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Sample records for acid dihydrate nad

  1. Infrared spectrum of nitric acid dihydrate: Influence of particle shape.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Stetzer, Olaf; Schurath, Ulrich

    2005-03-24

    In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectra of airborne alpha-NAD microparticles generated by two different methods were recorded in the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The extinction spectrum of alpha-NAD crystals obtained by shock freezing of a HNO3/H2O gas mixture could be accurately reproduced using Mie theory with published refractive indices of alpha-NAD as input. In contrast, Mie theory proved to be inadequate to properly reproduce the infrared extinction spectrum of alpha-NAD crystals which were formed via homogeneous nucleation of supercooled HNO3/H2O solution droplets, evaporating slowly on a time scale of several hours at about 195 K. Much better agreement between measured and calculated extinction spectra was obtained by T-matrix calculations assuming oblate particles with aspect ratios greater than five. This indicates that strongly aspherical alpha-NAD crystals are obtained when supercooled nitric acid solution droplets freeze and grow slowly, a process which has been discussed as a potential pathway to the formation of crystalline polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. PMID:16833561

  2. NAD

    PubMed Central

    Pétriacq, Pierre; de Bont, Linda; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Gakière, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Many metabolic processes that occur in living cells involve oxido-reduction (redox) chemistry underpinned by redox compounds such as glutathione, ascorbate and/or pyridine nucleotides. Among these redox carriers, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is the cornerstone of cellular oxidations along catabolism and is therefore essential for plant growth and development. In addition to its redox role, there is now compelling evidence that NAD is a signal molecule controlling crucial functions like primary and secondary carbon metabolism. Recent studies using integrative -omics approaches combined with molecular pathology have shown that manipulating NAD biosynthesis and recycling lead to an alteration of metabolites pools and developmental processes, and changes in the resistance to various pathogens. NAD levels should now be viewed as a potential target to improve tolerance to biotic stress and crop improvement. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the key role of NAD (and its metabolism) in plant responses to pathogen infections. PMID:23104110

  3. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-04-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario that coating layers

  4. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-08-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario that coating layers

  5. A Neat Trick Using Oxalic Acid Dihydrate and Potassium Permanganate and Other Experiments with Small Organic Amine or Oxygenated Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelland, Malcolm A.

    2011-01-01

    Solid potassium permanganate (KMnO[subscript 4]) is shown to react in a variety of ways with small organic amines or oxygenated compounds depending on whether they are liquids or solids and whether water is present. In particular, its reaction with solid oxalic acid dihydrate can be initiated by the moisture in one's breath, making an intriguing…

  6. Evidence of Polaron Excitations in Low Temperature Raman Spectra of Oxalic Acid Dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Mohaček-Grošev, Vlasta; Grdadolnik, Jože; Hadži, Dušan

    2016-05-12

    Low temperature Raman spectra of oxalic acid dihydrate (8-300 K) for both the polycrystalline and single crystal phase show strong variation with temperature in the interval from 1200 to 2000 cm(-1). Previous low temperature diffraction studies all confirmed the stability of the crystal P21/n phase with no indications of any phase transition, reporting the existence of a strong hydrogen bond between the oxalic acid and a water molecule. A new group of Raman bands in the 1200-1300 cm(-1) interval below 90 K is observed, caused by possible loss of the center of inversion. This in turn could originate either due to disorder in hydroxyl proton positions or due to proton transfer from carboxylic group to water molecule. The hypothesis of proton transfer is further supported by the emergence of new bands centered at 1600 and 1813 cm(-1), which can be explained with vibrations of H3O(+) ions. The broad band at 1600 cm(-1) looses intensity, while the band at 1813 cm(-1) gains intensity on cooling. The agreement between quantum calculations of vibrational spectra and experimentally observed Raman bands of hydronium ions in oxalic acid sesquihydrate crystal corroborates this hypothesis. PMID:27093217

  7. Proton transfer aiding phase transitions in oxalic acid dihydrate under pressure.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Himal; Mishra, A K; Murli, Chitra; Verma, Ashok K; Garg, Nandini; Deo, M N; Sharma, Surinder M

    2016-03-21

    Oxalic acid dihydrate, an important molecular solid in crystal chemistry, ecology and physiology, has been studied for nearly 100 years now. The most debated issues regarding its proton dynamics have arisen due to an unusually short hydrogen bond between the acid and water molecules. Using combined in situ spectroscopic studies and first-principles simulations at high pressures, we show that the structural modification associated with this hydrogen bond is much more significant than ever assumed. Initially, under pressure, proton migration takes place along this strong hydrogen bond at a very low pressure of 2 GPa. This results in the protonation of water with systematic formation of dianionic oxalate and hydronium ion motifs, thus reversing the hydrogen bond hierarchy in the high pressure phase II. The resulting hydrogen bond between a hydronium ion and a carboxylic group shows remarkable strengthening under pressure, even in the pure ionic phase III. The loss of cooperativity of hydrogen bonds leads to another phase transition at ∼ 9 GPa through reorientation of other hydrogen bonds. The high pressure phase IV is stabilized by a strong hydrogen bond between the dominant CO2 and H2O groups of oxalate and hydronium ions, respectively. These findings suggest that oxalate systems may provide useful insights into proton transfer reactions and assembly of simple molecules under extreme conditions. PMID:26924455

  8. Cooperativity Assisted Shortening of Hydrogen Bonds in Crystalline Oxalic Acid Dihydrate: DFT and NBO Model Studies.

    PubMed

    Stare, Jernej; Hadži, Dušan

    2014-04-01

    The distance of ∼2.49 Å separating the carboxylic OH oxygen from the water oxygen atom in the α-polymorph of crystalline oxalic acid dihydrate is by ∼0.1 Å shorter than the average distance in carboxylic acid monohydrates. It is also by ∼0.2 Å shorter than the corresponding distance presently calculated for the heterotrimer consisting of one acid and two water molecules. The large difference between RO···O in the heterotrimer and in the crystal is attributed to the cooperative effect in the latter; this is supported by calculations carried out on clusters constituted of an increasing number of acid and water molecules. The present DFT calculations with geometry optimization include seven isolated model clusters, the largest of which contains five acid and eight water molecules. The RO···O of the short hydrogen bond shortens progressively with increasing the number of cluster constituents; in the largest cluster, it reaches 2.50 Å. This is remarkably close to both the experimental distance as well as to the distance obtained by the periodic DFT calculation. The electronic effects were studied by Natural Bond Orbital analysis, revealing an enhancement of hydrogen bonding on extending the network by increased polarization of the carbonyl group and by the increased delocalization interaction between the lone electron pair on the acceptor oxygen atom and the OH antibond orbital. The formation of circular motifs appears to be the most important factor in the cooperative shortening of the hydrogen bonds. In agreement with the measured hydrogen bond distances, inspection of the electron density reveals a notable difference in hydrogen bond shrinking tendency between the two known polymorphs of the title system. PMID:26580388

  9. Synthesis and bioactivities of silver nanoparticles capped with 5-Amino-?-resorcylic acid hydrochloride dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Conjugated and drug loaded silver nanoparticles are getting an increased attention for various biomedical applications. Nanoconjugates showed significant enhancement in biological activity in comparison to free drug molecules. In this perspective, we report the synthesis of bioactive silver capped with 5-Amino-?-resorcylic acid hydrochloride dihydrate (AR). The in vitro antimicrobial (antibacterial, antifungal), enzyme inhibition (xanthine oxidase, urease, carbonic anhydrase, ?-chymotrypsin, cholinesterase) and antioxidant activities of the developed nanostructures was investigated before and after conjugation to silver metal. Results The conjugation of AR to silver was confirmed through FTIR, UV¿vis and TEM techniques. The amount of AR conjugated with silver was characterized through UV¿vis spectroscopy and found to be 9% by weight. The stability of synthesized nanoconjugates against temperature, high salt concentration and pH was found to be good. Nanoconjugates, showed significant synergic enzyme inhibition effect against xanthine and urease enzymes in comparison to standard drugs, pure ligand and silver. Conclusions Our synthesized nanoconjugate was found be to efficient selective xanthine and urease inhibitors in comparison to Ag and AR. On a per weight basis, our nanoconjugates required less amount of AR (about 11 times) for inhibition of these enzymes. PMID:25201390

  10. 2-Hydroxy-4-methylbenzenesulfonic acid dihydrate: Crystal structure, vibrational spectra, proton conductivity, and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisareva, A. V.; Shilov, G. V.; Karelin, A. I.; Dobrovolsky, Yu. A.; Pisarev, R. V.

    2010-03-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of 2-hydroxy4-methylbenzenesulfonic acid dihydrate C6H3(CH3)(OHSO- 3 H5O2 + (I) was studied by X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy. The compound crystallized in the monoclinic crystal system; crystal data: a=10.853(2) Å, b=7.937(2) Å, c=12.732(3) Å, β=112.13(3)°, V=1015.9(4)Å3,Z=4,dcalc=1.466g/cm3,spacegroupP21/c,Rf=0.0486,GOOF=1.161.The S-O distances in the sulfonate group differed substantially (S1-O2 1.439(2) Å, S1-O3 1.455(2) Å, and S1-O4 1.464(2) Å. The symmetry of the H5O2 cation decreased due to proton displacement toward one of the two water molecules. XRD data on the asymmetry of H5O2 were confirmed by IR and Raman spectral data. The strong triplet at 2900, 3166, 3377 cm-1 in the IR spectrum of I corresponds to different types of H-bond and shifted to 2185, 2363, 2553 cm-1 after deuteration. The proton conductivity of the compound was measured by impedance spectroscopy: 6 × 10-7 S/cm at 298 K (32 rel %), E act=0.4±0.01 eV. The conductivity increased to 10-3 S/cm, Eact=0.1 eV when ambient humidity increased to 60 rel %.

  11. Reaction of ClONO{sub 2} with HCl on NAT, NAD, and frozen sulfuric acid and hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} and ClONO{sub 2} on frozen sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.R.; Ravishankara, A.R. |

    1993-12-20

    The reaction of ClONO{sub 2} with HCl on the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and dihydrate (NAD) and on frozen sulfuric acid solutions was studied as functions of reactant concentration and temperature representative of the stratosphere. A flow tube reactor equipped with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer detector was used. The measured reactive uptake coefficient shows a strong dependence on temperature at constant H{sub 2}O partial pressure. These results for NAT are qualitatively similar to but quantitatively different from those of Abbatt and Molina. The hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} and ClONO{sub 2} on frozen sulfuric acid were measured to be far less efficient than that in liquid solutions. The implications of these results to the heterogeneous chemistry of the stratosphere are discussed. 19 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside: a molecular evaluation of NAD+ precursor vitamins in human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Katrina L; Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Although baseline requirements for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) synthesis can be met either with dietary tryptophan or with less than 20 mg of daily niacin, which consists of nicotinic acid and/or nicotinamide, there is growing evidence that substantially greater rates of NAD+ synthesis may be beneficial to protect against neurological degeneration, Candida glabrata infection, and possibly to enhance reverse cholesterol transport. The distinct and tissue-specific biosynthetic and/or ligand activities of tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and the newly identified NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide riboside, reviewed herein, are responsible for vitamin-specific effects and side effects. Because current data suggest that nicotinamide riboside may be the only vitamin precursor that supports neuronal NAD+ synthesis, we present prospects for human nicotinamide riboside supplementation and propose areas for future research. PMID:18429699

  13. Generation, Release, and Uptake of the NAD Precursor Nicotinic Acid Riboside by Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Veronika; Shabalin, Konstantin; Nerinovski, Kirill; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Yakimov, Alexander; Redpath, Philip; Khodorkovskiy, Mikhail; Migaud, Marie E; Ziegler, Mathias; Nikiforov, Andrey

