and electroconvulsive shock

    SciTech Connect

    Pediconi, M.F.; Rodriguez de Turco, E.B.; Bazan, N.G.

    1982-12-01

    (2-/sup 3/H)Glycerol and (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid were injected into the region of the frontal horn of the left ventricle of mice and were distributed rapidly throughout the brain. After 10 sec, most of the radioactive fatty acid was found in the hemisphere near the injection site; after 10 min, it was recovered in similar proportions in the cerebellum and brain stem. (2-/sup 3/H)Glycerol showed a heterogeneous distribution, with most of the label remaining in the left hemisphere even after 10 min. On a fresh weight basis, cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem were found to contain similar amounts of labeled glycerol. However, the amount of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonate in cerebrum was only 50% of that recovered from cerebellum or brain stem. Brain ischemia or a single electroconvulsive shock reduced the spread of the label, producing an accumulation of radioactivity in the injected hemisphere, except for an increase in (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol in the brain stem during ischemia. Despite the significant decrease in available precursor in the cerebellum and brain stem after electroshock, the amount of label incorporated into lipids was not altered in these areas and only slightly diminished in the cerebrum.

  13. Spreading lengths of Hermite polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Moreno, P.; Dehesa, J. S.; Manzano, D.; Yáñez, R. J.

    2010-03-01

    The Renyi, Shannon and Fisher spreading lengths of the classical or hypergeometric orthogonal polynomials, which are quantifiers of their distribution all over the orthogonality interval, are defined and investigated. These information-theoretic measures of the associated Rakhmanov probability density, which are direct measures of the polynomial spreading in the sense of having the same units as the variable, share interesting properties: invariance under translations and reflections, linear scaling and vanishing in the limit that the variable tends towards a given definite value. The expressions of the Renyi and Fisher lengths for the Hermite polynomials are computed in terms of the polynomial degree. The combinatorial multivariable Bell polynomials, which are shown to characterize the finite power of an arbitrary polynomial, play a relevant role for the computation of these information-theoretic lengths. Indeed these polynomials allow us to design an error-free computing approach for the entropic moments (weighted Lq-norms) of Hermite polynomials and subsequently for the Renyi and Tsallis entropies, as well as for the Renyi spreading lengths. Sharp bounds for the Shannon length of these polynomials are also given by means of an information-theoretic-based optimization procedure. Moreover, the existence of a linear correlation between the Shannon length (as well as the second-order Renyi length) and the standard deviation is computationally proved. Finally, the application to the most popular quantum-mechanical prototype system, the harmonic oscillator, is discussed and some relevant asymptotical open issues related to the entropic moments, mentioned previously, are posed.

  14. When does length cause the word length effect?

    PubMed

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-03-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining evidence for time-based decay. However, previous studies investigating this effect have confounded length with orthographic neighborhood size. In the present study, Experiments 1A and 1B revealed typical effects of length when short and long words were equated on all relevant dimensions previously identified in the literature except for neighborhood size. In Experiment 2, consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words with a large orthographic neighborhood were better recalled than were CVC words with a small orthographic neighborhood. In Experiments 3 and 4, using two different sets of stimuli, we showed that when short (1-syllable) and long (3-syllable) items were equated for neighborhood size, the word length effect disappeared. Experiment 5 replicated this with spoken recall. We suggest that the word length effect may be better explained by the differences in linguistic and lexical properties of short and long words rather than by length per se. These results add to the growing literature showing problems for theories of memory that include decay offset by rehearsal as a central feature. PMID:21171805

  15. A Systematic Comparison of Mathematical Models for Inherent Measurement of Ciliary Length: How a Cell Can Measure Length and Volume

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, William B.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Serebrenik, Yevgeniy V.; Ritter, Alex; Hernandez-Lopez, Rogelio A.; Gunzenhauser, Julia; Kannegaard, Elisa; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2015-01-01

    Cells control organelle size with great precision and accuracy to maintain optimal physiology, but the mechanisms by which they do so are largely unknown. Cilia and flagella are simple organelles in which a single measurement, length, can represent size. Maintenance of flagellar length requires an active transport process known as intraflagellar transport, and previous measurements suggest that a length-dependent feedback regulates intraflagellar transport. But the question remains: how is a length-dependent signal produced to regulate intraflagellar transport appropriately? Several conceptual models have been suggested, but testing these models quantitatively requires that they be cast in mathematical form. Here, we derive a set of mathematical models that represent the main broad classes of hypothetical size-control mechanisms currently under consideration. We use these models to predict the relation between length and intraflagellar transport, and then compare the predicted relations for each model with experimental data. We find that three models—an initial bolus formation model, an ion current model, and a diffusion-based model—show particularly good agreement with available experimental data. The initial bolus and ion current models give mathematically equivalent predictions for length control, but fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments rule out the initial bolus model, suggesting that either the ion current model or a diffusion-based model is more likely correct. The general biophysical principles of the ion current and diffusion-based models presented here to measure cilia and flagellar length can be generalized to measure any membrane-bound organelle volume, such as the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:25809250

  16. Diffusion characteristics of large molecules assessed by proton MRS on a whole-body MR system.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, A; Machann, J; Helms, G; Claussen, C D; Schick, F

    2004-01-01

    Methods for examinations of diffusion of large molecules of the size of fatty acids or triglycerides were developed for whole body MR units. Samples of aliphatic molecules were examined to study the influence of chain length. Feasibility under in vivo conditions was tested on lard samples at 37 degrees C and on human subjects Three stimulated echo sequences with maximum b-values of 2000 s/mm(2), 20000 s/mm(2), and 80000 s/mm(2) were used to assess a wide range of mobility. Sequence timing was optimized to minimize relaxation losses of fatty tissue. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were determined from five spectra with different diffusion weighting. In-vitro experiments were performed on butanol, decanol, and oleic acid to study the influence of chain length. In vivo conditions were mimicked using lard at 37 degrees C representing a composition of substances of various chain lengths. Subcutaneous fat and tibial bone marrow were studied in three healthy volunteers. ADC of muscular lipids of the lower leg was determined in two subjects. ADC values of pure aliphatic substances were in the range between 3.2 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s for oleic acid and 37.8 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s for butanol. In vivo investigations revealed ADC values of 1.11-1.24 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s for tibial bone marrow and 1.21-2.05 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s for subcutaneous fat. Diffusion coefficients of extra- and intramyocellular lipids were 1.83-3.65 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s and 2.22-3.60 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s, respectively. The proposed technique enables determination of ADC values of relatively large molecules and of lipid tissue compartments under in vivo conditions. Diffusion properties in several human lipid compartments are reported for the first time. Incoherent voxel motion influences the in vivo results to an unknown degree because of high motion sensitivity. In vitro experiments revealed ADC values depending on the chain length of the substances, indicating a residual dependence of measured ADC's on sequence timing

  17. PhaR, a protein of unknown function conserved among short-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoic acids producing bacteria, is a DNA-binding protein and represses Paracoccus denitrificans phaP expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maehara, A; Doi, Y; Nishiyama, T; Takagi, Y; Ueda, S; Nakano, H; Yamane, T

    2001-06-12

    A putative regulatory protein, PhaR, which was identified in the polyhydroxyalkanoic acid synthetic locus (phaZCPR) in Paracoccus denitrificans, was investigated. The PhaR protein purified from a recombinant Escherichia coli was estimated to be 22 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, being consistent with the mass calculated from the nucleotide sequence. The molecular mass was determined to be 93 kDa by size-exclusion chromatography, suggesting that the protein formed a tetramer. A gel mobility shift assay showed that PhaR specifically bound to the intergenic region of phaC--phaP. In a cell-free protein synthesis system using E. coli S30 extract, the expression of the phaP gene was repressed by the addition of purified PhaR. These results suggest that PhaR is a DNA-binding protein and may play a role in the regulation of phaP gene expression. PMID:11410342

  18. A diffusion-diffusion model for percutaneous drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Kubota, K; Ishizaki, T

    1986-08-01

    Several theories describing percutaneous drug absorption have been proposed, incorporating the mathematical solutions of differential equations describing percutaneous drug absorption processes where the vehicle and skin are regarded as simple diffusion membranes. By a solution derived from Laplace transforms, the mean residence time MRT and the variance of the residence time VRT in the vehicle are expressed as simple elementary functions of the following five pharmacokinetic parameters characterizing the percutaneous drug absorption: kd, which is defined as the normalized diffusion coefficient of the skin, kc, which is defined as the normalized skin-capillary boundary clearance, the apparent length of diffusion of the skin 1d, the effective length of the vehicle lv, and the diffusion coefficient of the vehicle Dv. All five parameters can be obtained by the methods proposed here. Results of numerical computation indicate that: concentration-distance curves in the vehicle and skin approximate two curves which are simply expressed using trigonometric functions when sufficient time elapses after an ointment application; the most suitable condition for the assumption that the concentration of a drug in the uppermost epidermis can be considered unchanged is the case where the partition coefficient between vehicle and skin is small, and the constancy of drug concentration is even more valid when the effective length of the vehicle is large; and the amount of a drug in the vehicle or skin and the flow rate of the drug from vehicle into skin or from skin into blood becomes linear on a semilogarithmic scale, and the slopes of those lines are small when Dv is small, when the partition coefficient between vehicle and skin is small, when lv is large, or when kc is small. A simple simulation method is also proposed using a biexponential for the concentration-time curve for the skin near the skin-capillary boundary, that is, the flow rate-time curve for drug passing from skin

  19. Statistical length measurement method by direct imaging of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bengio, E Amram; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E; Behabtu, Natnael; Kleinerman, Olga; Kesselman, Ellina; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Pasquali, Matteo

    2014-05-14

    The influence of carbon nanotube (CNT) length on their macroscopic properties requires an accurate methodology for CNT length measurement. So far, existing techniques are limited to short (less than a few micrometers) CNTs and sample preparation methods that bias the measured values. Here, we show that the average length of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be measured by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid. The method consists of dissolving at low concentration CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (a true solvent), imaging the individual CNTs by cryo-TEM, and processing and analyzing the images to determine CNT length. By measuring the total CNT contour length and number of CNT ends in each image, and by applying statistical analysis, we extend the method to cases where each CNT is long enough to span many cryo-TEM images, making the direct length measurement of an entire CNT impractical. Hence, this new technique can be used effectively to estimate samples in a wide range of CNT lengths, although we find that cryo-TEM imaging may bias the measurement towards longer CNTs, which are easier to detect. Our statistical method is also applied to AFM images of CNTs to show that, by using only a few AFM images, it yields estimates that are consistent with literature techniques, based on individually measuring a higher number of CNTs. PMID:24773046

  20. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  1. Proton conduction in exchange membranes across multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Jorn, Ryan; Savage, John; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-11-20

    Concerns over global climate change associated with fossil-fuel consumption continue to drive the development of electrochemical alternatives for energy technology. Proton exchange fuel cells are a particularly promising technology for stationary power generation, mobile electronics, and hybrid engines in automobiles. For these devices to work efficiently, direct electrical contacts between the anode and cathode must be avoided; hence, the separator material must be electronically insulating but highly proton conductive. As a result, researchers have examined a variety of polymer electrolyte materials for use as membranes in these systems. In the optimization of the membrane, researchers are seeking high proton conductivity, low electronic conduction, and mechanical stability with the inclusion of water in the polymer matrix. A considerable number of potential polymer backbone and side chain combinations have been synthesized to meet these requirements, and computational studies can assist in the challenge of designing the next generation of technologically relevant membranes. Such studies can also be integrated in a feedback loop with experiment to improve fuel cell performance. However, to accurately simulate the currently favored class of membranes, perfluorosulfonic acid containing moieties, several difficulties must be addressed including a proper treatment of the proton-hopping mechanism through the membrane and the formation of nanophase-separated water networks. We discuss our recent efforts to address these difficulties using methods that push the limits of computer simulation and expand on previous theoretical developments. We describe recent advances in the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method that can probe proton diffusion at the nanometer-length scale and accurately model the so-called Grotthuss shuttling mechanism for proton diffusion in water. Using both classical molecular dynamics and coarse-grained descriptions that replace atomistic

  2. Mapping of the active site of Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase: Identification of amino acid residues labeled by periodate-oxidized tRNA sup fMet molecules having modified lengths at the 3 prime -acceptor end

    SciTech Connect

    Hountondji, C.; Schmitter, J.M.; Beauvallet, C.; Blanquet, S. )

    1990-09-04

    Initiator tRNA molecules modified at the 3{prime}-end and lacking either A{sub 76} (tRNA-C{sub 75}), the C{sub 75}-A{sub 76} (tRNA-C{sub 74}), the C{sub 74}-C{sub 75}-A{sub 76} (tRNA-A{sub 73}), or the A{sub 73}-C{sub 74}-C{sub 75}-A{sub 76} (tRNA-A{sub 72}) nucleotides were prepared stepwise by repeated periodate, lysine, and alkaline phosphatase treatments. When incubated with trypsin-modified methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MTS{sub T}), excess amounts of the dialdehyde derivative of each of these shortened tRNAs (tRNA-C{sub 75}ox, tRNA-A{sub 73}ox, and tRNA-A{sub 72}ox) abolished both the isotopic ({sup 32}P)PP{sub i}ATP exchange and the tRNA aminoacylation activities of the enzyme. In the presence of limiting concentrations of the various tRNAox species, the relative extents of inactivation of the enzyme were consistent with the formation of 1:1 complexes of the reacting tRNAs with the monomeric modified synthetase. Specificity of the labeling was further established by demonstrating that tRNA-C{sub 75}ox binds the enzyme with an equilibrium constant and stoichiometry values in good agreement with those for the binding of nonoxidized tRNA-C{sub 75}. The peptides of MTS{sub T} labeled with either tRNA-C{sub 75}ox or tRNA-C{sub 74}ox were identified. In a previous work all these peptides but one (peptide D) had been already found labeled upon MTS{sub T} incubation with ({sup 14}C)tRNA-A{sub 76}ox. According to the crystallographic structure of MTS{sub T}, the labeled residues K335, K61, K142, K147, and K149 are within a sphere of about 5.5-{angstrom} radius. The present results therefore argue for a marked flexibility of the 3{prime}-end of the enzyme-bound tRNA, enabling it to contact any of the identified reacting residues. Such a cluster of basic amino acids may reflect ionic requirements in the guiding of the negatively charged CCA arm of tRNA toward enzyme-bound methionyl-adenylate.

  3. Review of HxPyOz-Catalyzed H + OH Recombination in Scramjet Nozzle Expansions; and Possible Phosphoric Acid Enhancement of Scramjet Flameholding, from Extinction of H3PO4 + H2 - Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Recent detailed articles by Twarowski indicate that small quantities of phosphorus oxides and acids in the fuel-rich combustion products of H2 + phosphine (PH3) + air should significantly catalyze H, OH and O recombination kinetics during high-speed nozzle expansions -- to reform H2O, release heat, and approach equilibrium more rapidly and closely than uncatalyzed kinetics. This paper is an initial feasibility study to determine (a) if addition of phosphoric acid vapor (H3PO4) to a H2 fuel jet -- which is much safer than using PH3 -- will allow combustion in a high-speed scramjet engine test without adverse effects on localized flameholding, and (b) if phosphorus-containing exhaust emissions are environmentally acceptable. A well-characterized axisymmetric straight-tube opposed jet burner (OJB) tool is used to evaluate H3PO4 addition effects on the air velocity extinction limit (flame strength) of a H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flame. Addition of nitric oxide (NO), also believed to promote catalytic H-atom recombination, was evaluated for comparison. Two to five mass percent H3PO4 in the H2 jet increased flame strength 4.2%, whereas airside addition decreased it 1%. Adding 5% NO to the H2 caused a 2% decrease. Products of H-atom attack on H3PO4 produced an intense green chemiluminescence near the stagnation point. The resultant exothermic production of phosphorus oxides and acids, with accelerated H-atom recombination, released sufficient heat near the stagnation point to increase flame strength. In conclusion, the addition of H3PO4 vapor (or more reactive P sources) to hydrogen in scramjet engine tests may positively affect flameholding stability in the combustor and thrust production during supersonic expansion -- a possible dual benefit with system design / performance implications. Finally, a preliminary assessment of possible environmental effects indicates that scramjet exhaust emissions should consist of phosphoric acid aerosol, with gradual

  4. Does length or neighborhood size cause the word length effect?

    PubMed

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-10-01

    Jalbert, Neath, Bireta, and Surprenant (2011) suggested that past demonstrations of the word length effect, the finding that words with fewer syllables are recalled better than words with more syllables, included a confound: The short words had more orthographic neighbors than the long words. The experiments reported here test two predictions that would follow if neighborhood size is a more important factor than word length. In Experiment 1, we found that concurrent articulation removed the effect of neighborhood size, just as it removes the effect of word length. Experiment 2 demonstrated that this pattern is also found with nonwords. For Experiment 3, we factorially manipulated length and neighborhood size, and found only effects of the latter. These results are problematic for any theory of memory that includes decay offset by rehearsal, but they are consistent with accounts that include a redintegrative stage that is susceptible to disruption by noise. The results also confirm the importance of lexical and linguistic factors on memory tasks thought to tap short-term memory. PMID:21461875

  5. When Does Length Cause the Word Length Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J.; Surprenant, Aimee M.

    2011-01-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining…

  6. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  7. Effective Cavity Length of Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    Megawatt-class gyrotron oscillators for electron cyclotron heating and non-inductive current drive (ECH&CD) in magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas have relatively low cavity quality factors in the range of 1000 to 2000. The effective length of their cavities cannot be simply deduced from the cavity electric field profile, since this has by far not a Gaussian shape. The present paper presents a novel method to estimate the effective length of a gyrotron cavity just from the eigenvalue of the operating TEm,n mode, the cavity radius and the exact oscillation frequency which may be numerically computed or precisely measured. This effective cavity length then can be taken to calculate the Fresnel parameter in order to confirm that the cavity is not too short so that the transverse structure of any mode in the cavity is the same as that of the corresponding mode in a long circular waveguide with the same diameter.

