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Sample records for acid dihydrate nad

  1. Effect of waters of crystallization on terahertz spectra: anhydrous oxalic acid and its dihydrate.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Korter, Timothy M

    2010-07-08

    Oxalic acid and oxalic acid dihydrate were studied using terahertz spectroscopy and solid-state density functional theory (DFT) in the spectral range 10-100 cm(-1). The size of the oxalic acid molecule and its limited internal degrees of freedom make it ideal for evaluating the performance of computational methods for the structural and dynamical simulation of strongly hydrogen-bonded solids. Calculations of the solid-state structures and terahertz spectra of oxalic acid and oxalic acid dihydrate were performed using the hybrid B3LYP and B3PW91 and the nonhybrid BLYP and PW91 density functionals employing the 6-311G(2d,2p) basis set. When these simulations were compared to the experimental spectra of the oxalic acid solids, a constant overprediction of the dihydrate frequencies was observed in contrast to the results of the anhydrous system. This change in behavior is connected to the nature of the vibrational motions being accessed. The primary molecular motion contributions to the terahertz vibrations of oxalic acid dihydrate were found to originate in the external motions of the cocrystallized H(2)O molecules. The observed overestimation of the vibrational energies in the simulated terahertz spectra is attributed to increased anharmonicity of the vibrational motions in the dihydrate system versus the anhydrous, resulting from weaker hydrogen bonding through the networked water molecules.

  2. Nitric acid dihydrate at ambient and high pressure: An experimental and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Martin; Pulham, Colin R.; Morrison, Carole A.; Allan, David R.; Marshall, William G.

    2006-06-01

    The high pressure structural behavior of nitric acid dihydrate ([H{sub 3}O]{sup +}{center_dot}[NO{sub 3}]{sup -}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O) has been investigated up to 3.8 GPa using single crystal x-ray diffraction and neutron powder diffraction techniques. A new structural phase has been identified above 1.33 GPa and this has been further studied by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. These have guided the refinement by neutron powder diffraction.

  3. A Neat Trick Using Oxalic Acid Dihydrate and Potassium Permanganate and Other Experiments with Small Organic Amine or Oxygenated Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelland, Malcolm A.

    2011-01-01

    Solid potassium permanganate (KMnO[subscript 4]) is shown to react in a variety of ways with small organic amines or oxygenated compounds depending on whether they are liquids or solids and whether water is present. In particular, its reaction with solid oxalic acid dihydrate can be initiated by the moisture in one's breath, making an intriguing…

  4. The EFG tensors and the positions of the deuterons in deuterated pyromellitic acid dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schajor, W.; Tegenfeldt, J.; Haeberlen, U.

    We report on high-field FT NMR measurements of the EFG tensors at the sites of the deuterons in selectively deuterated single crystals of pyromellitic acid dihydrate, PMADH. The principal directions of the EFGs and the quadrupole coupling constants are used to derive information about the positions of the deuterons relative to the framework of the heavy atoms of the PMA molecule, and about the hydrogen bond network in PMADH. The results are compared with the hydrogen positions found in Takusagawa's X-ray study of PMADH. The D NMR and the X-ray results are at variance. It is concluded that at least in this case of PMADH D NMR is superior to X-ray diffraction with regard to the positioning of the hydrogens.

  5. On 2:1 melamine - Squaric acid dihydrate complex: The structure and vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicka-Scheibe, J.; Pawlukojć, A.; Sobczyk, L.; Jański, J.

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper we would like to describe the structural and dynamical properties of crystalline dihydrated complex of melamine (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazin-1-ium) with squaric acid (3,4-dihydroxycyclobut-3-ene-1,2-dione) abbreviated as MH·SQ. The X-ray diffraction studies show the presence of deprotonated units (C4O4)2- and single protonated melamine cations surrounded by tetrameric water assemblies (H2O)4. The formation of the water tetramers deserves a special attention. IR absorption and Raman spectra reflect a richness of structural units and numerous hydrogen bonds. The presence of the continua in the IR spectra, with a characteristic presence of the Hadži's trio enriched by a numerous submaxima, may be ascribed to the structural units and to the various types of hydrogen bonds. The density functional theory calculation with the periodic boundary conditions was use to precise analysis of experimental data.

  6. Effect of NAD on PARP-mediated insulin sensitivity in oleic acid treated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jing; Cui, Ju; Gong, Huan; Xi, Chao; Zhang, Tie-Mei

    2015-07-01

    High serum free fatty acids levels are associated with the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes; however, the precise mechanisms underlying this lipid toxicity are unclear. To investigate whether PARP1 activation and NAD depletion are involved in the impairment of insulin sensitivity associated with lipotoxicity, HepG2 cells were cultured with 500 μM oleic acid for 48 h. Oleic acid-treated cells exhibited increased ROS generation, lipid accumulation and PARP1 activation. Treatment with the PARP1 inhibitor PJ34 and transfection with PARP1 small interfering RNA both prevented the oleic acid-induced impairment of the insulin signaling pathway. Furthermore, treatment with PJ34 reversed the oleic acid-induced decrease in intracellular NAD concentration, while exogenous NAD protected cells against oleic acid-induced insulin insensitivity. Combined NAD and PJ34 administration did not enhance the effects obtained by treatment with either NAD or PJ34 alone. Interestingly, when cells were treated with the SIRT1 inhibitor EX527, the protective effects of PJ34 and NAD treatment were diminished. Taken together, these data suggest that NAD depletion by PARP1 activation is essential for the modulation of insulin sensitivity in oleic acid-induced lipotoxicity.

  7. Elevation of cellular NAD levels by nicotinic acid and involvement of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human cells.

    PubMed

    Hara, Nobumasa; Yamada, Kazuo; Shibata, Tomoko; Osago, Harumi; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Tsuchiya, Mikako

    2007-08-24

    NAD plays critical roles in various biological processes through the function of SIRT1. Although classical studies in mammals showed that nicotinic acid (NA) is a better precursor than nicotinamide (Nam) in elevating tissue NAD levels, molecular details of NAD synthesis from NA remain largely unknown. We here identified NA phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT) in humans and provided direct evidence of tight link between NAPRT and the increase in cellular NAD levels. The enzyme was abundantly expressed in the small intestine, liver, and kidney in mice and mediated [(14)C]NAD synthesis from [(14)C]NA in human cells. In cells expressing endogenous NAPRT, the addition of NA but not Nam almost doubled cellular NAD contents and decreased cytotoxicity by H(2)O(2). Both effects were reversed by knockdown of NAPRT expression. These results indicate that NAPRT is essential for NA to increase cellular NAD levels and, thus, to prevent oxidative stress of the cells. Kinetic analyses revealed that NAPRT, but not Nam phosphoribosyltransferase (NamPRT, also known as pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor or visfatin), is insensitive to the physiological concentration of NAD. Together, we conclude that NA elevates cellular NAD levels through NAPRT function and, thus, protects the cells against stress, partly due to lack of feedback inhibition of NAPRT but not NamPRT by NAD. The ability of NA to increase cellular NAD contents may account for some of the clinically observed effects of the vitamin and further implies a novel application of the vitamin to treat diseases such as those associated with the depletion of cellular NAD pools.

  8. Nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside: a molecular evaluation of NAD+ precursor vitamins in human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Katrina L; Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Although baseline requirements for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) synthesis can be met either with dietary tryptophan or with less than 20 mg of daily niacin, which consists of nicotinic acid and/or nicotinamide, there is growing evidence that substantially greater rates of NAD+ synthesis may be beneficial to protect against neurological degeneration, Candida glabrata infection, and possibly to enhance reverse cholesterol transport. The distinct and tissue-specific biosynthetic and/or ligand activities of tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and the newly identified NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide riboside, reviewed herein, are responsible for vitamin-specific effects and side effects. Because current data suggest that nicotinamide riboside may be the only vitamin precursor that supports neuronal NAD+ synthesis, we present prospects for human nicotinamide riboside supplementation and propose areas for future research.

  9. Generation, Release, and Uptake of the NAD Precursor Nicotinic Acid Riboside by Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Veronika; Shabalin, Konstantin; Nerinovski, Kirill; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Yakimov, Alexander; Redpath, Philip; Khodorkovskiy, Mikhail; Migaud, Marie E; Ziegler, Mathias; Nikiforov, Andrey

    2015-11-06

    NAD is essential for cellular metabolism and has a key role in various signaling pathways in human cells. To ensure proper control of vital reactions, NAD must be permanently resynthesized. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as well as nicotinamide riboside (NR) and nicotinic acid riboside (NAR) are the major precursors for NAD biosynthesis in humans. In this study, we explored whether the ribosides NR and NAR can be generated in human cells. We demonstrate that purified, recombinant human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) CN-II and CN-III, but not CN-IA, can dephosphorylate the mononucleotides nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and thus catalyze NR and NAR formation in vitro. Similar to their counterpart from yeast, Sdt1, the human 5'-NTs require high (millimolar) concentrations of nicotinamide mononucleotide or NAMN for efficient catalysis. Overexpression of FLAG-tagged CN-II and CN-III in HEK293 and HepG2 cells resulted in the formation and release of NAR. However, NAR accumulation in the culture medium of these cells was only detectable under conditions that led to increased NAMN production from nicotinic acid. The amount of NAR released from cells engineered for increased NAMN production was sufficient to maintain viability of surrounding cells unable to use any other NAD precursor. Moreover, we found that untransfected HeLa cells produce and release sufficient amounts of NAR and NR under normal culture conditions. Collectively, our results indicate that cytosolic 5'-NTs participate in the conversion of NAD precursors and establish NR and NAR as integral constituents of human NAD metabolism. In addition, they point to the possibility that different cell types might facilitate each other's NAD supply by providing alternative precursors.

  10. Crystallization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate with presence of glutamic acid and arginine at 37 °C.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengfeng; Ge, Xiaolu; Li, Guochang; Bai, Jiahai; Ding, Rui

    2014-08-01

    The formations of non-metabolic stones, bones and teeth were seriously related to the morphology, size and surface reactivity of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD). Herein, a facile biomimetic mineralization method with presence of glutamic acid and arginine was employed to fabricate DCPD with well-defined morphology and adjustable crystallite size. In reaction solution containing more arginine, crystallization of DCPD occurred with faster rate of nucleation and higher density of stacked layers due to the generation of more OH(-) ions after hydrolysis of arginine at 37 °C. With addition of fluorescein or acetone, the consumption of OH(-) ions or desolvation reaction of Ca(2+) ions was modulated, which resulted in the fabrication of DCPD with adjustable crystallite sizes and densities of stacked layers. In comparison with fluorescein-loading DCPD, dicalcium phosphate anhydrate was prepared with enhanced photoluminescence properties due to the reduction of self-quenching effect and regular arrangement of encapsulated fluorescein molecules. With addition of more acetone, DCPD was prepared with smaller crystallite size via antisolvent crystallization. The simulated process with addition of amino acids under 37 °C would shed light on the dynamic process of biomineralization for calcium phosphate compounds.

  11. Crystal structure of human aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A3 complexed with NAD+ and retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Andrea; Li, Jianfeng; Donini, Stefano; Sobol, Robert W.; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) catalyzes the oxidation of retinal to the pleiotropic factor retinoic acid using NAD+. The level of ALDHs enzymatic activity has been used as a cancer stem cell marker and seems to correlate with tumour aggressiveness. Elevated ALDH1A3 expression in mesenchymal glioma stem cells highlights the potential of this isozyme as a prognosis marker and drug target. Here we report the first crystal structure of human ALDH1A3 complexed with NAD+ and the product all-trans retinoic acid (REA). The tetrameric ALDH1A3 folds into a three domain-based architecture highly conserved along the ALDHs family. The structural analysis revealed two different and coupled conformations for NAD+ and REA that we propose to represent two snapshots along the catalytic cycle. Indeed, the isoprenic moiety of REA points either toward the active site cysteine, or moves away adopting the product release conformation. Although ALDH1A3 shares high sequence identity with other members of the ALDH1A family, our structural analysis revealed few peculiar residues in the 1A3 isozyme active site. Our data provide information into the ALDH1As catalytic process and can be used for the structure-based design of selective inhibitors of potential medical interest. PMID:27759097

  12. An analytical method for the measurement of acid metabolites of tryptophan-NAD pathway and related acids in urine.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiangjun; Zhu, Jiping; Rubab, Mamoona; Feng, Yong-Lai; Poon, Raymond

    2010-04-15

    An analytical method has been developed for the measurements of five urinary acids namely, quinolinic acid, picolinic acid, nicotinic acid, 2-pyridylacetic acid and 3-pyridylacetic acid. The high performance liquid chromatograph-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was operated in positive polarity under selected ion monitoring mode, with a column flow rate of 0.2 ml/min and an injection volume of 20 microl. The method used isotope-labelled picolinic acid (PA-d(4)) and nicotinic acid (NA-d(4)) as internal standards for the quantification. The sample preparation involved parallel use of two different types of mixed-mode solid phase extraction cartridges (Strata-X-AW for the extraction of quinolinic acid, and Strata-X-C for the remaining acids). Quantitative analysis of five target acids in several human and rat urine samples showed that the levels of acids were relatively uniform among rats while larger variations were observed for human samples.

  13. Thermochemical Kinetics of H2O and HNO3 on crystalline Nitric Acid Hydrates (alpha-, beta-NAT, NAD) in the range 175-200 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Michel J.; Iannarelli, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The growth of NAT (Nitric Acid Trihydrate, HNO3x3H2O) and NAD (Nitric Acid Dihydrate, HNO3x2H2O) on an ice substrate, the evaporative lifetime of NAT and NAD as well as the interconversion of alpha- and beta-NAT competing with evaporation and growth under UT/LS conditions depends on the interfacial kinetics of H2O and HNO3 vapor on the condensed phase. Despite the existence of some literature results we have embarked on a systematic investigation of the kinetics using a multidiagnostic experimental approach enabled by the simultaneous observation of both the gas (residual gas mass spectrometry) as well as the condensed phase (FTIR absorption in transmission). We report on thermochemically consistent mass accommodation coefficients alpha and absolute evaporation rates Rev/molecule s-1cm-3 as a function of temperature which yields the corresponding vapor pressures of both H2O and HNO3 in equilibrium with the crystalline phases, hence the term thermochemical kinetics. These results have been obtained using a stirred flow reactor (SFR) using a macroscopic pure ice film of 1 micron or so thickness as a starting substrate mimicking atmospheric ice particles and are reported in a phase diagram specifically addressing UT (Upper Troposphere)/LS (Lower Stratosphere) conditions as far as temperature and partial pressures are concerned. The experiments have been performed either at steady-state flow conditions or in transient supersaturation using a pulsed solenoid valve in order to generate gas pulses whose decay were subsequently monitored in real time. Special attention has been given to the effect of the stainless-steel vessel walls in that Langmuir adsorption isotherms for H2O and HNO3 have been used to correct for wall-adsorption of both probe gases. Typically, the accommodation coefficients of H2O and HNO3 are similar throughout the temperature range whereas the rates of evaporation Rev of H2O are significantly larger than for HNO3 thus leading to the difference in

  14. Studies on the syntheses, structural characterization, antimicrobial-, and DPPH radical scavenging activity of the cocrystals caffeine:cinnamic acid and caffeine:eosin dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Kumar, G. S.; Seethalakshmi, P. G.; Bhuvanesh, N.; Kumaresan, S.

    2013-10-01

    Two organic cocrystals namely, caffeine:cinnamic acid [(caf)(ca)] (1) and caffeine:eosin dihydrate [(caf)(eos)]·2H2O (2) were synthesized and studied by FT-IR, TGA/DTA, and single crystal XRD. The crystal system of cocrystal 1 is triclinic with space group P-1 and Z = 2 and that of cocrystal 2 is monoclinic with space group P21/C and Z = 4. An imidazole-carboxylic acid synthon is observed in the cocrystal 1. The intermolecular hydrogen bond, O-H⋯N and π-π interactions play a major role in stabilizing 1 whereas the intermolecular hydrogen bonds, O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N, and intramolecular hydrogen bond, O-H⋯Br; along with π-π interactions together play a vital role in stabilizing the structure of 2. The antimicrobial- and DPPH radical scavenging activities of both the cocrystals were studied.

  15. Speciation in experimental C-O-H fluids produced by the thermal dissociation of oxalic acid dihydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, G.B.; Chou, I.-Ming; Pasteris, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Fluid speciations and their related reaction pathways were studied in C-O-H-system fluids produced by the thermal dissociation of oxalic acid dihydrate (OAD: H2C2O4 ?? 2H2O) sealed in silica glass capsules. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 230-750??C, with bulk fluid densities in the range 0.01-0.53 g/cm3. Pressure was controlled by temperature and density in the isochoric systems. The quenched products of dissociation experiments were an aqueous liquid and one (supercritical fluid) or, rarely, two (vapor plus liquid) carbonic phase (s). In-situ Raman microanalyses were performed on the quenched carbonic phases at room temperature, at which fluid pressures ranged from about 50 to 340 bars. Bulk fluid speciations were reconstructed from the Raman analyses via mass balance constraints, and appear to monitor the true fluid speciations at run conditions. In experiments from the lowtemperature range (230-350??C), fluid speciations record the dissociation of OAD according to the reaction OAD = CO2 + CO + 3H2O. A process of the form CO + H2O = CO2 + H2 is driven to the right with increasing temperature. The hydrogen gas produced tends to escape from the sample systems via diffusion into/through the silica glass capsules, shifting bulk compositions toward equimolar binary H2O-CO2 mixtures. The speciations of fluids in experiments with minimal hydrogen loss show poor agreement with speciations calculated for equilibrium fluids by the corresponding-states model of Saxena and Fei (1988). Such disagreement suggests that the formations of CH4 and graphite are metastably inhibited in the current experiments, which correlates with their absence or trivial abundances in experimental products. Moreover, calculations in which the stabilities of methane and graphite are suppressed suggest that such metastable equilibrium is approached only in experiments at temperatures greater than about 600-650??C. These results have applications to fluid processes in geological

  16. Preparation and thermal characterization of oxalic acid dihydrate/bentonite composite as shape-stabilized phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lipeng; Xie, Shaolei; Sun, Jinhe; Jia, Yongzhong

    2017-03-01

    Oxalic acid dihydrate (OAD) which has very high initial phase transition enthalpy is a promising phase change material (PCM). In this paper, shape-stabilized composite PCMs composed of OAD and bentonite were prepared by a facile blending method to overcome the problem of leakage. FT-IR results indicated the interactions between OAD and bentonite, such as the capillary force and the hydrogen bonding, resulting in the confined crystallization process. As a result, the OAD was confined to be amorphous. The thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscope results showed that sample had the best coating effect when the amount of bentonite was 17.7%. The differential scanning calorimetry analyses demonstrated that a decrease in the OAD content was accompanied by a continuous decrease in the melting point and phase change enthalpy of the composites.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-69-1... granulated tin suspended in water and hydrochloric acid or chlorine. (b) Both forms of the ingredient...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous... molecules of water. It is prepared from granulated tin suspended in water and hydrochloric acid or...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous... molecules of water. It is prepared from granulated tin suspended in water and hydrochloric acid or...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous... molecules of water. It is prepared from granulated tin suspended in water and hydrochloric acid or...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous... molecules of water. It is prepared from granulated tin suspended in water and hydrochloric acid or...

  2. Isonicotinic acid hydrazide conversion to Isonicotinyl-NAD by catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Ben; Carpena, Xavi; Feliz, Miguel; Donald, Lynda J; Pons, Miquel; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2010-08-20

    Activation of the pro-drug isoniazid (INH) as an anti-tubercular drug in Mycobacterium tuberculosis involves its conversion to isonicotinyl-NAD, a reaction that requires the catalase-peroxidase KatG. This report shows that the reaction proceeds in the absence of KatG at a slow rate in a mixture of INH, NAD(+), Mn(2+), and O(2), and that the inclusion of KatG increases the rate by >7 times. Superoxide, generated by either Mn(2+)- or KatG-catalyzed reduction of O(2), is an essential intermediate in the reaction. Elimination of the peroxidatic process by mutation slows the rate of reaction by 60% revealing that the peroxidatic process enhances, but is not essential for isonicotinyl-NAD formation. The isonicotinyl-NAD(*+) radical is identified as a reaction intermediate, and its reduction by superoxide is proposed. Binding sites for INH and its co-substrate, NAD(+), are identified for the first time in crystal complexes of Burkholderia pseudomallei catalase-peroxidase with INH and NAD(+) grown by co-crystallization. The best defined INH binding sites were identified, one in each subunit, on the opposite side of the protein from the entrance to the heme cavity in a funnel-shaped channel. The NAD(+) binding site is approximately 20 A from the entrance to the heme cavity and involves interactions primarily with the AMP portion of the molecule in agreement with the NMR saturation transfer difference results.

  3. Fabrication of Poly-l-lactic Acid/Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate Composite Scaffolds with High Mechanical Strength-Implications for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Tanataweethum, Nida; Liu, Wai Ching; Goebel, W Scott; Li, Ding; Chu, Tien Min

    2015-11-04

    Scaffolds were fabricated from poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)/dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) composite by indirect casting. Sodium citrate and PLLA were used to improve the mechanical properties of the DCPD scaffolds. The resulting PLLA/DCPD composite scaffold had increased diametral tensile strength and fracture energy when compared to DCPD only scaffolds (1.05 vs. 2.70 MPa and 2.53 vs. 12.67 N-mm, respectively). Sodium citrate alone accelerated the degradation rate by 1.5 times independent of PLLA. Cytocompatibility of all samples were evaluated using proliferation and differentiation parameters of dog-bone marrow stromal cells (dog-BMSCs). The results showed that viable dog-BMSCs attached well on both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD composite surfaces. In both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD conditioned medium, dog-BMSCs proliferated well and expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity indicating cell differentiation. These findings indicate that incorporating both sodium citrate and PLLA could effectively improve mechanical strength and biocompatibility without increasing the degradation time of calcium phosphate cement scaffolds for bone tissue engineering purposes.

  4. Fabrication of Poly-l-lactic Acid/Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate Composite Scaffolds with High Mechanical Strength—Implications for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tanataweethum, Nida; Liu, Wai Ching; Scott Goebel, W.; Li, Ding; Chu, Tien Min

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds were fabricated from poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)/dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) composite by indirect casting. Sodium citrate and PLLA were used to improve the mechanical properties of the DCPD scaffolds. The resulting PLLA/DCPD composite scaffold had increased diametral tensile strength and fracture energy when compared to DCPD only scaffolds (1.05 vs. 2.70 MPa and 2.53 vs. 12.67 N-mm, respectively). Sodium citrate alone accelerated the degradation rate by 1.5 times independent of PLLA. Cytocompatibility of all samples were evaluated using proliferation and differentiation parameters of dog-bone marrow stromal cells (dog-BMSCs). The results showed that viable dog-BMSCs attached well on both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD composite surfaces. In both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD conditioned medium, dog-BMSCs proliferated well and expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity indicating cell differentiation. These findings indicate that incorporating both sodium citrate and PLLA could effectively improve mechanical strength and biocompatibility without increasing the degradation time of calcium phosphate cement scaffolds for bone tissue engineering purposes. PMID:26556380

  5. Production of succinic acid through overexpression of NAD{sup +}-dependent malic enzyme in an Escherichia coli mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Stols, L.; Donnelly, M.I.

    1997-07-01

    NAD{sup +}-dependent malic enzyme was cloned from the Escherichia coli genome by PCR based on the published partial sequence of the gene. The enzyme was overexpressed and purified to near homogeneity in two chromatographic steps and was analyzed kinetically in the forward and reverse directions. The K{sub m} values determined in the presence of saturating cofactor and manganese ion were 0.26 mM for malate (physiological direction) and 16 mM for pyruvate (reverse direction). When malic enzyme was induced under appropriate culture conditions in a strain of E. coli that was unable to ferment glucose and accumulated pyruvate, fermentative metabolism of glucose was restored. Succinic acid was the major fermentation product formed. When this fermentation was performed in the presence of hydrogen, the yield of succinic acid increased. The constructed pathway represents an alternative metabolic route for the fermentative production of dicarboxylic acids from renewable feedstocks. 27 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Crystallization of calcium sulfate dihydrate under simulated conditions of phosphoric acid production in the presence of aluminum and magnesium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashad, M. M.; Mahmoud, M. H. H.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Abdel-Aal, E. A.

    2004-06-01

    The effect of Al 3+ and Mg 2+ ions, as additives, on the crystallization of gypsum was studied under simulated conditions of the phosphoric acid production. Calcium hydrogen phosphate and sulfuric acid were mixed with dilute phosphoric acid at 80°C, and the turbidity of the reaction mixture was measured at different time periods to calculate the induction time of gypsum crystals formation. Addition of Al 3+ ions up to 2% decreased the induction time and increased the growth efficiency while addition of Mg 2+ increased the induction time and decreased the growth efficiency compared with in absence of additives. Interestingly, the crystals mean and median diameters were found to increase in the presence of Al 3+ and decrease in the presence of Mg 2+. The surface energy increased with Al 3+ and decreased with Mg 2+ compared to the baseline (without additives). Gypsum morphology changed from needle-like type in absence of additives to thick-rhombic in the presence of Al 3+ ions.

  7. In vitro characterization of the NAD+ synthetase NadE1 from Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Kerly; Santos, Adrian R S; Bonatto, Ana C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase enzyme (NadE) catalyzes the amination of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) to form NAD(+). This reaction represents the last step in the majority of the NAD(+) biosynthetic routes described to date. NadE enzymes typically use either glutamine or ammonium as amine nitrogen donor, and the reaction is energetically driven by ATP hydrolysis. Given the key role of NAD(+) in bacterial metabolism, NadE has attracted considerable interest as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. The plant-associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae encodes two putative NadE, namely nadE1 and nadE2. The nadE1 gene is linked to glnB encoding the signal transduction protein GlnB. Here we report the purification and in vitro characterization of H. seropedicae NadE1. Gel filtration chromatography analysis suggests that NadE1 is an octamer. The NadE1 activity was assayed in vitro, and the Michaelis-Menten constants for substrates NaAD, ATP, glutamine and ammonium were determined. Enzyme kinetic and in vitro substrate competition assays indicate that H. seropedicae NadE1 uses glutamine as a preferential nitrogen donor.

  8. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Pour-Ghaz, Issa; Mansour, Josef J.; Németh, Beáta; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Substrate-level phosphorylation mediated by succinyl-CoA ligase in the mitochondrial matrix produces high-energy phosphates in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, when the electron transport chain is dysfunctional, provision of succinyl-CoA by the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) is crucial for maintaining the function of succinyl-CoA ligase yielding ATP, preventing the adenine nucleotide translocase from reversing. We addressed the source of the NAD+ supply for KGDHC under anoxic conditions and inhibition of complex I. Using pharmacologic tools and specific substrates and by examining tissues from pigeon liver exhibiting no diaphorase activity, we showed that mitochondrial diaphorases in the mouse liver contribute up to 81% to the NAD+ pool during respiratory inhibition. Under these conditions, KGDHC's function, essential for the provision of succinyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA ligase, is supported by NAD+ derived from diaphorases. Through this process, diaphorases contribute to the maintenance of substrate-level phosphorylation during respiratory inhibition, which is manifested in the forward operation of adenine nucleotide translocase. Finally, we show that reoxidation of the reducible substrates for the diaphorases is mediated by complex III of the respiratory chain.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Pour-Ghaz, I., Mansour, J. J., Németh, B., Starkov, A. A., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition. PMID:24391134

  9. Membrane-bound sugar alcohol dehydrogenase in acetic acid bacteria catalyzes L-ribulose formation and NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase is independent of the oxidative fermentation.

    PubMed

    Adachi, O; Fujii, Y; Ano, Y; Moonmangmee, D; Toyama, H; Shinagawa, E; Theeragool, G; Lotong, N; Matsushita, K

    2001-01-01

    To identify the enzyme responsible for pentitol oxidation by acetic acid bacteria, two different ribitol oxidizing enzymes, one in the cytosolic fraction of NAD(P)-dependent and the other in the membrane fraction of NAD(P)-independent enzymes, were examined with respect to oxidative fermentation. The cytoplasmic NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.56) was crystallized from Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 12528 and found to be an enzyme having 100 kDa of molecular mass and 5 s as the sedimentation constant, composed of four identical subunits of 25 kDa. The enzyme catalyzed a shuttle reversible oxidoreduction between ribitol and D-ribulose in the presence of NAD and NADH, respectively. Xylitol and L-arabitol were well oxidized by the enzyme with reaction rates comparable to ribitol oxidation. D-Ribulose, L-ribulose, and L-xylulose were well reduced by the enzyme in the presence of NADH as cosubstrates. The optimum pH of pentitol oxidation was found at alkaline pH such as 9.5-10.5 and ketopentose reduction was found at pH 6.0. NAD-Dependent ribitol dehydrogenase seemed to be specific to oxidoreduction between pentitols and ketopentoses and D-sorbitol and D-mannitol were not oxidized by this enzyme. However, no D-ribulose accumulation was observed outside the cells during the growth of the organism on ribitol. L-Ribulose was accumulated in the culture medium instead, as the direct oxidation product catalyzed by a membrane-bound NAD(P)-independent ribitol dehydrogenase. Thus, the physiological role of NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase was accounted to catalyze ribitol oxidation to D-ribulose in cytoplasm, taking D-ribulose to the pentose phosphate pathway after being phosphorylated. L-Ribulose outside the cells would be incorporated into the cytoplasm in several ways when need for carbon and energy sources made it necessary to use L-ribulose for their survival. From a series of simple experiments, membrane-bound sugar alcohol dehydrogenase was concluded to be

  10. NAD+ metabolism in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Bogan, Katrina L; Brenner, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is both a coenzyme for hydride-transfer enzymes and a substrate for NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, which include ADP-ribose transferases, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, cADP-ribose synthases and sirtuins. Recent results establish protective roles for NAD(+) that might be applicable therapeutically to prevent neurodegenerative conditions and to fight Candida glabrata infection. In addition, the contribution that NAD(+) metabolism makes to lifespan extension in model systems indicates that therapies to boost NAD(+) might promote some of the beneficial effects of calorie restriction. Nicotinamide riboside, the recently discovered nucleoside precursor of NAD(+) in eukaryotic systems, might have advantages as a therapy to elevate NAD(+) without inhibiting sirtuins, which is associated with high-dose nicotinamide, or incurring the unpleasant side-effects of high-dose nicotinic acid.

  11. Nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside salvage in fungi and mammals. Quantitative basis for Urh1 and purine nucleoside phosphorylase function in NAD+ metabolism.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Christensen, Kathryn C; Gazzaniga, Francesca; Pletnev, Alexandre A; Brenner, Charles

    2009-01-02

    NAD+ is a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and an essential substrate of ADP-ribose transfer enzymes and sirtuins, the type III protein lysine deacetylases related to yeast Sir2. Supplementation of yeast cells with nicotinamide riboside extends replicative lifespan and increases Sir2-dependent gene silencing by virtue of increasing net NAD+ synthesis. Nicotinamide riboside elevates NAD+ levels via the nicotinamide riboside kinase pathway and by a pathway initiated by splitting the nucleoside into a nicotinamide base followed by nicotinamide salvage. Genetic evidence has established that uridine hydrolase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and methylthioadenosine phosphorylase are required for Nrk-independent utilization of nicotinamide riboside in yeast. Here we show that mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase but not methylthioadenosine phosphorylase is responsible for mammalian nicotinamide riboside kinase-independent nicotinamide riboside utilization. We demonstrate that so-called uridine hydrolase is 100-fold more active as a nicotinamide riboside hydrolase than as a uridine hydrolase and that uridine hydrolase and mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase cleave nicotinic acid riboside, whereas the yeast phosphorylase has little activity on nicotinic acid riboside. Finally, we show that yeast nicotinic acid riboside utilization largely depends on uridine hydrolase and nicotinamide riboside kinase and that nicotinic acid riboside bioavailability is increased by ester modification.

  12. Evidence for two NAD kinases in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, W.; Roth, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The electron-carrying cofactor NADP is formed by phosphorylation of NAD. A strategy for the isolation of NAD kinase mutants revealed two classes of temperature-sensitive mutations, nadF and nadG, mapping at min 13 and 72 of the Salmonella chromosome. Both mutant types grew on nutrient broth at both 30 and 42 degrees C but on minimal medium showed a temperature-sensitive growth defect which was not corrected by any of the single nutritional supplements tested. A nadF deletion mutant grew on nutrient broth but not on minimal medium. A double mutant with the nadF deletion and a nadG(Ts) mutation showed temperature-sensitive growth on all media. We propose that Salmonella typhimurium has two NAD kinases, one encoded by the nadF and one by the nadG gene. This is supported by the fact that temperature-sensitive mutants of both genes produce kinase activity with altered heat stability. Results suggest that either one of two NAD kinases is sufficient for growth on rich medium, but that both are needed for growth on minimal media. Enzyme assays show that the nadF gene is responsible for about 70% of total NAD kinase activity, and that the nadG gene dictates the remaining 30%. While testing nutritional phenotypes of nadF and nadG mutants, we found that the biosynthetic intermediate, quinolinic acid (QA) inhibited growth of nadF mutants on nutrient broth. This suggested that the NadG enzyme might be inhibited by QA. Enzyme assays demonstrated that QA inhibits the NadG but not the NadF enzyme. This suggests the existence of a regulatory mechanism which controls NADP levels. PMID:8021211

  13. Major Role of NAD-Dependent Lactate Dehydrogenases in the Production of l-Lactic Acid with High Optical Purity by the Thermophile Bacillus coagulans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limin; Cai, Yumeng; Zhu, Lingfeng; Guo, Honglian; Yu, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus coagulans 2-6 is an excellent producer of optically pure l-lactic acid. However, little is known about the mechanism of synthesis of the highly optically pure l-lactic acid produced by this strain. Three enzymes responsible for lactic acid production-NAD-dependent l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-nLDH; encoded by ldhL), NAD-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-nLDH; encoded by ldhD), and glycolate oxidase (GOX)-were systematically investigated in order to study the relationship between these enzymes and the optical purity of lactic acid. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 (a d-lactic acid producer) and Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum DSM 20174 (a dl-lactic acid producer) were also examined in this study as comparative strains, in addition to B. coagulans. The specific activities of key enzymes for lactic acid production in the three strains were characterized in vivo and in vitro, and the levels of transcription of the ldhL, ldhD, and GOX genes during fermentation were also analyzed. The catalytic activities of l-nLDH and d-nLDH were different in l-, d-, and dl-lactic acid producers. Only l-nLDH activity was detected in B. coagulans 2-6 under native conditions, and the level of transcription of ldhL in B. coagulans 2-6 was much higher than that of ldhD or the GOX gene at all growth phases. However, for the two Lactobacillus strains used in this study, ldhD transcription levels were higher than those of ldhL. The high catalytic efficiency of l-nLDH toward pyruvate and the high transcription ratios of ldhL to ldhD and ldhL to the GOX gene provide the key explanations for the high optical purity of l-lactic acid produced by B. coagulans 2-6.

  14. A comparison of trehalose dihydrate and mannitol as stabilizing agents for dicalcium phosphate dihydrate based tablets.

    PubMed

    Landín, M; Fontao, M J; Martínez-Pacheco, R

    2005-03-01

    This study investigated the possible utility of trehalose dihydrate (TD) as a tablet stabilizing agent. Acetylsalicylic acid was used as the model hydrolyzable drug and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) as the base excipient, because it is well documented that ASA/DCPD tablets are unstable during storage at low temperature and high relative humidity; DCPD is usually combined with mannitol in order to improve tablet stability. Tablets comprising DCPD, 10% ASA, and 0%, 10%, or 20% w/w of TD were prepared by direct compression and stored at 35 degrees C and 82.9% relative humidity for 6 months. Additionally, control tablets with DCPD and ASA, only, or with DCPD, ASA and 20% mannitol, were also evaluated. At predetermined time intervals, formulations were tested for drug content, mechanical, microstructural, and drug dissolution properties. Additionally, thermal analyses and ASA solution stability studies were carried out. Results reveal that both TD and mannitol significantly reduce degradation of ASA included in DCPD-based tablets, but neither effectively protects against the marked decline in tablet mechanical properties on aging. The ASA stabilization effects of TD and mannitol were also observed in solution, indicating an interaction between these sugars and ASA.

  15. A catalytic triad is responsible for acid-base chemistry in the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Karsten, William E; Liu, Dali; Rao, G S Jagannatha; Harris, Ben G; Cook, Paul F

    2005-03-08

    The pH dependence of kinetic parameters of several active site mutants of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme was investigated to determine the role of amino acid residues likely involved in catalysis on the basis of three-dimensional structures of malic enzyme. Lysine 199 is positioned to act as the general base that accepts a proton from the 2-hydroxyl of malate during the hydride transfer step. The pH dependence of V/K(malate) for the K199R mutant enzyme reveals a pK of 5.3 for an enzymatic group required to be unprotonated for activity and a second pK of 6.3 that leads to a 10-fold loss in activity above the pK of 6.3 to a new constant value up to pH 10. The V profile for K199R is pH independent from pH 5.5 to pH 10 and decreases below a pK of 4.9. Tyrosine 126 is positioned to act as the general acid that donates a proton to the enolpyruvate intermediate to form pyruvate. The pH dependence of V/K(malate) for the Y126F mutant is qualitatively similar to K199R, with a requirement for a group to be unprotonated for activity with a pK of 5.6 and a partial activity loss of about 3-fold above a pK of 6.7 to a new constant value. The Y126F mutant enzyme is about 60000-fold less active than the wild-type enzyme. In contrast to K199R, the V rate profile for Y126F also shows a partial activity loss above pH 6.6. The wild-type pH profiles were reinvestigated in light of the discovery of the partial activity change for the mutant enzymes. The wild-type V/K(malate) pH-rate profile exhibits the requirement for a group to be unprotonated for catalysis with a pK of 5.6 and also shows the partial activity loss above a pK of 6.4. The wild-type V pH-rate profile decreases below a pK of 5.2 and is pH independent from pH 5.5 to pH 10. Aspartate 294 is within hydrogen-bonding distance to K199 in the open and closed forms of malic enzyme. D294A is about 13000-fold less active than the wild-type enzyme, and the pH-rate profile for V/K(malate) indicates the mutant is only active above p

  16. Nrt1 and Tna1-independent export of NAD+ precursor vitamins promotes NAD+ homeostasis and allows engineering of vitamin production.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Stebbins, Rebecca; Bogan, Katrina L; Evans, Charles R; Brenner, Charles

    2011-05-11

    NAD(+) is both a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate of sirtuins and other NAD(+) consuming enzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for two different regimens that extend lifespan in yeast. NAD(+) is synthesized from tryptophan and the three vitamin precursors of NAD(+): nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotinamide riboside. Supplementation of yeast cells with NAD(+) precursors increases intracellular NAD(+) levels and extends replicative lifespan. Here we show that both nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid are not only vitamins but are also exported metabolites. We found that the deletion of the nicotinamide riboside transporter, Nrt1, leads to increased export of nicotinamide riboside. This discovery was exploited to engineer a strain to produce high levels of extracellular nicotinamide riboside, which was recovered in purified form. We further demonstrate that extracellular nicotinamide is readily converted to extracellular nicotinic acid in a manner that requires intracellular nicotinamidase activity. Like nicotinamide riboside, export of nicotinic acid is elevated by the deletion of the nicotinic acid transporter, Tna1. The data indicate that NAD(+) metabolism has a critical extracellular element in the yeast system and suggest that cells regulate intracellular NAD(+) metabolism by balancing import and export of NAD(+) precursor vitamins.

  17. Identification of a repressor gene involved in the regulation of NAD de novo biosynthesis in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, N; Olivera, B M; Roth, J R

    1988-01-01

    Mutations at the nadI locus affect expression of the first two genes of NAD synthesis, nadA and nadB, which are unlinked. Genetic data imply that the regulatory effects of nadI mutations are not due to indirect consequences of physiological alterations. Two types of mutations map in the nadI region. Common null mutations (nadI) show constitutive high-level expression of the nadB and nadA genes. Rare nadIs mutations cause constitutive low-level expression of nadB and nadA. Some nadIs mutations shut off the expression of the biosynthetic genes sufficiently to cause a nicotinic acid auxotrophy. Spontaneous revertants of auxotrophic nadIs mutants have a NadI- phenotype, including some with deletions of the nadI locus. The nadI locus encodes a repressor protein acting on the unlinked nadA and nadB genes. PMID:3275606

  18. Enrofloxacin hydro-chloride dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Calderón, Jorge E; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; García-Gutiérrez, Ponciano; Sumano, Héctor

    2014-04-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C19H23FN3O3 (+)·Cl(-)·2H2O [systematic name: 4-(3-carb-oxy-1-cyclo-propyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-di-hydro-quin-o-lin-7-yl)-1-ethyl-piperazin-1-ium chloride dihydrate], consists of two independent monocations of the protonated enrofloxacin, two chloride anions and four water mol-ecules. In the cations, the piperazinium rings adopt chair conformations and the dihedral angles between the cyclo-propyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring system are 56.55 (2) and 51.11 (2)°. An intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed in each cation. In the crystal, the components are connected via O-H⋯Cl, N-H⋯Cl and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and a π-π inter-action between the benzene rings [centroid-centroid distance = 3.6726 (13) Å], resulting in a three-dimensional array.

  19. NAD(+) metabolism: Bioenergetics, signaling and manipulation for therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Sauve, Anthony A

    2016-12-01

    We survey the historical development of scientific knowledge surrounding Vitamin B3, and describe the active metabolite forms of Vitamin B3, the pyridine dinucleotides NAD(+) and NADP(+) which are essential to cellular processes of energy metabolism, cell protection and biosynthesis. The study of NAD(+) has become reinvigorated by new understandings that dynamics within NAD(+) metabolism trigger major signaling processes coupled to effectors (sirtuins, PARPs, and CD38) that reprogram cellular metabolism using NAD(+) as an effector substrate. Cellular adaptations include stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process fundamental to adjusting cellular and tissue physiology to reduced nutrient availability and/or increased energy demand. Several mammalian metabolic pathways converge to NAD(+), including tryptophan-derived de novo pathways, nicotinamide salvage pathways, nicotinic acid salvage and nucleoside salvage pathways incorporating nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside. Key discoveries highlight a therapeutic potential for targeting NAD(+) biosynthetic pathways for treatment of human diseases. A recent emergence of understanding that NAD(+) homeostasis is vulnerable to aging and disease processes has stimulated testing to determine if replenishment or augmentation of cellular or tissue NAD(+) can have ameliorative effects on aging or disease phenotypes. This experimental approach has provided several proofs of concept successes demonstrating that replenishment or augmentation of NAD(+) concentrations can provide ameliorative or curative benefits. Thus NAD(+) metabolic pathways can provide key biomarkers and parameters for assessing and modulating organism health.

  20. Dynamics of NAD-metabolism: everything but constant.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Christiane A; Heiland, Ines

    2015-12-01

    NAD, as well as its phosphorylated form, NADP, are best known as electron carriers and co-substrates of various redox reactions. As such they participate in approximately one quarter of all reactions listed in the reaction database KEGG. In metabolic pathway analysis, the total amount of NAD is usually assumed to be constant. That means that changes in the redox state might be considered, but concentration changes of the NAD moiety are usually neglected. However, a growing number of NAD-consuming reactions have been identified, showing that this assumption does not hold true in general. NAD-consuming reactions are common characteristics of NAD(+)-dependent signalling pathways and include mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation of proteins, NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation by sirtuins and the formation of messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) and nicotinic acid (NA)-ADP (NAADP). NAD-consuming reactions are thus involved in major signalling and gene regulation pathways such as DNA-repair or regulation of enzymes central in metabolism. All known NAD(+)-dependent signalling processes include the release of nicotinamide (Nam). Thus cellular NAD pools need to be constantly replenished, mostly by recycling Nam to NAD(+). This process is, among others, regulated by the circadian clock, causing complex dynamic changes in NAD concentration. As disturbances in NAD homoeostasis are associated with a large number of diseases ranging from cancer to diabetes, it is important to better understand the dynamics of NAD metabolism to develop efficient pharmacological invention strategies to target this pathway.

  1. Coupling of NAD+ biosynthesis and nicotinamide ribosyl transport: characterization of NadR ribonucleotide kinase mutants of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Merdanovic, Melisa; Sauer, Elizabeta; Reidl, Joachim

    2005-07-01

    Previously, we characterized a pathway necessary for the processing of NAD+ and for uptake of nicotinamide riboside (NR) in Haemophilus influenzae. Here we report on the role of NadR, which is essential for NAD+ utilization in this organism. Different NadR variants with a deleted ribonucleotide kinase domain or with a single amino acid change were characterized in vitro and in vivo with respect to cell viability, ribonucleotide kinase activity, and NR transport. The ribonucleotide kinase mutants were viable only in a nadV+ (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase) background, indicating that the ribonucleotide kinase domain is essential for cell viability in H. influenzae. Mutations located in the Walker A and B motifs and the LID region resulted in deficiencies in both NR phosphorylation and NR uptake. The ribonucleotide kinase function of NadR was found to be feedback controlled by NAD+ under in vitro conditions and by NAD+ utilization in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the NR phosphorylation step is essential for both NR uptake across the inner membrane and NAD+ synthesis and is also involved in controlling the NAD+ biosynthesis rate.

  2. Coupling of NAD+ Biosynthesis and Nicotinamide Ribosyl Transport: Characterization of NadR Ribonucleotide Kinase Mutants of Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Merdanovic, Melisa; Sauer, Elizabeta; Reidl, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we characterized a pathway necessary for the processing of NAD+ and for uptake of nicotinamide riboside (NR) in Haemophilus influenzae. Here we report on the role of NadR, which is essential for NAD+ utilization in this organism. Different NadR variants with a deleted ribonucleotide kinase domain or with a single amino acid change were characterized in vitro and in vivo with respect to cell viability, ribonucleotide kinase activity, and NR transport. The ribonucleotide kinase mutants were viable only in a nadV+ (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase) background, indicating that the ribonucleotide kinase domain is essential for cell viability in H. influenzae. Mutations located in the Walker A and B motifs and the LID region resulted in deficiencies in both NR phosphorylation and NR uptake. The ribonucleotide kinase function of NadR was found to be feedback controlled by NAD+ under in vitro conditions and by NAD+ utilization in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the NR phosphorylation step is essential for both NR uptake across the inner membrane and NAD+ synthesis and is also involved in controlling the NAD+ biosynthesis rate. PMID:15968050

  3. The different phases in the precipitation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A.; Oliveira, C.; Rocha, F.

    2003-05-01

    The precipitation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, brushite, by mixing a calcium hydroxide suspension and an orthophosphoric acid solution in equimolar quantities, has been investigated in a batch system at 25°C. The concentration of calcium hydroxide and orthophosphoric acid, before mixing, ranged from 50 to 300 mmol dm -3. The phase first precipitated is Ca 5OH(PO 4) 3, hydroxyapatite. The precipitation process of brushite is divided into five stages and is similar for all initial experimental conditions. The extension of each stage varies with the initial reagents' concentrations. These stages are discussed individually as a function of pH and reagents' concentrations. The precipitate was analysed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The solubility of brushite was determined at 25°C, 30°C and 35°C, and in the pH range 4.5-8.

  4. Isothermal Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide Dihydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of growing pure solid hydrogen peroxide in an ultra high vacuum environment and apply it to determine thermal stability of the dihydrate compound that forms when water and hydrogen peroxide are mixed at low temperatures. Using infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, we quantified the isothermal decomposition of the metastable dihydrate at 151.6 K. This decomposition occurs by fractional distillation through the preferential sublimation of water, which leads to the formation of pure hydrogen peroxide. The results imply that in an astronomical environment where condensed mixtures of H2O2 and H2O are shielded from radiolytic decomposition and warmed to temperatures where sublimation is significant, highly concentrated or even pure hydrogen peroxide may form.

  5. Assimilation of NAD(+) precursors in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Pan, Shih-Jung; Zupancic, Margaret L; Cormack, Brendan P

    2007-10-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) auxotroph and its growth depends on the environmental supply of vitamin precursors of NAD(+). C. glabrata salvage pathways defined in this article allow NAD(+) to be synthesized from three compounds - nicotinic acid (NA), nicotinamide (NAM) and nicotinamide riboside (NR). NA is salvaged through a functional Preiss-Handler pathway. NAM is first converted to NA by nicotinamidase and then salvaged by the Preiss-Handler pathway. Salvage of NR in C. glabrata occurs via two routes. The first, in which NR is phosphorylated by the NR kinase Nrk1, is independent of the Preiss-Handler pathway. The second is a novel pathway in which NR is degraded by the nucleosidases Pnp1 and Urh1, with a minor role for Meu1, and ultimately converted to NAD(+) via the nicotinamidase Pnc1 and the Preiss-Handler pathway. Using C. glabrata mutants whose growth depends exclusively on the external NA or NR supply, we also show that C. glabrata utilizes NR and to a lesser extent NA as NAD(+) sources during disseminated infection.

  6. NAD+ and vitamin B3: from metabolism to therapies.

    PubMed

    Sauve, Anthony A

    2008-03-01

    The role of NAD(+) metabolism in health and disease is of increased interest as the use of niacin (nicotinic acid) has emerged as a major therapy for treatment of hyperlipidemias and with the recognition that nicotinamide can protect tissues and NAD(+) metabolism in a variety of disease states, including ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, a growing body of evidence supports the view that NAD(+) metabolism regulates important biological effects, including lifespan. NAD(+) exerts potent effects through the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, and the recently characterized sirtuin enzymes. These enzymes catalyze protein modifications, such as ADP-ribosylation and deacetylation, leading to changes in protein function. These enzymes regulate apoptosis, DNA repair, stress resistance, metabolism, and endocrine signaling, suggesting that these enzymes and/or NAD(+) metabolism could be targeted for therapeutic benefit. This review considers current knowledge of NAD(+) metabolism in humans and microbes, including new insights into mechanisms that regulate NAD(+) biosynthetic pathways, current use of nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as pharmacological agents, and opportunities for drug design that are directed at modulation of NAD(+) biosynthesis for treatment of human disorders and infections.

  7. Altered behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms in mice with disrupted NAD+ oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Sahar, Saurabh; Nin, Veronica; Barbosa, Maria Thereza; Chini, Eduardo Nunes; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The Intracellular levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) are rhythmic and controlled by the circadian clock. However, whether NAD+ oscillation in turn contributes to circadian physiology is not fully understood. To address this question we analyzed mice mutated for the NAD+ hydrolase CD38. We found that rhythmicity of NAD+ was altered in the CD38-deficient mice. The high, chronic levels of NAD+ results in several anomalies in circadian behavior and metabolism. CD38-null mice display a shortened period length of locomotor activity and alteration in the rest-activity rhythm. Several clock genes and, interestingly, genes involved in amino acid metabolism were deregulated in CD38-null livers. Metabolomic analysis identified alterations in the circadian levels of several amino acids, specifically tryptophan levels were reduced in the CD38-null mice at a circadian time paralleling with elevated NAD+ levels. Thus, CD38 contributes to behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms and altered NAD+ levels influence the circadian clock. PMID:21937766

  8. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a-knockout and CYP1A-humanized mouse lines and its effect on bioactivation of the carcinogen aristolochic acid I

    SciTech Connect

    Levova, Katerina; Moserova, Michaela; Nebert, Daniel W.; Phillips, David H.; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Stiborova, Marie

    2012-12-15

    Aristolochic acid causes a specific nephropathy (AAN), Balkan endemic nephropathy, and urothelial malignancies. Using Western blotting suitable to determine protein expression, we investigated in several transgenic mouse lines expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)—the most efficient cytosolic enzyme that reductively activates aristolochic acid I (AAI). The mouse tissues used were from previous studies [Arlt et al., Chem. Res. Toxicol. 24 (2011) 1710; Stiborova et al., Toxicol. Sci. 125 (2012) 345], in which the role of microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in AAI metabolism in vivo had been determined. We found that NQO1 levels in liver, kidney and lung of Cyp1a1(−/−), Cyp1a2(−/−) and Cyp1a1/1a2(−/−) knockout mouse lines, as well as in two CYP1A-humanized mouse lines harboring functional human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1/1a2 orthologs, differed from NQO1 levels in wild-type mice. NQO1 protein and enzymic activity were induced in hepatic and renal cytosolic fractions isolated from AAI-pretreated mice, compared with those in untreated mice. Furthermore, this increase in hepatic NQO1 enzyme activity was associated with bioactivation of AAI and elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels in ex vivo incubations of cytosolic fractions with DNA and AAI. In conclusion, AAI appears to increase its own metabolic activation by inducing NQO1, thereby enhancing its own genotoxic potential. Highlights: ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a knockout and humanized CYP1A mice ► Reductive activation of the nephrotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid I (AAI) ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase is induced in mice treated with AAI. ► Induced hepatic enzyme activity resulted in elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels.

  9. dl-Tyrosinium chloride dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Guenifa, Fatiha; Bendjeddou, Lamia; Cherouana, Aouatef; Dahaoui, Slimane; Lecomte, Claude

    2012-01-01

    In the title compound, C9H12NO3 +·Cl−·2H2O, the cation has a protonated amino group resulting from proton transfer from chloridric acid. The structure displays double layers parallel to the [010] direction held together by N—H⋯O, N—H⋯Cl, O—H⋯O and O—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. These layers are stacked along the c axis at b = 1/2; within each layer, the tyrosinium cations are arranged in an alternating head-to-tail sequence, forming inversion dimers [R 2 2(10) motif]. The water mol­ecules allow for the construction of a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network formed by centrosymmetric R 6 6(28) and R 8 8(34) motifs. PMID:23284530

  10. Mitochondrial Impairment May Increase Cellular NAD(P)H: Resazurin Oxidoreductase Activity, Perturbing the NAD(P)H-Based Viability Assays.

    PubMed

    Aleshin, Vasily A; Artiukhov, Artem V; Oppermann, Henry; Kazantsev, Alexey V; Lukashev, Nikolay V; Bunik, Victoria I

    2015-08-21

    Cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase activity with artificial dyes (NAD(P)H-OR) is an indicator of viability, as the cellular redox state is important for biosynthesis and antioxidant defense. However, high NAD(P)H due to impaired mitochondrial oxidation, known as reductive stress, should increase NAD(P)H-OR yet perturb viability. To better understand this complex behavior, we assayed NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin (Alamar Blue) in glioblastoma cell lines U87 and T98G, treated with inhibitors of central metabolism, oxythiamin, and phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids. Targeting the thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes, the inhibitors are known to decrease the NAD(P)H production in the pentose phosphate shuttle and/or upon mitochondrial oxidation of 2-oxo acids. Nevertheless, the inhibitors elevated NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, suggesting impaired NAD(P)H oxidation rather than increased viability. In particular, inhibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes affects metabolism of malate, which mediates mitochondrial oxidation of cytosolic NAD(P)H. We showed that oxythiamin not only inhibited mitochondrial 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases, but also induced cell-specific changes in glutamate and malate dehydrogenases and/or malic enzyme. As a result, inhibition of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases compromises mitochondrial metabolism, with the dysregulated electron fluxes leading to increases in cellular NAD(P)H-OR. Perturbed mitochondrial oxidation of NAD(P)H may thus complicate the NAD(P)H-based viability assay.

  11. Mitochondrial Impairment May Increase Cellular NAD(P)H: Resazurin Oxidoreductase Activity, Perturbing the NAD(P)H-Based Viability Assays

    PubMed Central

    Aleshin, Vasily A.; Artiukhov, Artem V.; Oppermann, Henry; Kazantsev, Alexey V.; Lukashev, Nikolay V.; Bunik, Victoria I.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase activity with artificial dyes (NAD(P)H-OR) is an indicator of viability, as the cellular redox state is important for biosynthesis and antioxidant defense. However, high NAD(P)H due to impaired mitochondrial oxidation, known as reductive stress, should increase NAD(P)H-OR yet perturb viability. To better understand this complex behavior, we assayed NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin (Alamar Blue) in glioblastoma cell lines U87 and T98G, treated with inhibitors of central metabolism, oxythiamin, and phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids. Targeting the thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes, the inhibitors are known to decrease the NAD(P)H production in the pentose phosphate shuttle and/or upon mitochondrial oxidation of 2-oxo acids. Nevertheless, the inhibitors elevated NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, suggesting impaired NAD(P)H oxidation rather than increased viability. In particular, inhibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes affects metabolism of malate, which mediates mitochondrial oxidation of cytosolic NAD(P)H. We showed that oxythiamin not only inhibited mitochondrial 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases, but also induced cell-specific changes in glutamate and malate dehydrogenases and/or malic enzyme. As a result, inhibition of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases compromises mitochondrial metabolism, with the dysregulated electron fluxes leading to increases in cellular NAD(P)H-OR. Perturbed mitochondrial oxidation of NAD(P)H may thus complicate the NAD(P)H-based viability assay. PMID:26308058

  12. Nmnat3 Is Dispensable in Mitochondrial NAD Level Maintenance In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masashi; Hikosaka, Keisuke; Mahmood, Arshad; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Shojaku, Hideo; Inohara, Hidenori; Nakagawa, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is an essential co-enzyme mediating various enzymatic reactions. Mitochondrial NAD particularly occupies a considerable amount of total NAD in cells, and serves as a co-enzyme in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), β-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Despite the importance of mitochondrial NAD, its synthesis pathway remains unknown. It has been proposed that NAD synthesis enzyme, Nmnat3, was localized in mitochondria, but its physiological relevance to the metabolism in mitochondria was not fully elucidated. Previously, we have reported that murine Nmnat3 protein was strongly expressed in the cytoplasm of mature erythrocytes, in which mitochondria were absent, and Nmnat3-deficient mice (Nmnat3-KO mice) exhibited splenomegaly and hemolytic anemia due to reduced NAD levels in mature erythrocytes. These results challenged the role of Nmnat3 in mitochondrial NAD synthesis. In this study, we demonstrated that mitochondrial NAD levels in various tissues, except for red blood cells, were unchanged in Nmnat3-KO mice. We also analyzed the metabolites in glycolysis and TCA cycle and found that there were no differences between Nmnat3-KO and WT mice. In addition, the aged Nmnat3-KO mice had comparable NAD levels to that observed in WT mice. Our results indicated that Nmnat3 is dispensable in the maintenance of mitochondrial NAD levels, and that other NAD regulatory pathways may exist in mitochondria.

  13. Metabolic profiling of alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Mori, Valerio; Amici, Adolfo; Mazzola, Francesca; Di Stefano, Michele; Conforti, Laura; Magni, Giulio; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia; Orsomando, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    NAD plays essential redox and non-redox roles in cell biology. In mammals, its de novo and recycling biosynthetic pathways encompass two independent branches, the "amidated" and "deamidated" routes. Here we focused on the indispensable enzymes gating these two routes, i.e. nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), which in mammals comprises three distinct isozymes, and NAD synthetase (NADS). First, we measured the in vitro activity of the enzymes, and the levels of all their substrates and products in a number of tissues from the C57BL/6 mouse. Second, from these data, we derived in vivo estimates of enzymes'rates and quantitative contributions to NAD homeostasis. The NMNAT activity, mainly represented by nuclear NMNAT1, appears to be high and nonrate-limiting in all examined tissues, except in blood. The NADS activity, however, appears rate-limiting in lung and skeletal muscle, where its undetectable levels parallel a relative accumulation of the enzyme's substrate NaAD (nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide). In all tissues, the amidated NAD route was predominant, displaying highest rates in liver and kidney, and lowest in blood. In contrast, the minor deamidated route showed higher relative proportions in blood and small intestine, and higher absolute values in liver and small intestine. Such results provide the first comprehensive picture of the balance of the two alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in different mammalian tissues under physiological conditions. This fills a gap in the current knowledge of NAD biosynthesis, and provides a crucial information for the study of NAD metabolism and its role in disease.

  14. Pseudopolymorphism of levodopa: A novel “disappearing” dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Vânia; Duarte, M. Teresa

    2014-11-01

    We report herein the crystal structure of a novel L-dopa dihydrate, an unstable pseudopolymorph detected in some co-crystallization studies. This form is obtained by traditional solution techniques and tends to convert to the anhydrous form under ambient conditions. Even though pseudopolymorphism has generally been subject of large conceptual discussions, it is indeed of importance in the pharmaceutical industry and, in this particularly case, the knowledge of the formation of this novel dihydrate may be very relevant for processing issues.

  15. Boosting NAD to spare hearing.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Charles

    2014-12-02

    Ex vivo experiments have strangely shown that inhibition or stimulation of NAD metabolism can be neuroprotective. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Brown et al. (2014) demonstrate that cochlear NAD is diminished by deafening noise but protected by nicotinamide riboside or WldS mutation. Hearing protection by nicotinamide riboside depends on Sirt3.

  16. NAD Acts as an Integral Regulator of Multiple Defense Layers1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Patrit, Oriane; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Gakière, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides, such as NAD, are crucial redox carriers and have emerged as important signaling molecules in stress responses. Previously, we have demonstrated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that the inducible NAD-overproducing nadC lines are more resistant to an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst-AvrRpm1), which was associated with salicylic acid-dependent defense. Here, we have further characterized the NAD-dependent immune response in Arabidopsis. Quinolinate-induced stimulation of intracellular NAD in transgenic nadC plants enhanced resistance against a diverse range of (a)virulent pathogens, including Pst-AvrRpt2, Dickeya dadantii, and Botrytis cinerea. Characterization of the redox status demonstrated that elevated NAD levels induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the expression of redox marker genes of the cytosol and mitochondrion. Using pharmacological and reverse genetics approaches, we show that NAD-induced ROS production functions independently of NADPH oxidase activity and light metabolism but depends on mitochondrial respiration, which was increased at higher NAD. We further demonstrate that NAD primes pathogen-induced callose deposition and cell death. Mass spectrometry analysis reveals that NAD simultaneously induces different defense hormones and that the NAD-induced metabolic profiles are similar to those of defense-expressing plants after treatment with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. We thus conclude that NAD triggers metabolic profiles rather similar to that of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and discuss how signaling cross talk between defense hormones, ROS, and NAD explains the observed resistance to pathogens. PMID:27621425

  17. Hydrogen bonding. Part 82. Thermodynamic and infrared study of dimethonium and pentamethonium halide dihydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Nikolla, Eranda

    2003-09-01

    We have carried out equilibrium dissociation vapor pressure measurements on dimethonium bromide dihydrate and pentamethonium chloride and bromide dihydrates. None of these salts forms a monohydrate. Surprisingly the thermodynamic parameters for the two pentamethonium hydrates are nearly identical, although the properties of these hydrates are quite different. This is explained by a larger negative differential lattice enthalpy for the chloride dihydrate dissociation, which lowers the observed enthalpy of H 2O removal, and greater stabilization of saturated solution by chloride ion which makes the chloride dihydrate deliquescent while the bromide dihydrate is efflorescent. Infrared comparison suggests that tetramethonium chloride dihydrate and pentamethonium chloride and bromide dihydrates have the ladder type halide-water structure determined by X-ray analysis in tetramethonium bromide dihydrate.

  18. Additive concentration effects on dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using monocalcium phosphate monohydrate and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Santa Cruz Chavez, Grace; Alge, Daniel L; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2011-12-01

    In our previous study, we investigated the setting time, mechanical properties and microstructure of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and hydroxyapatite (HA). Despite the use of sodium citrate as a setting regulator, setting occurs rapidly in the MCPM/HA system and further studies on other retardants are needed. In the present study, sodium pyrophosphate and sulfuric acid were tested to evaluate their effectiveness in maintaining workability of the cement paste. MCPM/HA cements at a powder to liquid ratio of 1.0 with sodium pyrophosphate and sulfuric acid at 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mM were manufactured and studied based on their setting time, mechanical and porosity properties, phase composition, and microstructure. These measurements were compared to our previous data using sodium citrate. The results showed that the additives have a dose-dependent effect on the setting time. Their order of efficiency is sodium pyrophosphate > sodium citrate > sulfuric acid. However, the sulfuric acid group exhibited the highest compressive strength (CS) compared to the other groups. A lack of correlation between the CS and the porosity of the cements suggested that a mechanism other than porosity reduction was responsible for the CS increase. Since x-ray diffraction analysis did not indicate an effect on composition, explanations based on calcium sulfate dihydrate formation and changes in microstructure were proposed based on scanning electron micrograph observations.

  19. Enrofloxacin hydro­chloride dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Calderón, Jorge E.; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; García-Gutiérrez, Ponciano; Sumano, Héctor

    2014-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C19H23FN3O3 +·Cl−·2H2O [systematic name: 4-(3-carb­oxy-1-cyclo­propyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-di­hydro­quin­o­lin-7-yl)-1-ethyl­piperazin-1-ium chloride dihydrate], consists of two independent monocations of the protonated enrofloxacin, two chloride anions and four water mol­ecules. In the cations, the piperazinium rings adopt chair conformations and the dihedral angles between the cyclo­propyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring system are 56.55 (2) and 51.11 (2)°. An intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed in each cation. In the crystal, the components are connected via O—H⋯Cl, N—H⋯Cl and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and a π–π inter­action between the benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.6726 (13) Å], resulting in a three-dimensional array. PMID:24826167

  20. Biofuel cell anode: NAD +/glucose dehydrogenase-coimmobilized ketjenblack electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, T.; Oike, M.; Yoshino, S.; Yatagawa, Y.; Haneda, K.; Kaji, H.; Nishizawa, M.

    2009-09-01

    We have studied the coimmobilization of glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and its cofactor, oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD +), on a ketjenblack (KB) electrode as a step toward a biofuel cell anode that works without mediators. A KB electrode was first treated with a sulfuric acid/nitric acid/water mixture to lower the overvoltage for NADH oxidation, and was next chemically modified with NAD + and GDH. The improved GDH/NAD +/KB electrode is found to oxidize glucose around 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. A biofuel cell constructed with a bilirubin oxidase-immobilized KB cathode showed a maximum power density of 52 μW/cm 2 at 0.3 V.

  1. Nutritional energy stimulates NAD+ production to promote tankyrase-mediated PARsylation in insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Linlin; Yeh, Tsung-Yin J; Hao, Jun; Pourtabatabaei, Nasim; Mahata, Sushil K; Shao, Jianhua; Chessler, Steven D; Chi, Nai-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The poly-ADP-ribosylation (PARsylation) activity of tankyrase (TNKS) regulates diverse physiological processes including energy metabolism and wnt/β-catenin signaling. This TNKS activity uses NAD+ as a co-substrate to post-translationally modify various acceptor proteins including TNKS itself. PARsylation by TNKS often tags the acceptors for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Whether this TNKS activity is regulated by physiological changes in NAD+ levels or, more broadly, in cellular energy charge has not been investigated. Because the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) in vitro is robustly potentiated by ATP, we hypothesized that nutritional energy might stimulate cellular NAMPT to produce NAD+ and thereby augment TNKS catalysis. Using insulin-secreting cells as a model, we showed that glucose indeed stimulates the autoPARsylation of TNKS and consequently its turnover by the ubiquitin-proteasomal system. This glucose effect on TNKS is mediated primarily by NAD+ since it is mirrored by the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), and is blunted by the NAMPT inhibitor FK866. The TNKS-destabilizing effect of glucose is shared by other metabolic fuels including pyruvate and amino acids. NAD+ flux analysis showed that glucose and nutrients, by increasing ATP, stimulate NAMPT-mediated NAD+ production to expand NAD+ stores. Collectively our data uncover a metabolic pathway whereby nutritional energy augments NAD+ production to drive the PARsylating activity of TNKS, leading to autoPARsylation-dependent degradation of the TNKS protein. The modulation of TNKS catalytic activity and protein abundance by cellular energy charge could potentially impose a nutritional control on the many processes that TNKS regulates through PARsylation. More broadly, the stimulation of NAD+ production by ATP suggests that nutritional energy may enhance the functions of other NAD+-driven enzymes including sirtuins.