    2015-11-01

    NAD is essential for cellular metabolism and has a key role in various signaling pathways in human cells. To ensure proper control of vital reactions, NAD must be permanently resynthesized. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as well as nicotinamide riboside (NR) and nicotinic acid riboside (NAR) are the major precursors for NAD biosynthesis in humans. In this study, we explored whether the ribosides NR and NAR can be generated in human cells. We demonstrate that purified, recombinant human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) CN-II and CN-III, but not CN-IA, can dephosphorylate the mononucleotides nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and thus catalyze NR and NAR formation in vitro. Similar to their counterpart from yeast, Sdt1, the human 5'-NTs require high (millimolar) concentrations of nicotinamide mononucleotide or NAMN for efficient catalysis. Overexpression of FLAG-tagged CN-II and CN-III in HEK293 and HepG2 cells resulted in the formation and release of NAR. However, NAR accumulation in the culture medium of these cells was only detectable under conditions that led to increased NAMN production from nicotinic acid. The amount of NAR released from cells engineered for increased NAMN production was sufficient to maintain viability of surrounding cells unable to use any other NAD precursor. Moreover, we found that untransfected HeLa cells produce and release sufficient amounts of NAR and NR under normal culture conditions. Collectively, our results indicate that cytosolic 5'-NTs participate in the conversion of NAD precursors and establish NR and NAR as integral constituents of human NAD metabolism. In addition, they point to the possibility that different cell types might facilitate each other's NAD supply by providing alternative precursors. PMID:26385918

  14. The action of o-dihydric phenols in the hydroxylation of p-coumaric acid by a phenolase from leaves of spinach beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Vaughan, P F; Butt, V S

    1970-08-01

    1. Under defined conditions, the hydroxylation of p-coumaric acid catalysed by a phenolase from leaves of spinach beet (Beta vulgaris L.) was observed to develop its maximum rate only after a lag period. 2. By decreasing the reaction rate with lower enzyme concentrations or by increasing it with higher concentrations of reductants, the length of the lag period was inversely related to the maximum rate subsequently developed. 3. Low concentrations of caffeic acid or other o-dihydric phenols abolished this lag period. With caffeic acid, the rate of hydroxylation was independent of the reductant employed. 4. Hydroxylation was inhibited by diethyldithiocarbamate, but with low inhibitor concentrations hydroxylation recovered after a lag period. This lag could again be abolished by the addition of high concentrations of caffeic acid or other o-dihydric phenols. 5. Catechol oxidase activity showed no lag period, and did not recover from diethyldithiocarbamate inhibition. 6. The purified enzyme contained 0.17-0.33% copper; preparations with the highest specific activity were found to have the highest copper content. 7. The results are interpreted to suggest that the oxidation of o-dihydric phenols converts the enzymic copper into a species catalytically active in hydroxylation. This may represent the primary function for the catechol oxidase activity of the phenolase complex. The electron donors are concerned mainly, but not entirely, in the reduction of o-quinones produced in this reaction. PMID:4991965

  15. NAD(+)-independent aldehyde oxidase catalyzes cofactor balanced 3-hydroxypropionic acid production in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Liu, Luo; Tian, Pingfang

    2014-11-01

    The limiting step for biosynthesis of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) in Klebsiella pneumoniae is the conversion of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) to 3-HP. This reaction is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Although NAD(+)-dependent ALDH overexpression facilitates 3-HP biosynthesis, ALDH activity decreases and 3-HP stops accumulation when NAD(+) is exhausted. Here, we show that an NAD(+)-independent aldehyde oxidase (AOX) from Pseudomonas sp. AIU 362 holds promise for cofactor-balanced 3-HP production in K. pneumoniae. The AOX coding gene, alod, was heterologously expressed in E. coli and K. pneumoniae, and their respective crude cell extracts showed 38.1 U/mg and 16.6 U/mg activities toward propionaldehyde. The recombinant K. pneumoniae expressing alod showed 13.7 U/mg activity toward 3-HPA; K m and V max were 6.7 mM and 42 μM/min/mg, respectively. In shake-flask cultures, the recombinant K. pneumoniae strain produced 0.89 g 3-HP/l, twice that of the control. Moreover, it produced 3 g 3-HP/l during 24 h fed-batch cultivation in a 5 l bioreactor. The results indicate that AOX can efficiently convert 3-HPA into 3-HP. PMID:24980850

  16. OXPHOS-Mediated Induction of NAD+ Promotes Complete Oxidation of Fatty Acids and Interdicts Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Akie, Thomas E; Liu, Lijun; Nam, Minwoo; Lei, Shi; Cooper, Marcus P

    2015-01-01

    OXPHOS is believed to play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), however, precise mechanisms whereby OXPHOS influences lipid homeostasis are incompletely understood. We previously reported that ectopic expression of LRPPRC, a protein that increases cristae density and OXPHOS, promoted fatty acid oxidation in cultured primary hepatocytes. To determine the biological significance of that observation and define underlying mechanisms, we have ectopically expressed LRPPRC in mouse liver in the setting of NAFLD. Interestingly, ectopic expression of LRPPRC in mouse liver completely interdicted NAFLD, including inflammation. Consistent with mitigation of NAFLD, two markers of hepatic insulin resistance--ROS and PKCε activity--were both modestly reduced. As reported by others, improvement of NAFLD was associated with improved whole-body insulin sensitivity. Regarding hepatic lipid homeostasis, the ratio of NAD+ to NADH was dramatically increased in mouse liver replete with LRPPRC. Pharmacological activators and inhibitors of the cellular respiration respectively increased and decreased the [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio, indicating respiration-mediated control of the [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio. Supporting a prominent role for NAD+, increasing the concentration of NAD+ stimulated complete oxidation of fatty acids. Importantly, NAD+ rescued impaired fatty acid oxidation in hepatocytes deficient for either OXPHOS or SIRT3. These data are consistent with a model whereby augmented hepatic OXPHOS increases NAD+, which in turn promotes complete oxidation of fatty acids and protects against NAFLD. PMID:25933096

  17. OXPHOS-Mediated Induction of NAD+ Promotes Complete Oxidation of Fatty Acids and Interdicts Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Minwoo; Lei, Shi; Cooper, Marcus P.

    2015-01-01

    OXPHOS is believed to play an important role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), however, precise mechanisms whereby OXPHOS influences lipid homeostasis are incompletely understood. We previously reported that ectopic expression of LRPPRC, a protein that increases cristae density and OXPHOS, promoted fatty acid oxidation in cultured primary hepatocytes. To determine the biological significance of that observation and define underlying mechanisms, we have ectopically expressed LRPPRC in mouse liver in the setting of NAFLD. Interestingly, ectopic expression of LRPPRC in mouse liver completely interdicted NAFLD, including inflammation. Consistent with mitigation of NAFLD, two markers of hepatic insulin resistance—ROS and PKCε activity—were both modestly reduced. As reported by others, improvement of NAFLD was associated with improved whole-body insulin sensitivity. Regarding hepatic lipid homeostasis, the ratio of NAD+ to NADH was dramatically increased in mouse liver replete with LRPPRC. Pharmacological activators and inhibitors of the cellular respiration respectively increased and decreased the [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio, indicating respiration-mediated control of the [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio. Supporting a prominent role for NAD+, increasing the concentration of NAD+ stimulated complete oxidation of fatty acids. Importantly, NAD+ rescued impaired fatty acid oxidation in hepatocytes deficient for either OXPHOS or SIRT3. These data are consistent with a model whereby augmented hepatic OXPHOS increases NAD+, which in turn promotes complete oxidation of fatty acids and protects against NAFLD. PMID:25933096

  18. The nitrate dihydrate of an aquadicopper(II) complex cation with guanidinoacetic acid and a novel trianionic disubstituted guanidine as ligands at 120 K.

    PubMed

    Felcman, Judith; Howie, R Alan; Lopes de Miranda, Jussara; Skakle, Janet M S; Wardell, James L

    2003-03-01

    The structure of the title compound, aqua[mu-(N(1)-carboxylatomethylguanidino)oxidoacetato](mu-guanidinoacetic acid)dicopper(II) nitrate dihydrate, [Cu(2)(C(5)H(6)N(3)O(5))(C(3)H(7)N(3)O(2))(H(2)O)]NO(3) x 2H(2)O, contains two enantiomers of the dicopper(II) complex cation that comprise water, neutral zwitterionic guanidinoacetic acid and the trianion of (N(1)-carboxymethylguanidino)hydroxyacetic acid as ligands. Extensive hydrogen bonding creates three-dimensional connectivity but is largely confined to layers that each contain both cation enantiomers. These layers are related to one another by crystallographic symmetry and are therefore identical in composition and connectivity. PMID:12711772

  19. Studies on the syntheses, structural characterization, antimicrobial-, and DPPH radical scavenging activity of the cocrystals caffeine:cinnamic acid and caffeine:eosin dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Kumar, G. S.; Seethalakshmi, P. G.; Bhuvanesh, N.; Kumaresan, S.

    2013-10-01

    Two organic cocrystals namely, caffeine:cinnamic acid [(caf)(ca)] (1) and caffeine:eosin dihydrate [(caf)(eos)]·2H2O (2) were synthesized and studied by FT-IR, TGA/DTA, and single crystal XRD. The crystal system of cocrystal 1 is triclinic with space group P-1 and Z = 2 and that of cocrystal 2 is monoclinic with space group P21/C and Z = 4. An imidazole-carboxylic acid synthon is observed in the cocrystal 1. The intermolecular hydrogen bond, O-H⋯N and π-π interactions play a major role in stabilizing 1 whereas the intermolecular hydrogen bonds, O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N, and intramolecular hydrogen bond, O-H⋯Br; along with π-π interactions together play a vital role in stabilizing the structure of 2. The antimicrobial- and DPPH radical scavenging activities of both the cocrystals were studied.

  20. Speciation in experimental C-O-H fluids produced by the thermal dissociation of oxalic acid dihydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, G.B.; Chou, I.-Ming; Pasteris, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Fluid speciations and their related reaction pathways were studied in C-O-H-system fluids produced by the thermal dissociation of oxalic acid dihydrate (OAD: H2C2O4 ?? 2H2O) sealed in silica glass capsules. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 230-750??C, with bulk fluid densities in the range 0.01-0.53 g/cm3. Pressure was controlled by temperature and density in the isochoric systems. The quenched products of dissociation experiments were an aqueous liquid and one (supercritical fluid) or, rarely, two (vapor plus liquid) carbonic phase (s). In-situ Raman microanalyses were performed on the quenched carbonic phases at room temperature, at which fluid pressures ranged from about 50 to 340 bars. Bulk fluid speciations were reconstructed from the Raman analyses via mass balance constraints, and appear to monitor the true fluid speciations at run conditions. In experiments from the lowtemperature range (230-350??C), fluid speciations record the dissociation of OAD according to the reaction OAD = CO2 + CO + 3H2O. A process of the form CO + H2O = CO2 + H2 is driven to the right with increasing temperature. The hydrogen gas produced tends to escape from the sample systems via diffusion into/through the silica glass capsules, shifting bulk compositions toward equimolar binary H2O-CO2 mixtures. The speciations of fluids in experiments with minimal hydrogen loss show poor agreement with speciations calculated for equilibrium fluids by the corresponding-states model of Saxena and Fei (1988). Such disagreement suggests that the formations of CH4 and graphite are metastably inhibited in the current experiments, which correlates with their absence or trivial abundances in experimental products. Moreover, calculations in which the stabilities of methane and graphite are suppressed suggest that such metastable equilibrium is approached only in experiments at temperatures greater than about 600-650??C. These results have applications to fluid processes in geological

  1. NAD[S], an NAD analogue with reduced susceptibility to phosphodiesterase. Chemical synthesis and enzymic properties.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T; Wielckens, K; Thiem, J; Hilz, H