  8. Resolving and measuring diffusion in complex interfaces: Exploring new capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.

    2015-09-01

    This exploratory LDRD targeted the use of a new high resolution spectroscopic diffusion capabilities developed at Sandia to resolve transport processes at interfaces in heterogeneous polymer materials. In particular, the combination of high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments were used to directly explore interface diffusion within heterogeneous polymer composites, including measuring diffusion for individual chemical species in multi-component mixtures. Several different types of heterogeneous polymer systems were studied using these HRMAS NMR diffusion capabilities to probe the resolution limitations, determine the spatial length scales involved, and explore the general applicability to specific heterogeneous systems. The investigations pursued included a) the direct measurement of the diffusion for poly(dimethyl siloxane) polymer (PDMS) on nano-porous materials, b) measurement of penetrant diffusion in additive manufactures (3D printed) processed PDMS composites, and c) the measurement of diffusion in swollen polymers/penetrant mixtures within nano-confined aluminum oxide membranes. The NMR diffusion results obtained were encouraging and allowed for an improved understanding of diffusion and transport processes at the molecular level, while at the same time demonstrating that the spatial heterogeneity that can be resolved using HRMAS NMR PFG diffusion experiment must be larger than ~μm length scales, expect for polymer transport within nanoporous carbons where additional chemical resolution improves the resolvable heterogeneous length scale to hundreds of nm.

  9. Graduated compression stockings: knee length or thigh length.

    PubMed

    Benkö, T; Cooke, E A; McNally, M A; Mollan, R A

    2001-02-01

    The mechanisms by which graduated compression stockings prevent deep venous thrombosis are not completely understood. In the current study the physiologic effect of low-pressure graduated compression stockings on the venous blood flow in the lower limb and the practical aspects of their use were assessed. Patients having elective orthopaedic surgery at a university orthopaedic department were randomized into five groups to wear two different types of graduated compression stockings in thigh and knee lengths. Patients in the fifth control group did not wear graduated compression stockings. Venous occlusion strain gauge plethysmography was used to measure venous flow. After 20-minutes bed rest there was a highly significant increase in venous capacitance and venous outflow in patients in all of the four groups wearing stockings. There was no difference in the mean of the percentage change of venous capacitance in patients in the four groups wearing stockings. The knee length Brevet stockings were less efficient in increasing the venous outflow. There was no significant change in the venous capacitance and venous outflow in patients in the control group. Visual assessment of the fit and use of stockings was done, and patients' subjective opinion of comfort was sought. The knee length graduated compression stockings wrinkled significantly less, and significantly fewer patients reported discomfort with them. All stockings were reported to be difficult to use. Thigh and knee length stockings have a significant effect on decreasing venous stasis of the lower limb. Knee length graduated compression stockings are similarly efficient in decreasing venous stasis, but they are more comfortable to wear, and they wrinkle less. PMID:11210954

  10. Anomalous diffusion in neutral evolution of model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-06-01

    Protein evolution is frequently explored using minimalist polymer models, however, little attention has been given to the problem of structural drift, or diffusion. Here, we study neutral evolution of small protein motifs using an off-lattice heteropolymer model in which individual monomers interact as low-resolution amino acids. In contrast to most earlier models, both the length and folded structure of the polymers are permitted to change. To describe structural change, we compute the mean-square distance (MSD) between monomers in homologous folds separated by n neutral mutations. We find that structural change is episodic, and, averaged over lineages (for example, those extending from a single sequence), exhibits a power-law dependence on n . We show that this exponent depends on the alignment method used, and we analyze the distribution of waiting times between neutral mutations. The latter are more disperse than for models required to maintain a specific fold, but exhibit a similar power-law tail.

  11. Intramolecular diffusion controls aggregation of the PAPf39 peptide.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Kinshuk R; French, Kinsley C; Tzul, Franco O; Makhatadze, George I; Lapidus, Lisa J

    2016-09-01

    The 39-residue fragment of human prostatic acidic phosphatase (PAP) is found in high concentrations in semen and easily form fibrils. Previous work has shown that fibrillization is accelerated with a deletion of the first 8, mostly charged residues and it was hypothesized that fibrillization depended on the dynamics of these peptides. To test this hypothesis we have measured the intramolecular diffusion of the full length and 8-residue deletion peptides at two different pHs and found a correlation with fibrillization lag time. These results can be explained by a simple kinetic model of the early stages of aggregation in which oligomerization is controlled by the rate of peptide reconfiguration. PMID:27393931

  12. Coherence length of neutron superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    De Blasio, F.V.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Lazzari, G.; Baldo, M.; Schulze, H.

    1997-10-01

    The coherence length of superfluid neutron matter is calculated from the microscopic BCS wave function of a Cooper pair in momentum space making use of recent nucleon-nucleon potential models and including polarization (RPA) effects. We find as our main result that the coherence length is proportional to the Fermi momentum to pairing gap ratio, in good agreement with simple estimates used in the literature, with a nearly interaction independent constant of proportionality. Our calculations can be applied to the problem of inhomogeneous superfluidity of hadronic matter in the crust of a neutron star. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Overview of bunch length measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1999-02-19

    An overview of particle and photon beam bunch length measurements is presented in the context of free-electron laser (FEL) challenges. Particle-beam peak current is a critical factor in obtaining adequate FEL gain for both oscillators and self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) devices. Since measurement of charge is a standard measurement, the bunch length becomes the key issue for ultrashort bunches. Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques are presented in the context of using electromagnetic radiation over eight orders of magnitude in wavelength. In addition, the measurement of microbunching in a micropulse is addressed.

  14. Quantification in an Introductory Diffusion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, George E.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a take-home experiment in which students measure the diffusion of acid through acid-filled capillary tubes immersed into base solutions and vice versa. Students represent and analyze the effects of ambient temperature, molecular weight, and concentrations of the solutions on that movement. (MDH)

  15. Internode length in pisum: do the internode length genes effect growth in dark-grown plants?

    PubMed

    Reid, J B

    1983-07-01

    Internode length in light-grown peas (Pisum sativum L.) is controlled by the interaction of genes occupying at least five major loci, Le, La, Cry, Na, and Lm. The present work shows that the genes at all of the loci examined (Le, Cry, and Na) also exert an effect on internode length in plants grown in complete darkness. Preliminary results using pure lines were verified using either segregating progenies or near isogenic lines. The major cause of the differences was due to a change in the number of cells per internode rather than to an alteration of the cell length. Since the genes occupying at least two of these loci, Le and Na, have been shown to be directly involved with gibberellin metabolism, it appears that gibberellins are not only essential for elongation in the dark but are limiting for elongation in the nana (extremely short, na), dwarf (Na le), and tall (Na Le) phenotypes. These results are supported by the large inhibitory effects of AMO 1618 treatments on stem elongation in dwarf and tall lines grown in the dark and the fact that applied gibberellic acid could overcome this inhibition and greatly promote elongation in a gibberellin-deficient na line. It is clear that the internode length genes, and in particular the alleles at the Le locus, are not acting by simply controlling the sensitivity of the plant to light. PMID:16663081

  16. Fluid diffusion in porous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Lowell I.

    Fluid motion in porous media has received a great deal of theoretical and experimental attention due to its importance in systems as diverse as ground water aquifers, catalytic processes, and size separation schemes. Often, the motion of interest is the random thermal motion of molecules in a fluid undergoing no net flow. This diffusive motion is particularly important when the size of the pores is nearly the same as the size of the molecules. In this study, fluid diffusion is measured in several varieties of porous silica whose pore structure is determined by the process by which it is made. The samples in this study have porosities (φ, the ratio of the pore volume to the total sample volume) that vary from 0.3 to 0.75 and average pore radii that range from approximately 15 to 120 A. Determining the effect of the pore structure on the diffusion of a liquid in a porous material is complicated by the chemical interactions between the diffusing molecules and the pore surface. In this study, ions in a hydrophilic fluid are used to block the adsorption of the diffusing dye molecules to the hydroxyl groups covering the silica surface. This technique is unlike typical surface treatments of silica in that it does not permanently alter the pore geometry. In this work, fluid diffusion is measured with a transient holographic grating technique where interfering laser beams create a periodic refractive index modulation in the fluid. The diffraction of a third laser off this grating is monitored to determine how quickly the grating relaxes, thereby determining the diffusion coefficient of the molecules in the fluid. Varying the grating periodicity controls the length scale of the diffusion measurement from 1.2 to 100 μm which is much larger than the average pore sizes of the samples. Therefore, over these large scales, we measure 'normal' diffusion, where the mean squared displacement of a diffusing particle varies linearly with time. In one particular type of porous silica

  17. Length-Scale Dependent Viscosity in Semidilute Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poling-Skutvik, Ryan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Conrad, Jacinta

    2015-03-01

    Using optical microscopy and particle tracking algorithms, we measured the mean-squared displacements (MSDs) of fluorescent polystyrene particles with diameters ranging from 300 nm to 2 μm suspended in semidilute solutions of high molecular weight partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide. The solutions had polymer concentrations ranging from 0.67 to 67c*, where c* is the overlap concentration, and estimated correlation lengths of ~ 100 to 900 nm. At short times, the particles exhibited subdiffusive behavior characterized by MSD ~tα with α < 1 . On long time scales, the particles transitioned to Fickian diffusion (α = 1) and their diffusivity was calculated from the slope of the MSD. Whereas the large particles agreed with predictions using the Stokes-Einstein equation and bulk zero-shear viscosity, the smaller particles diffused much faster than predicted. The relative diffusivities do not collapse onto a single curve, but rather form a continuum that varies with particle size. This indicates that the particles experience a size-dependent effective viscosity mediated by the ratio of particle diameter to characteristic length scales in the polymer solution.

  18. Individual Telomere Lengths in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia12

    PubMed Central

    Samassekou, Oumar; Ntwari, Aimé; Hébert, Josée; Yan, Ju

    2009-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a neoplasia characterized by proliferation of a myeloid cell lineage and chromosome translocation t(9;22) (q34;q11.2). As in the case of most cancers, the average telomere length in CML cells is shorter than that in normal blood cells. However, there are currently no data available concerning specific individual telomere length in CML. Here, we studied telomere length on each chromosome arm of CML cells. In situ hybridization with peptide nucleic acid probes was performed on CML cells in metaphase. The fluorescence intensity of each specific telomere was converted into kilobases according to the telomere restriction fragment results for each sample. We found differences in telomere length between short arm ends and long arm ends. We observed recurrent telomere length changes as well as telomere length maintenance and elongation in some individual telomeres. We propose a possible involvement of individual telomere length changes to some chromosomal abnormalities in CML. We suggest that individual telomere length maintenance is chromosome arm-specific associated with leukemia cells. PMID:19881950

  19. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  20. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  1. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  2. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Michael; Yokota, Kenji; Antonova, Elena; Garcia, Angelica; Beaulieu, Ellen; Hayes, Terry; Iavarone, Anthony T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF). We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate host harboring X. fastidiosa RpfF (XfRpfF) is capable of producing a variety of both saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids. However, only 2-cis unsaturated acids were found to be biologically active in X. fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa produces, and is particularly responsive to, a novel DSF species, 2-cis-hexadecanoic acid that we term XfDSF2. It is also responsive to other, even longer 2-enoic acids to which other taxa such as Xanthomonas campestris are unresponsive. The 2-enoic acids that are produced by X. fastidiosa are strongly affected by the cellular growth environment, with XfDSF2 not detected in culture media in which 2-tetradecenoic acid (XfDSF1) had previously been found. X. fastidiosa is responsive to much lower concentrations of XfDSF2 than XfDSF1. Apparently competitive interactions can occur between various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that block the function of those agonistic 2-enoic fatty acids. By altering the particular 2-enoic acids produced and the relative balance of free enoic and saturated fatty acids, X. fastidiosa might modulate the extent of DSF-mediated quorum sensing. PMID:27435463

  3. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  4. Diffusive and re-orientation dynamics in lyotropic gels of self-assembled organic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegart, Lutz; Wiegart, Pierre; Caronna, Chiara

    2012-02-01

    It is known that dispersing lithocholic bile acid (LCA) in aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide or ammonia leads to the formation of organic nanotubes with well-defined diameters on the nanometer scale. The suspensions appear to be tunable from liquid- to solid-like via the LCA concentration. The length of the tubes is decreasing as a function of temperature, favoring the formation of a phase where the tubes form hexagonally ordered bundles for an appropriate LCA concentration and temperature. In the present study, we have used X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XCPS) to probe the diffusive dynamics of the nanotubes in these lyotropic gels under various conditions (concentration, counter ion, temperature). The multispeckle analysis of the coherent scattering pattern reveals domains in the sample with differing diffusive dynamics. The re-orientation process of different domains of nanotube bundles into a preferred parallel alignment has been observed.

  5. The correlation length for interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.; Sari, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    It is argued that it is appropriate to consider two correlation lengths for interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations. For particles with gyro-radii large enough to encounter and be scattered by large-scale tangential discontinuities in the field (particles with energies greater than or approximately equal to several GeV/nucleon) the appropriate correlation length is simply the mean spatial separation between the discontinuities, L approximately 2 x 10 to the 11th power. Particles with gyro-radii much less than this mean separation (energies less than or approximately equal to 100 MeV/nucleon) appear to be unaffected by the discontinuities and respond only to smaller-scale field fluctuations. For these particles the correlation length is shown to be L approximately 10 to the 10th power cm. With this system of two correlation lengths the cosmic-ray diffusion tensor may be altered from what was predicted by, for example, Jokipii and Coleman, and the objections raised recently by Klimas and Sandri to the diffusion analysis of Jokipii may apply only at relatively low energies (approximately 50 MeV/nucleon).

  6. Critical waves and the length problem of biology

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction–diffusion with a small number substance. Min oscillations in Escherichia coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eukaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PMID:26240329

  7. Hydrodynamic length-scale selection in microswimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Dunkel, Jörn; Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Bär, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A universal characteristic of mesoscale turbulence in active suspensions is the emergence of a typical vortex length scale, distinctly different from the scale invariance of turbulent high-Reynolds number flows. Collective length-scale selection has been observed in bacterial fluids, endothelial tissue, and active colloids, yet the physical origins of this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we systematically derive an effective fourth-order field theory from a generic microscopic model that allows us to predict the typical vortex size in microswimmer suspensions. Building on a self-consistent closure condition, the derivation shows that the vortex length scale is determined by the competition between local alignment forces, rotational diffusion, and intermediate-range hydrodynamic interactions. Vortex structures found in simulations of the theory agree with recent measurements in Bacillus subtilis suspensions. Moreover, our approach yields an effective viscosity enhancement (reduction), as reported experimentally for puller (pusher) microorganisms.