  2. Salmonella typhimurium mutants lacking NAD pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Park, U E; Roth, J R; Olivera, B M

    1988-01-01

    NAD can serve as both a purine and a pyridine source for Salmonella typhimurium. Exogenous NAD is rapidly broken down into nicotinamide mononucleotide and AMP by an NAD pyrophosphatase, the first step in the pathway for the assimilation of exogenous NAD. We isolated and characterized mutants of S. typhimurium lacking NAD pyrophosphatase activity; such mutants were identified by their failure to use exogenous NAD as a purine source. These mutants carry mutations that map at a new locus, designated pnuE, between 86 and 87 min on the Salmonella chromosome. PMID:2841298

  3. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  4. NAD+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase of the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus: biochemical and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Kersten, M A; Müller, Y; Baars, J J; Op den Camp, H J; van der Drift, C; Van Griensven, L J; Visser, J; Schaap, P J

    1999-04-01

    The NAD+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) of Agaricus bisporus, a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism, was purified to homogeneity. The apparent molecular mass of the native enzyme is 474 kDa comprising four subunits of 116 kDa. The isoelectric point of the enzyme is about 7.0. Km values for ammonium, 2-oxoglutarate, NADH, glutamate and NAD+ were 6.5, 3.5, 0.06, 37.1 and 0.046 mM, respectively. The enzyme is specific for NAD(H). The gene encoding this enzyme (gdhB) was isolated from an A. bisporus H39 recombinant lambda phage library. The deduced amino acid sequence specifies a 1029-amino acid protein with a deduced molecular mass of 115,463 Da, which displays a significant degree of similarity with NAD-GDH of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa. The ORF is interrupted by fifteen introns. Northern analysis combined with enzyme activity measurements suggest that NAD-GDH from A. bisporus is regulated by the nitrogen source. NAD-GDH levels in mycelium grown on glutamate were higher than NAD-GDH levels in mycelium grown on ammonium as a nitrogen source. Combined with the kinetic parameters, these results suggest a catabolic role for NAD-GDH. However, upon addition of ammonium to the culture transcription of the gene is not repressed as strongly as that of the gene encoding NADP-GDH (gdhA). To date, tetrameric NAD-GDHs with large subunits, and their corresponding genes, have only been isolated from a few species. This enzyme represents the first NAD-GDH of basidiomycete origin to be purified and is the first such enzyme from basidiomycetes whose sequence has been determined.

  5. Determination of the absolute configuration of (-)-(2R)-succinic-2-d acid by neutron diffraction study: Unambiguous proof of the absolute stereochemistry of the NAD/sup +//NADH interconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H.S.H.; Stevens, R.C.; Fujita, S.; Watkins, M.I.; Koetzle, T.F.; Bau, R.

    1988-05-01

    The absolute configuration of the CHD group (D = deuterium) in (-)-(2R)-succinic-2-d acid, as prepared from (-)-(2S,3R)-malic-3-d acid, has been shown unambiguously to be R by the technique of single-crystal neutron diffraction. The optically active cation (+)-phenylethylammonium was used as the chiral reference. The structure of (C/sub 6/H/sub 5/CH/sub 3/CHNH/sub 3/)/sup +/(HOOCCH/sub 2/CHDCOOO)/sup -/ has been studied with x-ray diffraction at room temperature and neutron diffraction at room temperature and neutron diffraction at 100 K. Crystal data from the neutron diffraction analysis of the phenylethylammonium slat of the title compound at 100 K: space group P2/sub 1/; a = 8.407 /angstrom/, b = 8.300 /angstrom/, c = 8.614 /angstrom/, ..beta.. = 91.20/degrees/; unit cell volume = 600.9 /angstrom//sup 3/, Z = 2. The result confirms the stereochemistry of the malate/succinate transformation, as well as the NAD/sup +//NADH interconversion, and demonstrates the usefulness of the single-crystal neutron diffraction method for determining the absolute configuration of molecules having a chiral monodeuteriomethylene group.

  6. Structural and functional characterization of human NAD kinase.

    PubMed

    Lerner, F; Niere, M; Ludwig, A; Ziegler, M

    2001-10-19

    NADP is essential for biosynthetic pathways, energy, and signal transduction. Its synthesis is catalyzed by NAD kinase. Very little is known about the structure, function, and regulation of this enzyme from multicellular organisms. We identified a human NAD kinase cDNA and the corresponding gene using available database information. A cDNA was amplified from a human fibroblast cDNA library and functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The obtained cDNA, slightly different from that deposited in the database, encodes a protein of 49 kDa. The gene is expressed in most human tissues, but not in skeletal muscle. Human NAD kinase differs considerably from that of prokaryotes by subunit molecular mass (49 kDa vs 30-35 kDa). The catalytically active homotetramer is highly selective for its substrates, NAD and ATP. It did not phosphorylate the nicotinic acid derivative of NAD (NAAD) suggesting that the potent calcium-mobilizing pyridine nucleotide NAADP is synthesized by an alternative route.

  7. Growth, spectral and thermal properties of manganous malonate dihydrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincy, A.; Mahalakshmi, V.; Thomas, J.; Saban, K. V.

    2012-02-01

    Manganous malonate dihydrate crystals have been grown by ionic diffusion in hydrosilica gel. Powder XRD pattern and the FTIR spectrum have been recorded for the sample. The vibrational bands corresponding to various functional groups are identified. Thermogravimetric studies have been done to explore the nature of the material as regards thermal decomposition.

  8. NAD+ and Sirtuins in Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Shin-ichiro; Guarente, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is a classical coenzyme mediating many redox reactions. NAD+ also plays an important role in the regulation of NAD+-consuming enzymes, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38/157 ectoenzymes. NAD+ biosynthesis, particularly mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), and SIRT1 function together to regulate metabolism and circadian rhythm. NAD+ levels decline during the aging process and may be an Achilles’ heel, causing defects in nuclear and mitochondrial functions and resulting in many age-associated pathologies. Restoring NAD+ by supplementing NAD+ intermediates can dramatically ameliorate these age-associated functional defects, counteracting many diseases of aging, including neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the combination of sirtuin activation and NAD+ intermediate supplementation may be an effective anti-aging intervention, providing hope to aging societies worldwide. PMID:24786309

  9. NAD+ and sirtuins in aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shin-ichiro; Guarente, Leonard

    2014-08-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a classical coenzyme mediating many redox reactions. NAD(+) also plays an important role in the regulation of NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38/157 ectoenzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis, particularly mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), and SIRT1 function together to regulate metabolism and circadian rhythm. NAD(+) levels decline during the aging process and may be an Achilles' heel, causing defects in nuclear and mitochondrial functions and resulting in many age-associated pathologies. Restoring NAD(+) by supplementing NAD(+) intermediates can dramatically ameliorate these age-associated functional defects, counteracting many diseases of aging, including neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the combination of sirtuin activation and NAD(+) intermediate supplementation may be an effective antiaging intervention, providing hope to aging societies worldwide.

  10. 75 FR 35796 - Busan 74 (2-hydroxypropyl methanethiosulfonate); Chlorine Gas; and Dichromic Acid, et al...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... AGENCY Busan 74 (2-hydroxypropyl methanethiosulfonate); Chlorine Gas; and Dichromic Acid, et al... harris.monisha@epa.gov Dichromic Acid EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-02 Rebecca VonDem- Disodium Salt 43 Hagen Dihydrate... Gas; Dichromic Acid, Disodium Salt, Dihydrate, Meta-Cresol (m-Cresol), and Xylenol. Dated: May...

  11. Structure of a NAD kinase from Thermotoga maritima at 2.3 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Huang, Candice; Adams, Paul D.; Jancarik, Jaru; Yokota, Hisao A.; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-07-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization, and structure determination of NAD-kinase from T. maritima are reported. Similarity to other NAD-kinases as well as homo-oligomrization state of the enzyme from T. maritima are discussed. NAD kinase is the only known enzyme that catalyzes the formation of NADP, a coenzyme involved in most anabolic reactions and in the antioxidant defense system. Despite its importance, very little is known regarding the mechanism of catalysis and only recently have several NAD kinase structures been deposited in the PDB. Here, an independent investigation of the crystal structure of inorganic polyphosphate/ATP-NAD kinase, PPNK-THEMA, a protein from Thermotoga maritima, is reported at a resolution of 2.3 Å. The crystal structure was solved using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) data collected at the Se absorption-peak wavelength in a state in which no cofactors or substrates were bound. It revealed that the 258-amino-acid protein is folded into two distinct domains, similar to recently reported NAD kinases. The N-terminal α/β-domain spans the first 100 amino acids and the last 30 amino acids of the polypeptide and has several topological matches in the PDB, whereas the other domain, which spans the middle 130 residues, adopts a unique β-sandwich architecture and only appreciably matches the recently deposited PDB structures of NAD kinases.

  12. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  13. Estimation of crystallinity of trehalose dihydrate microspheres by usage of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Issei; Tomoda, Keishiro; Nakajima, Takehisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Hideki; Makino, Kimiko

    2012-09-01

    Crystalline state of pharmaceutical materials is of great importance in the preparation of pharmaceutics because their physicochemical properties affect bioavailability, quality of products, therapeutic level, and manufacturing process. In this study, we have estimated the crystallinity of trehalose dihydrate microspheres by measuring terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. The commercially available trehalose dihydrate takes in general a crystalline state, but trehalose dihydrate microspheres prepared by using spray-drying method are in an amorphous state. We have prepared amorphous anhydrous trehalose by using melt-quenched method from crystalline trehalose dihydrate. We have measured the absorbance of trehalose dihydrate containing amorphous anhydrous trehalose (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to prepare calibration curves. Using the calibration curves, we have estimated the crystallinity of trehalose dihydrate microspheres prepared by using spray-drying method. Our results suggest that THz-TDS is well suited to distinguish crystallinity differences in pharmaceutical compounds.

  14. Quantitation of NAD+ biosynthesis from the salvage pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sporty, J; Lin, S; Kato, M; Ognibene, T; Stewart, B; Turteltaub, K; Bench, G

    2009-02-18

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) is synthesized via two major pathways in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems: the de novo biosynthesis pathway from tryptophan precursors, or by the salvage biosynthesis pathway from either extracellular nicotinic acid or various intracellular NAD{sup +} decomposition products. NAD{sup +} biosynthesis via the salvage pathway has been linked to an increase in yeast replicative lifespan under calorie restriction (CR). However, the relative contribution of each pathway to NAD{sup +} biosynthesis under both normal and CR conditions is not known. Here, we have performed lifespan, NAD{sup +} and NADH (the reduced form of NAD{sup +}) analyses on BY4742 wild type, NAD+ salvage pathway knockout (npt1{Delta}), and NAD+ de novo pathway knockout (qpt1{Delta}) yeast strains cultured in media containing either 2% glucose (normal growth) or 0.5% glucose (CR). We have utilized {sup 14}C labeled nicotinic acid in the culture media combined with HPLC speciation and both UV and {sup 14}C detection to quantitate the total amounts of NAD{sup +} and NADH and the amounts derived from the salvage pathway. We observe that wild type and qpt1{Delta} yeast exclusively utilize extracellular nicotinic acid for NAD{sup +} and NADH biosynthesis under both the 2% and 0.5% glucose growth conditions suggesting that the de novo pathway plays little role if a functional salvage pathway is present. We also observe that NAD{sup +} concentrations decrease in all three strains under CR. However, unlike the wild type strain, NADH concentrations do not decrease and NAD{sup +}:NADH ratios do not increase under CR for either knockout strain. Lifespan analyses reveal that CR results in a lifespan increase of approximately 25% for the wild type and qpt1{Delta} strains, while no increase in lifespan is observed for the npt1{Delta} strain. In combination these data suggest that having a functional salvage pathway is more important than the absolute levels of NAD

  15. Allosteric substrate inhibition of Arabidopsis NAD-dependent malic enzyme 1 is released by fumarate.

    PubMed

    Tronconi, Marcos Ariel; Wheeler, Mariel Claudia Gerrard; Martinatto, Andrea; Zubimendi, Juan Pablo; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Drincovich, María Fabiana

    2015-03-01

    Plant mitochondria can use L-malate and fumarate, which accumulate in large levels, as respiratory substrates. In part, this property is due to the presence of NAD-dependent malic enzymes (NAD-ME) with particular biochemical characteristics. Arabidopsis NAD-ME1 exhibits a non-hyperbolic behavior for the substrate L-malate, and its activity is strongly stimulated by fumarate. Here, the possible structural connection between these properties was explored through mutagenesis, kinetics, and fluorescence studies. The results indicated that NAD-ME1 has a regulatory site for L-malate that can also bind fumarate. L-Malate binding to this site elicits a sigmoidal and low substrate-affinity response, whereas fumarate binding turns NAD-ME1 into a hyperbolic and high substrate affinity enzyme. This effect was also observed when the allosteric site was either removed or altered. Hence, fumarate is not really an activator, but suppresses the inhibitory effect of l-malate. In addition, residues Arg50, Arg80 and Arg84 showed different roles in organic acid binding. These residues form a triad, which is the basis of the homo and heterotrophic effects that characterize NAD-ME1. The binding of L-malate and fumarate at the same allosteric site is herein reported for a malic enzyme and clearly indicates an important role of NAD-ME1 in processes that control flow of C4 organic acids in Arabidopsis mitochondrial metabolism.

  16. Photolabeling of Glu-129 of the S-1 subunit of pertussis toxin with NAD

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, J.T.; Mende-Mueller, L.M.; Rappuoli, R.; Collier, R.J. )

    1989-11-01

    UV irradiation was shown to induce efficient transfer of radiolabel from nicotinamide-labeled NAD to a recombinant protein (C180 peptide) containing the catalytic region of the S-1 subunit of pertussis toxin. Incorporation of label from (3H-nicotinamide)NAD was efficient (0.5 to 0.6 mol/mol of protein) relative to incorporation from (32P-adenylate)NAD (0.2 mol/mol of protein). Label from (3H-nicotinamide)NAD was specifically associated with Glu-129. Replacement of Glu-129 with glycine or aspartic acid made the protein refractory to photolabeling with (3H-nicotinamide)NAD, whereas replacement of a nearby glutamic acid, Glu-139, with serine did not. Photolabeling of the C180 peptide with NAD is similar to that observed with diphtheria toxin and exotoxin A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in which the nicotinamide portion of NAD is transferred to Glu-148 and Glu-553, respectively, in the two toxins. These results implicate Glu-129 of the S-1 subunit as an active-site residue and a potentially important site for genetic modification of pertussis toxin for development of an acellular vaccine against Bordetella pertussis.

  17. Thermal and dielectric studies of nickel malonate dihydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Varghese; Mathai, K. C.; Mahadeven, C. K.; Abraham, K. E.

    2011-02-01

    Single crystals of nickel malonate dihydrate were grown by the gel technique, employing the single diffusion method. Thermal dehydration of the crystal was investigated by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. The title compound exhibits a steady thermal behaviour at higher temperature range of 350-800 °C. The dielectric properties of the prepared sample were analyzed as a function of frequency in the range of 1 kHz-1 MHz and at temperatures between 40 and 140 °C.

  18. NAD(+), sirtuins, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent disease worldwide and there is intense interest in pharmaceutical approaches to reduce the burden of this chronic, aging-related condition. The sirtuin (SIRT) family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases have emerged as exciting targets for CVD management that can impact the cardiovascular system both directly and indirectly, the latter by modulating whole body metabolism. SIRT1-4 regulate the activities of a variety of transcription factors, coregulators, and enzymes that improve metabolic control in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and pancreas, particularly during obesity and aging. SIRT1 and 7 can control myocardial development and resist stress- and aging-associated myocardial dysfunction through the deacetylation of p53 and forkhead box O1 (FoxO1). By modulating the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), FoxO1, and p53, and the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), SIRT1 also promotes vasodilatory and regenerative functions in endothelial and smooth muscle cells of the vascular wall. Given the array of potentially beneficial effects of SIRT activation on cardiovascular health, interest in developing specific SIRT agonists is well-substantiated. Because SIRT activity depends on cellular NAD+ availability, enzymes involved in NAD+ biosynthesis, including nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), may also be valuable pharmaceutical targets for managing CVD. Herein we review the actions of the SIRT proteins on the cardiovascular system and consider the potential of modulating SIRT activity and NAD+ availability to control CVD.

  19. Effect of the temperature on the synthesis of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiba, D.; Hakam, A.; El Khoukhi, H.; Albourine, A.; Nounah, A.

    2005-03-01

    The use of calcium phosphates as biomaterials was largely developed during the last decades. Among the phosphorous compounds solid minerals of biological interest, the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, (DCPD or brushite) (CaHPO{4}, 2H{2}O), disserves a special attention. It can be prepared in different ways. The manufacture of inorganic phosphate, it is usually produced by the acidulation of limestone form of calcium with phosphoric acid. The synthesis of this phosphate depends on many operational parameters. This study was performed in order to verify the influence of temperature and the time on the chemical purity and the yield of precipitation. All the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectrometry and chemical analysis.

  20. Visualization and quantification of NAD(H) in brain sections by a novel histo-enzymatic nitrotetrazolium blue staining technique.

    PubMed

    Balan, Irina S; Fiskum, Gary; Kristian, Tibor

    2010-02-26

    A histo-enzymatic technique for visualizing and quantifying endogenous NAD(H) in brain tissue was developed, based on coupled enzymatic cycling reactions that reduce nitrotetrazolium blue chloride to produce formazan. Conditions were used where the endogenous level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD(H)) was the rate limiting factor for formazan production. Spontaneous degradation of NAD(+) that occurs during incubation of thawed tissue was minimized by the addition of nicotinamide mononucleotide, an inhibitor of NAD(+) glycohydrolases. Cryostat sections of brains obtained from rats immediately after decapitation and 30 min later were used to determine the effects of ischemia alone on brain NAD(H) levels and neuroanatomic distribution. The ischemic insult resulted in a greater than 50% decline in the rate of formazan generation in the CA1 pyramidal neuronal layer of the hippocampus and in the parietal cortex and striatum, but not in the CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) subregions of the hippocampus. The ischemia-induced changes in NAD(H) levels were confirmed by utilizing spectrofluorimetric measurements of NAD(H) present in perchloric acid extracts of brain samples. This new histo-enzymatic technique is suitable for visualizing and quantifying relative NAD(H) levels in the brain. This assay could prove useful in identifying region-selective NAD(H) catabolism that may contribute to neurodegeneration.

  1. Visualization and quantification of NAD(H) in brain sections by a novel histo-enzymatic nitrotetrazolium blue staining technique

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Irina S.; Fiskum, Gary; Kristian, Tibor

    2010-01-01

    A histo-enzymatic technique for visualizing and quantifying endogenous NAD(H) in brain tissue was developed, based on coupled enzymatic cycling reactions that reduce nitrotetrazolium blue chloride to produce formazan. Conditions were used where the endogenous level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD(H)) was the rate limiting factor for formazan production. Spontaneous degradation of NAD+ that occurs during incubation of thawed tissue was minimized by the addition of nicotinamide mononucleotide, an inhibitor of NAD+ glycohydrolases. Cryostat sections of brains obtained from rats immediately after decapitation and at 30 min later were used to determine the effects of ischemia alone on brain NAD(H) levels and neuroanatomic distribution. The ischemic insult resulted in a greater than 50% decline in the rate of formazan generation in the CA1 pyramidal neuronal layer of the hippocampus and in the parietal cortex and striatum, but not in the CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) subregions of the hippocampus. The ischemia-induced changes in NAD(H) levels were confirmed by utilizing spectrofluorimetric measurements of NAD(H) present in perchloric acid extracts of brain samples. This new histo-enzymatic technique is suitable for visualizing and quantifying relative NAD(H) levels in the brain. This assay could prove useful in identifying region-selective NAD(H) catabolism that may contribute to neurodegeneration. PMID:20036220

  2. Vitamins and aging: pathways to NAD+ synthesis.

    PubMed

    Denu, John M

    2007-05-04

    Recent genetic evidence reveals additional salvage pathways for NAD(+) synthesis. In this issue, Belenky et al. (2007) report that nicotinamide riboside, a new NAD(+) precursor, regulates Sir2 deacetylase activity and life span in yeast. The ability of nicotinamide riboside to enhance life span does not depend on calorie restriction.

  3. Preventing NAD+ Depletion Protects Neurons against Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Pitta, Michael; Mattson, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Neurons are excitable cells that require large amounts of energy to support their survival and functions and are therefore prone to excitotoxicity, which involves energy depletion. By examining bioenergetic changes induced by glutamate, we found that the cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) level is a critical determinant of neuronal survival. The bioenergetic effects of mitochondrial uncoupling and caloric restriction were also examined in cultured neurons and rodent brain. 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP) is a chemical mitochondrial uncoupler that stimulates glucose uptake and oxygen consumption on cultured neurons, which accelerates oxidation of NAD(P)H to NAD+ in mitochondria. The NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase sirtulin 1 (SIRT1) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) mRNA are upregulated mouse brain under caloric restriction. To examine whether NAD+ mediates neuroprotective effects, nicotinamide, a precursor of NAD+ and inhibitor of SIRT1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) (two NAD+-dependent enzymes), was employed. Nicotinamide attenuated excitotoxic death and preserved cellular NAD+ levels to support SIRT1 and PARP 1 activities. Our findings suggest that mild mitochondrial uncoupling and caloric restriction exert hormetic effects by stimulating bioenergetics in neurons thereby increasing tolerance of neurons to metabolic stress. PMID:19076449

  4. Pseudotumor of temporomandibular joint: destructive calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Pritzker, K P; Phillips, H; Luk, S C; Koven, I H; Kiss, A; Houpt, J B

    1976-03-01

    The clinical and pathological features of a tumor of the temporamandibular joint occurring in a 55 year old man, and subsequently identified as a calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) arthropathy, are reported. Crystalline deposits were identified by compensated light microscopy and confirmed with X-ray diffraction, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. The relationship of this unique case to other clinical presentations of CPPD deposition disease and the implications of the histological features to the pathogenesis of pseudogout are discussed. This case demonstrates that CPPD arthropathy should be included in the differential diagnosis of an arthrosis or of a tumor involving the temporomandibular joint.

  5. Nicotinamide riboside kinase structures reveal new pathways to NAD+.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Wolfram; Rabeh, Wael M; Bogan, Katrina L; Belenky, Peter; Wojcik, Marzena; Seidle, Heather F; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Yang, Tianle; Sauve, Anthony A; Park, Hee-Won; Brenner, Charles

    2007-10-02

    The eukaryotic nicotinamide riboside kinase (Nrk) pathway, which is induced in response to nerve damage and promotes replicative life span in yeast, converts nicotinamide riboside to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by phosphorylation and adenylylation. Crystal structures of human Nrk1 bound to nucleoside and nucleotide substrates and products revealed an enzyme structurally similar to Rossmann fold metabolite kinases and allowed the identification of active site residues, which were shown to be essential for human Nrk1 and Nrk2 activity in vivo. Although the structures account for the 500-fold discrimination between nicotinamide riboside and pyrimidine nucleosides, no enzyme feature was identified to recognize the distinctive carboxamide group of nicotinamide riboside. Indeed, nicotinic acid riboside is a specific substrate of human Nrk enzymes and is utilized in yeast in a novel biosynthetic pathway that depends on Nrk and NAD+ synthetase. Additionally, nicotinic acid riboside is utilized in vivo by Urh1, Pnp1, and Preiss-Handler salvage. Thus, crystal structures of Nrk1 led to the identification of new pathways to NAD+.

  6. Less is more: Nutrient limitation induces cross-talk of nutrient sensing pathways with NAD+ homeostasis and contributes to longevity

    PubMed Central

    TSANG, Felicia; LIN, Su-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient sensing pathways and their regulation grant cells control over their metabolism and growth in response to changing nutrients. Factors that regulate nutrient sensing can also modulate longevity. Reduced activity of nutrient sensing pathways such as glucose-sensing PKA, nitrogen-sensing TOR and S6 kinase homolog Sch9 have been linked to increased life span in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and higher eukaryotes. Recently, reduced activity of amino acid sensing SPS pathway was also shown to increase yeast life span. Life span extension by reduced SPS activity requires enhanced NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form) and nicotinamide riboside (NR, a NAD+ precursor) homeostasis. Maintaining adequate NAD+ pools has been shown to play key roles in life span extension, but factors regulating NAD+ metabolism and homeostasis are not completely understood. Recently, NAD+ metabolism was also linked to the phosphate (Pi)-sensing PHO pathway in yeast. Canonical PHO activation requires Pi-starvation. Interestingly, NAD+ depletion without Pi-starvation was sufficient to induce PHO activation, increasing NR production and mobilization. Moreover, SPS signaling appears to function in parallel with PHO signaling components to regulate NR/NAD+ homeostasis. These studies suggest that NAD+ metabolism is likely controlled by and/or coordinated with multiple nutrient sensing pathways. Indeed, cross-regulation of PHO, PKA, TOR and Sch9 pathways was reported to potentially affect NAD+ metabolism; though detailed mechanisms remain unclear. This review discusses yeast longevity-related nutrient sensing pathways and possible mechanisms of life span extension, regulation of NAD+ homeostasis, and cross-talk among nutrient sensing pathways and NAD+ homeostasis. PMID:27683589

  7. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-09-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins.

  8. Influence of an organic and an inorganic additive on the crystallization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anee, T. K.; Meenakshi Sundaram, N.; Arivuoli, D.; Ramasamy, P.; Narayana Kalkura, S.

    2005-12-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was crystallized by single diffusion method under physiological pH, in the presence of cobalt and malic acid. The morphology, composition and microstructure of the grown crystals were analyzed using EDTA titration, UV-Visible, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These analyses showed that the grown crystals were Co 2+-doped DCPD. The temperature has influenced the dopant entry into DCPD crystals, but the dopant content and temperature were having not much influence on the crystal morphology. In pathological crystallization, the size and morphology are very important since they decide the mode of treatment to adopt. The morphological changes arise when the growth assay is doped with cobalt and malic acid. The effect of malic acid on the crystallization was highly specific, adsorbing on certain crystal faces during growth and producing different morphologies. At higher concentration, the morphology showed a feature frequently encountered in biomineralization, the orientational ordering in [0 0 1], leading to elongated crystals.

  9. ARTD1 (PARP1) activation and NAD(+) in DNA repair and cell death.

    PubMed

    Fouquerel, Elise; Sobol, Robert W

    2014-11-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NAD(+), is a small metabolite coenzyme that is essential for the progress of crucial cellular pathways including glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and mitochondrial respiration. These processes consume and produce both oxidative and reduced forms of NAD (NAD(+) and NADH). NAD(+) is also important for ADP(ribosyl)ation reactions mediated by the ADP-ribosyltransferase enzymes (ARTDs) or deacetylation reactions catalyzed by the sirtuins (SIRTs) which use NAD(+) as a substrate. In this review, we highlight the significance of NAD(+) catabolism in DNA repair and cell death through its utilization by ARTDs and SIRTs. We summarize the current findings on the involvement of ARTD1 activity in DNA repair and most specifically its involvement in the trigger of cell death mediated by ARTD1 activation and energy depletion. By sharing the same substrate, the activities of ARTDs and SIRTs are tightly linked, are dependent on each other and are thereby involved in the same cellular processes that play an important role in cancer biology, inflammatory diseases and ischaemia/reperfusion.

  10. Study of N, N-dimethyl(carboethoxymethyl)-3-phthalimidopropylammonium chloride dihydrate by DFT calculations, NMR and FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Iwona

    2009-06-01

    N, N-dimethyl(carboethoxymethyl)-3-phthalimidopropylammonium chloride dihydrate ( 1) and N, N-dimethyl(carboxymethyl)-3-phthalimidopropylammonium hydrochloride ( 3) have been obtained in reaction of N, N-dimethyl-3-phthalimidopropylamine with ethyl chloroacetate and chloroacetic acid, respectively. N, N-dimethyl(carboethoxymethyl)-3-phthalimido-propylammonium chloride dihydrate ( 1) has been characterized by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, for ( 1) and ( 3) B3LYP calculations have been carried out. The optimized bond lengths, bond angles and torsion angles calculated by B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) approach have been presented. Both FTIR and Raman spectra of ( 1) are consistent with the calculated structures in the gas phase. Correlations between the experimental 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts ( δexp) of investigated compound in D 2O, and the GIAO/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) calculated magnetic isotropic shielding tensors ( σcalc), δexp = a + b σcalc, are reported. The assignments of the anharmonic experimental solid state vibrational frequencies of ( 1) based on the calculated B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) harmonic frequencies have been made. Linear correlations between the experimental 1H and 13C chemical shifts and the computed screening constants confirm the optimized geometry.

  11. A laboratory study of the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander D.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the kinetics of crystallisation of ternary H2O-H2SO4-HNO3 mixtures to produce nitric acid hydrate phases, as occurs in the lower stratosphere, have been a long-standing challenge for investigators in the laboratory. Understanding polar stratospheric chlorine chemistry and thereby ozone depletion is increasingly limited by descriptions of nucleation processes. Meteoric smoke particles have been considered in the past as heterogeneous nuclei, however recent studies suggest that these particles will largely dissolve, leaving mainly silica and alumina as solid inclusions. In this study the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrate phases have been measured in microliter droplets at polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) temperatures, using a droplet freezing assay. A clear heterogeneous effect was observed when silica particles were added. A parameterisation based on the number of droplets activated per nuclei surface area (ns) has been developed and compared to global model data. Nucleation experiments on identical droplets have been performed in an X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) to determine the nature of the phase which formed. β-Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) was observed alongside a mixture of Nitric Acid Dihydrate (NAD) phases. It is not possible to determine whether NAT nucleates directly or is formed by a phase transition from NAD (likely requiring the presence of a mediating liquid phase). Regardless, these results demonstrate the possibility of forming NAT on laboratory timescales. In the polar stratosphere, sulfuric acid (present at several weight percent of the liquid under equilibrium conditions) could provide such a liquid phase. This study therefor provides insight into previous discrepancies between phases formed in the laboratory and those observed in the atmosphere. It also provides a basis for future studies into atmospheric nucleation of solid PSCs.

  12. Lisinopril dihydrate: single-crystal x-ray structure and physicochemical characterization of derived solid forms.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Milena; Catenacci, Laura; Cruickshank, Dyanne L; Caira, Mino R

    2013-10-01

    Screening for new solid forms of the antihypertensive lisinopril was performed by recrystallization of the commercial form, lisinopril dihydrate, from various solvents and by exposing the product of its dehydration to a series of vapors under controlled conditions. Modifications other than the dihydrate encountered in the study included new anhydrous and amorphous forms, with intrinsic dissolution rates significantly greater than that of the dihydrate. Further physicochemical characterization included constant and programmed temperature powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In the course of this study, the single-crystal X-ray structure of lisinopril dihydrate, [a = 14.550(2), b = 5.8917(8), c = 14.238(2) Å, β = 112.832(3)° at T = 173(2) K, space group P21 , Z = 2], was determined for the first time, revealing its double zwitterionic character in the solid state.

  13. Do NAD and NAT form in liquid stratospheric aerosols by pseudoheterogeneous nucleation?

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A

    2006-05-04

    Laboratory data of the freezing of nitric acid hydrates (NAD, NAT) from HNO(3)/H(2)O and HNO(3)/H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O solution droplets have been evaluated with respect to a "pseudoheterogeneous" (surface-induced) nucleation mechanism of NAD and NAT, which has been argued to possibly lead to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). In addition, a parametrization of pseudoheterogeneous nucleation of NAD and NAT suggested recently (Tabazadeh et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2002, 106, 10238-10246) has been analyzed, showing that this parametrization should not be used in stratospheric modeling studies. The analysis of several laboratory data sets yields an upper limit of the pseudoheterogeneous nucleation rate coefficient of NAD of 2.2 x 10(-5) cm(-2) s(-1). In contrast, the upper limit of the pseudoheterogeneous nucleation rate coefficient of NAT could not be constrained satisfactorily, since formation of NAT has not been observed at stratospheric conditions in laboratory experiments applying small droplets. Maximum NAD production rates of 9.6 x 10(-9) cm(-3) (air) h(-1) in the stratosphere have been estimated assuming a pseudoheterogeneous nucleation mechanism that is constrained by the experimental observations. If maximum NAD supersaturation persisted for 4 weeks in the polar stratosphere the corresponding NAD particle number densities are estimated to be about 6 x 10(-6) cm(-3). These particle number densities are 3 orders of magnitude lower than particle number densities recently observed in the stratosphere. In conclusion, on the basis of laboratory data it is found that a pseudoheterogeneous nucleation mechanism is not sufficient to explain recent observations of large nitric acid containing particles in the polar stratosphere.

  14. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of NAD synthetase from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Arbade, Gajanan Kashinathrao; Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen that causes a wide range of infections. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains in both hospital and community settings makes it imperative to characterize new drug targets to combat S. aureus infections. In this context, enzymes involved in NAD metabolism and synthesis are significant drug targets as NAD is a central player in several cellular processes. NAD synthetase catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, making it a crucial intermediate enzyme linked to the biosynthesis of several amino acids, purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, coenzymes and antibiotics.

  15. Interpretation of dissolution kinetics of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingwu; Nancollas, George H.

    1992-11-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) has been investigated at physiological temperature 37°C using the constant composition method. In order to calculate the undersaturation, the solubility product was determined at the ionic strength of the dissolution experiments. The rates were sensitive to the solution hydrodynamics at high driving forces and under mild agitation, suggesting that volume diffusion provides a substantial resistance to dissolution. However, surface processes became rate determining at low undersaturations as reflected by the insensitivity of rates to changes of stirring speed and the relatively high activation energy. The dependence of the rate upon the relative undersaturation was analyzed using recent crystal growth theories. Though not necessarily rate determining, surface diffusion appeared to be involved in transporting dissolved ions into the solution phase.

  16. In vivo NAD assay reveals the intracellular NAD contents and redox state in healthy human brain and their age dependences.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Lee, Byeong-Yeul; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-03

    NAD is an essential metabolite that exists in NAD(+) or NADH form in all living cells. Despite its critical roles in regulating mitochondrial energy production through the NAD(+)/NADH redox state and modulating cellular signaling processes through the activity of the NAD(+)-dependent enzymes, the method for quantifying intracellular NAD contents and redox state is limited to a few in vitro or ex vivo assays, which are not suitable for studying a living brain or organ. Here, we present a magnetic resonance (MR) -based in vivo NAD assay that uses the high-field MR scanner and is capable of noninvasively assessing NAD(+) and NADH contents and the NAD(+)/NADH redox state in intact human brain. The results of this study provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the cellular NAD concentrations and redox state in the brains of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, an age-dependent increase of intracellular NADH and age-dependent reductions in NAD(+), total NAD contents, and NAD(+)/NADH redox potential of the healthy human brain were revealed in this study. The overall findings not only provide direct evidence of declined mitochondrial functions and altered NAD homeostasis that accompany the normal aging process but also, elucidate the merits and potentials of this new NAD assay for noninvasively studying the intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in normal and diseased human brain or other organs in situ.

  17. In vivo NAD assay reveals the intracellular NAD contents and redox state in healthy human brain and their age dependences

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Lee, Byeong-Yeul; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    NAD is an essential metabolite that exists in NAD+ or NADH form in all living cells. Despite its critical roles in regulating mitochondrial energy production through the NAD+/NADH redox state and modulating cellular signaling processes through the activity of the NAD+-dependent enzymes, the method for quantifying intracellular NAD contents and redox state is limited to a few in vitro or ex vivo assays, which are not suitable for studying a living brain or organ. Here, we present a magnetic resonance (MR) -based in vivo NAD assay that uses the high-field MR scanner and is capable of noninvasively assessing NAD+ and NADH contents and the NAD+/NADH redox state in intact human brain. The results of this study provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the cellular NAD concentrations and redox state in the brains of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, an age-dependent increase of intracellular NADH and age-dependent reductions in NAD+, total NAD contents, and NAD+/NADH redox potential of the healthy human brain were revealed in this study. The overall findings not only provide direct evidence of declined mitochondrial functions and altered NAD homeostasis that accompany the normal aging process but also, elucidate the merits and potentials of this new NAD assay for noninvasively studying the intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in normal and diseased human brain or other organs in situ. PMID:25730862

  18. Characteristics of external and internal NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in Hoya carnosa mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hoang Thi Kim; Nose, Akihiro

    2012-12-01

    This study aims at characterizing NAD(P)H dehydrogenases on the inside and outside of the inner membrane of mitochondria of one phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-crassulacean acid metabolism plant, Hoya carnosa. In crassulacean acid metabolism plants, NADH is produced by malate decarboxylation inside and outside mitochondria. The relative importance of mitochondrial alternative NADH dehydrogenases and their association was determined in intact-and alamethicin-permeabilized mitochondria of H. carnosa to discriminate between internal and external activities. The major findings in H. carnosa mitochondria are: (i) external NADPH oxidation is totally inhibited by DPI and totally dependent on Ca(2+), (ii) external NADH oxidation is partially inhibited by DPI and mainly dependent on Ca(2+), (iii) total NADH oxidation measured in permeabilized mitochondria is partially inhibited by rotenone and also by DPI, (iv) total NADPH oxidation measured in permeabilized mitochondria is partially dependent on Ca(2+) and totally inhibited by DPI. The results suggest that complex I, external NAD(P)H dehydrogenases, and internal NAD(P)H dehydrogenases are all linked to the electron transport chain. Also, the total measurable NAD(P)H dehydrogenases activity was less than the total measurable complex I activity, and both of these enzymes could donate their electrons not only to the cytochrome pathway but also to the alternative pathway. The finding indicated that the H. carnosa mitochondrial electron transport chain is operating in a classical way, partitioning to both Complex I and alternative Alt. NAD(P)H dehydrogenases.

  19. Freezing of sulfuric and nitric acid solutions: Implications for polar stratospheric cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo Gonzalez, Dara

    2000-12-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) play an important role in ozone chemistry during the polar winter. The magnitude of their effect depends on their phase, composition and formation mechanism, which are not fully understood yet. In order to understand how liquid PSCs freeze, two apparatus were designed to study the freezing behavior of small drops using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and an optical microscope. Sulfuric acid aqueous drops with composition of 10 to 50 wt % were studied with the FTIR apparatus. The surface on which the drops stand caused heterogeneous nucleation of ice, but not of the sulfuric acid hydrates. The more concentrated solutions (>40 wt %) supercooled to 130 K without freezing. Below 150 K these solutions formed an amorphous solid, which liquefied upon warming. Drops with composition of 40 to 64 wt % HNO3 were prepared and their phase transitions were detected with the optical microscope apparatus. Freezing temperatures of the drops were determined and homogeneous nucleation rates of nitric acid dihydrate (JNAD) and nitric acid trihydrate (JNAT) between 170 and 190 K were calculated. JNAT and JNAD depend predominantly on the saturation of the solid in the liquid solution: higher saturation ratios correspond to higher nucleation rates. Classical nucleation theory was used to parameterize this relation. Since the saturation ratios of NAD and NAT vary with temperature and composition in different ways, NAT or NAD can form preferentially under different conditions. Evidence was found that NAD catalyzes the nucleation of NAT below ~183 K. Mullite, cristobalite and alumina were tested as possible heterogeneous nuclei of volcanic origin for PSCs. They catalyze freezing of NAD and NAT at temperatures below 179 K, which are too low to be stratospherically important. The results suggest that the largest drops in a PSC will freeze homogeneously if the stratospheric temperature remains below the NAT condensation temperature for more

  20. Regulation of NAD+- and NADP+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase in the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas W6.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, K H; Babel, W

    1980-01-01

    Cell-free extracts of the obligate methanol-utilizing bacterium Pseudomonas W6 catalyze the oxydation of isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate in the presence of NAD+ and NADP+. After electro-focusing of the crude extract of Pseudomonas W6 actually two distinct bands each of NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD+-IDH) and of NADP+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+-IDH) could be observed. The NAD+-IDH was completely separated from the NADP+-IDH by employing DEAE ion exchange chromatography and further purified by affinity chromatography using Cibacron blue F 3G-A. The NAD+-IDH was inhibited by a high energy charge, whereas the NADP+-IDH was found to be independent of energy charge. Consequently the NAD+-IDH showed the control behaviour of an enzyme of an energy-generating sequence which, however, equally fulfils a catabolic and an anabolic function. With respect to the inhibition by reduced pyridine nucleotides and alpha-ketoglutarate differences between NAD+-IDH and NADP+-IDH were also found. Only the NADP+-linked enzyme exhibited a feedback inhibition by its reaction products alpha-ketoglutarate and NADPH. This control behaviour gives evidence for the biosynthetic function of the NADP+-IDH. These results confer an amphibolic character to the sequence from citrate to alpha-ketoglutarate in the incomplete citric-acid cycle of Pseudomonas W6.

  1. Discoveries of nicotinamide riboside as a nutrient and conserved NRK genes establish a Preiss-Handler independent route to NAD+ in fungi and humans.

    PubMed

    Bieganowski, Pawel; Brenner, Charles

    2004-05-14

    NAD+ is essential for life in all organisms, both as a coenzyme for oxidoreductases and as a source of ADPribosyl groups used in various reactions, including those that retard aging in experimental systems. Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide were defined as the vitamin precursors of NAD+ in Elvehjem's classic discoveries of the 1930s. The accepted view of eukaryotic NAD+ biosynthesis, that all anabolism flows through nicotinic acid mononucleotide, was challenged experimentally and revealed that nicotinamide riboside is an unanticipated NAD+ precursor in yeast. Nicotinamide riboside kinases from yeast and humans essential for this pathway were identified and found to be highly specific for phosphorylation of nicotinamide riboside and the cancer drug tiazofurin. Nicotinamide riboside was discovered as a nutrient in milk, suggesting that nicotinamide riboside is a useful compound for elevation of NAD+ levels in humans.

  2. PGC1α-dependent NAD biosynthesis links oxidative metabolism to renal protection

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Mei T.; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K.; Berg, Anders H.; Khankin, Eliyahu V.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B.; Stillman, Isaac E.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P.; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischemia. Indeed, acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients.1,2 Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α,3,4 is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating NAD biosynthesis. Following renal ischemia, PGC1α−/− mice developed local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (Nam), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Remarkably, exogenous Nam improved local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischemic PGC1α−/− mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulated the effects of Nam supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulated the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuated the de novo pathway. Nam enhanced NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augmented production of the fat breakdown product beta-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB), leading to increased prostaglandin PGE2, a secreted autocoid that maintains renal function.5 Nam treatment reversed established ischemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-OHB signaling or prostaglandins similarly abolished PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in aging and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate Nam and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance. PMID:26982719

  3. Single sample extraction and HPLC processing for quantification of NAD and NADH levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sporty, J; Kabir, M M; Turteltaub, K; Ognibene, T; Lin, S; Bench, G

    2008-01-10

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, approximately 10{sup 8} yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under non-oxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50-mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH{sub 3}CN + 50-mM ammonium acetate (3:1; v:v) was added to the cell lysates. After sample centrifugation to pellet precipitated proteins, organic solvent removal was performed on supernatants by chloroform extraction. The remaining aqueous phase was dried and resuspended in 50-mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV-VIS absorbance detection. Applicability of this procedure for quantifying NAD and NADH levels was evaluated by culturing yeast under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. NAD and NADH contents are similar to previously reported levels in yeast obtained using enzymatic assays performed separately on acid (for NAD) and alkali (for NADH) extracts. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (1) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in mammalian and bacterial cell cultures; and (2) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures.

  4. Characterization and expression of NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Turano, F J; Thakkar, S S; Fang, T; Weisemann, J M

    1997-04-01

    Two distinct cDNA clones encoding NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD[H]-GDH) in Arabidopsis thaliana were identified and sequenced. The genes corresponding to these cDNA clones were designated GDH1 and GDH2. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences suggest that both gene products contain putative mitochondrial transit polypeptides and NAD(H)- and alpha-ketoglutarate-binding domains. Subcellular fractionation confirmed the mitochondrial location of the NAD(H)-GDH isoenzymes. In addition, a putative EF-hand loop, shown to be associated with Ca2+ binding, was identified in the GDH2 gene product but not in the GDH1 gene product. GDH1 encodes a 43.0-kD polypeptide, designated alpha, and GDH2 encodes a 42.5-kD polypeptide, designated beta. The two subunits combine in different ratios to form seven NAD(H)-GDH isoenzymes. The slowest-migrating isoenzyme in a native gel, GDH1, is a homohexamer composed of alpha subunits, and the fastest-migrating isoenzyme, GDH7, is a homohexamer composed of beta subunits. GDH isoenzymes 2 through 6 are heterohexamers composed of different ratios of alpha and beta subunits. NAD(H)-GDH isoenzyme patterns varied among different plant organs and in leaves of plants irrigated with different nitrogen sources or subjected to darkness for 4 d. Conversely, there were little or no measurable changes in isoenzyme patterns in roots of plants treated with different nitrogen sources. In most instances, changes in isoenzyme patterns were correlated with relative differences in the level of alpha and beta subunits. Likewise, the relative difference in the level of alpha or beta subunits was correlated with changes in the level of GDH1 or GDH2 transcript detected in each sample, suggesting that NAD(H)-GDH activity is controlled at least in part at the transcriptional level.

  5. PGC1α drives NAD biosynthesis linking oxidative metabolism to renal protection.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mei T; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K; Berg, Anders H; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bhasin, Manoj K; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B; Stillman, Isaac E; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P; Parikh, Samir M

    2016-03-24

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischaemia. Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients. Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α, is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis. Following renal ischaemia, Pgc1α(-/-) (also known as Ppargc1a(-/-)) mice develop local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (NAM, also known as nicotinamide), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Notably, exogenous NAM improves local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischaemic Pgc1α(-/-) mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulate the effects of NAM supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischaemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulates the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuates the de novo pathway. NAM enhances NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augments production of the fat breakdown product β-hydroxybutyrate, leading to increased production of prostaglandin PGE2 (ref. 5), a secreted autacoid that maintains renal function. NAM treatment reverses established ischaemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-hydroxybutyrate signalling or prostaglandin production similarly abolishes PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in ageing and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate NAM and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance.

  6. Characterization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using a novel hydroxyapatite-based formulation.

    PubMed

    Alge, Daniel L; Santa Cruz, Grace; Goebel, W Scott; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2009-04-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cements are typically prepared using beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) as the base component. However, hydroxyapatite (HA) is an interesting alternative because of its potential for reducing cement acidity, as well as modulating cement properties via ionic substitutions. In the present study, we have characterized DCPD cements prepared with a novel formulation based on monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and HA. Cements were prepared using a 4:1 MCPM:HA molar ratio. The reactivity of HA in this system was verified by showing DCPD formation using poorly crystalline HA, as well as highly crystalline HA. Evaluation of cements prepared with poorly crystalline HA revealed that setting occurs rapidly in the MCPM/HA system, and that the use of a setting regulator is necessary to maintain workability of the cement paste. Compressive testing showed that MCPM/HA cements have strengths comparable to what has previously been published for DCPD cements. However, preliminary in vitro analysis of cement degradation revealed that conversion of DCPD to HA may occur much more rapidly in the MCPM/HA system compared to cements prepared with beta-TCP. Future studies should investigate this property further, as it could have important implications for the use of HA-based DCPD cement formulations.

  7. The mid-IR Absorption Cross Sections of α- and β-NAT (HNO3 · 3H2O) in the range 170 to 185 K and of metastable NAD (HNO3 · 2H2O) in the range 172 to 182 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannarelli, R.; Rossi, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    Growth and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption in transmission of the title nitric acid hydrates have been performed in a stirred flow reactor (SFR) under tight control of the H2O and HNO3 deposition conditions affording a closed mass balance of the binary mixture. The gas and condensed phases have been simultaneously monitored using residual gas mass spectrometry and FTIR absorption spectroscopy, respectively. Barrierless nucleation of the metastable phases of both α-NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) and NAD (nitric acid dihydrate) has been observed when HNO3 was admitted to the SFR in the presence of a macroscopic thin film of pure H2O ice of typically 1 µm thickness. The stable β-NAT phase was spontaneously formed from the precursor α-NAT phase through irreversible thermal rearrangement beginning at 185 K. This facile growth scheme of nitric acid hydrates requires the presence of H2O ice at thicknesses in excess of approximately hundred nanometers. Absolute absorption cross sections in the mid-IR spectral range (700-4000 cm-1) of all three title compounds have been obtained after spectral subtraction of excess pure ice at temperatures characteristic of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. Prominent IR absorption frequencies correspond to the antisymmetric nitrate stretch vibration (ν3(NO3-)) in the range 1300 to 1420 cm-1 and the bands of hydrated protons in the range 1670 to 1850 cm-1 in addition to the antisymmetric O-H stretch vibration of bound H2O in the range 3380 to 3430 cm-1 for NAT.

  8. A tactile sensory system of Myxococcus xanthus involves an extracellular NAD(P)(+)-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, B U; Lee, K; Mendez, J; Shimkets, L J

    1995-12-01

    CsgA is a cell surface protein that plays an essential role in tactile responses during Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body formation by producing the morphogenic C-signal. The primary amino acid sequence of CsgA exhibits homology with members of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase (SCAD) family and several lines of evidence suggest that NAD(P)+ binding is essential for biological activity. First, the predicted CsgA secondary structure based on the 3 alpha/20 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase crystal structure suggests that the amino-terminal portion of the protein contains an NAD(P)+ binding pocket. Second, strains with csgA alleles encoding amino acid substitutions T6A and R10A in the NAD(P)+ binding pocket failed to develop. Third, exogenous MalE-CsgA rescues csgA development, whereas MalE-CsgA with the amino acid substitution CsgA T6A does not. Finally, csgA spore yield increased approximately 20% when containing 100 nM of MalE-CsgA was supplemented with 10 microM of NAD+ or NADP+. Conversely, 10 microM of NADH or NADPH delayed development for approximately 24 hr and depressed spore levels approximately 10%. Together, these results argue that NAD(P)+ binding is critical for C-signaling. S135 and K155 are conserved amino acids in the catalytic domain of SCAD members. Strains with csgA alleles encoding the amino acid substitutions S135T or K155R failed to develop. Furthermore, a MalE-CsgA protein containing CsgA S135T was not able to restore development to csgA cells. In conclusion, amino acids conserved in the coenzyme binding pocket and catalytic site are essential for C-signaling.

  9. Mycofactocin-associated mycobacterial dehydrogenases with non-exchangeable NAD cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Haft, Daniel H.; Pierce, Phillip G.; Mayclin, Stephen J.; Sullivan, Amy; Gardberg, Anna S.; Abendroth, Jan; Begley, Darren W.; Phan, Isabelle Q.; Staker, Bart L.; Myler, Peter J.; Marathias, Vasilios M.; Lorimer, Donald D.; Edwards, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    During human infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives the normally bacteriocidal phagosome of macrophages. Mtb and related species may be able to combat this harsh acidic environment which contains reactive oxygen species due to the mycobacterial genomes encoding a large number of dehydrogenases. Typically, dehydrogenase cofactor binding sites are open to solvent, which allows NAD/NADH exchange to support multiple turnover. Interestingly, mycobacterial short chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) within family TIGR03971 contain an insertion at the NAD binding site. Here we present crystal structures of 9 mycobacterial SDRs in which the insertion buries the NAD cofactor except for a small portion of the nicotinamide ring. Line broadening and STD-NMR experiments did not show NAD or NADH exchange on the NMR timescale. STD-NMR demonstrated binding of the potential substrate carveol, the potential product carvone, the inhibitor tricyclazol, and an external redox partner 2,6-dichloroindophenol (DCIP). Therefore, these SDRs appear to contain a non-exchangeable NAD cofactor and may rely on an external redox partner, rather than cofactor exchange, for multiple turnover. Incidentally, these genes always appear in conjunction with the mftA gene, which encodes the short peptide MftA, and with other genes proposed to convert MftA into the external redox partner mycofactocin. PMID:28120876

  10. The plant mitochondrial mat-r gene/nad1 gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wolstenhome, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    We have completed sequencing segments of the maize mitochondrial (mt) DNA that contains all five of the exons (A-E) of the gene (nad1) for subunit I of the respiratory chain NADH dehydrogenase. Analysis of these sequences indicates that exons B and C are joined by a continuous group II intron, but the remaining exons are associated with partial group II introns and are encoded at widely separated locations in the maize mtDNA molecule. We have shown that mature transcripts of the maize nad1 gene contain 23 edited nucleotides, and that transcripts of maize and soybean mat-r genes contain 15 and 14 edits, respectively. The majority of edits in nad1 transcripts result in amino acid replacements that increase similarity between the maize NAD1 protein and NAD1 proteins of other plant species and of animal species. We found that the intron between exons b and c is not edited. From data obtained using PCR and sequencing we have shown that transcripts containing all possible exon combinations exist in maize mitochondria.

  11. Free [NADH]/[NAD(+)] regulates sirtuin expression.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Juan; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Borras, Consuelo; Valles, Soraya L; Lopez-Grueso, Raul; Martinez-Bello, Vladimir E; Herranz, Daniel; Pallardo, Federico V; Tresguerres, Jesus A F; Serrano, Manuel; Viña, Jose

    2011-08-01

    Sirtuins are deacetylases involved in metabolic regulation and longevity. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that they are subjected to redox regulation by the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] ratio. We used NIH3T3 fibroblasts in culture, Drosophila fed with or without ethanol and exercising rats. In all three models an increase in [NADH]/[NAD(+)] came up with an increased expression of sirtuin mRNA and protein. PGC-1α (a substrate of sirtuins) protein level was significantly increased in fibroblasts incubated with lactate and pyruvate but this effect was lost in fibroblasts obtained from sirtuin-deficient mice. We conclude that the expression of sirtuins is subject to tight redox regulation by the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] ratio, which is a major sensor for metabolite availability conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates.

  12. Translation of nad9 mRNAs in mitochondria from Solanum tuberosum is restricted to completely edited transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann, L; Thieck, O; Herz, U; Schröder, W; Brennicke, A

    1994-01-01

    The pool of partially and completely edited mRNAs present in plant mitochondria could potentially be translated into a mixture of divergent proteins. This possibility was investigated for the nad9 gene in potato by characterization of the mRNA population and the corresponding protein sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the nad9 gene product has significant similarity to the nuclear-encoded 30 kDa subunit of the bovine and Neurospora NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) and to the chloroplast ndhJ gene product. Immunoprecipitation of a 27 kDa in-organello 35S labelled mitochondrial translation product with an antibody directed against the wheat nad9 gene product demonstrates its functional expression in potato and wheat. Comparison of the nad9 genomic DNA and cDNA sequences reveals seven codons to be changed by a C to U RNA-editing. Direct sequencing of RT-PCR products derived from cDNAs of different tissues of potato plants shows the presence of a significant portion of only partially edited nad9 transcripts in the various tissues. Amino acid sequencing of internal peptides of the isolated 27 kDa protein from potato tubers demonstrates homogenous translation products of only completely edited nad9 mRNAs even in the presence of partially edited mRNAs. This result suggests a pretranslational selection between edited and incompletely edited mRNAs in plant mitochondria. Images PMID:8078764

  13. Molecular cloning and functional expression of bovine spleen ecto-NAD+ glycohydrolase: structural identity with human CD38.

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, A; Muller-Steffner, H; Schuber, F

    2000-01-01

    Bovine spleen ecto-NAD(+) glycohydrolase, an archetypal member of the mammalian membrane-associated NAD(P)(+) glycohydrolase enzyme family (EC 3.2.2.6), displays catalytic features similar to those of CD38, i.e. a protein originally described as a lymphocyte differentiation marker involved in the metabolism of cyclic ADP-ribose and signal transduction. Using amino acid sequence information obtained from NAD(+) glycohydrolase and from a truncated and hydrosoluble form of the enzyme (hNADase) purified to homogeneity, a full-length cDNA clone was obtained. The deduced sequence indicates a protein of 278 residues with a molecular mass of 31.5 kDa. It predicts that bovine ecto-NAD(+) glycohydrolase is a type II transmembrane protein, with a very short intracellular tail. The bulk of the enzyme, which is extracellular and contains two potential N-glycosylation sites, yields the fully catalytically active hNADase which is truncated by 71 residues. Transfection of HeLa cells with the full-length cDNA resulted in the expression of the expected NAD(+) glycohydrolase, ADP-ribosyl cyclase and GDP-ribosyl cyclase activities at the surface of the cells. The bovine enzyme, which is the first 'classical' NAD(P)(+) glycohydrolase whose structure has been established, presents a particularly high sequence identity with CD38, including the presence of 10 strictly conserved cysteine residues in the ectodomain and putative catalytic residues. However, it lacks two otherwise conserved cysteine residues near its C-terminus. Thus hNADase, the truncated protein of 207 amino acids, represents the smallest functional domain endowed with all the catalytic activities of CD38/NAD(+) glycohydrolases so far identified. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that the cloned bovine spleen ecto-NAD(+) glycohydrolase is the bovine equivalent of CD38. PMID:10600637

  14. A water setting tetracalcium phosphate-dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cement.

    PubMed

    Burguera, E F; Guitián, F; Chow, L C

    2004-11-01

    The development of a calcium phosphate cement, comprising tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), that hardens in 14 min with water as the liquid or 6 min with a 0.25 mol/L sodium phosphate solution as the liquid, without using hydroxyapatite (HA) seeds as setting accelerator, is reported. It was postulated that reduction in porosity would increase cement strength. Thus, the effects of applied pressure during the initial stages of the cement setting reaction on cement strength and porosity were studied. The cement powder comprised an equimolar mixture of TTCP and DCPD (median particle sizes 17 and 1.7 microm, respectively). Compressive strengths (CS) of samples prepared with distilled water were 47.6 +/- 2.4 MPa, 50.7 +/- 4.2 MPa, and 52.9 +/- 4.7 MPa at applied pressures of 5 MPa, 15 MPa, and 25 MPa, respectively. When phosphate solution was used, the CS values obtained were 41.5 +/- 2.3 MPa, 37.9 +/- 1.7 MPa, and 38.1 +/- 2.3 MPa at the same pressure levels. Statistical analysis of the results showed that pressure produced an improvement in CS when water was used as liquid but not when the phosphate solution was used. Compared to previously reported TTCP-DCPD cements, the greater CS values and shorter setting times together with a simplified formulation should make the present TTCP-DCPD cement a useful material as a bone substitute for clinical applications.

  15. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate on Modified Silica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Miller, Carrie; Komunjer, Ljepša; Hlady, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, CaHPO4•2H2O (DCPD) was studied on untreated planar fused silica and on three modified silica surfaces: octadecylsilyl (OTS) modified silica, human serum albumin treated OTS silica, and UV-oxidized 3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilyl (MTS) modified silica. The supersaturation ratio of calcium and phosphate solution with respect to DCPD was kept below ~10. The nucleated crystals were observed 24 hours and one week after initial contact between supersaturated solutions and substrate surfaces using bright field and reflectance interference contrast microscopy. No DCPD crystals nucleated on albumin-treated OTS-silica. Majority of the DCDP crystals formed on the other modified silica surfaces appeared to be morphologically similar irrespective of the nature of nucleating substrate. Reflectance interference contrast microscopy provided a proof that the majority of the crystals on these substrates do not develop an extended contact with the substrate surface. The images showed that the most extended contact planes were between the DCPD crystals and MTS modified silica surface. The crystals nucleated on OTS-treated and untreated silica surfaces showed only few or none well-developed contact planes.

  16. Dissolution kinetics of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate under pseudophysiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaki, Noriko; Onuma, Kazuo; Treboux, Gabin; Ito, Atsuo

    2002-02-01

    Dissolution kinetics of the (0 1 0) face of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and the transformation of DCPD to hydroxyapatite were observed using in situ atomic force microscopy. Step velocities for [2 0 1]- and [1 0 1]'-oriented steps were measured in pseudophysiological solutions. The latter step was inclined 5-7° toward [0 0 1] from [1 0 1] directions. The step kinetic coefficients calculated for the [2 0 1] and [1 0 1]' steps were, respectively, 0.70×10 -4 and 1.43×10 -4 m/s, values comparable to those for soluble inorganic crystals. The solubility product for DCPD accurately estimated from the relation between the step velocity and the undersaturation was (4.13±0.1)×10 -7, a value 1.6 times larger than that previously reported. It was shown that the precipitation of hydroxyapatite occurred after the dissolution of DCPD, and no evidence of direct structural transformation from DCPD to hydroxyapatite was observed. This indicates that DCPD acts as a simple heterogeneous growth center for hydroxyapatite without requiring any structural resemblance.

  17. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate, USP material compatibility with gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Quiles, Maritza

    Gamma radiation is a commonly used method to reduce the microbial bioburden in compatible materials when it is applied at appropriate dose levels. Gamma irradiation kills bacteria and mold by breaking down the organism’s DNA and inhibiting cell division. The purpose of this study is to determine the radiation dosage to be used to treat Dibasic Calcium Phosphate Dihydrate, USP (DCPD) and to evaluate its physicochemical effects if any, on this material. This material will be submitted to various doses of gamma radiation that were selected based on literature review and existing regulations that demonstrate that this method is effective to reduce or eliminate microbial bioburden in natural source and synthetic materials. Analytical testing was conducted to the DCPD exposed material in order to demonstrate that gamma radiation does not alter the physicochemical properties and material still acceptable for use in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products. The results obtained through this study were satisfactory and demonstrated that the gamma irradiation dosages from 5 to 30 kGy can be applied to DCPD without altering its physicochemical properties. These are supported by the Assay test data evaluation of lots tested before and after gamma irradiation implementation that show no significant statistical difference between irradiated and non irradiated assay results. The results of this study represent an achievement for the industry since they provide as an alternative the use of Gamma irradiation technology to control the microbial growth in DCPD.

  18. The ANKH gene and familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Netter, Patrick; Bardin, Thomas; Bianchi, Arnaud; Richette, Pascal; Loeuille, Damien

    2004-09-01

    Familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition (CPPD) disease is a chronic condition in which CPPD microcrystals deposit in the joint fluid, cartilage, and periarticular tissues. Two forms of familial CPPD disease have been identified: CCAL1 and CCAL2. The CCAL1 locus is located on the long arm of chromosome 8 and is associated with CPPD and severe osteoarthritis. The CCAL2 locus has been mapped to the short arm of chromosome 5 and identified in families from the Alsace region of France and the United Kingdom. The ANKH protein is involved in pyrophosphate metabolism and, more specifically, in pyrophosphate transport from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Numerous ANKH gene mutations cause familial CCAL2; they enhance ANKH protein activity, thereby elevating extracellular pyrophosphate levels and promoting the formation of pyrophosphate crystals, which produce the manifestations of the disease. Recent studies show that growth factors and cytokines can modify the expression of the normal ANKH protein. These results suggest a role for ANKH in sporadic CPPD disease and in CPPD associated with degenerative disease.

  19. 7 CFR 614.15 - Implementation of final NAD determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Implementation of final NAD determinations. 614.15 Section 614.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... Implementation of final NAD determinations. (a) No later than 30 days after a NAD determination becomes a...

  20. 7 CFR 614.15 - Implementation of final NAD determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Implementation of final NAD determinations. 614.15 Section 614.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... Implementation of final NAD determinations. (a) No later than 30 days after a NAD determination becomes a...

  1. Lupin nad9 and nad6 genes and their expression: 5' termini of the nad9 gene transcripts differentiate lupin species.

    PubMed

    Rurek, Michał; Nuc, Katarzyna; Raczyńska, Katarzyna Dorota; Augustyniak, Halina

    2003-10-02

    The mitochondrial nad9 and nad6 genes were analyzed in four lupin species: Lupinus luteus, Lupinus angustifolius, Lupinus albus and Lupinus mutabilis. The nucleotide sequence of these genes confirmed their high conservation, however, higher number of nucleotide substitution was observed in the L. albus genes. Southern hybridizations confirmed the presence of single copy number of these genes in L. luteus, L. albus and L. angustifolius. The expression of nad9 and nad6 genes was analyzed by Northern in different tissue types of analyzed lupin species. Transcription analyses of the two nad genes displayed single predominant mRNA species of about 0.6 kb in L. luteus and L. angustifolius. The L. albus transcripts were larger in size. The nad9 and nad6 transcripts were modified by RNA editing at 8 and 11 positions, in L. luteus and L. angustifolius, respectively. The gene order, rps3-rpl16-nad9, found in Arabidopsis thaliana is also conserved in L. luteus and L. angustifolius mitochondria. L. luteus and L. angustifolius showed some variability in the sequence of the nad9 promoter region. The last feature along with the differences observed in nad9 mRNA 5' termini of two lupins differentiate L. luteus and L. angustifolius species.

  2. NAD captureSeq indicates NAD as a bacterial cap for a subset of regulatory RNAs.

    PubMed

    Cahová, Hana; Winz, Marie-Luise; Höfer, Katharina; Nübel, Gabriele; Jäschke, Andres

    2015-03-19

    A distinctive feature of prokaryotic gene expression is the absence of 5'-capped RNA. In eukaryotes, 5',5'-triphosphate-linked 7-methylguanosine protects messenger RNA from degradation and modulates maturation, localization and translation. Recently, the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) was reported as a covalent modification of bacterial RNA. Given the central role of NAD in redox biochemistry, posttranslational protein modification and signalling, its attachment to RNA indicates that there are unknown functions of RNA in these processes and undiscovered pathways in RNA metabolism and regulation. The unknown identity of NAD-modified RNAs has so far precluded functional analyses. Here we identify NAD-linked RNAs from bacteria by chemo-enzymatic capture and next-generation sequencing (NAD captureSeq). Among those identified, specific regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) and sRNA-like 5'-terminal fragments of certain mRNAs are particularly abundant. Analogous to a eukaryotic cap, 5'-NAD modification is shown in vitro to stabilize RNA against 5'-processing by the RNA-pyrophosphohydrolase RppH and against endonucleolytic cleavage by ribonuclease (RNase) E. The nudix phosphohydrolase NudC decaps NAD-RNA and thereby triggers RNase-E-mediated RNA decay, while being inactive against triphosphate-RNA. In vivo, ∼13% of the abundant sRNA RNAI is NAD-capped in the presence, and ∼26% in the absence, of functional NudC. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a cap-like structure and a decapping machinery in bacteria.

  3. Plant Defensins NaD1 and NaD2 Induce Different Stress Response Pathways in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Dracatos, Peter M.; Payne, Jennifer; Di Pietro, Antonio; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Plummer, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana alata defensins 1 and 2 (NaD1 and NaD2) are plant defensins from the ornamental tobacco that have antifungal activity against a variety of fungal pathogens. Some plant defensins interact with fungal cell wall O-glycosylated proteins. Therefore, we investigated if this was the case for NaD1 and NaD2, by assessing the sensitivity of the three Aspergillus nidulans (An) O-mannosyltransferase (pmt) knockout (KO) mutants (An∆pmtA, An∆pmtB, and An∆pmtC). An∆pmtA was resistant to both defensins, while An∆pmtC was resistant to NaD2 only, suggesting NaD1 and NaD2 are unlikely to have a general interaction with O-linked side chains. Further evidence of this difference in the antifungal mechanism was provided by the dissimilarity of the NaD1 and NaD2 sensitivities of the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) signalling knockout mutants from the cell wall integrity (CWI) and high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. HOG pathway mutants were sensitive to both NaD1 and NaD2, while CWI pathway mutants only displayed sensitivity to NaD2. PMID:27598152

  4. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  5. Unique ligation properties of eukaryotic NAD+-dependent DNA ligase from Melanoplus sanguinipes entomopoxvirus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Tong, Jie; Feng, Hong; Huang, Jianmin; Afonso, Claudio L; Rock, Dan L; Barany, Francis; Cao, Weiguo

    2004-09-01

    The eukaryotic Melanoplus sanguinipes entomopoxvirus (MsEPV) genome reveals a homologous sequence to eubacterial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent DNA ligases [J. Virol. 73 (1999) 533]. This 522-amino acid open reading frame (ORF) contains all conserved nucleotidyl transferase motifs but lacks the zinc finger motif and BRCT domain found in conventional eubacterial NAD(+) ligases. Nevertheless, cloned MsEPV ligase seals DNA nicks in a NAD(+)-dependent fashion, while adenosine 5'-monophosphate (ATP) cannot serve as an adenylation cofactor. The ligation activity of MsEPV ligase requires Mg(2+) or Mn(2+). MsEPV ligase seals sticky ends efficiently, but has little activity on 1-nucleotide gap or blunt-ended DNA substrates even in the presence of polyethylene glycol. In comparison, bacterial NAD(+)-dependent ligases seal blunt-ended DNA substrates in the presence of polyethylene glycol. MsEPV DNA ligase readily joins DNA nicks with mismatches at either side of the nick junction, except for mismatches at the nick junction containing an A base in the template strand (A/A, G/A, and C/A). MsEPV NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase can join DNA probes on RNA templates, a unique property that distinguishes this enzyme from other conventional bacterial NAD(+) DNA ligases. T4 ATP-dependent DNA ligase shows no detectable mismatch ligation at the 3' side of the nick but substantial 5' T/G mismatch ligation on an RNA template. In contrast, MsEPV ligase joins mismatches at the 3' side of the nick more frequently than at the 5' side of the nick on an RNA template. The complementary specificities of these two enzymes suggest alternative primer design for genomic profiling approaches that use allele-specific detection directly from RNA transcripts.