    1984-05-01

    The chemical synthesis of adenosine(5') [alpha-thio]diphospho(5')ribofuranosyl-nicotinamide (NAD[S]) is described. The product occurs as a pair of diastereomers with different configuration at the sulfur-bearing phosphorus atom. The diastereomers were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and their absolute configuration was determined after chemical degradation to the ADP[alpha S] diastereomers and chromatographic comparison with enzymically synthesized ADP[alpha S] diastereomers of known absolute configuration. Additional support for this assignment is based on different rates in the phosphodiesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis. Furthermore the synthesis of [14C]NAD[S] is described. The coenzyme activity of NAD[S] in the reaction with alcohol dehydrogenase from baker's yeast and lactate dehydrogenase from pig heart is very similar to that of beta-NAD. Also, NAD and NAD[S] serve equally well as substrates for NAD glycohydrolase from calf spleen. In contrast, no reaction was detected with NAD pyrophosphorylase, and hydrolysis of the separated NAD[S] diastereomers with snake venom phosphodiesterase showed a 26-fold and a 33-fold slower reaction rate than that of NAD. Nucleotide pyrophosphatase was less sensitive to the S substitution, hydrolyzing NAD[S] 14-times slower than NAD. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase from Ehrlich ascites tumor cell nuclei accepted NAD[S] as a substrate but the reaction was significantly slower and approached saturation at much lower values than with NAD. Alkaline hydrolysis of the products insoluble in trichloroacetic acid yielded AMP[S] as the main derivative. It is concluded that with NAD[S] as a substrate the nuclear acceptors were nearly exclusively mono(ADP-ribosyl) ated . PMID:6144544

  2. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous... molecules of water. It is prepared from granulated tin suspended in water and hydrochloric acid or...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous... molecules of water. It is prepared from granulated tin suspended in water and hydrochloric acid or...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-69-1... granulated tin suspended in water and hydrochloric acid or chlorine. (b) Both forms of the ingredient...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous... molecules of water. It is prepared from granulated tin suspended in water and hydrochloric acid or...

  6. Decarboxylation of Malate in the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Bryophyllum (Kalanchoe) fedtschenkoi (Role of NAD-Malic Enzyme).

    PubMed

    Cook, R. M.; Lindsay, J. G.; Wilkins, M. B.; Nimmo, H. G.

    1995-12-01

    The role of NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Bryophyllum (Kalanchoe) fedtschenkoi was investigated using preparations of intact and solubilized mitochondria from fully expanded leaves. Intact, coupled mitochondria isolated during the day or night did not differ in their ability to take up [14C]malic acid from the surrounding medium or to respire using malate or succinate as substrate. However, intact mitochondria isolated from plants during the day decarboxylated added malate to pyruvate significantly faster than mitochondria isolated from plants at night. NAD-ME activity in solubilized mitochondrial extracts showed hysteretic kinetics and was stimulated by a number of activators, including acetyl-coenzyme A, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, and sulfate ions. In the absence of these effectors, reaction progress curves were nonlinear, with a pronounced acceleration phase. The lag period before a steady-state rate was reached in assays of mitochondrial extracts decreased during the photoperiod and increased slowly during the period of darkness. However, these changes in the kinetic properties of the enzyme could not account for the changes in the rate of decarboxylation of malate by intact mitochondria. Gel-filtration experiments showed that mitochondrial extracts contained three forms of NAD-ME with different molecular weights. The relative proportions of the three forms varied somewhat throughout the light/dark cycle, but this did not account for the changes in the kinetics behavior of the enzyme during the diurnal cycle. PMID:12228671

  7. Decarboxylation of Malate in the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Bryophyllum (Kalanchoe) fedtschenkoi (Role of NAD-Malic Enzyme).

    PubMed Central

    Cook, R. M.; Lindsay, J. G.; Wilkins, M. B.; Nimmo, H. G.

    1995-01-01

    The role of NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Bryophyllum (Kalanchoe) fedtschenkoi was investigated using preparations of intact and solubilized mitochondria from fully expanded leaves. Intact, coupled mitochondria isolated during the day or night did not differ in their ability to take up [14C]malic acid from the surrounding medium or to respire using malate or succinate as substrate. However, intact mitochondria isolated from plants during the day decarboxylated added malate to pyruvate significantly faster than mitochondria isolated from plants at night. NAD-ME activity in solubilized mitochondrial extracts showed hysteretic kinetics and was stimulated by a number of activators, including acetyl-coenzyme A, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, and sulfate ions. In the absence of these effectors, reaction progress curves were nonlinear, with a pronounced acceleration phase. The lag period before a steady-state rate was reached in assays of mitochondrial extracts decreased during the photoperiod and increased slowly during the period of darkness. However, these changes in the kinetic properties of the enzyme could not account for the changes in the rate of decarboxylation of malate by intact mitochondria. Gel-filtration experiments showed that mitochondrial extracts contained three forms of NAD-ME with different molecular weights. The relative proportions of the three forms varied somewhat throughout the light/dark cycle, but this did not account for the changes in the kinetics behavior of the enzyme during the diurnal cycle. PMID:12228671

  8. Isonicotinic acid hydrazide conversion to Isonicotinyl-NAD by catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Ben; Carpena, Xavi; Feliz, Miguel; Donald, Lynda J; Pons, Miquel; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2010-08-20

    Activation of the pro-drug isoniazid (INH) as an anti-tubercular drug in Mycobacterium tuberculosis involves its conversion to isonicotinyl-NAD, a reaction that requires the catalase-peroxidase KatG. This report shows that the reaction proceeds in the absence of KatG at a slow rate in a mixture of INH, NAD(+), Mn(2+), and O(2), and that the inclusion of KatG increases the rate by >7 times. Superoxide, generated by either Mn(2+)- or KatG-catalyzed reduction of O(2), is an essential intermediate in the reaction. Elimination of the peroxidatic process by mutation slows the rate of reaction by 60% revealing that the peroxidatic process enhances, but is not essential for isonicotinyl-NAD formation. The isonicotinyl-NAD(*+) radical is identified as a reaction intermediate, and its reduction by superoxide is proposed. Binding sites for INH and its co-substrate, NAD(+), are identified for the first time in crystal complexes of Burkholderia pseudomallei catalase-peroxidase with INH and NAD(+) grown by co-crystallization. The best defined INH binding sites were identified, one in each subunit, on the opposite side of the protein from the entrance to the heme cavity in a funnel-shaped channel. The NAD(+) binding site is approximately 20 A from the entrance to the heme cavity and involves interactions primarily with the AMP portion of the molecule in agreement with the NMR saturation transfer difference results. PMID:20554537

  9. Fabrication of Poly-l-lactic Acid/Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate Composite Scaffolds with High Mechanical Strength—Implications for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tanataweethum, Nida; Liu, Wai Ching; Scott Goebel, W.; Li, Ding; Chu, Tien Min

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds were fabricated from poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)/dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) composite by indirect casting. Sodium citrate and PLLA were used to improve the mechanical properties of the DCPD scaffolds. The resulting PLLA/DCPD composite scaffold had increased diametral tensile strength and fracture energy when compared to DCPD only scaffolds (1.05 vs. 2.70 MPa and 2.53 vs. 12.67 N-mm, respectively). Sodium citrate alone accelerated the degradation rate by 1.5 times independent of PLLA. Cytocompatibility of all samples were evaluated using proliferation and differentiation parameters of dog-bone marrow stromal cells (dog-BMSCs). The results showed that viable dog-BMSCs attached well on both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD composite surfaces. In both DCPD and PLLA/DCPD conditioned medium, dog-BMSCs proliferated well and expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity indicating cell differentiation. These findings indicate that incorporating both sodium citrate and PLLA could effectively improve mechanical strength and biocompatibility without increasing the degradation time of calcium phosphate cement scaffolds for bone tissue engineering purposes. PMID:26556380

  10. Production of succinic acid through overexpression of NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme in an Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Stols, L; Donnelly, M I

    1997-01-01

    NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme was cloned from the Escherichia coli genome by PCR based on the published partial sequence of the gene. The enzyme was overexpressed and purified to near homogeneity in two chromatographic steps and was analyzed kinetically in the forward and reverse directions. The Km values determined in the presence of saturating cofactor and manganese ion were 0.26 mM for malate (physiological direction) and 16 mM for pyruvate (reverse direction). When malic enzyme was induced under appropriate culture conditions in a strain of E. coli that was unable to ferment glucose and accumulated pyruvate, fermentative metabolism of glucose was restored. Succinic acid was the major fermentation product formed. When this fermentation was performed in the presence of hydrogen, the yield of succinic acid increased. The constructed pathway represents an alternative metabolic route for the fermentative production of dicarboxylic acids from renewable feedstocks. PMID:9212416

  11. The Small Molecule GMX1778 Is a Potent Inhibitor of NAD+ Biosynthesis: Strategy for Enhanced Therapy in Nicotinic Acid Phosphoribosyltransferase 1-Deficient Tumors▿

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Mark; Roulston, Anne; Bélec, Laurent; Billot, Xavier; Marcellus, Richard; Bédard, Dominique; Bernier, Cynthia; Branchaud, Stéphane; Chan, Helen; Dairi, Kenza; Gilbert, Karine; Goulet, Daniel; Gratton, Michel-Olivier; Isakau, Henady; Jang, Anne; Khadir, Abdelkrim; Koch, Elizabeth; Lavoie, Manon; Lawless, Michael; Nguyen, Mai; Paquette, Denis; Turcotte, Émilie; Berger, Alvin; Mitchell, Matthew; Shore, Gordon C.; Beauparlant, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    GMX1777 is a prodrug of the small molecule GMX1778, currently in phase I clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. We describe findings indicating that GMX1778 is a potent and specific inhibitor of the NAD+ biosynthesis enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). Cancer cells have a very high rate of NAD+ turnover, which makes NAD+ modulation an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Selective inhibition by GMX1778 of NAMPT blocks the production of NAD+ and results in tumor cell death. Furthermore, GMX1778 is phosphoribosylated by NAMPT, which increases its cellular retention. The cytotoxicity of GMX1778 can be bypassed with exogenous nicotinic acid (NA), which permits NAD+ repletion via NA phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (NAPRT1). The cytotoxicity of GMX1778 in cells with NAPRT1 deficiency, however, cannot be rescued by NA. Analyses of NAPRT1 mRNA and protein levels in cell lines and primary tumor tissue indicate that high frequencies of glioblastomas, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas are deficient in NAPRT1 and not susceptible to rescue with NA. As a result, the therapeutic index of GMX1777 can be widended in the treatment animals bearing NAPRT1-deficient tumors by coadministration with NA. This provides the rationale for a novel therapeutic approach for the use of GMX1777 in the treatment of human cancers. PMID:19703994

  12. In vitro characterization of the NAD(+) synthetase NadE1 from Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Kerly; Santos, Adrian R S; Bonatto, Ana C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase enzyme (NadE) catalyzes the amination of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) to form NAD(+). This reaction represents the last step in the majority of the NAD(+) biosynthetic routes described to date. NadE enzymes typically use either glutamine or ammonium as amine nitrogen donor, and the reaction is energetically driven by ATP hydrolysis. Given the key role of NAD(+) in bacterial metabolism, NadE has attracted considerable interest as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. The plant-associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae encodes two putative NadE, namely nadE1 and nadE2. The nadE1 gene is linked to glnB encoding the signal transduction protein GlnB. Here we report the purification and in vitro characterization of H. seropedicae NadE1. Gel filtration chromatography analysis suggests that NadE1 is an octamer. The NadE1 activity was assayed in vitro, and the Michaelis-Menten constants for substrates NaAD, ATP, glutamine and ammonium were determined. Enzyme kinetic and in vitro substrate competition assays indicate that H. seropedicae NadE1 uses glutamine as a preferential nitrogen donor. PMID:26802007