  8. Critical waves and the length problem of biology.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Robert B

    2015-08-18

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction-diffusion with a small number substance. Min oscillations in Escherichia coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eukaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PMID:26240329

  9. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  10. Characteristic lengths affecting evaporative drying of porous media.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Peter; Assouline, Shmuel; Or, Dani

    2008-05-01

    Evaporation from porous media involves mass and energy transport including phase change, vapor diffusion, and liquid flow, resulting in complex displacement patterns affecting drying rates. Force balance considering media properties yields characteristic lengths affecting the transition in the evaporation rate from a liquid-flow-based first stage limited only by vapor exchange with air to a second stage controlled by vapor diffusion through the medium. The characteristic lengths determine the extent of the hydraulically connected region between the receding drying front and evaporating surface (film region) and the onset of flow rate limitations through this film region. Water is displaced from large pores at the receding drying front to supply evaporation from hydraulically connected finer pores at the surface. Liquid flow is driven by a capillary pressure gradient spanned by the width of the pore size distribution and is sustained as long as the capillary gradient remains larger than gravitational forces and viscous dissipation. The maximum extent of the film region sustaining liquid flow is determined by a characteristic length L_{C} combining the gravity characteristic length L_{G} and viscous dissipation characteristic length L_{V} . We used two sands with particle sizes 0.1-0.5 mm ("fine") and 0.3-0.9 mm ("coarse") to measure the evaporation from columns of different lengths under various atmospheric evaporative demands. The value of L_{G} determined from capillary pressure-saturation relationships was 90 mm for the coarse sand and 140 mm for the fine sand. A significant decrease in drying rate occurred when the drying front reached the predicted L_{G} value (viscous dissipation was negligibly small in sand and L_{C} approximately L_{G} ). The approach enables a prediction of the duration of first-stage evaporation with the highest water losses from soil to the atmosphere. PMID:18643163

  11. Fiberoptic Microneedles: Novel Optical Diffusers for Interstitial Delivery of Therapeutic Light

    PubMed Central

    Kosoglu, Mehmet A.; Hood, Robert L.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Grant, David C.; Xu, Yong; Robertson, John L.; Rylander, M. Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Photothermal therapies have limited efficacy and application due to the poor penetration depth of light inside tissue. In earlier work, we described the development of novel fiberoptic microneedles to provide a means to mechanically penetrate dermal tissue and deliver light directly into a localized target area. This paper presents an alternate fiberoptic microneedle design with the capability of delivering more diffuse, but therapeutically useful photothermal energy. Laser lipolysis is envisioned as a future clinical application for this design. Materials and Methods A novel fiberoptic microneedle was developed using hydrofluoric acid etching of optical fiber to permit diffuse optical delivery. Microneedles etched for 10, 30, and 50 minutes, and an optical fiber control were compared with three techniques. First, red light delivery from the microneedles was evaluated by imaging the reflectance of the light from a white paper. Second, spatial temperature distribution of the paper in response to near-IR light (1064 nm, 1 W CW) was recorded using infrared thermography. Third, ex vivo adipose tissue response during 1064 nm, (5 W CW) irradiation was recorded with bright field microscopy. Results The acid etching exposed a 3 mm length of the fiber core, allowing circumferential delivery of light along this length. Increasing etching time decreased microneedle diameter, resulting in increased uniformity of red and 1064 nm light delivery along the microneedle axis. For equivalent total energy delivery, thinner microneedles reduced carbonization in the adipose tissue experiments. Conclusions We developed novel microscale optical diffusers that provided a more homogeneous light distribution from their surfaces, and compared performance to a flat-cleaved fiber, a device currently utilized in clinical practice. These fiberoptic microneedles can potentially enhance clinical laser procedures by providing direct delivery of diffuse light to target

  12. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  13. Softness Correlations Across Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, Robert; Shavit, Amit; Rieser, Jennifer; Schoenholz, Samuel; Cubuk, Ekin; Durian, Douglas; Liu, Andrea; Riggleman, Robert

    In disordered systems, it is believed that mechanical failure begins with localized particle rearrangements. Recently, a machine learning method has been introduced to identify how likely a particle is to rearrange given its local structural environment, quantified by softness. We calculate the softness of particles in simulations of atomic Lennard-Jones mixtures, molecular Lennard-Jones oligomers, colloidal systems and granular systems. In each case, we find that the length scale characterizing spatial correlations of softness is approximately a particle diameter. These results provide a rationale for why localized rearrangements--whose size is presumably set by the scale of softness correlations--might occur in disordered systems across many length scales. Supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46199.

  14. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  15. Perfluorooctanoic acid and environmental risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a member of the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) family of chemicals, which consist of a carbon backbone typically four to fourteen carbons in length and a charged functional moiety.

  16. Effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiac muscle cell length, diameter, area, and sarcomere length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, R.; Barnes, M. A.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of anisosmotic stress on adult mammalian cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte) size. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length were measured in cardiocytes isolated from 10 normal rats and 10 normal cats. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 300 +/- 6 to 130 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 630 +/- 8 mosM. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length increased progressively when osmolarity was decreased, and there were no significant differences between cat and rat cardiocytes with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area or diameter; however, there were significant differences in cardiocyte length (2.8 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05) and sarcomere length (3.3 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05). To determine whether these species-dependent differences in length were related to diastolic interaction of the contractile elements or differences in relative passive stiffness, cardiocytes were subjected to the osmolarity gradient 1) during treatment with 7 mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), which inhibits cross-bridge interaction, or 2) after pretreatment with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), a bivalent Ca2+ chelator. Treatment with EGTA or BDM abolished the differences between cat and rat cardiocytes. Species-dependent differences therefore appeared to be related to the degree of diastolic cross-bridge association and not differences in relative passive stiffness. In conclusion, the osmolarity vs. cell size relation is useful in assessing the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress and may in future studies be useful in assessing changes in relative passive cardiocyte stiffness produced by pathological processes.

  17. Diffusion in solid-Earth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, E. Bruce; Baxter, Ethan F.

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid expansion in the acquisition and use of information on diffusive transport in phases relevant to the solid Earth (crystals, melts and fluids). Although far from complete, the data base on diffusion coefficients is now sufficiently large that broad constraints can be placed upon the length- and time scales of many natural transport phenomena in which diffusion plays a role. Conversely, observations of diffusion progress in specific natural samples can be used to extract time-temperature information for a variety of geologic and geochemical processes, ranging from sediment burial and crustal erosion to fluid-mediated reactions and biosignature retention. Despite this undeniable progress, several major challenges remain that largely define the frontiers of research in solid-Earth diffusion. Perhaps foremost among these is the need to address and understand the multi-scale, multi-path aspects of diffusion in many systems—a complication that is not limited to polyphase materials (individual mineral grains can exhibit clear indications of multi-path behavior even when visible evidence of such paths is lacking). Many other diffusion frontiers are linked in one way or another to this multi-scale issue; they include: diffusion of molecular H 2O and the effect of H species on diffusion in minerals and rocks; diffusive fractionation of multiple isotopes of a single element; diffusion at the extreme conditions of the deep Earth; reconciliation of observations from natural samples and laboratory studies; and development of theoretical approaches to 'predict' diffusion behavior in regions inaccessible to observation.

  18. Critical Length Limiting Superlow Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  19. Double-diffusive layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaussinger, Florian; Kupka, Friedrich; Hücker, Sebastian; Egbers, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Double-diffusive convection plays an important role in geo- and astrophysical applications. The special case, where a destabilising temperature gradient counteracts a stabilising solute gradient leads to layering phenomena under certain conditions. Convectively mixed layers sandwiched in diffusive interfaces form a so-called stack. Well-known double-diffusive systems are observed in rift lakes in Africa and even from the coffee drink Latte Macciatto. Stacks of layers are also predicted to occur inside massive stars and inside giant planets. Their dynamics depend on the thermal, the solute and the momentum diffusivities, as well on the ratio of the gradients of the opposing stratifications. Since the layering process cannot be derived from linear stability analysis, the full nonlinear set of equations has to be investigated. Numerical simulations have become feasible for this task, despite the physical processes operate on a vast range of length and time scales, which is challenging for numerical hydrodynamical modelling. The oceanographically relevant case of fresh and salty water is investigated here in further details. The heat and mass transfer is compared with theoretical results and experimental measurements. Additionally, the initial dynamic of layering, the transient behaviour of a stack and the long time evolution are presented using the example of Lake Kivu and the interior of a giant planet.

  20. Structural and diffusion characterizations of steam-stable mesostructured zeolitic UL-ZSM-5 materials.

    PubMed

    Vinh-Thang, Hoang; Huang, Qinglin; Ungureanu, Adrian; Eić, Mladen; Trong-On, Do; Kaliaguine, Serge

    2006-05-01

    A series of mesoporous UL-ZSM-5 materials (Si/Al = 50) with different micro- and mesoporosity as well as crystallinity was prepared following the procedure proposed in one of our recent studies (Trong-On, D.; Kaliaguine, S. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2001, 40, 3248-3251. Trong-On, D.; Kaliaguine, S. U.S. Patent 6,669,924, B1, 2003). These materials have zeolitic structure in the form of nanoparticles intergrown in the walls of the amorphous wormhole-like aluminosilicate mesopores of Al-Meso-50, which was used as a precursor in the synthesis. The structure, crystallinity, and textural properties of the synthesized materials, as well as a reference ZSM-5 zeolite sample, were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/scanning electron microscoy (SEM) analyses, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and nitrogen adsorption/desorption techniques. The acid properties were examined by FTIR of adsorbed pyridine. UL-ZSM-5 materials were shown to be highly hydrothermally stable. The diffusion of two C7 hydrocarbons, i.e., n-heptane and toluene, in four UL-ZSM-5 materials with different microporosities, related acidities, and crystallinities were investigated using the zero-length column (ZLC) method. Furthermore, the wormhole-like mesostructured aluminosilicate precursor (Al-Meso-50) and a reference MFI zeolite sample were also investigated using the same technique. A theoretical model considering a combination of mesopore diffusion (with surface slip in the main channels) with an activated, mainly surface diffusion mechanism in the intrawall biporous structure, was proposed and employed to interpret the experimental ZLC results. A classical Knudsen type of diffusion was replaced by an activated surface slip type of diffusion mechanism in the mesopores. The transport of n-heptane in UL-ZSM-5 materials was found to be mainly controlled by mesopore diffusion in the main

  1. A theoretical study of rotational diffusion models for rod-shaped viruses. The influence of motion on 31P nuclear magnetic resonance lineshapes and transversal relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1993-01-01

    Information about the interaction between nucleic acids and coat proteins in intact virus particles may be obtained by studying the restricted backbone dynamics of the incapsulated nucleic acids using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In this article, simulations are carried out to investigate how reorientation of a rod-shaped virus particle as a whole and isolated nucleic acid motions within the virion influence the 31P NMR lineshape and transversal relaxation dominated by the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy. Two opposite cases are considered on a theoretical level. First, isotropic rotational diffusion is used as a model for mobile nucleic acids that are loosely or partially bound to the protein coat. The effect of this type of diffusion on lineshape and transversal relaxation is calculated by solving the stochastic Liouville equation by an expansion in spherical functions. Next, uniaxial rotational diffusion is assumed to represent the mobility of phosphorus in a virion that rotates as a rigid rod about its length axis. This type of diffusion is approximated by an exchange process among discrete sites. As turns out from these simulations, the amplitude and the frequency of the motion can only be unequivocally determined from experimental data by a combined analysis of the lineshape and the transversal relaxation. In the fast motional region both the isotropic and the uniaxial diffusion model predict the same transversal relaxation as the Redfield theory. For very slow motion, transversal relaxation resembles the nonexponential relaxation as observed for water molecules undergoing translational diffusion in a magnetic field gradient. In this frequency region T2e is inversely proportional to the cube root of the diffusion coefficient. In addition to the isotropic and uniaxial diffusion models, a third model is presented, in which fast restricted nucleic acid backbone motions dominating the lineshape are superimposed on a slow rotation of the

  2. Telomere length in Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Kitay-Cohen, Y; Goldberg-Bittman, L; Hadary, R; Fejgin, M D; Amiel, A

    2008-11-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures located at the termini of chromosomes that protect the chromosomes from fusion and degradation. Hepatocyte cell-cycle turnover may be a primary mechanism of telomere shortening in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, inducing fibrosis and cellular senescence. HCV infection has been recognized as potential cause of B-cell lymphoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study sought to assess relative telomere length in leukocytes from patients with chronic HCV infection, patients after eradication of HCV infection (in remission), and healthy controls. A novel method of manual evaluation was applied. Leukocytes derived from 22 patients with chronic HCV infection and age- and sex-matched patients in remission and healthy control subjects were subjected to a fluorescence-in-situ protocol (DAKO) to determine telomere fluorescence intensity and number. The relative, manual, analysis of telomere length was validated against findings on applied spectral imaging (ASI) in a random sample of study and control subjects. Leukocytes from patients with chronic HCV infection had shorter telomeres than leukocytes from patients in remission and healthy controls. On statistical analysis, more cells with low signal intensity on telomere FISH had shorter telomeres whereas more cells with high signal intensity had longer telomeres. The findings were corroborated by the ASI telomere software. Telomere shortening in leukocytes from patients with active HCV infection is probably due to the lower overall telomere level rather than higher cell cycle turnover. Manual evaluation is an accurate and valid method of assessing relative telomere length between patients with chronic HCV infection and healthy subjects. PMID:18992639

  3. First solar cells on silicon wafers doped using sprayed boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. A.; Brito, Miguel C.; Costa, Ivo; Alves, Jorge Maia; Serra, João; Vallêra, António

    2010-11-01

    A new method for boron bulk doping of silicon ribbons is developed. The method is based on the spraying of the ribbons with a boric acid solution and is particularly suited for silicon ribbons that require a zone-melting recrystallization step. To analyse the quality of the material thus obtained, multicrystalline silicon samples doped with this doping process were used as substrate for solar cells and compared with solar cells made on commercial multicrystalline silicon wafers. The values obtained for the diffusion length and the IV curve parameters show that the method of doping with the boric acid solution is suitable to produce p-doped silicon ribbons for solar cell applications.

  4. The NIST Length Scale Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Beers, John S.; Penzes, William B.

    1999-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) interferometer for measuring graduated length scales has been in use since 1965. It was developed in response to the redefinition of the meter in 1960 from the prototype platinum-iridium bar to the wavelength of light. The history of the interferometer is recalled, and its design and operation described. A continuous program of modernization by making physical modifications, measurement procedure changes and computational revisions is described, and the effects of these changes are evaluated. Results of a long-term measurement assurance program, the primary control on the measurement process, are presented, and improvements in measurement uncertainty are documented.

  5. The Length of Time's Arrow

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Edward H.; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-08-21

    An unresolved problem in physics is how the thermodynamic arrow of time arises from an underlying time reversible dynamics. We contribute to this issue by developing a measure of time-symmetry breaking, and by using the work fluctuation relations, we determine the time asymmetry of recent single molecule RNA unfolding experiments. We define time asymmetry as the Jensen-Shannon divergencebetween trajectory probability distributions of an experiment and its time-reversed conjugate. Among other interesting properties, the length of time's arrow bounds the average dissipation and determines the difficulty of accurately estimating free energy differences in nonequilibrium experiments.

  6. Length dependence of carbon nanotube thermal conductivity and the "problem of long waves"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mingo, N.; Broido, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the first calculations of finite length carbon nanotube thermal conductivity that extend from the ballistic to the diffusive regime, throughout a very wide range of lengths and temperatures. The long standing problem of vanishing scattering of the "long wavelength phonf dramatically here, making the thermal conductivity diverge as the nanotube length increases. We show that the divergence disappears if 3-phonon scattering processes are considered to second or higher order. Nevertheless, for defect free nanotubes, the thermal conductivity keeps increasing up to very large lengths (10 gm at 300 K). Defects in the nanotube are also able to remove the long wavelength divergence.

  7. Cyclodextrin and its complexation for resolution of isomers using diffusion ordered spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin R.; Srinivasa; Suryaprakash, N.

    2013-02-01

    Diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) generally fails to separate the peaks pertaining to isomeric species possessing identical molecular weights and similar hydrodynamic radii. The present study demonstrates the resolution of isomers using α/β-cyclodextrin as a co-solute by Matrix Assisted Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy. The resolution of isomers has been achieved by measuring the significant differences in the diffusion rates between the positional isomers of aminobenzoic acids, benzenedicarboxylic acids and between the cis, trans isomers, fumaric acid and maleic acid.

  8. Telomere length and cardiovascular aging.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, Frej; Saijonmaa, Outi

    2012-06-01

    Telomeres are located at the end of chromosomes. They are composed of repetitive TTAGGG tandem repeats and associated proteins of crucial importance for telomere function. Telomeric DNA is shortened by each cell division until a critical length is achieved and the cell enters senescence and eventually apoptosis. Telomeres are therefore considered a 'biological clock' of the cell. Telomerase adds nucleotides to telomeric DNA thereby contributing to telomere maintenance, genomic stability, functions, and proliferative capacity of the cell. In certain rare forms of progeria, point mutations within the telomere lead to accelerated telomere attrition and premature aging. Endogenous factors causing telomere shortening are aging, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) shortening is inhibited by estrogen and endogenous antioxidants. Accelerated telomere attrition is associated with cardiovascular risk factors such as age, gender, obesity, smoking, sedentary life-style, excess alcohol intake, and even mental stress. Cardiovascular (CV) diseases and CV aging are usually but not invariably associated with shorter telomeres than in healthy subjects. LTL appears to be a biomarker of CV aging, reflecting the cumulative burden of endogenous and exogenous factors negatively affecting LTL. Whether accelerated telomere shortening is cause or consequence of CV aging and disease is not clear. PMID:22713142

  9. Search for selective ion diffusion through membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rates of several ions through some membranes developed as battery separators were measured. The ions investigated were Li(+), Rb(+), Cl(-), and So4. The members were crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol, crosslinked polyacrylic acid, a copolymer of the two, crosslinked calcium polyacrylate, cellulose, and several microporous polyphenylene oxide based films. No true specificity for diffusion of any of these ions was found for any of the membranes. But the calcium polyacrylate membrane was found to exhibit ion exchange with the diffusing ions giving rise to the leaching of the calcium ion and low reproducibility. These findings contrast earlier work where the calcium polyacrylate membrane did show specificity to the diffusion of the copper ion. In general, Fick's law appeared to be obeyed. Except for the microporous membranes, the coefficients for ion diffusion through the membranes were comparable with their values in water. For the microporous membranes, the values found for the coefficients were much less, due to the tortuosity of the micropores.