  6. Imaging of chondrocalcinosis: calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease -- imaging of common sites of involvement.

    PubMed

    Magarelli, N; Amelia, R; Melillo, N; Nasuto, M; Cantatore, F; Guglielmi, G

    2012-01-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease is characterised by the accumulation of pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals in articular and periarticular tissues and it can be classified as sporadic, hereditary or secondary. The diagnosis frequently rests on radiographic findings. Computed tomography scanning can detect well mineralised deposits in joints and also ultrasound may be useful in detecting CPPD crystal deposits. About MRI recent studies have demonstrated the utility of high field in depiction of CPPD crystal deposits. The aim of this review is to focus on the clinical-classificative and radiological aspects of CPPD, particularly the contribution of the different imaging techniques.

  7. Evidence for a Direct Effect of the NAD+ Precursor Acipimox on Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Humans

    PubMed Central

    van de Weijer, Tineke; Phielix, Esther; Bilet, Lena; Williams, Evan G.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Bierwagen, Alessandra; Livingstone, Roshan; Nowotny, Peter; Sparks, Lauren M.; Paglialunga, Sabina; Szendroedi, Julia; Havekes, Bas; Moullan, Norman; Pirinen, Eija; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B.; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Recent preclinical studies showed the potential of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) precursors to increase oxidative phosphorylation and improve metabolic health, but human data are lacking. We hypothesize that the nicotinic acid derivative acipimox, an NAD+ precursor, would directly affect mitochondrial function independent of reductions in nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. In a multicenter randomized crossover trial, 21 patients with type 2 diabetes (age 57.7 ± 1.1 years, BMI 33.4 ± 0.8 kg/m2) received either placebo or acipimox 250 mg three times daily dosage for 2 weeks. Acipimox treatment increased plasma NEFA levels (759 ± 44 vs. 1,135 ± 97 μmol/L for placebo vs. acipimox, P < 0.01) owing to a previously described rebound effect. As a result, skeletal muscle lipid content increased and insulin sensitivity decreased. Despite the elevated plasma NEFA levels, ex vivo mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle increased. Subsequently, we showed that acipimox treatment resulted in a robust elevation in expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene sets and a mitonuclear protein imbalance, which may indicate activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Further studies in C2C12 myotubes confirmed a direct effect of acipimox on NAD+ levels, mitonuclear protein imbalance, and mitochondrial oxidative capacity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that NAD+ boosters can also directly affect skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in humans. PMID:25352640

  8. CD73 protein as a source of extracellular precursors for sustained NAD+ biosynthesis in FK866-treated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Grozio, Alessia; Sociali, Giovanna; Sturla, Laura; Caffa, Irene; Soncini, Debora; Salis, Annalisa; Raffaelli, Nadia; De Flora, Antonio; Nencioni, Alessio; Bruzzone, Santina

    2013-09-06

    NAD(+) is mainly synthesized in human cells via the "salvage" pathways starting from nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, or nicotinamide riboside (NR). The inhibition with FK866 of the enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), catalyzing the first reaction in the "salvage" pathway from nicotinamide, showed potent antitumor activity in several preclinical models of solid and hematologic cancers. In the clinical studies performed with FK866, however, no tumor remission was observed. Here we demonstrate that low micromolar concentrations of extracellular NAD(+) or NAD(+) precursors, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and NR, can reverse the FK866-induced cell death, this representing a plausible explanation for the failure of NAMPT inhibition as an anti-cancer therapy. NMN is a substrate of both ectoenzymes CD38 and CD73, with generation of NAM and NR, respectively. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD38 and CD73 in providing ectocellular NAD(+) precursors for NAD(+) biosynthesis and in modulating cell susceptibility to FK866. By specifically silencing or overexpressing CD38 and CD73, we demonstrated that endogenous CD73 enables, whereas CD38 impairs, the conversion of extracellular NMN to NR as a precursor for intracellular NAD(+) biosynthesis in human cells. Moreover, cell viability in FK866-treated cells supplemented with extracellular NMN was strongly reduced in tumor cells, upon pharmacological inhibition or specific down-regulation of CD73. Thus, our study suggests that genetic or pharmacologic interventions interfering with CD73 activity may prove useful to increase cancer cell sensitivity to NAMPT inhibitors.

  9. Physiology-based kinetic modeling of neuronal energy metabolism unravels the molecular basis of NAD(P)H fluorescence transients

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Kann, Oliver; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of the cellular fluorescence of the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) is one of the few metabolic readouts that enable noninvasive and time-resolved monitoring of the functional status of mitochondria in neuronal tissues. Stimulation-induced transient changes in NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity frequently display a biphasic characteristic that is influenced by various molecular processes, e.g., intracellular calcium dynamics, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, the malate–aspartate shuttle, the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle, oxygen supply or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) demand. To evaluate the relative impact of these processes, we developed and validated a detailed physiologic mathematical model of the energy metabolism of neuronal cells and used the model to simulate metabolic changes of single cells and tissue slices under different settings of stimulus-induced activity and varying nutritional supply of glucose, pyruvate or lactate. Notably, all experimentally determined NAD(P)H responses could be reproduced with one and the same generic cellular model. Our computations reveal that (1) cells with quite different metabolic status may generate almost identical NAD(P)H responses and (2) cells of the same type may quite differently contribute to aggregate NAD(P)H responses recorded in brain slices, depending on the spatial location within the tissue. Our computational approach reconciles different and sometimes even controversial experimental findings and improves our mechanistic understanding of the metabolic changes underlying live-cell NAD(P)H fluorescence transients. PMID:25899300

  10. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  11. Exploring NAD+ metabolism in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Inês; Varela, Patrícia; Belinha, Ana; Gaifem, Joana; Laforge, Mireille; Vergnes, Baptiste; Estaquier, Jérôme; Silvestre, Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a vital molecule found in all living cells. NAD(+) intracellular levels are dictated by its synthesis, using the de novo and/or salvage pathway, and through its catabolic use as co-enzyme or co-substrate. The regulation of NAD(+) metabolism has proven to be an adequate drug target for several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative or inflammatory diseases. Increasing interest has been given to NAD(+) metabolism during innate and adaptive immune responses suggesting that its modulation could also be relevant during host-pathogen interactions. While the maintenance of NAD(+) homeostatic levels assures an adequate environment for host cell survival and proliferation, fluctuations in NAD(+) or biosynthetic precursors bioavailability have been described during host-pathogen interactions, which will interfere with pathogen persistence or clearance. Here, we review the double-edged sword of NAD(+) metabolism during host-pathogen interactions emphasizing its potential for treatment of infectious diseases.

  12. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD(+) and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools.

  13. Solubility of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate by solid titration.

    PubMed

    Pan, H-B; Darvell, B W

    2009-01-01

    Solid-titration results for hydroxyapatite (HAp), octacalcium phosphate, beta-tricalcium phosphate and tetracalcium phosphate have shown that the only stable phase in 100 mmol x l(-1) KCl at 37 degrees C is HAp. In particular, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) did not form at pH <4.2 (where it is otherwise believed to be stable) except as a metastable phase under conditions of slight supersaturation. The behaviour of DCPD itself under the same conditions requires checking. Solid titration was used to determine the apparent solubility of DCPD in a 100-mmol x l(-1) KCl solution at 37.0 +/- 0.1 degrees C over the pH range 3.2-11.6. The constitution of the precipitate was determined by X-ray diffraction, particle morphology was observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and the precipitate Ca/P ratio was calculated by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The titration curve for DCPD was substantially lower than the position reported elsewhere. DCPD was the only identified phase at equilibrium at pH 3.60 and 4.50, but HAp was formed after seeding with 1 mg HAp at DCPD equilibrium at pH 4.47, 3.60 and 3.30. It is concluded that the titration curve observed for DCPD corresponds to the solubility isotherm for the phase, but that this represents a metastable equilibrium. HAp is more stable than DCPD, particularly below pH 4.2. The implications for calcium phosphate studies are profound as the reverse is generally believed to be true. Thus, solubility results and the nature of the carious lesion need reconsideration.

  14. Calcium sulfate dihydrate urolithiasis in a pet rabbit.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Jaroslav; Koristkova, Tamara; Gottwaldova, Barbora; Jekl, Vladimir

    2017-03-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 3-year-old sexually intact male rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) was evaluated because of a 1-day history of signs of anorexia and depression. CLINICAL FINDINGS Clinical examination revealed signs of depression, hunched posture, low skin elasticity (suggesting dehydration), slightly distended abdomen, and penile and preputial edema. The owner reported that the rabbit had been fed a routine diet, received water via a sipper bottle, and was allowed free movement around the home. It had been observed by the owner to bite and chew gypsum-based plaster from the walls of the home. Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography revealed radiopaque material in the urinary bladder, irregular thickening of the urinary bladder wall, and gaseous distention of the cecum. Urinalysis revealed mild hematuria and proteinuria. Results of the physical examination and other diagnostic tests were consistent with urolithiasis, cystitis, and gastrointestinal stasis. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME At clinical examination, numerous small uroliths originating from the urethral orifice were removed and submitted for composition analysis via infrared and Raman spectrometry and polarized microscopy. Laparotomy-assisted flushing of the urinary bladder and urethra was performed, and the rabbit recovered without complication. Results of composition analysis indicated the uroliths were composed of calcium sulfate dihydrate. CLINICAL RELEVANCE This is the first report of calcium sulfate urolithiasis in a rabbit, which was attributed to dehydration (possibly due to inadequate water provision) and excessive dietary intake of sulfur in the form of gypsum-based plaster. Rabbits should be prevented from consuming plaster and other potential extradietary sources of sulfur and provided an appropriate water supply.

  15. A Novel Type II NAD+-Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from the Marine Bacterium Congregibacter litoralis KT71.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Cai; Tian, Chang-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Xu, Lei; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In most living organisms, isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) convert isocitrate into ɑ-ketoglutarate (ɑ-KG). Phylogenetic analyses divide the IDH protein family into two subgroups: types I and II. Based on cofactor usage, IDHs are either NAD+-specific (NAD-IDH) or NADP+-specific (NADP-IDH); NADP-IDH evolved from NAD-IDH. Type I IDHs include NAD-IDHs and NADP-IDHs; however, no type II NAD-IDHs have been reported to date. This study reports a novel type II NAD-IDH from the marine bacterium Congregibacter litoralis KT71 (ClIDH, GenBank accession no. EAQ96042). His-tagged recombinant ClIDH was produced in Escherichia coli and purified; the recombinant enzyme was NAD+-specific and showed no detectable activity with NADP+. The Km values of the enzyme for NAD+ were 262.6±7.4 μM or 309.1±11.2 μM with Mg2+ or Mn2+ as the divalent cation, respectively. The coenzyme specificity of a ClIDH Asp487Arg/Leu488His mutant was altered, and the preference of the mutant for NADP+ was approximately 24-fold higher than that for NAD+, suggesting that ClIDH is an NAD+-specific ancestral enzyme in the type II IDH subgroup. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation analyses revealed the homohexameric structure of ClIDH, which is the first IDH hexamer discovered thus far. A 163-amino acid segment of CIIDH is essential to maintain its polymerization structure and activity, as a truncated version lacking this region forms a non-functional monomer. ClIDH was dependent on divalent cations, the most effective being Mn2+. The maximal activity of purified recombinant ClIDH was achieved at 35°C and pH 7.5, and a heat inactivation experiment showed that a 20-min incubation at 33°C caused a 50% loss of ClIDH activity. The discovery of a NAD+-specific, type II IDH fills a gap in the current classification of IDHs, and sheds light on the evolution of type II IDHs.

  16. NADS - Nuclear and Atomic Data System

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, Michael S.; Beck, Bret; McNabb, Dennis

    2005-05-24

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations of the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V, and ENDF/B-VI, as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/.

  17. NADS - Nuclear And Atomic Data System

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Beck, B; McNabb, D

    2004-09-17

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross-sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/

  18. Purification of NAD(+) glycohydrolase from human serum.

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Ozlem; Nurten, Rüstem

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, NAD(+) glycohydrolase was purified from serum samples collected from healthy individuals using ammonium sulfate fractionation, Affi-Gel blue (Cibacron Blue F3GA) affinity chromatography, Sephadex G-100 column chromatography and isoelectric focusing. The final step was followed by a second Sephadex G-100 column chromatography assay in order to remove the ampholytes from the isoelectric focusing step. In terms of enhancement of specific activity, the NAD(+) glycohydrolase protein was purified ∼480-fold, with a yield of 1% compared with the initial serum fraction. The purified fraction appeared to be homogeneous, with a molecular weight of 39 kDa, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis, and also corresponded to the soluble (monomeric) form of surface antigen CD38.

  19. Toward productive aging: SIRT1, systemic NAD biosynthesis, and the NAD world.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2010-11-01

    In our current society, achieving "productive aging," which aims to keep people as productive as possible with good health and spirit for their private and social activities as they grow older, will be important to maximize the duration of high quality of life and to promote a stable economy and solvent social security in healthcare systems. To achieve this goal, we have been studying mechanisms of mammalian aging and longevity, focusing on the physiological importance of the mammalian nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)--dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 and systemic NAD biosynthesis mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase for the regulation of metabolism and aging. Through these studies, we have recently proposed a comprehensive concept of a novel systemic regulatory network for metabolism and aging, named "NAD World." This new concept of NAD World also conveys ideas of functional hierarchy and frailty for the induction of aging in mammals. Details of the NAD World and its implications to age-associated metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes will be discussed.

  20. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition of multiple lumbar facet joints: a case report.

    PubMed

    Namazie, Mohamed Ridzwan bin Mohamed; Fosbender, Murray R

    2012-08-01

    Pseudogout of the lumbar facet joints is rare. We report on a 69-year-old woman with 2-level symptomatic synovial cysts of the facet joints caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition. She underwent surgical decompression for sciatica and low back pain. At one-year follow-up, she had recovered completely.

  1. A fluorescence-based coupling reaction for monitoring the activity of recombinant human NAD synthetase.

    PubMed

    Bembenek, Michael E; Kuhn, Eric; Mallender, William D; Pullen, Lester; Li, Ping; Parsons, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    NAD synthetase is responsible for the conversion of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. This reaction provides a biosynthetic route of the coenzyme and, thus, a source of cellular reducing equivalents. Alterations in the oxidative reductive potential of the cell have been implicated as a contributing factor in many disease states. Thus, this enzyme represents a new class of potential drug targets, and, hence, our efforts were focused upon developing a robust assay for utilization in a high throughput screen. Toward that end, we describe a coupled enzyme assay format for the measurement of recombinant human NAD synthetase by employing lactate dehydrogenase in a cycling/amplification reaction linked ultimately to the fluorescence generation of resorufin from resazurin via diaphorase. We present kinetics of the reaction of NAD synthetase in the coupled assay format, optimization conditions, and inhibition of the reaction by gossypol [1,1',6,6',7,7'-hexahydroxy-3,3'-dimethyl-5,5'-bis(1-methylethyl)-[2,2'- binaphthalene]-8,8'-dicarboxaldehyde] and illustrate the robustness of the assay by demonstrating 384-well microtiter plate uniformity statistics. Collectively, our results show that the assay method is both robust and well suited for this class of enzymes involved in the NAD+ biosynthetic pathway.

  2. NAD(P)H regeneration is the key for heterolactic fermentation of hexoses in Oenococcus oeni.

    PubMed

    Maicas, Sergi; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel

    2002-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni (formerly Leuconostoc oenos) can perform malolactic fermentation, converting L-malate to L-lactate and carbon dioxide, in wines. The energy and redox potential required to support the growth of the micro-organism are supplied mainly by the consumption of carbohydrates via the heterolactic pathway. In the first steps of hexose metabolism two molecules of NAD(P)(+) are consumed, which must be regenerated in later reactions. The aim of this work was to test if aerobic growth of O. oeni promotes higher cell yields than anaerobic conditions, as has been shown for other lactic acid bacteria. O. oeni M42 was found to grow poorly under aerobic conditions with glucose as the only carbohydrate in the medium. It was demonstrated that O(2) inactivates the enzymes of the ethanol-forming pathway, one of the two pathways which reoxidizes NAD(P)(+) cofactors in the heterolactic catabolism of glucose. These results suggest that the regeneration of cofactors is the limiting factor for the aerobic consumption of glucose. When external electron acceptors, such as fructose or pyruvate, were added to glucose-containing culture medium the growth of O. oeni was stimulated slightly; fructose was converted to mannitol, oxidizing two molecules of NAD(P)H, and pyruvate was transformed to lactate, enabling the regeneration of NAD(+). The addition of cysteine seemed to suppress the inactivation of the ethanol-forming pathway enzymes by O(2), enabling glucose consumption in aerobic conditions to reach similar rates to those found in anaerobic conditions.

  3. Gene transfers shaped the evolution of de novo NAD+ biosynthesis in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ternes, Chad M; Schönknecht, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    NAD(+) is an essential molecule for life, present in each living cell. It can function as an electron carrier or cofactor in redox biochemistry and energetics, and serves as substrate to generate the secondary messenger cyclic ADP ribose and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Although de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis is essential, different metabolic pathways exist in different eukaryotic clades. The kynurenine pathway starting with tryptophan was most likely present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes, and is active in fungi and animals. The aspartate pathway, detected in most photosynthetic eukaryotes, was probably acquired from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that gave rise to chloroplasts. An evolutionary analysis of enzymes catalyzing de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis resulted in evolutionary trees incongruent with established organismal phylogeny, indicating numerous gene transfers. Endosymbiotic gene transfers probably introduced the aspartate pathway into eukaryotes and may have distributed it among different photosynthetic clades. In addition, several horizontal gene transfers substituted eukaryotic genes with bacterial orthologs. Although horizontal gene transfer is accepted as a key mechanism in prokaryotic evolution, it is supposed to be rare in eukaryotic evolution. The essential metabolic pathway of de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis in eukaryotes was shaped by numerous gene transfers.

  4. Regulation of NAD biosynthetic enzymes modulates NAD-sensing processes to shape mammalian cell physiology under varying biological cues.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Silverio; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2015-09-01

    In addition to its role as a redox coenzyme, NAD is a substrate of various enzymes that split the molecule to either catalyze covalent modifications of target proteins or convert NAD into biologically active metabolites. The coenzyme bioavailability may be significantly affected by these reactions, with ensuing major impact on energy metabolism, cell survival, and aging. Moreover, through the activity of the NAD-dependent deacetylating sirtuins, NAD behaves as a beacon molecule that reports the cell metabolic state, and accordingly modulates transcriptional responses and metabolic adaptations. In this view, NAD biosynthesis emerges as a highly regulated process: it enables cells to preserve NAD homeostasis in response to significant NAD-consuming events and it can be modulated by various stimuli to induce, via NAD level changes, suitable NAD-mediated metabolic responses. Here we review the current knowledge on the regulation of mammalian NAD biosynthesis, with focus on the relevant rate-limiting enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications.

  5. Surrogate analyte approach for quantitation of endogenous NAD(+) in human acidified blood samples using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liling; Cui, Zhiyi; Deng, Yuzhong; Dean, Brian; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Liang, Xiaorong

    2016-02-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for the quantitative determination of NAD(+) in human whole blood using a surrogate analyte approach was developed and validated. Human whole blood was acidified using 0.5N perchloric acid at a ratio of 1:3 (v:v, blood:perchloric acid) during sample collection. 25μL of acidified blood was extracted using a protein precipitation method and the resulting extracts were analyzed using reverse-phase chromatography and positive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. (13)C5-NAD(+) was used as the surrogate analyte for authentic analyte, NAD(+). The standard curve ranging from 0.250 to 25.0μg/mL in acidified human blood for (13)C5-NAD(+) was fitted to a 1/x(2) weighted linear regression model. The LC-MS/MS response between surrogate analyte and authentic analyte at the same concentration was obtained before and after the batch run. This response factor was not applied when determining the NAD(+) concentration from the (13)C5-NAD(+) standard curve since the percent difference was less than 5%. The precision and accuracy of the LC-MS/MS assay based on the five analytical QC levels were well within the acceptance criteria from both FDA and EMA guidance for bioanalytical method validation. Average extraction recovery of (13)C5-NAD(+) was 94.6% across the curve range. Matrix factor was 0.99 for both high and low QC indicating minimal ion suppression or enhancement. The validated assay was used to measure the baseline level of NAD(+) in 29 male and 21 female human subjects. This assay was also used to study the circadian effect of endogenous level of NAD(+) in 10 human subjects.

  6. Identification of NAD+ capped mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robert W.; Matheny, Tyler; Mizoue, Laura S.; Rao, Bhalchandra S.; Muhlrad, Denise; Parker, Roy

    2017-01-01

    RNAs besides tRNA and rRNA contain chemical modifications, including the recently described 5′ nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) RNA in bacteria. Whether 5′ NAD-RNA exists in eukaryotes remains unknown. We demonstrate that 5′ NAD-RNA is found on subsets of nuclear and mitochondrial encoded mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. NAD-mRNA appears to be produced cotranscriptionally because NAD-RNA is also found on pre-mRNAs, and only on mitochondrial transcripts that are not 5′ end processed. These results define an additional 5′ RNA cap structure in eukaryotes and raise the possibility that this 5′ NAD+ cap could modulate RNA stability and translation on specific subclasses of mRNAs. PMID:28031484

  7. Extreme Vulnerability of IDH1 Mutant Cancers to NAD+ Depletion.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Kensuke; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Iafrate, A John; Tanaka, Shota; Loebel, Franziska; Lelic, Nina; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Bedel, Olivier; Deng, Gejing; Zhang, Bailin; He, Timothy; Shi, Xu; Gerszten, Robert E; Zhang, Yiyun; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J; Curry, William T; Zhao, Dan; Sundaram, Sudhandra; Nigim, Fares; Koerner, Mara V A; Ho, Quan; Fisher, David E; Roider, Elisabeth M; Kemeny, Lajos V; Samuels, Yardena; Flaherty, Keith T; Batchelor, Tracy T; Chi, Andrew S; Cahill, Daniel P

    2015-12-14

    Heterozygous mutation of IDH1 in cancers modifies IDH1 enzymatic activity, reprogramming metabolite flux and markedly elevating 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we found that 2-HG depletion did not inhibit growth of several IDH1 mutant solid cancer types. To identify other metabolic therapeutic targets, we systematically profiled metabolites in endogenous IDH1 mutant cancer cells after mutant IDH1 inhibition and discovered a profound vulnerability to depletion of the coenzyme NAD+. Mutant IDH1 lowered NAD+ levels by downregulating the NAD+ salvage pathway enzyme nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (Naprt1), sensitizing to NAD+ depletion via concomitant nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibition. NAD+ depletion activated the intracellular energy sensor AMPK, triggered autophagy, and resulted in cytotoxicity. Thus, we identify NAD+ depletion as a metabolic susceptibility of IDH1 mutant cancers.

  8. Mechanism of sirtuin inhibition by nicotinamide: altering the NAD(+) cosubstrate specificity of a Sir2 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Avalos, José L; Bever, Katherine M; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2005-03-18

    Sir2 enzymes form a unique class of NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases required for diverse biological processes, including transcriptional silencing, regulation of apoptosis, fat mobilization, and lifespan regulation. Sir2 activity is regulated by nicotinamide, a noncompetitive inhibitor that promotes a base-exchange reaction at the expense of deacetylation. To elucidate the mechanism of nicotinamide inhibition, we determined ternary complex structures of Sir2 enzymes containing nicotinamide. The structures show that free nicotinamide binds in a conserved pocket that participates in NAD(+) binding and catalysis. Based on our structures, we engineered a mutant that deacetylates peptides by using nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NAAD) as a cosubstrate and is inhibited by nicotinic acid. The characteristics of the altered specificity enzyme establish that Sir2 enzymes contain a single site that participates in catalysis and nicotinamide regulation and provides additional insights into the Sir2 catalytic mechanism.

  9. Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    efficacy of veliparib and NAD as agents for suppressing inflammation and improving outcomes after traumatic brain injury. The animal models include...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0091 TITLE: Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...COVERED 25 Sep 2014 - 24 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI 5b. GRANT

  10. NAD+ maintenance attenuates light induced photoreceptor degeneration Δ

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shi; Sheline, Christian T.

    2013-01-01

    Light-induced retinal damage (LD) occurs after surgery or sun exposure. We previously showed that zinc (Zn2+) accumulated in photoreceptors and RPE cells after LD but prior to cell death, and pyruvate or nicotinamide attenuated the resultant death perhaps by restoring nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) levels. We first examined the levels of NAD+ and the efficacy of pyruvate or nicotinamide in oxidative toxicities using primary retinal cultures. We next manipulated NAD+ levels in vivo and tested the affect on LD to photoreceptors and RPE. NAD+ levels cycle with a 24-h rhythm in mammals, which is affected by the feeding schedule. Therefore, we tested the affect of increasing NAD+ levels on LD by giving nicotinamide, inverting the feeding schedule, or using transgenic mice which overexpress cytoplasmic nicotinamide mononucleotide adenyl-transferase-1 (cytNMNAT1), an NAD+ synthetic enzyme. Zn2+ accumulation was also assessed in culture and in retinal sections. Retinas of light damaged animals were examined by OCT and plastic sectioning, and retinal NAD levels were measured. Day fed, or nicotinamide treated rats showed less NAD+ loss, and LD compared to night fed rats or untreated rats without changing the Zn2+ staining pattern. CytNMNAT1 showed less Zn2+ staining, NAD+ loss, and cell death after LD. In conclusion, intense light, Zn2+ and oxidative toxicities caused an increase in Zn2+, NAD+ loss, and cell death which were attenuated by NAD+ restoration. Therefore, NAD+ levels play a protective role in LD-induced death of photoreceptors and RPE cells. PMID:23274583

  11. Functional roles of ATP-binding residues in the catalytic site of human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hui-Chih; Chien, Yu-Ching; Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Chang, Gu-Gang; Liu, Guang-Yaw

    2005-09-27

    Human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme is inhibited by ATP. The X-ray crystal structures have revealed that two ATP molecules occupy both the active and exo site of the enzyme, suggesting that ATP might act as an allosteric inhibitor of the enzyme. However, mutagenesis studies and kinetic evidences indicated that the catalytic activity of the enzyme is inhibited by ATP through a competitive inhibition mechanism in the active site and not in the exo site. Three amino acid residues, Arg165, Asn259, and Glu314, which are hydrogen-bonded with NAD+ or ATP, are chosen to characterize their possible roles on the inhibitory effect of ATP for the enzyme. Our kinetic data clearly demonstrate that Arg165 is essential for catalysis. The R165A enzyme had very low enzyme activity, and it was only slightly inhibited by ATP and not activated by fumarate. The values of K(m,NAD) and K(i,ATP) to both NAD+ and malate were elevated. Elimination of the guanidino side chain of R165 made the enzyme defective on the binding of NAD+ and ATP, and it caused the charge imbalance in the active site. These effects possibly caused the enzyme to malfunction on its catalytic power. The N259A enzyme was less inhibited by ATP but could be fully activated by fumarate at a similar extent compared with the wild-type enzyme. For the N259A enzyme, the value of K(i,ATP) to NAD+ but not to malate was elevated, indicating that the hydrogen bonding between ATP and the amide side chain of this residue is important for the binding stability of ATP. Removal of this side chain did not cause any harmful effect on the fumarate-induced activation of the enzyme. The E314A enzyme, however, was severely inhibited by ATP and only slightly activated by fumarate. The values of K(m,malate), K(m,NAD), and K(i,ATP) to both NAD+ and malate for E314A were reduced to about 2-7-folds compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. It can be concluded that mutation of Glu314 to Ala eliminated the repulsive effects

  12. NAD(+) biosynthesis and salvage--a phylogenetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Gossmann, Toni I; Ziegler, Mathias; Puntervoll, Pål; de Figueiredo, Luis F; Schuster, Stefan; Heiland, Ines

    2012-09-01

    NAD is best known as an electron carrier and a cosubstrate of various redox reactions. However, over the past 20 years, NAD(+) has been shown to be a key signaling molecule that mediates post-translational protein modifications and serves as precursor of ADP-ribose-containing messenger molecules, which are involved in calcium mobilization. In contrast to its role as a redox carrier, NAD(+)-dependent signaling processes involve the release of nicotinamide (Nam) and require constant replenishment of cellular NAD(+) pools. So far, very little is known about the evolution of NAD(P) synthesis in eukaryotes. In the present study, genes involved in NAD(P) metabolism in 45 species were identified and analyzed with regard to similarities and differences in NAD(P) synthesis. The results show that the Preiss-Handler pathway and NAD(+) kinase are present in all organisms investigated, and thus seem to be ancestral routes. Additionally, two pathways exist that convert Nam to NAD(+); we identified several species that have apparently functional copies of both biosynthetic routes, which have been thought to be mutually exclusive. Furthermore, our findings suggest the parallel phylogenetic appearance of Nam N-methyltransferase, Nam phosphoribosyl transferase, and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases.

  13. Critical role for NAD glycohydrolase in regulation of erythropoiesis by hematopoietic stem cells through control of intracellular NAD content.

    PubMed

    Nam, Tae-Sik; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Kim, Byung-Ju; Han, Myung-Kwan; Kim, Youngho; Moss, Joel; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2014-06-06

    NAD glycohydrolases (NADases) catalyze the hydrolysis of NAD to ADP-ribose and nicotinamide. Although many members of the NADase family, including ADP-ribosyltransferases, have been cloned and characterized, the structure and function of NADases with pure hydrolytic activity remain to be elucidated. Here, we report the structural and functional characterization of a novel NADase from rabbit reticulocytes. The novel NADase is a glycosylated, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface protein exclusively expressed in reticulocytes. shRNA-mediated knockdown of the NADase in bone marrow cells resulted in a reduction of erythroid colony formation and an increase in NAD level. Furthermore, treatment of bone marrow cells with NAD, nicotinamide, or nicotinamide riboside, which induce an increase in NAD content, resulted in a significant decrease in erythroid progenitors. These results indicate that the novel NADase may play a critical role in regulating erythropoiesis of hematopoietic stem cells by modulating intracellular NAD.

  14. Fabrication of interconnected porous calcite by bridging calcite granules with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and their histological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kunio; Koga, Noriko; Tsuru, Kanji; Takahashi, Ichiro

    2015-10-28

    Interconnected porous calcite has attracted attention as an artificial bone replacement material and as a precursor for the fabrication of carbonate apatite, which is also an artificial bone replacement material. In this study, calcite granules were exposed to acidic calcium phosphate solution, and the feasibility of fabricating interconnected porous calcite using this process was evaluated. No setting reaction was observed under the non-loading condition. In contrast, under loading conditions, calcite granules were bridged with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate crystals, and the calcite granules set into interconnected porous calcite foam. When applied 0.4 MPa of loading pressure during sample preparation, compressive strength of the obtained interconnected porous calcite was approximately 1.5 MPa. The exposure of the calcite granules to acidic calcium phosphate solution under loading conditions was the key for the setting reaction to occur. This is because calcite granules cannot contact one another under the non-loading condition because of bubble formation on the surfaces of the calcite granules. The interconnected porous calcite revealed excellent tissue response, and new bone was able to penetrate into the porous calcite two weeks after implantation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Screening and in situ synthesis using crystals of a NAD kinase lead to a potent antistaphylococcal compound.

    PubMed

    Gelin, Muriel; Poncet-Montange, Guillaume; Assairi, Liliane; Morellato, Laurence; Huteau, Valérie; Dugué, Laurence; Dussurget, Olivier; Pochet, Sylvie; Labesse, Gilles

    2012-06-06

    Making new ligands for a given protein by in situ ligation of building blocks (or fragments) is an attractive method. However, it suffers from inherent limitations, such as the limited number of available chemical reactions and the low information content of usual chemical library deconvolution. Here, we describe a focused screening of adenosine derivatives using X-ray crystallography. We discovered an unexpected and biocompatible chemical reactivity and have simultaneously identified the mode of binding of the resulting products. We observed that the NAD kinase from Listeria monocytogenes (LmNADK1) can promote amide formation between 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine and carboxylic acid groups. This unexpected reactivity allowed us to bridge in situ two adenosine derivatives to fully occupy the active NAD site. This guided the design of a close analog showing micromolar inhibition of two human pathogenic NAD kinases and potent bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus in vitro.

  16. Agents for replacement of NAD+/NADH system in enzymatic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.; Kerr, John B.; Lo, Christine H.

    2004-04-06

    Novel agents acting as co-factors for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H co-enzyme systems in enzymatic oxido-reductive reactions. Agents mimicking the action of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system in enzymatic oxidation/reduction of substrates into reduced or oxidized products. A method for selection and preparation of the mimicking agents for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system and a device comprising co-factors for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system.

  17. The crystallization of hydroxyapatite and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate; representation of growth curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohl, H.; Koutsoukos, P. G.; Nancollas, G. H.

    1982-04-01

    The kinetics of growth of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate seed crystals has been investigated by a method in which the activities of the lattice ions were maintained constant during the reaction. The constant composition procedure has also been used to study the crystallization of hydroxyapatite at very low supersaturation. Changes in specific area during the resulting appreciable extents of growth have been used to predict the developing morphologies of the crystals. For dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and hydroxyapatite, the predominant crystal growth takes place in two dimensions and one dimension, respectively. In both cases the growth rates are pH dependent. Dimensionless representation of the crystallization rates and driving forces enable comparisons to be made between data for electrolytes of different charge types.

  18. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD)/Pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint - FNA findings and microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Asghar H; Abraham, Jerrold L; Kellman, Robert M; Khurana, Kamal K

    2008-04-21

    We report a case of a Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) presenting as a mass in the parotid and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that simulated a parotid tumor. A 35 year-old man presented with pain in the left ear area. A CT Scan of the area showed a large, calcified mass surrounding the left condylar head, and extending into the infratemporal fossa. FNA of the mass showed birefringent crystals, most of which were rhomboid with occasional ones being needle shaped, embedded in an amorphous pink substance. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of these crystals showed peaks corresponding to calcium and phosphorus. SEM/EDS is a rapid method of diagnosing calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) and an alternative to more commonly used method of special staining of cell block sections coupled with polarizing microscopy.

  19. Crystal structure of strychninium chloride dihydrate: Hidden helix in the water/anion tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Białońska, Agata; Ciunik, Zbigniew

    2005-11-01

    The crystal structure of strychninium chloride dihydrate SH +Cl -·2H 2O was determined. The structure is composed of strychnine herring-bone bilayer sheets with channels occupied by the hydrogen bonded anion/water tape between them. Considering different amount of water molecules in isomorphous crystal of SH +Cl -·2H 2O and previously described crystal of strychninium chloride sesquihydrate, we found that water molecules and chloride anions form a left-handed helix. Similarly, anions and water molecules in the crystal of strychnine bromide dihydrate form a left-handed helix related by the two-fold screw axis symmetry. Contrary, in the crystals of strychninium chloride sesquihydrate and SH +Cl -·2H 2O, the helices are related by only translation vector and are stabilized by one or two water bridges, respectively.

  20. Nucleation and morphology of sodium metaborate dihydrate from NaOH solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shiyue; Zhang, Yifei; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Szaibelyite ore is an important boron mineral used for producing boron compounds. Sodium metaborate dihydrate can be prepared through leaching of the szaibelyite ore in NaOH solution and the leaching liquor mainly consists of NaBO2 and NaOH. In this work, the induction time for sodium metaborate dihydrate crystallized in NaOH solution from 30 to 50 °C was systematically investigated. The primary nucleation and growth mechanism were determined on the basis of the induction time measurements. The crystals of various morphologies under different crystallization conditions were obtained: the rod-like crystals preferred to form at low temperature, while the plate-like crystals formed at high temperature; when the crystallization temperature was 30 °C, the flat rod-like crystals formed at low supersaturation, while the slim rod-like crystals formed at high supersaturation. Finally, the growth mechanism of the sodium metaborate dihydrate was identified with various models and the 2D nucleation-mediated model gave satisfactory fitting results.

  1. Effects of structural analogues of the substrate and allosteric regulator of the human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Su, Kuo-Liang; Chang, Kuan-Yu; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2009-08-01

    Fumarate, a four-carbon trans dicarboxylic acid, is the allosteric activator of the human mitochondrial NAD(P)(+)-dependent malic enzyme (m-NAD(P)-ME). In this paper, we discuss the effects of the structural analogues of fumarate on human m-NAD(P)-ME. Succinate, a dicarboxylic acid with a carbon-carbon single bond, can also activate the enzyme, but the activating effect of succinate is less than that of fumarate. Succinamide, a diamide of succinate, cannot activate the enzyme and is a poor active-site inhibitor. The cis isomer of fumarate, maleic acid, significantly inhibits the ME activity, suggesting that the trans configuration of fumarate is crucial for operating the allosteric regulation of the enzyme. Other dicarboxylic acids, including glutaconic acid, malonic acid and alpha-ketoglutarate, cannot activate the enzyme and inversely inhibit enzyme activity. Our data suggest that these structural analogues are mainly active-site inhibitors, although they may enter the allosteric site to inhibit the enzyme. Furthermore, these data also suggest that the dicarboxylic acid must be in a trans conformation for allosteric activation of the enzyme.

  2. Antidepressants may lead to a decrease in niacin and NAD in patients with poor dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Margaretha; Swanepoel, Annie; Bipath, Priyesh

    2015-03-01

    The term niacin is the generic name for the two compounds nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, the major dietary precursors for two important coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its phosphorylated form, NADP. Niacin is important for the maintenance of cellular integrity and energy production and is involved in more than 500 intracellular reactions. Deficiencies of niacin may contribute to neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Patients who develop nutritional deficiencies as a result of poor dietary intake, especially inadequate intake of proteins and vitamins, could potentially suffer from niacin deficiency and NAD depletion. However, de novo synthesis of niacin and NAD in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism may compensate for impaired dietary intake. The rate of synthesis of NAD and niacin from tryptophan oxidation depends on the induction of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma. Niacin synthesis is not limited by a decrease in tryptophan and excessive IDO activity may therefore lead to a decline in tryptophan levels. Antidepressants have an anti-inflammatory effect, including reduction of interferon-gamma and therefore inhibition of IDO, the rate-limiting enzyme of the kynurenine pathway. In theory, this could account for increased serotonin as more tryptophan becomes available for serotonin synthesis. However, the downside may be that less NAD and niacin are synthesised downstream, which could exacerbate common psychiatric problems. It is our hypothesis that patients with poor dietary intake, who are treated with antidepressants, are at risk of developing niacin/NAD deficiency with possible development of associated neuropsychiatric symptoms. We therefore propose that niacin supplementation be considered in patients with inadequate diets who are treated with antidepressants. We believe that if this does not happen, a subclinical niacin deficiency may result

  3. Enzymology of mammalian NAD metabolism in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Magni, Giulio; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Raffelli, Nadia; Ruggieri, Silverio

    2008-05-01

    Mounting evidence attests to the paramount importance of the non-redox NAD functions. Indeed, NAD homeostasis is related to the free radicals-mediated production of reactive oxygen species responsible for irreversible cellular damage in infectious disease, diabetes, inflammatory syndromes, neurodegeneration and cancer. Because the cellular redox status depends on both the absolute concentration of pyridine dinucleotides and their respective ratios of oxidized and reduced forms (i.e., NAD/NADH and NADP/NADPH), it is conceivable that an altered regulation of the synthesis and degradation of NAD impairs the cell redox state and likely contributes to the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of the above mentioned diseases. Taking into account the recent appearance in the literature of comprehensive reviews covering different aspects of the significance of NAD metabolism, with particular attention to the enzymes involved in NAD cleavage, this monograph includes the most recent results on NAD biosynthesis in mammals and humans. Due to recent findings on nicotinamide riboside as a nutrient, its inclusion under "niacins" is proposed. Here, the enzymes involved in the de novo and reutilization pathways are overviewed.

  4. Rosuvastatin prevents angiotensin II-induced vascular changes by inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase and COX-1

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Rocchina; Fornai, Matteo; Duranti, Emiliano; Antonioli, Luca; Rugani, Ilaria; Aydinoglu, Fatma; Ippolito, Chiara; Segnani, Cristina; Bernardini, Nunzia; Taddei, Stefano; Blandizzi, Corrado; Virdis, Agostino

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose NAD(P)H oxidase and COX-1 participate in vascular damage induced by angiotensin II. We investigated the effect of rosuvastatin on endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodelling, changes in extracellular matrix components and mechanical properties of small mesenteric arteries from angiotensin II-infused rats. Experimental Approach Male rats received angiotensin II (120 ng·kg−1·min−1, subcutaneously) for 14 days with or without rosuvastatin (10 mg·kg−1·day−1, oral gavage) or vehicle. Vascular functions and morphological parameters were assessed by pressurized myography. Key Results In angiotensin II-infused rats, ACh-induced relaxation was attenuated compared with controls, less sensitive to L-NAME, enhanced by SC-560 (COX-1 inhibitor) or SQ-29548 (prostanoid TP receptor antagonist), and normalized by the antioxidant ascorbic acid or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors. After rosuvastatin, relaxations to ACh were normalized, fully sensitive to L-NAME, and no longer affected by SC-560, SQ-29548 or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors. Angiotensin II enhanced intravascular superoxide generation, eutrophic remodelling, collagen and fibronectin depositions, and decreased elastin content, resulting in increased vessel stiffness. All these changes were prevented by rosuvastatin. Angiotensin II increased phosphorylation of NAD(P)H oxidase subunit p47phox and its binding to subunit p67phox, effects inhibited by rosuvastatin. Rosuvastatin down-regulated vascular Nox4/NAD(P)H isoform and COX-1 expression, attenuated the vascular release of 6-keto-PGF1α, and enhanced copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase expression. Conclusion and Implications Rosuvastatin prevents angiotensin II-induced alterations in resistance arteries in terms of function, structure, mechanics and composition. These effects depend on restoration of NO availability, prevention of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived oxidant excess, reversal of COX-1 induction and its prostanoid production, and stimulation of

  5. Reduced Ssy1-Ptr3-Ssy5 (SPS) signaling extends replicative life span by enhancing NAD+ homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Felicia; James, Christol; Kato, Michiko; Myers, Victoria; Ilyas, Irtqa; Tsang, Matthew; Lin, Su-Ju

    2015-05-15

    Attenuated nutrient signaling extends the life span in yeast and higher eukaryotes; however, the mechanisms are not completely understood. Here we identify the Ssy1-Ptr3-Ssy5 (SPS) amino acid sensing pathway as a novel longevity factor. A null mutation of SSY5 (ssy5Δ) increases replicative life span (RLS) by ∼50%. Our results demonstrate that several NAD(+) homeostasis factors play key roles in this life span extension. First, expression of the putative malate-pyruvate NADH shuttle increases in ssy5Δ cells, and deleting components of this shuttle, MAE1 and OAC1, largely abolishes RLS extension. Next, we show that Stp1, a transcription factor of the SPS pathway, directly binds to the promoter of MAE1 and OAC1 to regulate their expression. Additionally, deletion of SSY5 increases nicotinamide riboside (NR) levels and phosphate-responsive (PHO) signaling activity, suggesting that ssy5Δ increases NR salvaging. This increase contributes to NAD(+) homeostasis, partially ameliorating the NAD(+) deficiency and rescuing the short life span of the npt1Δ mutant. Moreover, we observed that vacuolar phosphatase, Pho8, is partially required for ssy5Δ-mediated NR increase and RLS extension. Together, our studies present evidence that supports SPS signaling is a novel NAD(+) homeostasis factor and ssy5Δ-mediated life span extension is likely due to concomitantly increased mitochondrial and vacuolar function. Our findings may contribute to understanding the molecular basis of NAD(+) metabolism, cellular life span, and diseases associated with NAD(+) deficiency and aging.

  6. Acyl-CoA-binding domain containing 3 modulates NAD+ metabolism through activating poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Bang, Sookhee; Park, Soohyun; Shi, Hanyuan; Kim, Sangwon F

    2015-07-15

    NAD(+) plays essential roles in cellular energy homoeostasis and redox state, functioning as a cofactor along the glycolysis and citric acid cycle pathways. Recent discoveries indicated that, through the NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, this molecule may also be involved in many other cellular and biological outcomes such as chromatin remodelling, gene transcription, genomic integrity, cell division, calcium signalling, circadian clock and pluripotency. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is such an enzyme and dysfunctional PARP1 has been linked with the onset and development of various human diseases, including cancer, aging, traumatic brain injury, atherosclerosis, diabetes and inflammation. In the present study, we showed that overexpressed acyl-CoA-binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), a Golgi-bound protein, significantly reduced cellular NAD(+) content via enhancing PARP1's polymerase activity and enhancing auto-modification of the enzyme in a DNA damage-independent manner. We identified that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 as well as de novo fatty acid biosynthesis pathways are involved in ACBD3-mediated activation of PARP1. Importantly, oxidative stress-induced PARP1 activation is greatly attenuated by knocking down the ACBD3 gene. Taken together, these findings suggest that ACBD3 has prominent impacts on cellular NAD(+) metabolism via regulating PARP1 activation-dependent auto-modification and thus cell metabolism and function.

  7. A Nampt inhibitor FK866 mimics vitamin B3 deficiency by causing senescence of human fibroblastic Hs68 cells via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Tuzz-Ying; Yeh, Shu-Lan; Hu, Miao-Lin; Chen, Mei-Yau; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B3 (niacin) deficiency can cause pellagra with symptoms of dermatitis, diarrhea and dementia. However, it is unclear whether the vitamin B3 deficiency causes human aging. FK866 (a Nampt inhibitor) can reduce intracellular NAD(+) level and induce senescence of human Hs68 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells are unclear. In this study, we used FK866 to mimic the effects of vitamin B3 deficiency to reduce the NAD(+) level and investigated the mechanisms of FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells. We hypothesized that FK866 induced the senescence of Hs68 cells via an attenuation of NAD(+)-silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling. We found that FK866 induced cell senescence and diminished cellular NAD(+) levels and SIRT1 activity (detected by acetylation of p53), and these effects were dramatically antagonized by co-treatment with nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, or NAD(+). In contrast, the protein expression of SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) was not affected by FK866. In addition, the role of GSH in the FK866-induced cells senescence may be limited, as N-acetylcysteine did not antagonize FK866-induced cell senescence. These results suggest that FK866 induces cell senescence via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling. The effects of vitamin B3 deficiency on human aging warrant further investigation.

  8. Nicotinamide improves glucose metabolism and affects the hepatic NAD-sirtuin pathway in a rodent model of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Soo Jin; Choi, Jung Mook; Kim, Lisa; Park, Se Eun; Rhee, Eun Jung; Lee, Won Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Park, Cheol-Young

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA) and nicotinamide (NAM) are major forms of niacin and exert their physiological functions as precursors of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). Sirtuins, which are NAD-dependent deacetylases, regulate glucose and lipid metabolism and are implicated in the pathophysiology of aging, diabetes, and hepatic steatosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two NAD donors, NA and NAM, on glucose metabolism and the hepatic NAD-sirtuin pathway. The effects were investigated in OLETF rats, a rodent model of obesity and type 2 diabetes. OLETF rats were divided into five groups: (1) high fat (HF) diet, (2) HF diet and 10 mg NA/kg body weight (BW)/day (NA 10), (3) HF diet and 100 mg NA/kg BW/day (NA 100), (4) HF diet and 10 mg NAM/kg BW/day (NAM 10), and (5) HF diet and 100 mg NAM/kg BW/day (NAM 100). NA and NAM were delivered via drinking water for four weeks. NAM 100 treatment affected glucose control significantly, as shown by lower levels of accumulative area under the curve during oral glucose tolerance test, serum fasting glucose, serum fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and higher levels of serum adiponectin. With regard to NAD-sirtuin pathway, intracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, NAD, the NAD/NADH ratio, Sirt1, 2, 3, and 6 mRNA expressions, and Sirt1 activity all increased in livers of NAM 100-treated rats. These alterations were accompanied by the increased levels of proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha and mitochondrial DNA. The effect of NA treatment was less evident than that of NAM 100. These results demonstrate that NAM is more effective than NA on the regulation of glucose metabolism and the NAD-sirtuin pathway, which may relate to the altered mitochondrial biogenesis.

  9. Faster Rubisco Is the Key to Superior Nitrogen-Use Efficiency in NADP-Malic Enzyme Relative to NAD-Malic Enzyme C4 Grasses1

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, Oula; Evans, John R.; Chow, Wah Soon; Andrews, T. John; Conroy, Jann P.; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    In 27 C4 grasses grown under adequate or deficient nitrogen (N) supplies, N-use efficiency at the photosynthetic (assimilation rate per unit leaf N) and whole-plant (dry mass per total leaf N) level was greater in NADP-malic enzyme (ME) than NAD-ME species. This was due to lower N content in NADP-ME than NAD-ME leaves because neither assimilation rates nor plant dry mass differed significantly between the two C4 subtypes. Relative to NAD-ME, NADP-ME leaves had greater in vivo (assimilation rate per Rubisco catalytic sites) and in vitro Rubisco turnover rates (kcat; 3.8 versus 5.7 s−1 at 25°C). The two parameters were linearly related. In 2 NAD-ME (Panicum miliaceum and Panicum coloratum) and 2 NADP-ME (Sorghum bicolor and Cenchrus ciliaris) grasses, 30% of leaf N was allocated to thylakoids and 5% to 9% to amino acids and nitrate. Soluble protein represented a smaller fraction of leaf N in NADP-ME (41%) than in NAD-ME (53%) leaves, of which Rubisco accounted for one-seventh. Soluble protein averaged 7 and 10 g (mmol chlorophyll)−1 in NADP-ME and NAD-ME leaves, respectively. The majority (65%) of leaf N and chlorophyll was found in the mesophyll of NADP-ME and bundle sheath of NAD-ME leaves. The mesophyll-bundle sheath distribution of functional thylakoid complexes (photosystems I and II and cytochrome f) varied among species, with a tendency to be mostly located in the mesophyll. In conclusion, superior N-use efficiency of NADP-ME relative to NAD-ME grasses was achieved with less leaf N, soluble protein, and Rubisco having a faster kcat. PMID:15665246

  10. Simulations of the Vertical Redistribution of HNO3 by NAT or NAD PSCs: The Sensitivity to the Number of Cloud Particles Formed and the Cloud Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Toon, Owen B.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Recent satellite and in situ measurements have indicated that limited denitrification can occur in the Arctic stratosphere. In situ measurements from the SOLVE campaign indicate polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) composed of small numbers (about 3 x 10^ -4 cm^-3) of 10-20 micron particles (probably NAT or NAD). These observations raise the issue of whether low number density NAT PSCs can substantially denitrify the air with reasonable cloud lifetimes. In this study, we use a one dimensional cloud model to investigate the verticle redistribution of HNO3 by NAT/NAD PSCs. The cloud formation is driven by a temperature oscillation which drops the temperature below the NAT/NAD formation threshold (about 195 K) for a few days. We assume that a small fraction of the available aerosols act as NAT nuclei when the saturation ratio of HNO3 over NAT(NAD) exceeds 10(l.5). The result is a cloud between about 16 and 20 km in the model, with NAT/NAD particle effective radii as large as about 10 microns (in agreement with the SOLVE data). We find that for typical cloud lifetimes of 2-3 days or less, the net depletion of HNO3 is no more than 1-2 ppbv, regardless of the NAT or NAD particle number density. Repeated passes of the air column through the cold pool build up the denitrification to 3-4 ppbv, and the cloud altitude steadily decreases due to the downward transport of nitric acid. Increasing the cloud lifetime results in considerably more effective denitrification, even with very low cloud particle number densities. As expected, the degree of denitrification by NAT clouds is much larger than that by NAD Clouds. Significant denitrification by NAD Clouds is only possible if the cloud lifetime is several days or more. The clouds also cause a local maximum HNO3 mixing ratio at cloud base where the cloud particles sublimate.

  11. Temperature-dependent formation of NaCl dihydrate in levitated NaCl and sea salt aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Peckhaus, Andreas; Kiselev, Alexei; Wagner, Robert; Duft, Denis; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-12-28

    Recent laboratory studies indicate that the hydrated form of crystalline NaCl is potentially important for atmospheric processes involving depositional ice nucleation on NaCl dihydrate particles under cirrus cloud conditions. However, recent experimental studies reported a strong discrepancy between the temperature intervals where the efflorescence of NaCl dihydrate has been observed. Here we report the measurements of the volume specific nucleation rate of crystalline NaCl in the aqueous solution droplets of pure NaCl suspended in an electrodynamic balance at constant temperature and humidity in the range from 250 K to 241 K. Based on these measurements, we derive the interfacial energy of crystalline NaCl dihydrate in a supersaturated NaCl solution and determined its temperature dependence. Taking into account both temperature and concentration dependence of nucleation rate coefficients, we explain the difference in the observed fractions of NaCl dihydrate reported in the previous studies. Applying the heterogeneous classical nucleation theory model, we have been able to reproduce the 5 K shift of the NaCl dihydrate efflorescence curve observed for the sea salt aerosol particles, assuming the presence of super-micron solid inclusions (hypothetically gypsum or hemihydrate of CaSO4). These results support the notion that the phase transitions in microscopic droplets of supersaturated solution should be interpreted by accounting for the stochastic nature of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and cannot be understood on the ground of bulk phase diagrams alone.

  12. Heterogeneous kinetics of H2O, HNO3 and HCl on HNO3 hydrates (α-NAT, β-NAT, NAD) in the range 175-200 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J.

    2016-09-01

    Experiments on the title compounds have been performed using a multidiagnostic stirred-flow reactor (SFR) in which the gas phase as well as the condensed phase has been simultaneously investigated under stratospheric temperatures in the range 175-200 K. Wall interactions of the title compounds have been taken into account using Langmuir adsorption isotherms in order to close the mass balance between deposited and desorbed (recovered) compounds. Thin solid films at 1 µm typical thickness have been used as a proxy for atmospheric ice particles and have been deposited on a Si window of the cryostat, with the optical element being the only cold point in the deposition chamber. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy in transmission as well as partial and total pressure measurement using residual gas mass spectrometry (MS) and sensitive pressure gauges have been employed in order to monitor growth and evaporation processes as a function of temperature using both pulsed and continuous gas admission and monitoring under SFR conditions. Thin solid H2O ice films were used as the starting point throughout, with the initial spontaneous formation of α-NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) followed by the gradual transformation of α- to β-NAT at T > 185 K. Nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) was spontaneously formed at somewhat larger partial pressures of HNO3 deposited on pure H2O ice. In contrast to published reports, the formation of α-NAT proceeded without prior formation of an amorphous HNO3 / H2O layer and always resulted in β-NAT. For α- and β-NAT, the temperature-dependent accommodation coefficient α(H2O) and α(HNO3), the evaporation flux Jev(H2O) and Jev(HNO3) and the resulting saturation vapor pressure Peq(H2O) and Peq(HNO3) were measured and compared to binary phase diagrams of HNO3 / H2O in order to afford a thermochemical check of the kinetic parameters. The resulting kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of activation energies for evaporation (Eev) and

  13. Hydrogen bonding. Part 26. Thermodynamics of dissociation and infrared spectracrystal structure correlations for betaine monohydrate and trimethylamine oxide dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccalino, Patricia L.; Harmon, Kenneth M.; Harmon, Jennifer

    1988-10-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for the dissociation of betaine monohydrate and trimethylamine oxide dihydrate have been determined by equilibrium vapor pressure measurements. Betaine monohydrate appears in two slightly different crystalline forms, one obtained by crystallization from water and the other by addition of water vapor to solid anhydrous betaine. Hydrogen bond energies in these hydrates are at least 8-9 kcal mol -1 per OH⋯O bond. Hydrogen bond energies in trimethylamine oxide dihydrate average at least 14 kcal mol -1 per OH⋯O bond; however, as there are two distinct types of hydrogen bonds in this hydrate, some bonds are stronger and some weaker than 14 kcal mol -1. These studies show conclusively that trimethylamine oxide monohydrate does not exist. The infrared spectrum of trimethylamine oxide dihydrate is correlated with the crystal structure.

  14. The gdhB gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes an arginine-inducible NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase which is subject to allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, C D; Abdelal, A T

    2001-01-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was purified, and its amino-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. This sequence information was used in identifying and cloning the encoding gdhB gene and its flanking regions. The molecular mass predicted from the derived sequence for the encoded NAD-GDH was 182.6 kDa, in close agreement with that determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme (180 kDa). Cross-linking studies established that the native NAD-GDH is a tetramer of equal subunits. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of NAD-GDH from P. aeruginosa with the GenBank database showed the highest homology with hypothetical polypeptides from Pseudomonas putida, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Rickettsia prowazakii, Legionella pneumophila, Vibrio cholerae, Shewanella putrefaciens, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Caulobacter crescentus. A moderate degree of homology, primarily in the central domain, was observed with the smaller tetrameric NAD-GDH (protomeric mass of 110 kDa) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Neurospora crassa. Comparison with the yet smaller hexameric GDH (protomeric mass of 48 to 55 kDa) of other prokaryotes yielded a low degree of homology that was limited to residues important for binding of substrates and for catalytic function. NAD-GDH was induced 27-fold by exogenous arginine and only 3-fold by exogenous glutamate. Primer extension experiments established that transcription of gdhB is initiated from an arginine-inducible promoter and that this induction is dependent on the arginine regulatory protein, ArgR, a member of the AraC/XyIS family of regulatory proteins. NAD-GDH was purified to homogeneity from a recombinant strain of P. aeruginosa and characterized. The glutamate saturation curve was sigmoid, indicating positive cooperativity in the binding of glutamate. NAD-GDH activity was subject to allosteric control by arginine and citrate, which

  15. Effects of NAD at purine receptors in isolated blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Alefishat, E; Alexander, S P H; Ralevic, V

    2015-03-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) belongs to the family of naturally occurring adenine dinucleotides, best known for their various intracellular roles. However, there is evidence that they can also be released from cells to act as novel extracellular signalling molecules. Relatively little is known about the extracellular actions of NAD, especially in the cardiovascular system. The present study investigated the actions of NAD in the rat thoracic aorta, porcine coronary artery and porcine mesenteric arteries, mounted in organ baths for isometric tension recording. In the rat thoracic aorta and porcine coronary artery, NAD caused endothelium-independent concentration-dependent vasorelaxations which were unaffected by palmitoylCoA, a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, but which were blocked by CGS15943, a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist. In the porcine coronary artery, NAD-evoked relaxations were abolished by SCH58261, a selective A2A receptor antagonist. In the rat thoracic aorta, NAD-evoked relaxations were attenuated by A2A receptor antagonism with SCH58261 but were unaffected by an A2B receptor antagonist, MRS1754. In contrast, in the porcine mesenteric artery, NAD-evoked endothelium-independent contractions, which were unaffected by a P2 receptor antagonist, suramin, or by NF449, a P2X1 receptor antagonist, but were attenuated following P2X receptor desensitisation with αβ-meATP. In conclusion, the present results show that NAD can alter vascular tone through actions at purine receptors in three different arteries from two species; its molecular targets differ according to the type of blood vessel.

  16. New Therapeutic Concept of NAD Redox Balance for Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kwak, Tae Hwan; So, Hong-Seob

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various tumors. In addition to its antitumor activity, cisplatin affects normal cells and may induce adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and peripheral neuropathy. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses are closely associated with cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity; however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. Recent studies have demonstrated associations between disturbance in intracellular NAD+ levels and clinical progression of various diseases through the production of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that reduction of the intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio is critically involved in cisplatin-induced kidney damage through inflammation and oxidative stress and that increase of the cellular NAD+/NADH ratio suppresses cisplatin-induced kidney damage by modulation of potential damage mediators such as oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the role of NAD+ metabolism in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and discuss a potential strategy for the prevention or treatment of cisplatin-induced adverse effects with a particular focus on NAD+-dependent cellular pathways. PMID:26881219

  17. NAD+/NADH and skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations to exercise

    PubMed Central

    White, Amanda T.

    2012-01-01

    The pyridine nucleotides, NAD+ and NADH, are coenzymes that provide oxidoreductive power for the generation of ATP by mitochondria. In skeletal muscle, exercise perturbs the levels of NAD+, NADH, and consequently, the NAD+/NADH ratio, and initial research in this area focused on the contribution of redox control to ATP production. More recently, numerous signaling pathways that are sensitive to perturbations in NAD+(H) have come to the fore, as has an appreciation for the potential importance of compartmentation of NAD+(H) metabolism and its subsequent effects on various signaling pathways. These pathways, which include the sirtuin (SIRT) proteins SIRT1 and SIRT3, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins PARP1 and PARP2, and COOH-terminal binding protein (CtBP), are of particular interest because they potentially link changes in cellular redox state to both immediate, metabolic-related changes and transcriptional adaptations to exercise. In this review, we discuss what is known, and not known, about the contribution of NAD+(H) metabolism and these aforementioned proteins to mitochondrial adaptations to acute and chronic endurance exercise. PMID:22436696

  18. Physiological and pathophysiological roles of NAMPT and NAD metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garten, Antje; Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; de Giorgis, Tommaso; Kiess, Wieland

    2015-09-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a regulator of the intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) pool. NAD is an essential coenzyme involved in cellular redox reactions and is a substrate for NAD-dependent enzymes. In various metabolic disorders and during ageing, levels of NAD are decreased. Through its NAD-biosynthetic activity, NAMPT influences the activity of NAD-dependent enzymes, thereby regulating cellular metabolism. In addition to its enzymatic function, extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT) has cytokine-like activity. Abnormal levels of eNAMPT are associated with various metabolic disorders. NAMPT is able to modulate processes involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and related disorders such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by influencing the oxidative stress response, apoptosis, lipid and glucose metabolism, inflammation and insulin resistance. NAMPT also has a crucial role in cancer cell metabolism, is often overexpressed in tumour tissues and is an experimental target for antitumour therapies. In this Review, we discuss current understanding of the functions of NAMPT and highlight progress made in identifying the physiological role of NAMPT and its relevance in various human diseases and conditions, such as obesity, NAFLD, T2DM, cancer and ageing.

  19. Porcine CD38 exhibits prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Ting, Kai Yiu; Leung, Christina F P; Graeff, Richard M; Lee, Hon Cheung; Hao, Quan; Kotaka, Masayo

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and activates Ca(2+) influx to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. It is one of the products produced from the catalysis of NAD(+) by the multifunctional CD38/ADP-ribosyl cyclase superfamily. After elimination of the nicotinamide ring by the enzyme, the reaction intermediate of NAD(+) can either be hydrolyzed to form linear ADPR or cyclized to form cADPR. We have previously shown that human CD38 exhibits a higher preference towards the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to form linear ADPR while Aplysia ADP-ribosyl cyclase prefers cyclizing NAD(+) to form cADPR. In this study, we characterized the enzymatic properties of porcine CD38 and revealed that it has a prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity producing cADPR. We also determined the X-ray crystallographic structures of porcine CD38 and were able to observe conformational flexibility at the base of the active site of the enzyme which allow the NAD(+) reaction intermediate to adopt conformations resulting in both hydrolysis and cyclization forming linear ADPR and cADPR respectively.

  20. SIRT1 and NAD as regulators of ageing.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Leopold; Laszki-Szcząchor, Krystyna; Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata; Polak-Jonkisz, Dorota

    2014-06-06

    The recent research on ageing processes in mammals throws new light on the biochemistry of circadian clock. The already known regulatory pathways for biological rhythms and metabolism, combined with newly discovered functions of sirtuins, unveil a perspective for new hypotheses, regarding possible links between ageing and circadian rhythms. The NAD World hypothesis - postulated as a systemic regulatory network for the metabolism and ageing, linked with mammalian, NAD+ dependent Sirtuin 1 - conceptually involves two critical elements. One is the systemic, Nampt-controlled NAD+ (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase) biosynthesis, where Nampt (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase) acts as "propulsion" for metabolism and the other is NAD+ dependent deacetylase (SIRT1) - a regulator responsible for various biological effects, depending on its localisation in organism. In this approach, the role of sirtuins, which are evolutionary conservative, NAD+ dependent histone deacetylases, may be very important for the mammalian metabolic clock. This paper is a review of current research on possible links among SIRT1 (Sirtuin 1), metabolism and ageing with particular consideration of the NAD World hypothesis.

  1. NdnR is an NAD-responsive transcriptional repressor of the ndnR operon involved in NAD de novo biosynthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2012-04-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum ndnR gene, which is chromosomally located in a gene cluster involved in NAD de novo biosynthesis, negatively regulates expression of the cluster genes, i.e. nadA, nadC, nadS and ndnR itself. Although ndnR encodes a member of the recently identified NrtR family of transcriptional regulators, whether or not the NdnR protein directly regulates these NAD biosynthesis genes remains to be verified. Here, two NdnR binding sites in the promoter region of the ndnR-nadA-nadC-nadS operon in C. glutamicum were confirmed by in vitro DNA binding assay and analysis of in vivo expression of the chromosomally integrated ndnR promoter-lacZ reporter fusion. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that the NdnR protein binds to the 5'-upstream region of ndnR, and that the binding is significantly enhanced by NAD. Mutation in two 21 bp NdnR binding motifs in the ndnR promoter region inhibited the binding of NdnR in vitro. The mutation also enhanced the promoter activity in cells cultured in the presence of nicotinate, which is utilized in NAD biosynthesis, resulting in the loss of the repression in response to an exogenous NAD precursor; this is consistent with the effect of deletion of ndnR reported in our previous study. These results indicate that NAD acts as a co-repressor for the NdnR protein that directly regulates the ndnR operon involved in NAD de novo biosynthesis; the NAD-NdnR regulatory system likely plays an important role in the control of NAD homeostasis in C. glutamicum.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of ferredoxin-NAD(P){sup +} reductase from Chlorobium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Muraki, Norifumi; Seo, Daisuke; Shiba, Tomoo; Sakurai, Takeshi; Kurisu, Genji

    2008-03-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P){sup +} reductase from C. tepidum has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Ferredoxin-NAD(P){sup +} reductase (FNR) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the photoreduction of NAD(P){sup +} to generate NAD(P)H during the final step of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. FNR from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a homodimeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 90 kDa; it shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity to thioredoxin reductase rather than to conventional plant-type FNRs. In order to understand the structural basis of the ferredoxin-dependency of this unique photosynthetic FNR, C. tepidum FNR has been heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized in two forms. Form I crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} and contain one dimer in the asymmetric unit, while form II crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1}22 or P4{sub 3}22. Diffraction data were collected from a form I crystal to 2.4 Å resolution on the synchrotron-radiation beamline NW12 at the Photon Factory.