  13. Collapse of the native structure caused by a single amino acid exchange in human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Michael K.; Binter, Alexandra; Pulido, Sergio A.; Saf, Robert; Zangger, Klaus; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is essential for the antioxidant defense system, stabilization of tumor suppressors (e.g. p53, p33, and p73), and activation of quinone-based chemotherapeutics. Overexpression of NQO1 in many solid tumors, coupled with its ability to convert quinone-based chemotherapeutics into potent cytotoxic compounds, have made it a very attractive target for anticancer drugs. A naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism (C609T) leading to an amino acid exchange (P187S) has been implicated in the development of various cancers and poor survival rates following anthracyclin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite its importance for cancer prediction and therapy, the exact molecular basis for the loss of function in NQO1 P187S is currently unknown. Therefore, we solved the crystal structure of NQO1 P187S. Surprisingly, this structure is almost identical to NQO1. Employing a combination of NMR spectroscopy and limited proteolysis experiments, we demonstrated that the single amino acid exchange destabilized interactions between the core and C-terminus, leading to depopulation of the native structure in solution. This collapse of the native structure diminished cofactor affinity and led to a less competent FAD-binding pocket, thus severely compromising the catalytic capacity of the variant protein. Hence, our findings provide a rationale for the loss of function in NQO1 P187S with a frequently occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism. PMID:25143260

  14. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Pour-Ghaz, Issa; Mansour, Josef J.; Németh, Beáta; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Substrate-level phosphorylation mediated by succinyl-CoA ligase in the mitochondrial matrix produces high-energy phosphates in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, when the electron transport chain is dysfunctional, provision of succinyl-CoA by the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) is crucial for maintaining the function of succinyl-CoA ligase yielding ATP, preventing the adenine nucleotide translocase from reversing. We addressed the source of the NAD+ supply for KGDHC under anoxic conditions and inhibition of complex I. Using pharmacologic tools and specific substrates and by examining tissues from pigeon liver exhibiting no diaphorase activity, we showed that mitochondrial diaphorases in the mouse liver contribute up to 81% to the NAD+ pool during respiratory inhibition. Under these conditions, KGDHC's function, essential for the provision of succinyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA ligase, is supported by NAD+ derived from diaphorases. Through this process, diaphorases contribute to the maintenance of substrate-level phosphorylation during respiratory inhibition, which is manifested in the forward operation of adenine nucleotide translocase. Finally, we show that reoxidation of the reducible substrates for the diaphorases is mediated by complex III of the respiratory chain.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Pour-Ghaz, I., Mansour, J. J., Németh, B., Starkov, A. A., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition. PMID:24391134

  15. Nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside salvage in fungi and mammals. Quantitative basis for Urh1 and purine nucleoside phosphorylase function in NAD+ metabolism.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Christensen, Kathryn C; Gazzaniga, Francesca; Pletnev, Alexandre A; Brenner, Charles

    2009-01-01

    NAD+ is a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and an essential substrate of ADP-ribose transfer enzymes and sirtuins, the type III protein lysine deacetylases related to yeast Sir2. Supplementation of yeast cells with nicotinamide riboside extends replicative lifespan and increases Sir2-dependent gene silencing by virtue of increasing net NAD+ synthesis. Nicotinamide riboside elevates NAD+ levels via the nicotinamide riboside kinase pathway and by a pathway initiated by splitting the nucleoside into a nicotinamide base followed by nicotinamide salvage. Genetic evidence has established that uridine hydrolase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and methylthioadenosine phosphorylase are required for Nrk-independent utilization of nicotinamide riboside in yeast. Here we show that mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase but not methylthioadenosine phosphorylase is responsible for mammalian nicotinamide riboside kinase-independent nicotinamide riboside utilization. We demonstrate that so-called uridine hydrolase is 100-fold more active as a nicotinamide riboside hydrolase than as a uridine hydrolase and that uridine hydrolase and mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase cleave nicotinic acid riboside, whereas the yeast phosphorylase has little activity on nicotinic acid riboside. Finally, we show that yeast nicotinic acid riboside utilization largely depends on uridine hydrolase and nicotinamide riboside kinase and that nicotinic acid riboside bioavailability is increased by ester modification. PMID:19001417

  16. NAD+ metabolism in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Bogan, Katrina L; Brenner, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is both a coenzyme for hydride-transfer enzymes and a substrate for NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, which include ADP-ribose transferases, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, cADP-ribose synthases and sirtuins. Recent results establish protective roles for NAD(+) that might be applicable therapeutically to prevent neurodegenerative conditions and to fight Candida glabrata infection. In addition, the contribution that NAD(+) metabolism makes to lifespan extension in model systems indicates that therapies to boost NAD(+) might promote some of the beneficial effects of calorie restriction. Nicotinamide riboside, the recently discovered nucleoside precursor of NAD(+) in eukaryotic systems, might have advantages as a therapy to elevate NAD(+) without inhibiting sirtuins, which is associated with high-dose nicotinamide, or incurring the unpleasant side-effects of high-dose nicotinic acid. PMID:17161604

  17. NAD metabolism in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, J W; Brestel, C

    1982-01-01

    Extracts of Vibrio cholerae were assayed for various enzymatic activities associated with pyridine nucleotide cycle metabolism. The activities measured include NAD glycohydrolase, nicotinamide deamidase, nicotinamide mononucleotide deamidase, and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase. The results obtained demonstrate the existence in V. cholerae of the five-membered pyridine nucleotide cycle and the potential for a four-membered pyridine nucleotide cycle. The data presented also suggest that most of the NAD glycohydrolase in V. cholerae extracts is not directly related to cholera toxin. PMID:6119307

  18. Sodium alpha-glucoheptonate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Park, Y J; Lee, B H

    2001-01-01

    In the structure of sodium D-glycero-D-gulo-heptonate dihydrate, Na+.C7H13O8-.2H2O, the glucoheptonate anion has a bent carbon chain conformation. There are extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds involving all the hydroxy and water H atoms. The Na+ cation has a distorted octahedral coordination to six O atoms, with Na+...O distances ranging from 2.316 (2) to 2.645 (2) A. PMID:11173380

  19. Microbial NAD metabolism: lessons from comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Gazzaniga, Francesca; Stebbins, Rebecca; Chang, Sheila Z; McPeek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2009-09-01

    NAD is a coenzyme for redox reactions and a substrate of NAD-consuming enzymes, including ADP-ribose transferases, Sir2-related protein lysine deacetylases, and bacterial DNA ligases. Microorganisms that synthesize NAD from as few as one to as many as five of the six identified biosynthetic precursors have been identified. De novo NAD synthesis from aspartate or tryptophan is neither universal nor strictly aerobic. Salvage NAD synthesis from nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide riboside, and nicotinic acid riboside occurs via modules of different genes. Nicotinamide salvage genes nadV and pncA, found in distinct bacteria, appear to have spread throughout the tree of life via horizontal gene transfer. Biochemical, genetic, and genomic analyses have advanced to the point at which the precursors and pathways utilized by a microorganism can be predicted. Challenges remain in dissecting regulation of pathways. PMID:19721089

  20. Mimicking the growth of a pathologic biomineral: shape development and structures of calcium oxalate dihydrate in the presence of polyacrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Annu; Rosseeva, Elena; Hochrein, Oliver; Carrillo-Cabrera, Wilder; Simon, Paul; Duchstein, Patrick; Zahn, Dirk; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2012-03-26

    The morphogenesis of calcium oxalate hydrates in aqueous solutions was investigated by varying the pH, oxalate concentration, and the concentration of the sodium salt of polyacrylate (PAA). With increasing amounts of PAA in solution, the shape of tetragonal calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) changes from bipyramidal through elongated bipyramidal prisms to dumbbells and finally reverts to rodlike tetragonal bipyramidal prisms. PAA is incorporated into the prismatic zones of the growing COD crystals, thereby reducing the growth rate of the {100} faces along the <100> direction. Dumbbells start to develop through "non-crystallographic" branching from the prism faces and the formation of "multiple head" crystals. Adsorption of PAA on the rough surfaces of the splitting individuals supports the selection of new subindividuals and leads to the formation of core-shell patterns. The various shapes and structures of the biomimetic COD/PAA crystals and aggregates are closely related to the well-known "pathologic" individuals observed in the urine of patients with urinary disease (including urinary stones). PMID:22354632

  1. Major Role of NAD-Dependent Lactate Dehydrogenases in the Production of l-Lactic Acid with High Optical Purity by the Thermophile Bacillus coagulans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limin; Cai, Yumeng; Zhu, Lingfeng; Guo, Honglian; Yu, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus coagulans 2-6 is an excellent producer of optically pure l-lactic acid. However, little is known about the mechanism of synthesis of the highly optically pure l-lactic acid produced by this strain. Three enzymes responsible for lactic acid production-NAD-dependent l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-nLDH; encoded by ldhL), NAD-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-nLDH; encoded by ldhD), and glycolate oxidase (GOX)-were systematically investigated in order to study the relationship between these enzymes and the optical purity of lactic acid. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 (a d-lactic acid producer) and Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum DSM 20174 (a dl-lactic acid producer) were also examined in this study as comparative strains, in addition to B. coagulans. The specific activities of key enzymes for lactic acid production in the three strains were characterized in vivo and in vitro, and the levels of transcription of the ldhL, ldhD, and GOX genes during fermentation were also analyzed. The catalytic activities of l-nLDH and d-nLDH were different in l-, d-, and dl-lactic acid producers. Only l-nLDH activity was detected in B. coagulans 2-6 under native conditions, and the level of transcription of ldhL in B. coagulans 2-6 was much higher than that of ldhD or the GOX gene at all growth phases. However, for the two Lactobacillus strains used in this study, ldhD transcription levels were higher than those of ldhL. The high catalytic efficiency of l-nLDH toward pyruvate and the high transcription ratios of ldhL to ldhD and ldhL to the GOX gene provide the key explanations for the high optical purity of l-lactic acid produced by B. coagulans 2-6. PMID:25217009

  2. Major Role of NAD-Dependent Lactate Dehydrogenases in the Production of l-Lactic Acid with High Optical Purity by the Thermophile Bacillus coagulans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Cai, Yumeng; Zhu, Lingfeng; Guo, Honglian

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans 2-6 is an excellent producer of optically pure l-lactic acid. However, little is known about the mechanism of synthesis of the highly optically pure l-lactic acid produced by this strain. Three enzymes responsible for lactic acid production—NAD-dependent l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-nLDH; encoded by ldhL), NAD-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-nLDH; encoded by ldhD), and glycolate oxidase (GOX)—were systematically investigated in order to study the relationship between these enzymes and the optical purity of lactic acid. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 (a d-lactic acid producer) and Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum DSM 20174 (a dl-lactic acid producer) were also examined in this study as comparative strains, in addition to B. coagulans. The specific activities of key enzymes for lactic acid production in the three strains were characterized in vivo and in vitro, and the levels of transcription of the ldhL, ldhD, and GOX genes during fermentation were also analyzed. The catalytic activities of l-nLDH and d-nLDH were different in l-, d-, and dl-lactic acid producers. Only l-nLDH activity was detected in B. coagulans 2-6 under native conditions, and the level of transcription of ldhL in B. coagulans 2-6 was much higher than that of ldhD or the GOX gene at all growth phases. However, for the two Lactobacillus strains used in this study, ldhD transcription levels were higher than those of ldhL. The high catalytic efficiency of l-nLDH toward pyruvate and the high transcription ratios of ldhL to ldhD and ldhL to the GOX gene provide the key explanations for the high optical purity of l-lactic acid produced by B. coagulans 2-6. PMID:25217009

  3. Cytosinium orotate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Portalone, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, C4H6N3O(+)·C5H3N2O4(-)·2H2O or Cyt(+)·Or(-)·2H2O, was synthesized by a reaction between cytosine (4-amino-2-hy-droxy-pyrimidine, Cyt) and orotic acid (2,4-dihy-droxy-6-carb-oxy-pyrimidine, Or) in aqueous solution. The two ions are joined by two N(+)-H⋯O(-) (±)-(CAHB) hydrogen bonds, forming a dimer with graph-set motif R2(2)(8). In the crystal, the ion pairs of the asymmetric unit are joined by four N-H⋯O inter-actions to adjacent dimers, forming hydrogen-bonded rings with R2(2)(8) graph-set motif in a two-dimensional network. The formation of the three-dimensional array is facilitated by water mol-ecules, which act as bridges between structural sub-units linked in R3(2)(8) and R3(2)(7) hydrogen-bonded rings. The orotate anion is essentially planar, as the dihedral angle between the planes defined by the carboxylate group and the uracil fragment is 4.0 (4)°. PMID:23476396

  4. [Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease].