  10. Diffusion of photoacid generators by laser scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping L.; Webber, Stephen E.; Mendenhall, J.; Byers, Jeffrey D.; Chao, Keith K.

    1998-06-01

    Diffusion of the photogenerated acid during the period of time between exposure and development can cause contrast loss and ultimately loss of the latent image. This is especially relevant for chemically amplified photoresists that require a post-exposure baking step, which in turn facilitates acid diffusion due to the high temperature normally employed. It is thus important to develop techniques with good spatial resolution to monitor the photogeneration of acid. More precisely, we need techniques that provide two distinct types of information: spatial resolution on various length scales within the surface layer and also sufficient depth resolution so that one can observe the transition from very surface layer to bulk structure in the polymer blend coated on silicon substrate. Herein laser scanning confocal microscopy is used to evaluate the resist for the first time. We report the use of the confocal microscopy to map the pag/dye distribution in PHS matrices, with both reflectance images and fluorescence images. A laser beam is focused onto a small 3D volume element, termed a voxel. It is typically 200 nm X 200 nm laterally and 800 nm axially. The illuminated voxel is viewed such that only signals emanating from this voxel are detected, i.e., signal from outside the probed voxel is not detected. By adjusting the vertical position of the laser focal point, the voxel can be moved to the designated lateral plane to produce an image. Contrast caused by topology difference between the exposed and unexposed area can be eliminated. Bis-p-butylphenyl iodonium triflat (7% of polyhydroxystyrene) is used as photoacid generators. 5% - 18% (by weight, PHS Mn equals 13 k) resist in PGMEA solution is spin cast onto the treated quartz disk with thickness of 1.4 micrometers , 5 micrometers space/10 micrometers pitch chrome mask is used to generate the pattern with mercury DUV illumination. Fluoresceinamine, the pH-sensitive dye, is also used to enhance the contrast of

  11. Intrachain diffusion in a protein loop fragment from carp parvalbumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Florian; Fierz, Beat; Axthelm, Fabian; Joder, Karin; Meyer, Dominique; Kiefhaber, Thomas

    2004-12-01

    During protein folding a polypeptide chain has to form specific intrachain interactions starting from an ensemble of unfolded conformation. Thus, intrachain diffusion in unfolded polypeptide chains can be regarded as an elementary step in protein folding, which should determine the dynamics of the early stages in the folding process. We have previously applied exothermic triplet-triplet energy transfer from xanthone to naphthalene to determine rate constants for intrachain end-to-end contact formation in unstructured homo-polypeptide chains. Here we show that the method can be applied to determine absolute rate constants for intrachain diffusion in natural loop sequences, if they are free of methionine, tryptophan and tyrosine. We measured the rate of loop formation in an 18 amino acid polypeptide chain corresponding to a natural loop sequence from carp muscle β-parvalbumin (residues 85-102). Contact formation shows single exponential kinetics with a time constant ( τ=1/ k) of 53 ± 3 ns at 22.5 °C in water. Comparison with the results on homo-polypeptide chains shows that this value agrees well with rates obtained earlier for a polyserine chain of the same length.

  12. Applicability of Mixing Length Theory to a Turbulent Vortex System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, Robert G.

    1961-01-01

    The ability of mixing length theory to correlate vortex data is evaluated. Expressions are derived for eddy diffusivity by applying the techniques of von Karman and Prandtl which have been established for pipe flow. Total and static pressures were measured from the outer radius to the exhaust-nozzle radius of a vortex generator for a range of mass flows. These data are combined with Navier-Stokes solutions for this region of a compressible vortex to determine turbulent Reynolds numbers. The Reynolds number is related to Prandtl and Karman functions for various assumed boundary conditions, and the experimental data are used to determine the usefulness of these expressions. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Mixing length functions developed by applying von Karman's similarity hypothesis to vortex motion correlate the data better than do Prandtl functions obtained with the assumption that mixing length is proportional to radius. (2) Some of the expressions developed do not adequately represent the experimental data. (3) The data are correlated with acceptable scatter by evaluating the fluid radial inertia at the outer boundary and the shear stress at the inner boundary. The universal constant K was found to be 0.04 to 0.08, rather than the value of 0.4 which is accepted for rectilinear flow. (4) The data are best correlated by a modified Karman expression which includes an effect of radial inertia, as well as shear stress, on eddy diffusivity.

  13. Crossover from Ballistic to Diffusive Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Konabe, Satoru; Shiomi, Junichiro; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2009-09-01

    We present a theoretical scheme that seamlessly handles the crossover from fully ballistic to diffusive thermal transport regimes and apply it to carbon nanotubes. At room temperature, micrometer-length nanotubes belong to the intermediate regime in which ballistic and diffusive phonons coexist. According to our scheme, the thermal conductance of these nanotubes exhibit anomalous nonlinear dependence of tube length due to this coexistence. This result is in excellent agreement with molecular-dynamics simulation results showing the nonlinear thermal conductance. Additionally, we clarify the mechanism of crossover in terms of the length-dependent characteristic frequency.

  14. Dependence on chain length of NMR relaxation times in mixtures of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Denise E.

    2007-05-01

    Many naturally occurring fluids, such as crude oils, consist of a very large number of components. It is often of interest to determine the composition of the fluids in situ. Diffusion coefficients and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times can be measured in situ and depend on the size of the molecules. It has been shown [D. E. Freed et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 067602 (2005)] that the diffusion coefficient of each component in a mixture of alkanes follows a scaling law in the chain length of that molecule and in the mean chain length of the mixture, and these relations were used to determine the chain length distribution of crude oils from NMR diffusion measurements. In this paper, the behavior of NMR relaxation times in mixtures of chain molecules is addressed. The author explains why one would expect scaling laws for the transverse and longitudinal relaxation times of mixtures of short chain molecules and mixtures of alkanes, in particular. It is shown how the power law dependence on the chain length can be calculated from the scaling laws for the translational diffusion coefficients. The author fits the literature data for NMR relaxation in binary mixtures of alkanes and finds that its dependence on chain length agrees with the theory. Lastly, it is shown how the scaling laws in the chain length and the mean chain length can be used to determine the chain length distribution in crude oils that are high in saturates. A good fit is obtained between the NMR-derived chain length distributions and the ones from gas chromatography.

  15. Geometry of area without length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming; Inami, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    To define a free string by the Nambu-Goto action, all we need is the notion of area, and mathematically the area can be defined directly in the absence of a metric. Motivated by the possibility that string theory admits backgrounds where the notion of length is not well defined but a definition of area is given, we study space-time geometries based on the generalization of a metric to an area metric. In analogy with Riemannian geometry, we define the analogues of connections, curvatures, and Einstein tensor. We propose a formulation generalizing Einstein's theory that will be useful if at a certain stage or a certain scale the metric is ill defined and the space-time is better characterized by the notion of area. Static spherical solutions are found for the generalized Einstein equation in vacuum, including the Schwarzschild solution as a special case.

  16. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  17. Diffusion on spatial network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zi; Tang, Xiaoyue; Li, Wei; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study the problem of diffusing a product (idea, opinion, disease etc.) among agents on spatial network. The network is constructed by random addition of nodes on the planar. The probability for a previous node to be connected to the new one is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of α. The diffusion rate between two connected nodes is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of β as well. Inspired from the Fick's first law, we introduce the diffusion coefficient to measure the diffusion ability of the spatial network. Using both theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, we get the fact that the diffusion coefficient always decreases with the increasing of parameter α and β, and the diffusion sub-coefficient follows the power-law of the spatial distance with exponent equals to -α-β+2. Since both short-range diffusion and long-range diffusion exist, we use anomalous diffusion method in diffusion process. We get the fact that the slope index δ in anomalous diffusion is always smaller that 1. The diffusion process in our model is sub-diffusion.

  18. UPDATING APPLIED DIFFUSION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most diffusion models currently used in air quality applications are substantially out of date with understanding of turbulence and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer. Under a Cooperative Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency, the American Meteorological Socie...

  19. Monte Carlo analysis of obstructed diffusion in three dimensions: application to molecular diffusion in organelles.

    PubMed

    Olveczky, B P; Verkman, A S

    1998-05-01

    Molecular transport in the aqueous lumen of organelles involves diffusion in a confined compartment with complex geometry. Monte Carlo simulations of particle diffusion in three dimensions were carried out to evaluate the influence of organelle structure on diffusive transport and to relate experimental photobleaching data to intrinsic diffusion coefficients. Two organelle structures were modeled: a mitochondria-like long closed cylinder containing fixed luminal obstructions of variable number and size, and an endoplasmic reticulum-like network of interconnected cylinders of variable diameter and density. Trajectories were computed in each simulation for >10(5) particles, generally for >10(5) time steps. Computed time-dependent concentration profiles agreed quantitatively with analytical solutions of the diffusion equation for simple geometries. For mitochondria-like cylinders, significant slowing of diffusion required large or wide single obstacles, or multiple obstacles. In simulated spot photobleaching experiments, a approximately 25% decrease in apparent diffusive transport rate (defined by the time to 75% fluorescence recovery) was found for a single thin transverse obstacle occluding 93% of lumen area, a single 53%-occluding obstacle of width 16 lattice points (8% of cylinder length), 10 equally spaced 53% obstacles alternately occluding opposite halves of the cylinder lumen, or particle binding to walls (with mean residence time = 10 time steps). Recovery curve shape with obstacles showed long tails indicating anomalous diffusion. Simulations also demonstrated the utility of measurement of fluorescence depletion at a spot distant from the bleach zone. For a reticulum-like network, particle diffusive transport was mildly reduced from that in unobstructed three-dimensional space. In simulated photobleaching experiments, apparent diffusive transport was decreased by 39-60% in reticular structures in which 90-97% of space was occluded. These computations provide

  20. Role of impurities on diffusion-induced defective states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Giannotte, E.

    1992-12-01

    The defective states induced in floating zone Si by the heavy diffusion of dopants have been investigated by means of the electron beam-induced current method. By measuring the minority carrier diffusion length with the first order moment method, and by directly imaging the defects, their electrical activity has been analyzed. The diffused samples have subsequently been dry oxidized, so that the evolution of the electrical and morphological properties of the induced defects could be followed. Two sets of samples, one diffused with B and the other with B and Al, have been investigated in order to study the effects of the presence of Al. Significant improvements in the diffusion length have been observed in samples where Al had been codiffused, thus providing indication for the role played by Al on the electrical activity of bulk defective states.

  1. Diffusion coefficients of several aqueous alkanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Snijder, E.D.; Riele, M.J.M. te; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    In absorption processes of acid gases (H[sub 2]S, CO[sub 2], COS) in alkanolamine solutions, diffusion coefficients are used for the calculation of the mass transfer rate. The Taylor dispersion technique was applied for the determination of diffusion coefficients of various systems. Experiments with the system KCl in water showed that the experimental setup provides accurate data. For the alkanolamines monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and di-2-propanolamine (DIPA), correlations for the diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature at different concentrations are given. A single relation for every amine has been derived which correlates the diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature and concentration. The temperature was varied between 298 and 348 K, and the concentration between 0 and 4000-5000 mol/m[sup 3]. Furthermore, a modified Stokes-Einstein relation is presented for the prediction of the diffusion coefficients in the alkanolamines in relation to the viscosity of the solvent and the diffusion coefficient at infinite dilution. The diffusion coefficients at low concentrations are compared with some available relations for the estimation of diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution, and it appears that the agreement is fairly good.

  2. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  3. Phase-Length Optical Phase-Locked-Loop Sensor (PLOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Rogawski, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    PLOPS system designed to provide high-resolution measurement of change in optical length from optical-system source to any optical reflector, including diffuse reflector. Serves as adjustable optical ruler, providing high resolution in measurements of small and large changes in distance to target. Use is broad and includes most measurement situations requiring information on length, vibration, and their derivatives. Applications include building dynamics, remote sensing of vibrations in such systems as turbine-based machinery, monitoring of structural dynamics, noncontacting sensing of surface contours, measurement of large strains as in earthquake monitoring, measurement of atmospheric dynamics and turbulence, high-resolution sensing of humidity, detection of surface acoustic waves by optical microscopy, and related areas.

  4. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl acids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Perfluoroalkyl acids(PFAAs) area a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perflurinated carbon backbone (4-12in length) and a acidic functional moiety (Carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds have excellent surface-tension reducing properties and have numerous industr...

  5. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  6. Handbook on atmospheric diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

  7. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  8. Diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

  9. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  10. Generalized Drift-Diffusion Model In Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, S.; Bendib-Kalache, K.; Bendib, A.

    2008-09-23

    A new drift-diffusion model is proposed based on the computation of the stationary nonlocal current density. The semi classical Boltzmann equation is solved keeping all the anisotropies of the distribution function with the use of the continued fractions. The conductivity is calculated in the linear approximation and for arbitrary collision frequency with respect to Kv{sub t} where K{sup -1} is the characteristic length scale of the system and V{sub t} is the thermal velocity. The nonlocal conductivity can be used to close the generalized drift-diffusion equations valid for arbitrary collisionality.

  11. Radon Diffusion Measurement in Polyethylene based on Alpha Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, Wolfgang

    2011-04-27

    We present a method to measure the diffusion of Radon in solid materials based on the alpha decay of the radon daughter products. In contrast to usual diffusion measurements which detect the radon that penetrates a thin barrier, we let the radon diffuse into the material and then measure the alpha decays of the radon daughter products in the material. We applied this method to regular and ultra high molecular weight poly ethylene and find diffusion lengths of order of mm as expected. However, the preliminary analysis shows significant differences between two different approaches we have chosen. These differences may be explained by the different experimental conditions.

  12. Simulations of singlet exciton diffusion in organic semiconductors: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorgaard, Josiah A.; Kose, Muhammet Erkan

    2014-12-22

    Our review describes the various aspects of simulation strategies for exciton diffusion in condensed phase thin films of organic semiconductors. Several methods for calculating energy transfer rate constants are discussed along with procedures for how to account for energetic disorder. Exciton diffusion can be modelled by using kinetic Monte-Carlo methods or master equations. Recent literature on simulation efforts for estimating exciton diffusion lengths of various conjugated polymers and small molecules are introduced. Moreover, these studies are discussed in the context of the effects of morphology on exciton diffusion and the necessity of accurate treatment of disorder for comparison of simulation results with those of experiment.

  13. Natural convection within a vertical finite-length channel in free space

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.C.; Chang, K.P.; Hung, Y.H. )

    1994-04-01

    Natural convection within a vertical finite length channel in free space is studied in this article to remove assumptions that need to be made on velocity and temperature profiles at the channel entrance. For small channel aspect ratios and low Rayleigh numbers, significant deviations of the Nusselt number and temperature distributions exist due to the effects of vertical thermal diffusion and free space stratification in the channel. A new correlation was proposed on induced Reynolds number for vertical finite length channel. 8 refs.

  14. Minimal length uncertainty and accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmany, A.; Mortazavi, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, minimal length uncertainty is used as a constraint to solve the Friedman equation. It is shown that, based on the minimal length uncertainty principle, the Hubble scale is decreasing which corresponds to an accelerating universe.

  15. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  16. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  17. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  18. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  19. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  20. Changes in the Length of the Neuraminidase Stalk Region Impact H7N9 Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Haixia; Chen, Quanjiao; Wu, Yan; Fu, Lifeng; Quan, Chuansong; Wong, Gary; Liu, Jun; Haywood, Joel; Liu, Yingxia; Zhou, Boping; Yan, Jinghua; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    The neuraminidase stalk of the newly emerged H7N9 influenza virus possesses a 5-amino-acid deletion. This study focuses on characterizing the biological functions of H7N9 with varied neuraminidase stalk lengths. Results indicate that the 5-amino-acid deletion had no impact on virus infectivity or replication in vitro or in vivo compared to that of a virus with a full-length stalk, but enhanced virulence in mice was observed for H7N9 encoding a 19- to 20-amino-acid deletion, suggesting that N9 stalk length impacts virulence in mammals, as N1 stalk length does. PMID:26656694

  1. Non-linear diffusion paths in two-phase ternary diffusion couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongwei

    2005-11-01

    Prediction of diffusion paths facilitates the understanding of interdiffusion microstructure development at the vicinity of a common interface between two alloys. Understanding the influence of interdiffusion on microstructure is critically important to the design of many advanced materials systems such as high temperature coatings. The current study using DICTRA finite difference software predicts non-linear features formed on the diffusion path as the initial interface is approached. The non-linear diffusion path deviates from the linear zigzag shape predicted by an error function model for multiphase diffusion couples. The deviations appear as "horns" that protrude from the linear paths. The horns were found to be of two types. When the two outer legs of the diffusion path bend in the same direction, a "single-horn" is formed. When they bend in opposite directions a "double-horn" is formed. The formation of horns is attributed to the concentration dependence of the diffusivity. It results in a shift on the maximum of the flux profile from the initial interface, which accordingly leads to a rapid rise or decrease of the precipitate fraction as the interface is approached. It was found that the horn length is proportional to the composition vector component along the major eigenvector of the effective diffusivity matrix. Applying these results to a study on Ni-Cr-Al diffusion couples prepared from gamma + beta alloys, it also was found that the formation of single-phase beta layers could be attributed to the horns pointing away from each other, in which case the diffusion path could intersect the single phase beta region of the phase diagram. Comparison between EPMA data and DICTRA simulation shows that existence of second phase could introduce microstructure effect on diffusion. This microstructure effect may be taken into account for promoting or blocking the diffusion.