  3. Identification of structural determinants of NAD(P)H selectivity and lysine binding in lysine N(6)-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Heba; Robinson, Reeder; Rodriguez, Pedro; Adly, Camelia; El-Sohaimy, Sohby; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-09-15

    l-lysine (l-Lys) N(6)-monooxygenase (NbtG), from Nocardia farcinica, is a flavin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of l-Lys in the presence of oxygen and NAD(P)H in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore nocobactin. NbtG displays only a 3-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, different from well-characterized related enzymes, which are highly selective for NADPH. The structure of NbtG with bound NAD(P)(+) or l-Lys is currently not available. Herein, we present a mutagenesis study targeting M239, R301, and E216. These amino acids are conserved and located in either the NAD(P)H binding domain or the l-Lys binding pocket. M239R resulted in high production of hydrogen peroxide and little hydroxylation with no change in coenzyme selectivity. R301A caused a 300-fold decrease on kcat/Km value with NADPH but no change with NADH. E216Q increased the Km value for l-Lys by 30-fold with very little change on the kcat value or in the binding of NAD(P)H. These results suggest that R301 plays a major role in NADPH selectivity by interacting with the 2'-phosphate of the adenine-ribose moiety of NADPH, while E216 plays a role in l-Lys binding.

  4. Pseudopolymorphism in hydroxybenzophenones: the dihydrate of 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone.

    PubMed

    Landre, I M R; Martins, F T; Ellena, J A; Dos Santos, M H; Doriguetto, A C

    2012-04-01

    A dihydrate pseudopolymorph of bis(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methanone, C(13)H(10)O(5)·2H(2)O, (I), was obtained during polymorphism screening of hydroxybenzophenone derivatives. This structure, in which the molecule sits on a twofold axis, was compared with the known anhydrous form of (I) [Schlemper (1982). Acta Cryst. B38, 554-559]. The role of water in the crystal assembly was established on the basis of the known monohydrate pseudopolymorph of 3,4-dihydroxybenzophenone [Landre, Souza, Corrêa, Martins & Doriguetto (2010). Acta Cryst. C66, o463-o465].

  5. The growth of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate on octacalcium phosphate at 25°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heughebaert, Jean-Claude; De Rooij, J. F.; Nancollas, G. H.

    1986-07-01

    The crystallization of calcium phosphate phases from metastable supersaturated solutions following seeding with well characterized octacalcium phosphate [OCP) has been studied at 25°C, using a constant composition method. At pH 6.00, and at low supersaturation (σ<1.02), OCP is grown, whereas at higher supersaturation, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) nucleates and grows on the OCP seed, after well-defined induction periods. The linear dependencies of the logarithm of the induction periods upon (log supersaturation) -2, is indicative of a surface nucleation process for DCPD with an effective surface energy of 7±1 mJ m -2.

  6. Determination of dosimetric and kinetic features of gamma irradiated solid calcium ascorbate dihydrate using ESR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuner, H.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of gamma radiation on solid calcium ascorbate dihydrate were studied using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Irradiated samples were found to present two specific ESR lines with shoulder at low and high magnetic field sides. Structural and kinetic features of the radicalic species responsible for experimental ESR spectrum were explored through the variations of the signal intensities with applied microwave power, variable temperature, high-temperature annealing and room temperature storage time studies. Dosimetric potential of the sample was also determined using spectrum area and measured signal intensity measurements. It was concluded that three radicals with different spectroscopic and kinetic features were produced upon gamma irradiation.

  7. Dosimetric and kinetic investigations of γ-irradiated sodium tartrate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Tuner, H; Kayikçi, M A

    2012-03-01

    Effects of gamma radiation on solid sodium tartrate dihydrate (NaTA) were studied using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. One main singlet located at g = 2.0034 and many weak lines located at low and high magnetic field sides were found in the irradiated samples. Dosimetric and kinetic features of the radical species responsible for the experimental ESR spectra were explored through the variations in the signal intensities with respect to applied microwave power, temperature and storage time. Activation energies of the involved radical species were also determined using data derived from annealing studies.

  8. Thermal and dielectric properties of gel-grown cobalt malonate dihydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Varghese; Xavier, Lizymol; Mahadevan, C. K.; Abraham, K. E.

    2011-03-01

    Single crystals of cobalt malonate dihydrate were grown in a silica gel medium by the single diffusion method. The thermal behavior of the crystals was investigated by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and ac conductivity of the crystals were estimated as a function of temperature in the range 40-140 °C for four different frequencies. The results indicate that the grown crystals are thermally stable up to about 150 °C and exhibit a phase transition at 130 °C.

  9. Total lattice potential energy of sodium bromide dihydrate NaBr · 2H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzig, P.; Jenkins, H. D. B.; Pritchett, M. S. F.

    1984-08-01

    In addition to presenting comparative calculations by two approaches for the total lattice potential energy of sodium bromide dihydrate, NaBr · 2H 2O, found to take the value 803.9 kJ mol -1, we investigate the influence of the size and nature of the basis set used to generate multipole moments in a Hartee-Fock calculation which are in turn used to calculate the Madelung constant. The requirement is one of critical size of the basis set and once this is reached the electrostatic energy will be reliable.

  10. The Maize Ncs2 Abnormal Growth Mutant Has a Chimeric Nad4-Nad7 Mitochondrial Gene and Is Associated with Reduced Complex I Function

    PubMed Central

    Marienfeld, J. R.; Newton, K. J.

    1994-01-01

    The molecular basis of the maternally inherited, heteroplasmic NCS2 mutant of maize was investigated. Analysis of the NCS2 mtDNA showed that it closely resembles the progenitor cmsT mitochondrial genome, except that the mutant genome contains a fused nad4-nad7 gene and is deleted for the small fourth exon of nad4. The rearrangement has occurred at a 16-bp repeat present in the third intron of the nad4 gene and in the second intron of the nad7 gene. Transcripts containing exon 4 of the nad4 gene are greatly reduced in mtRNA preparations from heteroplasmic NCS2 plants; larger transcripts are associated with the first three nad4 exons. Identical 5' ends of the nad4 transcripts have been mapped 396 and 247 bp upstream of the start codon in mtRNAs from both NCS2 and related non-NCS plants. The putative transcription termination signal of nad4 is deleted in mutant DNA, resulting in the production of the unique longer transcripts. The complex transcript pattern associated with nad7 is also altered in the mutant. Both nad4 and nad7 encode subunits of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. Oxygen uptake experiments show that the functioning of complex I is specifically reduced in mitochondria isolated from NCS2 mutant plants. PMID:7851780

  11. Ethanol Enhances Hepatitis C Virus Replication through Lipid Metabolism and Elevated NADH/NAD+*

    PubMed Central

    Seronello, Scott; Ito, Chieri; Wakita, Takaji; Choi, Jinah

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol has been suggested to elevate HCV titer in patients and to increase HCV RNA in replicon cells, suggesting that HCV replication is increased in the presence and absence of the complete viral replication cycle, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we use Huh7 human hepatoma cells that naturally express comparable levels of CYP2E1 as human liver to demonstrate that ethanol, at subtoxic and physiologically relevant concentrations, enhances complete HCV replication. The viral RNA genome replication is affected for both genotypes 2a and 1b. Acetaldehyde, a major product of ethanol metabolism, likewise enhances HCV replication at physiological concentrations. The potentiation of HCV replication by ethanol is suppressed by inhibiting CYP2E1 or aldehyde dehydrogenase and requires an elevated NADH/NAD+ ratio. In addition, acetate, isopropyl alcohol, and concentrations of acetone that occur in diabetics enhance HCV replication with corresponding increases in the NADH/NAD+. Furthermore, inhibiting the host mevalonate pathway with lovastatin or fluvastatin and fatty acid synthesis with 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid or cerulenin significantly attenuates the enhancement of HCV replication by ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, as well as acetate, whereas inhibiting β-oxidation with β-mercaptopropionic acid increases HCV replication. Ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and acetate increase the total intracellular cholesterol content, which is attenuated with lovastatin. In contrast, both endogenous and exogenous ROS suppress the replication of HCV genotype 2a, as previously shown with genotype 1b. Conclusion: Therefore, lipid metabolism and alteration of cellular NADH/NAD+ ratio are likely to play a critical role in the potentiation of HCV replication by ethanol rather than oxidative stress. PMID:19910460

  12. "Clocks" in the NAD World: NAD as a metabolic oscillator for the regulation of metabolism and aging.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shin-Ichiro

    2010-08-01

    SIR2 (silent information regulator 2) proteins, now called "sirtuins," are an evolutionarily conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacetylases/ADP-ribosyltransferases. Sirtuins have recently attracted major attention in the field of aging research, and it has been demonstrated that SIR2 and its orthologs regulate aging and longevity in yeast, worms, and flies. In mammals, the SIR2 ortholog SIRT1 coordinates important metabolic responses to nutritional availability in multiple tissues. Most recently, it has been demonstrated that SIRT1 regulates the amplitude and the duration of circadian gene expression through the interaction and the deacetylation of key circadian clock regulators, such as BMAL1 and PER2. More strikingly, we and others have discovered a novel circadian clock feedback loop in which both the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD biosynthesis, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), and NAD levels display circadian oscillations and modulate CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated circadian transcriptional regulation through SIRT1, demonstrating a new function of NAD as a "metabolic oscillator." These findings reveal a novel system dynamics of a recently proposed systemic regulatory network regulated by NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis and SIRT1, namely, the NAD World. In the light of this concept, a new connection between physiological rhythmicity, metabolism, and aging will be discussed.

  13. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria. PMID:27066186

  14. A Lagrangian method to study stratospheric nitric acid variations in the polar regions as measured by the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RivièRe, Emmanuel D.; Terao, Yukio; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2003-12-01

    Denitrification is well known to affect the severity of springtime ozone depletion in Polar Regions. In winter 1996/1997 in the Northern Hemisphere and winter 1997 in the Southern Hemisphere, the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) on board the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) detected denitrification in both hemispheres. Here the Match technique and a Lagrangian model are used to analyze the nitric acid variation between a pair of measurements belonging to the same air parcel. Eleven cases are studied in Antarctica and seventeen in the Arctic, permitting testing of the laboratory-measured homogeneous freezing rate of liquid ternary aerosol into nitric acid hydrates, thought to be the determining step of the denitrification process. Over the Antarctica, eight cases out of eleven lead to results in agreement with the measurements, taking into account uncertainties of the measurement and possible acceptable bias in the temperature field used for the modeling study. Over the Arctic, more cases remain unexplained even after taking into account the possible scavenging of nitric acid by large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles falling from the layers above. These disagreements are mainly due to relatively high temperatures along the trajectories that do not lead to significant NAT or nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) freezing. Thus it appears that some additional mechanisms are required to explain the denitrification in the Arctic winter. Moreover, the occurrence of denitrification due to the few NAT particles with very large radius (few μm), the so-called "NAT rocks," over the Antarctic winter in 1997 is suggested.

  15. Comparative genomics of NAD(P) biosynthesis and novel antibiotic drug targets.

    PubMed

    Bi, Jicai; Wang, Honghai; Xie, Jianping

    2011-02-01

    NAD(P) is an indispensable cofactor for all organisms and its biosynthetic pathways are proposed as promising novel antibiotics targets against pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Six NAD(P) biosynthetic pathways were reconstructed by comparative genomics: de novo pathway (Asp), de novo pathway (Try), NmR pathway I (RNK-dependent), NmR pathway II (RNK-independent), Niacin salvage, and Niacin recycling. Three enzymes pivotal to the key reactions of NAD(P) biosynthesis are shared by almost all organisms, that is, NMN/NaMN adenylyltransferase (NMN/NaMNAT), NAD synthetase (NADS), and NAD kinase (NADK). They might serve as ideal broad spectrum antibiotic targets. Studies in M. tuberculosis have in part tested such hypothesis. Three regulatory factors NadR, NiaR, and NrtR, which regulate NAD biosynthesis, have been identified. M. tuberculosis NAD(P) metabolism and regulation thereof, potential drug targets and drug development are summarized in this paper.

  16. NAD homeostasis in the bacterial response to DNA/RNA damage.

    PubMed

    Sorci, Leonardo; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    In mammals, NAD represents a nodal point for metabolic regulation, and its availability is critical to genome stability. Several NAD-consuming enzymes are induced in various stress conditions and the consequent NAD decline is generally accompanied by the activation of NAD biosynthetic pathways to guarantee NAD homeostasis. In the bacterial world a similar scenario has only recently begun to surface. Here we review the current knowledge on the involvement of NAD homeostasis in bacterial stress response mechanisms. In particular, we focus on the participation of both NAD-consuming enzymes (DNA ligase, mono(ADP-ribosyl) transferase, sirtuins, and RNA 2'-phosphotransferase) and NAD biosynthetic enzymes (both de novo, and recycling enzymes) in the response to DNA/RNA damage. As further supporting evidence for such a link, a genomic context analysis is presented showing several conserved associations between NAD homeostasis and stress responsive genes.

  17. Subcellular Distribution of NAD+ between Cytosol and Mitochondria Determines the Metabolic Profile of Human Cells.

    PubMed

    VanLinden, Magali R; Dölle, Christian; Pettersen, Ina K N; Kulikova, Veronika A; Niere, Marc; Agrimi, Gennaro; Dyrstad, Sissel E; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Nikiforov, Andrey A; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-11-13

    The mitochondrial NAD pool is particularly important for the maintenance of vital cellular functions. Although at least in some fungi and plants, mitochondrial NAD is imported from the cytosol by carrier proteins, in mammals, the mechanism of how this organellar pool is generated has remained obscure. A transporter mediating NAD import into mammalian mitochondria has not been identified. In contrast, human recombinant NMNAT3 localizes to the mitochondrial matrix and is able to catalyze NAD(+) biosynthesis in vitro. However, whether the endogenous NMNAT3 protein is functionally effective at generating NAD(+) in mitochondria of intact human cells still remains to be demonstrated. To modulate mitochondrial NAD(+) content, we have expressed plant and yeast mitochondrial NAD(+) carriers in human cells and observed a profound increase in mitochondrial NAD(+). None of the closest human homologs of these carriers had any detectable effect on mitochondrial NAD(+) content. Surprisingly, constitutive redistribution of NAD(+) from the cytosol to the mitochondria by stable expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial NAD(+) transporter NDT2 in HEK293 cells resulted in dramatic growth retardation and a metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, despite the elevated mitochondrial NAD(+) levels. These results suggest that a mitochondrial NAD(+) transporter, similar to the known one from A. thaliana, is likely absent and could even be harmful in human cells. We provide further support for the alternative possibility, namely intramitochondrial NAD(+) synthesis, by demonstrating the presence of endogenous NMNAT3 in the mitochondria of human cells.

  18. High-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase in the apo form, in complex with NAD+ and in complex with NAD+ and triclosan

    PubMed Central

    Otero, José M.; Noël, Ann-Josée; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Wende, Wolfgang; Schierling, Benno; Pingoud, Alfred; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR; the product of the fabI gene) is an important enzyme that is involved in the type II fatty-acid-synthesis pathway of bacteria, plants, apicomplexan protozoa and mitochondria. Harmful pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum use the type II fatty-acid-synthesis system, but not mammals or fungi, which contain a type I fatty-acid-synthesis pathway consisting of one or two multifunctional enzymes. For this reason, specific inhibitors of ENR are attractive antibiotic candidates. Triclosan, a broad-range antibacterial agent, binds to ENR, inhibiting fatty-acid synthesis. As humans do not have an ENR enzyme, they are not affected. Here, high-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus (Tth) ENR in the apo form, bound to NAD+ and bound to NAD+ plus triclosan are reported. Differences from and similarities to other known ENR structures are reported; in general, the structures are very similar. The cofactor-binding site is also very similar to those of other ENRs and, as reported for other species, triclosan leads to greater ordering of the loop that covers the cofactor-binding site, which, together with the presence of triclosan itself, presumably provides tight binding of the dinucleotide, preventing cycling of the cofactor. Differences between the structures of Tth ENR and other ENRs are the presence of an additional β-sheet at the N-terminus and a larger number of salt bridges and side-chain hydrogen bonds. These features may be related to the high thermal stability of Tth ENR. PMID:23027736

  19. Dissecting systemic control of metabolism and aging in the NAD World: the importance of SIRT1 and NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2011-06-06

    Many countries are facing social and economic problems due to increased elderly demographics. With these demands, it is now critical to understand the fundamental regulatory mechanism for aging and longevity in mammals. Our studies on the mammalian NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT)-mediated systemic NAD biosynthesis led us to propose a comprehensive model for the systemic regulatory network connecting metabolism and aging, termed the "NAD World". In this article, I will discuss the importance of SIRT1 and NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis in the NAD World and the system dynamics of this hierarchical network for the connection between metabolism and aging.

  20. Crystal structure of monoclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (m-CPPD) involved in inflammatory reactions and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gras, Pierre; Rey, Christian; André, Gilles; Charvillat, Cédric; Sarda, Stéphanie; Combes, Christèle

    2016-02-01

    Pure monoclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (m-CPPD) has been synthesized and characterized by synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. Rietveld refinement of complementary diffraction data has, for the first time, allowed the crystal structure of m-CPPD to be solved. The monoclinic system P2(1)/n was confirmed and unit-cell parameters determined: a = 12.60842 (4), b = 9.24278 (4), c = 6.74885 (2) Å and β = 104.9916 (3)°. Neutron diffraction data especially have allowed the precise determination of the position of H atoms in the structure. The relationship between the m-CPPD crystal structure and that of the triclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (t-CPPD) phase as well as other pyrophosphate phases involving other divalent cations are discussed by considering the inflammatory potential of these phases and/or their involvement in different diseases. These original structural data represent a key step in the understanding of the mechanisms of crystal formation involved in different types of arthritis and to improve early detection of calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) phases in vivo.

  1. In situ dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate: a novel technique to prepare amorphous anhydrous carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Han, J; Zhang, G G; Grant, D J; Suryanarayanan, R

    2000-01-01

    The purposes of this project were to prepare amorphous carbamazepine by dehydration of crystalline carbamazepine dihydrate, and to study the kinetics of crystallization of the prepared amorphous phase. Amorphous carbamazepine was formed and characterized in situ in the sample chamber of a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), and a variable temperature x-ray powder diffractometer (VTXRD). It has a glass transition temperature of 56 degrees C and it is a relatively strong glass with a strength parameter of 37. The kinetics of its crystallization were followed by isothermal XRD, under a controlled water vapor pressure of 23 Torr. The crystallization kinetics are best described by the three-dimensional nuclear growth model with rate constants of 0.014, 0.021, and 0.032 min-1 at 45, 50, and 55 degrees C, respectively. When the Arrhenius equation was used, the activation energy of crystallization was calculated to be 74 kJ/mol in the presence of water vapor (23 Torr). On the basis of the Kissinger plot, the activation energy of crystallization in the absence of water vapor (0 Torr water vapor pressure) was determined to be 157 kJ/mol. Dehydration of the dihydrate is a novel method to prepare amorphous carbamazepine; in comparison with other methods, it is a relatively gentle and effective technique.

  2. Catalytic effects of ZnO nanorods grown by sonochemical decomposition of zinc acetate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok Cheol; Lee, Ho Suk; Sohn, Sang Ho

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we prepared ZnO nanorods by a sonochemical method using a zinc acetate dihydrate as a new precursor. Well-aligned high-quality ZnO nanorods were synthesized on FTO glass by the sonochemical decomposition of zinc acetate dihydrate using a ZnO thin-film as the catalytic layer. The ZnO thin-films were deposited on the FTO glass by a sputtering method. To investigate their catalytic effects on the ZnO nanorods, catalytic ZnO thin-films of 20 nm, 40 nm, and 60 nm thickness were prepared by adjusting the sputtering time. The ZnO nanorods grown on catalytic layers with different thicknesses were characterized by SEM, XRD, and PL. The ZnO nanorods grown on the catalytic layer of 40 nm thickness show the best crystal and spatial orientation and as a result display the best optical properties. It was found that a catalytic ZnO thin-film of 40 nm in thickness yields well-aligned high-quality ZnO nanorods, due to its small surface roughness and structural strain.

  3. Unusual effect of water vapor pressure on dehydration of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Aditya M; Vangala, Venu R; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2011-04-01

    Dibasic calcium phosphate occurs as an anhydrate (DCPA; CaHPO₄) and as a dihydrate (DCPD; CaHPO₄•2H₂O). Our objective was to investigate the unusual behavior of these phases. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate was dehydrated in a (i) differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) in different pan configurations; (ii) variable-temperature X-ray diffractometer (XRD) at atmospheric and under reduced pressure, and in sealed capillaries; and (iii) water vapor sorption analyzer at varying temperature and humidity conditions. Dehydration was complete by 210°C in an open DSC pan and under atmospheric pressure in the XRD. Unlike "conventional" hydrates, the dehydration of DCPD was facilitated in the presence of water vapor. Variable-temperature XRD in a sealed capillary and DSC in a hermetic pan with pinhole caused complete dehydration by 100°C and 140°C, respectively. Under reduced pressure, conversion to the anhydrate was incomplete even at 300°C. The increase in dehydration rate with increase in water vapor pressure has been explained by the Smith-Topley effect. Under "dry" conditions, a coating of poorly crystalline product is believed to form on the surface of particles and act as a barrier to further dehydration. However, in the presence of water vapor, recrystallization occurs, creating cracks and channels and facilitating continued dehydration.

  4. Purification, Characterization, and Submitochondrial Localization of a 58-Kilodalton NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Luethy, M. H.; Thelen, J. J.; Knudten, A. F.; Elthon, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    An NADH dehydrogenase activity from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) root mitochondria was purified to a 58-kD protein doublet. An immunologically related dehydrogenase was partially purified from maize (Zea mays L. B73) mitochondria to a 58-kD protein doublet, a 45-kD protein, and a few other less prevalent proteins. Polyclonal antibodies prepared against the 58-kD protein of red beet roots were found to immunoprecipitate the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase activity. The antibodies cross-reacted to similar proteins in mitochondria from a number of plant species but not to rat liver mitochondrial proteins. The polyclonal antibodies were used in conjunction with maize mitochondrial fractionation to show that the 58-kD protein was likely part of a protein complex loosely associated with the membrane fraction. A membrane-impermeable protein cross-linking agent was used to further show that the majority of the 58-kD protein was located on the outer surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane or in the intermembrane space. Analysis of the cross-linked 58-kD NAD(P)H dehydrogenase indicated that specific proteins of 64, 48, and 45 kD were cross-linked to the 58-kD protein doublet. The NAD(P)H dehydrogenase activity was not affected by ethyleneglycol-bis([beta]-aminoethyl ether)-N,N[prime] -tetraacetic acid or CaCl2, was stimulated somewhat (21%) by flavin mononucleotide, was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (49%) and mersalyl (40%), and was inhibited by a bud scale extract of Platanus occidentalis L. containing platanetin (61%). PMID:12228370

  5. NadN and e (P4) are essential for utilization of NAD and nicotinamide mononucleotide but not nicotinamide riboside in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kemmer, G; Reilly, T J; Schmidt-Brauns, J; Zlotnik, G W; Green, B A; Fiske, M J; Herbert, M; Kraiss, A; Schlör, S; Smith, A; Reidl, J

    2001-07-01

    Haemophilus influenzae has an absolute requirement for NAD (factor V) because it lacks almost all the biosynthetic enzymes necessary for the de novo synthesis of that cofactor. Factor V can be provided as either nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide (NAD), nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), or nicotinamide riboside (NR) in vitro, but little is known about the source or the mechanism of uptake of these substrates in vivo. As shown by us earlier, at least two gene products are involved in the uptake of NAD, the outer membrane lipoprotein e (P4), which has phosphatase activity and is encoded by hel, and a periplasmic NAD nucleotidase, encoded by nadN. It has also been observed that the latter gene product is essential for H. influenzae growth on media supplemented with NAD. In this report, we describe the functions and substrates of these two proteins as they act together in an NAD utilization pathway. Data are provided which indicate that NadN harbors not only NAD pyrophosphatase but also NMN 5'-nucleotidase activity. The e (P4) protein is also shown to have NMN 5'-nucleotidase activity, recognizing NMN as a substrate and releasing NR as its product. Insertion mutants of nadN or deletion and site-directed mutants of hel had attenuated growth and a reduced uptake phenotype when NMN served as substrate. A hel and nadN double mutant was only able to grow in the presence of NR, whereas no uptake of NMN was observed.

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae 1,3-propanediol:NAD+ oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E A; Lin, E C

    1987-01-01

    Fermentative utilization of glycerol, a more reduced carbohydrate than aldoses and ketoses, requires the disposal of the two extra hydrogen atoms. This is accomplished by sacrificing an equal quantity of glycerol via an auxiliary pathway initiated by glycerol dehydratase. The product, 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde, is then reduced by 1,3-propanediol NAD+:oxidoreductase (1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase; EC 1.1.1.202), resulting in the regeneration of NAD+ from NADH. The pathway for the assimilation of glycerol is initiated by an NAD-linked dehydrogenase. In Klebsiella pneumoniae the two pathways are encoded by the dha regulon which is inducible only anaerobically. In this study 1,3-propanediol:NAD+ oxidoreductase was purified from cells grown anaerobically on glycerol. The enzyme was immunochemically distinct from the NAD-linked glycerol dehydrogenase and was an octamer or hexamer of a polypeptide of 45,000 +/- 3,000 daltons. When tested as a dehydrogenase, only 1,3-propanediol served as a substrate; no activity was detected with ethanol, 1-propanol, 1,2-propanediol, glycerol, or 1,4-butanediol. The enzyme was inhibited by chelators of divalent cations. An enzyme preparation inhibited by alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl was reactivated by the addition of Fe2+ or Mn2+ after removal of the chelator by gel filtration. As for glycerol dehydrogenase, 1,3-propanediol oxidoreductase is apparently inactivated by oxidation during aerobic metabolism, under which condition the enzyme becomes superfluous. Images PMID:3553154

  7. Suppression of NDA-type alternative mitochondrial NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in arabidopsis thaliana modifies growth and metabolism, but not high light stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport.

    PubMed

    Wallström, Sabá V; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Araújo, Wagner L; Escobar, Matthew A; Geisler, Daniela A; Aidemark, Mari; Lager, Ida; Fernie, Alisdair R; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Rasmusson, Allan G

    2014-05-01

    The plant respiratory chain contains several pathways which bypass the energy-conserving electron transport complexes I, III and IV. These energy bypasses, including type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases and the alternative oxidase (AOX), may have a role in redox stabilization and regulation, but current evidence is inconclusive. Using RNA interference, we generated Arabidopsis thaliana plants simultaneously suppressing the type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase genes NDA1 and NDA2. Leaf mitochondria contained substantially reduced levels of both proteins. In sterile culture in the light, the transgenic lines displayed a slow growth phenotype, which was more severe when the complex I inhibitor rotenone was present. Slower growth was also observed in soil. In rosette leaves, a higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)⁺ ratio and elevated levels of lactate relative to sugars and citric acid cycle metabolites were observed. However, photosynthetic performance was unaffected and microarray analyses indicated few transcriptional changes. A high light treatment increased AOX1a mRNA levels, in vivo AOX and cytochrome oxidase activities, and levels of citric acid cycle intermediates and hexoses in all genotypes. However, NDA-suppressing plants deviated from the wild type merely by having higher levels of several amino acids. These results suggest that NDA suppression restricts citric acid cycle reactions, inducing a shift towards increased levels of fermentation products, but do not support a direct association between photosynthesis and NDA proteins.

  8. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of the effect of 4-hydroxynonenal on endogenous NAD(P)H in living cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorvatova, Alzbeta; Aneba, Swida; Mateasik, Anton; Chorvat, Dusan; Comte, Blandine

    2013-06-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a major biochemical consequence of the oxidative deterioration of polyunsaturated lipids in cell membranes and causes damage to membrane integrity and loss of protein function. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), one of the most reactive products of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation of membrane phospholipids, has been shown to be capable of affecting both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) reduced [NAD(P)H] as well as NADH production. However, the understanding of its effects in living cardiac cells is still lacking. Our goal was to therefore investigate HNE effects on NAD(P)H noninvasively in living cardiomyocytes. Spectrally resolved lifetime detection of endogenous fluorescence, an innovative noninvasive technique, was employed. Individual fluorescence components were resolved by spectral linear unmixing approach. Gathered results revealed that HNE reduced the amplitude of both resolved NAD(P)H components in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, HNE increased flavoprotein fluorescence and responsiveness of the NAD(P)H component ratio to glutathione reductase (GR) inhibitor. HNE also increased the percentage of oxidized nucleotides and decreased maximal NADH production. Presented data indicate that HNE provoked an important cell oxidation by acting on NAD(P)H regulating systems in cardiomyocytes. Understanding the precise role of oxidative processes and their products in living cells is crucial for finding new noninvasive tools for biomedical diagnostics of pathophysiological states.

  9. Enhancing NAD+ salvage metabolism is neuroprotective in a PINK1 model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Susann; Loh, Samantha H. Y.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Familial forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) caused by mutations in PINK1 are linked to mitochondrial impairment. Defective mitochondria are also found in Drosophila models of PD with pink1 mutations. The co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is essential for both generating energy in mitochondria and nuclear DNA repair through NAD+-consuming poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). We found alterations in NAD+ salvage metabolism in Drosophila pink1 mutants and showed that a diet supplemented with the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide rescued mitochondrial defects and protected neurons from degeneration. Additionally, a mutation of Parp improved mitochondrial function and was neuroprotective in the pink1 mutants. We conclude that enhancing the availability of NAD+ by either the use of a diet supplemented with NAD+ precursors or the inhibition of NAD+-dependent enzymes, such as PARPs, which compete with mitochondria for NAD+, is a viable approach to preventing neurotoxicity associated with mitochondrial defects. PMID:28011627

  10. Targeted, LCMS-based Metabolomics for Quantitative Measurement of NAD(+) Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Samuel Aj; Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a coenzyme for hydride transfer reactions and a substrate for sirtuins and other NAD(+)-consuming enzymes. The abundance of NAD (+), NAD(+) biosynthetic intermediates, and related nucleotides reflects the metabolic state of cells and tissues. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) followed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopic analysis of NAD(+) metabolites does not offer the specificity and sensitivity necessary for robust quantification of complex samples. Thus, we developed a targeted, quantitative assay of the NAD(+) metabolome with the use of HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry. Here we discuss NAD(+) metabolism as well as the technical challenges required for reliable quantification of the NAD(+) metabolites. The new method incorporates new separations and improves upon a previously published method that suffered from the problem of ionization suppression for particular compounds.

  11. Deuterium MAS NMR studies of dynamics on multiple timescales: histidine and oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Wimperis, Stephen; Gervais, Christel; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Duma, Luminita

    2015-01-12

    Deuterium ((2) H) magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance is applied to monitor the dynamics of the exchanging labile deuterons of polycrystalline L-histidine hydrochloride monohydrate-d7 and α-oxalic acid dihydrate-d6 . Direct experimental evidence of fast dynamics is obtained from T1Z and T1Q measurements. Further motional information is extracted from two-dimensional single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) MAS spectra. Differences between the SQ and DQ linewidths clearly indicate the presence of motions on intermediate timescales for the carboxylic moiety and the D2 O in α-oxalic acid dihydrate, and for the amine group and the D2 O in L-histidine hydrochloride monohydrate. Comparison of the relaxation rate constants of Zeeman and quadrupolar order with the relaxation rate constants of the DQ coherences suggests the co-existence of fast and slow motional processes.

  12. NAD+ metabolism and the control of energy homeostasis - a balancing act between mitochondria and the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Menzies, Keir; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    NAD+ has emerged as a vital cofactor that can rewire metabolism, activate sirtuins and maintain mitochondrial fitness through mechanisms such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. This improved understanding of NAD+ metabolism revived interest in NAD+ boosting strategies to manage a wide spectrum of diseases, ranging from diabetes to cancer. In this review, we summarize how NAD+ metabolism links energy status with adaptive cellular and organismal responses and how this knowledge can be therapeutically exploited. PMID:26118927

  13. 6-Phospho-D-gluconate:NAD+ 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating) from slow-growing Rhizobia.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Drets, G; Gardiol, A; Arias, A

    1977-01-01

    6-Phospho-D-gluconate:NAD+ 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating) (NAD+-6PGD) was detected in several slow-growing strains of rhizobia, and no activity involving NADP+ was found in the same extracts. By contrast, fast-growing strains of rhizobia had NADP+-6PGD activity; most of them also had NAD+-6PGD activity. NAD+-6PGD was partially purified from the slow-growing strain Rhizobium japonicum 5006. The reaction was shown to be an oxidative decarboxylation. PMID:16867

  14. NAD(+) Metabolism and the Control of Energy Homeostasis: A Balancing Act between Mitochondria and the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Carles; Menzies, Keir J; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-07-07

    NAD(+) has emerged as a vital cofactor that can rewire metabolism, activate sirtuins, and maintain mitochondrial fitness through mechanisms such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. This improved understanding of NAD(+) metabolism revived interest in NAD(+)-boosting strategies to manage a wide spectrum of diseases, ranging from diabetes to cancer. In this review, we summarize how NAD(+) metabolism links energy status with adaptive cellular and organismal responses and how this knowledge can be therapeutically exploited.

  15. Coenzyme Engineering of a Hyperthermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+ with Its Application to Biobatteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Zhiguang; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the coenzyme specificity of redox enzymes plays an important role in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis, but it has rarely been applied to bioelectrochemistry. Here we develop a rational design strategy to change the coenzyme specificity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima from its natural coenzyme NADP+ to NAD+. Through amino acid-sequence alignment of NADP+- and NAD+-preferred 6PGDH enzymes and computer-aided substrate-coenzyme docking, the key amino acid residues responsible for binding the phosphate group of NADP+ were identified. Four mutants were obtained via site-directed mutagenesis. The best mutant N32E/R33I/T34I exhibited a ~6.4 × 104-fold reversal of the coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. The maximum power density and current density of the biobattery catalyzed by the mutant were 0.135 mW cm−2 and 0.255 mA cm−2, ~25% higher than those obtained from the wide-type 6PGDH-based biobattery at the room temperature. By using this 6PGDH mutant, the optimal temperature of running the biobattery was as high as 65 °C, leading to a high power density of 1.75 mW cm−2. This study demonstrates coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6PGDH and its application to high-temperature biobatteries. PMID:27805055

  16. Coenzyme Engineering of a Hyperthermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+ with Its Application to Biobatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Zhiguang; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-11-01

    Engineering the coenzyme specificity of redox enzymes plays an important role in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis, but it has rarely been applied to bioelectrochemistry. Here we develop a rational design strategy to change the coenzyme specificity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima from its natural coenzyme NADP+ to NAD+. Through amino acid-sequence alignment of NADP+- and NAD+-preferred 6PGDH enzymes and computer-aided substrate-coenzyme docking, the key amino acid residues responsible for binding the phosphate group of NADP+ were identified. Four mutants were obtained via site-directed mutagenesis. The best mutant N32E/R33I/T34I exhibited a ~6.4 × 104-fold reversal of the coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. The maximum power density and current density of the biobattery catalyzed by the mutant were 0.135 mW cm‑2 and 0.255 mA cm‑2, ~25% higher than those obtained from the wide-type 6PGDH-based biobattery at the room temperature. By using this 6PGDH mutant, the optimal temperature of running the biobattery was as high as 65 °C, leading to a high power density of 1.75 mW cm‑2. This study demonstrates coenzyme engineering of a hyperthermophilic 6PGDH and its application to high-temperature biobatteries.

  17. Interaction Signatures Stabilizing the NAD(P)-Binding Rossmann Fold: A Structure Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Upadhyay, Roopali; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2012-01-01

    The fidelity of the folding pathways being encoded in the amino acid sequence is met with challenge in instances where proteins with no sequence homology, performing different functions and no apparent evolutionary linkage, adopt a similar fold. The problem stated otherwise is that a limited fold space is available to a repertoire of diverse sequences. The key question is what factors lead to the formation of a fold from diverse sequences. Here, with the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann fold domains as a case study and using the concepts of network theory, we have unveiled the consensus structural features that drive the formation of this fold. We have proposed a graph theoretic formalism to capture the structural details in terms of the conserved atomic interactions in global milieu, and hence extract the essential topological features from diverse sequences. A unified mathematical representation of the different structures together with a judicious concoction of several network parameters enabled us to probe into the structural features driving the adoption of the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann fold. The atomic interactions at key positions seem to be better conserved in proteins, as compared to the residues participating in these interactions. We propose a “spatial motif” and several “fold specific hot spots” that form the signature structural blueprints of the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann fold domain. Excellent agreement of our data with previous experimental and theoretical studies validates the robustness and validity of the approach. Additionally, comparison of our results with statistical coupling analysis (SCA) provides further support. The methodology proposed here is general and can be applied to similar problems of interest. PMID:23284738

  18. The NAD/NARB System: Advertising Self-Regulation at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Robert

    Self-regulation, as defined by the National Advertising Division/National Advertising Review Board (NAD/NARB), is a process whereby the advertising industry regulates itself and turns to the federal government only if the system fails. The NAD/NARB system involves a two-step process: complaints are initially handled by the NAD and then are either…

  19. Regulation of SIRT2-dependent α-tubulin deacetylation by cellular NAD levels.

    PubMed

    Skoge, Renate Hvidsten; Dölle, Christian; Ziegler, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    Acetylation of α-tubulin on lysine 40 is one of the major posttranslational modifications of microtubules. The acetylation reaction is catalyzed by alpha-tubulin N-acetyltransferase and the modification can be reversed by either the NAD-independent class II histone deacetylase HDAC6 or the NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT2. In this study, we assessed to what extent cellular NAD levels are involved in the regulation of the α-tubulin acetylation state. Cells were subjected to different treatments known to influence cellular NAD content. In response to NAD depletion caused by inhibition of NAD synthesis from nicotinamide, α-tubulin was hyperacetylated. Under these conditions, the normal tubulin acetylation state could be restored by providing the cells with alternative NAD precursors. Likewise, decreasing the rate of endogenous NAD consumption using an inhibitor of poly-ADP-ribosylation also stabilized the acetylation of α-tubulin. Conversely, the level of acetylated α-tubulin decreased when NAD synthesis was enhanced by overexpression of an NAD biosynthetic enzyme. Combined, these results show that the tubulin acetylation status is reciprocally regulated by cellular NAD levels. Furthermore, we provide evidence confirming that the NAD-dependent regulation of tubulin acetylation is mediated by SIRT2.

  20. Effects of ethanol addition on formation of hydroxyapatite through hydrothermal treatment of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, T.; Kamitakahara, M.; Kim, I. Y.; Ohtsuki, C.

    2011-10-01

    The mixture of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and calcium acetate monohydrate were hydrothermally treated in a condition of water-ethanol mixed solvent at 120 °C for various periods. The rate of hydroxyapatite (HAp) formation was decreased with increasing the volume ratio of ethanol, to result in formation of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous and β-tricalcium phosphate. Needle-like HAp particles were observed in the sample treated with the mere water. The sample treated with the ethanol-water mixed solvent had nano-sized HAp particles with a form of the plate-like crystals. The size of HAp crystal was decreased with increasing the fraction of ethanol. These results show that HAp formation and crystal growth were prevented by the ethanol addition.

  1. Growth, photoluminescence, thermal and mechanical behaviour of Ethyltriphenylphosphonium bromide dihydrate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2013-10-01

    Single crystal of Ethyltriphenylphosphonium bromide dihydrate (ETPB) was grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The grown crystal was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The functional groups and vibrational frequencies were identified using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral analyses. Optical properties were studied by UV-Visible and photoluminescence spectroscopic techniques to explore its efficacy towards device fabrication. Thermal characteristics of ETPB were studied using the TGA/DTA and DSC response curves. The mechanical behaviour of the grown crystal was studied using Vicker's microhardness tester and the work hardening coefficient was evaluated. The second harmonic generation of the title compound was tested by Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  2. Dual roles of borax in kinetics of calcium sulfate dihydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenge; Pan, Haihua; Tao, Jinhui; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2007-04-24

    An additive is not exclusively retardant or promoter for a crystallization system. The kinetic studies of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD) crystal growth demonstrated that borax played dual roles in the reaction, which accelerated CSD formations at the low concentration levels but inhibited the crystal growth at the high ones. In situ atomic force microscopy studies revealed that borax modulated the CSD crystallization via two different pathways: promoted the secondary nucleation to increase the step density on the growing crystal faces but simultaneously retarded the spread of these growth steps by the Langmuir adsorption. These two contradictory factors were incorporated in the crystallization, and their balance was regulated by the borax concentration. Both the macroscopic and microscopic experimental data nicely displayed the crystallization model of birth and spread that was able to account for the behaviors of borax in CSD formations.

  3. Crystal structure of 3,5-di­methyl­pyridine N-oxide dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Merino García, Rosario; Ríos-Merino, Francisco Javier; Bernès, Sylvain; Reyes-Ortega, Yasmi

    2016-01-01

    In the title compound, also known as 3,5-lutidine N-oxide dihydrate, C7H9NO·2H2O, the N—O bond is weakened due to the involvement of the O atom as an acceptor of hydrogen bonds from the two water mol­ecules of crystallization present in the asymmetric unit. Fused R 3 5(10) ring motifs based on O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form chains in the [010] direction, which are further connected by weak C—H⋯O inter­molecular contacts. As a result, the lutidine mol­ecules are stacked in an efficient manner, with π–π contacts characterized by a short separation of 3.569 (1) Å between the benzene rings. PMID:27980810

  4. Crystallization of calcium sulfate dihydrate in the presence of some metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdona, Samia K.; Al Hadad, Umaima A.

    2007-02-01

    Crystallization of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO 4·2H 2O gypsum) in sodium chloride solutions in the presence of some metal ions, and over a range of relative super-saturation has been studied. The addition of metal ions, even at relatively low concentration (10 -6 mol l -1), markedly retard the rate of crystallization of gypsum. Retardation effect was enhanced with increase in the additives contents. Moreover, the effect was enhanced as the relative super-saturation decreases. Influence of mixed additives on the rate of crystallization (Cd 2++Arg, Cd 2++H 3PO 4 and Cd 2++PAA) has also been studied. Direct adsorption experiments of these metal ions on the surface of gypsum crystals have been made for comparison.

  5. Identification and characterization of the motion of water molecules in normal and deuterated pyromellitic acid dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schajor, W.; Haeberlen, U.; Tegenfeldt, T.

    Proton wide-line, multiple-pulse, T1 and T1 ϱ measurements on single crystals of PMADH, and deuteron EFG measurements and bandshape analyses of spectra recorded from deuterated crystals of PMADH are reported. The wide-line and multiple-pulse proton results indicate that the water molecules in PMADH are flipping about their twofold symmetry axes. Both T1 and T1 ϱ were measured as a function of crystal orientation and temperature. Comparison of the experimental data with model calculations for T1 ϱ based on the established flipping motions of the water molecules shows that {1}/{T 1ϱ} is dominated by this process whereas {1}/{T 1} is not. The T1 ϱ data thus enable determination of the rate of the H 2O flips as a function of temperature. EFGs of the water deuterons in deuterated PMADH, measured at low and high temperatures, confirm the occurrence of the flips for D 2O in PMADH. The flips constitute an exchange process for the water deuterons. Bandshape analyses of single-crystal deuteron spectra recorded at temperatures covering the full range of exchange rates allowed determination of the flip rates of the D 2O molecules. The activation energies for the H 2O and D 2O flips are the same, Ea = 10 kcal/mol, within the limits of accuracy of the experiments. The frequency factors in the Arrhenius relation are 8.3 X 10 13 sec -1 (H 2O) and 2.6 X 10 13 sec -1 (D 2O).

  6. Influence of environmental conditions on the kinetics and mechanism of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Suryanarayanan, R

    1998-11-01

    The object of this project was to study the influence of temperature and water vapor pressure on the kinetics and mechanism of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate and to establish the relationship between the dehydration mechanism and the solid-state of the anhydrous phase formed. Three experimental techniques were utilized to study the kinetics of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate (C15H12N2O.2H2O)-thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and variable temperature powder X-ray diffractometry (VTXRD). These techniques respectively provide information about the changes in weight, heat flow and solid-state (phase) during the dehydration process. The instrumental setup was modified so that simultaneous control of both the temperature and the water vapor pressure was possible. The experiments were carried out at different temperatures, ranging from 26 to 64 degrees C. In the absence of water vapor, the dehydration followed the 2-dimensional phase boundary controlled model at all the temperatures studied. In the next stage, the water vapor pressure was altered while the studies were carried out at a single temperature of 44 degrees C. The dehydration was 2-dimensional phase boundary controlled at water vapor pressures < or = 5.1 torr while the Avrami-Erofeev kinetics (3-dimensional nucleation) was followed at water vapor pressures > or = 12.0 torr. In the former case, the anhydrous phase formed was X-ray amorphous while it was the crystalline anhydrous gamma-carbamazepine in the latter. Thus a relationship between the mechanism of dehydration and the solid-state of the product phase was evident. The dehydration conditions influence not only the mechanism but also the solid-state of the anhydrous phase formed. While the techniques of TGA and DSC have found extensive use in studying dehydration reactions, VTXRD proved to be an excellent complement in characterizing the solid-states of the reactant and product phases.

  7. Gallium Arsenate Dihydrate under Pressure: Elastic Properties, Compression Mechanism, and Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Elinor C; Soghomonian, Victoria; Ross, Nancy L

    2015-08-03

    Gallium arsenate dihydrate is a member of a class of isostructural compounds, with the general formula M(3+)AsO4·2H2O (M(3+) = Fe, Al, In, or Ga), which are being considered as potential solid-state storage media for the sequestration of toxic arsenic cations. We report the first high-pressure structural analysis of a metal arsenate dihydrate, namely, GaAsO4·2H2O. This compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with Z = 8. Accurate unit cell parameters as a function of pressure were obtained by high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and a bulk modulus of 51.1(3) GPa for GaAsO4·2H2O was determined from a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state fit to the P-V data. Assessment of the pressure dependencies of the unit cell lengths showed that the compressibility of the structure along the axial directions increases in the order of [010] < [100] < [001]. This order was found to correlate well with the proposed compression mechanism for GaAsO4·2H2O, which involves deformation of the internal channel void spaces of the polyhedral helices that lie parallel to the [010] direction, and increased distortion of the GaO6 octahedra. The findings of the high-pressure diffraction experiment were further supported by the results from variable-pressure Raman analysis of GaAsO4·2H2O. Moreover, we propose a revised and more complex model for the hydrogen-bonding scheme in GaAsO4·2H2O, and on the basis of this revision, we reassigned the peaks in the OH stretching regions of previously published Raman spectra of this compound.

  8. Extracellular NAD(+): a danger signal hindering regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Adriouch, Sahil; Haag, Friedrich; Boyer, Olivier; Seman, Michel; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2012-11-01

    Endogenous danger signals released during cell damage contribute to alert the immune system. Typically, their release results in the activation and maturation of innate immune cells, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, extracellular NAD(+) stimulates immune responses by hindering regulatory T cells (Tregs), and could, therefore, represent the prototype of a new category of danger signals.

  9. In vitro metabolic engineering for the salvage synthesis of NAD(.).

    PubMed

    Honda, Kohsuke; Hara, Naoya; Cheng, Maria; Nakamura, Anna; Mandai, Komako; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2016-05-01

    Excellent thermal and operational stabilities of thermophilic enzymes can greatly increase the applicability of biocatalysis in various industrial fields. However, thermophilic enzymes are generally incompatible with thermo-labile substrates, products, and cofactors, since they show the maximal activities at high temperatures. Despite their pivotal roles in a wide range of enzymatic redox reactions, NAD(P)(+) and NAD(P)H exhibit relatively low stabilities at high temperatures, tending to be a major obstacle in the long-term operation of biocatalytic chemical manufacturing with thermophilic enzymes. In this study, we constructed an in vitro artificial metabolic pathway for the salvage synthesis of NAD(+) from its degradation products by the combination of eight thermophilic enzymes. The enzymes were heterologously produced in recombinant Escherichia coli and the heat-treated crude extracts of the recombinant cells were directly used as enzyme solutions. When incubated with experimentally optimized concentrations of the enzymes at 60°C, the NAD(+) concentration could be kept almost constant for 15h.

  10. Dunnione ameliorates cisplatin ototoxicity through modulation of NAD(+) metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Pandit, Arpana; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Lee, SeungHoon; Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2016-03-01

    Ototoxicity is an important issue in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy. Numerous studies have demonstrated that cisplatin-induced ototoxicity is related to oxidative stress and DNA damage. However, the precise mechanism underlying cisplatin-associated ototoxicity is still unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) has emerged as an important regulator of energy metabolism and cellular homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that the levels and activities of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) are suppressed by the reduction of intracellular NAD(+) levels in cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. We provide evidence that the decreases in SIRT1 activity and expression facilitated by increasing poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation and microRNA-34a levels through cisplatin-mediated p53 activation aggravate the associated ototoxicity. Furthermore, we show that the induction of cellular NAD(+) levels using dunnione, which targets intracellular NQO1, prevents the toxic effects of cisplatin through the regulation of PARP-1 and SIRT1 activity. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD(+) levels by pharmacological agents could be a promising therapeutic approach for protection from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  11. NMNAT1 inhibits axon degeneration via blockade of SARM1-mediated NAD+ depletion

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yo; Nakagawa, Takashi; Mao, Xianrong; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT1 leads to preservation of injured axons. While increased NAD+ or decreased NMN levels are thought to be critical to this process, the mechanism(s) of this axon protection remain obscure. Using steady-state and flux analysis of NAD+ metabolites in healthy and injured mouse dorsal root ganglion axons, we find that rather than altering NAD+ synthesis, NMNAT1 instead blocks the injury-induced, SARM1-dependent NAD+ consumption that is central to axon degeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19749.001 PMID:27735788

  12. Neuronal death induced by misfolded prion protein is due to NAD+ depletion and can be relieved in vitro and in vivo by NAD+ replenishment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Minghai; Ottenberg, Gregory; Sferrazza, Gian Franco; Hubbs, Christopher; Fallahi, Mohammad; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Brantley, Alicia F.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal death in protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases are poorly understood. We used a highly toxic misfolded prion protein (TPrP) model to understand neurotoxicity induced by prion protein misfolding. We show that abnormal autophagy activation and neuronal demise is due to severe, neuron-specific, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) depletion. Toxic prion protein-exposed neuronal cells exhibit dramatic reductions of intracellular NAD+ followed by decreased ATP production, and are completely rescued by treatment with NAD+ or its precursor nicotinamide because of restoration of physiological NAD+ levels. Toxic prion protein-induced NAD+ depletion results from PARP1-independent excessive protein ADP-ribosylations. In vivo, toxic prion protein-induced degeneration of hippocampal neurons is prevented dose-dependently by intracerebral injection of NAD+. Intranasal NAD+ treatment of prion-infected sick mice significantly improves activity and delays motor impairment. Our study reveals NAD+ starvation as a novel mechanism of autophagy activation and neurodegeneration induced by a misfolded amyloidogenic protein. We propose the development of NAD+ replenishment strategies for neuroprotection in prion diseases and possibly other protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25678560

  13. Neuronal death induced by misfolded prion protein is due to NAD+ depletion and can be relieved in vitro and in vivo by NAD+ replenishment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghai; Ottenberg, Gregory; Sferrazza, Gian Franco; Hubbs, Christopher; Fallahi, Mohammad; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Brantley, Alicia F; Lasmézas, Corinne I

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal death in protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion diseases are poorly understood. We used a highly toxic misfolded prion protein (TPrP) model to understand neurotoxicity induced by prion protein misfolding. We show that abnormal autophagy activation and neuronal demise is due to severe, neuron-specific, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) depletion. Toxic prion protein-exposed neuronal cells exhibit dramatic reductions of intracellular NAD(+) followed by decreased ATP production, and are completely rescued by treatment with NAD(+) or its precursor nicotinamide because of restoration of physiological NAD(+) levels. Toxic prion protein-induced NAD(+) depletion results from PARP1-independent excessive protein ADP-ribosylations. In vivo, toxic prion protein-induced degeneration of hippocampal neurons is prevented dose-dependently by intracerebral injection of NAD(+). Intranasal NAD(+) treatment of prion-infected sick mice significantly improves activity and delays motor impairment. Our study reveals NAD(+) starvation as a novel mechanism of autophagy activation and neurodegeneration induced by a misfolded amyloidogenic protein. We propose the development of NAD(+) replenishment strategies for neuroprotection in prion diseases and possibly other protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Molecular Basis of Ligand-Dependent Regulation of NadR, the Transcriptional Repressor of Meningococcal Virulence Factor NadA

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Alessia; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Fagnocchi, Luca; Cantini, Francesca; Haag, Andreas F.; Brier, Sébastien; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Delany, Isabel; Bottomley, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is present on the meningococcal surface and contributes to adhesion to and invasion of human cells. NadA is also one of three recombinant antigens in the recently-approved Bexsero vaccine, which protects against serogroup B meningococcus. The amount of NadA on the bacterial surface is of direct relevance in the constant battle of host-pathogen interactions: it influences the ability of the pathogen to engage human cell surface-exposed receptors and, conversely, the bacterial susceptibility to the antibody-mediated immune response. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms which regulate nadA expression levels, which are predominantly controlled by the transcriptional regulator NadR (Neisseria adhesin A Regulator) both in vitro and in vivo. NadR binds the nadA promoter and represses gene transcription. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA), a catabolite present in human saliva both under physiological conditions and during bacterial infection, the binding of NadR to the nadA promoter is attenuated and nadA expression is induced. NadR also mediates ligand-dependent regulation of many other meningococcal genes, for example the highly-conserved multiple adhesin family (maf) genes, which encode proteins emerging with important roles in host-pathogen interactions, immune evasion and niche adaptation. To gain insights into the regulation of NadR mediated by 4-HPA, we combined structural, biochemical, and mutagenesis studies. In particular, two new crystal structures of ligand-free and ligand-bound NadR revealed (i) the molecular basis of ‘conformational selection’ by which a single molecule of 4-HPA binds and stabilizes dimeric NadR in a conformation unsuitable for DNA-binding, (ii) molecular explanations for the binding specificities of different hydroxyphenylacetate ligands, including 3Cl,4-HPA which is produced during inflammation, (iii) the presence of a leucine residue essential for dimerization and conserved in

  15. Small kernel 1 encodes a pentatricopeptide repeat protein required for mitochondrial nad7 transcript editing and seed development in maize (Zea mays) and rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jie; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Hou, Mingming; Sun, Feng; Shen, Yun; Xiu, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Xiaomin; Chen, Zong-Liang; Sun, Samuel S M; Small, Ian; Tan, Bao-Cai

    2014-09-01

    RNA editing modifies cytidines (C) to uridines (U) at specific sites in the transcripts of mitochondria and plastids, altering the amino acid specified by the DNA sequence. Here we report the identification of a critical editing factor of mitochondrial nad7 transcript via molecular characterization of a small kernel 1 (smk1) mutant in Zea mays (maize). Mutations in Smk1 arrest both the embryo and endosperm development. Cloning of Smk1 indicates that it encodes an E-subclass pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein that is targeted to mitochondria. Loss of SMK1 function abolishes the C → U editing at the nad7-836 site, leading to the retention of a proline codon that is edited to encode leucine in the wild type. The smk1 mutant showed dramatically reduced complex-I assembly and NADH dehydrogenase activity, and abnormal biogenesis of the mitochondria. Analysis of the ortholog in Oryza sativa (rice) reveals that rice SMK1 has a conserved function in C → U editing of the mitochondrial nad7-836 site. T-DNA knock-out mutants showed abnormal embryo and endosperm development, resulting in embryo or seedling lethality. The leucine at NAD7-279 is highly conserved from bacteria to flowering plants, and analysis of genome sequences from many plants revealed a molecular coevolution between the requirement for C → U editing at this site and the existence of an SMK1 homolog. These results demonstrate that Smk1 encodes a PPR-E protein that is required for nad7-836 editing, and this editing is critical to NAD7 function in complex-I assembly in mitochondria, and hence to embryo and endosperm development in maize and rice.

  16. Increasing NAD synthesis in muscle via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is not sufficient to promote oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Frederick, David W; Davis, James G; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A

    2015-01-16

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle.

  17. Increasing NAD Synthesis in Muscle via Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Is Not Sufficient to Promote Oxidative Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, David W.; Davis, James G.; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  18. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD)/Pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint – FNA findings and microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Asghar H; Abraham, Jerrold L; Kellman, Robert M; Khurana, Kamal K

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of a Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) presenting as a mass in the parotid and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that simulated a parotid tumor. A 35 year-old man presented with pain in the left ear area. A CT Scan of the area showed a large, calcified mass surrounding the left condylar head, and extending into the infratemporal fossa. FNA of the mass showed birefringent crystals, most of which were rhomboid with occasional ones being needle shaped, embedded in an amorphous pink substance. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of these crystals showed peaks corresponding to calcium and phosphorus. SEM/EDS is a rapid method of diagnosing calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) and an alternative to more commonly used method of special staining of cell block sections coupled with polarizing microscopy. PMID:18426573

  19. Hairpin stabilized fluorescent silver nanoclusters for quantitative detection of NAD(+) and monitoring NAD(+)/NADH based enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Jain, Priyamvada; Chakma, Babina; Patra, Sanjukta; Goswami, Pranab

    2017-03-01

    A set of 90 mer long ssDNA candidates, with different degrees of cytosine (C-levels) (% and clusters) was analyzed for their function as suitable Ag-nanocluster (AgNC) nucleation scaffolds. The sequence (P4) with highest C-level (42.2%) emerged as the only candidate supporting the nucleation process as evident from its intense fluorescence peak at λ660 nm. Shorter DNA subsets derived from P4 with only stable hairpin structures could support the AgNC formation. The secondary hairpin structures were confirmed by PAGE, and CD studies. The number of base pairs in the stem region also contributes to the stability of the hairpins. A shorter 29 mer sequence (Sub 3) (ΔG = -1.3 kcal/mol) with 3-bp in the stem of a 7-mer loop conferred highly stable AgNC. NAD(+) strongly quenched the fluorescence of Sub 3-AgNC in a concentration dependent manner. Time resolved photoluminescence studies revealed the quenching involves a combined static and dynamic interaction where the binding constant and number of binding sites for NAD(+) were 0.201 L mol(-1) and 3.6, respectively. A dynamic NAD(+) detection range of 50-500 μM with a limit of detection of 22.3 μM was discerned. The NAD(+) mediated quenching of AgNC was not interfered by NADH, NADP(+), monovalent and divalent ions, or serum samples. The method was also used to follow alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase catalyzed physiological reactions in a turn-on and turn-off assay, respectively. The proposed method with ssDNA-AgNC could therefore be extended to monitor other NAD(+)/NADH based enzyme catalyzed reactions in a turn-on/turn-off approach.

  20. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD(+) is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD(+) homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD(+) metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD(+) metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD(+) metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD(+) metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD(+) metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD(+) metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD(+)-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD(+) intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD(+) homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD(+) and NAD(+) intermediates

  1. Sequence divergence and diversity suggests ongoing functional diversification of vertebrate NAD metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gossmann, Toni I; Ziegler, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    NAD is not only an important cofactor in redox reactions but has also received attention in recent years because of its physiological importance in metabolic regulation, DNA repair and signaling. In contrast to the redox reactions, these regulatory processes involve degradation of NAD and therefore necessitate a constant replenishment of its cellular pool. NAD biosynthetic enzymes are common to almost all species in all clades, but the number of NAD degrading enzymes varies substantially across taxa. In particular, vertebrates, including humans, have a manifold of NAD degrading enzymes which require a high turnover of NAD. As there is currently a lack of a systematic study of how natural selection has shaped enzymes involved in NAD metabolism we conducted a comprehensive evolutionary analysis based on intraspecific variation and interspecific divergence. We compare NAD biosynthetic and degrading enzymes in four eukaryotic model species and subsequently focus on human NAD metabolic enzymes and their orthologs in other vertebrates. We find that the majority of enzymes involved in NAD metabolism are subject to varying levels of purifying selection. While NAD biosynthetic enzymes appear to experience a rather high level of evolutionary constraint, there is evidence for positive selection among enzymes mediating NAD-dependent signaling. This is particularly evident for members of the PARP family, a diverse protein family involved in DNA damage repair and programmed cell death. Based on haplotype information and substitution rate analysis we pinpoint sites that are potential targets of positive selection. We also link our findings to a three dimensional structure, which suggests that positive selection occurs in domains responsible for DNA binding and polymerization rather than the NAD catalytic domain. Taken together, our results indicate that vertebrate NAD metabolism is still undergoing functional diversification.

  2. Anhydrous ammonioguanidinium(2+) and dihydrated bis[aminoguanidinium(1+)] hexafluorosilicates: new co-products of preparing ferroelectric ammonioguanidinium(2+) hexafluorozirconate.

    PubMed

    Ross, C R; Bauer, M R; Nielson, R M; Abrahams, S C

    1999-04-01

    Ammonioguanidinium hexafluorosilicate, CH8N4(2+).SiF6(2-), and bis(aminoguanidinium) hexafluorosilicate dihydrate, 2CH7N4+.SiF6(2-).2H2O, are new materials formed as by-products in course of preparing ferroelectric CH8N4ZrF6 in the presence of glassware. Their structures were determined for comparison with the corresponding hexafluorozirconates. All atoms including the eight H atoms in the CH8N4(2+) cation and the seven H atoms in the CH7N4+ cation have been located and refined with wR(F2) = 0.0653, R = 0.0255, S = 1.146 and wR(F2) = 0.0745, R = 0.0301, S = 1.065, respectively. The N2C-N-N backbone of the 2+ cation is close to planarity, while that of the 1+ cation does not differ significantly from planarity. The SiF6(2-) octahedron is nearly ideally regular in both materials, with < Si-F > = 1.684 (unbiassed estimator of standard uncertainty = 0.016) A in the anhydrous hexafluorosilicate and 1.6801 (unbiassed estimator of standard uncertainty = 0.0006) A in the dihydrate. The combination of coulombic and NH...F interactions in CH8N4SiF6 results in a relatively dense variant of the NaCl structure. In addition to similar forces, the dihydrate is also characterized by the role of the water molecule with its strong NH...O interactions; its packing efficiency is, however, appreciably less than that of the anhydrous hexafluorosilicate with an approximately 8% increase in void space. Cleaved crystals of the dihydrate are frequently twinned across the (001) composition plane, with a twofold rotation about the b axis as the twin operation.

  3. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant short-chain NAD(H)-dependent dehydrogenase/reductase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, Angela; Giordano, Assunta; Pucci, Biagio; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2010-03-01

    The gene encoding a novel alcohol dehydrogenase that belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) superfamily was identified in the aerobic thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius strain DSM 639. The saadh gene was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein (SaADH) was purified to homogeneity and characterized. SaADH is a tetrameric enzyme consisting of identical 28,978-Da subunits, each composed of 264 amino acids. The enzyme has remarkable thermophilicity and thermal stability, displaying activity at temperatures up to 75 degrees C and a 30-min half-inactivation temperature of ~90 degrees C, and shows good tolerance to common organic solvents. SaADH has a strict requirement for NAD(H) as the coenzyme, and displays a preference for the reduction of alicyclic, bicyclic and aromatic ketones and alpha-keto esters, but is poorly active on aliphatic, cyclic and aromatic alcohols, and shows no activity on aldehydes. The enzyme catalyses the reduction of alpha-methyl and alpha-ethyl benzoylformate, and methyl o-chlorobenzoylformate with 100% conversion to methyl (S)-mandelate [17% enantiomeric excess (ee)], ethyl (R)-mandelate (50% ee), and methyl (R)-o-chloromandelate (72% ee), respectively, with an efficient in situ NADH-recycling system which involves glucose and a thermophilic glucose dehydrogenase. This study provides further evidence supporting the critical role of the D37 residue in discriminating NAD(H) from NAD(P)H in members of the SDR superfamily.

  4. The NAD World: a new systemic regulatory network for metabolism and aging--Sirt1, systemic NAD biosynthesis, and their importance.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shin-Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    For the past several years, it has been demonstrated that the NAD-dependent protein deacetylase Sirt1 and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)-mediated systemic NAD biosynthesis together play a critical role in the regulation of metabolism and possibly aging in mammals. Based on our recent studies on these two critical components, we have developed a hypothesis of a novel systemic regulatory network, named "NAD World", for mammalian aging. Conceptually, in the NAD World, systemic NAD biosynthesis mediated by intra- and extracellular Nampt functions as a driver that keeps up the pace of metabolism in multiple tissues/organs, and the NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirt1 serves as a universal mediator that executes metabolic effects in a tissue-dependent manner in response to changes in systemic NAD biosynthesis. This new concept of the NAD World provides important insights into a systemic regulatory mechanism that fundamentally connects metabolism and aging and also conveys the ideas of functional hierarchy and frailty for the regulation of metabolic robustness and aging in mammals.

  5. Sources and implications of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance in diabetes and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Zheng, Hong; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    NAD+ is a fundamental molecule in metabolism and redox signaling. In diabetes and its complications, the balance between NADH and NAD+ can be severely perturbed. On one hand, NADH is overproduced due to influx of hyperglycemia to the glycolytic and Krebs cycle pathways and activation of the polyol pathway. On the other hand, NAD+ can be diminished or depleted by overactivation of poly ADP ribose polymerase that uses NAD+ as its substrate. Moreover, sirtuins, another class of enzymes that also use NAD+ as their substrate for catalyzing protein deacetylation reactions, can also affect cellular content of NAD+. Impairment of NAD+ regeneration enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and complex I in mitochondria can also contribute to NADH accumulation and NAD+ deficiency. The consequence of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance is initially reductive stress that eventually leads to oxidative stress and oxidative damage to macromolecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. Accordingly, redox imbalance-triggered oxidative damage has been thought to be a major factor contributing to the development of diabetes and its complications. Future studies on restoring NADH/NAD+ redox balance could provide further insights into design of novel antidiabetic strategies. PMID:27274295

  6. Sources and implications of NADH/NAD(+) redox imbalance in diabetes and its complications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Zheng, Hong; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    NAD(+) is a fundamental molecule in metabolism and redox signaling. In diabetes and its complications, the balance between NADH and NAD(+) can be severely perturbed. On one hand, NADH is overproduced due to influx of hyperglycemia to the glycolytic and Krebs cycle pathways and activation of the polyol pathway. On the other hand, NAD(+) can be diminished or depleted by overactivation of poly ADP ribose polymerase that uses NAD(+) as its substrate. Moreover, sirtuins, another class of enzymes that also use NAD(+) as their substrate for catalyzing protein deacetylation reactions, can also affect cellular content of NAD(+). Impairment of NAD(+) regeneration enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and complex I in mitochondria can also contribute to NADH accumulation and NAD(+) deficiency. The consequence of NADH/NAD(+) redox imbalance is initially reductive stress that eventually leads to oxidative stress and oxidative damage to macromolecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. Accordingly, redox imbalance-triggered oxidative damage has been thought to be a major factor contributing to the development of diabetes and its complications. Future studies on restoring NADH/NAD(+) redox balance could provide further insights into design of novel antidiabetic strategies.

  7. The potential regulatory roles of NAD(+) and its metabolism in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Ping; Hu, Jiong-Yu; Huang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    (Macro)autophagy mediates the bulk degradation of defective organelles, long-lived proteins and protein aggregates in lysosomes and plays a critical role in cellular and tissue homeostasis. Defective autophagy processes have been found to contribute to a variety of metabolic diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy are not fully understood. Increasing data indicate that nicotinamide adenine nucleotide (NAD(+)) homeostasis correlates intimately with autophagy. NAD(+) is a ubiquitous coenzyme that functions primarily as an electron carrier of oxidoreductase in multiple redox reactions. Both NAD(+) homeostasis and its metabolism are thought to play critical roles in regulating autophagy. In this review, we discuss how the regulation of NAD(+) and its metabolism can influence autophagy. We focus on the regulation of NAD(+)/NADH homeostasis and the effects of NAD(+) consumption by poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation by sirtuins and NAD(+) metabolites on autophagy processes and the underlying mechanisms. Future studies should provide more direct evidence for the regulation of autophagy processes by NAD(+). A better understanding of the critical roles of NAD(+) and its metabolites on autophagy will shed light on the complexity of autophagy regulation, which is essential for the discovery of new therapeutic tools for autophagy-related diseases.