    PubMed

    Koitschev, C; Kaiserling, E; Koitschev, A

    2003-08-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) of the temporomandibular joint is rare. The disorder is characterized by the presence of crystal deposits within the affected joint. The deposition of crystals in adjacent soft tissue may lead to the formation of pseudotumors. This form of the disease is called tophaceous pseudogout and typically affects the temporomandibular joint. It is difficult to differentiate the disease, particularly from malignant tumors, on the clinical and radiographic findings alone. The diagnosis is based on histological identification of the calcium pyrophosphate crystals. We present an unusually advanced case of tophaceous pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint. The etiology, clinical and diagnostic criteria as well as treatment options are discussed on the basis of our own experience and a review of the literature. PMID:12942180

  5. Rationally re-designed mutation of NAD-independent l-lactate dehydrogenase: high optical resolution of racemic mandelic acid by the engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background NAD-independent l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-iLDH) from Pseudomonas stutzeri SDM can potentially be used for the kinetic resolution of small aliphatic 2-hydroxycarboxylic acids. However, this enzyme showed rather low activity towards aromatic 2-hydroxycarboxylic acids. Results Val-108 of l-iLDH was changed to Ala by rationally site-directed mutagenesis. The l-iLDH mutant exhibited much higher activity than wide-type l-iLDH towards l-mandelate, an aromatic 2-hydroxycarboxylic acid. Using the engineered Escherichia coli expressing the mutant l-iLDH as a biocatalyst, 40 g·L-1 of dl-mandelic acid was converted to 20.1 g·L-1 of d-mandelic acid (enantiomeric purity higher than 99.5%) and 19.3 g·L-1 of benzoylformic acid. Conclusions A new biocatalyst with high catalytic efficiency toward an unnatural substrate was constructed by rationally re-design mutagenesis. Two building block intermediates (optically pure d-mandelic acid and benzoylformic acid) were efficiently produced by the one-pot biotransformation system. PMID:23176608

  6. NAD metabolism in HPRT-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacomelli, Gabriella; Di Marcello, Federica; Notarantonio, Laura; Sestini, Silvia; Cerboni, Barbara; Bertelli, Matteo; Pompucci, Giuseppe; Jinnah, Hyder A.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) is virtually absent in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by uric acid accumulation and neurodevelopmental dysfunction. The biochemical basis for the neurological and behavioral abnormalities have not yet been completely explained. Prior studies of cells from affected patients have shown abnormalities of NAD metabolism. In the current studies, NAD metabolism was evaluated in HPRT gene knock-out mice. NAD content and the activities of the enzymes required for synthesis and breakdown of this coenzyme were investigated in blood, brain and liver of HPRT− and control mice. NAD concentration and enzyme activities were found to be significantly increased in liver, but not in brain or blood of the HPRT− mice. These results demonstrate that changes in NAD metabolism occur in response to HPRT deficiency depending on both species and tissue type. PMID:19319672

  7. Enrofloxacin hydro-chloride dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Calderón, Jorge E; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; García-Gutiérrez, Ponciano; Sumano, Héctor

    2014-04-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C19H23FN3O3 (+)·Cl(-)·2H2O [systematic name: 4-(3-carb-oxy-1-cyclo-propyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-di-hydro-quin-o-lin-7-yl)-1-ethyl-piperazin-1-ium chloride dihydrate], consists of two independent monocations of the protonated enrofloxacin, two chloride anions and four water mol-ecules. In the cations, the piperazinium rings adopt chair conformations and the dihedral angles between the cyclo-propyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring system are 56.55 (2) and 51.11 (2)°. An intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed in each cation. In the crystal, the components are connected via O-H⋯Cl, N-H⋯Cl and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and a π-π inter-action between the benzene rings [centroid-centroid distance = 3.6726 (13) Å], resulting in a three-dimensional array. PMID:24826167

  8. Nrt1 and Tna1-independent export of NAD+ precursor vitamins promotes NAD+ homeostasis and allows engineering of vitamin production.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Stebbins, Rebecca; Bogan, Katrina L; Evans, Charles R; Brenner, Charles

    2011-01-01

    NAD(+) is both a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate of sirtuins and other NAD(+) consuming enzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for two different regimens that extend lifespan in yeast. NAD(+) is synthesized from tryptophan and the three vitamin precursors of NAD(+): nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotinamide riboside. Supplementation of yeast cells with NAD(+) precursors increases intracellular NAD(+) levels and extends replicative lifespan. Here we show that both nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid are not only vitamins but are also exported metabolites. We found that the deletion of the nicotinamide riboside transporter, Nrt1, leads to increased export of nicotinamide riboside. This discovery was exploited to engineer a strain to produce high levels of extracellular nicotinamide riboside, which was recovered in purified form. We further demonstrate that extracellular nicotinamide is readily converted to extracellular nicotinic acid in a manner that requires intracellular nicotinamidase activity. Like nicotinamide riboside, export of nicotinic acid is elevated by the deletion of the nicotinic acid transporter, Tna1. The data indicate that NAD(+) metabolism has a critical extracellular element in the yeast system and suggest that cells regulate intracellular NAD(+) metabolism by balancing import and export of NAD(+) precursor vitamins. PMID:21589930

  9. A conjugated fatty acid present at high levels in bitter melon seed favorably affects lipid metabolism in hepatocytes by increasing NAD(+)/NADH ratio and activating PPARα, AMPK and SIRT1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gou-Chun; Su, Hui-Min; Lin, Yu-Shun; Tsou, Po-Yen; Chyuan, Jong-Ho; Chao, Pei-Min

    2016-07-01

    α-Eleostearic acid (α-ESA), or the cis-9, trans-11, trans-13 isomer of conjugated linolenic acid, is a special fatty acid present at high levels in bitter melon seed oil. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of α-ESA on hepatic lipid metabolism. Using H4IIEC3 hepatoma cell line, we showed that α-ESA significantly lowered intracellular triglyceride accumulation compared to α-linolenic acid (LN), used as a fatty acid control, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The effects of α-ESA on enzyme activities and mRNA profiles in H4IIEC3 cells suggested that enhanced fatty acid oxidation and lowered lipogenesis were involved in α-ESA-mediated triglyceride lowering effects. In addition, α-ESA triggered AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation without altering sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein levels. When cells were treated with vehicle control (VC), LN alone (LN; 100μmol/L) or in combination with α-ESA (LN+α-ESA; 75+25μmol/L) for 24h, acetylation of forkhead box protein O1 was decreased, while the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, mRNA levels of NAMPT and PTGR1 and enzyme activity of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase were increased by LN+α-ESA treatment compared to treatment with LN alone, suggesting that α-ESA activates SIRT1 by increasing NAD(+) synthesis and NAD(P)H consumption. The antisteatosis effect of α-ESA was confirmed in mice treated with a high-sucrose diet supplemented with 1% α-ESA for 5weeks. We conclude that α-ESA favorably affects hepatic lipid metabolism by increasing cellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio and activating PPARα, AMPK and SIRT1 signaling pathways. PMID:27260465

  10. Amino acid residues involved in the catalytic mechanism of NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pomares, F; Ferrer, J; Camacho, M; Pire, C; LLorca, F; Bonete, M J

    1999-02-01

    The pH dependence of kinetic parameters for a competitive inhibitor (glutarate) was determined in order to obtain information on the chemical mechanism for NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum. The maximum velocity is pH dependent, decreasing at low pHs giving a pK value of 7.19+/-0.13, while the V/K for l-glutamate at 30 degrees C decreases at low and high pHs, yielding pK values of 7.9+/-0.2 and 9.8+/-0.2, respectively. The glutarate pKis profile decreases at high pHs, yielding a pK of 9. 59+/-0.09 at 30 degrees C. The values of ionization heat calculated from the change in pK with temperature are: 1.19 x 10(4), 5.7 x 10(3), 7 x 10(3), 6.6 x 10(3) cal mol-1, for the residues involved. All these data suggest that the groups required for catalysis and/or binding are lysine, histidine and tyrosine. The enzyme shows a time-dependent loss in glutamate oxidation activity when incubated with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC). Inactivation follows pseudo-first-order kinetics with a second-order rate constant of 53 M-1min-1. The pKa of the titratable group was pK1=6.6+/-0.6. Inactivation with ethyl acetimidate also shows pseudo-first-order kinetics as well as inactivation with TNM yielding second-order constants of 1.2 M-1min-1 and 2.8 M-1min-1, and pKas of 8.36 and 9.0, respectively. The proposed mechanism involves hydrogen binding of each of the two carboxylic groups to tyrosyl residues; histidine interacts with one of the N-hydrogens of the l-glutamate amino group. We also corroborate the presence of a conservative lysine that has a remarkable ability to coordinate a water molecule that would act as general base. PMID:10076069

  11. Isothermal Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide Dihydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of growing pure solid hydrogen peroxide in an ultra high vacuum environment and apply it to determine thermal stability of the dihydrate compound that forms when water and hydrogen peroxide are mixed at low temperatures. Using infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, we quantified the isothermal decomposition of the metastable dihydrate at 151.6 K. This decomposition occurs by fractional distillation through the preferential sublimation of water, which leads to the formation of pure hydrogen peroxide. The results imply that in an astronomical environment where condensed mixtures of H2O2 and H2O are shielded from radiolytic decomposition and warmed to temperatures where sublimation is significant, highly concentrated or even pure hydrogen peroxide may form.

  12. NAD+ and vitamin B3: from metabolism to therapies.

    PubMed

    Sauve, Anthony A

    2008-03-01

    The role of NAD(+) metabolism in health and disease is of increased interest as the use of niacin (nicotinic acid) has emerged as a major therapy for treatment of hyperlipidemias and with the recognition that nicotinamide can protect tissues and NAD(+) metabolism in a variety of disease states, including ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, a growing body of evidence supports the view that NAD(+) metabolism regulates important biological effects, including lifespan. NAD(+) exerts potent effects through the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, and the recently characterized sirtuin enzymes. These enzymes catalyze protein modifications, such as ADP-ribosylation and deacetylation, leading to changes in protein function. These enzymes regulate apoptosis, DNA repair, stress resistance, metabolism, and endocrine signaling, suggesting that these enzymes and/or NAD(+) metabolism could be targeted for therapeutic benefit. This review considers current knowledge of NAD(+) metabolism in humans and microbes, including new insights into mechanisms that regulate NAD(+) biosynthetic pathways, current use of nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as pharmacological agents, and opportunities for drug design that are directed at modulation of NAD(+) biosynthesis for treatment of human disorders and infections. PMID:18165311

  13. Assimilation of NAD(+) precursors in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Pan, Shih-Jung; Zupancic, Margaret L; Cormack, Brendan P