  2. Thermal diffusivity of some crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity data at room temperature and uniaxial pressure of 1 MPa are reported for five sets of crystalline rocks - granite, granodiorite, gabbro, basalt and gneiss. Diffusivity ranges between approximately 0.6 and 1.9 mm/sup 2//s, the lower end of the range being appropriate for basic rocks and the upper end for quartz-bearing acidic rocks. The scatter in diffusivity for each data set is significantly more than that of thermal conductivity, because the diffusivity of water is typically less than 10% of the diffusivity of most common minerals, whereas water conductivity is 25 - 30% of the conductivity of the minerals. For a sample set of uniform mineralogy in which porosity varies, a greater variation of diffusivity than of conductivity is therefore expected. For three of the sets sufficient mineralogical data were available to permit the assessment of methods of estimating thermal diffusivity from mineral content. All models tested yielded higher mean values of diffusivity than the means of the measured values. No model was found to be able to predict diffusivity to better than approximately 20%, but if that accuracy is sufficient, a simple geometrical model, for which only quartz content must be known, is adequate. The diffusivity data have been combined with measurements of thermal conductivity and density to provide estimates of specific heat. These all tend to be higher than those reported in the literature. For some rocks, such as the basalts, this can be explained in terms of relatively high water content and the very high specific heat of water compared with that of most common minerals. For the granites and granodiorites, the new specific heat data redefine the previously published means and ranges, by increasing the data base by approximately an order of magnitude.

  3. Combined measurements of modulus and length and their correlation for different amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Porscha, B.; Neuhaeuser, H.

    1995-03-15

    Combined measurements of length and modulus change on the same specimen of Ni{sub 78}Si{sub 8}B{sub 14}, Cu{sub 64}Ti{sub 36} and Co{sub 66}Fe{sub 4}(MoSiB){sub 30} are presented. These properties are sensitive to different aspects of structural changes during relaxation in the amorphous state. The change of length is mainly sensitive to the topological long range relaxation. The change of the eigenfrequency is mainly sensitive to atomic rearrangements changing the chemical short range order. The results of the correlation between the effect of relaxation of frequency versus that of length can be described as follows: the observed structural relaxation in the amorphous states of each material can be divided up into two regimes. The first regime (I) with a prevailing change of eigenfrequency is attributed to short range rearrangements of the chemically different atomic species in the material; the second regime (II) with a larger amount of length change is interpreted as a long range topological relaxation with enhanced loss of free volume. This interpretation is supported by a comparison of the diffusion coefficients at the characteristic transition temperature {Tc} between the regimes I and II. It shows that the average diffusion path lengths of the possible diffusors below the characteristic temperature are in the order of 2 to 5 next neighbor distances, i.e., diffusion is only possible in a short range changing the species of neighboring atoms. Above {Tc}, the average diffusion path lengths are in the order of 5 to 50 next neighbor distances suggesting long range relaxation rearrangements by a diffusion process preferentially connected with the annihilation of free volume.

  4. Diffusion of Particles in Polymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liheng; Rubinstein, Michael

    2010-03-01

    We use scaling theory to derive the time dependence of the mean-square-displacement <δr^2> of a probe particle of size d in an entangled semidilute polymer solution. Particles with size smaller than solution correlation length ξ undergo ordinary diffusion (<δr^2 (t)>˜t) with diffusion coefficient determined by the solvent viscosity. The motion of particles with intermediate sizes (ξ˜t^1/2) at short time scales since their motion is affected by sub-sections of polymer chains. At long time scales the motion of these particles is diffusive and their diffusion coefficient is determined by effective viscosity of a polymer solution with chains of size comparable to particle diameter d. The motion of particles larger than tube diameter (d>a) at time scales shorter than the relaxation time of an entanglement strand τe is similar to the motion of particles with intermediate sizes. At longer time scales (t>τe) large particles (d>a) are trapped by entanglement mesh and cannot move until the surrounding chains relax at the reptation time scale τrep. At longer times t>τrep, the motion of large particles becomes diffusive with diffusion coefficient determined by the bulk viscosity of the entangled polymer solution.

  5. 'LTE-diffusion approximation' for arc calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, J. J.; Tanaka, M.

    2006-08-01

    This paper proposes the use of the 'LTE-diffusion approximation' for predicting the properties of electric arcs. Under this approximation, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) is assumed, with a particular mesh size near the electrodes chosen to be equal to the 'diffusion length', based on De/W, where De is the electron diffusion coefficient and W is the electron drift velocity. This approximation overcomes the problem that the equilibrium electrical conductivity in the arc near the electrodes is almost zero, which makes accurate calculations using LTE impossible in the limit of small mesh size, as then voltages would tend towards infinity. Use of the LTE-diffusion approximation for a 200 A arc with a thermionic cathode gives predictions of total arc voltage, electrode temperatures, arc temperatures and radial profiles of heat flux density and current density at the anode that are in approximate agreement with more accurate calculations which include an account of the diffusion of electric charges to the electrodes, and also with experimental results. Calculations, which include diffusion of charges, agree with experimental results of current and heat flux density as a function of radius if the Milne boundary condition is used at the anode surface rather than imposing zero charge density at the anode.

  6. Favorite Demonstrations: Gaseous Diffusion: A Demonstration of Graham's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.; Ebner, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid are used to illustrate rates of diffusion (Graham's Law). Simple equipment needed for the demonstration include a long tube, rubber stoppes, and cotton. Two related demonstrations are also explained. (DH)

  7. Microrheology and characteristic lengths in wormlike micelles made of a zwitterionic surfactant and SDS in brine.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Gomez, Erick; Lopez-Diaz, David; Castillo, Rolando

    2010-09-30

    We study the Brownian motion of probe particles embedded in a wormlike micellar fluid made of a zwitterionic surfactant N-tetradecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate (TDPS), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and salty water to get structural and dynamical information of the micellar network. The motion of the probe particles was tracked with diffusing wave spectroscopy, and the mean square displacement as a function of time for the particles was obtained. This allowed us to obtain the long-time diffusion coefficient for microspheres moving in the micellar network and the cage size where each particle is harmonically bound at short times in that network. The bulk mechanical susceptibility of the fluid determines the response of the probe particles excited by the thermal stochastic forces. As a consequence, the mean square displacement curves allowed us to calculate the elastic (storage) and the viscous (loss) moduli as a function of the frequency. From these curves, spanning a wide frequency range, we estimated the characteristic lengths as the mesh size, the entanglement length, the persistence length, and the contour length for micellar solutions of different zwitterionic surfactant concentration, surfactant ratio ([SDS]/[TDPS]), salt concentration, and temperature. Mesh size, entanglement length, and persistence length are almost insensitive to the change of these variables. In contrast, the contour length changes in an important way. The contour length becomes shorter as the temperature increases, and it presents a peak at a surfactant ratio of ∼0.50-0.55. When salt is added to the solution, the contour length presents a peak at a salt concentration of ∼0.225 M, and in some solutions, this length can reach values of ∼12 μm. Scission energies help us to understand why the contour length first increases and then decreases when salt is added. PMID:20825212

  8. Structural Proton Diffusion along Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Serowy, Steffen; Saparov, Sapar M.; Antonenko, Yuri N.; Kozlovsky, Wladas; Hagen, Volker; Pohl, Peter

    2003-01-01

    For H+ transport between protein pumps, lateral diffusion along membrane surfaces represents the most efficient pathway. Along lipid bilayers, we measured a diffusion coefficient of 5.8 × 10−5 cm2 s−1. It is too large to be accounted for by vehicle diffusion, considering proton transport by acid carriers. Such a speed of migration is accomplished only by the Grotthuss mechanism involving the chemical exchange of hydrogen nuclei between hydrogen-bonded water molecules on the membrane surface, and the subsequent reorganization of the hydrogen-bonded network. Reconstitution of H+-binding sites on the membrane surface decreased the velocity of H+ diffusion. In the absence of immobile buffers, structural (Grotthuss) diffusion occurred over a distance of 100 μm as shown by microelectrode aided measurements of the spatial proton distribution in the immediate membrane vicinity and spatially resolved fluorescence measurements of interfacial pH. The efficiency of the anomalously fast lateral diffusion decreased gradually with an increase in mobile buffer concentration suggesting that structural diffusion is physiologically important for distances of ∼10 nm. PMID:12547784

  9. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2000-02-04

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  10. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOEpatents

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  11. Going up in time and length scales in modeling polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.

    Polymer properties depend on a wide range of coupled length and time scales, with unique macroscopic viscoelastic behavior stemming from interactions at the atomistic level. The need to probe polymers across time and length scales and particularly computational modeling is inherently challenging. Here new paths to probing long time and length scales including introducing interactions into traditional bead-spring models and coarse graining of atomistic simulations will be compared and discussed. Using linear polyethylene as a model system, the degree of coarse graining with two to six methylene groups per coarse-grained bead derived from a fully atomistic melt simulation were probed. We show that the degree of coarse graining affects the measured dynamic. Using these models we were successful in probing highly entangled melts and were able reach the long-time diffusive regime which is computationally inaccessible using atomistic simulations. We simulated the relaxation modulus and shear viscosity of well-entangled polyethylene melts for scaled times of 500 µs. Results for plateau modulus are in good agreement with experiment. The long time and length scale is coupled to the macroscopic viscoelasticity where the degree of coarse graining sets the minimum length scale instrumental in defining polymer properties and dynamics. Results will be compared to those obtained from simple bead-spring models to demonstrate the additional insight that can be gained from atomistically inspired coarse grained models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Numerical study of a cylinder model of the diffusion MRI signal for neuronal dendrite trees.

    PubMed

    Van Nguyen, Dang; Grebenkov, Denis; Le Bihan, Denis; Li, Jing-Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    We study numerically how the neuronal dendrite tree structure can affect the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) signal in brain tissue. For a large set of randomly generated dendrite trees, synthetic dMRI signals are computed and fitted to a cylinder model to estimate the effective longitudinal diffusivity D(L) in the direction of neurites. When the dendrite branches are short compared to the diffusion length, D(L) depends significantly on the ratio between the average branch length and the diffusion length. In turn, D(L) has very weak dependence on the distribution of branch lengths and orientations of a dendrite tree, and the number of branches per node. We conclude that the cylinder model which ignores the connectivity of the dendrite tree, can still be adapted to describe the apparent diffusion coefficient in brain tissue. PMID:25681802

  13. Numerical study of a cylinder model of the diffusion MRI signal for neuronal dendrite trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nguyen, Dang; Grebenkov, Denis; Le Bihan, Denis; Li, Jing-Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    We study numerically how the neuronal dendrite tree structure can affect the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) signal in brain tissue. For a large set of randomly generated dendrite trees, synthetic dMRI signals are computed and fitted to a cylinder model to estimate the effective longitudinal diffusivity DL in the direction of neurites. When the dendrite branches are short compared to the diffusion length, DL depends significantly on the ratio between the average branch length and the diffusion length. In turn, DL has very weak dependence on the distribution of branch lengths and orientations of a dendrite tree, and the number of branches per node. We conclude that the cylinder model which ignores the connectivity of the dendrite tree, can still be adapted to describe the apparent diffusion coefficient in brain tissue.

  14. Diffusion in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo; Ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion in disordered systems does not follow the classical laws which describe transport in ordered crystalline media, and this leads to many anomalous physical properties. Since the application of percolation theory, the main advances in the understanding of these processes have come from fractal theory. Scaling theories and numerical simulations are important tools to describe diffusion processes (random walks: the 'ant in the labyrinth') on percolation systems and fractals. Different types of disordered systems exhibiting anomalous diffusion are presented (the incipient infinite percolation cluster, diffusion-limited aggregation clusters, lattice animals, and random combs), and scaling theories as well as numerical simulations of greater sophistication are described. Also, diffusion in the presence of singular distributions of transition rates is discussed and related to anomalous diffusion on disordered structures.

  15. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-03-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma. PMID:24892564

  16. Multinomial diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balter, Ariel; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-01

    We describe a new, microscopic model for diffusion that captures diffusion induced fluctuations at scales where the concept of concentration gives way to discrete particles. We show that in the limit as the number of particles N→∞, our model is equivalent to the classical stochastic diffusion equation (SDE). We test our new model and the SDE against Langevin dynamics in numerical simulations, and show that our model successfully reproduces the correct ensemble statistics, while the classical model fails.

  17. Multinomial diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Ariel I.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-24

    We describe a new, microscopic model for diffusion that captures diffusion induced uctuations at scales where the concept of concentration gives way to discrete par- ticles. We show that in the limit as the number of particles N ! 1, our model is equivalent to the classical stochastic diffusion equation (SDE). We test our new model and the SDE against Langevin dynamics in numerical simulations, and show that our model successfully reproduces the correct ensemble statistics, while the classical model fails.

  18. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  19. Control of exit velocity profile of an asymmetric annular diffuser using wall suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    An asymmetric annular diffuser equipped with wall bleed (suction) capability was tested for controllability of exit velocity profile. The diffuser area ratio was 3.2, and the length to inlet height ratio was 1.6. Results show that the diffuser radial exit velocity profile could be controlled from a hub peaked to a tip peaked form by selective use of bleed on the outer wall or on both diffuser walls. Based on these results, application of the diffuser bleed technique to gas turbine combustors may be possible. Diffuser bleed could be used to tailor the airflow distribution for optimizing combustor performance at a variety of operating conditions.

  20. Signatures of Quantum-Tunneling Diffusion of Hydrogen Atoms on Water Ice at 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, K.; Hama, T.; Kouchi, A.; Watanabe, N.

    2015-09-01

    Reported here is the first observation of the tunneling surface diffusion of a hydrogen (H) atom on water ice. Photostimulated desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization methods were used to determine the diffusion rates at 10 K on amorphous solid water and polycrystalline ice. H-atom diffusion on polycrystalline ice was 2 orders of magnitude faster than that of deuterium atoms, indicating the occurrence of tunneling diffusion. Whether diffusion is by tunneling or thermal hopping also depends on the diffusion length of the atoms and the morphology of the surface. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of elementary physicochemical processes of hydrogen on cosmic ice dust.

  1. Signatures of Quantum-Tunneling Diffusion of Hydrogen Atoms on Water Ice at 10 K.

    PubMed

    Kuwahata, K; Hama, T; Kouchi, A; Watanabe, N

    2015-09-25

    Reported here is the first observation of the tunneling surface diffusion of a hydrogen (H) atom on water ice. Photostimulated desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization methods were used to determine the diffusion rates at 10 K on amorphous solid water and polycrystalline ice. H-atom diffusion on polycrystalline ice was 2 orders of magnitude faster than that of deuterium atoms, indicating the occurrence of tunneling diffusion. Whether diffusion is by tunneling or thermal hopping also depends on the diffusion length of the atoms and the morphology of the surface. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of elementary physicochemical processes of hydrogen on cosmic ice dust. PMID:26451552

  2. A Simple Single Step diffusion and Emitter Etching Process for High Efficiency Gallium Antimonide Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rajagopalan; N.S. Reddy; E. Ehsani; I.B. Bhat; P.S. Dutta; R.J. Gutmann; G. Nichols; G.W. Charache; O. Sulima

    2003-08-29

    A single step diffusion followed by precise etching of the diffused layer has been developed to obtain a diffusion profile appropriate for high efficiency GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells. The junction depth was controlled through monitoring of light current-voltage (I-V) curves (photovoltaic response) during the post diffusion emitter etching process. The measured photoresponses (prior to device fabrication) have been correlated with the quantum efficiencies and the open circuit voltages in the fabricated devices. An optimum junction depth for obtaining highest quantum efficiency and open circuit voltage is presented based on diffusion lengths (or monitoring carrier lifetimes), carrier mobility and typical diffused impurity profile in GaSb.

  3. Back diffusion from thin low permeability zones.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minjune; Annable, Michael D; Jawitz, James W

    2015-01-01

    Aquitards can serve as long-term contaminant sources to aquifers when contaminant mass diffuses from the aquitard following aquifer source mass depletion. This study describes analytical and experimental approaches to understand reactive and nonreactive solute transport in a thin aquitard bounded by an adjacent aquifer. A series of well-controlled laboratory experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional flow chamber to quantify solute diffusion from a high-permeability sand into and subsequently out of kaolinite clay layers of vertical thickness 15 mm, 20 mm, and 60 mm. One-dimensional analytical solutions were developed for diffusion in a finite aquitard with mass exchange with an adjacent aquifer using the method of images. The analytical solutions showed very good agreement with measured breakthrough curves and aquitard concentration distributions measured in situ by light reflection visualization. Solutes with low retardation accumulated more stored mass with greater penetration distance in the aquitard compared to high-retardation solutes. However, because the duration of aquitard mass release was much longer, high-retardation solutes have a greater long-term back diffusion risk. The error associated with applying a semi-infinite domain analytical solution to a finite diffusion domain increases as a function of the system relative diffusion length scale, suggesting that the solutions using image sources should be applied in cases with rapid solute diffusion and/or thin clay layers. The solutions presented here can be extended to multilayer aquifer/low-permeability systems to assess the significance of back diffusion from thin layers. PMID:25478850

  4. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  5. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  6. Curved and diffuse interface effects on the nuclear surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomietz, V. M.; Lukyanov, S. V.; Sanzhur, A. I.