  8. High early strength calcium phosphate bone cement: effects of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and absorbable fibers.

    PubMed

    Burguera, Elena F; Xu, Hockin H K; Takagi, Shozo; Chow, Laurence C

    2005-12-15

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) sets in situ to form resorbable hydroxyapatite with chemical and crystallographic similarity to the apatite in human bones, hence it is highly promising for clinical applications. The objective of the present study was to develop a CPC that is fast setting and has high strength in the early stages of implantation. Two approaches were combined to impart high early strength to the cement: the use of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate with a high solubility (which formed the cement CPC(D)) instead of anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (which formed the conventional cement CPC(A)), and the incorporation of absorbable fibers. A 2 x 8 design was tested with two materials (CPC(A) and CPC(D)) and eight levels of cement reaction time: 15 min, 30 min, 1 h, 1.5 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h. An absorbable suture fiber was incorporated into cements at 25% volume fraction. The Gilmore needle method measured a hardening time of 15.8 min for CPC(D), five-fold faster than 81.5 min for CPC(A), at a powder:liquid ratio of 3:1. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of nanosized rod-like hydroxyapatite crystals and platelet crystals in the cements. At 30 min, the flexural strength (mean +/- standard deviation; n = 5) was 0 MPa for CPC(A) (the paste did not set), (4.2 +/- 0.3) MPa for CPC(D), and (10.7 +/- 2.4) MPa for CPC(D)-fiber specimens, significantly different from each other (Tukey's at 0.95). The work of fracture (toughness) was increased by two orders of magnitude for the CPC(D)-fiber cement. The high early strength matched the reported strength for cancellous bone and sintered porous hydroxyapatite implants. The composite strength S(c) was correlated to the matrix strength S(m): S(c) = 2.16S(m). In summary, substantial early strength was imparted to a moldable, self-hardening and resorbable hydroxyapatite via two synergistic approaches: dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, and absorbable fibers. The new fast-setting and strong cement may help prevent

  9. Formation of N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylformamidinium disulphide from the chemical and electrochemical oxidation of tetramethylthiourea: Vibrational spectra and crystal structure of the chloride dihydrate salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzán, A. E.; Güida, J. A.; Piatti, R. C. V.; Arvia, A. J.; Piro, O. E.; Sabino, J. R.; Castellano, E. E.

    2007-12-01

    The N, N, N', N'-tetramethylformamidinium disulphide (TMFDS) was prepared from either the electro-oxidation of tetramethylthiourea (TMTU) on platinum electrodes in aqueous perchloric acid solution or the chemical oxidation of TMTU with hydrogen peroxide in hydrochloric acid-containing absolute ethanol. The electrochemical formation of TMFDS at different potentials was followed by in situ FTIRRAS spectroscopy. The IR and Raman spectra of TMFDS chemically formed as a chloride dihydrate were determined and compared to the product produced electrochemically. The crystal structure of the chloride salt [N(CH 3) 2] 2C dbnd S sbnd S dbnd C [N(CH 3) 2] 2Cl 2·2H 2O, as determined by X-ray diffraction, crystallises in the monoclinic C2/ c space group with a = 23.267(1), b = 10.824(1), c = 17.774(1) Å, β = 126.91(1)°, and Z = 8. The structure was solved from 2489 reflections with I > 2 σ( I) and refined to an agreement R1-factor of 0.0405. The two molecular halves of the dimeric [N(CH)2]2C dbnd S sbnd S dbnd C [N(CH)2]22+ ion are linked by a disulphide single bond [ d(S sbnd S) = 2.0454(9) Å] and related to each other by a non-crystallographic pseudo two-fold axis. DFT structure optimisation and normal mode frequencies were calculated using the 6-311G(d,f) basis set at DFT theory level. An estimation of the free energy for the dimer formation and rate ratio for the homogeneous and heterogeneous processes are presented. These data are consistent with the electrochemical mechanism of the anodic formation of TMFDS 2+ from TMTU electro-oxidation in acid solutions.

  10. The Circadian NAD+ Metabolism: Impact on Chromatin Remodeling and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bessho, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is known to be a stochastic phenomenon. The stochastic gene expression rate is thought to be altered by topological change of chromosome and/or by chromatin modifications such as acetylation and methylation. Changes in mechanical properties of chromosome/chromatin by soluble factors, mechanical stresses from the environment, or metabolites determine cell fate, regulate cellular functions, or maintain cellular homeostasis. Circadian clock, which drives the expression of thousands of genes with 24-hour rhythmicity, has been known to be indispensable for maintaining cellular functions/homeostasis. During the last decade, it has been demonstrated that chromatin also undergoes modifications with 24-hour rhythmicity and facilitates the fine-tuning of circadian gene expression patterns. In this review, we cover data which suggests that chromatin structure changes in a circadian manner and that NAD+ is the key metabolite for circadian chromatin remodeling. Furthermore, we discuss the relationship among circadian clock, NAD+ metabolism, and aging/age-related diseases. In addition, the interventions of NAD+ metabolism for the prevention and treatment of aging and age-related diseases are also discussed. PMID:28050554

  11. De-novo NAD+ synthesis regulates SIRT1-FOXO1 apoptotic pathway in response to NQO1 substrates in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuefang; Li, Qingran; Liu, Fang; Ye, Hui; Zhao, Min; Wang, Hong; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan metabolism is essential in diverse kinds of tumors via regulating tumor immunology. However, the direct role of tryptophan metabolism and its signaling pathway in cancer cells remain largely elusive. Here, we establish a mechanistic link from L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) mediated transport of tryptophan and the subsequent de-novo NAD+ synthesis to SIRT1-FOXO1 regulated apoptotic signaling in A549 cells in response to NQO1 activation. In response to NQO1 activation, SIRT1 is repressed leading to the increased cellular accumulation of acetylated FOXO1 that transcriptionally activates apoptotic signaling. Decreased uptake of tryptophan due to the downregulation of LAT1 coordinates with PARP-1 hyperactivation to induce rapid depletion of NAD+ pool. Particularly, the LAT1-NAD+-SIRT1 signaling is activated in tumor tissues of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Because NQO1 activation is characterized with oxidative challenge induced DNA damage, these results suggest that LAT1 and de-novo NAD+ synthesis in NSCLC cells may play essential roles in sensing excessive oxidative stress. PMID:27566573

  12. Molecular structure, vibrational spectra and DFT computational studies of melaminium N-acetylglycinate dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanak, H.; Pawlus, K.; Marchewka, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    Melaminium N-acetylglycinate dihydrate, an organic material has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, and FT-Raman spectroscopies for the protiated and deuteriated crystals. The title complex crystallizes in the triclinic system, and the space group is P-1 with a = 5.642(1) Å, b = 7.773(2) Å, c = 15.775(3) Å, α = 77.28(1)°, β = 84.00(1)°, γ = 73.43(1)° and Z = 2. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands have been interpreted with the aid of structure optimization based on density functional method (B3LYP) with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The obtained vibrational wavenumbers and optimized geometric parameters were seen to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions of the title compound have been investigated using the natural bonding orbital analysis. It reveals that the O-H···O, N-H···N and N-H···O intermolecular interactions significantly influence crystal packing of this molecule. The non-linear optical properties are also addressed theoretically. The predicted NLO properties of the title compound are much greater than ones of urea. In addition, DFT calculations of the title compound, molecular electrostatic potential, thermodynamic properties, frontier orbitals and chemical reactivity descriptors were also performed at 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory.

  13. Identification of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate deposited during osteoblast mineralization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng-Lai; Chen, Xiao-Rong; Bian, Sha; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Tian-Lan; Wang, Kui

    2014-02-01

    The hydroxyapatite (HAP) with variable chemical substitutions has been considered as the major component in the mineralized part of bones. Various metastable crystalline phases have been suggested as transitory precursors of HAP in bone, but there are no consensuses as to the nature of these phases and their temporal evolution. In the present study, we cultured rat calvarial osteoblasts with ascorbate and β-glycerophosphate to explore which calcium phosphate precursor phases comprise the initial mineral in the process of osteoblast mineralization in vitro. At the indicated time points, the deposited calcium phosphate was analyzed after removing organic substances from the extracellular matrix with hydrazine. The features comparable to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP), in addition to HAP, were detected in the mineral phases by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. And there was a trend of conversion from DCPD- and OCP-like phases to HAP in the course of mineralization, as indicated by Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction analyses. Besides, biochemical assay showed a progressive decrease in the ratio of mineral-associated proteins to calcium with time. These findings suggest that DCPD- and OCP-like phases are likely to occur on the course of osteoblast mineralization, and the mineral-associated proteins might be involved in modulating the mineral phase transformation.

  14. Compositional changes of a dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cement after implantation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Bohner, M; Theiss, F; Apelt, D; Hirsiger, W; Houriet, R; Rizzoli, G; Gnos, E; Frei, C; Auer, J A; von Rechenberg, B

    2003-09-01

    A hydraulic calcium phosphate cement having dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) as end-product of the setting reaction was implanted in a cylindrical defect in the diaphysis of sheep for up to 6 months. The composition of the cement was investigated as a function of time. After setting, the cement composition consisted essentially of a mixture of DCPD and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP). In the first few weeks of implantation, the edges of the cement samples became depleted in DCPD, suggesting a selective dissolution of DCPD, possibly due to low pH conditions. The cement resorption at this stage was high. After 8 weeks, the resorption rate slowed down. Simultaneously, a change of the color and density of the cement center was observed. These changes were due to the conversion of DCPD into a poorly crystalline apatite. Precipitation started after 6-8 weeks and progressed rapidly. At 9 weeks, the colored central zone reached its maximal size. The fraction of beta-TCP in the cement was constant at all time. Therefore, this study demonstrates that the resorption rate of DCPD cement is more pronounced as long as DCPD is not transformed in vivo.

  15. Two hydrate pseudopolymorphs of thiamine pyrophosphate: a dihydrate and a trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Qiang; Hu, Ning-Hai

    2013-07-01

    Two hydrate pseudopolymorphs of 3-[(4-amino-2-methylpyrimidin-1-ium-5-yl)methyl]-4-methyl-1,3-thiazol-3-ium-5-yl hydrogen pyrophosphate (TPP), viz. a dihydrate, C12H18N4O7P2S·2H2O, (I), and a trihydrate, C12H18N4O7P2S·3H2O, (II), were obtained during a structural study of vitamin B1 coenzyme. In both compounds, TPP is a neutral zwitterion, with its pyrophosphate group doubly deprotonated and its pyrimidine ring protonated, and it assumes the usual `F' conformation in terms of the two torsion angles about the bonds by which the methylene group links the thiazolium and pyrimidinium rings [1.1 (3) and 79.7 (3)° for (I), and 2.0 (3) and 75.5 (3)° for (II)]. In (I), two TPP molecules are linked by a pair of O-H···O hydrogen bonds into a phosphate-pairing dimer. N-H···O hydrogen bonds connect the dimers into a sheet parallel to (101). In (II), the TPP molecules are self-assembled solely by N-H···O hydrogen bonds, generating a tape structure along [001]. A comparison of the four known hydrate pseudopolymorphs of TPP shows that the phosphate-pairing dimers are basic building units for the formation of two-dimensional networks.

  16. Channel-like crystal structure of cinchoninium L-O-phosphoserine salt dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Oleksyn, Barbara J; Watroba, Joanna

    2010-06-01

    Studies on the interactions between L-O- phosphoserine, as one of the simplest fragments of membrane components, and the Cinchona alkaloid cinchonine, in the crystalline state were performed. Cinchoninium L-O-phosposerine salt dihydrate (PhSerCin) crystallizes in a monoclinic crystal system, space group P2(1), with unit cell parameters: a = 8.45400(10) A, b = 7.17100(10) A, c = 20.7760(4) A, alpha = 90 degrees , beta = 98.7830(10) degrees , gamma = 90 degrees , Z = 2. The asymmetric unit consists of the cinchoninium cation linked by hydrogen bonds to a phosphoserine anion and two water molecules. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds connecting phosphoserine anions via water molecules form chains extended along the b axis. Two such chains symmetrically related by twofold screw axis create a "channel." On both sides of this channel cinchonine cations are attached by hydrogen bonds in which the atoms N1, O12, and water molecules participate. This arrangement mimics the system of bilayer biological membrane.

  17. Dual emission fluorescent silver nanoclusters for sensitive detection of the biological coenzyme NAD+/NADH.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yufeng; Huang, Kehan; Chang, Mengfang; Qin, Cuifang; Zhang, Sanjun; Pan, Haifeng; Chen, Yan; Xu, Jianhua

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) displaying dual-excitation and dual-emission properties have been developed for the specific detection of NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form). With the increase of NAD(+) concentrations, the longer wavelength emission (with the peak at 550 nm) was gradually quenched due to the strong interactions between the NAD(+) and Ag NCs, whereas the shorter wavelength emission (peaking at 395 nm) was linearly enhanced. More important, the dual-emission intensity ratio (I395/I550), fitting by a single-exponential decay function, can efficiently detect various NAD(+) levels from 100 to 4000 μM, as well as label NAD(+)/NADH (reduced form of NAD) ratios in the range of 1-50.

  18. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  19. Inelastic Neutron Scattering of Nitric Acid Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloh, P.; Grothe, H.; Martín-Llorente, B.; Parker, S.

    2009-04-01

    . Ortega "Metastable Nitric Acid Hydrates - Possible Constituents of Polar Stratospheric Clouds?" Faraday Discussion 2008, 137, 223-234. [3] Y. Kim, W. Choi, K.-M. Lee, J. H. Park, S. T. Massie, Y. Sasano, H. Nakajima and T. Yokota, J. Geophys. Res., [Atmos.], 2006, 111, D13S90. [4] H. Grothe, C.E. Lund Myhre and C. J. Nielsen "Low-frequency Raman Spectra of Nitric Acid Hydrates" J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 1, 171-176. [5] Grothe, H.; Lund Myhre, C.E.; Tizek, H. "Vibrational Spectra of Nitric Acid Dihydrate (NAD)" Vibr. Spectr. 2004, 34, 55-62. [6] Tizek, H.; Knözinger, E.; Grothe, H. "Formation and Phase Distribution of Nitric Acid Hydrates in the Mole Fraction Range xHNO3 < 0.25: a combined XRD and IR study" Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2004, 6, 972-979. [7] R. Escribano, D. Fernández-Torre, V. J. Herrero, B. Martín-Llorente, B. Maté, I. K. Ortega and H. Grothe "The Low-frequency Raman and IR Spectra of Nitric Acid Hydrates" Vibr. Spectr. 2007, 43, 254-259.

  20. Detection of cerebral NAD(+) by in vivo (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Robin A; Behar, Kevin L

    2014-07-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) plays a central role in cellular metabolism both as a coenzyme for electron-transfer enzymes as well as a substrate for a wide range of metabolic pathways. In the current study NAD(+) was detected on rat brain in vivo at 11.7T by 3D localized (1)H MRS of the NAD(+) nicotinamide protons in the 8.7-9.5 ppm spectral region. Avoiding water perturbation was critical to the detection of NAD(+) as strong, possibly indirect cross-relaxation between NAD(+) and water would lead to a several-fold reduction of the NAD(+) intensity in the presence of water suppression. Water perturbation was minimized through the use of localization by adiabatic spin-echo refocusing (LASER) in combination with frequency-selective excitation. The NAD(+) concentration in the rat cerebral cortex was determined at 296 ± 28 μm, which is in good agreement with recently published (31) P NMR-based results as well as results from brain extracts in vitro (355 ± 34 μm). The T1 relaxation time constants of the NAD(+) nicotinamide protons as measured by inversion recovery were 280 ± 65 and 1136 ± 122 ms in the absence and presence of water inversion, respectively. This confirms the strong interaction between NAD(+) nicotinamide and water protons as observed during water suppression. The T2 relaxation time constants of the NAD(+) nicotinamide protons were determined at 60 ± 13 ms after confounding effects of scalar coupling evolution were taken into account. The simplicity of the MR sequence together with the robustness of NAD(+) signal detection and quantification makes the presented method a convenient choice for studies on NAD(+) metabolism and function. As the method does not critically rely on magnetic field homogeneity and spectral resolution it should find immediate applications in rodents and humans even at lower magnetic fields.

  1. The Secret Life of NAD+: An Old Metabolite Controlling New Metabolic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Cantó, Carles; Wanders, Ronald J.; Auwerx, Johan

    2010-01-01

    A century after the identification of a coenzymatic activity for NAD+, NAD+ metabolism has come into the spotlight again due to the potential therapeutic relevance of a set of enzymes whose activity is tightly regulated by the balance between the oxidized and reduced forms of this metabolite. In fact, the actions of NAD+ have been extended from being an oxidoreductase cofactor for single enzymatic activities to acting as substrate for a wide range of proteins. These include NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, and transcription factors that affect a large array of cellular functions. Through these effects, NAD+ provides a direct link between the cellular redox status and the control of signaling and transcriptional events. Of particular interest within the metabolic/endocrine arena are the recent results, which indicate that the regulation of these NAD+-dependent pathways may have a major contribution to oxidative metabolism and life span extension. In this review, we will provide an integrated view on: 1) the pathways that control NAD+ production and cycling, as well as its cellular compartmentalization; 2) the signaling and transcriptional pathways controlled by NAD+; and 3) novel data that show how modulation of NAD+-producing and -consuming pathways have a major physiological impact and hold promise for the prevention and treatment of metabolic disease. PMID:20007326

  2. Activating transhydrogenase and NAD kinase in combination for improving isobutanol production.

    PubMed

    Shi, Aiqin; Zhu, Xinna; Lu, Jiao; Zhang, Xueli; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-03-01

    Isobutanol is an excellent alternative biofuel. Fermentative production of isobutanol had been realized in several microorganisms by combining branched-chain amino acids synthetic pathway and Ehrlich pathway. In contrast to using plasmid overexpression and inducible promoters, genetically stable Escherichia coli strains for isobutanol production were constructed in this work by integrating essential genes into chromosome. A chromosome-based markerless gene modulation method was then developed for fine-tuning gene expression with multiple regulatory parts to improve isobutanol production. There was also a cofactor imbalance problem for anaerobic isobutanol synthesis. NADPH is the reducing equivalent required for isobutanol production, while the common reducing equivalent under anaerobic condition is NADH. Two strategies were used to modulate expression of transhydrogenase (pntAB) and NAD kinase (yfjB) genes to increase NADPH supply for improving isobutanol production. Plasmid overexpression of pntAB and yfjB genes either individually or in combination had little effect on isobutanol production. In contrast, modulating pntAB and yfjB gene expression in chromosome with multiple regulatory parts identified optimal modulators under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, and improved isobutanol production. Modulating pntAB gene alone led to 20% and 8% increase of anaerobic isobutanol titer and yield. Although modulating yfjB gene alone had nearly no effect, modulating pntAB and yfjB genes in combination led to 50% and 30% increase of isobutanol titer and yield in comparison with modulating pntAB gene alone. It was also found that increasing pntAB gene expression alone had a threshold for improving anaerobic isobutanol production, while activating NAD kinase could break through this threshold, leading to a yield of 0.92mol/mol. Our results suggested that transhydrogenase and NAD kinase had a synergistic effect on increasing NADPH supply and improving anaerobic

  3. Niacin-mediated Gene Expression and Role of NiaR as a Transcriptional Repressor of niaX, nadC, and pnuC in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Shafeeq, Sulman

    2017-01-01

    NAD (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) biosynthesis is vital for bacterial physiology and plays an important role in cellular metabolism. A naturally occurring vitamin B complex, niacin (nicotinic acid), is a precursor of coenzymes NAD and NADP. Here, we study the impact of niacin on global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 and elucidate the role of NiaR as a transcriptional regulator of niaX, nadC, and pnuC. Transcriptome comparison of the D39 wild-type grown in chemically defined medium (CDM) with 0 to 10 mM niacin revealed elevated expression of various genes, including niaX, nadC, pnuC, fba, rex, gapN, pncB, gap, adhE, and adhB2 that are putatively involved in the transport and utilization of niacin. Niacin-dependent expression of these genes is confirmed by promoter lacZ-fusion studies. Moreover, the role of transcriptional regulator NiaR in the regulation of these genes is explored by DNA microarray analysis. Our transcriptomic comparison of D39 ΔniaR to D39 wild-type revealed that the transcriptional regulator NiaR acts as a transcriptional repressor of niaX, pnuC, and nadC. NiaR-dependent regulation of niaX, nadC, and pnuC is further confirmed by promoter lacZ-fusion studies. The putative operator site of NiaR (5′-TACWRGTGTMTWKACASYTRWAW-3′) in the promoter regions of niaX, nadC, and pnuC is predicted and further confirmed by promoter mutational experiments. PMID:28337428

  4. Catalytic properties of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-2 (NQO2), a dihydronicotinamide riboside dependent oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Wu, K; Knox, R; Sun, X Z; Joseph, P; Jaiswal, A K; Zhang, D; Deng, P S; Chen, S

    1997-11-15

    Human NAD(P)H:quinone acceptor oxidoreductase-2 (NQO2) has been prepared using an Escherichia coli expression method. NQO2 is thought to be an isoform of DT-diaphorase (EC 1.6.99.2) [also referred to as NAD(P)H:quinone acceptor oxidoreductase] because there is a 49% identity between their amino acid sequences. The present investigation has revealed that like DT-diaphorase, NQO2 is a dimer enzyme with one FAD prosthetic group per subunit. Interestingly, NQO2 uses dihydronicotinamide riboside (NRH) rather than NAD(P)H as an electron donor. It catalyzes a two-electron reduction of quinones and oxidation-reduction dyes. One-electron acceptors, such as potassium ferricyanide, cannot be reduced by NQO2. This enzyme also catalyzes a four-electron reduction, using methyl red as the electron acceptor. The NRH-methyl red reductase activity of NQO2 is 11 times the NADH-methyl red reductase activity of DT-diaphorase. In addition, through a four-electron reduction reaction, NQO2 can catalyze nitroreduction of cytotoxic compound CB 1954 [5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. NQO2 is 3000 times more effective than DT-diaphorase in the reduction of CB 1954. Therefore, NQO2 is a NRH-dependent oxidoreductase which catalyzes two- and four-electron reduction reactions. NQO2 is resistant to typical inhibitors of DT-diaphorase, such as dicumarol, Cibacron blue, and phenindone. Flavones are inhibitors of NQO2. However, structural requirements of flavones for the inhibition of NQO2 are different from those for DT-diaphorase. The most potent flavone inhibitor tested so far is quercetin (3,5,7,3',4'-. 6pentahydroxyflavone). It has been found that quercetin is a competitive inhibitor with respect to NRH (Ki = 21 nM). NQO2 is 43 amino acids shorter than DT-diaphorase, and it has been suggested that the carboxyl terminus of DT-diaphorase plays a role in substrate binding (S. Chen et al., Protein Sci. 3, 51-57, 1994). In order to understand better the basis of catalytic differences between

  5. The role of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in restoring growth on glucose of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoglucose isomerase mutant.

    PubMed

    Boles, E; Lehnert, W; Zimmermann, F K

    1993-10-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase pgi1-deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot grow on glucose as the sole carbon source and are even inhibited by glucose. These growth defects could be suppressed by an over-expression on a multi-copy plasmid of the structural gene GDH2 coding for the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. GDH2 codes for a protein with 1092 amino acids which is located on chromosome XII and shows high sequence similarity to the Neurospora crassa NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase. Suppression of the pgi1 deletion by over-expression of GDH2 was abolished in strains with a deletion of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene ZWF1 or gene GDH1 coding for the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. Moreover, this suppression required functional mitochondria. It is proposed that the growth defect of pgi1 deletion mutants on glucose is due to a rapid depletion of NADP which is needed as a cofactor in the oxidative reactions of the pentose phosphate pathway. Over-expression of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase leads to a very efficient conversion of glutamate with NADH generation to 2-oxoglutarate which can be converted back to glutamate by the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase with the consumption of NADPH. Consequently, over-expression of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase causes a substrate cycling between 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate which restores NADP from NADPH through the coupled conversion of NAD to NADH which can be oxidized in the mitochondria. Furthermore, the requirement for an increase in NADPH consumption for the suppression of the phosphoglucose isomerase defect could be met by addition of oxidizing agents which are known to reduce the level of NADPH.

  6. Troxerutin improves hepatic lipid homeostasis by restoring NAD(+)-depletion-mediated dysfunction of lipin 1 signaling in high-fat diet-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Feng; Fan, Shao-Hua; Zheng, Yuan-Lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidences suggest that NAD(+) depletion leads to abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); however, the contributing mechanism is not well understood. Our previous study showed that troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of natural bioflavonoid rutin, effectively inhibited obesity, and normalized hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in high-cholesterol diet-induced diabetic mice. Here we investigated whether troxerutin improved hepatic lipid metabolism via preventing NAD(+) depletion in HFD-induced NAFLD mouse model and the mechanisms underlying these effects. Our results showed that troxerutin markedly prevented obesity, liver steatosis and injury in HFD-fed mice. Troxerutin largely suppressed oxidative stress-mediated NAD(+)-depletion by increasing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) protein expression and decreasing poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) protein expression and activity in HFD-treated mouse livers. Consequently, troxerutin remarkably restored Silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog1 (SirT1) protein expression and activity in HFD-treated mouse livers. Therefore, troxerutin promoted SirT1-mediated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, which enhanced nuclear lipin 1 localization, lowered cytoplasmic lipin 1 localization and the ratio of hepatic Lpin 1β/α. Ultimately, troxerutin improved lipid homeostasis by enhancing fatty acid oxidation and triglyceride secretion, and suppressing lipogenesis in HFD-fed mouse livers. In conclusion, troxerutin displayed beneficial effects on hepatic lipid homeostasis in HFD-induced NAFLD by blocking oxidative stress to restore NAD(+)-depletion-mediated dysfunction of lipin 1 signaling. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into NAFLD pathogenesis and indicates that troxerutin is a candidate for pharmacological intervention of NAFLD

  7. The membrane expression of Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA) increases the proimmune effects of MenB OMVs on human macrophages, compared with NadA- OMVs, without further stimulating their proinflammatory activity on circulating monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tavano, Regina; Franzoso, Susanna; Cecchini, Paola; Cartocci, Elena; Oriente, Francesca; Aricò, Beatrice; Papini, Emanuele

    2009-07-01

    Hypervirulent MenB causing fatal human infections frequently display the oligomeric-coiled coil adhesin NadA, a 45-kDa intrinsic outer membrane protein implicated in binding to and invasion of respiratory epithelial cells. A recombinant soluble mutant lacking the 10-kDa COOH terminal membrane domain (NadA(Delta351-405)) also activates human monocytes/macrophages/DCs. As NadA is physiologically released during sepsis as part of OMVs, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that NadA(+) OMVs have an enhanced or modified proinflammatory/proimmune action compared with NadA(-) OMVs. To do this we investigated the activity of purified free NadA(Delta351-405) and of OMVs from MenB and Escherichia coli strains, expressing or not full-length NadA. NadA(Delta351-405) stimulated monocytes and macrophages to secrete cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-10) and chemokines (IL-8, MIP-1alpha, MCP-1, RANTES), and full-length NadA improved MenB OMV activity, preferentially on macrophages, and only increased cytokine release. NadA(Delta351-405) induced the lymphocyte costimulant CD80 in monocytes and macrophages, and NadA(+) OMVs induced a wider set of molecules supporting antigen presentation (CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, and ICAM-1) more efficiently than NadA(-) OMVs only in macrophages. Moreover, membrane NadA effects, unlike NadA(Delta351-405) ones, were much less IFN-gamma-sensitive. The activity of NadA-positive E. coli OMVs was similar to that of control OMVs. NadA in MenB OMVs acted at adhesin concentrations approximately 10(6) times lower than those required to stimulate cells with free NadA(Delta351-405).

  8. Properties of fujicalin, a new modified anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate for direct compression: comparison with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Schlack, H; Bauer-Brandl, A; Schubert, R; Becker, D

    2001-09-01

    The novel, commercially available, free-flowing spherically granulated dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (SGDCPA) Fujicalin for direct tableting was compared with directly compressible dicalcium phosphate dihYdrate (DCPD), the properties of which are well known. The two excipients were investigated and compared with regard to their physical and powder properties, compressibility, and compactibility. As a consequence of the spherical shape of its particles, SGDCPA shows the same good flowability and even better compactibility. In contrast to DCPD, SGDCPA shows significant uptake of moisture when exposed to relative humidities (RHs) exceeding 70%. For both excipients, the main deformation mechanism is fragmentation, with SGDCPA yielding significantly stronger tablets.

  9. Simple and rapid determination of hydrogen peroxide using phosphine-based fluorescent reagents with sodium tungstate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Maki; Uchiyama, Takefumi; Mawatari, Ken-Ichi; Kaneko, Kiyoko; Nakagomi, Kazuya

    2006-06-01

    A simple batch method for the fluorometric determination of hydrogen peroxide using phosphine-based fluorescent reagents has been developed. A rapid, mild and selective derivatization reaction was achieved by adding sodium tungstate dihydrate to the reaction mixture of hydrogen peroxide and a phosphine-based fluorescent reagent. When 4-diphenylphosphino-7-methylthio-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole was used as a reagent, the derivatization reaction was completed after 2 min at room temperature. The calibration curve was linear between 12.5 and 500 ng hydrogen peroxide in a 10 microL sample solution. This method is accurate and has potential for on-line applications.

  10. Biochemical Issues in Estimation of Cytosolic Free NAD/NADH Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiansheng; Hu, Xun

    2012-01-01

    Cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio is fundamentally important in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis but current techniques cannot distinguish between protein-bound and free NAD/NADH. Williamson et al reported a method to estimate this ratio by cytosolic lactate/pyruvate (L/P) based on the principle of chemical equilibrium. Numerous studies used L/P ratio to estimate the cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio by assuming that the conversion in cells was at near-equilibrium but not verifying how near it was. In addition, it seems accepted that cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio was a dependent variable responding to the change of L/P ratio. In this study, we show (1) that the change of lactate/glucose (percentage of glucose that converts to lactate by cells) and L/P ratio could measure the status of conversion between pyruvate + NADH and lactate + NAD that tends to or gets away from equilibrium; (2) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH could be accurately estimated by L/P only when the conversion is at or very close to equilibrium otherwise a calculation error by one order of magnitude could be introduced; (3) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH is stable and L/P is highly labile, that the highly labile L/P is crucial to maintain the homeostasis of NAD/NADH; (4) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH is dependent on oxygen levels. Our study resolved the key issues regarding accurate estimation of cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio and the relationship between NAD/NADH and L/P. PMID:22570687

  11. Bovine albumin release and degradation analysis of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cement.

    PubMed

    Metz, Jeremy; Sargent, Peter; Chu, Tien-Min G

    2006-01-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cement was effective in our prior study as a bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) delivery vehicle in a rat segmental defect regeneration study. In this study, we investigated the effects of liquid-to-powder (L/P) ratio on the in vitro degradation and protein release behavior of this material. The L/P ratios used in this study ranged from 0.50 to 0.83. DCPD cylinders were formed with a diameter of 1/4" and a height of 1/4". The effect of L/P on the initial compressive strength was found to be related to the porosity of the material at different L/P level. The strength of the material in phosphate buffered solution was found to degrade roughly 20% in 14 days. The relation between the final porosity and the compressive strength after degradation was modeled with Ryshkewitch equation. A liquid-to-powder ratio of 0.55, 0.7, and 0.8 was then used to fabricate samples for the protein release kinetic study. The low porosity (L/P = 0.55) group was found to have the fastest release rate, while the L/P = 0.8 group had the lowest. More then 60% of the loaded protein was released after 10 hours in all three groups with a final total release ranging between 75% and 93%. The findings suggested that the protein release profile of DCPD cements can be adjusted by the L/P ratio.

  12. Poly(propylene fumarate) reinforced dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cement composites for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Alge, Daniel L; Bennett, Jeffrey; Treasure, Trevor; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry; Goebel, W Scott; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2012-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements have many desirable properties for bone tissue engineering, including osteoconductivity, resorbability, and amenability to rapid prototyping-based methods for scaffold fabrication. In this study, we show that dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cements, which are highly resorbable but also inherently weak and brittle, can be reinforced with poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) to produce strong composites with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering. Characterization of DCPD-PPF composites revealed significant improvements in mechanical properties for cements with a 1.0 powder to liquid ratio. Compared with nonreinforced controls, flexural strength improved from 1.80 ± 0.19 MPa to 16.14 ± 1.70 MPa, flexural modulus increased from 1073.01 ± 158.40 MPa to 1303.91 ± 110.41 MPa, maximum displacement during testing increased from 0.11 ± 0.04 mm to 0.51 ± 0.09 mm, and work of fracture improved from 2.74 ± 0.78 J/m(2) to 249.21 ± 81.64 J/m(2) . To demonstrate the utility of our approach for scaffold fabrication, 3D macroporous scaffolds were prepared with rapid prototyping technology. Compressive testing revealed that PPF reinforcement increased scaffold strength from 0.31 ± 0.06 MPa to 7.48 ± 0.77 MPa. Finally, 3D PPF-DCPD scaffolds were implanted into calvarial defects in rabbits for 6 weeks. Although the addition of mesenchymal stem cells to the scaffolds did not significantly improve the extent of regeneration, numerous bone nodules with active osteoblasts were observed within the scaffold pores, especially in the peripheral regions. Overall, the results of this study suggest that PPF-DCPD composites may be promising scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering.

  13. Physicochemical characterization and pharmacokinetics in broiler chickens of a new recrystallized enrofloxacin hydrochloride dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, L; Miranda-Calderon, J E; Garcia-Gutierrez, P; Sumano, H

    2015-04-01

    Enrofloxacin, a key antimicrobial agent in commercial avian medicine, has limited bioavailability (60%). This prompted its chemical manipulation to yield a new solvate-recrystallized enrofloxacin hydrochloride dihydrate entity (enroC ). Its chemical structure was characterized by means of mass spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and thermal analysis. Comparative oral pharmacokinetics (PK) of reference enrofloxacin (enroR ) and enroC in broiler chickens after oral administration revealed noticeable improvements in key parameters and PK/PD ratios. Maximum serum concentration values were 2.61 ± 0.21 and 5.9 ± 0.42 μg/mL for enroR and enroC , respectively; mean residence time was increased from 5.50 ± 0.26 h to 6.20 ± 0.71 h and the relative bioavailability of enroC was 336%. Considering Cmax /MIC and AUC/MIC ratios and the MIC values for a wild-type Escherichia coli O78/H12 (0.25 μg/mL), optimal ratios will only be achieved by enroC (Cmax /MIC = 23.6 and AUC/MIC = 197.7 for enroC ; vs. Cmax /MIC = 10.4 and AUC/MIC = 78.1 for enroR ). Furthermore, enroC may provide in most cases mutant prevention concentrations (Cmax /MIC ≥ 16). Ready solubility of powder enroC in drinking water at concentrations regularly used (0.01%) to provide an additional advantage of enroC in the field. Further development of enroC is warranted before it can be recommended for clinical use in veterinary medicine.

  14. Solid acid-catalyzed depolymerization of barley straw driven by ball milling.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Laura; Haverinen, Jasmiina; Jaakkola, Mari; Lassi, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    This study describes a time and energy saving, solvent-free procedure for the conversion of lignocellulosic barley straw into reducing sugars by mechanocatalytical pretreatment. The catalytic conversion efficiency of several solid acids was tested which revealed oxalic acid dihydrate as a potential catalyst with high conversion rate. Samples were mechanically treated by ball milling and subsequently hydrolyzed at different temperatures. The parameters of the mechanical treatment were optimized in order to obtain sufficient amount of total reducing sugar (TRS) which was determined following the DNS assay. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis (CE) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) were carried out. Under optimal conditions TRS 42% was released using oxalic acid dihydrate as a catalyst. This study revealed that the acid strength plays an important role in the depolymerization of barley straw and in addition, showed, that the oxalic acid-catalyzed reaction generates low level of the degradation product 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF).

  15. Bioluminescent Cell-Based NAD(P)/NAD(P)H Assays for Rapid Dinucleotide Measurement and Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Leippe, Donna; Sobol, Mary; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Cali, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The central role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in cellular energy metabolism and signaling makes them important nodes that link the metabolic state of cells with energy homeostasis and gene regulation. In this study, we describe the implementation of cell-based bioluminescence assays for rapid and sensitive measurement of those important redox cofactors. We show that the sensitivity of the assays (limit of detection ∼0.5 nM) enables the selective detection of total amounts of nonphosphorylated or phosphorylated dinucleotides directly in cell lysates. The total amount of NAD+NADH or NADP+NADPH levels can be detected in as low as 300 or 600 cells/well, respectively. The signal remains linear up to 5,000 cells/well with the maximum signal-to-background ratios ranging from 100 to 200 for NAD+NADH and from 50 to 100 for NADP+NADPH detection. The assays are robust (Z′ value >0.7) and the inhibitor response curves generated using a known NAD biosynthetic pathway inhibitor FK866 correlate well with the reported data. More importantly, by multiplexing the dinucleotide detection assays with a fluorescent nonmetabolic cell viability assay, we show that dinucleotide levels can be decreased dramatically (>80%) by FK866 treatment before changes in cell viability are detected. The utility of the assays to identify modulators of intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels was further confirmed using an oncology active compound library, where novel dinucleotide regulating compounds were identified. For example, the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat was a potent inhibitor of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides, whereas the selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene unexpectedly caused a twofold increase in cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels. PMID:25506801

  16. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  17. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  18. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  19. Detection of NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme activity with dynamic luminescence quenching of terbium complexes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroki; Terai, Takuya; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Komatsu, Toru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2015-05-14

    We discovered that positively charged terbium complexes bearing 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane functionalized with amide ligands are highly sensitive to dynamic luminescence quenching by NAD(P)H. We exploited this phenomenon to establish a general time-resolved luminescence-based assay platform for sensitive detection of NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme activities.

  20. Activity of select dehydrogenases with Sepharose-immobilized N6-carboxymethyl-NAD

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N6-carboxymethyl-NAD (N6-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N6-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N6-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N6-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N6-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N6-amine group on NAD. PMID:25611453

  1. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  2. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  3. Exogenous NAD+ administration significantly protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youjun; Wang, Ban; Fu, Xingli; Guan, Shaofeng; Han, Wenzheng; Zhang, Jie; Gan, Qian; Fang, Weiyi; Ying, Weihai; Qu, Xinkai

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes for death around the world. Although essential for successful interventional therapy, it is inevitably complicated by reperfusion injury. Thus effective approaches to reduce ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are still critically needed. To test our hypothesis that intravenous administration of NAD+ can attenuate I/R injury by reducing apoptotic damage and enhancing antioxidant capacity, we used a rat mode of myocardial I/R. Our study found that administration of 10-20 mg/kg NAD+ can dose dependently reduce myocardial infarct induced by I/R, with an approximately 85% reduction of the infarct at the dosage of 20 mg/kg NAD+. We further found that the injection of NAD+ can significantly decrease I/R-induced apoptotic damage in the heart: NAD+ administration can both decrease the TUNEL signals, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 levels and increase the Bcl-XL levels in the rats that are subjected to myocardial I/R injury. NAD+ administration can also significantly attenuate I/R-induced decreases in SOD activity and SOD-2 protein levels in the hearts. NAD+ can profoundly decrease myocardial I/R injury at least partially by attenuating apoptotic damage and enhancing the antioxidant capacity, thus suggesting that NAD+ may become a promising therapeutic agent for myocardial I/R injury. PMID:27648125

  4. Identification of UshA as a major enzyme for NAD degradation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Yongjin J; Ji, Debin; Lin, Xinping; Liu, Yuxue; Zhang, Yixin; Liu, Wujun; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2014-05-10

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form NADH are essential cofactors for many redox biocatalysts. Because these cofactors are consumed in stoichiometric amounts, whole-cell biocatalysts have been routinely employed in order to reduce the costs. To further improve the efficacy of redox biocatalysts, it is essential to maintain the stability of nicotinamide cofactors, for which it is attractive to block degradation pathways for NAD(H). While the biosynthesis of NAD(H) has been well studied, it is less understood how NAD(H) are degraded. Here we demonstrated that UshA was a major periplasmic enzyme for NAD degradation in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant UshA showed high pyrophosphatase activity with the catalytic efficiencies for hydrolysis of NAD and NADH at 3.7μM(-1)s(-1) and 1.4μM(-1)s(-1), respectively. Deletion of the ushA gene from the chromosome led to faster cell growth and improved extracellular NAD stability by 3-fold under conditions similar to whole-cell biocatalysis. These results significantly enriched our understanding on NAD metabolism, and should facilitate many applications including designing more robust redox biocatalysts.

  5. Independent AMP and NAD signaling regulates C2C12 differentiation and metabolic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia George; Burkholder, Thomas J

    2016-12-01

    The balance of ATP production and consumption is reflected in adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) content and has been associated with phenotypic plasticity in striated muscle. Some studies have suggested that AMPK-dependent plasticity may be an indirect consequence of increased NAD synthesis and SIRT1 activity. The primary goal of this study was to assess the interaction of AMP- and NAD-dependent signaling in adaptation of C2C12 myotubes. Changes in myotube developmental and metabolic gene expression were compared following incubation with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) to activate AMPK- and NAD-related signaling. AICAR showed no effect on NAD pool or nampt expression but significantly reduced histone H3 acetylation and GLUT1, cytochrome C oxidase subunit 2 (COX2), and MYH3 expression. In contrast, NMN supplementation for 24 h increased NAD pool by 45 % but did not reduce histone H3 acetylation nor promote mitochondrial gene expression. The combination of AMP and NAD signaling did not induce further metabolic adaptation, but NMN ameliorated AICAR-induced myotube reduction. We interpret these results as indication that AMP and NAD contribute to C2C12 differentiation and metabolic adaptation independently.

  6. Activity of select dehydrogenases with sepharose-immobilized N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD (N(6)-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N(6)-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N(6)-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N(6)-amine group on NAD.

  7. The effects of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function after glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2014-11-07

    NAD+ is an essential co-enzyme for cellular energy metabolism and is also involved as a substrate for many cellular enzymatic reactions. It has been shown that NAD+ has a beneficial effect on neuronal survival and brain injury in in vitro and in vivo ischemic models. However, the effect of NAD+ on mitochondrial biogenesis and function in ischemia has not been well investigated. In the present study, we used an in vitro glutamate excitotoxicity model of primary cultured cortical neurons to study the effect of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Our results show that supplementation of NAD+ could effectively reduce apoptotic neuronal death, and apoptotic inducing factor translocation after neurons were challenged with excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Using different approaches including confocal imaging, mitochondrial DNA measurement and Western blot analysis of PGC-1 and NRF-1, we also found that NAD+ could significantly attenuate glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and the impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, NAD+ treatment effectively inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and NADH redistribution after excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NAD+ is capable of inhibiting apoptotic neuronal death after glutamate excitotoxicity via preserving mitochondrial biogenesis and integrity. Our findings provide insights into potential neuroprotective strategies in ischemic stroke.

  8. Modulation of calcium oxalate dihydrate growth by selective crystal-face binding of phosphorylated osteopontin and polyaspartate peptide showing occlusion by sectoral (compositional) zoning.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yung-Ching; Masica, David L; Gray, Jeffrey J; Nguyen, Sarah; Vali, Hojatollah; McKee, Marc D

    2009-08-28

    Calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) mineral and the urinary protein osteopontin/uropontin (OPN) are commonly found in kidney stones. To investigate the effects of OPN on COD growth, COD crystals were grown with phosphorylated OPN or a polyaspartic acid-rich peptide of OPN (DDLDDDDD, poly-Asp(86-93)). Crystals grown with OPN showed increased dimensions of the {110} prismatic faces attributable to selective inhibition at this crystallographic face. At high concentrations of OPN, elongated crystals with dominant {110} faces were produced, often with intergrown, interpenetrating twin crystals. Poly-Asp(86-93) dose-dependently elongated crystal morphology along the {110} faces in a manner similar to OPN. In crystal growth studies using fluorescently tagged poly-Asp(86-93) followed by imaging of crystal interiors using confocal microscopy, sectoral (compositional) zoning in COD was observed resulting from selective binding and incorporation (occlusion) of peptide exclusively into {110} crystal sectors. Computational modeling of poly-Asp(86-93) adsorption to COD {110} and {101} surfaces also suggests increased stabilization of the COD {110} surface and negligible change to the natively stable {101} surface. Ultrastructural, colloidal-gold immunolocalization of OPN by transmission electron microscopy in human stones confirmed an intracrystalline distribution of OPN. In summary, OPN and its poly-Asp(86-93) sequence similarly affect COD mineral growth; the {110} crystallographic faces become enhanced and dominant attributable to {110} face inhibition by the protein/peptide, and peptides can incorporate into the mineral phase. We, thus, conclude that the poly-Asp(86-93) domain is central to the OPN ability to interact with the {110} faces of COD, where it binds to inhibit crystal growth with subsequent intracrystalline incorporation (occlusion).

  9. Novel concept of enzyme selective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-modified inhibitors based on enzyme taxonomy from the diphosphate conformation of NAD.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mikio; Kitagawa, Yasuyuki; Iida, Shui; Kato, Keisuke; Ono, Machiko

    2015-11-15

    The dihedral angle θ of the diphosphate part of NAD(P) were investigated to distinguish the differences in the binding-conformation of NAD(P) to enzymes and to create an enzyme taxonomy. Furthermore, new inhibitors with fixed dihedral angles showed that enzymes could recognize the differences in the dihedral angle θ. We suggest the taxonomy and the dihedral angle θ are important values for chemists to consider when designing inhibitors and drugs that target enzymes.

  10. NAD kinase levels control the NADPH concentration in human cells.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Nadine; Niere, Marc; Ziegler, Mathias

    2007-11-16

    NAD kinases (NADKs) are vital, as they generate the cellular NADP pool. As opposed to three compartment-specific isoforms in plants and yeast, only a single NADK has been identified in mammals whose cytoplasmic localization we established by immunocytochemistry. To understand the physiological roles of the human enzyme, we generated and analyzed cell lines stably deficient in or overexpressing NADK. Short hairpin RNA-mediated down-regulation led to similar (about 70%) decrease of both NADK expression, activity, and the NADPH concentration and was accompanied by increased sensitivity toward H(2)O(2). Overexpression of NADK resulted in a 4-5-fold increase in the NADPH, but not NADP(+), concentration, although the recombinant enzyme phosphorylated preferentially NAD(+). Surprisingly, NADK overexpression and the ensuing increase of the NADPH level only moderately enhanced protection against oxidant treatment. Apparently, to maintain the NADPH level for the regeneration of oxidative defense systems human cells depend primarily on NADP-dependent dehydrogenases (which re-reduce NADP(+)), rather than on a net increase of NADP. The stable shifts of the NADPH level in the generated cell lines were also accompanied by alterations in the expression of peroxiredoxin 5 and Nrf2. Because the basal oxygen radical level in the cell lines was only slightly changed, the redox state of NADP may be a major transmitter of oxidative stress.

  11. NADS: A Web Applet for Manipulation and Graphical Viewing of Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Beck, B R; McNabb, D P

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a program called NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System) which provides a web-based, user-friendly interface for viewing nuclear data. NADS uses a client/server model. The client is a Java applet that runs in a web browser. The server is a Python code that delivers pointwise data to the applet per user request and then plots the data. The data is also stored in tables for viewing and modifying. NADS can display 2-D, 3-D and 4-D (time sliced) data in a powerful, user-friendly environment. Currently, evaluated nuclear data are available from ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, JENDL, JEF and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ENDL databases. LLNL's ENDL database has data for neutron, gamma and charged particles as projectiles. In addition to displaying and saving data, NADS has the capability to perform computations with the data. NADS is accessible over the Internet at http://nuclear.llnl.gov/.

  12. A conserved NAD(+) binding pocket that regulates protein-protein interactions during aging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Bonkowski, Michael S; Moniot, Sébastien; Zhang, Dapeng; Hubbard, Basil P; Ling, Alvin J Y; Rajman, Luis A; Qin, Bo; Lou, Zhenkun; Gorbunova, Vera; Aravind, L; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A

    2017-03-24

    DNA repair is essential for life, yet its efficiency declines with age for reasons that are unclear. Numerous proteins possess Nudix homology domains (NHDs) that have no known function. We show that NHDs are NAD(+) (oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) binding domains that regulate protein-protein interactions. The binding of NAD(+) to the NHD domain of DBC1 (deleted in breast cancer 1) prevents it from inhibiting PARP1 [poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase], a critical DNA repair protein. As mice age and NAD(+) concentrations decline, DBC1 is increasingly bound to PARP1, causing DNA damage to accumulate, a process rapidly reversed by restoring the abundance of NAD(+) Thus, NAD(+) directly regulates protein-protein interactions, the modulation of which may protect against cancer, radiation, and aging.

  13. Elevated mitochondria-coupled NAD(P)H in endoplasmic reticulum of dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal R.; Cavolo, Samantha L.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2016-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are redox coenzymes that are critical in bioenergetics, metabolism, and neurodegeneration. Here we use brain slice multiphoton microscopy to show that substantia nigra dopamine neurons, which are sensitive to stress in mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), display elevated combined NADH and NADPH (i.e., NAD(P)H) autofluorescence. Despite limited mitochondrial mass, organellar NAD(P)H is extensive because much of the signal is derived from the ER. Remarkably, even though pyridine nucleotides cannot cross mitochondrial and ER membranes, inhibiting mitochondrial function with an uncoupler or interrupting the electron transport chain with cyanide (CN−) alters ER NAD(P)H. The ER CN− response can occur without a change in nuclear NAD(P)H, raising the possibility of redox shuttling via the cytoplasm locally between neuronal mitochondria and the ER. We propose that coregulation of NAD(P)H in dopamine neuron mitochondria and ER coordinates cell redox stress signaling by the two organelles. PMID:27582392

  14. Hepatic NAD salvage pathway is enhanced in mice on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Penke, Melanie; Larsen, Per S; Schuster, Susanne; Dall, Morten; Jensen, Benjamin A H; Gorski, Theresa; Meusel, Andrej; Richter, Sandy; Vienberg, Sara G; Treebak, Jonas T; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-09-05

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD salvage and the abundance of Nampt has been shown to be altered in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. It is, however, unknown how hepatic Nampt is regulated in response to accumulation of lipids in the liver of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). HFD mice gained more weight, stored more hepatic lipids and had an impaired glucose tolerance compared with control mice. NAD levels as well as Nampt mRNA expression, protein abundance and activity were significantly increased in HFD mice. Enhanced NAD levels were associated with deacetylation of p53 and Nfκb indicating increased activation of Sirt1. Despite impaired glucose tolerance and increased hepatic lipid levels in HFD mice, NAD metabolism was significantly enhanced. Thus, improved NAD metabolism may be a compensatory mechanism to protect against negative impact of hepatic lipid accumulation.

  15. Deletion or overexpression of mitochondrial NAD+ carriers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae alters cellular NAD and ATP contents and affects mitochondrial metabolism and the rate of glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Agrimi, Gennaro; Brambilla, Luca; Frascotti, Gianni; Pisano, Isabella; Porro, Danilo; Vai, Marina; Palmieri, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    The modification of enzyme cofactor concentrations can be used as a method for both studying and engineering metabolism. We varied Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial NAD levels by altering expression of its specific mitochondrial carriers. Changes in mitochondrial NAD levels affected the overall cellular concentration of this coenzyme and the cellular metabolism. In batch culture, a strain with a severe NAD depletion in mitochondria succeeded in growing, albeit at a low rate, on fully respiratory media. Although the strain increased the efficiency of its oxidative phosphorylation, the ATP concentration was low. Under the same growth conditions, a strain with a mitochondrial NAD concentration higher than that of the wild type similarly displayed a low cellular ATP level, but its growth rate was not affected. In chemostat cultures, when cellular metabolism was fully respiratory, both mutants showed low biomass yields, indicative of impaired energetic efficiency. The two mutants increased their glycolytic fluxes, and as a consequence, the Crabtree effect was triggered at lower dilution rates. Strikingly, the mutants switched from a fully respiratory metabolism to a respirofermentative one at the same specific glucose flux as that of the wild type. This result seems to indicate that the specific glucose uptake rate and/or glycolytic flux should be considered one of the most important independent variables for establishing the long-term Crabtree effect. In cells growing under oxidative conditions, bioenergetic efficiency was affected by both low and high mitochondrial NAD availability, which suggests the existence of a critical mitochondrial NAD concentration in order to achieve optimal mitochondrial functionality.

  16. Mild reductions in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in altered nitrate assimilation and pigmentation but do not impact growth.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Sulpice, Ronan; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Leisse, Andrea; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Hodges, Michael; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated expressing a fragment of the mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlIDH1) in the antisense orientation. The transgenic plants displayed a mild reduction in the activity of the target enzyme in the leaves but essentially no visible alteration in growth from the wild-type. Fruit size and yield were, however, reduced. These plants were characterized by relatively few changes in photosynthetic parameters, but they displayed a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm). Furthermore, a clear reduction in flux through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was observed in the transformants. Additionally, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines exhibited considerably altered metabolism, being characterized by slight decreases in the levels of amino acids, intermediates of the TCA cycle, photosynthetic pigments, starch, and NAD(P)H levels, but increased levels of nitrate and protein. Results from these studies show that even small changes in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in nitrate assimilation and suggest the presence of different strategies by which metabolism is reprogrammed to compensate for this deficiency.

  17. Influence of shot peening on corrosion properties of biocompatible magnesium alloy AZ31 coated by dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD).

    PubMed

    Mhaede, Mansour; Pastorek, Filip; Hadzima, Branislav

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials for biomedical applications because of many outstanding properties like biodegradation, bioactivity and their specific density and Young's modulus are closer to bone than the commonly used metallic implant materials. Unfortunately their fatigue properties and low corrosion resistance negatively influenced their application possibilities in the field of biomedicine. These problems could be diminished through appropriate surface treatments. This study evaluates the influence of a surface pre-treatment by shot peening and shot peening+coating on the corrosion properties of magnesium alloy AZ31. The dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating (DCPD) was electrochemically deposited in a solution containing 0.1M Ca(NO3)2, 0.06M NH4H2PO4 and 10mL/L of H2O2. The effect of shot peening on the surface properties of magnesium alloy was evaluated by microhardness and surface roughness measurements. The influence of the shot peening and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate layer on the electrochemical characteristics of AZ31 magnesium alloy was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.9% NaCl solution at a temperature of 22±1°C. The obtained results were analyzed by the Tafel-extrapolation method and equivalent circuit method. The results showed that the application of shot peening process followed by DCPD coating improves the properties of the AZ31 surface from corrosion and mechanical point of view.

  18. Proteomic analysis of a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kiyoko; Matsuta, Yosuke; Moriyama, Manabu; Yasuda, Makoto; Chishima, Noriharu; Yamaoka, Noriko; Fukuuchi, Tomoko; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Suzuki, Koji

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the matrix protein of a rare urinary stone that contained calcium carbonate. A urinary stone was extracted from a 34-year-old male patient with metabolic alkalosis. After X-ray diffractometry and infrared analysis of the stone, proteomic analysis was carried out. The resulting mass spectra were evaluated with protein search software, and matrix proteins were identified. X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis confirmed that the stone contained calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Of the identified 53 proteins, 24 have not been previously reported from calcium oxalate- or calcium phosphate-containing stones. The protease inhibitors and several proteins related to cell adhesion or the cytoskeleton were identified for the first time. We analyzed in detail a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Considering the formation of a calcium carbonate stone, the new identified proteins should play an important role on the urolithiasis process in alkaline condition.

  19. Effect of experimental and sample factors on dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate: mechanism of dehydration and determination of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Agris; Actiņš, Andris

    2014-06-01

    The dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate [3-(1,1,1-trimethylhydrazin-1-ium-2-yl)propionate dihydrate] was analyzed in isothermal and nonisothermal modes. The particle size, sample preparation and storage, sample weight, nitrogen flow rate, relative humidity, and sample history were varied in order to evaluate the effect of these factors and to more accurately interpret the data obtained from such analysis. It was determined that comparable kinetic parameters can be obtained in both isothermal and nonisothermal mode. However, dehydration activation energy values obtained in nonisothermal mode showed variation with conversion degree because of different rate-limiting step energy at higher temperature. Moreover, carrying out experiments in this mode required consideration of additional experimental complications. Our study of the different sample and experimental factor effect revealed information about changes of the dehydration rate-limiting step energy, variable contribution from different rate limiting steps, as well as clarified the dehydration mechanism. Procedures for convenient and fast determination of dehydration kinetic parameters were offered.

  20. Molecular Characterization of NAD+-Dependent DNA Ligase from Wolbachia Endosymbiont of Lymphatic Filarial Parasite Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Nidhi; Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2012-01-01

    The lymphatic filarial parasite, Brugia malayi contains Wolbachia endobacteria that are essential for development, viability and fertility of the parasite. Therefore, wolbachial proteins have been currently seen as the potential antifilarial drug targets. NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is characterized as a promising drug target in several organisms due to its crucial, indispensable role in DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. We report here the cloning, expression and purification of NAD+-dependent DNA ligase of Wolbachia endosymbiont of B. malayi (wBm-LigA) for its molecular characterization. wBm-LigA has all the domains that are present in nearly all the eubacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligases such as N-terminal adenylation domain, OB fold, helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and BRCT domain except zinc-binding tetracysteine domain. The purified recombinant protein (683-amino acid) was found to be biochemically active and was present in its native form as revealed by the circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra. The purified recombinant enzyme was able to catalyze intramolecular strand joining on a nicked DNA as well as intermolecular joining of the cohesive ends of BstEII restricted lamda DNA in an in vitro assay. The enzyme was localized in the various life-stages of B. malayi parasites by immunoblotting and high enzyme expression was observed in Wolbachia within B. malayi microfilariae and female adult parasites along the hypodermal chords and in the gravid portion as evident by the confocal microscopy. Ours is the first report on this enzyme of Wolbachia and these findings would assist in validating the antifilarial drug target potential of wBm-LigA in future studies. PMID:22815933

  1. Neuroprotective effect of ethyl pyruvate against Zn(2+) toxicity via NAD replenishment and direct Zn(2+) chelation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Woo; Lee, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Ja-Kyeong

    2016-06-01

    Ethyl pyruvate (EP) is a simple aliphatic ester of pyruvic acid and has been shown to have robust protective effect in various pathological conditions. A variety of mechanisms have been reported to underlie the protective effects of EP, which include anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic functions. Recently, we reported that EP suppressed high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) release from primary microglial cells via direct Ca(2+) chelation. In the present study, we investigated whether and how EP chelates Zn(2+) in neurons when it is present at toxic levels. In cortical neurons treated with 40 μM of Zn(2+) for 24 h, both EP and pyruvate significantly suppressed neuronal cell death, although the potency of pyruvate was greater than that of EP, and that NAD replenishment contributed to the neuroprotective effects of both pyruvate and EP. However, when cortical neurons were exposed to acute treatment of Zn(2+) (400 μM, 15 min), EP, but not pyruvate, significantly suppressed neuronal death, despite the fact that NAD replenishment by EP was weaker than that by pyruvate. Spectrophotometric studies revealed that EP directly chelates Zn(2+), and this was confirmed in physiological contexts, such as, NMDA-treated primary cortical cultures and OGD-subjected hippocampal slice cultures, in which EP suppressed intracellular Zn(2+) elevation and neuronal cell death. In addition, EP markedly reduced the expressions of PARP-1 and of the NADPH oxidase subunit in Zn(2+)-treated primary cortical neurons, well known Zn(2+)-induced downstream processes. Together, these results show EP suppresses Zn(2+) induced neurotoxicity via dual functions, chelating Zn(2+) and promoting NAD replenishment.

  2. NAMPT-Mediated Salvage Synthesis of NAD+ Controls Morphofunctional Changes of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Venter, Gerda; Oerlemans, Frank T. J. J.; Willemse, Marieke; Wijers, Mietske; Fransen, Jack A. M.; Wieringa, Bé

    2014-01-01

    Functional morphodynamic behavior of differentiated macrophages is strongly controlled by actin cytoskeleton rearrangements, a process in which also metabolic cofactors ATP and NAD(H) (i.e. NAD+ and NADH) and NADP(H) (i.e. NADP+ and NADPH) play an essential role. Whereas the link to intracellular ATP availability has been studied extensively, much less is known about the relationship between actin cytoskeleton dynamics and intracellular redox state and NAD+-supply. Here, we focus on the role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), found in extracellular form as a cytokine and growth factor, and in intracellular form as one of the key enzymes for the production of NAD+ in macrophages. Inhibition of NAD+ salvage synthesis by the NAMPT-specific drug FK866 caused a decrease in cytosolic NAD+ levels in RAW 264.7 and Maf-DKO macrophages and led to significant downregulation of the glycolytic flux without directly affecting cell viability, proliferation, ATP production capacity or mitochondrial respiratory activity. Concomitant with these differential metabolic changes, the capacity for phagocytic ingestion of particles and also substrate adhesion of macrophages were altered. Depletion of cytoplasmic NAD+ induced cell-morphological changes and impaired early adhesion in phagocytosis of zymosan particles as well as spreading performance. Restoration of NAD+ levels by NAD+, NMN, or NADP+ supplementation reversed the inhibitory effects of FK866. We conclude that direct coupling to local, actin-based, cytoskeletal dynamics is an important aspect of NAD+’s cytosolic role in the regulation of morphofunctional characteristics of macrophages. PMID:24824795

  3. NTP toxicity studies of sodium dichromate dihydrate (CAS No. 7789-12-0) administered in drinking water to male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice and male BALB/c and am3-C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Bucher, John R

    2007-01-01

    mg/L or greater and male and female mice exposed to 125 mg/L or greater was generally less than that by the control groups, and decreases in urine volume and increases in urine specific gravity in rats were related to reduced water consumption. Exposure to sodium dichromate dihydrate caused a microcytic hypochromic anemia in rats and mice, but the severity was less in mice. Serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were decreased in rats. Increased bile acid concentrations in exposed groups of rats may have been due to altered hepatic function. The incidences of histiocytic cellular infiltration were generally significantly increased in the duodenum of rats and mice, the liver of female rats, and the mesenteric lymph node of mice exposed to 125 mg/L or greater. Significantly increased nonneoplastic lesions (focal ulceration, regenerative epithelial hyperplasia, and squamous epithelial metaplasia) occurred in the glandular stomach of male and female rats exposed to 1,000 mg/L. Incidences of epithelial hyperplasia of the duodenum were significantly increased in all exposed groups of mice. In study 2, sodium dichromate dihydrate was administered in drinking water to groups of 10 male B6C3F1, 10 male BALB/c, and five male am3-C57BL/6 mice for 3 months at exposure concentrations of 0, 62.5, 125, or 250 mg/L (equivalent to average daily doses of approximately 8, 15, or 25 mg/kg sodium dichromate dihydrate or 2.8, 5.2, or 8.7 mg/kg chromium to B6C3F1, BALB/c, and am3-C57BL/6 mice). All mice in study 2 survived until study termination. Mean body weights of 125 and 250 mg/L B6C3F1 and BALB/c mice and all exposed groups of am3-C57BL/6 mice were less than those of the control groups. Mice exposed to 250 mg/L consumed less water than the control groups. Exposure concentration-related decreases in mean red cell volumes and mean red cell hemoglobin values were observed in all three mouse strains. Erythrocyte counts were increased in exposed B6C3F1 and BALB/c mice but not

  4. Transmission electron microscopic identification of silicon-containing particles in synovial fluid: potential confusion with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate and apatite crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, T; Schumacher, H R; Lansaman, J; Rothfuss, S; Dryll, A

    1984-01-01

    Silicon-containing particles were identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in thin sections of two synovial fluids, which also contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals, aspirated during acute attacks of pseudogout. Such particles, which are interpreted as probably being artefacts from glassware, were electron dense and similar in appearance to some CPPD or hydroxyapatite crystals. Images PMID:6476921

  5. Characterization of the functional role of allosteric site residue Asp102 in the regulatory mechanism of human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (malic enzyme).

    PubMed

    Hung, Hui-Chih; Kuo, Meng-Wei; Chang, Gu-Gang; Liu, Guang-Yaw

    2005-11-15

    Human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) (malic enzyme) can be specifically and allosterically activated by fumarate. X-ray crystal structures have revealed conformational changes in the enzyme in the absence and in the presence of fumarate. Previous studies have indicated that fumarate is bound to the allosteric pocket via Arg67 and Arg91. Mutation of these residues almost abolishes the activating effect of fumarate. However, these amino acid residues are conserved in some enzymes that are not activated by fumarate, suggesting that there may be additional factors controlling the activation mechanism. In the present study, we tried to delineate the detailed molecular mechanism of activation of the enzyme by fumarate. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace Asp102, which is one of the charged amino acids in the fumarate binding pocket and is not conserved in other decarboxylating malate dehydrogenases. In order to explore the charge effect of this residue, Asp102 was replaced by alanine, glutamate or lysine. Our experimental data clearly indicate the importance of Asp102 for activation by fumarate. Mutation of Asp102 to Ala or Lys significantly attenuated the activating effect of fumarate on the enzyme. Kinetic parameters indicate that the effect of fumarate was mainly to decrease the K(m) values for malate, Mg2+ and NAD+, but it did not notably elevate kcat. The apparent substrate K(m) values were reduced by increasing concentrations of fumarate. Furthermore, the greatest effect of fumarate activation was apparent at low malate, Mg2+ or NAD+ concentrations. The K(act) values were reduced with increasing concentrations of malate, Mg2+ and NAD+. The Asp102 mutants, however, are much less sensitive to regulation by fumarate. Mutation of Asp102 leads to the desensitization of the co-operative effect between fumarate and substrates of the enzyme.

  6. Efficient whole-cell biocatalyst for acetoin production with NAD+ regeneration system through homologous co-expression of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase in engineered Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Teng; Zhang, Xian; Rao, Zhiming; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Yang, Taowei; Xu, Zhenghong; Yang, Shangtian

    2014-01-01

    Acetoin (3-hydroxy-2-butanone), an extensively-used food spice and bio-based platform chemical, is usually produced by chemical synthesis methods. With increasingly requirement of food security and environmental protection, bio-fermentation of acetoin by microorganisms has a great promising market. However, through metabolic engineering strategies, the mixed acid-butanediol fermentation metabolizes a certain portion of substrate to the by-products of organic acids such as lactic acid and acetic acid, which causes energy cost and increases the difficulty of product purification in downstream processes. In this work, due to the high efficiency of enzymatic reaction and excellent selectivity, a strategy for efficiently converting 2,3-butandiol to acetoin using whole-cell biocatalyst by engineered Bacillus subtilis is proposed. In this process, NAD+ plays a significant role on 2,3-butanediol and acetoin distribution, so the NADH oxidase and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase both from B. subtilis are co-expressed in B. subtilis 168 to construct an NAD+ regeneration system, which forces dramatic decrease of the intracellular NADH concentration (1.6 fold) and NADH/NAD+ ratio (2.2 fold). By optimization of the enzymatic reaction and applying repeated batch conversion, the whole-cell biocatalyst efficiently produced 91.8 g/L acetoin with a productivity of 2.30 g/(L·h), which was the highest record ever reported by biocatalysis. This work indicated that manipulation of the intracellular cofactor levels was more effective than the strategy of enhancing enzyme activity, and the bioprocess for NAD+ regeneration may also be a useful way for improving the productivity of NAD+-dependent chemistry-based products.