    2007-10-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) auxotroph and its growth depends on the environmental supply of vitamin precursors of NAD(+). C. glabrata salvage pathways defined in this article allow NAD(+) to be synthesized from three compounds - nicotinic acid (NA), nicotinamide (NAM) and nicotinamide riboside (NR). NA is salvaged through a functional Preiss-Handler pathway. NAM is first converted to NA by nicotinamidase and then salvaged by the Preiss-Handler pathway. Salvage of NR in C. glabrata occurs via two routes. The first, in which NR is phosphorylated by the NR kinase Nrk1, is independent of the Preiss-Handler pathway. The second is a novel pathway in which NR is degraded by the nucleosidases Pnp1 and Urh1, with a minor role for Meu1, and ultimately converted to NAD(+) via the nicotinamidase Pnc1 and the Preiss-Handler pathway. Using C. glabrata mutants whose growth depends exclusively on the external NA or NR supply, we also show that C. glabrata utilizes NR and to a lesser extent NA as NAD(+) sources during disseminated infection. PMID:17725566

  14. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a-knockout and CYP1A-humanized mouse lines and its effect on bioactivation of the carcinogen aristolochic acid I

    SciTech Connect

    Levova, Katerina; Moserova, Michaela; Nebert, Daniel W.; Phillips, David H.; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Stiborova, Marie

    2012-12-15

    Aristolochic acid causes a specific nephropathy (AAN), Balkan endemic nephropathy, and urothelial malignancies. Using Western blotting suitable to determine protein expression, we investigated in several transgenic mouse lines expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)—the most efficient cytosolic enzyme that reductively activates aristolochic acid I (AAI). The mouse tissues used were from previous studies [Arlt et al., Chem. Res. Toxicol. 24 (2011) 1710; Stiborova et al., Toxicol. Sci. 125 (2012) 345], in which the role of microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in AAI metabolism in vivo had been determined. We found that NQO1 levels in liver, kidney and lung of Cyp1a1(−/−), Cyp1a2(−/−) and Cyp1a1/1a2(−/−) knockout mouse lines, as well as in two CYP1A-humanized mouse lines harboring functional human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1/1a2 orthologs, differed from NQO1 levels in wild-type mice. NQO1 protein and enzymic activity were induced in hepatic and renal cytosolic fractions isolated from AAI-pretreated mice, compared with those in untreated mice. Furthermore, this increase in hepatic NQO1 enzyme activity was associated with bioactivation of AAI and elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels in ex vivo incubations of cytosolic fractions with DNA and AAI. In conclusion, AAI appears to increase its own metabolic activation by inducing NQO1, thereby enhancing its own genotoxic potential. Highlights: ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a knockout and humanized CYP1A mice ► Reductive activation of the nephrotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid I (AAI) ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase is induced in mice treated with AAI. ► Induced hepatic enzyme activity resulted in elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels.

  15. Altered behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms in mice with disrupted NAD+ oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Sahar, Saurabh; Nin, Veronica; Barbosa, Maria Thereza; Chini, Eduardo Nunes; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The Intracellular levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) are rhythmic and controlled by the circadian clock. However, whether NAD+ oscillation in turn contributes to circadian physiology is not fully understood. To address this question we analyzed mice mutated for the NAD+ hydrolase CD38. We found that rhythmicity of NAD+ was altered in the CD38-deficient mice. The high, chronic levels of NAD+ results in several anomalies in circadian behavior and metabolism. CD38-null mice display a shortened period length of locomotor activity and alteration in the rest-activity rhythm. Several clock genes and, interestingly, genes involved in amino acid metabolism were deregulated in CD38-null livers. Metabolomic analysis identified alterations in the circadian levels of several amino acids, specifically tryptophan levels were reduced in the CD38-null mice at a circadian time paralleling with elevated NAD+ levels. Thus, CD38 contributes to behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms and altered NAD+ levels influence the circadian clock. PMID:21937766

  16. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester stimulates human antioxidant response element-mediated expression of the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) gene.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, A K; Venugopal, R; Mucha, J; Carothers, A M; Grunberger, D

    1997-02-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a phenolic antioxidant derived from the propolis of honeybee hives. CAPE was shown to inhibit the formation of intracellular hydrogen peroxide and oxidized bases in DNA of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated HeLa cells and was also found to induce a redox change that correlated with differential growth effects in transformed cells but not the nontumorigenic parental ones. Mediated via the electrophile or human antioxidant response element (hARE), induction of the expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit genes by certain phenolic antioxidants has been correlated with the chemopreventive properties of these agents. Here, we determined by Northern analysis that CAPE treatment of hepatoma cells stimulates NQO1 gene expression in cultured human hepatoma cells (HepG2), and we characterized the effects of CAPE treatment on the expression of a reporter gene either containing or lacking the hARE or carrying a mutant version of this element in rodent hepatoma (Hepa-1) transfectants. A dose-dependent transactivation of human hARE-mediated chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene expression was observed upon treatments of the Hepa-1 transfectants with TPA, a known inducer, as well as with CAPE. The combined treatments resulted in an apparent additive stimulation of the reporter expression. To learn whether this activation of cat gene expression was effected by protein kinase C in CAPE-treated cells, a comparison was made of cat gene activity after addition of calphostin, a protein kinase C inhibitor. Calphostin reduced the cat gene induction by TPA but not by CAPE, suggesting that stimulation of gene expression in this system by these agents proceeds via distinct mechanisms. Band-shift experiments to examine binding of transactivator proteins from nuclear extracts of treated and untreated cells to a hARE DNA probe showed that TPA exposure increased the binding level

  17. Tri-calcium phosphate (ß-TCP) can be artificially synthesized by recycling dihydrate gypsum hardened.

    PubMed

    Han-Cheol, Cho; Hori, Masaharu; Yoshida, Takakazu; Yamada, Naoko; Komada, Yuko; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate is known as a major component of biological hard tissues. This study aimed to produce calcium phosphate by recycling kneaded surplus gypsum. β-dihydrate gypsum was derived from commercial dental β-hemihydrate gypsum, which was mechanically powdered and mixed with the liquid component of a commercial zinc phosphate cement. This mixture was fired at 1,200°C and evaluated by XRD analysis, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). An acceptable ratio of mixing was 4 g of β-dihydrate gypsum powder to 1.5 mL of phosphoric acid liquid. XRD peaks were monotonic below 800°C, but new ß-TCP was formed by firing at 900°C or more, although TG-DTA analysis of synthetic ß-TCP suggested that some residual dihydrate gypsum remained in the sample. SEM images indicated a fused-block bone-like structure covered with phosphorus and calcium. These results suggest that production of synthetic β-TCP is possible through ecological techniques using recycled materials. PMID:25483384

  18. Crystal structure of ammonia dihydrate II.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Gareth I G; Fortes, A Dominic; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, R J

    2012-05-01

    We have used density-functional-theory (DFT) methods together with a structure searching algorithm to make an experimentally constrained prediction of the structure of ammonia dihydrate II (ADH-II). The DFT structure is in good agreement with neutron diffraction data and verifies the prediction. The structure consists of the same basic structural elements as ADH-I, with a modest alteration to the packing, but a considerable reduction in volume. The phase diagram of the known ADH and ammonia monohydrate + water-ice structures is calculated with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof density functional, and the effects of a semi-empirical dispersion corrected functional are investigated. The results of our DFT calculations of the finite-pressure elastic constants of ADH-II are compared with the available experimental data for the elastic strain coefficients. PMID:22583254

  19. Hexaaquanickel diorotate(1-) dihydrate at 150 K.

    PubMed

    Falvello, Larry R; Ferrer, Daniel; Soler, Tatiana; Tomás, Milagros

    2003-04-01

    In hexaaquanickel bis(2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrimidine-4-carboxylate) dihydrate, [Ni(H(2)O)(6)](C(5)H(3)N(2)O(4))(2).2H(2)O, the nickel cation is coordinated by six aqua ligands and only associated with the two orotate ions through hydrogen bonds. The structure is isotypic with the magnesium and zinc analogues. The metal cation sits on a crystallographic center of inversion that relates the water molecules and the organic anions. The orotate moieties form an unbonded one-dimensional chain mediated by a hydrogen-bonded self-recognition interaction. The hexaaquanickel complex molecules bridge these chains laterally, acting as molecular clamps that bring neighboring layers nearer than expected. As a result of this three-dimensional arrangement, a short contact of 3.166 (5) A is observed between two C atoms of two adjacent ribbons. PMID:12682397

  20. Pseudopolymorphism of levodopa: A novel “disappearing” dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Vânia; Duarte, M. Teresa

    2014-11-01

    We report herein the crystal structure of a novel L-dopa dihydrate, an unstable pseudopolymorph detected in some co-crystallization studies. This form is obtained by traditional solution techniques and tends to convert to the anhydrous form under ambient conditions. Even though pseudopolymorphism has generally been subject of large conceptual discussions, it is indeed of importance in the pharmaceutical industry and, in this particularly case, the knowledge of the formation of this novel dihydrate may be very relevant for processing issues.

  1. Mitochondrial Impairment May Increase Cellular NAD(P)H: Resazurin Oxidoreductase Activity, Perturbing the NAD(P)H-Based Viability Assays

    PubMed Central

    Aleshin, Vasily A.; Artiukhov, Artem V.; Oppermann, Henry; Kazantsev, Alexey V.; Lukashev, Nikolay V.; Bunik, Victoria I.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase activity with artificial dyes (NAD(P)H-OR) is an indicator of viability, as the cellular redox state is important for biosynthesis and antioxidant defense. However, high NAD(P)H due to impaired mitochondrial oxidation, known as reductive stress, should increase NAD(P)H-OR yet perturb viability. To better understand this complex behavior, we assayed NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin (Alamar Blue) in glioblastoma cell lines U87 and T98G, treated with inhibitors of central metabolism, oxythiamin, and phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids. Targeting the thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes, the inhibitors are known to decrease the NAD(P)H production in the pentose phosphate shuttle and/or upon mitochondrial oxidation of 2-oxo acids. Nevertheless, the inhibitors elevated NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, suggesting impaired NAD(P)H oxidation rather than increased viability. In particular, inhibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes affects metabolism of malate, which mediates mitochondrial oxidation of cytosolic NAD(P)H. We showed that oxythiamin not only inhibited mitochondrial 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases, but also induced cell-specific changes in glutamate and malate dehydrogenases and/or malic enzyme. As a result, inhibition of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases compromises mitochondrial metabolism, with the dysregulated electron fluxes leading to increases in cellular NAD(P)H-OR. Perturbed mitochondrial oxidation of NAD(P)H may thus complicate the NAD(P)H-based viability assay. PMID:26308058

  2. Metabolic Profiling of Alternative NAD Biosynthetic Routes in Mouse Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Valerio; Amici, Adolfo; Mazzola, Francesca; Di Stefano, Michele; Conforti, Laura; Magni, Giulio; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia; Orsomando, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    NAD plays essential redox and non-redox roles in cell biology. In mammals, its de novo and recycling biosynthetic pathways encompass two independent branches, the “amidated” and “deamidated” routes. Here we focused on the indispensable enzymes gating these two routes, i.e. nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), which in mammals comprises three distinct isozymes, and NAD synthetase (NADS). First, we measured the in vitro activity of the enzymes, and the levels of all their substrates and products in a number of tissues from the C57BL/6 mouse. Second, from these data, we derived in vivo estimates of enzymes'rates and quantitative contributions to NAD homeostasis. The NMNAT activity, mainly represented by nuclear NMNAT1, appears to be high and nonrate-limiting in all examined tissues, except in blood. The NADS activity, however, appears rate-limiting in lung and skeletal muscle, where its undetectable levels parallel a relative accumulation of the enzyme's substrate NaAD (nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide). In all tissues, the amidated NAD route was predominant, displaying highest rates in liver and kidney, and lowest in blood. In contrast, the minor deamidated route showed higher relative proportions in blood and small intestine, and higher absolute values in liver and small intestine. Such results provide the first comprehensive picture of the balance of the two alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in different mammalian tissues under physiological conditions. This fills a gap in the current knowledge of NAD biosynthesis, and provides a crucial information for the study of NAD metabolism and its role in disease. PMID:25423279

  3. Additive concentration effects on dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using monocalcium phosphate monohydrate and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Santa Cruz Chavez, Grace; Alge, Daniel L; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2011-11-21