    2012-08-01

    We redefine the surface tension coefficient for a nuclear Fermi-liquid drop with a finite diffuse layer. Following the Gibbs-Tolman concept, we introduce the equimolar radius Re of the droplet surface at which the surface tension is applied and the radius of tension surface Rs which provides the minimum of the surface tension coefficient σ. This procedure allows us to derive both the surface tension and the corresponding curvature correction (Tolman length) correctly for the curved and diffuse interface. We point out that the curvature correction depends significantly on the finite diffuse interface. We show that Tolman's length ξ is negative for a nuclear Fermi-liquid drop. The value of the Tolman length is only slightly sensitive to the Skyrme force parametrization and equals ξ=-0.36 fm.

  7. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  8. Novel light diffusing fiber for use in medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klubben, W. Spencer; Logunov, Stephan L.; Fewkes, Edward J.; Mooney, Jeff; Then, Paul M.; Wigley, Peter G.; Schreiber, Horst; Matias, Kaitlyn; Wilson, Cynthia J.; Ocampo, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    Fiber-based cylindrical light diffusers are often used in photodynamic therapy to illuminate a luminal organ, such as the esophagus. The diffusers are often made of plastic and suffer from short diffusion lengths and low transmission efficiencies over a broad spectrum. We have developed FibranceTM, a glass-based fiber optic cylindrical diffuser which can illuminate a fiber from 0.5 cm to 10 meters over a broad wavelength range. With these longer illumination lengths, a variety of other medical applications are possible beyond photodynamic therapy. We present a number of applications for Fibrance ranging from in situ controllable illumination for Photodynamic Therapy to light guided anatomy highlighting for minimally invasive surgery to mitigating hospital acquired infections and more.

  9. High-power diffusing-tip fibers for interstitial photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinofsky, Edward L.; Farr, Norman; Baxter, Lincoln; Weiler, William

    1997-05-01

    A line of optical fiber based diffusing tips has been designed, developed, and tested that are capable of distributing tens of watts of cw laser power over lengths ranging from two millimeters to over 10 cm. The result is a flexible non-stick diffuser capable of coagulating large volumes of tissue in reasonably short exposures of 3 - 5 minutes. Sub-millimeter diameter devices have a distinct effect on reducing the force needed to insert the applicator interstitially into tissue. Utilizing our design approach, we have produced diffusers based on 200 micrometer core fiber that has delivered over 35 watts of Nd:YAG energy over diffusion lengths as short as 4 mm. These applicators are being tested for applications in oncology, cardiology, electrophysiology, urology and gynecology.

  10. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  11. Dither Cavity Length Controller with Iodine Locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Marty; Eloranta, Ed

    2016-06-01

    A cavity length controller for a seeded Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser is constructed. The cavity length controller uses a piezo-mirror dither voltage to find the optimum length for the seeded cavity. The piezo-mirror dither also dithers the optical frequency of the output pulse. [1]. This dither in optical frequency is then used to lock to an Iodine absorption line.

  12. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  13. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  14. Required length of guardrails before hazards.

    PubMed

    Tomasch, E; Sinz, W; Hoschopf, H; Gobald, M; Steffan, H; Nadler, B; Nadler, F; Strnad, B; Schneider, F

    2011-11-01

    One way to protect against impacts during run-off-road accidents with infrastructure is the use of guardrails. However, real-world accidents indicate that vehicles can leave the road and end up behind the guardrail. These vehicles have no possibility of returning to the lane. Vehicles often end up behind the guardrail because the length of the guardrails installed before hazards is too short; this can lead to a collision with a shielded hazard. To identify the basic speed for determining the necessary length of guardrails, we analyzed the speed at which vehicles leave the roadway from the ZEDATU (Zentrale Datenbank Tödlicher Unfälle) real-world accidents database. The required length of guardrail was considered the length that reduces vehicle speed at a maximum theoretically possible deceleration of 0.3g behind the barrier based on real-world road departure speed. To determine the desired length of a guardrail ahead of a hazard, we developed a relationship between guardrail length and the speed at which vehicles depart the roadway. If the initial elements are flared away from the carriageway, the required length will be reduced by up to an additional 30% The ZEDATU database analysis showed that extending the current length of guardrails to the evaluated required length would reduce the number of fatalities among occupants of vehicles striking bridge abutments by approximately eight percent. PMID:21819841

  15. Invariant length of a cosmic string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Malcolm R.

    1990-06-01

    The world sheet of a cosmic string is characterized by a function l, invariant under both coordinate and gauge transformations, which can be interpreted as the ``invariant length'' of the string. In flat space, l reduces to the invariant length of Vachaspati and Vilenkin, and gives an upper bound for the actual length of the string, and a lower bound for its energy, as measured by any inertial observer. In curved spacetime, time variations in the invariant length divide naturally into two parts: one due to the tidal tensor at points exterior to the world sheet and one due to the tidal tensor at points on the world sheet itself.

  16. Exact curvilinear diffusion coefficients in the repton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhot, A.

    2005-10-01

    The Rubinstein-Duke or repton model is one of the simplest lattice model of reptation for the diffusion of a polymer in a gel or a melt. Recently, a slightly modified model with hardcore interactions between the reptons has been introduced. The curvilinear diffusion coefficients of both models are exactly determined for all chain lengths. The case of periodic boundary conditions is also considered.

  17. Galactic Diffuse Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

    2007-10-25

    Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

  18. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  19. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  20. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  1. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  2. Investigation of Perforated Convergent-divergent Diffusers with Initial Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Maynard I

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made at Mach number 1.90 of the performance of a series of perforated convergent-divergent supersonic diffusers operating with initial boundary layer, which was induced and controlled by lengths of cylindrical inlets affixed to the diffusers. Supercritical mass-flow and peak total-pressure recoveries were decreased slightly by use of the longest inlets (4 inlet diameters in length). Combinations of cylindrical inlets, perforated diffusers, and subsonic diffuser were evaluated as simulated wind tunnels having second throats. Comparisons with noncontracted configurations of similar scale indicated conservatively computed power reductions of 25 percent.

  3. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous. PMID:21867316

  4. Diffusion on strained surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, M.; Wolf, D. E.

    1997-03-01

    The change of diffusion kinetics when elastic fields are present is discussed for diffusion on (001) surfaces of simple cubic, fcc and bcc lattices. All particles interact pairwise with a Lennard-Jones potential. The simple cubic lattice was stabilized by an anisotropic prefactor. It is found that generically compressive strain enhances diffusion whereas tensile strain increases the activation barrier. An approximately linear dependence of the barrier in a wide range of misfits is found. In heteroepitaxy, diffusion on top of large clusters is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. The kinetics close to edges and centers of islands are remarkably different. In many cases changes of binding energies are small compared to those of saddle point energies. Thermodynamic arguments (minimization of free energy) are not appropriate to describe diffusion on strained surfaces in these cases.

  5. Demospongic Acids Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kornprobst, Jean-Michel; Barnathan, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    The well-known fatty acids with a Δ5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C16–C32) and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C18–C19). Finally, the Δ5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs). This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between Δ5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs. PMID:21116406

  6. Size of diffusion pore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1988-03-01

    The diffusion pore of the outer membrane of Alcaligenes faecalis was shown to be substantially smaller than the Escherichia coli porin pore. In experiments with intact cells, pentoses and hexoses penetrated into the NaCl-expanded periplasm, whereas saccharides of Mr greater than 342 did not. Cells treated with 0.5 M saccharides of Mr greater than 342 weighed 33 to 38% less than cells treated with isotonic solution, suggesting that these saccharides do not permeate through the outer membrane. The diffusion rates of various solutes through the liposome membranes reconstituted from the Mr-43,000 outer membrane protein showed the following characteristics. (i) The relative diffusion rates of pentoses, hexoses, and methylhexoses appeared to be about 1.0, 0.6, and negligibly small, respectively. (ii) The diffusion rate of glucose appeared to be about 1/10th that with the E. coli B porin. (iii) The diffusion rate of gluconic acid was five to seven times higher than that of glucose. (iv) The diffusion rates of beta-lactam antibiotics appeared to be 40 to less than 10% of those with the E. coli B porin. PMID:2835003

  7. Size of diffusion pore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1988-01-01

    The diffusion pore of the outer membrane of Alcaligenes faecalis was shown to be substantially smaller than the Escherichia coli porin pore. In experiments with intact cells, pentoses and hexoses penetrated into the NaCl-expanded periplasm, whereas saccharides of Mr greater than 342 did not. Cells treated with 0.5 M saccharides of Mr greater than 342 weighed 33 to 38% less than cells treated with isotonic solution, suggesting that these saccharides do not permeate through the outer membrane. The diffusion rates of various solutes through the liposome membranes reconstituted from the Mr-43,000 outer membrane protein showed the following characteristics. (i) The relative diffusion rates of pentoses, hexoses, and methylhexoses appeared to be about 1.0, 0.6, and negligibly small, respectively. (ii) The diffusion rate of glucose appeared to be about 1/10th that with the E. coli B porin. (iii) The diffusion rate of gluconic acid was five to seven times higher than that of glucose. (iv) The diffusion rates of beta-lactam antibiotics appeared to be 40 to less than 10% of those with the E. coli B porin. Images PMID:2835003

  8. LENGTH SCALE OF TURBULENCE ABOVE ROUGH SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of analyses of data for two urban sites and a rural site suggest that the mixing length can be represented by the integral length scale of the turbulence derived from vertical velocity spectra. The result is apparently universal and permits the shear production of turbule...

  9. The chain-length dependence test.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2006-01-01

    Trends obtained from systematic studies based on chain-length variation have provided valuable insight and understanding into the behavior of m-phenylene ethynylene foldamers. The generalization of this experimental approach, the chain-length dependence test, is useful for studying solution conformation, packing in the solid state, specific intrachain interactions, and the contributions of end groups to a particular property. PMID:16411735

  10. Telomere length in early life predicts lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Heidinger, Britt J.; Blount, Jonathan D.; Boner, Winnie; Griffiths, Kate; Metcalfe, Neil B.; Monaghan, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The attrition of telomeres, the ends of eukaryote chromosomes, is thought to play an important role in cell deterioration with advancing age. The observed variation in telomere length among individuals of the same age is therefore thought to be related to variation in potential longevity. Studies of this relationship are hampered by the time scale over which individuals need to be followed, particularly in long-lived species where lifespan variation is greatest. So far, data are based either on simple comparisons of telomere length among different age classes or on individuals whose telomere length is measured at most twice and whose subsequent survival is monitored for only a short proportion of the typical lifespan. Both approaches are subject to bias. Key studies, in which telomere length is tracked from early in life, and actual lifespan recorded, have been lacking. We measured telomere length in zebra finches (n = 99) from the nestling stage and at various points thereafter, and recorded their natural lifespan (which varied from less than 1 to almost 9 y). We found telomere length at 25 d to be a very strong predictor of realized lifespan (P < 0.001); those individuals living longest had relatively long telomeres at all points at which they were measured. Reproduction increased adult telomere loss, but this effect appeared transient and did not influence survival. Our results provide the strongest evidence available of the relationship between telomere length and lifespan and emphasize the importance of understanding factors that determine early life telomere length. PMID:22232671

  11. Precise Measurement of Effective Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.; Young, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computerized instrument measures effective focal lengths to 0.01 percent accuracy. Laser interferometers measure mirror angle and stage coordinate y in instrument for accurate measurment of focal properties of optical systems. Operates under computer control to measure effective focal length, focal surface shape, modulation transfer function, and astigmatism.

  12. Thorium Diffusion in Monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Diffusion of thorium has been characterized in synthetic monazite under dry conditions. The synthetic monazites (either pure CePO4, NdPO4, or a mixed LREE phosphate containing Ce, Nd, and Sm) were grown via a Na2CO3-MoO3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were either synthesized ThSiO4 or CaTh(PO4)2 powders. Experiments were performed by placing source and monazite in Pt capsules and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 10 days to a few hours, at temperatures from 1400 to 1550C. The Th distributions in the monazite were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for diffusion in monazite: DSm = 7.2x103 exp(-814 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1 The diffusivity of Th was similar for monazites containing a single REE and the mixed LREE phosphates. Th diffusion was also similar for experiments run using the Th silicate and Ca-Th phosphate sources, suggesting that the substitutional mechanism for Th in monazite, i.e, Th+4 + Si+4 for REE+3 + P+5 with the ThSiO4 source, and Th+4 + Ca+2 for 2REE+3 with the CaTh(PO4)2 source, does not significantly affect Th diffusivities, and that Th is likely the rate-limiting species. Th diffusion in monazite is about 4 orders of magnitude slower than Pb diffusion (Cherniak et al., 2004). This contrasts with findings of Gardes et al. (2005) who determined that Pb, Th and REE diffusivities in monazite are similar. Th diffusion in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997) is about an order of magnitude slower than in monazite, but with similar activation energy for diffusion. The smaller diffusivities in zircon may be a consequence of the larger disparity in size between Th and the Zr site in zircon as compared with Th and the REE site in monazite. Nonetheless, Th is essentially immobile in monazite with respect to exchange by volume diffusion under most geologic conditions; these findings may have implications for containment of high- level actinide

  13. Tail paradox, partial identifiability, and influential priors in Bayesian branch length inference.

    PubMed

    Rannala, Bruce; Zhu, Tianqi; Yang, Ziheng

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have observed that Bayesian analyses of sequence data sets using the program MrBayes sometimes generate extremely large branch lengths, with posterior credibility intervals for the tree length (sum of branch lengths) excluding the maximum likelihood estimates. Suggested explanations for this phenomenon include the existence of multiple local peaks in the posterior, lack of convergence of the chain in the tail of the posterior, mixing problems, and misspecified priors on branch lengths. Here, we analyze the behavior of Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms when the chain is in the tail of the posterior distribution and note that all these phenomena can occur. In Bayesian phylogenetics, the likelihood function approaches a constant instead of zero when the branch lengths increase to infinity. The flat tail of the likelihood can cause poor mixing and undue influence of the prior. We suggest that the main cause of the extreme branch length estimates produced in many Bayesian analyses is the poor choice of a default prior on branch lengths in current Bayesian phylogenetic programs. The default prior in MrBayes assigns independent and identical distributions to branch lengths, imposing strong (and unreasonable) assumptions about the tree length. The problem is exacerbated by the strong correlation between the branch lengths and parameters in models of variable rates among sites or among site partitions. To resolve the problem, we suggest two multivariate priors for the branch lengths (called compound Dirichlet priors) that are fairly diffuse and demonstrate their utility in the special case of branch length estimation on a star phylogeny. Our analysis highlights the need for careful thought in the specification of high-dimensional priors in Bayesian analyses. PMID:21890479

  14. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  15. Tungsten diffusion in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Van Orman, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion of tungsten has been characterized in synthetic forsterite and natural olivine (Fo90) under dry conditions. The source of diffusant was a mixture of magnesium tungstate and olivine powders. Experiments were prepared by sealing the source material and polished olivine under vacuum in silica glass ampoules with solid buffers to buffer at NNO or IW. Prepared capsules were annealed in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 45 min to several weeks, at temperatures from 1050 to 1450 °C. Tungsten distributions in the olivine were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation is obtained for W diffusion in forsterite: D=1.0×10-8exp(-365±28 kJ mol/RT) m s Diffusivities for the synthetic forsterite and natural Fe-bearing olivine are similar, and tungsten diffusion in olivine shows little dependence on crystallographic orientation or oxygen fugacity. The slow diffusivities measured for W in olivine indicate that Hf-W ages in olivine-metal systems will close to diffusive exchange at higher temperatures than other chronometers commonly used in cosmochronology, and that tungsten isotopic signatures will be less likely to be reset by subsequent thermal events.

  16. Germanium nanowire growth controlled by surface diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtbauer, Jan; Bansen, Roman; Heimburger, Robert; Teubner, Thomas; Boeck, Torsten; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-07-23

    Germanium nanowires (NWs) were grown onto Ge(111) substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid process using gold droplets. The growth was carried out in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at substrate temperatures between 370 Degree-Sign C and 510 Degree-Sign C. The resulting nanowire growth rate turns out to be highly dependent on the substrate temperature exhibiting the maximum at T = 430 Degree-Sign C. The temperature dependence of growth rate can be attributed to surface diffusion both along the substrate and nanowire sidewalls. Analyzing the diffusive material transport yields a diffusion length of 126 nm at a substrate temperature of 430 Degree-Sign C.