  7. Injectable and rapid-setting calcium phosphate bone cement with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Burguera, Elena F; Xu, Hockin H K; Weir, Michael D

    2006-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) sets in situ with intimate adaptation to the contours of defect surfaces, and forms an implant having a structure and composition similar to hydroxyapatite, the putative mineral in teeth and bones. The objective of the present study was to develop an injectable CPC using dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) with a high solubility for rapid setting. Two agents were incorporated to impart injectability and fast-hardening to the cement: a hardening accelerator (sodium phosphate) and a gelling agent (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, HPMC). The cement with DCPD was designated as CPC(D), and the conventional cement was referred to as CPC(A). Using water without sodium phosphate, CPC(A) had a setting time of 82 +/- 6 min. In contrast, CPC(D) exhibited rapid setting with a time of 17 +/- 1 min. At 0.2 mol/L sodium phosphate, setting time for CPC(D) was 15 +/- 1 min, significantly faster than 40 +/- 2 min for CPC(A) (Tukey's at 0.95). Sodium phosphate decreased the paste injectability (measured as the paste mass extruded from the syringe divided by the original paste mass inside the syringe). However, the addition of HPMC dramatically increased the paste injectability. For CPC(D), the injectability was increased from 65% +/- 12% without HPMC to 98% +/- 1% with 1% HPMC. Injectability of CPC(A) was also doubled to 99% +/- 1%. The injectable and rapid-setting CPC(D) possessed flexural strength and elastic modulus values overlapping the reported values for sintered porous hydroxyapatite implants and cancellous bone. In summary, the rapid setting and relatively high strength and elastic modulus of CPC(D) should help the graft to quickly attain strength and geometrical integrity within a short period of time postoperatively. Furthermore, the injectability of CPC(D) may have potential for procedures involving defects with limited accessibility or narrow cavities, when there is a need for precise placement of the paste, and when using minimally invasive

  8. Upcoming replacements for NAD83, NAVD88 and IGLD85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. A.; Snay, R.

    2009-05-01

    The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is responsible for defining, maintaining and providing access to the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) for the United States. The NSRS is the official system to which all civil federal mapping agencies should refer, and contains, amongst other things, the official geopotential (historically "vertical") datum of NAVD 88, the 3-D geometric reference system (historically "horizontal datum") of NAD 83 and great lakes datum (IGLD 85). Although part of the United States NSRS, all three of these datums have been created through international partnerships across North America. Unfortunately, time has shown both the systematic errors existent within these datums, as well as the inherent weaknesses of relying exclusively on passive monuments to define and provide access to these datums. In recognition of these issues, the National Geodetic Survey has issued a "10 year plan", available online, which outlines steps which will be taken to update NAD 83, NAVD 88 and IGLD 85 concurrently around the year 2018. The primary source of success will be in the refinement of the CORS network and the upcoming execution of the GRAV-D project (Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum). Conversations are ongoing with colleagues in Canada, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean in order to coordinate all of these efforts across the entire continent. The largest changes expected to occur are the removal of over 2 meters of non-geocentricity in NAD 83; the removal of decimeters of bias and over a meter of tilt in NAVD 88; the addition of the ability to track crustal motions (subsidence, tectonics, etc) in the datums; the removal of leveling as a tool for long-line height differencing; the use of a "best" geoid as the orthometric height reference surface; the addition of datum velocities (motions of the 3-D geometric reference system origin and motions of the geoid

  9. Towards an integrative model of C4 photosynthetic subtypes: insights from comparative transcriptome analysis of NAD-ME, NADP-ME, and PEP-CK C4 species

    PubMed Central

    Bräutigam, Andrea; Schliesky, Simon; Külahoglu, Canan; Osborne, Colin P.; Weber, Andreas P.M.

    2014-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis affords higher photosynthetic carbon conversion efficiency than C3 photosynthesis and it therefore represents an attractive target for engineering efforts aiming to improve crop productivity. To this end, blueprints are required that reflect C4 metabolism as closely as possible. Such blueprints have been derived from comparative transcriptome analyses of C3 species with related C4 species belonging to the NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) and NADP-ME subgroups of C4 photosynthesis. However, a comparison between C3 and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK) subtype of C4 photosynthesis is still missing. An integrative analysis of all three C4 subtypes has also not been possible to date, since no comparison has been available for closely related C3 and PEP-CK C4 species. To generate the data, the guinea grass Megathyrsus maximus, which represents a PEP-CK species, was analysed in comparison with a closely related C3 sister species, Dichanthelium clandestinum, and with publicly available sets of RNA-Seq data from C4 species belonging to the NAD-ME and NADP-ME subgroups. The data indicate that the core C4 cycle of the PEP-CK grass M. maximus is quite similar to that of NAD-ME species with only a few exceptions, such as the subcellular location of transfer acid production and the degree and pattern of up-regulation of genes encoding C4 enzymes. One additional mitochondrial transporter protein was associated with the core cycle. The broad comparison identified sucrose and starch synthesis, as well as the prevention of leakage of C4 cycle intermediates to other metabolic pathways, as critical components of C4 metabolism. Estimation of intercellular transport fluxes indicated that flux between cells is increased by at least two orders of magnitude in C4 species compared with C3 species. In contrast to NAD-ME and NADP-ME species, the transcription of photosynthetic electron transfer proteins was unchanged in PEP-CK. In summary, the PEP-CK blueprint of M

  10. Tributyltin induces mitochondrial fission through NAD-IDH dependent mitofusin degradation in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro; Nakano, Mizuho; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2015-08-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are well-known endocrine disruptors. TBT acts at the nanomolar level through genomic pathways via the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR). We recently reported that TBT inhibits cell growth and the ATP content in the human embryonic carcinoma cell line NT2/D1 via a non-genomic pathway involving NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which metabolizes isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NAD-IDH mediates TBT toxicity remain unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of TBT on mitochondrial NAD-IDH and energy production. Staining with MitoTracker revealed that nanomolar TBT levels induced mitochondrial fragmentation. TBT also degraded the mitochondrial fusion proteins, mitofusins 1 and 2. Interestingly, apigenin, an inhibitor of NAD-IDH, mimicked the effects of TBT. Incubation with an α-ketoglutarate analogue partially recovered TBT-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the involvement of NAD-IDH. Our data suggest that nanomolar TBT levels impair mitochondrial quality control via NAD-IDH in NT2/D1 cells. Thus, mitochondrial function in embryonic cells could be used to assess cytotoxicity associated with metal exposure.

  11. Dimerization of Plant Defensin NaD1 Enhances Its Antifungal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Fung T.; Mills, Grant D.; Poon, Ivan K. H.; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Kirby, Nigel; Baxter, Amy A.; van der Weerden, Nicole L.; Dogovski, Con; Perugini, Matthew A.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Kvansakul, Marc; Hulett, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The plant defensin, NaD1, from the flowers of Nicotiana alata, is a member of a family of cationic peptides that displays growth inhibitory activity against several filamentous fungi, including Fusarium oxysporum. The antifungal activity of NaD1 has been attributed to its ability to permeabilize membranes; however, the molecular basis of this function remains poorly defined. In this study, we have solved the structure of NaD1 from two crystal forms to high resolution (1.4 and 1.58 Å, respectively), both of which contain NaD1 in a dimeric configuration. Using protein cross-linking experiments as well as small angle x-ray scattering analysis and analytical ultracentrifugation, we show that NaD1 forms dimers in solution. The structural studies identified Lys4 as critical in formation of the NaD1 dimer. This was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis of Lys4 that resulted in substantially reduced dimer formation. Significantly, the reduced ability of the Lys4 mutant to dimerize correlated with diminished antifungal activity. These data demonstrate the importance of dimerization in NaD1 function and have implications for the use of defensins in agribiotechnology applications such as enhancing plant crop protection against fungal pathogens. PMID:22511788

  12. Monocyte-derived extracellular Nampt-dependent biosynthesis of NAD(+) protects the heart against pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Yano, Masamichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Toru; Yabumoto, Chizuru; Kudo-Sakamoto, Yoko; Kamo, Takehiro; Shimizu, Yu; Yagi, Hiroki; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Lee, Jong-Kook; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Yasushi; Komuro, Issei

    2015-11-02

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the salvage pathway for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) biosynthesis, and thereby regulates the deacetylase activity of sirtuins. Here we show accommodative regulation of myocardial NAD(+) by monocyte-derived extracellular Nampt (eNampt), which is essential for hemodynamic compensation to pressure overload. Although intracellular Nampt (iNampt) expression was decreased in pressure-overloaded hearts, myocardial NAD(+) concentration and Sirt1 activity were preserved. In contrast, iNampt was up-regulated in spleen and monocytes, and circulating eNampt protein and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), a key precursor of NAD(+), were significantly increased. Pharmacological inhibition of Nampt by FK866 or depletion of monocytes/macrophages by clodronate liposomes disrupted the homeostatic mechanism of myocardial NAD(+) levels and NAD(+)-dependent Sirt1 activity, leading to susceptibility to cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac decompensation in pressure-overloaded mice. These biochemical and hemodynamic defects were prevented by systemic administration of NMN. Our studies uncover a crucial role of monocyte-derived eNampt in myocardial adaptation to pressure overload, and highlight a potential intervention controlling myocardial NAD(+) against heart failure.

  13. HPLC analysis of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose and adenosine diphosphate ribose: determination of NAD+ metabolites in hippocampal membranes.

    PubMed

    Casabona, G; Sturiale, L; L'Episcopo, M R; Raciti, G; Fazzio, A; Sarpietro, M G; Genazzani, A A; Cambria, A; Nicoletti, F

    1995-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose (cADPR) and ADPR were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a CarboPac PA-1 column at strong basic pH and quantitated by a pulsed amperometric detector. Although this HPLC method was quite sensitive and highly reproducible, it did not allow the separation of cADPR from guanosine monophosphate (GMP) which, when present, could be removed by ion-affinity chromatography, using gel-immobilized Fe3+ columns. Crude synaptic membranes from rat hippocampi were incubated with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and acidic extracts were subject to HPLC analysis after neutralization. Incubation led to a time-dependent formation of ADPR, which was amplified when membranes were incubated in the presence of guanosine trisphosphate (GTP), guanosine-5'-0-(3-thiotrisphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S) or AlF3. cADPR did not accumulate in detectable amounts and only a minimal proportion (< 5%) of radioactivity originating from [3H]NAD co-eluted with authentic cADPR in extracts from hippocampal membranes. The simultaneous detection of cADPR and ADPR we have described may help the search for inhibitors of cADPR metabolism, which will allow to measure the cADPR that accumulates under basal conditions or in response to extracellular signals.

  14. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    PubMed

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases.

  15. Elongator Plays a Positive Role in Exogenous NAD-Induced Defense Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    An, Chuanfu; Ding, Yezhang; Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chenggang; Mou, Zhonglin

    2016-05-01

    Extracellular NAD is emerging as an important signal molecule in animal cells, but its role in plants has not been well-established. Although it has been shown that exogenous NAD(+) activates defense responses in Arabidopsis, components in the exogenous NAD(+)-activated defense pathway remain to be fully discovered. In a genetic screen for mutants insensitive to exogenous NAD(+) (ien), we isolated a mutant named ien2. Map-based cloning revealed that IEN2 encodes ELONGATA3 (ELO3)/AtELP3, a subunit of the Arabidopsis Elongator complex, which functions in multiple biological processes, including histone modification, DNA (de)methylation, and transfer RNA modification. Mutations in the ELO3/AtELP3 gene compromise exogenous NAD(+)-induced expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes and resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326, and transgenic expression of the coding region of ELO3/AtELP3 in elo3/Atelp3 restores NAD(+) responsiveness to the mutant plants, demonstrating that ELO3/AtELP3 is required for exogenous NAD(+)-induced defense responses. Furthermore, mutations in genes encoding the other five Arabidopsis Elongator subunits (ELO2/AtELP1, AtELP2, ELO1/AtELP4, AtELP5, and AtELP6) also compromise exogenous NAD(+)-induced PR gene expression and resistance to P. syringae pv. maculicola ES4326. These results indicate that the Elongator complex functions as a whole in exogenous NAD(+)-activated defense signaling in Arabidopsis.

  16. The MTCY428.08 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Codes for NAD+ Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Rita; Branzoni, Manuela; Labò, Monica; Rizzi, Menico; Riccardi, Giovanna

    1998-01-01

    The product of the MTCY428.08 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows sequence homology with several NAD+ synthetases. The MTCY428.08 gene was cloned into the expression vectors pGEX-4T-1 and pET-15b. Expression in Escherichia coli led to overproduction of glutathione S-transferase fused and His6-tagged gene products, which were enzymatically assayed for NAD synthetase activity. Our results demonstrate that the MTCY428.08 gene of M. tuberculosis is the structural gene for NAD+ synthetase. PMID:9620974

  17. From heterochromatin islands to the NAD World: a hierarchical view of aging through the functions of mammalian Sirt1 and systemic NAD biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2009-10-01

    For the past couple of decades, aging science has been rapidly evolving, and powerful genetic tools have identified a variety of evolutionarily conserved regulators and signaling pathways for the control of aging and longevity in model organisms. Nonetheless, a big challenge still remains to construct a comprehensive concept that could integrate many distinct layers of biological events into a systemic, hierarchical view of aging. The "heterochromatin island" hypothesis was originally proposed 10 years ago to explain deterministic and stochastic aspects of cellular and organismal aging, which drove the author to the study of evolutionarily conserved Sir2 proteins. Since a surprising discovery of their NAD-dependent deacetylase activity, Sir2 proteins, now called "sirtuins," have been emerging as a critical epigenetic regulator for aging. In this review, I will follow the process of conceptual development from the heterochromatin island hypothesis to a novel, comprehensive concept of a systemic regulatory network for mammalian aging, named "NAD World," summarizing recent studies on the mammalian NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirt1 and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)-mediated systemic NAD biosynthesis. This new concept of the NAD World provides critical insights into a systemic regulatory mechanism that fundamentally connects metabolism and aging and also conveys the ideas of functional hierarchy and frailty for the regulation of aging in mammals.

  18. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD[superscript +] and triclosan

    SciTech Connect

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2010-11-19

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD{sup +} has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure (PDB code 2jjy) which is bound to only NAD{sup +} reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD{sup +} cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors.

  19. The fabrication and characterization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate-modified magnetic nanoparticles and their performance in hyperthermia processes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chun-han; Chen, Ching-wei; Hou, Sheng-mou; Li, Yu-ting; Lin, Feng-huei

    2009-09-01

    Many different types of magnetic particles have been developed for the purpose of hyperthermia cancer therapy. In this study, a magnetic nanoparticle based on dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was formed by co-precipitation method. Addition of different concentrations of ferrous chloride to DCPD can alter its material properties. Various physical, chemical and magnetic tests of the magnetic DCPD nanoparticles (mDCPD) were performed, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The heating efficiency of mDCPD in alternating magnetic field was proved to be suitable for hyperthermia. The results of cytotoxicity tests (WST-1 and LDH assay) showed no harmful effect. The mDCPD showed relative cancer-killing ability without damaging normal cells in vitro.

  20. Development of an enhanced anticaries efficacy dual component dentifrice containing sodium fluoride and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, R J; Masters, J; Cantore, R; Roberson, A; Petrou, I; Stranick, M; Goldman, H; Guggenheim, B; Gaffar, A

    2001-05-01

    A dual-chamber dentifrice, which contains sodium fluoride (NaF) in one component and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (dical) in the other, has been developed. The dentifrice is packaged in a dual-chamber tube and is formulated to deliver 1100 ppm F. A series of studies consisting of in vitro fluoride uptake, in vivo calcium labeling, intraoral remineralization-demineralization, and animal caries studies were performed to support the improved anticaries efficacy of this product in comparison to a sodium fluoride/silica dentifrice (NaF/silica). An in vitro fluoride uptake study comparing 1100 ppm F NaF/dical dentifrice to 1100 ppm F NaF/silica showed that NaF/dical delivered significantly more fluoride than NaF/silica, 3.72 +/- 0.36 micrograms/cm2 versus 2.41 +/- 0.10 micrograms/cm2. A 6-day in vivo brushing study with a 44Ca labeled NaF/dical dentifrice showed that calcium from dical penetrated demineralized enamel and was present in plaque up to 18 hrs since the last brushing. An intra-oral remineralization-demineralization study was performed to evaluate NaF/dical's ability to promote remineralization in comparison to three silica-based dentifrices containing 0, 250, and 1100 ppm F as NaF. The percent mineral changes after treatment were +20.44 +/- 17.14 for NaF/dical, +9.27 +/- 19.53 for 1100 ppm NaF/silica, -1.43 +/- 20.57 for 250 ppm NaF/silica, and -12.36 +/- 32.76 for 0 ppm F/silica. A statistical analysis showed that the dual-chamber NaF/dical dentifrice was significantly more effective than the 1100 ppm NaF/silica dentifrice at promoting remineralization. A rat caries study was performed to evaluate NaF/dical ability to prevent caries in comparison to 1100 ppm F NaF/silica, 250 ppm F NaF/silica, silica, and dical dentifrices. The mean smooth surface caries scores were 1.6 +/- 2.8 for NaF/dical, 5.5 +/- 6.2 for 1100 ppm F NaF/silica, 10.6 +/- 6.2 for 250 ppm F NaF/silica, 13.7 +/- 4.7 for 0 ppm F/silica, and 9.5 +/- 7.8 0 ppm F/dical. A statistical analysis

  1. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 inducer activity of some novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S; Higgins, Maureen; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Shahat, Abdelaaty A; Elghazawy, Nehal H; Arafa, Reem K

    2016-01-01

    The Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response elements pathway enables cells to survive oxidative stress conditions through regulating the expression of cytoprotective enzymes such as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). This work presents the design and synthesis of novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives (2–16a) and evaluation of their NQO1 inducer activity in murine cells. Molecular docking of the new compounds was performed to assess their ability to inhibit Keap1–Nrf2 protein–protein interaction through occupying the Keap1–Nrf2-binding domain, which leads to Nrf2 accumulation and enhanced gene expression of NQO1. Docking results showed that all compounds can potentially interact with Keap1; however, 1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-4-(2-phenylquinazolin-4-ylamino)-1,2-dihydropyrazol-3-one (9), the most potent inducer, showed the largest number of interactions with key amino acids in the binding pocket (Arg483, Tyr525, and Phe478) compared to the native ligand or any other compound in this series. PMID:27540279

  2. Purification and Characterization of a Novel NAD(P)+-Farnesol Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Seman-Kamarulzaman, Ahmad-Faris; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile hormones have attracted attention as safe and selective targets for the design and development of environmentally friendly and biorational insecticides. In the juvenile hormone III biosynthetic pathway, the enzyme farnesol dehydrogenase catalyzes the oxidation of farnesol to farnesal. In this study, farnesol dehydrogenase was extracted from Polygonum minus leaves and purified 204-fold to apparent homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography using DEAE-Toyopearl, SP-Toyopearl, and Super-Q Toyopearl, followed by three successive purifications by gel filtration chromatography on a TSK-gel GS3000SW. The enzyme is a heterodimer comprised of subunits with molecular masses of 65 kDa and 70 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH were 35°C and pH 9.5, respectively. Activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents, metal-chelating agents and heavy metal ions. The enzyme utilized both NAD+ and NADP+ as coenzymes with Km values of 0.74 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Trans, trans-farnesol was the preferred substrate for the P. minus farnesol dehydrogenase. Geometrical isomers of trans, trans-farnesol, cis, trans-farnesol and cis, cis-farnesol were also oxidized by the enzyme with lower activity. The Km values for trans, trans-farnesol, cis, trans-farnesol and cis, cis-farnesol appeared to be 0.17 mM, 0.33 mM and 0.42 mM, respectively. The amino acid sequences of 4 tryptic peptides of the enzyme were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS spectrometry, and showed no significant similarity to those of previously reported farnesol dehydrogenases. These results suggest that the purified enzyme is a novel NAD(P)+-dependent farnesol dehydrogenase. The purification and characterization established in the current study will serve as a basis to provide new information for recombinant production of the enzyme. Therefore, recombinant farnesol dehydrogenase may provide a useful molecular tool in manipulating juvenile hormone biosynthesis to generate transgenic plants for pest control. PMID:26600471

  3. Stereospecificity of NAD+/NADH Reactions: A Project Experiment for Advanced Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrey, Jonathan S.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Presents background information, materials needed, and experimental procedures to study enzymes dependent on pyridine nucleotide coenzymes (NAD/NADH). The experiments, suitable for advanced organic or biochemistry courses, require approximately 10-15 hours to complete. (SK)

  4. Mitochondrial type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in fungal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, A. Pedro; Videira, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    During aerobic respiration, cells produce energy through oxidative phosphorylation, which includes a specialized group of multi-subunit complexes in the inner mitochondrial membrane known as the electron transport chain. However, this canonical pathway is branched into single polypeptide alternative routes in some fungi, plants, protists and bacteria. They confer metabolic plasticity, allowing cells to adapt to different environmental conditions and stresses. Type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases (also called alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases) are non-proton pumping enzymes that bypass complex I. Recent evidence points to the involvement of fungal alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in the process of programmed cell death, in addition to their action as overflow systems upon oxidative stress. Consistent with this, alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases are phylogenetically related to cell death - promoting proteins of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-family. PMID:28357279

  5. Theophylline prevents NAD{sup +} depletion via PARP-1 inhibition in human pulmonary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moonen, Harald J.J. . E-mail: h.moonen@grat.unimaas.nl; Geraets, Liesbeth; Vaarhorst, Anika; Bast, Aalt; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Hageman, Geja J.

    2005-12-30

    Oxidative DNA damage, as occurs during exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), highly activates the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). This can lead to cellular depletion of its substrate NAD{sup +}, resulting in an energy crisis and ultimately in cell death. Inhibition of PARP-1 results in preservation of the intracellular NAD{sup +} pool, and of NAD{sup +}-dependent cellular processes. In this study, PARP-1 activation by hydrogen peroxide decreased intracellular NAD{sup +} levels in human pulmonary epithelial cells, which was found to be prevented in a dose-dependent manner by theophylline, a widely used compound in the treatment of COPD. This enzyme inhibition by theophylline was confirmed in an ELISA using purified human PARP-1 and was found to be competitive by nature. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the therapeutic effect of theophylline in oxidative stress-induced lung pathologies.

  6. Insights from modeling the 3D structure of NAD(P)H-dependent D-xylose reductase of Pichia stipitis and its binding interactions with NAD and NADP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Fang; Wei, Dong-Qing; Lin, Ying; Wang, Yong-Hua; Du, Hong-Li; Li, Yi-Xve; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2007-07-27

    NAD(P)H-dependent d-xylose reductase is a homodimeric oxidoreductase that belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. The enzyme has the special function to catalyze the first step in the assimilation of xylose into yeast metabolic pathways. Performing this function via reducing the open chain xylose to xylitol, the xylose reductase of Pichia stipitis is one of the most important enzymes that can be used to construct recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for utilizing xylose and producing alcohol. To investigate into the interaction mechanism of the enzyme with its ligand NAD and NADP, the 3D structure was developed for the NAD(P)H-dependent d-xylose reductase from P. stipitis. With the 3D structure, the molecular docking operations were conducted to find the most stable bindings of the enzyme with NAD and NADP, respectively. Based on these results, the binding pockets of the enzyme for NAD and NADP have been explicitly defined. It has been found that the residues in forming the binding pockets for both NAD and NADP are almost the same and mainly hydrophilic. These findings may be used to guide mutagenesis studies, providing useful clues to modify the enzyme to improve the utilization of xylose for producing alcohol. Also, because human aldose reductases have the function to reduce the open chain form of glucose to sorbitol, a process physiologically significant for diabetic patients at the time that their blood glucose levels are elevated, the information gained through this study may also stimulate the development of new strategies for therapeutic treatment of diabetes.

  7. Depletion of the central metabolite NAD leads to oncosis-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Del Nagro, Christopher; Xiao, Yang; Rangell, Linda; Reichelt, Mike; O'Brien, Thomas

    2014-12-19

    Depletion of the central metabolite NAD in cells results in broad metabolic defects leading to cell death and is a proposed novel therapeutic strategy in oncology. There is, however, a limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms that connect disruption of this central metabolite with cell death. Here we utilize GNE-617, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT, a rate-limiting enzyme required for NAD generation, to probe the pathways leading to cell death following NAD depletion. In all cell lines examined, NAD was rapidly depleted (average t½ of 8.1 h) following NAMPT inhibition. Concurrent with NAD depletion, there was a decrease in both cell proliferation and motility, which we attribute to reduced activity of NAD-dependent deacetylases because cells fail to deacetylate α-tubulin-K40 and histone H3-K9. Following depletion of NAD by >95%, cells lose the ability to regenerate ATP. Cell lines with a slower rate of ATP depletion (average t½ of 45 h) activate caspase-3 and show evidence of apoptosis and autophagy, whereas cell lines with rapid depletion ATP (average t½ of 32 h) do not activate caspase-3 or show signs of apoptosis or autophagy. However, the predominant form of cell death in all lines is oncosis, which is driven by the loss of plasma membrane homeostasis once ATP levels are depleted by >20-fold. Thus, our work illustrates the sequence of events that occurs in cells following depletion of a key metabolite and reveals that cell death caused by a loss of NAD is primarily driven by the inability of cells to regenerate ATP.

  8. Radioenzymatic assay for quinolinic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, A.C.; Okuno, E.; Brougher, D.S.; Schwarcz, R.

    1986-10-01

    A new and rapid method for the determination of the excitotoxic tryptophan metabolite quinolinic acid is based on its enzymatic conversion to nicotinic acid mononucleotide and, in a second step utilizing (/sup 3/H)ATP, further to (/sup 3/H) deamido-NAD. Specificity of the assay is assured by using a highly purified preparation of the specific quinolinic acid-catabolizing enzyme, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase, in the initial step. The limit of sensitivity was found to be 2.5 pmol of quinolinic acid, sufficient to conveniently determine quinolinic acid levels in small volumes of human urine and blood plasma.

  9. Isotope partitioning for NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum confirms a steady-state random kinetic mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.Y.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-01-12

    Isotope partitioning studies beginning with E-(/sup 14/C)NAD, E-(/sup 14/C) malate, E-(/sup 14/C) NAD-Mg/sup 2 +/, and E-Mg-(/sup 14/C)malate suggest a steady-state random mechanism for the NAD-malic enzyme. Isotope trapping beginning with E-(/sup 14/C)NAD and with varying concentrations of Mg/sup 2 +/ and malate in the chase solution indicates that Mg/sup 2 +/ is added in rapid equilibrium and must be added prior to malate for productive ternary complex formation. Equal percentage trapping from E-(/sup 14/C)NAD-Mg and E-Mg-(/sup 14/C) malate indicates the mechanism is steady-state random with equal off-rates for NAD and malate from E-NAD-Mg-malate. The off-rates for both do not change significantly in the ternary E-Mg-malate and E-NAD-Mg complexes, nor does the off-rate change for NAD from E-NAD. No trapping of malate was obtained from E-(/sup 14/C) malate, suggesting that this complex is nonproductive. A quantitative analysis of the data allows an estimation of values for a number of the rate constants along the reaction pathway.

  10. 5' End Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Cap in Human Cells Promotes RNA Decay through DXO-Mediated deNADding.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xinfu; Doamekpor, Selom K; Bird, Jeremy G; Nickels, Bryce E; Tong, Liang; Hart, Ronald P; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2017-03-09

    Eukaryotic mRNAs generally possess a 5' end N7 methyl guanosine (m(7)G) cap that promotes their translation and stability. However, mammalian mRNAs can also carry a 5' end nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) cap that, in contrast to the m(7)G cap, does not support translation but instead promotes mRNA decay. The mammalian and fungal noncanonical DXO/Rai1 decapping enzymes efficiently remove NAD(+) caps, and cocrystal structures of DXO/Rai1 with 3'-NADP(+) illuminate the molecular mechanism for how the "deNADding" reaction produces NAD(+) and 5' phosphate RNA. Removal of DXO from cells increases NAD(+)-capped mRNA levels and enables detection of NAD(+)-capped intronic small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), suggesting NAD(+) caps can be added to 5'-processed termini. Our findings establish NAD(+) as an alternative mammalian RNA cap and DXO as a deNADding enzyme modulating cellular levels of NAD(+)-capped RNAs. Collectively, these data reveal that mammalian RNAs can harbor a 5' end modification distinct from the classical m(7)G cap that promotes rather than inhibits RNA decay.

  11. One-electron transfer reactions of the couple NAD. /NADH. [Pulse radiolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grodkowski, J.; Neta, P.; Carlson, B.W.; Miller, L.

    1983-08-04

    One-electron transfer reactions involving nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide in its oxidized and reducd forms (NAD./NADH) were studied by pulse radiolysis in aqueous solutions. One-electron oxidation of NADH by various phenoxyl radicals and phenothiazine cation radicals was found to take place with rate constants in the range of 10/sup 5/ to 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, depending on the redox potential of the oxidizing species. In all cases, NAD. is formed quantitatively with no indication for the existence of the protonated form (NADH/sup +/.). The spectrum of NAD., as well as the rates of oxidation of NADH by phenoxyl and by (chlorpromazine)/sup +/. were independent of pH between pH 4.5 and 13.5. Reaction of deuterated NADH indicated only a small kinetic isotope effect. All these findings point to an electron transfer mechanism. On the other hand, attempts to observe the reverse electron transfer, i.e., one-electron reduction of NAD. to NADH by radicals such as semiquinones, showed that k was less than 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, so that it was unobservable. Consequently, it was not possible to achieve equilibrium conditions which would have permitted the direct measurement of the redox potential for NAD./NADH. One-electron reduction of NAD. appears to be an unlikely process. 1 table.

  12. NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase as a novel target of tributyltin in human embryonic carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Kurihara, Masaaki; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2014-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is known to cause developmental defects as endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs). At nanomoler concentrations, TBT actions were mediated by genomic pathways via PPAR/RXR. However, non-genomic target of TBT has not been elucidated. To investigate non-genomic TBT targets, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses using human embryonic carcinoma NT2/D1 cells. We found that 100 nM TBT reduced the amounts of α-ketoglutarate, succinate and malate. We further found that TBT decreased the activity of NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in the TCA cycle. In addition, TBT inhibited cell growth and enhanced neuronal differentiation through NAD-IDH inhibition. Furthermore, studies using bacterially expressed human NAD-IDH and in silico simulations suggest that TBT inhibits NAD-IDH due to a possible interaction. These results suggest that NAD-IDH is a novel non-genomic target of TBT at nanomolar levels. Thus, a metabolomic approach may provide new insights into the mechanism of EDC action.

  13. Roles of NAD in Protection of Axon against Degeneration via SIRT1 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Guo, Wei-Hua; Qi, Xiao-Xia; Li, Gui-Bao; Hu, Yan-Lai; Wu, Qi; Ding, Zhao-Xi; Li, Hong-Yu; Hao, Jing; Sun, Jin-Hao

    2016-04-30

    Axonal degeneration is a common pathological change of neurogenical disease which often arises before the neuron death. But it had not found any effective method to protect axon from degeneration. In this study we intended to confirm the protective effect of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), investigate the optimal administration dosage and time of NAD, and identify the relationship between silence signal regulating factor 1 (SIRT1) and axonal degeneration. An axonal degeneration model was established using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons injured by vincristine to observe the protective effects of NAD to the injured axons. In addition, the potential contribution of the SIRT1 in axonal degeneration was also investigated. Through the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, immunochemistry staining, axons counting and length measuring, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation, we demonstrated that NAD played an important role in preventing axonal degeneration. Further study revealed that the expression of SIRT1 and phosphorylated Akt1 (p-Akt1) was up-regulated when NAD was added into the culturing medium. Taking together, our results demonstrated that NAD might delay the axonal degeneration through SIRT1/Akt1 pathways.

  14. Electrodeposited non-stoichiometric tungstic acid for electrochromic applications: film growth modes, crystal structure, redox behavior and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugolovkin, Leonid V.; Cherstiouk, Olga V.; Plyasova, Lyudmila M.; Molina, Irina Yu.; Kardash, Tatyana Yu.; Stonkus, Olga A.; Yatsenko, Dmitriy A.; Kaichev, Vasily V.; Tsirlina, Galina A.

    2016-12-01

    Bath composition for cathodic electrodeposition of non-stoichiometric hydrated tungstic acid with high electrochromic efficiency is optimized with account for selective electroreduction of certain isopolytungstates. XRD data for thin electrodeposited films and chemically synthesized bulk tungstic acid dihydrate are compared in the context of reversible oxidation and reduction in hydrogen atmosphere, in presence of Pt catalyst. XPS and TEM techniques are attracted to understand the nature of reversible and less reversible transformations of films in the course of their storage and operation.

  15. Bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex a new apoptotic agent through Flk-1 down regulation, caspase-3 activation and oligonucleosomes DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Azab, Hassan A; Hussein, Belal H M; El-Azab, Mona F; Gomaa, Mohamed; El-Falouji, Abdullah I

    2013-01-01

    New bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex was synthesized and characterized. In vivo anti-angiogenic activities of bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells are described. The newly synthesized complex resulted in inhibition of proliferation of EAC cells and ascites formation. The anti-tumor effect was found to be through anti-angiogenic activity as evident by the reduction of microvessel density in EAC solid tumors. The anti-angiogenic effect is mediated through down-regulation of VEGF receptor type-2 (Flk-1). The complex was also found to significantly increase the level of caspase-3 in laboratory animals compared to the acridine ligand and to the control group. This was also consistent with the DNA fragmentation detected by capillary electrophoresis that proved the apoptotic effect of the new complex. Our complex exhibited anti-angiogenic and apoptotic activity in vivo, a thing that makes it a potential effective chemotherapeutic agent. The interaction of calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) with bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex has been investigated using fluorescence technique. A competitive experiment of the europium(III)-acridine complex with ethidium bromide (EB) to bind DNA revealed that interaction between the europium(III)-acridine and DNA was via intercalation. The interaction of the synthesized complex with tyrosine kinases was also studied using molecular docking simulation to further substantiate its mode of action.

  16. Reverse reaction of malic enzyme for HCO3- fixation into pyruvic acid to synthesize L-malic acid with enzymatic coenzyme regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoko; Nakamori, Toshihiko; Zheng, Haitao; Suye, Shin-ichiro

    2008-05-01

    Malic enzyme [L-malate: NAD(P)(+) oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.39)] catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of L-malic acid to produce pyruvic acid using the oxidized form of NAD(P) (NAD(P)(+)). We used a reverse reaction of the malic enzyme of Pseudomonas diminuta IFO 13182 for HCO(3)(-) fixation into pyruvic acid to produce L-malic acid with coenzyme (NADH) generation. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC1.1.1.49) of Leuconostoc mesenteroides was suitable for coenzyme regeneration. Optimum conditions for the carboxylation of pyruvic acid were examined, including pyruvic acid, NAD(+), and both malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase concentrations. Under optimal conditions, the ratio of HCO(3)(-) and pyruvic acid to malic acid was about 38% after 24 h of incubation at 30 degrees C, and the concentration of the accumulated L-malic acid in the reaction mixture was 38 mM. The malic enzyme reverse reaction was also carried out by the conjugated redox enzyme reaction with water-soluble polymer-bound NAD(+).

  17. Comparative Metabolomic Profiling Reveals That Dysregulated Glycolysis Stemming from Lack of Salvage NAD+ Biosynthesis Impairs Reproductive Development in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenqing; McReynolds, Melanie R.; Goncalves, Jimmy F.; Shu, Muya; Dhondt, Ineke; Braeckman, Bart P.; Lange, Stephanie E.; Kho, Kelvin; Detwiler, Ariana C.; Pacella, Marisa J.; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Temporal developmental progression is highly coordinated in Caenorhabditis elegans. However, loss of nicotinamidase PNC-1 activity slows reproductive development, uncoupling it from its typical progression relative to the soma. Using LC/MS we demonstrate that pnc-1 mutants do not salvage the nicotinamide released by NAD+ consumers to resynthesize NAD+, resulting in a reduction in global NAD+ bioavailability. We manipulate NAD+ levels to demonstrate that a minor deficit in NAD+ availability is incompatible with a normal pace of gonad development. The NAD+ deficit compromises NAD+ consumer activity, but we surprisingly found no functional link between consumer activity and reproductive development. As a result we turned to a comparative metabolomics approach to identify the cause of the developmental phenotype. We reveal widespread metabolic perturbations, and using complementary pharmacological and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that a glycolytic block accounts for the slow pace of reproductive development. Interestingly, mitochondria are protected from both the deficiency in NAD+ biosynthesis and the effects of reduced glycolytic output. We suggest that compensatory metabolic processes that maintain mitochondrial activity in the absence of efficient glycolysis are incompatible with the requirements for reproductive development, which requires high levels of cell division. In addition to demonstrating metabolic requirements for reproductive development, this work also has implications for understanding the mechanisms behind therapeutic interventions that target NAD+ salvage biosynthesis for the purposes of inhibiting tumor growth. PMID:26350462

  18. Comparative Metabolomic Profiling Reveals That Dysregulated Glycolysis Stemming from Lack of Salvage NAD+ Biosynthesis Impairs Reproductive Development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqing; McReynolds, Melanie R; Goncalves, Jimmy F; Shu, Muya; Dhondt, Ineke; Braeckman, Bart P; Lange, Stephanie E; Kho, Kelvin; Detwiler, Ariana C; Pacella, Marisa J; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2015-10-23

    Temporal developmental progression is highly coordinated in Caenorhabditis elegans. However, loss of nicotinamidase PNC-1 activity slows reproductive development, uncoupling it from its typical progression relative to the soma. Using LC/MS we demonstrate that pnc-1 mutants do not salvage the nicotinamide released by NAD(+) consumers to resynthesize NAD(+), resulting in a reduction in global NAD(+) bioavailability. We manipulate NAD(+) levels to demonstrate that a minor deficit in NAD(+) availability is incompatible with a normal pace of gonad development. The NAD(+) deficit compromises NAD(+) consumer activity, but we surprisingly found no functional link between consumer activity and reproductive development. As a result we turned to a comparative metabolomics approach to identify the cause of the developmental phenotype. We reveal widespread metabolic perturbations, and using complementary pharmacological and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that a glycolytic block accounts for the slow pace of reproductive development. Interestingly, mitochondria are protected from both the deficiency in NAD(+) biosynthesis and the effects of reduced glycolytic output. We suggest that compensatory metabolic processes that maintain mitochondrial activity in the absence of efficient glycolysis are incompatible with the requirements for reproductive development, which requires high levels of cell division. In addition to demonstrating metabolic requirements for reproductive development, this work also has implications for understanding the mechanisms behind therapeutic interventions that target NAD(+) salvage biosynthesis for the purposes of inhibiting tumor growth.

  19. 4-Hydr-oxy-1-oxo-1,2-dihydro-phthalazine-6,7-dicarboxylic acid dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ling-Ling; Zhao, Jian-She; Ng, Seik Weng

    2008-06-07

    In the crystal structure of the title compound, C(10)H(6)N(2)O(6)·2H(2)O, the OH and NH groups each serve as a hydrogen-bond donor to one acceptor site whereas the water mol-ecules each serve as a hydrogen-bond donor to two acceptor sites. The hydrogen-bonding scheme gives rise to a three-dimensional network.

  20. The crystal structure of human alpha-amino-beta-carboxymuconate-epsilon-semialdehyde decarboxylase in complex with 1,3-dihydroxyacetonephosphate suggests a regulatory link between NAD synthesis and glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Silvia; Perozzi, Silvia; Galeazzi, Luca; Raffaelli, Nadia; Rizzi, Menico

    2009-11-01

    The enzyme alpha-amino-beta-carboxymuconate-epsilon-semialdehyde decarboxylase (ACMSD) is a zinc-dependent amidohydrolase that participates in picolinic acid (PA), quinolinic acid (QA) and NAD homeostasis. Indeed, the enzyme stands at a branch point of the tryptophan to NAD pathway, and determines the final fate of the amino acid, i.e. transformation into PA, complete oxidation through the citric acid cycle, or conversion into NAD through QA synthesis. Both PA and QA are key players in a number of physiological and pathological conditions, mainly affecting the central nervous system. As their relative concentrations must be tightly controlled, modulation of ACMSD activity appears to be a promising prospect for the treatment of neurological disorders, including cerebral malaria. Here we report the 2.0 A resolution crystal structure of human ACMSD in complex with the glycolytic intermediate 1,3-dihydroxyacetonephosphate (DHAP), refined to an R-factor of 0.19. DHAP, which we discovered to be a potent enzyme inhibitor, resides in the ligand binding pocket with its phosphate moiety contacting the catalytically essential zinc ion through mediation of a solvent molecule. Arg47, Asp291 and Trp191 appear to be the key residues for DHAP recognition in human ACMSD. Ligand binding induces a significant conformational change affecting a strictly conserved Trp-Met couple, and we propose that these residues are involved in controlling ligand admission into ACMSD. Our data may be used for the design of inhibitors with potential medical interest, and suggest a regulatory link between de novo NAD biosynthesis and glycolysis.

  1. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Onkar; O’Seaghdha, Maghnus; Velarde, Jorge J.; Wessels, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS) has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase). When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO), and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase) that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells. PMID:26938870

  2. Sequence of a cDNA encoding the bi-specific NAD(P)H-nitrate reductase from the tree Betula pendula and identification of conserved protein regions.

    PubMed

    Friemann, A; Brinkmann, K; Hachtel, W

    1991-05-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) assays revealed a bispecific NAD(P)H-NR (EC 1.6.6.2.) to be the only nitrate-reducing enzyme in leaves of hydroponically grown birches. To obtain the primary structure of the NAD(P)H-NR, leaf poly(A)+ mRNA was used to construct a cDNA library in the lambda gt11 phage. Recombinant clones were screened with heterologous gene probes encoding NADH-NR from tobacco and squash. A 3.0 kb cDNA was isolated which hybridized to a 3.2 kb mRNA whose level was significantly higher in plants grown on nitrate than in those grown on ammonia. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA comprises a reading frame encoding a protein of 898 amino acids which reveals 67%-77% identity with NADH-nitrate reductase sequences from higher plants. To identify conserved and variable regions of the multicentre electron-transfer protein a graphical evaluation of identities found in NR sequence alignments was carried out. Thirteen well-conserved sections exceeding a size of 10 amino acids were found in higher plant nitrate reductases. Sequence comparisons with related redox proteins indicate that about half of the conserved NR regions are involved in cofactor binding. The most striking difference in the birch NAD(P)H-NR sequence in comparison to NADH-NR sequences was found at the putative pyridine nucleotide binding site. Southern analysis indicates that the bi-specific NR is encoded by a single copy gene in birch.

  3. Insights into the Sirtuin Mechanism from Ternary Complexes Containing NAD[superscript +] and Acetylated Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Kevin G.; Avalos, Jose L.; Sens, Kristin; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-07-22

    Sirtuin proteins comprise a unique class of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylases. Although several structures of sirtuins have been determined, the mechanism by which NAD{sup +} cleavage occurs has remained unclear. We report the structures of ternary complexes containing NAD{sup +} and acetylated peptide bound to the bacterial sirtuin Sir2Tm and to a catalytic mutant (Sir2Tm{sup H116Y}). NAD{sup +} in these structures binds in a conformation different from that seen in previous structures, exposing the {alpha} face of the nicotinamide ribose to the carbonyl oxygen of the acetyl lysine substrate. The NAD{sup +} conformation is identical in both structures, suggesting that proper coenzyme orientation is not dependent on contacts with the catalytic histidine. We also present the structure of Sir2Tm{sup H116A} bound to deacteylated peptide and 3{prime}-O-acetyl ADP ribose. Taken together, these structures suggest a mechanism for nicotinamide cleavage in which an invariant phenylalanine plays a central role in promoting formation of the O-alkylamidate reaction intermediate and preventing nicotinamide exchange.

  4. NAD deamidation "a new reaction" by an enzyme from Aspergillus terreus DSM 826.

    PubMed

    Elzainy, Tahany A; Ali, Thanaa H

    2005-02-01

    NAD deamidation is a non-previously recognized reaction. This reaction has been found to be catalyzed by extracts of Aspergillus terreus DSM 826. Conversion of NAD to the biosynthetic intermediate, deamido NAD, by these extracts, at the optimum pH and temperature did not exceed about 55 of the amount of the substrate added. Completion of the reaction was achieved when the extracts were pre-heated at 50 degrees C for 15 min in absence of the substrate. In a very similar manner, the extracts catalyzed hydrolytic cleavage of the amide linkages of different biomolecules such as nicotinamide, nicotinamide riboside, nicotinamide mononucleotide, L-glutamine, L-asparagine and acetamide. Polyacrylamide was also deamidated under the same conditions. In addition, complete dephosphorylation of the dinucleotide molecule was also effected by the same extracts. Separation of the NAD deamidating enzyme from the NAD dephosphorylating enzyme was achieved on using either DEAE - Sephadex A-25 or Sephadex G-200 column chromatography. The obtained phosphohydrolase-free-deamidase showed optimum activity at pH 8 of 0.1 M phosphate buffer and 50 degrees C. It exhibited broad substrate specificity and hyperbolic substrate saturation kinetics. It was isosterically inhibited by the product of its activity and this inhibition was prevented by heating the extracts at 50 degrees C for 15 min. Its activity was not affected in presence of sodium fluoride, partially inhibited in presence of magnesium chloride and was retained in the freezer for some months.

  5. Structure of the meningococcal vaccine antigen NadA and epitope mapping of a bactericidal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Malito, Enrico; Biancucci, Marco; Faleri, Agnese; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Scarselli, Maria; Maruggi, Giulietta; Lo Surdo, Paola; Veggi, Daniele; Liguori, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Bertoldi, Isabella; Petracca, Roberto; Marchi, Sara; Romagnoli, Giacomo; Cartocci, Elena; Vercellino, Irene; Savino, Silvana; Spraggon, Glen; Norais, Nathalie; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Masignani, Vega; Bottomley, Matthew James

    2014-01-01

    Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) is a major cause of severe sepsis and invasive meningococcal disease, which is associated with 5–15% mortality and devastating long-term sequelae. Neisserial adhesin A (NadA), a trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA) that acts in adhesion to and invasion of host epithelial cells, is one of the three antigens discovered by genome mining that are part of the MenB vaccine that recently was approved by the European Medicines Agency. Here we present the crystal structure of NadA variant 5 at 2 Å resolution and transmission electron microscopy data for NadA variant 3 that is present in the vaccine. The two variants show similar overall topology with a novel TAA fold predominantly composed of trimeric coiled-coils with three protruding wing-like structures that create an unusual N-terminal head domain. Detailed mapping of the binding site of a bactericidal antibody by hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS shows that a protective conformational epitope is located in the head of NadA. These results provide information that is important for elucidating the biological function and vaccine efficacy of NadA. PMID:25404323

  6. Structural Basis for NADH/NAD+ Redox Sensing by a Rex Family Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, K.J.; Soares, A.; Strain-Damerell, C. M.; Xie, K.; Brekasis, D.; Pagent, M. S. B.; Kielkopf, C. L.

    2010-05-28

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides have emerged as key signals of the cellular redox state. Yet the structural basis for allosteric gene regulation by the ratio of reduced NADH to oxidized NAD{sup +} is poorly understood. A key sensor among Gram-positive bacteria, Rex represses alternative respiratory gene expression until a limited oxygen supply elevates the intracellular NADH:NAD{sup +} ratio. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism for NADH/NAD{sup +} sensing among Rex family members by determining structures of Thermus aquaticus Rex bound to (1) NAD{sup +}, (2) DNA operator, and (3) without ligand. Comparison with the Rex/NADH complex reveals that NADH releases Rex from the DNA site following a 40{sup o} closure between the dimeric subunits. Complementary site-directed mutagenesis experiments implicate highly conserved residues in NAD-responsive DNA-binding activity. These rare views of a redox sensor in action establish a means for slight differences in the nicotinamide charge, pucker, and orientation to signal the redox state of the cell.

  7. Lycopene Pretreatment Ameliorates Acute Ethanol Induced NAD+ Depletion in Human Astroglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Jade; Heng, Benjamin; Grant, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with reduced brain volume and cognition. While the mechanisms by which ethanol induces these deleterious effects in vivo are varied most are associated with increased inflammatory and oxidative processes. In order to further characterise the effect of acute ethanol exposure on oxidative damage and NAD+ levels in the brain, human U251 astroglioma cells were exposed to physiologically relevant doses of ethanol (11 mM, 22 mM, 65 mM, and 100 mM) for ≤ 30 minutes. Ethanol exposure resulted in a dose dependent increase in both ROS and poly(ADP-ribose) polymer production. Significant decreases in total NAD(H) and sirtuin 1 activity were also observed at concentrations ≥ 22 mM. Similar to U251 cells, exposure to ethanol (≥22 mM) decreased levels of NAD(H) in primary human astrocytes. NAD(H) depletion in primary astrocytes was prevented by pretreatment with 1 μM of lycopene for 3.5 hours. Unexpectedly, in U251 cells lycopene treatment at concentrations ≥ 5 μM resulted in significant reductions in [NAD(H)]. This study suggests that exposure of the brain to alcohol at commonly observed blood concentrations may cause transitory oxidative damage which may be at least partly ameliorated by lycopene. PMID:26075038

  8. Investigation of the NADH/NAD(+) ratio in Ralstonia eutropha using the fluorescence reporter protein Peredox.

    PubMed

    Tejwani, Vijay; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Wilkening, Svea; Zebger, Ingo; Horch, Marius; Lenz, Oliver; Friedrich, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha is a hydrogen-oxidizing ("Knallgas") bacterium that can easily switch between heterotrophic and autotrophic metabolism to thrive in aerobic and anaerobic environments. Its versatile metabolism makes R. eutropha an attractive host for biotechnological applications, including H2-driven production of biodegradable polymers and hydrocarbons. H2 oxidation by R. eutropha takes place in the presence of O2 and is mediated by four hydrogenases, which represent ideal model systems for both biohydrogen production and H2 utilization. The so-called soluble hydrogenase (SH) couples reversibly H2 oxidation with the reduction of NAD(+) to NADH and has already been applied successfully in vitro and in vivo for cofactor regeneration. Thus, the interaction of the SH with the cellular NADH/NAD(+) pool is of major interest. In this work, we applied the fluorescent biosensor Peredox to measure the [NADH]:[NAD(+)] ratio in R. eutropha cells under different metabolic conditions. The results suggest that the sensor operates close to saturation level, indicating a rather high [NADH]:[NAD(+)] ratio in aerobically grown R. eutropha cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that multicomponent analysis of spectrally-resolved fluorescence lifetime data of the Peredox sensor response to different [NADH]:[NAD(+)] ratios represents a novel and sensitive tool to determine the redox state of cells.

  9. Base-modified NAD and AMP derivatives and their activity against bacterial DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Giulia; Cominetti, Marco M D; Butt, Julea N; Field, Robert A; Bowater, Richard P; Wagner, Gerd K

    2015-06-14

    We report the chemical synthesis and conformational analysis of a collection of 2-, 6- and 8-substituted derivatives of β-NAD(+) and AMP, and their biochemical evaluation against NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases from Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial DNA ligases are validated anti-microbial targets, and new strategies for their inhibition are therefore of considerable scientific and practical interest. Our study includes several pairs of β-NAD(+) and AMP derivatives with the same substitution pattern at the adenine base. This has enabled the first direct comparison of co-substrate and inhibitor behaviour against bacterial DNA ligases. Our results suggest that an additional substituent in position 6 or 8 of the adenine base in β-NAD(+) is detrimental for activity as either co-substrate or inhibitor. In contrast, substituents in position 2 are not only tolerated, but appear to give rise to a new mode of inhibition, which targets the conformational changes these DNA ligases undergo during catalysis. Using a molecular modelling approach, we highlight that these findings have important implications for our understanding of ligase mechanism and inhibition, and may provide a promising starting point for the rational design of a new class of inhibitors against NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases.

  10. A pathway for repair of NAD(P)H in plants.

    PubMed

    Colinas, Maite; Shaw, Holly V; Loubéry, Sylvain; Kaufmann, Markus; Moulin, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Teresa B

    2014-05-23

    Unwanted enzyme side reactions and spontaneous decomposition of metabolites can lead to a build-up of compounds that compete with natural enzyme substrates and must be dealt with for efficient metabolism. It has recently been realized that there are enzymes that process such compounds, formulating the concept of metabolite repair. NADH and NADPH are vital cellular redox cofactors but can form non-functional hydrates (named NAD(P)HX) spontaneously or enzymatically that compete with enzymes dependent on NAD(P)H, impairing normal enzyme function. Here we report on the functional characterization of components of a potential NAD(P)H repair pathway in plants comprising a stereospecific dehydratase (NNRD) and an epimerase (NNRE), the latter being fused to a vitamin B6 salvage enzyme. Through the use of the recombinant proteins, we show that the ATP-dependent NNRD and NNRE act concomitantly to restore NAD(P)HX to NAD(P)H. NNRD behaves as a tetramer and NNRE as a dimer, but the proteins do not physically interact. In vivo fluorescence analysis demonstrates that the proteins are localized to mitochondria and/or plastids, implicating these as the key organelles where this repair is required. Expression analysis indicates that whereas NNRE is present ubiquitously, NNRD is restricted to seeds but appears to be dispensable during the normal Arabidopsis life cycle.

  11. 3-Hydr-oxy-1,2,3,9-tetra-hydro-pyrrolo[2,1-b]quinazolin-4-ium chloride dihydrate: (+)-vasicinol hydro-chloride dihydrate from Peganum harmala L.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amir Muhammad; Abbas, Ghulam; Qureshi, Rizwana Aleem; Khan, Uzma; Ghufran, Muhammad Asad; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen

    2009-02-06

    The title compound, C(11)H(13)N(2)O(+)·Cl(-)·2H(2)O, the dihydrate of (+)-vasicinol hydro-chloride, is a pyrrolidinoquinazoline alkaloid. It was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of the leaves of Peganum harmala L. The pyrrolidine ring has an envelope conformation with the C atom at position 2 acting as the flap and the C atom at position 3, carrying the hydroxyl substituent, has an S configuration. The absolute configuration was determined as a result of the anomalous scattering of the Cl atom. In the crystal structure, mol-ecules stack along the a axis, connected to one another via inter-molecular O-H⋯Cl and N-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, forming approximately triangular-shaped R(2) (1)(7) rings, and O-H⋯Cl and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming penta-gonal-shaped R(5) (4)(10) rings. The overall effect is a ribbon-like arrangement running parallel to the a axis.

  12. Intracellular NAD+ levels are associated with LPS-induced TNF-α release in pro-inflammatory macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shabany, Abbas Jawad; Moody, Alan John; Foey, Andrew David; Billington, Richard Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism and immune responses have been shown to be closely linked and as our understanding increases, so do the intricacies of the level of linkage. NAD+ has previously been shown to regulate tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) synthesis and TNF-α has been shown to regulate NAD+ homoeostasis providing a link between a pro-inflammatory response and redox status. In the present study, we have used THP-1 differentiation into pro- (M1-like) and anti- (M2-like) inflammatory macrophage subset models to investigate this link further. Pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages showed different resting NAD+ levels and expression levels of NAD+ homoeostasis enzymes. Challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a pro-inflammatory stimulus for macrophages, caused a large, biphasic and transient increase in NAD+ levels in pro- but not anti-inflammatory macrophages that were correlated with TNF-α release and inhibition of certain NAD+ synthesis pathways blocked TNF-α release. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation also caused changes in mRNA levels of some NAD+ homoeostasis enzymes in M1-like cells. Surprisingly, despite M2-like cells not releasing TNF-α or changing NAD+ levels in response to lipopolysaccharide, they showed similar mRNA changes compared with M1-like cells. These data further strengthen the link between pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages and NAD+. The agonist-induced rise in NAD+ shows striking parallels to well-known second messengers and raises the possibility that NAD+ is acting in a similar manner in this model. PMID:26764408

  13. Intracellular NAD+ levels are associated with LPS-induced TNF-α release in pro-inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Al-Shabany, Abbas Jawad; Moody, Alan John; Foey, Andrew David; Billington, Richard Andrew

    2016-01-13

    Metabolism and immune responses have been shown to be closely linked and as our understanding increases, so do the intricacies of the level of linkage. NAD(+) has previously been shown to regulate tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) synthesis and TNF-α has been shown to regulate NAD(+) homoeostasis providing a link between a pro-inflammatory response and redox status. In the present study, we have used THP-1 differentiation into pro- (M1-like) and anti- (M2-like) inflammatory macrophage subset models to investigate this link further. Pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages showed different resting NAD(+) levels and expression levels of NAD(+) homoeostasis enzymes. Challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a pro-inflammatory stimulus for macrophages, caused a large, biphasic and transient increase in NAD(+) levels in pro- but not anti-inflammatory macrophages that were correlated with TNF-α release and inhibition of certain NAD(+) synthesis pathways blocked TNF-α release. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation also caused changes in mRNA levels of some NAD(+) homoeostasis enzymes in M1-like cells. Surprisingly, despite M2-like cells not releasing TNF-α or changing NAD(+) levels in response to lipopolysaccharide, they showed similar mRNA changes compared with M1-like cells. These data further strengthen the link between pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages and NAD(+). The agonist-induced rise in NAD(+) shows striking parallels to well-known second messengers and raises the possibility that NAD(+) is acting in a similar manner in this model.

  14. Calcium-deficient apatite synthesized by ammonia hydrolysis of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate: influence of temperature, time, and pressure.

    PubMed

    Obadia, Laetitia; Rouillon, Thierry; Bujoli, Bruno; Daculsi, Guy; Bouler, Jean Michel

    2007-01-01

    In this work, calcium-deficient apatites (CDA) were synthesized by ammonia hydrolysis reaction of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD; CaHPO4 x 2 H2O) to obtain biphasic calcium phosphates (BCP) without any extraionic substitution. The influence of three parameters was studied: temperature of the reaction (70 and 100 degrees C), time of the reaction (4 and 18 h), and the pressure (open and closed system). Experiments were made according to a factorial design method (FDM) allowing optimization of the number of samples as well as statistical analysis of results. Moreover, the influence of temperature (until 200 degrees C) was investigated. The crystal size of CDA was determined according to the Scherrer's formula and from Rietveld refinements taking the CDA anisotropy into account. The last method seems to be a reliable method to determine crystallite sizes of CDA, since crystallite sizes of CDA along <00l> and directions were accessible. The results describe the hydroxyapatite % (HA%) in BCP by a first-order polynomial equation in the experimental area studied and the HA content was found to increase by raising time and temperature of the reaction. Moreover, the type of reaction system (open/closed vessel) appeared to have little influence on HA%.

  15. The effect of autoclaving on the physical and biological properties of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate bioceramics: brushite vs. monetite.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Faleh; Le Nihouannen, Damien; Eimar, Hazem; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Komarova, Svetlana; Barralet, Jake

    2012-08-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (brushite) is an osteoconductive biomaterial with great potential as a bioresorbable cement for bone regeneration. Preset brushite cement can be dehydrated into dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (monetite) bioceramics by autoclaving. This heat treatment results in changes in the physical characteristics of the material, improving in vivo bioresorption. This property is a great advantage in bone regeneration; however, it is not known how autoclaving brushite preset cement might improve its capacity to regenerate bone. This study was designed to compare brushite bioceramics with monetite bioceramics in terms of physical characteristics in vitro, and in vivo performance upon bone implantation. In this study we observed that monetite bioceramics prepared by autoclaving preset brushite cements had higher porosity, interconnected porosity and specific surface area than their brushite precursors. In vitro cell culture experiments revealed that bone marrow cells expressed higher levels of osteogenic genes Runx2, Opn, and Alp when the cells were cultured on monetite ceramics rather than on brushite ones. In vivo experiments revealed that monetite bioceramics resorbed faster than brushite ones and were more infiltrated with newly formed bone. In summary, autoclaving preset brushite cements results in a material with improved properties for bone regeneration procedures.

  16. Surfactant-assisted intercalation of high molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide) into vanadyl phosphate di-hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Joao Paulo L.; Oliveira, Herenilton P.

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: CuK{sub {alpha}} X-ray diffraction patterns of the VOPO{sub 4}/PEO (A) e VOPO{sub 4}/CTA (B) and VOPO{sub 4}/CTA/PEO (C). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VOPO{sub 4}/PEO has been synthesized by using CTAB, thereby improving PEO intercalation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The d-spacing increase from 1.30 nm (VOPO{sub 4}/PEO) to 2.94 nm (VOPO{sub 4}/CTA/PEO). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This strategy was viable for intercalation of PEO with high molecular weight. -- Abstract: A high molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide)/layered vanadyl phosphate di-hydrate intercalation compound was synthesized via the surfactant-assisted approach. Results confirmed that surfactant molecules were replaced with the polymer, while the lamellar structure of the matrix was retained, and that the material presents high specific surface area. In addition, intercalation produced a more thermally stable polymer as evidenced by thermal analysis.

  17. Crystal growth, structural, thermal and mechanical behavior of L-arginine 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol dihydrate (LAPP) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, M.; Ramachandran, K.; Anandan, P.; Arivanandhan, M.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Single crystals of L-arginine 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol dihydrate (LAPP) have been grown successfully from the solution of L-arginine and 4-nitrophenol. Slow evaporation of solvent technique was adopted to grow the bulk single crystals. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the grown crystal has monoclinic crystal system with space group of P21. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis shows the good crystalline nature. The crystalline perfection of the grown single crystals was analyzed by HRXRD by employing a multicrystal X-ray diffractometer. The functional groups were identified from proton NMR spectroscopic analysis. Linear and nonlinear optical properties were determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometer and Kurtz powder technique respectively. It is found that the grown crystal has no absorption in the green wavelength region and the SHG efficiency was found to be 2.66 times that of the standard KDP. The Thermal stability of the crystal was found by obtaining TG/DTA curve. The mechanical behavior of the grown crystal has been studied by Vicker's microhardness method.

  18. Investigations on nucleation, HRXRD, optical, piezoelectric, polarizability and Z-scan analysis of L-arginine maleate dihydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthy Priya, S.; Alexandar, A.; Surendran, P.; Lakshmanan, A.; Rameshkumar, P.; Sagayaraj, P.

    2017-04-01

    An efficient organic nonlinear optical single crystal of L-arginine maleate dihydrate (LAMD) has been grown by slow evaporation solution technique (SEST) and slow cooling technique (SCT). The crystalline perfection of the crystal was examined using high-resolution X-ray diffractometry (HRXRD) analysis. Photoluminescence study confirmed the optical properties and defects level in the crystal lattice. Electromechanical behaviour was observed using piezoelectric co-efficient (d33) analysis. The photoconductivity analysis confirmed the negative photoconducting nature of the material. The dielectric constant and loss were measured as a function of frequency with varying temperature and vice-versa. The laser damage threshold (LDT) measurement was carried out using Nd:YAG Laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm (Focal length is 35 cm) and the obtained results showed that LDT value of the crystal is high compared to KDP crystal. The high laser damage threshold of the grown crystal makes it a potential candidate for second and higher order nonlinear optical device application. The third order nonlinear optical parameters of LAMD crystal is determined by open-aperture and closed-aperture studies using Z-scan technique. The third order linear and nonlinear optical parameters such as the nonlinear refractive index (n2), two photon absorption coefficient (β), Real part (Reχ3) and imaginary part (Imχ3) of third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility are calculated.

  19. Evans hole and non linear optical activity in Bis(melaminium) sulphate dihydrate: A vibrational spectral study.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, V R; Binoy, J; Dawn Dharma Roy, S; Marchewka, M K; Jayakumar, V S

    2015-01-01

    Bis(melaminium) sulphate dihydrate (BMSD), an interesting melaminium derivative for nonlinear optical activity, has been subjected to vibrational spectral analysis using FT IR and FT Raman spectra. The analysis has been aided by the Potential Energy Distribution (PED) of vibrational spectral bands, derived using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The geometry is found to correlate well with the XRD structure and the band profiles for certain vibrations in the finger print region have been theoretically explained using Evans hole. The detailed Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis of the hydrogen bonding in BMSD has also been carried out to understand the correlation between the stabilization energy of hyperconjugation of the lone pair of donor with the σ(∗) orbital of hydrogen-acceptor bond and the strength of hydrogen bond. The theoretical calculation shows that BMSD has NLO efficiency, 2.66 times that of urea. The frontier molecular orbital analysis points to a charge transfer, which contributes to NLO activity, through N-H…O intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the melaminium ring and the sulphate. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) mapping has also been performed for the detailed analysis of the mutual interactions between melaminium ring and sulphate ion.

  20. Influence of crystal habit on the surface free energy and interparticulate bonding of L-lysine monohydrochloride dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, R; Grant, D J

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to apply a technique to measure the surface energy of crystalline powders without changing the surface properties by compaction, and to relate such measurements to crystal habit and orientation. The surface free energy of uncompacted L-lysine monohydrochloride dihydrate (LH), determined using a modified sessile-drop method, reflected a combined value for the various faces, and was influenced by the relative size of the faces and the orientation of the crystals. The surface free energy values obtained from contact angle measurements were within the possible range calculated from the crystal structure. Discrepancies between the theoretical estimates of interparticulate cohesive strengths and those measured from the tensile strength of powder compacts were used to estimate the flaw sizes (or gaps between the particles) that act as stress concentrators and reduce the tensile strength of the compacts. The flaw sizes indicate packing and compressibility of the various crystal habits. In the absence of compressive load, compacts made out of the equidimensional crystals have the larger flaw sizes (wider cracks or wider gaps between the particles). At higher compaction pressures, the compacts from long rod-shaped crystals have longer crack lengths. The weakness of the compacts made from the long rods at the higher compaction pressures may be because of the longer crack length along the interparticulate boundary, which may result in a higher stress intensity at the crack tip and increased fracture propensity.

  1. Cobalt selenite dihydrate as an effective and stable Pt-free counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jia; Wu, Jihuai; Jia, Jinbiao; Fan, Leqing; Lan, Zhang; Lin, Jianming; Wei, Yuelin

    2016-12-01

    Cobalt selenite dihydrate (CoSeO3·2H2O) is spin-coated on conductive glass and used as counter electrode (CE) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Owing to CoSeO3·2H2O electrode good electrocatalytic activity, high conductivity and low resistance, the DSSC based on optimal CoSeO3·2H2O CE provides a power conversion efficiency of 8.90% under one sun irradiation from the front of DSSC, which is superior to the DSSC based on conventional Pt CE. Furthermore, when incorporating trace amounts of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into CoSeO3·2H2O CE, the DSSC device achieves an improved power conversion efficiency of 9.89%. The research presented here indicates that hydration oxysalt can be used as efficient, stable and free-Pt counter electrode material and shows excellent prospects for application in DSSCs.

  2. Crystal growth and DFT insight on sodium para-nitrophenolate para-nitrophenol dihydrate single crystal for NLO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, S.; Boobalan, Maria Susai; Anthuvan Babu, S.; Ramalingam, S.; Leo Rajesh, A.

    2016-12-01

    Single crystals of sodium para-nitrophenolate para-nitrophenol dihydrate (SPPD) were grown by slow evaporation technique and its structure has been studied by FT-IR, FT-Raman and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The optical and electrical properties were characterized by UV-Vis spectrum, and dielectric studies respectively. SPPD was thermally stable up to 128 °C as determined by TG-DTA curves. Using the Kurtz-Perry powder method, the second-harmonic generation efficiency was found to be five times to that of KDP. Third-order nonlinear response was studied using Z-scan technique with a He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) and NLO parameters such as intensity dependent refractive index, nonlinear absorption coefficient and third-order susceptibility were also estimated. The molecular geometry from X-ray experiment in the ground state has been compared using density functional theory (DFT) with appropriate basis set. The first-order hyperpolarizability also calculated using DFT approaches. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions leading to its nonlinear optical activity and charge delocalization were analyzed using natural bond orbital technique. HOMO-LUMO energy gap value suggests the possibility of charge transfer within the molecule. Based on optimized ground state geometries, Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was performed to study donor-acceptor interactions.

  3. The acoustic velocity, refractive index, and equation of state of liquid ammonia dihydrate under high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunli; Wu, Xiaoxin; Huang, Fengxian; Zhou, Qiang; Li, Fangfei; Cui, Qiliang

    2012-09-14

    High-pressure and high-temperature Brillouin scattering studies have been performed on liquid of composition corresponding to the ammonia dihydrate stoichiometry (NH(3)·2H(2)O) in a diamond anvil cell. Using the measured Brillouin frequency shifts from 180° back- and 60° platelet-scattering geometries, the acoustic velocity, refractive index, density, and adiabatic bulk modulus have been determined under pressure up to freezing point along the 296, 338, 376, and 407 K isotherms. Along these four isotherms, the acoustic velocities increase smoothly with increasing pressure but decrease with the increased temperature. However, the pressure dependence of the refractive indexes on the four isotherms exhibits a change in slope around 1.5 GPa. The bulk modulus increases linearly with pressure and its slope, dB/dP, decreases from 6.83 at 296 K to 4.41 at 407 K. These new datasets improve our understanding of the pressure- and temperature-induced molecular structure changes in the ammonia-water binary system.