    In our previous study, we investigated the setting time, mechanical properties and microstructure of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and hydroxyapatite (HA). Despite the use of sodium citrate as a setting regulator, setting occurs rapidly in the MCPM/HA system and further studies on other retardants are needed. In the present study, sodium pyrophosphate and sulfuric acid were tested to evaluate their effectiveness in maintaining workability of the cement paste. MCPM/HA cements at a powder to liquid ratio of 1.0 with sodium pyrophosphate and sulfuric acid at 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mM were manufactured and studied based on their setting time, mechanical and porosity properties, phase composition, and microstructure. These measurements were compared to our previous data using sodium citrate. The results showed that the additives have a dose-dependent effect on the setting time. Their order of efficiency is sodium pyrophosphate > sodium citrate > sulfuric acid. However, the sulfuric acid group exhibited the highest compressive strength (CS) compared to the other groups. A lack of correlation between the CS and the porosity of the cements suggested that a mechanism other than porosity reduction was responsible for the CS increase. Since x-ray diffraction analysis did not indicate an effect on composition, explanations based on calcium sulfate dihydrate formation and changes in microstructure were proposed based on scanning electron micrograph observations. PMID:22101069

  4. Emerging therapeutic roles for NAD(+) metabolism in mitochondrial and age-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sarika

    2016-12-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a central metabolic cofactor in eukaryotic cells that plays a critical role in regulating cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis. NAD(+) in its reduced form (i.e. NADH) serves as the primary electron donor in mitochondrial respiratory chain, which involves adenosine triphosphate production by oxidative phosphorylation. The NAD(+)/NADH ratio also regulates the activity of various metabolic pathway enzymes such as those involved in glycolysis, Kreb's cycle, and fatty acid oxidation. Intracellular NAD(+) is synthesized de novo from L-tryptophan, although its main source of synthesis is through salvage pathways from dietary niacin as precursors. NAD(+) is utilized by various proteins including sirtuins, poly ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs) and cyclic ADP-ribose synthases. The NAD(+) pool is thus set by a critical balance between NAD(+) biosynthetic and NAD(+) consuming pathways. Raising cellular NAD(+) content by inducing its biosynthesis or inhibiting the activity of PARP and cADP-ribose synthases via genetic or pharmacological means lead to sirtuins activation. Sirtuins modulate distinct metabolic, energetic and stress response pathways, and through their activation, NAD(+) directly links the cellular redox state with signaling and transcriptional events. NAD(+) levels decline with mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced NAD(+)/NADH ratio is implicated in mitochondrial disorders, various age-related pathologies as well as during aging. Here, I will provide an overview of the current knowledge on NAD(+) metabolism including its biosynthesis, utilization, compartmentalization and role in the regulation of metabolic homoeostasis. I will further discuss how augmenting intracellular NAD(+) content increases oxidative metabolism to prevent bioenergetic and functional decline in multiple models of mitochondrial diseases and age-related disorders, and how this knowledge could be translated to the clinic for human relevance. PMID

  5. Boosting NAD to spare hearing.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Charles

    2014-12-01

    Ex vivo experiments have strangely shown that inhibition or stimulation of NAD metabolism can be neuroprotective. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Brown et al. (2014) demonstrate that cochlear NAD is diminished by deafening noise but protected by nicotinamide riboside or WldS mutation. Hearing protection by nicotinamide riboside depends on Sirt3. PMID:25470539

  6. Enrofloxacin hydro­chloride dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Calderón, Jorge E.; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; García-Gutiérrez, Ponciano; Sumano, Héctor

    2014-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C19H23FN3O3 +·Cl−·2H2O [systematic name: 4-(3-carb­oxy-1-cyclo­propyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-di­hydro­quin­o­lin-7-yl)-1-ethyl­piperazin-1-ium chloride dihydrate], consists of two independent monocations of the protonated enrofloxacin, two chloride anions and four water mol­ecules. In the cations, the piperazinium rings adopt chair conformations and the dihedral angles between the cyclo­propyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring system are 56.55 (2) and 51.11 (2)°. An intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed in each cation. In the crystal, the components are connected via O—H⋯Cl, N—H⋯Cl and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and a π–π inter­action between the benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.6726 (13) Å], resulting in a three-dimensional array. PMID:24826167

  7. NAD binding site of diphtheria toxin: identification of a residue within the nicotinamide subsite by photochemical modification with NAD.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, S F; Collier, R J

    1984-01-01

    We showed earlier that exposing mixtures of NAD and diphtheria toxin fragment A to ultraviolet radiation (253.7 nm) induced the formation of covalently linked protein-ligand photoproducts. Here we report that when [carbonyl-14C]NAD was employed in such procedures, the efficiency of labeling of the protein approached 1 mol/mol, and at least 94% of the incorporated label was associated with a single residue, glutamic acid at position 148. Fragment A photolabeled in this manner was enzymically inactive. The efficiency of photolabeling was much lower (less than 0.2 mol/mol) when NAD radiolabeled in either the adenine moiety or the adenylate phosphate was used, and the label was attached to different site(s) within fragment A. Efficient photochemical transfer of label from [carbonyl-14C]NAD occurred under identical conditions with the nucleotide-free form of whole diphtheria toxin, CRM-45, or activated exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not with nucleotide-bound diphtheria toxin, CRM-197, native exotoxin A, or any of several NAD-linked dehydrogenases. On the basis of these and other results we suggest that part or all of the nicotinamide moiety of NAD is efficiently transferred to glutamate-148 of fragment A under the influence of ultraviolet irradiation and that this residue is located within the nicotinamide subsite. This location implies that glutamate-148 is at or near the catalytic center of the toxin. Our data provide direct evidence for the location of the NAD site in an ADP-ribosylating toxin and demonstrate highly efficient and specific photolabeling by [carbonyl-14C]NAD. Images PMID:6145155

  8. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated). 184.1845 Section 184.1845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  9. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  10. The Leishmania nicotinamidase is essential for NAD+ production and parasite proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gazanion, E; Garcia, D; Silvestre, R; Gérard, C; Guichou, J F; Labesse, G; Seveno, M; Cordeiro-Da-Silva, A; Ouaissi, A; Sereno, D; Vergnes, B

    2011-10-01

    NAD+ is a central cofactor that plays important roles in cellular metabolism and energy production in all living cells. Genomics-based reconstruction of NAD+ metabolism revealed that Leishmania protozoan parasites are NAD+ auxotrophs. Consequently, these parasites require assimilating NAD+ precursors (nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide riboside) from their host environment to synthesize NAD+ by a salvage pathway. Nicotinamidase is a key enzyme of this salvage pathway that catalyses conversion of nicotinamide (NAm) to nicotinic acid (Na), and that is absent in higher eukaryotes. We present here the biochemical and functional characterizations of the Leishmania infantum nicotinamidase (LiPNC1). Generation of Lipnc1 null mutants leads to a decrease in NAD+ content, associated with a metabolic shutdown-like phenotype with an extensive lag phase of growth. Both phenotypes could be rescued by an add-back construct or by addition of exogenous Na. In addition, Lipnc1 null mutants were unable to establish a sustained infection in a murine experimental model. Altogether, these results illustrate that NAD+ homeostasis is a fundamental component of Leishmania biology and virulence, and that NAm constitutes its main NAD+ source in the mammalian host. The crystal structure of LiPNC1 we solved allows now the design of rational inhibitors against this new promising therapeutic target. PMID:21819459

  11. Structural and functional characterization of human NAD kinase.

    PubMed

    Lerner, F; Niere, M; Ludwig, A; Ziegler, M

    2001-10-19

    NADP is essential for biosynthetic pathways, energy, and signal transduction. Its synthesis is catalyzed by NAD kinase. Very little is known about the structure, function, and regulation of this enzyme from multicellular organisms. We identified a human NAD kinase cDNA and the corresponding gene using available database information. A cDNA was amplified from a human fibroblast cDNA library and functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The obtained cDNA, slightly different from that deposited in the database, encodes a protein of 49 kDa. The gene is expressed in most human tissues, but not in skeletal muscle. Human NAD kinase differs considerably from that of prokaryotes by subunit molecular mass (49 kDa vs 30-35 kDa). The catalytically active homotetramer is highly selective for its substrates, NAD and ATP. It did not phosphorylate the nicotinic acid derivative of NAD (NAAD) suggesting that the potent calcium-mobilizing pyridine nucleotide NAADP is synthesized by an alternative route. PMID:11594753

  12. NAD+ and sirtuins in aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shin-ichiro; Guarente, Leonard

    2014-08-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a classical coenzyme mediating many redox reactions. NAD(+) also plays an important role in the regulation of NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38/157 ectoenzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis, particularly mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), and SIRT1 function together to regulate metabolism and circadian rhythm. NAD(+) levels decline during the aging process and may be an Achilles' heel, causing defects in nuclear and mitochondrial functions and resulting in many age-associated pathologies. Restoring NAD(+) by supplementing NAD(+) intermediates can dramatically ameliorate these age-associated functional defects, counteracting many diseases of aging, including neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the combination of sirtuin activation and NAD(+) intermediate supplementation may be an effective antiaging intervention, providing hope to aging societies worldwide. PMID:24786309

  13. Phase transformations of erythromycin A dihydrate during pelletisation and drying.

    PubMed

    Römer, Meike; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Miroshnyk, Inna; Sandler, Niklas; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2007-08-01

    An at-line process analytical approach was applied to better understand process-induced transformations of erythromycin dihydrate during pellet manufacture (extrusion-spheronisation and drying process). The pellets contained 50% (w/w) erythromycin dihydrate and 50% (w/w) microcrystalline cellulose, with purified water used as a granulating fluid. To characterise changes in solid-state properties during processing, near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) were applied. Samples were taken after every processing step (blending, granulation, extrusion, and spheronisation) and at predetermined intervals during drying at 30 or 60 degrees C. During pelletisation and drying at 30 degrees C no changes occurred. Partial transformation to the dehydrated form was observed for the pellets dried at 60 degrees C by NIR and XRPD. The variable temperature XRPD measurements of the wet pellets (from 25 to 200 degrees C) also confirmed the change to erythromycin dehydrate at approximately 60 degrees C. PMID:17270405

  14. A reagentless amperometric electrode based on carbon paste, chemically modified with D-lactate dehydrogenase, NAD(+), and mediator containing polymer for D-lactic acid analysis. I. Construction, composition, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Shu, H C; Mattiasson, B; Persson, B; Nagy, G; Gorton, L; Sahni, S; Geng, L; Boguslavsky, L; Skotheim, T

    1995-05-01

    A reagentless carbon paste electrode was designed for D-lactic acid analysis in a flow injection system for the monitoring of the production of D-lactate in a batch fermentation. D-Lactate dehydrogenase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), a synthetic redox polymer containing covalently attached toluidine blue O as mediator, graphite powder, and paraffin oil were used for the construction of the modified carbon paste electrode. D-Lactate selectivity was indicated by insignificant responses from a variety of possible interfernces including L-lactate. The electrodes gave a linear response in the range between 0.05 and 5 mM D-lactate, with a detecting limit of 30 muM, allowing a sample throughput of 20 h(-1). Preliminary investigations were made by covering the electrode surface with electropolymerized membranes. Satisfactory stability was observed, indicated by a reproducibility of 3.3% relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 31), with a non-membrane-covered electrode for the analysis of D-lactate in fermentation broth. A long-term stability (230 broth samples) was proven, suggesting the electrodes to have a good potential for use in on-line monitoring of fermentation processes. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18623311

  15. SAR Studies for a New Class of Antibacterial NAD Biosynthesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Whitney Beysselance; Yang, Zhengrong; Kane, Tasha A.; Zhou, Qingxian; Harville, Steve; Brouillette, Christie G.; Brouillette, Wayne J.