  17. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  18. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  19. Permeability of acetic acid across gel and liquid-crystalline lipid bilayers conforms to free-surface-area theory.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, T X; Anderson, B D

    1997-01-01

    Solubility-diffusion theory, which treats the lipid bilayer membrane as a bulk lipid solvent into which permeants must partition and diffuse across, fails to account for the effects of lipid bilayer chain order on the permeability coefficient of any given permeant. This study addresses the scaling factor that must be applied to predictions from solubility-diffusion theory to correct for chain ordering. The effects of bilayer chemical composition, temperature, and phase structure on the permeability coefficient (Pm) of acetic acid were investigated in large unilamellar vesicles by a combined method of NMR line broadening and dynamic light scattering. Permeability values were obtained in distearoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, and dilauroylphosphatidylcholine bilayers, and their mixtures with cholesterol, at various temperatures both above and below the gel-->liquid-crystalline phase transition temperatures (Tm). A new scaling factor, the permeability decrement f, is introduced to account for the decrease in permeability coefficient from that predicted by solubility-diffusion theory owing to chain ordering in lipid bilayers. Values of f were obtained by division of the observed Pm by the permeability coefficient predicted from a bulk solubility-diffusion model. In liquid-crystalline phases, a strong correlation (r = 0.94) between f and the normalized surface density sigma was obtained: in f = 5.3 - 10.6 sigma. Activation energies (Ea) for the permeability of acetic acid decreased with decreasing phospholipid chain length and correlated with the sensitivity of chain ordering to temperature, [symbol: see text] sigma/[symbol: see text](1/T), as chain length was varied. Pm values decreased abruptly at temperatures below the main phase transition temperatures in pure dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers (30-60-fold) and below the pretransition in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

  20. Normal and anomalous diffusion of Brownian particles on disordered potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado-García, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we study the transition from normal to anomalous diffusion of Brownian particles on disordered potentials. The potential model consists of a series of "potential hills" (defined on a unit cell of constant length) whose heights are chosen randomly from a given distribution. We calculate the exact expression for the diffusion coefficient in the case of uncorrelated potentials for arbitrary distributions. We show that when the potential heights have a Gaussian distribution (with zero mean and a finite variance) the diffusion of the particles is always normal. In contrast, when the distribution of the potential heights is exponentially distributed the diffusion coefficient vanishes when the system is placed below a critical temperature. We calculate analytically the diffusion exponent for the anomalous (subdiffusive) phase by using the so-called "random trap model". Our predictions are tested by means of Langevin simulations obtaining good agreement within the accuracy of our numerical calculations.

  1. Fully Modulated Turbulent Diffusion Flames in Microgravity*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangras, Ravikiran; Hermanson, James C.; Johari, Hamid; Stocker, Dennis P.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2001-11-01

    Fully modulated, turbulent diffusion flames are studied in microgravity in 2.2 s drop-tower tests with a co-flow combustor. The fuel consists of pure ethylene or a 50/50 mixture with nitrogen; the oxidizer is either normal air or up to 40% oxygen in nitrogen. A fast solenoid valve is used to fully modulate (completely shut off) the fuel flow. The injection times range from 5 to 400 ms with a duty-cycle of 0.1 - 0.5. The fuel nozzle is 2 mm in diameter with a jet Reynolds number of 5000. The shortest injection times yield compact puffs with a mean flame length as little as 20% of that of the steady-state flame. The reduction in flame length appears to be somewhat greater in microgravity than in normal gravity. As the injection time increases, elongated flames result with a mean flame length comparable to that of a steady flame. The injection time for which the steady-state flame length is approached is shorter for lower air/fuel ratios. For a given duty-cycle, the separation between puffs is greater in microgravity than in normal gravity. For compact puffs, increasing the duty-cycle appears to increase the flame length more in microgravity than in normal gravity. The microgravity flame puffs do not exhibit the vortex-ring-like structure seen in normal gravity.

  2. Crystal structure and growth fabric of length-fast chalcedony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miehe, G.; Graetsch, H.; Flörke, O. W.

    1984-04-01

    Chalcedony from Brazilian agates, has been investigated by using transmission-electron microscopy, X-ray-diffraction, thermogravimetry and optical techniques. The quartz fibers of length-fast chalcedony are composed of submicroscopical polysynthetic, lamellar-twinned right- and lefthanded crystals, according to the Brazil law. This very narrow twinning causes 3 systems of diffuse diffraction streaks (corresponding to the three-fold symmetry) parallel to <10.1>, very frequently possessing an intensity maximum at h±1/2, k, l±1/2. These extra reflections were detected both in electron- and X-ray-diffraction patterns. Wall-lining chalcedony is parallel fibrous consisting of smaller crystallites with a higher total water content (0.06±0.01 μm and 1.2±0.1 wt %) than spherulitic chalcedony in horizontal agate bands (ca. 0.1 μm and 0.7±0.1 wt%).

  3. Anomalous diffusion in neutral evolution of model proteins.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik D; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-06-01

    Protein evolution is frequently explored using minimalist polymer models, however, little attention has been given to the problem of structural drift, or diffusion. Here, we study neutral evolution of small protein motifs using an off-lattice heteropolymer model in which individual monomers interact as low-resolution amino acids. In contrast to most earlier models, both the length and folded structure of the polymers are permitted to change. To describe structural change, we compute the mean-square distance (MSD) between monomers in homologous folds separated by n neutral mutations. We find that structural change is episodic, and, averaged over lineages (for example, those extending from a single sequence), exhibits a power-law dependence on n. We show that this exponent depends on the alignment method used, and we analyze the distribution of waiting times between neutral mutations. The latter are more disperse than for models required to maintain a specific fold, but exhibit a similar power-law tail. PMID:26172648

  4. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  5. Spectral attenuation length of scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexlin, Guido; Eberhard, Veit; Hunkel, Dirk; Zeitnitz, B.

    1995-02-01

    A double spectrometer allows the precise measurement of the spectral attenuation length of scintillating fibers. Exciting the fibers with a N 2-laser at different points and measuring the wavelength dependent light intensity on both ends of the fiber simultaneously, enables a measurement of the attenuation length which is practically independent of systematic uncertainties. The experimental setup can additionally be used for the measurement of the relative light output. Six types of scintillating fibers from four manufactures (Bicron, Kuraray, Pol.Hi.Tech, and Plastifo) were tested. For different fibers the wavelength dependent attenuation lengths were measured from 0.3 m up to 20 m with an accuracy as good as 1%.

  6. Regulation of Flagellar Length in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nedra F.; Iyer, Janaki Kannan; Buchheim, Julie A.; Meek, William

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has two apically localized flagella that are maintained at an equal and appropriate length. Assembly and maintenance of flagella requires a microtubule-based transport system known as intraflagellar transport (IFT). During IFT, proteins destined for incorporation into or removal from a flagellum are carried along doublet microtubules via IFT particles. Regulation of IFT activity therefore is pivotal in determining the length of a flagellum. Reviewed is our current understanding of the role of IFT and signal transduction pathways in the regulation of flagellar length. PMID:18692148

  7. A Note on Solar Cycle Length Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquero, J. M.; García, J. A.; Gallego, M. C.

    2006-05-01

    Recently, new estimates of the solar cycle length (SCL) have been calculated using the Zurich Sunspot Number (R Z) and the Regression-Fourier-Calculus (RFC)-method, a mathematically rigorous method involving multiple regression, Fourier approximation, and analytical expressions for the first derivative. In this short contribution, we show estimates of the solar cycle length using the RFC-method and the Group Sunspot Number (R G) instead the R Z. Several authors have showed the advantages of R G for the analysis of sunspot activity before 1850. The use of R G solves some doubtful solar cycle length estimates obtained around 1800 using R Z.

  8. Diffusion of sucrose, sodium, and water in ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Suenson, M.; Richmond, D. R.; Bassingthwaighte, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    The cumulative fluxes of radioactive sucrose, sodium, and water across a sheet of cat right ventricle were studied simultaneously to obtain the apparent tissue diffusion coefficients for extravascular diffusion at 37°C. The sucrose data fitted the equations for diffusion in tortuous channels in a plane sheet with a tortuosity factor, λ, of 2.11 ± 0.11 (mean ± SE, n = 10). The fit of the earliest data before attainment of steady state was improved by assuming a Gaussian distribution of diffusion path lengths through the extracellular space, but λ was only changed by a few percent. The sucrose diffusion channel contained 0.27 ± 0.03 ml of total tissue water, which is more than measured by others but still less than the expected sucrose space. The steady-state data for sodium agreed with the model for extracellular diffusion using λ and the area available for diffusion for sucrose when sodium equilibration with a dead-end pore volume (presumed to be intracellular) was taken into account. The cumulative flux data for water were monotonic and lacked secondary inflections. Thus the apparent tissue diffusion coefficients for sucrose, sodium, and water were (in 10−6 cm2/s) 1.77 ± 0.23, 5.13 ± 0.68, and 7.39 ± 0.99, respectively, representing a reduction to 23% of the free diffusion coefficient for sucrose and sodium and 22% for water. PMID:4440753

  9. Concerted diffusion of lipids in raft-like membranes.

    PubMed

    Apajalahti, Touko; Niemelä, Perttu; Govindan, Praveen Nedumpully; Miettinen, Markus S; Salonen, Emppu; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is no comprehensive model for the dynamics of cellular membranes. The understanding of even the basic dynamic processes, such as lateral diffusion of lipids, is still quite limited. Recent studies of one-component membrane systems have shown that instead of single-particle motions, the lateral diffusion is driven by a more complex, concerted mechanism for lipid diffusion (E. Falck et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 44-45), where a lipid and its neighbors move in unison in terms of loosely defined clusters. In this work, we extend the previous study by considering the concerted lipid diffusion phenomena in many-component raft-like membranes. This nature of diffusion phenomena emerge in all the cases we have considered, including both atom-scale simulations of lateral diffusion within rafts and coarse-grained MARTINI simulations of diffusion in membranes characterized by coexistence of raft and non-raft domains. The data allows us to identify characteristic time scales for the concerted lipid motions, which turn out to range from hundreds of nanoseconds to several microseconds. Further, we characterize typical length scales associated with the correlated lipid diffusion patterns and find them to be about 10 nm, or even larger if weak correlations are taken into account. Finally, the concerted nature of lipid motions is also found in dissipative particle dynamics simulations of lipid membranes, clarifying the role of hydrodynamics (local momentum conservation) in membrane diffusion phenomena. PMID:20158041

  10. Flow Control in a Transonic Diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartner, Jeremy; Amitay, Michael

    2014-11-01

    In some airplanes such as fighter jets and UAV, short inlet ducts replace the more conventional ducts due to their shorter length. However, these ducts are associated with low length-to-diameter ratio and low aspect ratio and, thus, experience massive separation and the presence of secondary flow structures. These flow phenomena are undesirable as they lead to pressure losses and distortion at the Aerodynamic Interface Plane (AIP), where the engine face is located. It causes the engine to perform with a lower efficiency as it would with a straight duct diffuser. Different flow control techniques were studied on the short inlet duct, with the goal to reattach the flow and minimize the distortions at the AIP. Due to the complex interaction between the separation and the secondary flow structures, the necessity to understand the flow mechanisms, and how to control them at a more fundamental level, a new transonic diffuser with an upper ramp and a straight floor was designed and built. The objective of this project is to explore the effectiveness of different flow control techniques in a high subsonic (up to Mach 0.8) diffuser, so that the quasi two-dimensional separation and the formation of secondary flow structure can be isolated using a canonical flow field. Supported by Northrop Grumman.

  11. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the syndrome is recommended. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with HDGC? Not everyone who ... the lifetime risk for diffuse gastric cancer is estimated to be 70% to 80% for men and ...

  12. Multinomial Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Ariel I.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel stochastic, space/time discrete representation of particle diffusion (e.g. Brownian motion) based on discrete probability distributions. We show that in the limit of both very small time step and large concentration, our description is equivalent to the space/time continuous stochastic diffusion equation. Being discrete in both time and space, our model can be used as an extremely accurate, efficient, and stable stochastic finite-difference diffusion algorithm when concentrations are so small that computationally expensive particle-based methods are usually needed. Through numerical simulations, we show that our method can generate realizations that capture the statistical properties of particle simulations. While our method converges converges to both the correct ensemble mean and ensemble variance very quickly with decreasing time step, but for small concentration, the stochastic diffusion PDE does not, even for very small time steps.

  13. Investigating diffusion with technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-07-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities (darkness) of the digital pictures are recorded and then plotted on a graph. The resulting graph of darkness versus time allows students to see the results of diffusion of the dye over time. Through modification of the basic lesson plan, students are able to investigate the influence of a variety of variables on diffusion. Furthermore, students are able to expand the boundaries of their thinking by formulating hypotheses and testing their hypotheses through experimentation. As a result, students acquire a relevant science experience through taking measurements, organizing data into tables, analysing data and drawing conclusions.

  14. Mastocytosis, diffuse cutaneous (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of diffuse, cutaneous mastocytosis. Abnormal collections of cells in the skin (mast cells) produce this rash. Unlike bullous mastocytosis, rubbing will not lead to formation of blisters ( ...

  15. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    Lung diffusion testing measures how well the lungs exchange gases. This is an important part of lung testing , because ... Gender Height Hemoglobin (the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen) level

  16. Hydrogen Diffusion in Forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouchy, S.; Mackwell, S.

    2002-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of Earth's mantle are readily modified by interaction with volatiles, such as water. Thus, characterization of solubility and kinetics of incorporation for water in nominally anhydrous minerals is important in order to understand the behavior of Earth's interior under hydrous conditions. Experimental studies on the olivine-water system indicate that significant amounts of OH can dissolve within olivine as point defects (Bell and Rossman, 1992; Kohlstedt et al. 1996). Extending Kohlstedt and Mackwell's (1998) work, our study concerns the kinetics of hydrogen transport in the iron-free olivine-water system. This study is based on hydrogenation of forsterite samples during piston-cylinder and TZM cold-seal vessel experiments. We use infrared analyses in order to constrain the speciation of the mobile water-derived defects in forsterite single-crystal sample, and the rates of diffusion of such species under uppermost mantle conditions (0.2 to 1.5 GPa, 900 to 1100° C). Hydrogen defect transport in single crystals of forsterite is investigated for diffusion parallel to each crystallographic axis. Defect diffusivities are obtained by fitting a diffusion law to the OH content as a function of position in the sample. Our current results indicate that incorporation of hydroxyl species into iron-free olivine is a one-stage process with hydrogen diffusion linked to magnesium vacancy self-diffusion DV, such that DV = D~/3 = 10-12 m2/s at 1000° C parallel to [001], where D~ represents the chemical diffusivity. Those diffusion rates are slightly lower than in iron-bearing olivine for the same incorporation mechanism. The different concentration profiles show a clear anisotropy of diffusion, with fastest diffusion parallel to [001] as in iron-bearing olivine. Thus, while hydrogen solubilities are dependent on iron content, the rate of incorporation of water-derived species in olivine is not strongly coupled to the concentration of iron. This

  17. Nodal Diffusion & Transport Theory

    1992-02-19

    DIF3D solves multigroup diffusion theory eigenvalue, adjoint, fixed source, and criticality (concentration, buckling, and dimension search) problems in 1, 2, and 3-space dimensions for orthogonal (rectangular or cylindrical), triangular, and hexagonal geometries. Anisotropic diffusion theory coefficients are permitted. Flux and power density maps by mesh cell and regionwise balance integrals are provided. Although primarily designed for fast reactor problems, upscattering and internal black boundary conditions are also treated.

  18. Viscous diffusion of vorticity in unsteady wall layers using the diffusion velocity concept

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Kempka, S.N.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1995-03-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to provide a careful evaluation of the diffusion velocity concept with regard to its ability to predict the diffusion of vorticity near a moving wall. A computer code BDIF has been written which simulates the evolution of the vorticity field near a wall of infinite length which is moving in an arbitrary fashion. The simulations generated by this code are found to give excellent results when compared to several exact solutions. We also outline a two-dimensional unsteady viscous boundary layer model which utilizes the diffusion velocity concept and is compatible with vortex methods. A primary goal of this boundary layer model is to minimize the number of vortices generated on the surface at each time step while achieving good resolution of the vorticity field near the wall. Preliminary results have been obtained for simulating a simple two-dimensional laminar boundary layer.