  4. Occurrence of cold-labile NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Jahns, T

    1992-09-15

    A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GluDH; EC 1.4.1.3) inactivated by incubation at low temperatures was detected in several species of the genus Bacillus, including strains of B. cereus, B. laterosporus, B. lentus, B. panthotenicus, B. pasteurii, B. sphaericus, B. stearothermophilus, B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis. Incubation of cell-free extracts of these strains at 0 degrees C resulted in an 80-100% inactivation of NAD-GluDH activity within 120 min. The addition of 20% glycerol protected the enzyme from this inactivation in the cold. Strains of B. fastidiosus, B. licheniformis, B. macerans, B. megaterium and B. pumilus were found to lack NAD-GluDH activity.

  5. NaD excess objects and its implications on initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sukyoung K.; Jeong, Hyunjin

    2015-04-01

    van Dokkum and Conroy (2010) have heralded the possible implication of NaI 8200A lines on extra bottom-heavy IMF of bright elliptical galaxies. A flurry of papers have followed it and revisited the half a century old issue all over again from various angles. For a sanity check, we investigate on the issue this time using the better measured NaD 5900A line instead. We found from the SDSS database that a large (~ 10%) fraction of galaxies (both early and late types) exhibit strong NaD lines and that the same bottom-heavy models of van Dokkum and Conroy that reproduced the strong NaI 8200 lines of elliptical galaxies are not capable of reproducing NaD line strengths at all. The mystery prevails. This article is mainly a review of our recent paper (Jeong et al. 2013).

  6. NAD+ Is a Food Component That Promotes Exit from Dauer Diapause in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Mylenko, Mykola; Boland, Sebastian; Penkov, Sider; Sampaio, Julio L.; Lombardot, Benoit; Vorkel, Daniela; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Kurzchalia, Teymuras V.

    2016-01-01

    The free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans adapts its development to the availability of food. When food is scarce and population density is high, worms enter a developmentally arrested non-feeding diapause stage specialized for long-term survival called the dauer larva. When food becomes available, they exit from the dauer stage, resume growth and reproduction. It has been postulated that compound(s) present in food, referred to as the “food signal”, promote exit from the dauer stage. In this study, we have identified NAD+ as a component of bacterial extract that promotes dauer exit. NAD+, when dissolved in alkaline medium, causes opening of the mouth and ingestion of food. We also show that to initiate exit from the dauer stage in response to NAD+ worms require production of serotonin. Thus, C. elegans can use redox cofactors produced by dietary organisms to sense food. PMID:27907064

  7. Investigation of the action of poly(ADP-ribose)-synthesising enzymes on NAD+ analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wallrodt, Sarah; Simpson, Edward L

    2017-01-01

    ADP-ribosyl transferases with diphtheria toxin homology (ARTDs) catalyse the covalent addition of ADP-ribose onto different acceptors forming mono- or poly(ADP-ribos)ylated proteins. Out of the 18 members identified, only four are known to synthesise the complex poly(ADP-ribose) biopolymer. The investigation of this posttranslational modification is important due to its involvement in cancer and other diseases. Lately, metabolic labelling approaches comprising different reporter-modified NAD+ building blocks have stimulated and enriched proteomic studies and imaging applications of ADP-ribosylation processes. Herein, we compare the substrate scope and applicability of different NAD+ analogues for the investigation of the polymer-synthesising enzymes ARTD1, ARTD2, ARTD5 and ARTD6. By varying the site and size of the NAD+ modification, suitable probes were identified for each enzyme. This report provides guidelines for choosing analogues for studying poly(ADP-ribose)-synthesising enzymes. PMID:28382184

  8. Role of NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S M; Magasanik, B

    1990-01-01

    We cloned GDH2, the gene that encodes the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by purifying the enzyme, making polyclonal antibodies to it, and using the antibodies to screen a lambda gt11 yeast genomic library. A yeast strain with a deletion-disruption allele of GDH2 which replaced the wild-type gene grew very poorly with glutamate as a nitrogen source, but growth improved significantly when the strain was also provided with adenine or other nitrogenous compounds whose biosynthesis requires glutamine. Our results indicate that the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase catalyzes the major, but not sole, pathway for generation of ammonia from glutamate. We also isolated yeast mutants that lacked glutamate synthase activity and present evidence which shows that normally NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase is not involved in glutamate biosynthesis, but that if the enzyme is overexpressed, it may function reversibly in intact cells. PMID:1975578

  9. Structural Basis of Inhibition of the Human NAD+ -Dependent Deacetylase SIRT5 by Suramin

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz,A.; Min, J.; Antoshenko, T.; Wang, C.; Allali-Hassani, A.; Dong, A.; Loppnau, P.; vedadi, M.; Bochkarev, A.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases and are emerging as molecular targets for the development of pharmaceuticals to treat human metabolic and neurological diseases and cancer. To date, several sirtuin inhibitors and activators have been identified, but the structural mechanisms of how these compounds modulate sirtuin activity have not yet been determined. We identified suramin as a compound that binds to human SIRT5 and showed that it inhibits SIRT5 NAD+-dependent deacetylase activity with an IC50 value of 22 {mu}M. To provide insights into how sirtuin function is altered by inhibitors, we determined two crystal structures of SIRT5, one in complex with ADP-ribose, the other bound to suramin. Our structural studies provide a view of a synthetic inhibitory compound in a sirtuin active site revealing that suramin binds into the NAD+, the product, and the substrate-binding site. Finally, our structures may enable the rational design of more potent inhibitors.

  10. Whole blood NAD and NADP concentrations are not depressed in subjects with clinical pellagra.

    PubMed

    Creeke, Paul I; Dibari, Filippo; Cheung, Edith; van den Briel, Tina; Kyroussis, Eustace; Seal, Andrew J

    2007-09-01

    Population surveys for niacin deficiency are normally based on clinical signs or on biochemical measurements of urinary niacin metabolites. Status may also be determined by measurement of whole blood NAD and NADP concentrations. To compare these methods, whole blood samples and spot urine samples were collected from healthy subjects (n = 2) consuming a western diet, from patients (n = 34) diagnosed with pellagra and attending a pellagra clinic in Kuito (central Angola, where niacin deficiency is endemic), and from female community control subjects (n = 107) who had no clinical signs of pellagra. Whole blood NAD and NADP concentrations were measured by microtiter plate-based enzymatic assays and the niacin urinary metabolites 1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (2-PYR) and 1-methylnicotinamide (1-MN) by HPLC. In healthy volunteers, inter- and intra-day variations for NAD and NADP concentrations were much lower than for the urinary metabolites, suggesting a more stable measure of status. However, whole blood concentrations of NAD and NADP or the NAD:NADP ratio were not significantly depressed in clinical pellagra. In contrast, the concentrations of 2-PYR and 1-MN, expressed relative to either creatinine or osmolality, were lower in pellagra patients and markedly higher following treatment. The use of the combined cut-offs (2-PYR <3.0 micromol/mmol creatinine and 1-MN <1.3 micromol/mmol creatinine) gave a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 72%. In conclusion, whole blood NAD and NADP concentrations gave an erroneously low estimate of niacin deficiency. In contrast, spot urine sample 2-PYR and 1-MN concentrations, relative to creatinine, were a sensitive and specific measure of deficiency.

  11. Pharmacological NAD-Boosting Strategies Improve Mitochondrial Homeostasis in Human Complex I-Mutant Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Felici, Roberta; Lapucci, Andrea; Cavone, Leonardo; Pratesi, Sara; Berlinguer-Palmini, Rolando; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are devastating genetic diseases for which efficacious therapies are still an unmet need. Recent studies report that increased availability of intracellular NAD obtained by inhibition of the NAD-consuming enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 or supplementation with the NAD-precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) ameliorates energetic derangement and symptoms in mouse models of mitochondrial disorders. Whether these pharmacological approaches also improve bioenergetics of human cells harboring mitochondrial defects is unknown. It is also unclear whether the same signaling cascade is prompted by PARP-1 inhibitors and NR supplementation to improve mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, we show that human fibroblasts mutant for the NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 1 (NDUFS1) subunit of respiratory complex I have similar ATP, NAD, and mitochondrial content compared with control cells, but show reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, mutant cells also show increased transcript levels of mitochondrial DNA but not nuclear DNA respiratory complex subunits, suggesting activation of a compensatory response. At variance with prior work in mice, however, NR supplementation, but not PARP-1 inhibition, increased intracellular NAD content in NDUFS1 mutant human fibroblasts. Conversely, PARP-1 inhibitors, but not NR supplementation, increased transcription of mitochondrial transcription factor A and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes constitutively induced in mutant cells. Still, both NR and PARP-1 inhibitors restored mitochondrial membrane potential and increased organelle content as well as oxidative activity of NDUFS1-deficient fibroblasts. Overall, data provide the first evidence that in human cells harboring a mitochondrial respiratory defect exposure to NR or PARP-1, inhibitors activate different signaling pathways that are not invariantly prompted by NAD increases, but equally able to improve energetic

  12. A paradoxical method for NAD+/NADH accumulation on an electrode surface using a hydrophobic ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Miyuki; Motoyama, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Jun; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-15

    In this communication, we describe a novel and facile method for the immobilization of NAD(+)/NADH on an electrode surface using a hydrophobic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([C4mim][Tf(2)N]). By taking advantage of the insolubility of NAD(+)/NADH in hydrophobic ionic liquids, it is expected that NAD(+)/NADH can be retained on the electrode's surface. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and NAD(+)/NADH were immobilized with a gelatin hydrogel on an electrode that was modified with an electropolymerized ruthenium complex containing 5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline (pAPRu) as a mediator for NADH oxidation. The (ADH, NAD(+))/pAPRu-immobilized electrode exhibited the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol in [C4mim][Tf(2)N]. The obtained catalytic current in [C4mim][Tf(2)N] was comparable to that in buffer solution containing NAD(+). It was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy that NAD(+) did not dissolve in the [C4mim][Tf(2)N] and was retained on the electrode's surface. Furthermore, we succeeded in constructing an ethanol/O(2) biofuel cell comprised of an (ADH, NAD(+))/pAPRu anode and a bilirubin oxidase cathode using [C4mim][Tf(2)N] as an electrolyte.

  13. NAD(+)-linked alcohol dehydrogenase 1 regulates methylglyoxal concentration in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Ku, MyungHee; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2014-04-02

    We purified a fraction that showed NAD(+)-linked methylglyoxal dehydrogenase activity, directly catalyzing methylglyoxal oxidation to pyruvate, which was significantly increased in glutathione-depleted Candida albicans. It also showed NADH-linked methylglyoxal-reducing activity. The fraction was identified as a NAD(+)-linked alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1) through mass spectrometric analyses. In ADH1-disruptants of both the wild type and glutathione-depleted cells, the intracellular methylglyoxal concentration increased significantly; defects in growth, differentiation, and virulence were observed; and G2-phase arrest was induced.

  14. Axon self destruction: new links among SARM1, MAPKs, and NAD+ metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gerdts, Josiah; Summers, Daniel W.; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Wallerian axon degeneration is a form of programmed subcellular death that promotes axon breakdown in disease and injury. Active degeneration requires SARM1 and MAP kinases including DLK, while the NAD+ synthetic enzyme NMNAT2 prevents degeneration. New studies reveal that these pathways cooperate in a locally-mediated axon destruction program with NAD+ metabolism playing a central role. Here, we review the biology of Wallerian type axon degeneration and discuss the most recent findings with special emphasis on critical signaling events and their potential as therapeutic targets for axonopathy. PMID:26844829

  15. Assessment of Cellular Redox State Using NAD(P)H Fluorescence Intensity and Lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Blacker, Thomas S.; Berecz, Tunde; Duchen, Michael R.; Szabadkai, Gyorgy

    2017-01-01

    NADH and NADPH are redox cofactors, primarily involved in catabolic and anabolic metabolic processes respectively. In addition, NADPH plays an important role in cellular antioxidant defence. In live cells and tissues, the intensity of their spectrally-identical autofluorescence, termed NAD(P)H, can be used to probe the mitochondrial redox state, while their distinct enzyme-binding characteristics can be used to separate their relative contributions to the total NAD(P)H intensity using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). These protocols allow differences in metabolism to be detected between cell types and altered physiological and pathological states. PMID:28286806

  16. Direct Imaging of Nanoscale Dissolution of Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate by an Organic Ligand: Concentration Matters

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Lihong; Zhang, Wenjun; Lu, Jianwei; Stack, Andrew G; Wang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Unraveling the kinetics and mechanisms of sparingly soluble calcium orthophosphate (Ca!P) dissolution in the presence of organic acids at microscopic levels is important for an improved understanding in determining the effectiveness of organic acids present in most rhizosphere environments. Herein, we use in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) coupled with a fluid reaction cell to image dissolution on the (010) face of brushite, CaHPO4 2H2O, in citrate- bearing solutions over a broad concentration range. We directly measure the dependence of molecular step retreat rate on citrate concentration at various pH values and ionic strengths, relevant to soil solution conditions. We find that low concentrations of citrate(10!100 M)inducedareductioninstepretreatratesalongboththe[10 0]Ccand[101] Ccdirections.However,at higher concentrations (exceeding 0.1 mM), this inhibitory effect was reversed with step retreat speeds increasing rapidly. These results demonstrate that the concentration-dependent modulation of nanoscale Ca!P phase dissolution by citrate may be applied to analyze the controversial role of organic acids in enhancing Ca!P mineral dissolution in a more complex rhizosphere environment. These in situ observations may contribute to resolving the previously unrecognized interactions of root exudates (low molecular weight organic acids) and sparingly soluble Ca!P minerals.

  17. Direct imaging of nanoscale dissolution of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate by an organic ligand: concentration matters.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lihong; Zhang, Wenjun; Lu, Jianwei; Stack, Andrew G; Wang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Unraveling the kinetics and mechanisms of sparingly soluble calcium orthophosphate (Ca-P) dissolution in the presence of organic acids at microscopic levels is important for an improved understanding in determining the effectiveness of organic acids present in most rhizosphere environments. Herein, we use in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) coupled with a fluid reaction cell to image dissolution on the (010) face of brushite, CaHPO4 · 2H2O, in citrate-bearing solutions over a broad concentration range. We directly measure the dependence of molecular step retreat rate on citrate concentration at various pH values and ionic strengths, relevant to soil solution conditions. We find that low concentrations of citrate (10-100 μM) induced a reduction in step retreat rates along both the [100]Cc and [101]Cc directions. However, at higher concentrations (exceeding 0.1 mM), this inhibitory effect was reversed with step retreat speeds increasing rapidly. These results demonstrate that the concentration-dependent modulation of nanoscale Ca-P phase dissolution by citrate may be applied to analyze the controversial role of organic acids in enhancing Ca-P mineral dissolution in a more complex rhizosphere environment. These in situ observations may contribute to resolving the previously unrecognized interactions of root exudates (low molecular weight organic acids) and sparingly soluble Ca-P minerals.

  18. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-03

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  19. Effect of alternative NAD+-regenerating pathways on the formation of primary and secondary aroma compounds in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycerol-defective mutant.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishist K; Divol, Benoit; Prior, Bernard A; Bauer, Florian F

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae maintains a redox balance under fermentative growth conditions by re-oxidizing NADH formed during glycolysis through ethanol formation. Excess NADH stimulates the synthesis of mainly glycerol, but also of other compounds. Here, we investigated the production of primary and secondary metabolites in S. cerevisiae strains where the glycerol production pathway was inactivated through deletion of the two glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenases genes (GPD1/GPD2) and replaced with alternative NAD(+)-generating pathways. While these modifications decreased fermentative ability compared to the wild-type strain, all improved growth and/or fermentative ability of the gpd1Δgpd2Δ strain in self-generated anaerobic high sugar medium. The partial NAD(+) regeneration ability of the mutants resulted in significant amounts of alternative products, but at lower yields than glycerol. Compared to the wild-type strain, pyruvate production increased in most genetically manipulated strains, whereas acetate and succinate production decreased in all strains. Malate production was similar in all strains. Isobutanol production increased substantially in all genetically manipulated strains compared to the wild-type strain, whereas only mutant strains expressing the sorbitol producing SOR1 and srlD genes showed increases in isoamyl alcohol and 2-phenyl alcohol. A marked reduction in ethyl acetate concentration was observed in the genetically manipulated strains, while isobutyric acid increased. The synthesis of some primary and secondary metabolites appears more readily influenced by the NAD(+)/NADH availability. The data provide an initial assessment of the impact of redox balance on the production of primary and secondary metabolites which play an essential role in the flavour and aroma character of beverages.

  20. NAD+ Attenuates Bilirubin-Induced Hyperexcitation in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus by Inhibiting Excitatory Neurotransmission and Neuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Min; Yin, Xin-Lu; Wang, Lu-Yang; Yin, Wei-Hai; Song, Ning-Ying; Shi, Hai-Bo; Li, Chun-Yan; Yin, Shan-Kai

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an important molecule with extensive biological functions in various cellular processes, including protection against cell injuries. However, little is known regarding the roles of NAD+ in neuronal excitation and excitotoxicity associated with many neurodegenerative disorders and diseases. Using patch-clamp recordings, we studied its potential effects on principal neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), which is particularly vulnerable to bilirubin excitotoxicity. We found that NAD+ effectively decreased the size of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs), increased paired-pulse ratio (PPR) and reversed the effect of bilirubin on eEPSCs, implicating its inhibitory effects on the presynaptic release probability (Pr). Moreover, NAD+ not only decreased the basal frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs), but also reversed bilirubin-induced increases in the frequency of mEPSCs without affecting their amplitude under either condition. Furthermore, we found that NAD+ decreased the frequency of spontaneous firing of VCN neurons as well as bilirubin-induced increases in firing frequency. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings showed that NAD+ could directly decrease the intrinsic excitability of VCN neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers, suggesting NAD+ exerts its actions in both presynaptic and postsynaptic loci. Consistent with these observations, we found that the latency of the first postsynaptic spike triggered by high-frequency train stimulation of presynaptic afferents (i.e., the auditory nerve) was prolonged by NAD+. These results collectively indicate that NAD+ suppresses presynaptic transmitter release and postsynaptic excitability, jointly weakening excitatory neurotransmission. Our findings provide a basis for the exploration of NAD+ for the prevention and treatment of bilirubin encephalopathy and excitotoxicity associated with other neurological disorders. PMID:28217084

  1. Isolation of a high malic and low acetic acid-producing sake yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain screened from respiratory inhibitor 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shingo; Kiyoshi, Keiji; Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi; Nakayama, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We isolated 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-resistant sake yeast strains by UV mutagenesis. Among the DNP-resistant mutants, we focused on strains exhibiting high malic acid and low acetic acid production. The improved organic acid composition is unlikely to be under the control of enzyme activities related to malic and acetic acid synthesis pathways. Instead, low mitochondrial activity was observed in DNP-resistant mutants, indicating that the excess pyruvic acid generated during glycolysis is not metabolized in the mitochondria but converted to malic acid in the cytosol. In addition, the NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the DNP-resistant strains was higher than that of the parental strain K901. These results suggest that the increased NADH/NAD(+) ratio together with the low mitochondrial activity alter the organic acid composition because malic acid synthesis requires NADH, while acetic acid uses NAD(+).

  2. Augmentation of NAD+ by NQO1 attenuates cisplatin-mediated hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H-J; Oh, G-S; Shen, A; Lee, S-B; Choe, S-K; Kwon, K-B; Lee, S; Seo, K-S; Kwak, T H; Park, R; So, H-S

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diaminedichloroplatinum-II) is an extensively used chemotherapeutic agent, and one of its most adverse effects is ototoxicity. A number of studies have demonstrated that these effects are related to oxidative stress and DNA damage. However, the precise mechanism underlying cisplatin-associated ototoxicity is still unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that, in cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity, the levels and activities of SIRT1 are suppressed by the reduction of intracellular NAD+ levels. We provide evidence that the decrease in SIRT1 activity and expression facilitated by increasing poly(ADP-ribose) transferase (PARP)-1 activation and microRNA-34a through p53 activation aggravates cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. Moreover, we show that the induction of cellular NAD+ levels using β-lapachone (β-Lap), whose intracellular target is NQO1, prevents the toxic effects of cisplatin through the regulation of PARP-1 and SIRT1 activity. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD+ levels by pharmacological agents could be a promising therapeutic approach for protection from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:24922076

  3. 8-Thioalkyl-adenosine derivatives inhibit Listeria monocytogenes NAD kinase through a novel binding mode.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Julie; Assairi, Liliane; Gelin, Muriel; Huteau, Valérie; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Dussurget, Olivier; Labesse, Gilles; Pochet, Sylvie

    2016-11-29

    Increased resistance of pathogens to existing antibiotics necessitates the search for novel targets to develop potent antimicrobials. Biosynthetic pathways of several cofactors important for bacterial growth, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP), have been proposed as a promising source of antibiotic targets. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinases (NADK; EC 2.7.1.23) are attractive for inhibitor development, since they catalyze the phosphorylation of NAD to NADP, which is an essential step of NADP metabolism. We previously synthesized diadenosine derivatives that inhibited NADK from two human pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, in the micromolar range. They behave as NAD mimics with the 5',5'-diphosphate group substituted by a 8,5' thioglycolic bridge. In an attempt to improve inhibitory potency, we designed new NAD mimics based on a single adenosine moiety harboring a larger derivatization attached to the C8 position and a small group at the 5' position. Here we report the synthesis of a series of 8-thioalkyl-adenosine derivatives containing various aryl and heteroaryl moieties and their evaluation as inhibitors of L. monocytogenes NADK1, S. aureus NADK and their human counterpart. Novel, sub-micromolar inhibitors of LmNADK1 were identified. Surprisingly, most LmNADK1 inhibitors demonstrated a high selectivity index against the close staphylococcal ortholog and the human NADK. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes revealed the original binding mode of these novel NAD mimics.

  4. Catastrophic NAD+ Depletion in Activated T Lymphocytes through Nampt Inhibition Reduces Demyelination and Disability in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Tiziana; Poggi, Alessandro; Garuti, Anna; D'Urso, Agustina; Selmo, Martina; Benvenuto, Federica; Cea, Michele; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Moran, Eva; Soncini, Debora; Ballestrero, Alberto; Sordat, Bernard; Patrone, Franco; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Uccelli, Antonio; Nencioni, Alessio

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) inhibitors such as FK866 are potent inhibitors of NAD+ synthesis that show promise for the treatment of different forms of cancer. Based on Nampt upregulation in activated T lymphocytes and on preliminary reports of lymphopenia in FK866 treated patients, we have investigated FK866 for its capacity to interfere with T lymphocyte function and survival. Intracellular pyridine nucleotides, ATP, mitochondrial function, viability, proliferation, activation markers and cytokine secretion were assessed in resting and in activated human T lymphocytes. In addition, we used experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a model of T-cell mediated autoimmune disease to assess FK866 efficacy in vivo. We show that activated, but not resting, T lymphocytes undergo massive NAD+ depletion upon FK866-mediated Nampt inhibition. As a consequence, impaired proliferation, reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α production, and finally autophagic cell demise result. We demonstrate that upregulation of the NAD+-degrading enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP) by activated T cells enhances their susceptibility to NAD+ depletion. In addition, we relate defective IFN-γ and TNF-α production in response to FK866 to impaired Sirt6 activity. Finally, we show that FK866 strikingly reduces the neurological damage and the clinical manifestations of EAE. In conclusion, Nampt inhibitors (and possibly Sirt6 inhibitors) could be used to modulate T cell-mediated immune responses and thereby be beneficial in immune-mediated disorders. PMID:19936064

  5. Discovery of bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligase inhibitors: optimization of antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Suzanne S; Huynh, Hoan; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Albert, Robert; Cavero-Tomas, Marta; Chen, Brendan; Harang, Jenna; Loch, James T; Lu, Min; Mullen, George B; Zhao, Shannon; Liu, Ce-Feng; Mills, Scott D

    2011-08-01

    Optimization of adenosine analog inhibitors of bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is discussed. Antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus was improved by modification of the 2-position substituent on the adenine ring and 3'- and 5'-substituents on the ribose. Compounds with logD values 1.5-2.5 maximized potency and maintained drug-like physical properties.

  6. Benzofuran-, benzothiophene-, indazole- and benzisoxazole- quinones: excellent substrates for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Jeffery J.; Hassani, Mary; Swann, Elizabeth; Bibby, Jane M.; Beall, Howard D.; Moody, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    A series of heterocyclic quinones based on benzofuran, benzothiophene, indazole and benzisoxazole has been synthesized, and evaluated for their ability to function as substrates for recombinant human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), a two-electron reductase upregulated in tumor cells. Overall, the quinones are excellent substrates for NQO1, approaching the reduction rates observed for menadione PMID:23635904

  7. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  8. 78 FR 36571 - North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official Protraction Diagram (OPDs) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM),...

  9. Extremely high intracellular concentration of glucose-6-phosphate and NAD(H) in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Takumi; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2017-03-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is highly resistant to ionizing radiation and UV radiation, and oxidative stress caused by such radiations. NADP(H) seems to be important for this resistance (Slade and Radman, Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 75:133-191; Slade, Radman, Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 75:133-191, 2011), but the mechanism underlying the generation of NADP(H) or NAD(H) in D. radiodurans has not fully been addressed. Intracellular concentrations of NAD(+), NADH, NADP(+), and NADPH in D. radiodurans are also not determined yet. We found that cell extracts of D. radiodurans catalyzed reduction of NAD(P)(+) in vitro, indicating that D. radiodurans cells contain both enzymes and a high concentration of substrates for this activity. The enzyme and the substrate were attributed to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate of which intracellular concentration was extremely high. Unexpectedly, the intracellular concentration of NAD(H) was also much greater than that of NADP(H), suggesting some significant roles of NADH. These unusual features of this bacterium would shed light on a new aspect of physiology of this bacterium.

  10. Crosstalk of Signaling and Metabolism Mediated by the NAD(+)/NADH Redox State in Brain Cells.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Ulrike; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The energy metabolism of the brain has to be precisely adjusted to activity to cope with the organ's energy demand, implying that signaling regulates metabolism and metabolic states feedback to signaling. The NAD(+)/NADH redox state constitutes a metabolic node well suited for integration of metabolic and signaling events. It is affected by flux through metabolic pathways within a cell, but also by the metabolic state of neighboring cells, for example by lactate transferred between cells. Furthermore, signaling events both in neurons and astrocytes have been reported to change the NAD(+)/NADH redox state. Vice versa, a number of signaling events like astroglial Ca(2+) signals, neuronal NMDA-receptors as well as the activity of transcription factors are modulated by the NAD(+)/NADH redox state. In this short review, this bidirectional interdependence of signaling and metabolism involving the NAD(+)/NADH redox state as well as its potential relevance for the physiology of the brain and the whole organism in respect to blood glucose regulation and body weight control are discussed.

  11. NAD(+)-dependent SIRT1 deactivation has a key role on ischemia-reperfusion-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cattelan, Arianna; Ceolotto, Giulio; Bova, Sergio; Albiero, Mattia; Kuppusamy, Maniselvan; De Martin, Sara; Semplicini, Andrea; Fadini, Gian Paolo; de Kreutzenberg, Saula Vigili; Avogaro, Angelo

    2015-07-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) leads to severe organ injury and dysfunction. Sirtuins (SIRTs) are a family of histone deacetylases (HDACs) that require nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) for the deacetylation reaction. SIRTs play a major role in counteracting cellular stress and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of heart protection against apoptosis by SIRTs and the molecular pathways involved in SIRTs regulation and function in a rat model of IR injury. Hearts of male Wistar-Kyoto rats were subjected to 30-min ischemia followed by reperfusion up to 6h. IR increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis; the cleavage of caspase 3, induced a transient upregulation of SIRT1 and downregulation of SIRT6 expression, but decreased SIRT1 activity and reduced NAD(+) content. IR also increased forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) expression and FoxO1 binding to SIRT1 promoter region. Resveratrol restored SIRT1 activity and NAD(+) level by an AMPK-dependent mechanism, reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and attenuated caspase 3 cleavage via heat shock factor-1 deacetylation and heat shock protein (HSP) expression upregulation. Our data show new potential molecular mechanisms of up and downstream regulation of SIRT1 in IR. The interplay among FoxO1, SIRT1, NAD(+), AMPK, HSP, and SIRT6 depicts a complex molecular network that protects the heart from apoptosis during IR and may be susceptible to therapeutic interventions.

  12. Dunnione ameliorates cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage by modulating NAD(+) metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Arpana; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Lee, SeungHoon; Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2015-11-27

    Although cisplatin is a widely used anticancer drug for the treatment of a variety of tumors, its use is critically limited because of adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, neuropathy, and gastrointestinal damage. Cisplatin treatment increases oxidative stress biomarkers in the small intestine, which may induce apoptosis of epithelial cells and thereby elicit damage to the small intestine. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a cofactor for various enzymes associated with cellular homeostasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that the hyper-activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is closely associated with the depletion of NAD(+) in the small intestine after cisplatin treatment, which results in downregulation of sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity. Furthermore, a decrease in SIRT1 activity was found to play an important role in cisplatin-mediated small intestinal damage through nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, facilitated by its acetylation increase. However, use of dunnione as a strong substrate for the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme led to an increase in intracellular NAD(+) levels and prevented the cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage correlating with the modulation of PARP-1, SIRT1, and NF-κB. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD(+) levels by pharmacological NQO1 substrates could be a promising therapeutic approach for protecting against cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage.

  13. The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis of the symphysis pubis on CT scan and correlation with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Trusha; Ryan, Lawrence; Dubois, Melissa; Carrera, Guillermo; Baynes, Keith; Mannem, Rajeev; Mulkerin, Jennifer; Visotcky, Alexis

    2016-03-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP) crystal deposition in the articular cartilage can often be seen radiographically as chondrocalcinosis (CC). CPP crystals preferentially deposit in fibrocartilages such as the knee menisci and symphysis pubis (SP). We sought to determine the prevalence of CC in the SP on computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis. This retrospective study involved readings on 1070 consecutive CTs of the abdomen and pelvis performed over 3 months in patients over 65 years of age. Medical records of 226 patients found to have CC were reviewed to determine age, gender, documentation of CPPD on problem lists or in medical histories, and whether radiology readings of the CTs mentioned CC. SP CC was identified in 21.1 % (226/1070) of consecutive CT scans with the mean age of CT+ patients being 78.6. Of the 226 patients with SP CC, the observation of CC was documented in only 5.3 % (12/226) of the radiology reports. Of the 12 instances in which the radiology reports mentioned CC, this observation was never (0/12) transmitted to the medical history or problem list. The prevalence of SP CC in patients older than 65 was 21.1 %. Since the majority of CTs of the abdomen and pelvis are not ordered for evaluation of musculoskeletal conditions, this is likely a true prevalence without selection bias. When CC of the SP was present on images, radiologists routinely overlooked or chose not to report CC. Even in the rare instances when it was reported, that information was not added to the medical history or problem list. There are several clinical situations (e.g., acute monoarthritis or atypical osteoarthritis) in which recognizing that a patient has CPP deposition would be useful. Taking the time to review images may yield clinically important findings that are not mentioned anywhere on the patient chart.

  14. Structure of radicals from X-irradiated guanine derivatives: an experimental and computational study of sodium guanosine dihydrate single crystals.

    PubMed

    Jayatilaka, Nayana; Nelson, William H

    2007-02-01

    In sodium guanosine dihydrate single crystals, the guanine moiety is deprotonated at N1 due to growth from high-pH (>12) solutions. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) studies of crystals X-irradiated at 10 K detected evidence for three radical forms. Radical R1, characterized by two proton and two nitrogen hyperfine interactions, was identified as the product of net hydrogenation at N7 of the N1-deprotonated guanine unit. R1 exhibited an unusually distorted structure leading to net positive isotropic components of the hydrogen alpha-couplings. Radical R2, characterized by one proton and one nitrogen hyperfine coupling, was identified as the primary electron-loss product. This product is equivalent to that of deprotonation at N1 by the guanine cation and represents the first ENDOR characterization of that product. Radical R3, characterized by a single hydrogen hyperfine coupling, was identified as the product of net dehydrogenation at C1' of the ribose moiety. The identification of radicals R1-R3 was supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations on several possible structures using the B3LYP/6-311G(2df,p)//6-31G(d,p) approach. Radical R4, detected after warming the crystals to room temperature, was identified as the well-known product of net hydrogenation of C8 of the (N1-deprotonated) guanine component. Radical R1, evidently formed by protonation of the primary electron addition product, was present as roughly 60% of the total radicals detected at 10 K. Radical R2 was present as roughly 27% of the total yield, and the concentration of R3 contributed the remaining 13%. R3 is evidently the product of one-electron oxidation followed by deprotonation; thus, the balance of oxidation and reduction products is approximately equal within experimental uncertainty.

  15. Crystal structure of 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium hydrogen oxalate dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Mouhamadou Birame; Diop, Libasse; Plasseraud, Laurent; Cattey, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Single crystals of the title mol­ecular salt, C4H7N2 +·HC2O4 −·2H2O, were isolated from the reaction of 2-methyl-1H-imidazole and oxalic acid in a 1:1 molar ratio in water. In the crystal, the cations and anions are positioned alternately along an infinite [010] ribbon and linked together through bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds. The water mol­ecules of crystallization link the chains into (10-1) bilayers, with the methyl groups of the cations organized in an isotactic manner. PMID:27536393

  16. Atomic-Resolution Structures of Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase with NAD[superscript +] and Fluoroalcohols Define Strained Michaelis Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2013-01-16

    Structures of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with NAD{sup +} and unreactive substrate analogues, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol, were determined at 100 K at 1.12 or 1.14 {angstrom} resolution, providing estimates of atomic positions with overall errors of 0.02 {angstrom}, the geometry of ligand binding, descriptions of alternative conformations of amino acid residues and waters, and evidence of a strained nicotinamide ring. The four independent subunits from the two homodimeric structures differ only slightly in the peptide backbone conformation. Alternative conformations for amino acid side chains were identified for 50 of the 748 residues in each complex, and Leu-57 and Leu-116 adopt different conformations to accommodate the different alcohols at the active site. Each fluoroalcohol occupies one position, and the fluorines of the alcohols are well-resolved. These structures closely resemble the expected Michaelis complexes with the pro-R hydrogens of the methylene carbons of the alcohols directed toward the re face of C4N of the nicotinamide rings with a C-C distance of 3.40 {angstrom}. The oxygens of the alcohols are ligated to the catalytic zinc at a distance expected for a zinc alkoxide (1.96 {angstrom}) and participate in a low-barrier hydrogen bond (2.52 {angstrom}) with the hydroxyl group of Ser-48 in a proton relay system. As determined by X-ray refinement with no restraints on bond distances and planarity, the nicotinamide rings in the two complexes are slightly puckered (quasi-boat conformation, with torsion angles of 5.9{sup o} for C4N and 4.8{sup o} for N1N relative to the plane of the other atoms) and have bond distances that are somewhat different compared to those found for NAD(P){sup +}. It appears that the nicotinamide ring is strained toward the transition state on the path to alcohol oxidation.

  17. Decline in NAD(P)H autofluorescence precedes apoptotic cell death from chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toms, Steven A.; Muhammad, Osman; Jackson, Heather; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2005-11-01

    OBJECTIVE: Optical spectroscopic tools exist that allow open surgical and minimally invasive assays of intrinsic tissue optics. Optical detection of cellular and tissue viability may offer a minimally invasive way to assess tumor responsiveness to chemotherapies. We report on an optical spectroscopic change that precedes apoptotic cell death and appears related to NAD(P)H autofluorescence. METHODS: The cell lines SW 480 and U87-MG were grown in culture and treated with cisplatin 100 μg/ml and tamoxifen 10 μM, respectively. Fluorescence spectroscopy at 355 nm excitation and 460 nm emission were collected. MTS assays were used to determine cell viability. Cell lysates were analyzed for NAD(P)H concentrations by mass spectroscopy. RESULTS: Autoflourescence at 355 nm excitation and 460 nm emission declines markedly despite normalization for cell number and total protein concentration after treatment with tamoxifen or cisplatin. The autofluorescence drop precedes the loss of cell viability as measured by MTS assay. For example, the relative viability of the U87-MG cell treated with tamoxifen at hours 0, 8, 12 and 24 of treatment was 100 +/- 6, 85 +/- 6, 53 +/- 9 and 0 +/- 3. The relative fluorescence at the same time points were 100 +/- 2, 57 +/- 6, 47 +/- 3, and 0 +/- 1. TUNNEL assays confirm that cell death is via apoptosis. The key cellular fluorophore at these wavelengths is NAD(P)H. Mass spectroscopic analysis of cell lysates at these time points reveals a drop in NAD(P)H concentrations that is parallel to the loss of fluorescence signal. CONCLUSIONS: NAD(P)H autofluoresence decline precedes apoptotic cell death. This may allow the design of minimally invasive spectroscopic tools to monitor chemotherapeutic response.

  18. The evolving role of the NAD+/nicotinamide metabolome in skin homeostasis, cellular bioenergetics, and aging.

    PubMed

    Oblong, John E

    2014-11-01

    Human skin is exposed to daily environmental insults, particularly solar radiation, that triggers a range of molecular responses. These perturbations to the normal homeostatic state can lead to cellular dysfunction and, ultimately, impacts tissue integrity and accelerates skin aging (photoaging). One of the responses is increased oxidative stress which has been shown to disrupt cellular bioenergetics. This can be detected by depletion of the nucleotide energy metabolites NAD+ and ATP as both an acute transient decrease and, over time, a more permanent chronic reduction due in part to cumulative damage of mitochondria. NAD+ and its primary precursor nicotinamide have been known for some time to impact skin homeostasis based on linkages to dietary requirements, treatment of various inflammatory conditions, photoaging, and prevention of cancer. Cellular NAD+ pools are known to be lower in aged skin and treatment with nicotinamide is hypothesized to restore these levels, thereby mitigating cellular bioenergetics dysfunction. In dermal fibroblasts, nicotinamide is able to protect against oxidative stress to glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation as well as increase mitochondrial efficiency via sirtuin-dependent selective mitophagy. Recent research has found that NAD+ cellular pools are more dynamic than previously thought, oscillating in tandem with free nicotinamide, and serves as a regulatory point and feedback loop in cellular metabolism regulation, maintenance of mitochondrial efficiency, and circadian rhythmicity. Since UV-induced oxidative stress in skin can disrupt these processes, continued molecular understanding of the role of NAD+ and nicotinamide in skin biology is important to identify interventions that would help maintain its normal homeostatic functions and efficient cellular bioenergetics.

  19. Partial purification of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) pyrophosphatase from Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, M.M.; Foster, J.W.; Kasvinsky, P.J.

    1987-05-01

    NAD is an extremely important compound in cellular physiology. In the pyridine nucleotide cycle of S. typhimurium NAD pyrophosphatase, located in the inner membrane, carries out the cleavage of NAD prior to the transport of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) into the cell. The partial purification of this enzyme is reported here. A cell suspension of S. typhimurium was passed twice through a French pressure cell, centrifugated at 5000 xg, and at 200,000 xg, for 1 hr. The pellet containing the crude membrane fraction was extracted with a novel detergent extraction using the differential solubility of NAD pyrophosphatase at various concentrations of the non-ionic detergent n-octyl glucoside (nOG). Extraction of the membrane fraction with 0.5% nOG in the presence of 10mM MgCl/sub 2/ removed 60% of the protein with no loss in activity. A second extraction with 2% nOG and 10mM MgCl/sub 2/ removed 20% of the protein and 71% of the activity from the membrane fraction. Ammonium sulfate fractionation at 45 to 50% sat. gave a partially purified enzyme preparation having a specific activity of about 2500 units/mg with a 94% recovery compared to the crude extract. One unit of activity is the cleavage of 1 nmole /sup 14/C NAD to /sup 14/C NMN per minute. The enzyme appears to have a MW of 200,000 on Sephacryl S-200, is temperature labile, and stabilized by 1mM Mg/sup + +/ and storage at -70/sup 0/.

  20. Molecular evolution of the nicotinic acid requirement within the Shigella/EIEC pathotype.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Fioravanti, Rosa; Barbabella, Giada; Prosseda, Gianni; Colonna, Bianca; Casalino, Mariassunta

    2013-12-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a crucial cofactor in several anabolic and catabolic reactions. NAD derives from quinolinic acid (QUIN) which in Escherichia coli is obtained through a pyridine salvage pathway or a de novo synthesis pathway. In the latter case, two enzymes, L-aspartate oxidase (NadB) and quinolinate synthase (NadA), are required for the synthesis of QUIN. In contrast to its E. coli ancestor, Shigella spp., the causative agent of bacillary dissentery, lacks the de novo pathway and strictly requires nicotinic acid for growth (Nic⁻ phenotype). This phenotype depends on the silencing of the nadB and nadA genes and its pathoadaptive nature is suggested by the observation that QUIN attenuates the Shigella invasive process. Shigella shares the pathogenicity mechanism with enteronvasive E. coli (EIEC), a group of pathogenic E. coli. On the basis of this similarity EIEC and Shigella have been grouped into a single E. coli pathotype. However EIEC strains do not constitute a homogeneous group and do not possess the complete set of characters that define Shigella strains. In this work we have analysed thirteen EIEC strains belonging to different serotypes and originating from different geographic areas. We show that, in contrast to Shigella, only some EIEC strains require nicotinic acid for growth in minimal medium. Moreover, by studying the emergence of the Nic⁻ phenotype in all serotypes of S. flexneri, as well as in S. sonnei and S. dysenteriae, we describe which molecular rearrangements occurred and which mutations are responsible for the inactivation of the nadA and nadB genes. Our data confirm that the genome of Shigella is extremely dynamic and support the hypothesis that EIEC might reflect an earlier stage of the pathoadaptation process undergone by Shigella.

  1. Novel assay for simultaneous measurement of pyridine mononucleotides synthesizing activities allows dissection of the NAD(+) biosynthetic machinery in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zamporlini, Federica; Ruggieri, Silverio; Mazzola, Francesca; Amici, Adolfo; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    The redox coenzyme NAD(+) is also a rate-limiting co-substrate for several enzymes that consume the molecule, thus rendering its continuous re-synthesis indispensable. NAD(+) biosynthesis has emerged as a therapeutic target due to the relevance of NAD(+) -consuming reactions in complex intracellular signaling networks whose alteration leads to many neurologic and metabolic disorders. Distinct metabolic routes, starting from various precursors, are known to support NAD(+) biosynthesis with tissue/cell-specific efficiencies, probably reflecting differential expression of the corresponding rate-limiting enzymes, i.e. nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase, nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase. Understanding the contribution of these enzymes to NAD(+) levels depending on the tissue/cell type and metabolic status is necessary for the rational design of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating NAD(+) availability. Here we report a simple, fast and sensitive coupled fluorometric assay that enables simultaneous determination of the four activities in whole-cell extracts and biological fluids. Its application to extracts from various mouse tissues, human cell lines and plasma yielded for the first time an overall picture of the tissue/cell-specific distribution of the activities of the various enzymes. The screening enabled us to gather novel findings, including (a) the presence of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase in all examined tissues/cell lines, indicating that quinolinate and nicotinamide riboside are relevant NAD(+) precursors, and (b) the unexpected occurrence of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase in human plasma.

  2. Isolation and characterization of an NAD+-degrading bacterium PTX1 and its role in chromium biogeochemical cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Puzon, Geoffrey J.; Huang, Yan C.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xun, Luying

    2008-06-01

    Microorganisms can reduce toxic chromate to less toxic trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. Besides Cr(OH)3 precipitates, some soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes are readily formed upon microbial, enzymatic, and chemical reduction of chromate. However, the biotransformation of the organo-Cr(III) complexes has not been characterized. We have previously reported the formation of a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-Cr(III) complex after enzymatic reduction of chromate. Although the NAD+-Cr(III) complex was stable under sterile conditions, microbial cells were identified as precipitates in a non-sterile NAD+-Cr(III) solution after extended incubation. The most dominant bacterium PTX1 was isolated and assigned to Leifsonia genus by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. PTX1 grew slowly on NAD+ with a doubling time of 17 h, and even more slowly on the NAD+-Cr(III) complex with an estimated doubling time of 35 days. The slow growth suggests that PTX1 passively grew on trace NAD+ dissociated from the NAD+-Cr(III) complex, facilitating further dissociation of the complex and formation of Cr(III) precipitates. Thus, organo-Cr(III) complexes might be an intrinsic link of the chromium biogeochemical cycle; they can be produced during chromate reduction and then further mineralized by microorganisms.

  3. Key role of an ADP - ribose - dependent transcriptional regulator of NAD metabolism for fitness and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Okon, Elza; Dethlefsen, Sarah; Pelnikevich, Anna; Barneveld, Andrea van; Munder, Antje; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    NAD is an essential co-factor of redox reactions and metabolic conversions of NAD-dependent enzymes. NAD biosynthesis in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has yet not been experimentally explored. The in silico search for orthologs in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome identified the operon pncA - pncB1-nadE (PA4918-PA4920) to encode the nicotinamidase, nicotinate phosporibosyltransferase and Nad synthase of salvage pathway I. The functional role of the preceding genes PA4917 and PA4916 was resolved by the characterization of recombinant protein. PA4917 turned out to encode the nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase NadD2 and PA4916 was determined to encode the transcriptional repressor NrtR that binds to an intergenic sequence between nadD2 and pncA. Complex formation between the catalytically inactive Nudix protein NrtR and its DNA binding site was suppressed by the antirepressor ADP-ribose. NrtR plasposon mutagenesis abrogated virulence of P. aeruginosa TBCF10839 in a murine acute airway infection model and constrained its metabolite profile. When grown together with other isogenic plasposon mutants, the nrtR knock-out was most compromised in competitive fitness to persist in nutrient-rich medium in vitro or murine airways in vivo. This example demonstrates how tightly metabolism and virulence can be intertwined by key elements of metabolic control.

  4. Infrared optical constants of H2O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Jordon, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. We have also found the infrared optical constants of H2O ice. We measured the transmission of infrared light throught thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500/cm at temperatures below 200 K. We developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. We used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds.

  5. Overexpression of NAD kinase in recombinant Escherichia coli harboring the phbCAB operon improves poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) production.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Jun; Cai, Lei; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-07-01

    NAD kinase was overexpressed to enhance the accumulation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) in recombinant Escherichia coli harboring PHB synthesis pathway via an accelerated supply of NADPH, which is one of the most crucial factors influencing PHB production. A high copy number expression plasmid pE76 led to a stronger NAD kinase activity than that brought about by the low copy number plasmid pELRY. Overexpressing NAD kinase in recombinant E. coli was found not to have a negative effect on cell growth in the absence of PHB synthesis. Shake flask experiments demonstrated that excess NAD kinase in E. coli harboring the PHB synthesis operon could increase the accumulation of PHB to 16-35 wt.% compared with the controls; meanwhile, NADP concentration was enhanced threefold to sixfold. Although the two NAD kinase overexpression recombinants exhibited large disparity on NAD kinase activity, their influence on cell growth and PHB accumulation was not proportional. Under the same growth conditions without process optimization, the NAD kinase-overexpressing recombinant produced 14 g/L PHB compared with 7 g/L produced by the control in a 28-h fermentor study. In addition, substrate to PHB yield Y (PHB/glucose) showed an increase from 0.08 g PHB/g glucose for the control to 0.15 g PHB/g glucose for the NAD kinase-overexpressing strain, a 76% increase for the Y (PHB/glucose). These results clearly showed that the overexpression of NAD kinase could be used to enhance the PHB synthesis.

  6. NAD(+) administration decreases doxorubicin-induced liver damage of mice by enhancing antioxidation capacity and decreasing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ban; Ma, Yingxin; Kong, Xiaoni; Ding, Xianting; Gu, Hongchen; Chu, Tianqing; Ying, Weihai

    2014-04-05

    One of the major obstacles for cancer treatment is the toxic side effects of anti-cancer drugs. Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most widely used anti-cancer drugs, which produces significant toxic side effects on the heart and such organs as the liver. Because NAD(+) can decrease cellular or tissue damage under multiple conditions, we hypothesized that NAD(+) administration may decrease DOX-induced hepatotoxicity. In this study we tested this hypothesis by using a mouse model, showing that NAD(+) administration can significantly attenuate DOX-induced increase in serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase activity and decrease in liver weight. The NAD(+) administration also attenuated the DOX-induced increases in the levels of double-strand DNA (dsDNA) damage, TUNEL signals, and active caspase-3. Furthermore, our data has suggested that the NAD(+) administration could produce protective effects at least partially by restoring the antioxidation capacity of the liver, because NAD(+) administration can attenuate the decreases in both the GSH levels and the glutathione reductase activity of the DOX-treated liver, which could play a significant role in the DOX-induced hepatotoxicity. This finding has provided the first evidence indicating that NAD(+) is capable of increasing the antioxidation capacity of tissues. Collectively, our study has found that NAD(+) can significantly decrease DOX-induced liver damage at least partially by enhancing antioxidation capacity and decreasing dsDNA damage. Because it can also selectively decrease tumor cell survival, NAD(+) may have significant merits over antioxidants for applying jointly with DOX to decrease the toxic side effects of DOX.

  7. [Kinetic characteristics of microsomal NAD-glycohydrolase natural and solubilized with a non-ionic surface-active substance].

    PubMed

    Sestini, S; Cinci, G; Ricci, C

    1982-04-30

    Microsomal rat spleen NAD-glycohydrolase was solubilized by Nonidet P40. The solubilized enzyme shows Nicotinamide inhibition and pH dependence at the same extent as unsolubilized microsomal one. It differs from the latter in having a higher affinity for NAD and NADP, and in showing two peaks, instead of one, on electrofocusing: the former with a pH 5 pI without any activity, the latter with a pH 4, 1 pI with a high NAD-ase activity.

  8. An improved glycerol biosensor with an Au-FeS-NAD-glycerol-dehydrogenase anode.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Aishwarya; Fernando, Sandun

    2017-06-15

    An improved glycerol biosensor was developed via direct attachment of NAD(+)-glycerol dehydrogenase coenzyme-apoenzyme complex onto supporting gold electrodes, using novel inorganic iron (II) sulfide (FeS)-based single molecular wires. Sensing performance factors, i.e., sensitivity, a detection limit and response time of the FeS and conventional pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-based biosensor were evaluated by dynamic constant potential amperometry at 1.3V under non-buffered conditions. For glycerol concentrations ranging from 1 to 25mM, a 77% increase in sensitivity and a 53% decrease in detection limit were observed for the FeS-based biosensor when compared to the conventional PQQ-based counterpart. The electrochemical behavior of the FeS-based glycerol biosensor was analyzed at different concentrations of glycerol, accompanied by an investigation into the effects of applied potential and scan rate on the current response. Effects of enzyme stimulants ((NH4)2SO4 and MnCl2·4H2O) concentrations and buffers/pH (potassium phosphate buffer pH 6-8, Tris buffer pH 8-10) on the current responses generated by the FeS-based glycerol biosensor were also studied. The optimal detection conditions were 0.03M (NH4)2SO4 and 0.3µm MnCl2·4H2O in non-buffered aqueous electrolyte under stirring whereas under non-stirring, Tris buffer at pH 10 with 0.03M (NH4)2SO4 and 30µm MnCl2·4H2O were found to be optimal detection conditions. Interference by glucose, fructose, ethanol, and acetic acid in glycerol detection was studied. The observations indicated a promising enhancement in glycerol detection using the novel FeS-based glycerol sensing electrode compared to the conventional PQQ-based one. These findings support the premise that FeS-based bioanodes are capable of biosensing glycerol successfully and may be applicable for other enzymatic biosensors.

  9. Hexaaquacobalt(II) and hexaaquanickel(II) bis(μ-pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato)bis[(pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato)bismuthate(III)] dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Stavila, Vitalie; Bulimestru, Ion; Gulea, Aurelian; Colson, Adam C; Whitmire, Kenton H

    2011-03-01

    The title complexes, hexaaquacobalt(II) bis(μ-pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato)bis[(pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato)bismuthate(III)] dihydrate, [Co(H(2)O)(6)][Bi(2)(C(7)H(4)NO(4))(4)]·2H(2)O, (I), and hexaaquanickel(II) bis(μ-pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato)bis[(pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato)bismuthate(III)] dihydrate, [Ni(H(2)O)(6)][Bi(2)(C(7)H(4)NO(4))(4)]·2H(2)O, (II), are isomorphous and crystallize in the triclinic space group P-1. The transition metal ions are located on the inversion centre and adopt slightly distorted MO(6) (M = Co or Ni) octahedral geometries. Two [Bi(pydc)(2)](-) units (pydc is pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate) are linked via bridging carboxylate groups into centrosymmetric [Bi(2)(pydc)(4)](2-) dianions. The crystal packing reveals that the [M(H(2)O)(6)](2+) cations, [Bi(2)(pydc)(4)](2-) anions and solvent water molecules form multiple hydrogen bonds to generate a supramolecular three-dimensional network. The formation of secondary Bi...O bonds between adjacent [Bi(2)(pydc)(4)](2-) dimers provides an additional supramolecular synthon that directs and facilitates the crystal packing of both (I) and (II).

  10. Crystal and molecular structure of the dihydrate of the artificial sweetener lactitol: 4-O-β- D-galactopyranosyl- D-glucitol.2H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanter, Jan A.; Schouten, Arie; van Bommel, Mark

    1990-10-01

    Crystallization of lactitol from aqueous ethanol readily yields crystals of the monohydrate, the structure of which has recently been reported. Slow evaporation of very concentrated aqueous syrups results in the crystalline dihydrate. The space group is P4 32 12 with a = 8.762(2), c = 45.508(8) Å, V = 3493.8(13) Å 3, Z = 8, Dc = 1.446 g cm -3, R = 0.037 for 2017 unique observed reflections and 310 variables. The galactopyranosyl ring has the 4C1 chair conformation and the carbon chain of the glucitol fragment has a non-planar, bent MAA conformation. The conformations about the glycosidic C(1)O(1) and O(1)C(14) bonds are different from those observed in the monohydrate: the torsion angles O(5)C(1)O(1)C(14) and C(1)O(1)C(14)C(13) differ by 29.6° and 15.0°, respectively. The orientations of the terminal C(11)O(11) bonds with respect to the carbon-atom chain of the glucitol fragment also differ appreciably: in the dihydrate the pertinent torsion angle is -47.3(3)° and in the monohydrate 75.5(2)°. All hydroxyl groups are involved in a complex three-dimensional system of hydrogen bonds, in which the two water molecules constitute an important cohesive element

  11. The choice of reducing substrate is altered by replacement of an alanine by a proline in the FAD domain of a bispecific NAD(P)H-nitrate reductase from birch.

    PubMed Central

    Schöndorf, T; Hachtel, W

    1995-01-01

    Differences in the amino acid sequence between the bispecific NAD(P)H-nitrate reductase of birch (Betula pendula Roth) and the monospecific NADH-nitrate reductases of a variety of other higher plants have been found at the dinucleotide-binding site in the FAD domain. To pinpoint amino acid residues that determine the choice of reducing substrate, we introduced mutations into the cDNA coding for birch nitrate reductase. These mutations were aimed at replacing certain amino acids of the NAD(P)H-binding site by conserved amino acids located at identical positions in NADH-monospecific enzymes. The mutated cDNAs were integrated into the genome of tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants were grown on a medium containing ammonium as the sole nitrogen source to keep endogenous tobacco nitrate reductase activity low. Whereas some of the mutated enzymes showed a slight preference for NADPH, as does the nonmutated birch enzyme, the activity of some others greatly depended on the availability of NADH and was low with NADPH alone. Comparison of the mutations reveals that replacement of a single amino acid in the birch sequence (alanine871 by proline) is critical for the use of reducing substrate. PMID:7784504

  12. The choice of reducing substrate is altered by replacement of an alanine by a proline in the FAD domain of a bispecific NAD(P)H-nitrate reductase from birch.

    PubMed

    Schöndorf, T; Hachtel, W

    1995-05-01

    Differences in the amino acid sequence between the bispecific NAD(P)H-nitrate reductase of birch (Betula pendula Roth) and the monospecific NADH-nitrate reductases of a variety of other higher plants have been found at the dinucleotide-binding site in the FAD domain. To pinpoint amino acid residues that determine the choice of reducing substrate, we introduced mutations into the cDNA coding for birch nitrate reductase. These mutations were aimed at replacing certain amino acids of the NAD(P)H-binding site by conserved amino acids located at identical positions in NADH-monospecific enzymes. The mutated cDNAs were integrated into the genome of tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants were grown on a medium containing ammonium as the sole nitrogen source to keep endogenous tobacco nitrate reductase activity low. Whereas some of the mutated enzymes showed a slight preference for NADPH, as does the nonmutated birch enzyme, the activity of some others greatly depended on the availability of NADH and was low with NADPH alone. Comparison of the mutations reveals that replacement of a single amino acid in the birch sequence (alanine871 by proline) is critical for the use of reducing substrate.

  13. NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase is essential for the survival of Arabidopsis thaliana during dark-induced carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Yo; Good, Allen G

    2008-01-01

    Interconversion between glutamate and 2-oxoglutarate, which can be catalysed by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), is a key reaction in plant carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism. However, the physiological role of plant GDH has been a controversial issue for several decades. To elucidate the function of GDH, the expression of GDH in various tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana was studied. Results suggested that the expression of two Arabidopsis GDH genes was differently regulated depending on the organ/tissue types and cellular C availability. Moreover, Arabidopsis mutants defective in GDH genes were identified and characterized. The two isolated mutants, gdh1-2 and gdh2-1, were crossed to make a double knockout mutant, gdh1-2/gdh2-1, which contained negligible levels of NAD(H)-dependent GDH activity. Phenotypic analysis on these mutants revealed an increased susceptibility of gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants to C-deficient conditions. This conditional phenotype of the double knockout mutant supports the catabolic role of GDH and its role in fuelling the TCA cycle during C starvation. The reduced rate of glutamate catabolism in the gdh2-1 and gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants was also evident by the growth retardation of these mutants when glutamate was supplied as the alternative N source. Furthermore, amino acid profiles during prolonged dark conditions were significantly different between WT and the gdh mutant plants. For instance, glutamate levels increased in WT plants but decreased in gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants, and aberrant accumulation of several amino acids was detected in the gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants. These results suggest that GDH plays a central role in amino acid breakdown under C-deficient conditions.

  14. Structural and functional features of the NAD(P) dependent Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Taberman, Helena; Parkkinen, Tarja; Rouvinen, Juha

    2016-04-01

    The Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family contains a number of different proteins, which almost exclusively consist of NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductases that have a diverse set of substrates, typically pyranoses. In this study, to clarify common structural features that would contribute to their function, the available crystal structures of the members of this family have been analyzed. Despite a very low sequence identity, the central features of the three-dimensional structures of the proteins are surprisingly similar. The members of the protein family have a two-domain structure consisting of a N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain and a C-terminal α/β-domain. The C-terminal domain contributes to the substrate binding and catalysis, and contains a βα-motif with a central α-helix carrying common essential amino acid residues. The β-sheet of the α/β-domain contributes to the oligomerization in most of the proteins in the family.

  15. Relative catalytic efficiency of ldhL- and ldhD-encoded products is crucial for optical purity of lactic acid produced by lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaojuan; Sheng, Binbin; Ma, Cuiqing; Zhang, Haiwei; Gao, Chao; Su, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2012-05-01

    NAD-dependent l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases coexist in Lactobacillus genomes and may convert pyruvic acid into l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid, respectively. Our findings suggest that the relative catalytic efficiencies of ldhL- and ldhD-encoded products are crucial for the optical purity of lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus strains.

  16. A comparison of the binding of urinary calcium oxalate monohydrate and dihydrate crystals to human kidney cells in urine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Thurgood, Lauren A.; Grover, Phulwinder K.; Ryall, Rosemary L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the binding kinetics of urinary calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals to human kidney (HK-2) cells in ultra-filtered (UF), and centrifuged and filtered (CF) human urine; and to quantify the binding of COM and COD crystals to cultured HK-2 cells in UF and CF urine samples collected from different individuals. Materials and methods Urine was collected from healthy subjects, pooled, centrifuged and filtered. 14C-oxalate-labelled COM and COD crystals were precipitated from the urine by adding oxalate after adjustment of two aliquots of the urine to 2 and 8 mm Ca2+, respectively. For the kinetic study, the crystals were incubated with HK-2 cells for up to 120 min in pooled CF urine adjusted to 2 and 8 mm Ca2+. Identical experiments were also carried out in UF urine samples collected from the same individuals. For the quantitative study, the same radioactively labelled COM and COD crystals were incubated with HK-2 cells for 50 min in separate CF and UF urines collected from eight healthy individuals at the native Ca2+ concentrations of the urines. Field emission electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy were used to confirm crystal morphology. Results Binding of both COM and COD crystals generally bound more strongly at 8 mm than at 2 mm Ca2+. The kinetic binding curves of COM were smooth, while those of COD were consistently biphasic, suggesting that the two crystal types induce different cellular metabolic responses: HK-2 cells crystals appear to possess a transitory mechanism for detaching COD, but not COM crystals. In UF urine, COM binding was significantly greater than that of COD at 2 mm Ca2+, but at 8 mm Ca2+ the binding of COD was greater at early and late time points. COD also bound significantly more strongly at early time points in CF urine at both 2 and 8 mm Ca2+. In both CF and UF urine, there was no difference between the binding affinity of urinary COM and COD crystals. Conclusion

  17. CtBP1/BARS Gly172-->Glu mutant structure: impairing NAD(H)-binding and dimerization.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Marco; Valente, Carmen; Ricagno, Stefano; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela; Bolognesi, Martino

    2009-03-27

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are multi-functional proteins involved in nuclear transcriptional co-repression, Golgi membrane fission, and synaptic ribbon formation. Binding of NAD(H) to CtBPs promotes dimerization. CtBP dimers act as a scaffold for multimeric protein complex formation, thus bridging transcriptional repressors and their targets in the nucleus. Based on size-exclusion chromatography experiments and on the crystal structure of the NAD(H)-free G172E CtBP mutant, we show here that absence of NAD(H) induces flexibility/backbone conformational changes at the dimerization interface and at the CtBP interdomain region. The results presented shed first light on the correlation between NAD(H)-binding and functional CtBP dimerization.

  18. CtBP1/BARS Gly172 {yields} Glu mutant structure: Impairing NAD(H)-binding and dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Nardini, Marco; Valente, Carmen; Ricagno, Stefano; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela; Bolognesi, Martino

    2009-03-27

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are multi-functional proteins involved in nuclear transcriptional co-repression, Golgi membrane fission, and synaptic ribbon formation. Binding of NAD(H) to CtBPs promotes dimerization. CtBP dimers act as a scaffold for multimeric protein complex formation, thus bridging transcriptional repressors and their targets in the nucleus. Based on size-exclusion chromatography experiments and on the crystal structure of the NAD(H)-free G172E CtBP mutant, we show here that absence of NAD(H) induces flexibility/backbone conformational changes at the dimerization interface and at the CtBP interdomain region. The results presented shed first light on the correlation between NAD(H)-binding and functional CtBP dimerization.

  19. Inhibitor and NAD+ binding to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase as derived from crystal structures and homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Ruf, A; de Murcia, G; Schulz, G E

    1998-03-17

    Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP, EC 2.4.2.30) are of clinical interest because they have potential for improving radiation therapy and chemotherapy of cancer. The refined binding structures of four such inhibitors are reported together with the refined structure of the unligated catalytic fragment of the enzyme. Following their design, all inhibitors bind at the position of the nicotinamide moiety of the substrate NAD+. The observed binding mode suggests inhibitor improvements that avoid other NAD(+)-binding enzymes. Because the binding pocket of NAD+ has been strongly conserved during evolution, the homology with ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins could be used to extend the bound nicotinamide, which is marked by the inhibitors, to the full NAD+ molecule.

  20. Imaging the NADH:NAD+ Homeostasis for Understanding the Metabolic Response of Mycobacterium to Physiologically Relevant Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Shabir A.; Iqbal, Iram K.; Kumar, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    The NADH:NAD+ ratio is the primary indicator of the metabolic state of bacteria. NAD(H) homeostasis is critical for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survival and is thus considered an important drug target, but the spatio-temporal measurements of NAD(H) remain a challenge. Genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors of the NADH:NAD+ ratios were recently described, paving the way for investigations of the metabolic state of pathogens during infection. Here we have adapted the genetically encoded biosensor Peredox for measurement of the metabolic state of Mtb in vitro and during infection of macrophage cells. Using Peredox, here we show that inhibition of the electron transport chain, disruption of the membrane potential and proton gradient, exposure to reactive oxygen species and treatment with antimycobacterial drugs led to the accumulation of NADH in mycobacterial cells. We have further demonstrated that Mtb residing in macrophages displays higher NADH:NAD+ ratios, that may indicate a metabolic stress faced by the intracellular Mtb. We also demonstrate that the Mtb residing in macrophages display a metabolic heterogeneity, which may perhaps explain the tolerance displayed by intracellular Mtb. Next we studied the effect of immunological modulation by interferon gamma on metabolism of intracellular Mtb, since macrophage activation is known to restrict mycobacterial growth. We observed that activation of resting macrophages with interferon-gamma results in higher NADH:NAD+ levels in resident Mtb cells. We have further demonstrated that exposure of Isoniazid, Bedaquiline, Rifampicin, and O-floxacin results in higher NADH:NAD+ ratios in the Mtb residing in macrophages. However, intracellular Mtb displays lower NADH:NAD+ ratio upon exposure to clofazimine. In summary, we have generated reporter strains capable of measuring the metabolic state of Mtb cells in vitro and in vivo with spatio-temporal resolution. We believe that this tool will facilitate further studies on

  1. Use of NAD(P)H and Flavoprotein Autofluorescence Transients to Probe Neuron and Astrocyte Responses to Synaptic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shuttleworth, C. William

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic stimulation in brain slices is accompanied by changes in tissue autofluorescence, which are a consequence of changes in tissue metabolism. Autofluorescence excited by ultraviolet light has been most extensively studied, and is due to reduced pyridine nucleotides (NADH and NADPH, collectively termed NAD(P)H). Stimulation generates a characteristic compound NAD(P)H response, comprising an initial fluorescence decrease and then an overshooting increase that slowly recovers to baseline levels. Evoked NAD(P)H transients are relatively easy to record, do not require the addition of exogenous indicators and have good signal-noise ratios. These characteristics make NAD(P)H imaging methods very useful for tracking the spread of neuronal activity in complex brain tissues, however the cellular basis of synaptically-evoked autofluorescence transients has been the subject of recent debate. Of particular importance is the question of whether signals are due primarily to changes in neuronal mitochondrial function, and/or whether astrocyte metabolism triggered by glutamate uptake may be a significant contributor to the overshooting NAD(P)H fluorescence increases. This mini-review addresses the subcellular origins of NAD(P)H autofluorescence and the evidence for mitochondrial and glycolytic contributions to compound transients. It is concluded that there is no direct evidence for a contribution to NAD(P)H signals from glycolysis in astrocytes following synaptic glutamate uptake. In contrast, multiple lines of evidence, including from complimentary flavoprotein autofluorescence signals, imply that mitochondrial NADH dynamics in neurons dominate compound evoked NAD(P)H transients. These signals are thus appropriate for studies of mitochondrial function and dysfunction in brain slices, in addition to providing robust maps of postsynaptic neuronal activation following physiological activation. PMID:20036704

  2. Identification and Characterization of an Inducible NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase from Red Beetroot Mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Menz, R. I.; Day, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    Exogenous NADH oxidation of mitochondria isolated from red beetroots (Beta vulgaris L.) increased dramatically upon slicing and aging the tissue. Anion-exchange chromatography of soluble fractions derived by sonication from fresh and aged beetroot mitochondria yielded three NADH dehydrogenase activity peaks. The third peak from aged beetroot mitochondria was separated into two activities by blue-affinity chromatography. One of these (the unbound peak) readily oxidized dihydrolipoamide, whereas the other (the bound peak) did not. The latter was an NAD(P)H dehydrogenase with high quinone and ferricyanide reductase activity and was absent from fresh beet mitochondria. Further affinity chromatography of the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase indicated enrichment of a 58-kD polypeptide on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We propose that this 58-kD protein is the inducible, external NADH dehydrogenase. PMID:12226415

  3. Identification and Characterization of an Inducible NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase from Red Beetroot Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Menz, R. I.; Day, D. A.

    1996-10-01

    Exogenous NADH oxidation of mitochondria isolated from red beetroots (Beta vulgaris L.) increased dramatically upon slicing and aging the tissue. Anion-exchange chromatography of soluble fractions derived by sonication from fresh and aged beetroot mitochondria yielded three NADH dehydrogenase activity peaks. The third peak from aged beetroot mitochondria was separated into two activities by blue-affinity chromatography. One of these (the unbound peak) readily oxidized dihydrolipoamide, whereas the other (the bound peak) did not. The latter was an NAD(P)H dehydrogenase with high quinone and ferricyanide reductase activity and was absent from fresh beet mitochondria. Further affinity chromatography of the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase indicated enrichment of a 58-kD polypeptide on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We propose that this 58-kD protein is the inducible, external NADH dehydrogenase.

  4. Divergent intron conservation in the mitochondrial nad2 gene: signatures for the three bryophyte classes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) and the lycophytes.

    PubMed

    Pruchner, Dagmar; Beckert, Susanne; Muhle, Hermann; Knoop, Volker

    2002-09-01

    The slow-evolving mitochondrial DNAs of plants have potentially conserved information on the phylogenetic branching of the earliest land plants. We present the nad2 gene structures in hornworts and liverworts and in the presumptive earliest-branching vascular land plant clade, the Lycopodiopsida. Taken together with the recently obtained nad2 data for mosses, each class of bryophytes presents another pattern of angiosperm-type introns conserved in nad2: intron nad2i1 in mosses; intron nad2i3 in liverworts; and both introns, nad2i3 and nad2i4, in hornworts. The lycopods Isoetes and Lycopodium show diverging intron conservation and feature a unique novel intron, termed nad2i3b. Hence, mitochondrial introns in general are positionally stable in the bryophytes and provide significant intraclade phylogenetic information, but the nad2 introns, in particular, cannot resolve the interclade relationships of the bryophyte classes and to the tracheophytes. The necessity for RNA editing to reconstitute conserved codon entities in nad2 is obvious for all clades except the marchantiid liverworts. Finally, we find that particularly small group II introns appear as a general feature of the Isoetes chondriome. Plant mitochondrial peculiarities such as RNA editing frequency, U-to-C type of RNA editing, and small group II introns appear to be genus-specific rather than gene-specific features.

  5. Conservation of the structure and organization of lupin mitochondrial nad3 and rps12 genes.

    PubMed

    Rurek, M; Oczkowski, M; Augustyniak, H

    1998-01-01

    A high level of the nucleotide sequence conservation of mitochondrial nad3 and rps12 genes was found in four lupin species. The only differences concern three nucleotides in the Lupinus albus rps12 gene and three nucleotides insertion in the L. mutabilis spacer. Northern blot analysis as well as RT-PCR confirmed cotranscription of the L. luteus genes because the transcripts detected were long enough.

  6. Structure of Nampt/PBEF/visfatin, a mammalian NAD[superscript +]biosynthetic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xiangbin; Bheda, Poonam; Revollo, Javier R.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-07-22

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) synthesizes nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide in a mammalian NAD{sup +} biosynthetic pathway and is required for SirT1 activity in vivo. Nampt has also been presumed to be a cytokine (PBEF) or a hormone (visfatin). The crystal structure of Nampt in the presence and absence of NMN shows that Nampt is a dimeric type II phosphoribosyltransferase and provides insights into the enzymatic mechanism.

  7. Two-photon fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy of NAD(P)H and flavoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaohui; Heikal, Ahmed A; Webb, Watt W

    2002-01-01

    Two-photon (2P) ratiometric redox fluorometry and microscopy of pyridine nucleotide (NAD(P)H) and flavoprotein (FP) fluorescence, at 800-nm excitation, has been demonstrated as a function of mitochondrial metabolic states in isolated adult dog cardiomyocytes. We have measured the 2P-excitation spectra of NAD(P)H, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and lipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH) over the wavelength range of 720-1000 nm. The 2P-excitation action cross sections (sigma2P) increase rapidly at wavelengths below 800 nm, and the maximum sigma2P of LipDH is approximately 5 and 12 times larger than those of FAD and NAD(P)H, respectively. Only FAD and LipDH can be efficiently excited at wavelengths above 800 nm with a broad 2P-excitation band around 900 nm. Two autofluorescence spectral regions (i.e., approximately 410-490 nm and approximately 510-650 nm) of isolated cardiomyocytes were imaged using 2P-laser scanning microscopy. At 750-nm excitation, fluorescence of both regions is dominated by NAD(P)H emission, as indicated by fluorescence intensity changes induced by mitochondrial inhibitor NaCN and mitochondria uncoupler carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy) phenyl hydrazone (FCCP). In contrast, 2P-FP fluorescence dominates at 900-nm excitation, which is in agreement with the sigma2P measurements. Finally, 2P-autofluorescence emission spectra of single cardiac cells have been obtained, with results suggesting potential for substantial improvement of the proposed 2P-ratiometric technique. PMID:11964266

  8. The mechanism of RNA 5′ capping with NAD+, NADH and desphospho-CoA.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jeremy G; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Yuan; Panova, Natalya; Barvík, Ivan; Greene, Landon; Liu, Min; Buckley, Brian; Krásný, Libor; Lee, Jeehiun K; Kaplan, Craig D; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2016-07-21

    The chemical nature of the 5′ end of RNA is a key determinant of RNA stability, processing, localization and translation efficiency, and has been proposed to provide a layer of ‘epitranscriptomic’ gene regulation. Recently it has been shown that some bacterial RNA species carry a 5′-end structure reminiscent of the 5′ 7-methylguanylate ‘cap’ in eukaryotic RNA. In particular, RNA species containing a 5′-end nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) or 3′-desphospho-coenzyme A (dpCoA) have been identified in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. It has been proposed that NAD+, reduced NAD+ (NADH) and dpCoA caps are added to RNA after transcription initiation, in a manner analogous to the addition of 7-methylguanylate caps. Here we show instead that NAD+, NADH and dpCoA are incorporated into RNA during transcription initiation, by serving as non-canonical initiating nucleotides (NCINs) for de novo transcription initiation by cellular RNA polymerase (RNAP). We further show that both bacterial RNAP and eukaryotic RNAP II incorporate NCIN caps, that promoter DNA sequences at and upstream of the transcription start site determine the efficiency of NCIN capping, that NCIN capping occurs in vivo, and that NCIN capping has functional consequences. We report crystal structures of transcription initiation complexes containing NCIN-capped RNA products. Our results define the mechanism and structural basis of NCIN capping, and suggest that NCIN-mediated ‘ab initio capping’ may occur in all organisms.

  9. Investigating the Sensitivity of NAD+-dependent Sirtuin Deacylation Activities to NADH.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Andreas S; Andersen, Christian; Daoud, Mohammad; Anderson, Kristin A; Laursen, Jonas S; Chakladar, Saswati; Huynh, Frank K; Colaço, Ana R; Backos, Donald S; Fristrup, Peter; Hirschey, Matthew D; Olsen, Christian A

    2016-03-25

    Protein lysine posttranslational modification by an increasing number of different acyl groups is becoming appreciated as a regulatory mechanism in cellular biology. Sirtuins are class III histone deacylases that use NAD(+)as a co-substrate during amide bond hydrolysis. Several studies have described the sirtuins as sensors of the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, but it has not been formally tested for all the mammalian sirtuinsin vitro To address this problem, we first synthesized a wide variety of peptide-based probes, which were used to identify the range of hydrolytic activities of human sirtuins. These probes included aliphatic ϵ-N-acyllysine modifications with hydrocarbon lengths ranging from formyl (C1) to palmitoyl (C16) as well as negatively charged dicarboxyl-derived modifications. In addition to the well established activities of the sirtuins, "long chain" acyllysine modifications were also shown to be prone to hydrolytic cleavage by SIRT1-3 and SIRT6, supporting recent findings. We then tested the ability of NADH, ADP-ribose, and nicotinamide to inhibit these NAD(+)-dependent deacylase activities of the sirtuins. In the commonly used 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin-coupled fluorescence-based assay, the fluorophore has significant spectral overlap with NADH and therefore cannot be used to measure inhibition by NADH. Therefore, we turned to an HPLC-MS-based assay to directly monitor the conversion of acylated peptides to their deacylated forms. All tested sirtuin deacylase activities showed sensitivity to NADH in this assay. However, the inhibitory concentrations of NADH in these assays are far greater than the predicted concentrations of NADH in cells; therefore, our data indicate that NADH is unlikely to inhibit sirtuinsin vivo These data suggest a re-evaluation of the sirtuins as direct sensors of the NAD(+)/NADH ratio.

  10. The NAD(+) precursor nicotinamide riboside enhances oxidative metabolism and protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Carles; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Pirinen, Eija; Youn, Dou Y; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Cen, Yana; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Andreux, Pénélope A; Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Gademann, Karl; Rinsch, Chris; Schoonjans, Kristina; Sauve, Anthony A; Auwerx, Johan

    2012-06-06

    As NAD(+) is a rate-limiting cosubstrate for the sirtuin enzymes, its modulation is emerging as a valuable tool to regulate sirtuin function and, consequently, oxidative metabolism. In line with this premise, decreased activity of PARP-1 or CD38-both NAD(+) consumers-increases NAD(+) bioavailability, resulting in SIRT1 activation and protection against metabolic disease. Here we evaluated whether similar effects could be achieved by increasing the supply of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a recently described natural NAD(+) precursor with the ability to increase NAD(+) levels, Sir2-dependent gene silencing, and replicative life span in yeast. We show that NR supplementation in mammalian cells and mouse tissues increases NAD(+) levels and activates SIRT1 and SIRT3, culminating in enhanced oxidative metabolism and protection against high-fat diet-induced metabolic abnormalities. Consequently, our results indicate that the natural vitamin NR could be used as a nutritional supplement to ameliorate metabolic and age-related disorders characterized by defective mitochondrial function.

  11. Gentamicin differentially alters cellular metabolism of cochlear hair cells as revealed by NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholudeva, Lyandysha V.; Ward, Kristina G.; Nichols, Michael G.; Smith, Heather Jensen

    2015-05-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are implicated as culprits of hearing loss in more than 120,000 individuals annually. Research has shown that the sensory cells, but not supporting cells, of the cochlea are readily damaged and/or lost after use of such antibiotics. High-frequency outer hair cells (OHCs) show a greater sensitivity to antibiotics than high- and low-frequency inner hair cells (IHCs). We hypothesize that variations in mitochondrial metabolism account for differences in susceptibility. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy was used to quantify changes in NAD(P)H in sensory and supporting cells from explanted murine cochleae exposed to mitochondrial uncouplers, inhibitors, and an ototoxic antibiotic, gentamicin (GM). Changes in metabolic state resulted in a redistribution of NAD(P)H between subcellular fluorescence lifetime pools. Supporting cells had a significantly longer lifetime than sensory cells. Pretreatment with GM increased NAD(P)H intensity in high-frequency sensory cells, as well as the NAD(P)H lifetime within IHCs. GM specifically increased NAD(P)H concentration in high-frequency OHCs, but not in IHCs or pillar cells. Variations in NAD(P)H intensity in response to mitochondrial toxins and GM were greatest in high-frequency OHCs. These results demonstrate that GM rapidly alters mitochondrial metabolism, differentially modulates cell metabolism, and provides evidence that GM-induced changes in metabolism are significant and greatest in high-frequency OHCs.

  12. Nitric oxide degradation by potato tuber mitochondria: evidence for the involvement of external NAD(P)H dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Wulff, Alfredo; Saviani, Elzira Elisabeth; Salgado, Ione

    2008-05-01

    The mechanisms of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in plants have been extensively investigated. NO degradation can be just as important as its synthesis in controlling steady-state levels of NO. Here, we examined NO degradation in mitochondria isolated from potato tubers and the contribution of the respiratory chain to this process. NO degradation was faster in mitochondria energized with NAD(P)H than with succinate or malate. Oxygen consumption and the inner membrane potential were transiently inhibited by NO in NAD(P)H-energized mitochondria, in contrast to the persistent inhibition seen with succinate. NO degradation was abolished by anoxia and superoxide dismutase, which suggested that NO was consumed by its reaction with superoxide anion (O2(-)). Antimycin-A stimulated and myxothiazol prevented NO consumption in succinate- and malate-energized mitochondria. Although favored by antimycin-A, NAD(P)H-mediated NO consumption was not abolished by myxothiazol, indicating that an additional site of O2(-) generation, besides complex III, stimulated NO degradation. Larger amounts of O2(-) were generated in NAD(P)H- compared to succinate- or malate-energized mitochondria. NAD(P)H-mediated NO degradation and O2(-) production were stimulated by free Ca2+ concentration. Together, these results indicate that Ca2+-dependent external NAD(P)H dehydrogenases, in addition to complex III, contribute to O2(-) production that favors NO degradation in potato tuber mitochondria.

  13. High-Throughput Screening of Coenzyme Preference Change of Thermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD+, and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. This screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT. PMID:27587230

  14. The NAD+ precursor nicotinamide riboside enhances oxidative metabolism and protects against high-fat diet induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Pirinen, Eija; Youn, Dou Y.; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Cen, Yana; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Andreux, Pénélope A.; Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Gademann, Karl; Rinsch, Chris; Schoonjans, Kristina; Sauve, Anthony A.; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY As NAD+ is a rate-limiting co-substrate for the sirtuin enzymes, its modulation is emerging as a valuable tool to regulate sirtuin function and, consequently, oxidative metabolism. In line with this premise, decreased activity of PARP-1 or CD38 —both NAD+ consumers— increases NAD+ bioavailability, resulting in SIRT1 activation and protection against metabolic disease. Here we evaluated whether similar effects could be achieved by increasing the supply of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a recently described natural NAD+ precursor with the ability to increase NAD+ levels, Sir2-dependent gene silencing and replicative lifespan in yeast. We show that NR supplementation in mammalian cells and mouse tissues increases NAD+ levels and activates SIRT1 and SIRT3, culminating in enhanced oxidative metabolism and protection against high fat diet-induced metabolic abnormalities. Consequently, our results indicate that the natural vitamin, NR, could be used as a nutritional supplement to ameliorate metabolic and age-related disorders characterized by defective mitochondrial function. PMID:22682224

  15. Physiological and genetic analysis of the carbon regulation of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Coschigano, P W; Miller, S M; Magasanik, B

    1991-09-01

    We found that cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an elevated level of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH; encoded by the GDH2 gene) when grown with a nonfermentable carbon source or with limiting amounts of glucose, even in the presence of the repressing nitrogen source glutamine. This regulation was found to be transcriptional, and an upstream activation site (GDH2 UASc) sufficient for activation of transcription during respiratory growth conditions was identified. This UAS was found to be separable from a neighboring element which is necessary for the nitrogen source regulation of the gene, and strains deficient for the GLN3 gene product, required for expression of NAD-GDH during growth with the activating nitrogen source glutamate, were unaffected for the expression of NAD-GDH during growth with activating carbon sources. Two classes of mutations which prevented the normal activation of NAD-GDH in response to growth with nonfermentable carbon sources, but which did not affect the nitrogen-regulated expression of NAD-GDH, were found and characterized. Carbon regulation of GDH2 was found to be normal in hxk2, hap3, and hap4 strains and to be only slightly altered in a ssn6 strain; thus, in comparison with the regulation of previously identified glucose-repressed genes, a new pathway appears to be involved in the regulation of GDH2.

  16. Conformational Change Near the Redox Center of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Induced by NAD(+) to Regulate the Enzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Fukamichi, Tomoe; Nishimoto, Etsuko

    2015-05-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH) transfers two electrons from dihydrolipoamide (DHL) to NAD(+) mediated by FAD. Since this reaction is the final step of a series of catalytic reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase multi-enzyme complex (PDC), LipDH is a key enzyme to maintain the fluent metabolic flow. We reported here the conformational change near the redox center of LipDH induced by NAD(+) promoting the access of the DHL to FAD. The increase in the affinity of DHL to redox center was evidenced by the decrease in K M responding to the increase in the concentration of NAD(+) in Lineweaver-Burk plots. The fluorescence intensity of FAD transiently reduced by the addition of DHL was not recovered but rather reduced by the binding of NAD(+) with LipDH. The fluorescence decay lifetimes of FAD and Trp were prolonged in the presence of NAD(+) to show that FAD would be free from the electron transfer from the neighboring Tyrs and the resonance energy transfer efficiency between Trp and FAD lowered. These results consistently reveal that the conformation near the FAD and the surroundings would be so rearranged by NAD(+) to allow the easier access of DHL to the redox center of LipDH.

  17. SIRT1-Mediated eNAMPT Secretion from Adipose Tissue Regulates Hypothalamic NAD+ and Function in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Myeong Jin; Yoshida, Mitsukuni; Johnson, Sean; Takikawa, Akiko; Usui, Isao; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yoshino, Jun; Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2015-05-05

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the key NAD(+) biosynthetic enzyme, has two different forms, intra- and extracellular (iNAMPT and eNAMPT), in mammals. However, the significance of eNAMPT secretion remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that deacetylation of iNAMPT by the mammalian NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 predisposes the protein to secretion in adipocytes. NAMPT mutants reveal that SIRT1 deacetylates lysine 53 (K53) and enhances eNAMPT activity and secretion. Adipose tissue-specific Nampt knockout and knockin (ANKO and ANKI) mice show reciprocal changes in circulating eNAMPT, affecting hypothalamic NAD(+)/SIRT1 signaling and physical activity accordingly. The defect in physical activity observed in ANKO mice is ameliorated by nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN). Furthermore, administration of a NAMPT-neutralizing antibody decreases hypothalamic NAD(+) production, and treating ex vivo hypothalamic explants with purified eNAMPT enhances NAD(+), SIRT1 activity, and neural activation. Thus, our findings indicate a critical role of adipose tissue as a modulator for the regulation of NAD(+) biosynthesis at a systemic level.

  18. Benzylidenemalononitrile derivatives as substrates and inhibitors of a new NAD(P)H dehydrogenase of erythrocytes. Purification and crystallisation of two forms of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ueberschär, K H; Kille, S; Laule, G; Maurer, P; Wallenfels, K

    1979-10-01

    Using the powerful lachrymator (2-chlorobenzylidene)malononitrile as electron acceptor, two types of NAD(P)H dehydrogenases have been isolated from human blood. Crystallisation of the homogenous enzymes was performed in 50% polyethylene glycol solution. The enzymes (average molecular weight 18 000) are composed of only one polypeptide chain and have a very similar amino acid composition. B-side stereospecificity was determined with respect to the cofactor by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the reductase. Besides (2-chlorobenzylidene)malononitrile, 2,6-dichloroindophenol, methylene blue, 4-benzoquinone, FMN and FAD are also reduced using NADH or NADPH as hydrogen donor with the rates decreasing in the given order. Reduction of methemoglobin is observed only upon addition of methylene blue, FMN or FAD as carriers. (2-Chlorobenzylidene)malononitrile reduction is inhibited by most of the compounds known to be decouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

  19. The chemistry of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) analogues containing C-nucleosides related to nicotinamide riboside.

    PubMed

    Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W; Watanabe, Kyoichi A; Lesiak-Watanabe, Krystyna; Goldstein, Barry M; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N

    2002-04-01

    Oncolytic C-nucleosides, tiazofurin (2-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazole-4-carboxamide) and benzamide riboside (3-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzamide) are converted in cell into active metabolites thiazole-4-carboxamide- and benzamide adenine dinucleotide, TAD and BAD, respectively. TAD and BAD as NAD analogues were found to bind at the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (cofactor NAD) site of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an important target in cancer treatment. The synthesis and evaluation of anticancer activity of a number of C-nucleosides related to tiazofurin and nicotinamide riboside then followed and are reviewed herein. Interestingly, pyridine C-nucleosides (such as C-nicotinamide riboside) are not metabolized into the corresponding NAD analogues in cell. Their conversion by chemical methods is described. As dinucleotides these compounds show inhibition of IMPDH in low micromolar level. Also, the synthesis of BAD in metabolically stable bis(phosphonate) form is discussed indicating the usefulness of such preformed inhibitors in drug development. Among tiazofurin analogues, Franchetti and Grifantini found, that the replacement of the sulfur by oxygen (as in oxazafurin) but not the removal of nitrogen (tiophenfurin) of the thiazole ring resulted in inactive compounds. The anti cancer activity of their synthetic dinucleotide analogues indicate that inactive compounds are not only poorly metabolized in cell but also are weak inhibitors of IMPDH as dinucleotides.

  20. NAD(+) Replenishment Improves Lifespan and Healthspan in Ataxia Telangiectasia Models via Mitophagy and DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Kassahun, Henok; Croteau, Deborah L; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Marosi, Krisztina; Lu, Huiming; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Kalyanasundaram, Sumana; Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Wilson, Mark A; Iser, Wendy B; Wollman, Bradley N; Morevati, Marya; Li, Jun; Kerr, Jesse S; Lu, Qiping; Waltz, Tyler B; Tian, Jane; Sinclair, David A; Mattson, Mark P; Nilsen, Hilde; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-10-11

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and cerebellar ataxia. A-T is causally linked to defects in ATM, a master regulator of the response to and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The molecular basis of cerebellar atrophy and neurodegeneration in A-T patients is unclear. Here we report and examine the significance of increased PARylation, low NAD(+), and mitochondrial dysfunction in ATM-deficient neurons, mice, and worms. Treatments that replenish intracellular NAD(+) reduce the severity of A-T neuropathology, normalize neuromuscular function, delay memory loss, and extend lifespan in both animal models. Mechanistically, treatments that increase intracellular NAD(+) also stimulate neuronal DNA repair and improve mitochondrial quality via mitophagy. This work links two major theories on aging, DNA damage accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction through nuclear DNA damage-induced nuclear-mitochondrial signaling, and demonstrates that they are important pathophysiological determinants in premature aging of A-T, pointing to therapeutic interventions.

  1. The hidden life of NAD+-consuming ectoenzymes in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Fabio; Deaglio, Silvia; Zaccarello, Gianluca; Horenstein, Alberto L; Chillemi, Antonella; Audrito, Valentina; Serra, Sara; Gandione, Marina; Zitella, Andrea; Tizzani, Alessandro

    2010-10-01

    Ectoenzymes are a family of cell surface molecules whose catalytic domain lies in the extracellular region. A subset of this family, nucleotide-metabolizing ectoenzymes, are key components in the regulation of the extracellular balance between nucleotides (e.g. NAD(+) or ATP) and nucleosides (e.g. adenosine). Their substrates and products are signalling molecules that act by binding to specific receptors, triggering signals that regulate a variety of functions, ranging from the migration of immune cells, to synaptic transmission in the brain, to hormone/receptor interactions in the glands. Almost two decades of accumulated data indicate that these regulatory processes significantly affect the endocrine system, a tightly controlled information signal complex with clear evidence of fine regulation. Functional models discussed in this review include insulin secretion, bone modelling and the association between hormones and behaviour. The emerging pattern is one of a system operating as a scale-free network that hinges around hubs of key molecules, such as NAD(+) or ATP. The underlying natural link between nucleotides, ectoenzymes and the endocrine system is far from being clearly demonstrated. However, the body of evidence supporting the existence of such connection is growing exponentially. This review will try to read the available evidence in a hypothesis-oriented perspective, starting from the description of NAD(+) and of ecto- and endoenzymes involved in its metabolism.

  2. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  3. Mechanism of Sirt1 NAD+-dependent Protein Deacetylase Inhibition by Cysteine S-Nitrosation.

    PubMed

    Kalous, Kelsey S; Wynia-Smith, Sarah L; Olp, Michael D; Smith, Brian C

    2016-12-02

    The sirtuin family of proteins catalyze the NAD(+)-dependent deacylation of acyl-lysine residues. Humans encode seven sirtuins (Sirt1-7), and recent studies have suggested that post-translational modification of Sirt1 by cysteine S-nitrosation correlates with increased acetylation of Sirt1 deacetylase substrates. However, the mechanism of Sirt1 inhibition by S-nitrosation was unknown. Here, we show that Sirt1 is transnitrosated and inhibited by the physiologically relevant nitrosothiol S-nitrosoglutathione. Steady-state kinetic analyses and binding assays were consistent with Sirt1 S-nitrosation inhibiting binding of both the NAD(+) and acetyl-lysine substrates. Sirt1 S-nitrosation correlated with Zn(2+) release from the conserved sirtuin Zn(2+)-tetrathiolate and a loss of α-helical structure without overall thermal destabilization of the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that Zn(2+) loss due to Sirt1 S-nitrosation results in repositioning of the tetrathiolate subdomain away from the rest of the catalytic domain, thereby disrupting the NAD(+) and acetyl-lysine-binding sites. Sirt1 S-nitrosation was reversed upon exposure to the thiol-based reducing agents, including physiologically relevant concentrations of the cellular reducing agent glutathione. Reversal of S-nitrosation resulted in full restoration of Sirt1 activity only in the presence of Zn(2+), consistent with S-nitrosation of the Zn(2+)-tetrathiolate as the primary source of Sirt1 inhibition upon S-nitrosoglutathione treatment.

  4. Mutations in adenine-binding pockets enhance catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Cahn, J.K.B.; Baumschlager, A.; Brinkmann-Chen, S.; Arnold, F.H.

    2016-01-01

    NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in metabolism and cellular processes and are also of great interest for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Here, we present a structure-guided enzyme engineering strategy for improving catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes toward native or native-like reactions using mutations to the enzyme's adenine-binding pocket, distal to the site of catalysis. Screening single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries identified mutations that increased catalytic efficiency up to 10-fold in 7 out of 10 enzymes. The enzymes improved in this study represent three different cofactor-binding folds (Rossmann, DHQS-like, and FAD/NAD binding) and utilize both NADH and NADPH. Structural and biochemical analyses show that the improved activities are accompanied by minimal changes in other properties (cooperativity, thermostability, pH optimum, uncoupling), and initial tests on two enzymes (ScADH6 and EcFucO) show improved functionality in Escherichia coli. PMID:26512129

  5. Immobilized cofactor derivatives for kinetic-based enzyme capture strategies: direct coupling of NAD(P)+.

    PubMed

    Oakey, Laura; Mulcahy, Patricia

    2004-12-15

    This study reevaluates the potential for direct coupling of NAD(P)(+) to a carboxylate-terminating spacer arm using carbodiimide-promoted coupling in an attempt to develop a greatly simplified synthetic method for cofactor immobilization that would support the more widespread adoption of kinetic-based enzyme capture (KBEC) strategies for protein purification applications and protein-detecting arrays/proteomic studies. Direct coupling of NAD(+) to epoxy (1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether)-activated Sepharose is also described. Depending on the synthetic method used, the position of attachment of cofactor is concluded to be primarily through the pyrophosphate or ribosyl hydroxyl groups. Total substitution levels varied from 0.5 to 2 micromol/g wet weight with 28-67% accessibility. Model bioaffinity chromatographic studies employing KBEC strategies are reported for bovine heart L-lactate dehydrogenase, yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, l-phenylalanine dehydrogenase from Sporosarcina, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from Candida utilis, and GDH from bovine liver. The NAD(+) derivative prepared using epoxy-activated Sepharose shows most potential for further development based on total substitution levels, the apparent absence of nonbiospecific interference, reversible biospecific adsorption of some of the test enzymes using soluble KBEC/stripping ligand tactics, and the relative simplicity of the synthetic method.

  6. ARTD1/PARP1 negatively regulates glycolysis by inhibiting hexokinase 1 independent of NAD+ depletion

    PubMed Central

    Fouquerel, Elise; Goellner, Eva M.; Yu, Zhongxun; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; de Moura, Michelle Barbi; Feinstein, Tim; Wheeler, David; Redpath, Philip; Li, Jianfeng; Romero, Guillermo; Migaud, Marie; Van Houten, Bennett; Poirier, Guy G.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary ARTD1 (PARP1) is a key enzyme involved in DNA repair by synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in response to strand breaks and plays an important role in cell death following excessive DNA damage. ARTD1-induced cell death is associated with NAD+ depletion and ATP loss, however the molecular mechanism of ARTD1-mediated energy collapse remains elusive. Using real-time metabolic measurements, we directly compared the effects of ARTD1 activation and direct NAD+ depletion. We found that ARTD1-mediated PAR synthesis, but not direct NAD+ depletion, resulted in a block to glycolysis and ATP loss. We then established a proteomics based PAR-interactome after DNA damage and identified hexokinase 1 (HK1) as a PAR binding protein. HK1 activity is suppressed following nuclear ARTD1 activation and binding by PAR. These findings help explain how prolonged activation of ARTD1 triggers energy collapse and cell death, revealing new insight on the importance of nucleus to mitochondria communication via ARTD1 activation. PMID:25220464

  7. Identification of the NAD(P)H binding site of eukaryotic UDP-galactopyranose mutase.

    PubMed

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Solano, Luis M; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Robinson, Reeder M; Ellerbrock, Jacob F; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J

    2012-10-31

    UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) plays an essential role in galactofuranose biosynthesis in microorganisms by catalyzing the conversion of UDP-galactopyranose to UDP-galactofuranose. The enzyme has gained attention recently as a promising target for the design of new antifungal, antitrypanosomal, and antileishmanial agents. Here we report the first crystal structure of UGM complexed with its redox partner NAD(P)H. Kinetic protein crystallography was used to obtain structures of oxidized Aspergillus fumigatus UGM (AfUGM) complexed with NADPH and NADH, as well as reduced AfUGM after dissociation of NADP(+). NAD(P)H binds with the nicotinamide near the FAD isoalloxazine and the ADP moiety extending toward the mobile 200s active site flap. The nicotinamide riboside binding site overlaps that of the substrate galactopyranose moiety, and thus NADPH and substrate binding are mutually exclusive. On the other hand, the pockets for the adenine of NADPH and uracil of the substrate are distinct and separated by only 6 Å, which raises the possibility of designing novel inhibitors that bind both sites. All 12 residues that contact NADP(H) are conserved among eukaryotic UGMs. Residues that form the AMP pocket are absent in bacterial UGMs, which suggests that eukaryotic and bacterial UGMs have different NADP(H) binding sites. The structures address the longstanding question of how UGM binds NAD(P)H and provide new opportunities for drug discovery.

  8. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S; Griffor, Matt

    2009-11-01

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD(+)-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  9. Infrared optical constants of crystalline sodium chloride dihydrate: application to study the crystallization of aqueous sodium chloride solution droplets at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Schnaiter, Martin

    2012-08-23

    Complex refractive indices of sodium chloride dihydrate, NaCl·2H(2)O, have been retrieved in the 6000-800 cm(-1) wavenumber regime from the infrared extinction spectra of crystallized aqueous NaCl solution droplets. The data set is valid in the temperature range from 235 to 216 K and was inferred from crystallization experiments with airborne particles performed in the large coolable aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The retrieval concept was based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship for a complex function of the optical constants n and k whose imaginary part is proportional to the optical depth of a small particle absorption spectrum in the Rayleigh approximation. The appropriate proportionality factor was inferred from a fitting algorithm applied to the extinction spectra of about 1 μm sized particles, which, apart from absorption, also featured a pronounced scattering contribution. NaCl·2H(2)O is the thermodynamically stable crystalline solid in the sodium chloride-water system below the peritectic at 273.3 K; above 273.3 K, the anhydrous NaCl is more stable. In contrast to anhydrous NaCl crystals, the dihydrate particles reveal prominent absorption signatures at mid-infrared wavelengths due to the hydration water molecules. Formation of NaCl·2H(2)O was only detected at temperatures clearly below the peritectic and was first evidenced in a crystallization experiment conducted at 235 K. We have employed the retrieved refractive indices of NaCl·2H(2)O to quantify the temperature dependent partitioning between anhydrous and dihydrate NaCl particles upon crystallization of aqueous NaCl solution droplets. It was found that the temperature range from 235 to 216 K represents the transition regime where the composition of the crystallized particle ensemble changes from almost only NaCl to almost only NaCl·2H(2)O particles. Compared to the findings on the NaCl/NaCl·2H(2)O partitioning from a recent study conducted with micron

  10. Cloning and Expression of ntnD, Encoding a Novel NAD(P)+-Independent 4-Nitrobenzyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain TW3

    PubMed Central

    James, Keith D.; Hughes, Michelle A.; Williams, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain TW3 is able to metabolize 4-nitrotoluene to 4-nitrobenzoate and toluene to benzoate aerobically via a route analogous to the upper pathway of the TOL plasmids. We report the cloning and characterization of a benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ntnD) which encodes the enzyme for the catabolism of 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol and benzyl alcohol to 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and benzaldehyde, respectively. The gene is located downstream of the previously reported ntn gene cluster. NtnD bears no similarity to the analogous TOL plasmid XylB (benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase) protein either in its biochemistry, being NAD(P)+ independent and requiring assay via dye-linked electron transfer, or in its deduced amino acid sequence. It does, however, have significant similarity in its amino acid sequence to other NAD(P)+-independent alcohol dehydrogenases and contains signature patterns characteristic of type III flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent alcohol oxidases. Reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that ntnD is transcribed during growth on 4-nitrotoluene, although apparently not as part of the same transcript as the other ntn genes. The substrate specificity of the enzyme expressed from the cloned and overexpressed gene was similar to the activity expressed from strain TW3 grown on 4-nitrotoluene, providing evidence that ntnD is the previously unidentified gene in the pathway of 4-nitrotoluene catabolism. Examination of the 14.8-kb region around the ntn genes suggests that one or more recombination events have been involved in the formation of their current organization. PMID:10809692

  11. NAD(P)+-Malic Enzyme Mutants of Sinorhizobium sp. Strain NGR234, but Not Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571, Maintain Symbiotic N2 Fixation Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Aono, Toshihiro; Poole, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    C4-dicarboxylic acids appear to be metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in N2-fixing bacteria (bacteroids) within legume nodules. In Sinorhizobium meliloti bacteroids from alfalfa, NAD+-malic enzyme (DME) is required for N2 fixation, and this activity is thought to be required for the anaplerotic synthesis of pyruvate. In contrast, in the pea symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum, pyruvate synthesis occurs via either DME or a pathway catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and pyruvate kinase (PYK). Here we report that dme mutants of the broad-host-range Sinorhizobium sp. strain NGR234 formed nodules whose level of N2 fixation varied from 27 to 83% (plant dry weight) of the wild-type level, depending on the host plant inoculated. NGR234 bacteroids had significant PCK activity, and while single pckA and single dme mutants fixed N2 at reduced rates, a pckA dme double mutant had no N2-fixing activity (Fix−). Thus, NGR234 bacteroids appear to synthesize pyruvate from TCA cycle intermediates via DME or PCK pathways. These NGR234 data, together with other reports, suggested that the completely Fix− phenotype of S. meliloti dme mutants may be specific to the alfalfa-S. meliloti symbiosis. We therefore examined the ME-like genes azc3656 and azc0119 from Azorhizobium caulinodans, as azc3656 mutants were previously shown to form Fix− nodules on the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata. We found that purified AZC3656 protein is an NAD(P)+-malic enzyme whose activity is inhibited by acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and stimulated by succinate and fumarate. Thus, whereas DME is required for symbiotic N2 fixation in A. caulinodans and S. meliloti, in other rhizobia this activity can be bypassed via another pathway(s). PMID:22307295

  12. A novel NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase specifically expressed in the thyroidectomized chicken fatty liver: catalytic properties and crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yudai; Sone, Takeki; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Shibata, Takeshi; Yoneda, Kazunari

    2015-10-01

    A gene encoding a functionally unknown protein that is specifically expressed in the thyroidectomized chicken fatty liver and has a predicted amino acid sequence similar to that of NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli; its product was purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme was an NAD(P)H-dependent broad substrate specificity carbonyl reductase and was inhibited by arachidonic acid at 1.5 μm. Enzymological characterization indicated that the enzyme could be classified as a cytosolic-type carbonyl reductase. The enzyme's 3D structure was determined using the molecular replacement method at 1.98 Å resolution in the presence of NADPH and ethylene glycol. The asymmetric unit consisted of two subunits, and a noncrystallographic twofold axis generated the functional dimer. The structures of the subunits, A and B, differed from each other. In subunit A, the active site contained an ethylene glycol molecule absent in subunit B. Consequently, Tyr172 in subunit A rotated by 103.7° in comparison with subunit B, which leads to active site closure in subunit A. In Y172A mutant, the Km value for 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (model substrate) was 12.5 times higher than that for the wild-type enzyme, indicating that Tyr172 plays a key role in substrate binding in this carbonyl reductase. Because the Tyr172-containing active site lid structure (Ile164-Gln174) is not conserved in all known carbonyl reductases, our results provide new insights into substrate binding of carbonyl reductase. The catalytic properties and crystal structure revealed that thyroidectomized chicken fatty liver carbonyl reductase is a novel enzyme.

  13. PLATELET-ASSOCIATED NAD(P)H OXIDASE CONTRIBUTES TO THE THROMBOGENIC PHENOTYPE INDUCED BY HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Karen Y.; Russell, Janice M.; Jennings, Merilyn H.; Alexander, J. Steven; Granger., D. Neil

    2007-01-01

    Elevated cholesterol levels promote pro-inflammatory and prothrombogenic responses in venules and impaired endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation. Although NAD(P)H oxidase-derived superoxide has been implicated in the altered vascular responses to hypercholesterolemia, it remains unclear whether this oxidative pathway mediates the associated arteriolar dysfunction and platelet adhesion in venules. Platelet and leukocyte adhesion in cremasteric postcapillary venules, and arteriolar dilation responses to acetylcholine were monitored in wild-type (WT), Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase transgenic (SOD-TgN) and NAD(P)H oxidase-knockout (gp91phox-/-) mice placed on normal (ND) or high cholesterol (HC) diet for 2 wk. HC elicited increased platelet and leukocyte adhesion in WT mice, versus ND. Cytosolic subunits of NAD(P)H oxidase (p47phox and p67phox) were expressed in platelets. This was not altered by hypercholesterolemia, however platelets and leukocytes from HC mice exhibited elevated generation of reactive oxygen species when compared to ND mice. Hypercholesterolemia-induced leukocyte recruitment was attenuated in SOD-TgN-HC and gp91phox-/--HC mice. Recruitment of platelets derived from WT-HC mice in venules of SOD-TgN-HC or gp91phox-/--HC recipients was comparable to ND levels. Adhesion of SOD-TgN-HC platelets paralleled the leukocyte response and was attenuated in SOD-TgN-HC recipients, but not in WT-HC recipients. However, gp91phox-/--HC platelets exhibited low levels of adhesion comparable to WT-ND in both hypercholesterolemic gp91phox-/- and WT recipients. Arteriolar dysfunction was evident in WT-HC mice, compared to WT-ND. Overexpression of SOD or, to a lesser extent, gp91phox deficiency, restored arteriolar vasorelaxation responses towards WT-ND levels. These findings reveal a novel role for platelet-associated NAD(P)H oxidase in producing the thrombogenic phenotype in hypercholesterolemia and demonstrate that NAD(P)H oxidase-derived superoxide mediates the HC

  14. Nicotinamide riboside promotes Sir2 silencing and extends lifespan via Nrk and Urh1/Pnp1/Meu1 pathways to NAD+.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Racette, Frances G; Bogan, Katrina L; McClure, Julie M; Smith, Jeffrey S; Brenner, Charles

    2007-05-04

    Although NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for Sir2 functions and replicative lifespan in yeast, alterations in NAD(+) precursors have been reported to accelerate aging but not to extend lifespan. In eukaryotes, nicotinamide riboside is a newly discovered NAD(+) precursor that is converted to nicotinamide mononucleotide by specific nicotinamide riboside kinases, Nrk1 and Nrk2. In this study, we discovered that exogenous nicotinamide riboside promotes Sir2-dependent repression of recombination, improves gene silencing, and extends lifespan without calorie restriction. The mechanism of action of nicotinamide riboside is totally dependent on increased net NAD(+) synthesis through two pathways, the Nrk1 pathway and the Urh1/Pnp1/Meu1 pathway, which is Nrk1 independent. Additionally, the two nicotinamide riboside salvage pathways contribute to NAD(+) metabolism in the absence of nicotinamide-riboside supplementation. Thus, like calorie restriction in the mouse, nicotinamide riboside elevates NAD(+) and increases Sir2 function.

  15. Transferred multipolar atom model for 10β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate obtained from the biotransformation of methyloestrenolone.

    PubMed

    Faroque, Muhammad Umer; Yousuf, Sammer; Zafar, Salman; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Ahmed, Maqsood

    2016-05-01

    Biotransformation is the structural modification of compounds using enzymes as the catalysts and it plays a key role in the synthesis of pharmaceutically important compounds. 10β,17β-Dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate, C19H28O3·2H2O, was obtained from the fungal biotransformation of methyloestrenolone. The structure was refined using the classical independent atom model (IAM) and a transferred multipolar atom model using the ELMAM2 database. The results from the two refinements have been compared. The ELMAM2 refinement has been found to be superior in terms of the refinement statistics. It has been shown that certain electron-density-derived properties can be calculated on the basis of the transferred parameters for crystals which diffract to ordinary resolution.

  16. Dynamic changes in nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotide content in normal human epidermal keratinocytes and their effect on retinoic acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkas-Sarafova, Adriana . E-mail: apinkassaraf@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Markova, N.G. . E-mail: nmarkova@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Simon, M. . E-mail: marsimon@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

    2005-10-21

    The function of many enzymes that regulate metabolism and transcription depends critically on the nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotides. To understand the role of NAD(P)(H) in physiology and pathophysiology, it is imperative to estimate both their amount and ratios in a given cell type. In human epidermis and in cultured epidermal keratinocytes, we found that the total dinucleotide content is in the low millimolar range. The dinucleotide pattern changes during proliferation and maturation of keratinocytes in culture. Differences in the concentrations of NAD(P)(H) of 1.5- to 12-fold were observed. This resulted in alteration of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P) ratio, which could impact the differential regulation of both transcriptional and metabolic processes. In support of this notion, we provide evidence that the two-step oxidation of retinol to retinoic acid, a nuclear hormone critical for epidermal homeostasis, can be regulated by the relative physiological amounts of the pyridine dinucleotides.

  17. Mitochondrial nad2 gene is co-transcripted with CMS-associated orfB gene in cytoplasmic male-sterile stem mustard (Brassica juncea).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Ming-Fang; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional patterns of mitochondrial respiratory related genes were investigated in cytoplasmic male-sterile and fertile maintainer lines of stem mustard, Brassica juncea. There were numerous differences in nad2 (subunit 2 of NADH dehydrogenase) between stem mustard CMS and its maintainer line. One novel open reading frame, hereafter named orfB gene, was located at the downstream of mitochondrial nad2 gene in the CMS. The novel orfB gene had high similarity with YMF19 family protein, orfB in Raphanus sativus, Helianthus annuus, Nicotiana tabacum and Beta vulgaris, orfB-CMS in Daucus carota, atp8 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, 5' flanking of orf224 in B. napus (nap CMS) and 5' flanking of orf220 gene in CMS Brassica juncea. Three copies probed by specific fragment (amplified by primers of nad2F and nad2R from CMS) were found in the CMS line following Southern blotting digested with HindIII, but only a single copy in its maintainer line. Meanwhile, two transcripts were shown in the CMS line following Northern blotting while only one transcript was detected in the maintainer line, which were probed by specific fragment (amplified by primers of nad2F and nad2R from CMS). Meanwhile, the expression of nad2 gene was reduced in CMS bud compared to that in its maintainer line. We thus suggested that nad2 gene may be co-transcripted with CMS-associated orfB gene in the CMS. In addition, the specific fragment that was amplified by primers of nad2F and nad2R just spanned partial sequences of nad2 gene and orfB gene. Such alterations in the nad2 gene would impact the activity of NADH dehydrogenase, and subsequently signaling, inducing the expression of nuclear genes involved in male sterility in this type of cytoplasmic male sterility.

  18. Enhancing NAD+ Salvage Pathway Reverts the Toxicity of Primary Astrocytes Expressing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked Mutant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1).

    PubMed

    Harlan, Benjamin A; Pehar, Mariana; Sharma, Deep R; Beeson, Gyda; Beeson, Craig C; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2016-05-13

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) participates in redox reactions and NAD(+)-dependent signaling pathways. Although the redox reactions are critical for efficient mitochondrial metabolism, they are not accompanied by any net consumption of the nucleotide. On the contrary, NAD(+)-dependent signaling processes lead to its degradation. Three distinct families of enzymes consume NAD(+) as substrate: poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, ADP-ribosyl cyclases (CD38 and CD157), and sirtuins (SIRT1-7). Because all of the above enzymes generate nicotinamide as a byproduct, mammalian cells have evolved an NAD(+) salvage pathway capable of resynthesizing NAD(+) from nicotinamide. Overexpression of the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, increases total and mitochondrial NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Moreover, targeting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase to the mitochondria also enhances NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes. Supplementation with the NAD(+) precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside also increases NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations account for up to 20% of familial ALS and 1-2% of apparently sporadic ALS cases. Primary astrocytes isolated from mutant human superoxide dismutase 1-overexpressing mice as well as human post-mortem ALS spinal cord-derived astrocytes induce motor neuron death in co-culture. Increasing total and mitochondrial NAD(+) content in ALS astrocytes increases oxidative stress resistance and reverts their toxicity toward co-cultured motor neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancing the NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target to prevent astrocyte-mediated motor neuron death in ALS.

  19. High-resolution crystal structures of the photoreceptor glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) with three and four-bound NAD molecules.

    PubMed

    Baker, Bo Y; Shi, Wuxian; Wang, Benlian; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-11-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) into 1,3-diphosphoglycerate (BGP) in the presence of the NAD cofactor. GAPDH is an important drug target because of its central role in glycolysis, and nonglycolytic processes such as nuclear RNA transport, DNA replication/repair, membrane fusion and cellular apoptosis. Recent studies found that GAPDH participates in the development of diabetic retinopathy and its progression after the cessation of hyperglycemia. Here, we report two structures for native bovine photoreceptor GAPDH as a homotetramer with differing occupancy by NAD, bGAPDH(NAD)4 , and bGAPDH(NAD)3 . The bGAPDH(NAD)4 was solved at 1.52 Å, the highest resolution for GAPDH. Structural comparison of the bGAPDH(NAD)4 and bGAPDH(NAD)3 models revealed novel details of conformational changes induced by cofactor binding, including a loop region (residues 54-56). Structure analysis of bGAPDH confirmed the importance of Phe34 in NAD binding, and demonstrated that Phe34 was stabilized in the presence of NAD but displayed greater mobility in its absence. The oxidative state of the active site Cys149 residue is regulated by NAD binding, because this residue was found oxidized in the absence of dinucleotide. The distance between Cys149 and His176 decreased upon NAD binding and Cys149 remained in a reduced state when NAD was bound. These findings provide an important structural step for understanding the mechanism of GAPDH activity in vision and its pathological role in retinopathies.

  20. The plant defensin NaD1 induces tumor cell death via a non-apoptotic, membranolytic process.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Amy A; Poon, Ivan Kh; Hulett, Mark D

    2017-01-01

    Cationic anti-microbial peptides (CAPs) have an important role in host innate defense against pathogens such as bacteria and fungi. Many CAPs including defensins also exhibit selective cytotoxic activity towards mammalian cells via both apoptotic and non-apoptotic processes, and are being investigated as potential anticancer agents. The anti-fungal plant defensin from ornamental tobacco, Nicotiana alata Defensin 1 (NaD1), was recently shown to induce necrotic-like cell death in a number of tumor cell types within 30 min of treatment, at a concentration of 10 μM. NaD1-mediated cell killing within these experimental parameters has been shown to occur via binding to the plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) in target cells to facilitate membrane destabilization and subsequent lysis. Whether NaD1 is also capable of inducing apoptosis in tumor cells has not been reported previously. In this study, treatment of MM170 (melanoma) and Jurkat T (leukemia) cells with subacute (<10 μM) concentrations of NaD1 over 6-24 h was investigated to determine whether NaD1 could induce cell death via apoptosis. At subacute concentrations, NaD1 did not efficiently induce membrane permeabilization within 30 min, but markedly reduced cell viability over 24 h. In contrast to other CAPs that have been shown to induce apoptosis through caspase activation, dying cells were not sensitive to a pancaspase inhibitor nor did they display caspase activity or DNA fragmentation over the 24 h treatment time. Furthermore, over the 24 h period, cells exhibited necrotic phenotypes and succumbed to membrane permeabilization. These results indicate that the cytotoxic mechanism of NaD1 at subacute concentrations is membranolytic rather than apoptotic and is also likely to be mediated through a PIP2-targeting cell lytic pathway.

  1. The plant defensin NaD1 induces tumor cell death via a non-apoptotic, membranolytic process

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Amy A; Poon, Ivan KH; Hulett, Mark D

    2017-01-01

    Cationic anti-microbial peptides (CAPs) have an important role in host innate defense against pathogens such as bacteria and fungi. Many CAPs including defensins also exhibit selective cytotoxic activity towards mammalian cells via both apoptotic and non-apoptotic processes, and are being investigated as potential anticancer agents. The anti-fungal plant defensin from ornamental tobacco, Nicotiana alata Defensin 1 (NaD1), was recently shown to induce necrotic-like cell death in a number of tumor cell types within 30 min of treatment, at a concentration of 10 μM. NaD1-mediated cell killing within these experimental parameters has been shown to occur via binding to the plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) in target cells to facilitate membrane destabilization and subsequent lysis. Whether NaD1 is also capable of inducing apoptosis in tumor cells has not been reported previously. In this study, treatment of MM170 (melanoma) and Jurkat T (leukemia) cells with subacute (<10 μM) concentrations of NaD1 over 6–24 h was investigated to determine whether NaD1 could induce cell death via apoptosis. At subacute concentrations, NaD1 did not efficiently induce membrane permeabilization within 30 min, but markedly reduced cell viability over 24 h. In contrast to other CAPs that have been shown to induce apoptosis through caspase activation, dying cells were not sensitive to a pancaspase inhibitor nor did they display caspase activity or DNA fragmentation over the 24 h treatment time. Furthermore, over the 24 h period, cells exhibited necrotic phenotypes and succumbed to membrane permeabilization. These results indicate that the cytotoxic mechanism of NaD1 at subacute concentrations is membranolytic rather than apoptotic and is also likely to be mediated through a PIP2-targeting cell lytic pathway. PMID:28179997

  2. beta-NAD is a novel nucleotide released on stimulation of nerve terminals in human urinary bladder detrusor muscle.

    PubMed

    Breen, Leanne T; Smyth, Lisa M; Yamboliev, Ilia A; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N

    2006-02-01

    Endogenous nucleotides with extracellular functions may be involved in the complex neural control of human urinary bladder (HUB). Using HPLC techniques with fluorescence detection, we observed that in addition to ATP and its metabolites ADP, AMP and adenosine, electrical field stimulation (EFS; 4-16 Hz, 0.1 ms, 15 V, 60 s) of HUB detrusor smooth muscle coreleases novel nucleotide factors, which produce etheno-1N(6)-ADP-ribose (eADPR) on etheno-derivatization at high temperature. A detailed HPLC fraction analysis determined that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-NAD+; 7.0 +/- 0.7 fmol/mg tissue) is the primary nucleotide that contributes to the formation of eADPR. The tissue superfusates collected during EFS also contained the beta-NAD+ metabolite ADPR (0.35 +/- 0.2 fmol/mg tissue) but not cyclic ADPR (cADPR). HUB failed to degrade nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide (NGD+), a specific substrate of ADP ribosyl cyclase, suggesting that the activity of this enzyme in the HUB is negligible. The EFS-evoked release of beta-NAD+ was frequency dependent and is reduced in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.3 micromol/l), omega-conotoxin GVIA (50 nmol/l), and botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A; 100 nmol/l), but remained unchanged in the presence of guanethidine (3 micromol/l), omega-agatoxin IVA (50 nmol/l), or charbachol (1 micromol/l). Capsaicin (10 micromol/l) increased both the resting and EFS-evoked overflow of beta-NAD+. Exogenous beta-NAD+ (1 micromol/l) reduced both the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous contractions. In conclusion, we detected nerve-evoked overflow of beta-NAD+ and ADPR in HUB. The beta-NAD(+)/ADPR system may constitute a novel inhibitory extracellular nucleotide mechanism of neural control of the human bladder.

  3. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ng, Chyan Leong

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold) to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that’s highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate specificity

  4. Reduction of Flavodoxin by Electron Bifurcation and Sodium Ion-dependent Reoxidation by NAD+ Catalyzed by Ferredoxin-NAD+ Reductase (Rnf).

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nilanjan Pal; Klomann, Katharina; Seubert, Andreas; Buckel, Wolfgang

    2016-06-03

    Electron-transferring flavoprotein (Etf) and butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (Bcd) from Acidaminococcus fermentans catalyze the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin by NADH, which is also driven by the concomitant reduction of crotonyl-CoA by NADH, a process called electron bifurcation. Here we show that recombinant flavodoxin from A. fermentans produced in Escherichia coli can replace ferredoxin with almost equal efficiency. After complete reduction of the yellow quinone to the blue semiquinone, a second 1.4 times faster electron transfer affords the colorless hydroquinone. Mediated by a hydrogenase, protons reoxidize the fully reduced flavodoxin or ferredoxin to the semi-reduced species. In this hydrogen-generating system, both electron carriers act catalytically with apparent Km = 0.26 μm ferredoxin or 0.42 μm flavodoxin. Membrane preparations of A. fermentans contain a highly active ferredoxin/flavodoxin-NAD(+) reductase (Rnf) that catalyzes the irreversible reduction of flavodoxin by NADH to the blue semiquinone. Using flavodoxin hydroquinone or reduced ferredoxin obtained by electron bifurcation, Rnf can be measured in the forward direction, whereby one NADH is recycled, resulting in the simple equation: crotonyl-CoA + NADH + H(+) = butyryl-CoA + NAD(+) with Km = 1.4 μm ferredoxin or 2.0 μm flavodoxin. This reaction requires Na(+) (Km = 0.12 mm) or Li(+) (Km = 0.25 mm) for activity, indicating that Rnf acts as a Na(+) pump. The redox potential of the quinone/semiquinone couple of flavodoxin (Fld) is much higher than that of the semiquinone/hydroquinone couple. With free riboflavin, the opposite is the case. Based on this behavior, we refine our previous mechanism of electron bifurcation.

  5. Induction of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase by vitamins A, E and C in Colo205 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Higuchi, C M

    1995-11-27

    High consumption of fruits and vegetables which are abundant in dietary antioxidants has been linked to a reduced incidence of colorectal cancer. A potential mechanism of dietary anticarcinogenesis involves the induction of detoxifying phase II enzymes, including NAD(P)H:quinone reductase (QR) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). This study therefore examined the ability of the dietary antioxidant vitamins beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid to induce cellular expression of QR and GST activities in human colon cancer cells. Colo205 cells were cultured in the presence or absence of various concentrations (10(-10) to 10(-5) M) of each antioxidative micronutrient, then assessed for cytosolic QR and GST activities and cell growth. beta-Carotene, alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid each resulted in dose-dependent increases in QR activity, without adverse effects upon cell proliferation. To investigate whether the ability of beta-carotene to induce QR may be attributable to its conversion to vitamin A and/or to its antioxidant capacity as a carotenoid, retinol, retinoic acid, and lycopene were similarly tested for their capacity for enzyme induction. Although retinol and retinoic acid were both noted to be antiproliferative at higher concentrations (10(-6) to 10(-5) M), both retinoids stimulated QR at physiological concentrations. Lycopene, a carotenoid which is not converted to vitamin A, was devoid of biologic activity. By contrast with the effects upon QR, GST activity was unaffected by treatment with any of the micronutrients tested in this in vitro model. The results support a hypothesis that a high dietary consumption of vitamins A, E and C may confer partial protection against colorectal cancer by the induction of specific detoxifying enzymes. The antioxidant capacity of beta-carotene appears to have less biologic impact vis-a-vis QR induction than its function as a non-toxic reservoir of vitamin A. Measurements of QR activity within the colorectal

  6. Cloning and nucleotide sequences of the genes for the subunits of NAD-reducing hydrogenase of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16.

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Betcke, A; Warnecke, U; Böcker, C; Zaborosch, C; Friedrich, B

    1990-01-01

    The genes hoxF, -U, -Y, and -H which encode the four subunit polypeptides alpha, gamma, delta, and beta of the NAD-reducing hydrogenase (HoxS) of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16, were cloned, expressed in Pseudomonas facilis, and sequenced. On the basis of the nucleotide sequence, the predicted amino acid sequences, and the N-terminal amino acid sequences, it was concluded that the structural genes are tightly linked and presumably organized as an operon, denoted hoxS. Two pairs of -24 and -12 consensus sequences resembling RpoN-activatable promoters lie upstream of hoxF, the first of the four genes. Primer extension experiments indicate that the second promoter is responsible for hoxS transcription. hoxF and hoxU code for the flavin-containing dimer (alpha and gamma subunits) of HoxS which exhibits NADH:oxidoreductase activity. A putative flavin-binding region is discussed. The 26.0-kilodalton (kDa) gamma subunit contains two cysteine clusters which may participate in the coordination of two [4F3-4S]centers. The genes hoxY and hoxH code for the small 22.9-kDa delta subunit and the nickel-containing 54.8-kDa beta subunit, respectively, of the hydrogenase dimer of HoxS. The latter dimer exhibits several conserved regions found in all nickel-containing hydrogenases. The roles of these regions in coordinating iron and nickel are discussed. Although the deduced amino acid sequences of the delta and beta subunits share some conserved regions with the corresponding polypeptides of other [NiFe] hydrogenases, the overall amino acid homology is marginal. Nevertheless, significant sequence homology (35%) to the corresponding polypeptides of the soluble methylviologen-reducing hydrogenase of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum was found. Unlike the small subunits of the membrane-bound and soluble periplasmic hydrogenases, the HoxS protein does not appear to be synthesized with an N-terminal leader peptide. Images PMID:2188945

  7. AMPK activation protects cells from oxidative stress-induced senescence via autophagic flux restoration and intracellular NAD(+) elevation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaojuan; Tai, Haoran; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jiao; Wei, Xiawei; Ding, Yi; Gong, Hui; Mo, Chunfen; Zhang, Jie; Qin, Jianqiong; Ma, Yuanji; Huang, Ning; Xiang, Rong; Xiao, Hengyi

    2016-06-01

    AMPK activation is beneficial for cellular homeostasis and senescence prevention. However, the molecular events involved in AMPK activation are not well defined. In this study, we addressed the mechanism underlying the protective effect of AMPK on oxidative stress-induced senescence. The results showed that AMPK was inactivated in senescent cells. However, pharmacological activation of AMPK by metformin and berberine significantly prevented the development of senescence and, accordingly, inhibition of AMPK by Compound C was accelerated. Importantly, AMPK activation prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced impairment of the autophagic flux in senescent cells, evidenced by the decreased p62 degradation, GFP-RFP-LC3 cancellation, and activity of lysosomal hydrolases. We also found that AMPK activation restored the NAD(+) levels in the senescent cells via a mechanism involving mostly the salvage pathway for NAD(+) synthesis. In addition, the mechanistic relationship of autophagic flux and NAD(+) synthesis and the involvement of mTOR and Sirt1 activities were assessed. In summary, our results suggest that AMPK prevents oxidative stress-induced senescence by improving autophagic flux and NAD(+) homeostasis. This study provides a new insight for exploring the mechanisms of aging, autophagy and NAD(+) homeostasis, and it is also valuable in the development of innovative strategies to combat aging.

  8. The structural requirements of organophosphorus insecticides (OPI) for reducing chicken embryo NAD(+) content in OPI-induced teratogenesis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the structural requirements of organophosphorus insecticides (OPI) for reducing chicken embryo nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) content in OPI-induced teratogenesis and compare them with those needed for OPI inhibition of yolk sac membrane kynurenine formamidase (KFase), the proposed primary target for OPI teratogens in chicken embryos. The comparative molecular field analysis (COMFA) of three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) revealed the electrostatic and steric fields as good predictors of OPI structural requirements to reduce NAD(+) content in chicken embryos. The dominant electrostatic interactions were localized at nitrogen-1, nitrogen-3, nitrogen of 2-amino substituent of the pyrimidinyl of pyrimidinyl phosphorothioates, and at the oxygen of crotonamide carbonyl in crotonamide phosphates. Bulkiness of the substituents at carbon-6 of the pyrimidinyls and/or N-substituents of crotonamides was the steric structural component that contributed to superiority of those OPI for reducing embryonic NAD(+) levels. Both electrostatic and steric requirements are similar to those defined in our previous study for OPI inhibition of chicken embryo yolk sac membrane KFase. The findings of this study provide another piece of evidence for the cause-and-effect relationship between yolk sac membrane KFase inhibition and reduced embryo NAD(+) content in NAD-associated OPI-induced teratogenesis in chickens.

  9. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; ...

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  10. Acute Ethanol Intake Induces NAD(P)H Oxidase Activation and Rhoa Translocation in Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Simplicio, Janaina A.; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; do Vale, Gabriel Tavares; Callera, Glaucia Elena; Pereira, Camila André; Touyz, Rhian M; Tostes, Rita de Cássia; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanism underlying the vascular dysfunction induced by ethanol is not totally understood. Identification of biochemical/molecular mechanisms that could explain such effects is warranted. Objective To investigate whether acute ethanol intake activates the vascular RhoA/Rho kinase pathway in resistance arteries and the role of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) on such response. We also evaluated the requirement of p47phox translocation for ethanol-induced NAD(P)H oxidase activation. Methods Male Wistar rats were orally treated with ethanol (1g/kg, p.o. gavage) or water (control). Some rats were treated with vitamin C (250 mg/kg, p.o. gavage, 5 days) before administration of water or ethanol. The mesenteric arterial bed (MAB) was collected 30 min after ethanol administration. Results Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in superoxide anion (O2-) generation and lipoperoxidation in the MAB. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities and the reduced glutathione, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were not affected by ethanol. Vitamin C and 4-methylpyrazole prevented the increase on O2- generation induced by ethanol in cultured MAB vascular smooth muscle cells. Ethanol had no effect on phosphorylation levels of protein kinase B (Akt) and eNOS (Ser1177 or Thr495 residues) or MAB vascular reactivity. Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in the membrane: cytosol fraction ratio of p47phox and RhoA expression in the rat MAB. Conclusion Acute ethanol intake induces activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway by a mechanism that involves ROS generation. In resistance arteries, ethanol activates NAD(P)H oxidase by inducing p47phox translocation by a redox-sensitive mechanism. PMID:27812679

  11. The NAD(+) salvage pathway modulates cancer cell viability via p73.

    PubMed

    Sharif, T; Ahn, D-G; Liu, R-Z; Pringle, E; Martell, E; Dai, C; Nunokawa, A; Kwak, M; Clements, D; Murphy, J P; Dean, C; Marcato, P; McCormick, C; Godbout, R; Gujar, S A; Lee, P W K

    2016-04-01

    The involvement of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) salvage pathway in cancer cell survival is poorly understood. Here we show that the NAD(+) salvage pathway modulates cancer cell survival through the rarely mutated tumour suppressor p73. Our data show that pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a rate-limiting enzyme in the NAD(+) salvage pathway, enhances autophagy and decreases survival of cancer cells in a p53-independent manner. Such NAMPT inhibition stabilizes p73 independently of p53 through increased acetylation and decreased ubiquitination, resulting in enhanced autophagy and cell death. These effects of NAMPT inhibition can be effectively reversed using nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzymatic product of NAMPT. Similarly, knockdown of p73 also decreases NAMPT inhibition-induced autophagy and cell death, whereas overexpression of p73 alone enhances these effects. We show that the breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468) harbour significantly higher levels of NAMPT and lower levels of p73 than does the normal cell line (MCF-10A), and that NAMPT inhibition is cytotoxic exclusively to the cancer cells. Furthermore, data from 176 breast cancer patients demonstrate that higher levels of NAMPT and lower levels of p73 correlate with poorer patient survival, and that high-grade tumours have significantly higher NAMPT/p73 mRNA ratios. Therefore, the inverse relationship between NAMPT and p73 demonstrable in vitro is also reflected from the clinical data. Taken together, our studies reveal a new NAMPT-p73 nexus that likely has important implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  12. Ferredoxin:NAD + Oxidoreductase of Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and Its Role in Ethanol Formation

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Liang; Lo, Jonathan; Shao, Xiongjun; ...

    2016-09-30

    Ferredoxin:NAD+oxidoreductase (NADH-FNOR) catalyzes the transfer of electrons from reduced ferredoxin to NAD+. This enzyme has been hypothesized to be the main enzyme responsible for ferredoxin oxidization in the NADH-based ethanol pathway inThermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum; however, the corresponding gene has not yet been identified. Here, we identified the Tsac_1705 protein as a candidate FNOR based on the homology of its functional domains. We then confirmed its activityin vitrowith a ferredoxin-based FNOR assay. To determine its role in metabolism, thetsac_1705gene was deleted in different strains ofT. saccharolyticum. In wild-typeT. saccharolyticum, deletion oftsac_1705resulted in a 75% loss of NADH-FNOR activity, which indicated thatmore » Tsac_1705 is the main NADH-FNOR inT.saccharolyticum. When both NADH- and NADPH-linked FNOR genes were deleted, the ethanol titer decreased and the ratio of ethanol to acetate approached unity, indicative of the absence of FNOR activity. Finally, we tested the effect of heterologous expression of Tsac_1705 inClostridium thermocellumand found improvements in both the titer and the yield of ethanol. IMPORTANCERedox balance plays a crucial role in many metabolic engineering strategies. Ferredoxins are widely used as electron carriers for anaerobic microorganism and plants. This study identified the gene responsible for electron transfer from ferredoxin to NAD+, a key reaction in the ethanol production pathway of this organism and many other metabolic pathways. Identification of this gene is an important step in transferring the ethanol production ability of this organism to other organisms.« less

  13. A variety of electrostatic interactions and adducts can activate NAD(P) cofactors for hydride transfer.

    PubMed

    Meijers, Rob; Cedergren-Zeppezauer, Eila

    2009-03-16

    In NAD(P)-dependent enzymes the coenzyme gives or takes a hydride ion, but how the nicotinamide ring is activated to form the transition state for hydride transfer is not clear. On the basis of ultra-high resolution X-ray crystal structures of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) in complex with NADH and a number of substrate analogues we proposed that the activation of NADH is an integral part of the enzyme mechanism of aldehyde reduction [R. Meijers, R.J. Morris, H.W. Adolph, A. Merli, V.S. Lamzin, E.S. Cedergren-Zeppezauer, On the enzymatic activation of NADH, The Journal of Biological Chemistry 276(12) (2001) 9316-9321, %U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11134046; R. Meijers, H.-W. Adolph, Z. Dauter, K.S. Wilson, V.S. Lamzin, E.S. Cedergren-Zeppezauer, Structural evidence for a ligand coordination switch in liver alcohol dehydrogenase, Biochemistry 46(18) (2007) 5446-5454, %U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17429946]. We observed a nicotinamide with a severely distorted pyridine ring and a water molecule in close proximity to the ring. Quantum chemical calculations indicated that (de)protonation of the water molecule c