  19. Diffusing wave spectroscopy in Maxwellian fluids.

    PubMed

    Galvan-Miyoshi, J; Delgado, J; Castillo, R

    2008-08-01

    We present a critical assessment of the diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) technique for obtaining the characteristic lengths and for measuring the loss and storage moduli of a reasonable well-known wormlike micelle (WM) system. For this purpose, we tracked the Brownian motion of particles using DWS embedded in a Maxwellian fluid constituted by a wormlike micellar solution made of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), sodium salicylate (NaSal), and water. We found that the motion of particles was governed by the viscosity of the solvent at short times and by the stress relaxation mechanisms of the giant micelles at longer times. From the time evolution of the mean square displacement of particles, we could obtain for the WM solution the cage size where each particle is harmonically bound at short times, the long-time diffusion coefficient, and experimental values for the exponent that accounts for the broad spectrum of relaxation times at the plateau onset time found in the (deltar2(t)) vs. time curves. In addition, from the (deltar2(t)) vs. time curves, we obtained G'(omega) and G"(omega) for the WM solutions. All the DWS microreological information allowed us to estimate the characteristic lengths of the WM network. We compare our DWS microrheological results and characteristic lengths with those obtained with mechanical rheometers at different NaSal/CTAB concentration ratios and temperatures. PMID:19230210

  20. Lateral Diffusion Length Changes in HgCdTe Detectors in a Proton Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbs, John E.; Marshall, Paul W.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Gramer, Mark E.; Maestas, Diana; Garcia, John P.; Dole, Gary A.; Anderson, Amber A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the performance degradation in a proton environment of very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) HgCdTe detectors. The energy dependence of the Non-Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) in HgCdTe provides a framework for estimating the responsivity degradation in VLWIR HgCdTe due to on orbit exposure from protons. Banded detector arrays that have different detector designs were irradiated at proton energies of 7, 12, and 63 MeV. These banded detector arrays allovedin sight into how the fundamental detector parameters degraded in a proton environment at the three different proton energies. Measured data demonstrated that the detector responsivity degradation at 7 MeV is 5 times larger than the degradation at 63 MeV. The comparison of the responsivity degradation at the different proton energies suggests that the atomic Columbic interaction of the protons with the HgCdTe detector is likely the primary mechanism responsible for the degradation in responsivity at proton energies below 30 MeV.

  1. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  2. Characteristic length of the knotting probability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Erica; Deguchi, Tetsuo

    2015-09-01

    We present a self-avoiding polygon (SAP) model for circular DNA in which the radius of impermeable cylindrical segments corresponds to the screening length of double-stranded DNA surrounded by counter ions. For the model we evaluate the probability for a generated SAP with N segments having a given knot K through simulation. We call it the knotting probability of a knot K with N segments for the SAP model. We show that when N is large the most significant factor in the knotting probability is given by the exponentially decaying part exp(-N/NK), where the estimates of parameter NK are consistent with the same value for all the different knots we investigated. We thus call it the characteristic length of the knotting probability. We give formulae expressing the characteristic length as a function of the cylindrical radius rex, i.e. the screening length of double-stranded DNA.

  3. Impedance of finite length resistive cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsky, S.; Podobedov, B.; Gluckstern, R. L.

    2004-11-01

    We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor) of radius a, length g, and conductivity σ attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency (k≫1/a). In the equilibrium regime, ka2≪g, the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity σ. In the transient regime, ka2≫g, where the contribution of transition radiation arising from the discontinuity in conductivity is important, we derive an analytic expression for the impedance and compute the short-range wakefield. The analytic results are shown to agree with numerical evaluation of the impedance.

  4. Method of continuously determining crack length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramamurthy (Inventor); Lopez, Osvaldo F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The determination of crack lengths in an accurate and straight forward manner is very useful in studying and preventing load created flaws and cracks. A crack length sensor according to the present invention is fabricated in a rectangular or other geometrical form from a conductive powder impregnated polymer material. The long edges of the sensor are silver painted on both sides and the sensor is then bonded to a test specimen via an adhesive having sufficient thickness to also serve as an insulator. A lead wire is connected to each of the two outwardly facing silver painted edges. The resistance across the sensor changes as a function of the crack length in the specimen and sensor. The novel aspect of the present invention includes the use of relatively uncomplicated sensors and instrumentation to effectively measure the length of generated cracks.

  5. Phase coherence length in silicon photonic platform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yisu; Ma, Yangjin; Guan, Hang; Liu, Yang; Danziger, Steven; Ocheltree, Stewart; Bergman, Keren; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael

    2015-06-29

    We report for the first time two typical phase coherence lengths in highly confined silicon waveguides fabricated in a standard CMOS foundry's multi-project-wafer shuttle run in the 220nm silicon-on-insulator wafer with 248nm lithography. By measuring the random phase fluctuations of 800 on-chip silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometers across the wafer, we extracted, with statistical significance, the coherence lengths to be 4.17 ± 0.42 mm and 1.61 ± 0.12 mm for single mode strip waveguide and rib waveguide, respectively. We present a new experimental method to quantify the phase coherence length. The theory model is verified by both our and others' experiments. Coherence length is expected to become one key parameter of the fabrication non-uniformity to guide the design of silicon photonics. PMID:26191700

  6. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hight-Walker, Angela; Simpson, Jeffrey R.; Chun, Jaehun; Obrzut, Jan; Bajpai, Vardhan; Phelan, Fred R.; Simien, Daneesh; Yeon Huh, Ji; Migler, Kalman B.

    2011-03-01

    Advanced technological uses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid phase post processing. The foundation of all of these processing steps is the attainment of individualized nanotube dispersion in solution; an understanding of the collodial properties of the dispersed SWCNTs can then be used to designed appropriate conditions for separations. In many instances nanotube size, particularly length, is especially active in determining the achievable properties from a given population, and thus there is a critical need for measurement technologies for both length distribution and effective separation techniques. In this Progress Report, we document the current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations, including separations, and use examples to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  7. Cold bose gases with large scattering lengths.

    PubMed

    Cowell, S; Heiselberg, H; Mazets, I E; Morales, J; Pandharipande, V R; Pethick, C J

    2002-05-27

    We calculate the energy and condensate fraction for a dense system of bosons interacting through an attractive short range interaction with positive s-wave scattering length a. At high densities n>a(-3), the energy per particle, chemical potential, and square of the sound speed are independent of the scattering length and proportional to n(2/3), as in Fermi systems. The condensate is quenched at densities na(3) approximately 1. PMID:12059466

  8. Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 82 NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron effective attenuation lengths (EALs) in solid elements and compounds at selected electron energies between 50 eV and 2,000 eV. The database was designed mainly to provide EALs (to account for effects of elastic-eletron scattering) for applications in surface analysis by Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  9. Nucleosome repeat lengths and columnar chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-06-01

    Thorough quantitative study of nucleosome repeat length (NRL) distributions, conducted in 1992 by J. Widom, resulted in a striking observation that the linker lengths between the nucleosomes are quantized. Comparison of the NRL average values with the MNase cut distances predicted from the hypothetical columnar structure of chromatin (this work) shows a close correspondence between the two. This strongly suggests that the NRL distribution, actually, reflects the dominant role of columnar chromatin structure common for all eukaryotes. PMID:26208520

  10. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Hunter R.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C.; Daza, Riza; Gligorich, Keith M.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134–144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132–145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA. PMID:27428049

  11. Process for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor precursor between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to form a super conductor layer.

  12. Measurement of Solute Diffusion Behavior in Fractured Waste Glass Media

    SciTech Connect

    Saripalli, Kanaka P.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Meyer, Philip D.

    2008-10-01

    Determination of aqueous phase diffusion coefficients of solutes through fractured media is essential for understanding and modeling contaminants transport at many hazardous waste disposal sites. No methods for earlier measurements are available for the characterization of diffusion in fractured glass blocks. We report here the use of time-lag diffusion experimental method to assess the diffusion behavior of three different solutes (Cs, Sr and Pentafluoro Benzoic Acid or PFBA) in fractured, immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) glass forms. A fractured media time-lag diffusion experimental apparatus that allows the measurement of diffusion coefficients has been designed and built for this purpose. Use of time-lag diffusion method, a considerably easier experimental method than the other available methods, was not previously demonstrated for measuring diffusion in any fractured media. Hydraulic conductivity, porosity and diffusion coefficients of a solute were experimentally measured in fractured glass blocks using this method for the first time. Results agree with the range of properties reported for similar rock media earlier, indicating that the time-lag experimental method can effectively characterize the diffusion coefficients of fractured ILAW glass media.

  13. Tracheoesophageal fistula length decreases over time.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nancy; Kearney, Ann; Damrose, Edward J

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to demonstrate that the length of the tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis changes over time and to determine whether the prosthesis length over time increased, decreased, or showed no predictable change in size. A retrospective chart review was performed at a tertiary care referral center. Patients who underwent either primary or secondary tracheoesophageal puncture between January 2006 and August 2014 were evaluated. Patients were excluded if the tracheoesophageal prosthesis size was not consistently recorded or if they required re-puncturing for an extruded prosthesis. Data analyzed included patient demographics and the length of the tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis at each change. A total of 37 patients were identified. The mean age was 64 years. Seventy-six percent were male. 24 % underwent primary tracheoesophageal puncture and 76 % underwent secondary tracheoesophageal puncture. The length of the prosthesis decreased over time (median Kendall correlation coefficient = -0.60; mean = -0.44) and this correlation between length and time was significant (p = 0.00085). Therefore, in conclusion, tracheoesophageal prosthesis length is not constant over time. The tracheoesophageal wall thins, necessitating placement of shorter prostheses over time. Patients with a tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis will require long-term follow-up and repeat sizing of their prosthesis. Successful tracheoesophageal voicing will require periodic reevaluation of these devices, and insurers must, therefore, understand that long-term professional care will be required to manage these patients and their prostheses. PMID:26951219

  14. Dynamical Length-Regulation of Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbinger, Anna; Reese, Louis; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are vital constituents of the cytoskeleton. These stiff filaments are not only needed for mechanical support. They also fulfill highly dynamic tasks. For instance MTs build the mitotic spindle, which pulls the doubled set of chromosomes apart during mitosis. Hence, a well-regulated and adjustable MT length is essential for cell division. Extending a recently introduced model [1], we here study length-regulation of MTs. Thereby we account for both spontaneous polymerization and depolymerization triggered by motor proteins. In contrast to the polymerization rate, the effective depolymerization rate depends on the presence of molecular motors at the tip and thereby on crowding effects which in turn depend on the MT length. We show that these antagonistic effects result in a well-defined MT length. Stochastic simulations and analytic calculations reveal the exact regimes where regulation is feasible. Furthermore, the adjusted MT length and the ensuing strength of fluctuations are analyzed. Taken together, we make quantitative predictions which can be tested experimentally. These results should help to obtain deeper insights in the microscopic mechanisms underlying length-regulation. [4pt] [1] L.Reese, A.Melbinger, E.Frey, Biophys. J., 101, 9, 2190 (2011)

  15. Cation Diffusion in Xenotime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2004-05-01

    Xenotime is an important mineral in metamorphic paragenesis, and useful in isotopic dating, garnet-xenotime thermometry, and monazite-xenotime thermometry, so diffusion data for xenotime of cations of geochronological and geochemical importance are of some interest. We report here on diffusion of the rare earth elements Sm, Dy and Yb in synthetic xenotime under dry conditions. The synthetic xenotime was grown via a Na2}CO{3}-MoO_{3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were REE phosphate powders, with experiments run with sources containing a single REE. Experiments were performed by placing source and xenotime in Pt capsules, and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from thirty minutes to a month, at temperatures from 1000 to 1400C. The REE distributions in the xenotime were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relations are obtained for diffusion in xenotime, normal to (101): DSm = 1.7x10-4 exp(-442 kJ mol-1/RT) m2}sec{-1 DDy = 3.5x10-7 exp(-365 kJ mol-1/RT) m2}sec{-1 DYb = 7.4x10-7 exp(-371 kJ mol-1/RT) m2}sec{-1. Diffusivities of these REE do not differ greatly in xenotime, in contrast to the findings noted for the REE in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997), where the LREE diffuse more slowly, and with higher activation energies for diffusion, than the heavier rare earths. In zircon, these differences among diffusion of the rare earths are attributed to the relatively large size of the REE with respect to Zr, for which they substitute in the zircon lattice. With the systematic increase in ionic radius from the heavy to lighter REE, this size mismatch becomes more pronounced and diffusivities of the LREE are as consequence slower. Although xenotime is isostructural with zircon, the REE are more closely matched in size to Y, so in xenotime this effect appears much smaller and the REE diffuse at similar rates. In addition, the process of diffusion in xenotime likely involves simple REE+3

  16. Ti Diffusion in Pyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D.; Liang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Diffusion of titanium has been characterized in natural enstatite and diopside under buffered conditions and in air. The sources of diffusant for the enstatite experiments were mixtures of Mg, Si and Ti oxide powders, which were combined and heated at 1300°C overnight, and then thoroughly mixed with synthesized enstatite powder and heated for an additional day at 1300°C. Sources for diopside experiments were prepared similarly, using Ca, Mg, Si, and Ti oxide powders combined with synthesized diopside powder, with heating of source materials at 1200°C. Buffered experiments were prepared by enclosing source material and pyroxene (polished and pre-annealed under conditions comparable to those to be experienced in the experiment) in AgPd or platinum capsules, placing the metal capsule in a silica glass capsule with a solid buffer (to buffer at NNO or IW) and sealing the assembly under vacuum. Some experiments on enstatite were run in air; sample and source were placed in Pt capsules and crimped shut. Prepared capsules were then annealed in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 8 hours to a few months, at temperatures from 950 to 1200°C. The Ti distributions in the pyroxene were profiled with Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation is obtained for Ti diffusion in a natural enstatite, for diffusion normal to the (210) cleavage face (950 - 1150°C, experiments run in air): DTi = 1.9×10-10 exp(-300 ± 44 kJ mol-1/RT) m2 sec-1. Diffusion under NNO and IW-buffered conditions is similar to that for experiments run in air, suggesting little dependence of Ti diffusion on oxygen fugacity. There is also little evidence of anisotropy, as diffusion normal to (001) does not differ significantly from diffusion for the other orientation. Preliminary findings for Ti diffusion in diopside suggest diffusivities similar to those for enstatite. Ti diffusivities in enstatite are similar to those of the trivalent REEs (Cherniak and Liang, 2007

  17. Sorption of perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluoroheptanoic acid on granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Luo, Qi; Gao, Bin; Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Woodward, David; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    The sorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) on granular activated carbon (GAC) was characterized and compared to explore the underlying mechanisms. Sorption of the three perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) on GAC appeared to be a rapid intra-particle diffusion process, which were well represented by the pseudo-second-order rate model with the sorption rate following the order PFOS > PFOA > PFHpA. Sorption isotherm data were well fitted by the Freundlich model with the sorption capacity (Kf) of PFOS, PFOA and PFHpA being 4.45, 2.42 and 1.66 respectively. This suggests that the hydrophilic head group on PFAAs, i.e. sulfonate vs carboxylic, has a strong influence on their sorption. Comparison between PFOA and PFHpA revealed that hydrophobicity could also play a role in the sorption of PFAAs on GAC when the fluorocarbon chain length is different. Analyses using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR)-Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested possible formation of a negative charge-assisted H-bond between PFAAs and the functionalities on GAC surfaces, including non-aromatic ketones, sulfides, and halogenated hydrocarbons. PMID:26606188

  18. Multigroup Complex Geometry Neutron Diffusion Code System.

    2002-12-18

    Version 01 SNAP-3D is based on SNAP2 and is a one- two- or three-dimensional multigroup diffusion code system. It is primarily intended for neutron diffusion calculations, but it can also carry out gamma-ray calculations if the diffusion approximation is accurate enough. It is suitable for fast and thermal reactor core calculations and for shield calculations. SNAP-3D can solve the multi-group neutron diffusion equations using finite difference methods in (x,y,z), (r,theta,z), (TRI,z), (HEX,z) or (spherical) coordinates.more » The one-dimensional slab and cylindrical geometries and the two-dimensional (x,y), (r,z), (r,theta), (HEX) and (TRI) are all treated as simple special cases of three-dimensional geometries. Numerous reflective and periodic symmetry options are available and may be used to reduce the number of mesh points necessary to represent the system. Extrapolation lengths can be specified at internal and external boundaries. The problem classes are: 1) eigenvalue search for critical k-effective, 2) eigenvalue search for critical buckling, 3) eigenvalue search for critical time-constant, 4) fixed source problems in which the sources are functions of regions, 5) fixed source problems in which the sources are provided, on disc, for every mesh point and group.« less

  19. Load Diffusion in Composite and Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Ambur, D. (Technical Monitor); Nemeth, M. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for the multi-functional large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Some specific problems recently considered were those of end effects in smart materials and structures, study of the stress response of pressurized linear piezoelectric cylinders for both static and steady rotating configurations, an analysis of the effect of pre-stressing and pre-polarization on the decay of end effects in piezoelectric solids and investigation of constitutive models for hardening rubber-like materials. Our goal in the study of load diffusion is the development of readily applicable results for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses.

  20. Diffusion induced stresses in buckling battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandakkar, Tanmay K.; Johnson, Harley T.

    2012-06-01

    Highly networked nanostructured battery electrode materials offer the possibility of achieving both rapid battery charge-discharge rates and high storage capacity. Recently, lithium ion battery (LIB) electrodes based on a 2-D honeycomb architecture were shown to undergo remarkable and reversible morphological changes during the lithiation process. Charge-discharge rates in 3-D composite electrode have also been shown to benefit from sandwiching the electrolytically active material between highly conductive ion and electron transport pathways to reduce electrical resistance and solid-state diffusion lengths. In the present work we simulate and analyze the observed morphological changes in honeycomb electrodes, with and without the presence of conductive pathways, during the lithiation-delithiation process. Diffusion induced stresses are analyzed for such structures undergoing elastic-plastic deformation during cycling. The results show that such a periodic, nanostructured electrode geometry allows for the presence of buckling-like deformation modes, which effectively reduce the resulting mechanical stresses that lead to electrode failure.