    2009-01-01

    A new lead class of antibacterial drug-like NAD synthetase (NADs) inhibitors was previously identified from a virtual screening study. Here a solution-phase synthetic library of 76 compounds, analogs of the urea-sulfonamide 5838, was synthesized in parallel to explore SAR on the sulfonamide aryl group. All library members were tested for enzyme inhibition against NADs and nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NaMNAT), the last two enzymes in the biosynthesis of NAD, and for growth inhibition in a B. anthracis antibacterial assay. Most compounds that inhibited bacterial growth also showed inhibition against one of the enzymes tested. While only modest enhancements in the enzyme inhibition potency against NADs were observed, of significance was the observation that the antibacterial urea-sulfonamides more consistently inhibited NaMNAT. PMID:19408950

  16. Structure of a NAD kinase from Thermotoga maritima at 2.3 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Huang, Candice; Adams, Paul D.; Jancarik, Jaru; Yokota, Hisao A.; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-07-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization, and structure determination of NAD-kinase from T. maritima are reported. Similarity to other NAD-kinases as well as homo-oligomrization state of the enzyme from T. maritima are discussed. NAD kinase is the only known enzyme that catalyzes the formation of NADP, a coenzyme involved in most anabolic reactions and in the antioxidant defense system. Despite its importance, very little is known regarding the mechanism of catalysis and only recently have several NAD kinase structures been deposited in the PDB. Here, an independent investigation of the crystal structure of inorganic polyphosphate/ATP-NAD kinase, PPNK-THEMA, a protein from Thermotoga maritima, is reported at a resolution of 2.3 Å. The crystal structure was solved using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) data collected at the Se absorption-peak wavelength in a state in which no cofactors or substrates were bound. It revealed that the 258-amino-acid protein is folded into two distinct domains, similar to recently reported NAD kinases. The N-terminal α/β-domain spans the first 100 amino acids and the last 30 amino acids of the polypeptide and has several topological matches in the PDB, whereas the other domain, which spans the middle 130 residues, adopts a unique β-sandwich architecture and only appreciably matches the recently deposited PDB structures of NAD kinases.

  17. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder. PMID:25896882

  18. Quantitation of NAD+ biosynthesis from the salvage pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sporty, J; Lin, S; Kato, M; Ognibene, T; Stewart, B; Turteltaub, K; Bench, G

    2009-02-18

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) is synthesized via two major pathways in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems: the de novo biosynthesis pathway from tryptophan precursors, or by the salvage biosynthesis pathway from either extracellular nicotinic acid or various intracellular NAD{sup +} decomposition products. NAD{sup +} biosynthesis via the salvage pathway has been linked to an increase in yeast replicative lifespan under calorie restriction (CR). However, the relative contribution of each pathway to NAD{sup +} biosynthesis under both normal and CR conditions is not known. Here, we have performed lifespan, NAD{sup +} and NADH (the reduced form of NAD{sup +}) analyses on BY4742 wild type, NAD+ salvage pathway knockout (npt1{Delta}), and NAD+ de novo pathway knockout (qpt1{Delta}) yeast strains cultured in media containing either 2% glucose (normal growth) or 0.5% glucose (CR). We have utilized {sup 14}C labeled nicotinic acid in the culture media combined with HPLC speciation and both UV and {sup 14}C detection to quantitate the total amounts of NAD{sup +} and NADH and the amounts derived from the salvage pathway. We observe that wild type and qpt1{Delta} yeast exclusively utilize extracellular nicotinic acid for NAD{sup +} and NADH biosynthesis under both the 2% and 0.5% glucose growth conditions suggesting that the de novo pathway plays little role if a functional salvage pathway is present. We also observe that NAD{sup +} concentrations decrease in all three strains under CR. However, unlike the wild type strain, NADH concentrations do not decrease and NAD{sup +}:NADH ratios do not increase under CR for either knockout strain. Lifespan analyses reveal that CR results in a lifespan increase of approximately 25% for the wild type and qpt1{Delta} strains, while no increase in lifespan is observed for the npt1{Delta} strain. In combination these data suggest that having a functional salvage pathway is more important than the absolute levels of NAD

  19. Photolabeling of Glu-129 of the S-1 subunit of pertussis toxin with NAD

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, J.T.; Mende-Mueller, L.M.; Rappuoli, R.; Collier, R.J. )

    1989-11-01

    UV irradiation was shown to induce efficient transfer of radiolabel from nicotinamide-labeled NAD to a recombinant protein (C180 peptide) containing the catalytic region of the S-1 subunit of pertussis toxin. Incorporation of label from (3H-nicotinamide)NAD was efficient (0.5 to 0.6 mol/mol of protein) relative to incorporation from (32P-adenylate)NAD (0.2 mol/mol of protein). Label from (3H-nicotinamide)NAD was specifically associated with Glu-129. Replacement of Glu-129 with glycine or aspartic acid made the protein refractory to photolabeling with (3H-nicotinamide)NAD, whereas replacement of a nearby glutamic acid, Glu-139, with serine did not. Photolabeling of the C180 peptide with NAD is similar to that observed with diphtheria toxin and exotoxin A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in which the nicotinamide portion of NAD is transferred to Glu-148 and Glu-553, respectively, in the two toxins. These results implicate Glu-129 of the S-1 subunit as an active-site residue and a potentially important site for genetic modification of pertussis toxin for development of an acellular vaccine against Bordetella pertussis.

  20. Nicotinamide mononucleotide synthetase is the key enzyme for an alternative route of NAD biosynthesis in Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Sorci, Leonardo; Martynowski, Dariusz; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Eyobo, Yvonne; Zogaj, Xhavit; Klose, Karl E; Nikolaev, Evgeni V; Magni, Giulio; Zhang, Hong; Osterman, Andrei L

    2009-03-01

    Enzymes involved in the last 2 steps of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) cofactor biosynthesis, which catalyze the adenylylation of the nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) precursor to nicotinic acid dinucleotide (NaAD) followed by its amidation to NAD, constitute promising drug targets for the development of new antibiotics. These enzymes, NaMN adenylyltransferase (gene nadD) and NAD synthetase (gene nadE), respectively, are indispensable and conserved in nearly all bacterial pathogens. However, a comparative genome analysis of Francisella tularensis allowed us to predict the existence of an alternative route of NAD synthesis in this category A priority pathogen, the causative agent of tularaemia. In this route, the amidation of NaMN to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) occurs before the adenylylation reaction, which converts this alternative intermediate to the NAD cofactor. The first step is catalyzed by NMN synthetase, which was identified and characterized in this study. A crystal structure of this enzyme, a divergent member of the NadE family, was solved at 1.9-A resolution in complex with reaction products, providing a rationale for its unusual substrate preference for NaMN over NaAD. The second step is performed by NMN adenylyltransferase of the NadM family. Here, we report validation of the predicted route (NaMN --> NMN --> NAD) in F. tularensis including mathematical modeling, in vitro reconstitution, and in vivo metabolite analysis in comparison with a canonical route (NaMN --> NaAD --> NAD) of NAD biosynthesis as represented by another deadly bacterial pathogen, Bacillus anthracis. PMID:19204287

  1. Nicotinamide mononucleotide synthetase is the key enzyme for an alternative route of NAD biosynthesis in Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Leonardo; Martynowski, Dariusz; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Eyobo, Yvonne; Zogaj, Xhavit; Klose, Karl E.; Nikolaev, Evgeni V.; Magni, Giulio; Zhang, Hong; Osterman, Andrei L.

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes involved in the last 2 steps of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) cofactor biosynthesis, which catalyze the adenylylation of the nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) precursor to nicotinic acid dinucleotide (NaAD) followed by its amidation to NAD, constitute promising drug targets for the development of new antibiotics. These enzymes, NaMN adenylyltransferase (gene nadD) and NAD synthetase (gene nadE), respectively, are indispensable and conserved in nearly all bacterial pathogens. However, a comparative genome analysis of Francisella tularensis allowed us to predict the existence of an alternative route of NAD synthesis in this category A priority pathogen, the causative agent of tularaemia. In this route, the amidation of NaMN to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) occurs before the adenylylation reaction, which converts this alternative intermediate to the NAD cofactor. The first step is catalyzed by NMN synthetase, which was identified and characterized in this study. A crystal structure of this enzyme, a divergent member of the NadE family, was solved at 1.9-Å resolution in complex with reaction products, providing a rationale for its unusual substrate preference for NaMN over NaAD. The second step is performed by NMN adenylyltransferase of the NadM family. Here, we report validation of the predicted route (NaMN → NMN → NAD) in F. tularensis including mathematical modeling, in vitro reconstitution, and in vivo metabolite analysis in comparison with a canonical route (NaMN → NaAD → NAD) of NAD biosynthesis as represented by another deadly bacterial pathogen, Bacillus anthracis. PMID:19204287

  2. Analysis of NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H cofactors by imprinted polymer membranes associated with ion-sensitive field-effect transistor devices and Au-quartz crystals.

    PubMed

    Pogorelova, Svetlana P; Zayats, Maya; Bourenko, Tatyana; Kharitonov, Andrei B; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Katz, Eugenii; Willner, Itamar

    2003-02-01

    Specific recognition sites for the NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H cofactors are imprinted in a cross-linked acrylamide-acrylamidophenylboronic acid copolymer membrane. The imprinted membranes, associated with pH-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) or Au-quartz piezoelectric crystals, enable the potentiometric or microgravimetric analysis of the oxidized NAD(P)+ cofactors and the reduced NAD(P)H cofactors, respectively. The NAD+- and NADP+-imprinted membranes associated with the ISFET allow the analysis of NAD+ and NADP+ with sensitivities that correspond to 15.0 and 18.0 mVdecade(-1) and detection limits of 4 x 10(-7) and 2 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The NADH- and NADPH-imprinted membranes associated with the ISFET device enable the analysis of NADH and NADPH with sensitivities that correspond to 24.2 and 21.8 mV x decade(-1) and lower detection limits that are 1 x 10(-7) and 2 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The ISFET devices functionalized with the NADH and NADPH membranes are employed in the analysis of the biocatalyzed oxidation of lactic acid and ethanol in the presence of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. PMID:12585477

  3. TEMPOL increases NAD(+) and improves redox imbalance in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Yamato, Mayumi; Kawano, Kimika; Yamanaka, Yuki; Saiga, Misako; Yamada, Ken-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) processes. NAD(+) and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD(+) production in the ascorbic acid-glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to investigate the effects of antioxidants and NAD(+)/NADH modulators on the metabolic imbalance in obese mice. Increases in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio by TEMPOL ameliorated the metabolic imbalance when combined with a dietary intervention, changing from a high-fat diet to a normal diet. Plasma levels of the superoxide marker dihydroethidium were higher in mice receiving the dietary intervention compared with a control diet, but were normalized with TEMPOL consumption. These findings provide novel insights into redox regulation in obesity. PMID:26942863

  4. Enhanced aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by regenerating NAD+ in Klebsiella pneumoniae and implications for the glycerol dissimilation pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Su, Mingyue; Ge, Xizhen; Tian, Pingfang

    2013-10-01

    In Klebsiella pneumoniae, 3-hydroxypropaldehyde is converted to 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Although ALDH overexpression stimulates the formation of 3-HP, it ceases to accumulate when NAD(+) is exhausted. Here we show that NAD(+) regeneration, together with ALDH overexpression, facilitates 3-HP production and benefits cell growth. Three distinct NAD(+)-regenerating enzymes: NADH oxidase and NADH dehydrogenase from K. pneumoniae, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were individually expressed in K. pneumoniae. In vitro assay showed their higher activities than that of the control, indicating their capacities to regenerate NAD(+). When they were respectively co-expressed with ALD4, an ALDH from S. cerevisiae, the activities of ALD4 were significantly elevated compared with that expressing ALD4 alone, suggesting that the regenerated NAD(+) enhanced the activity of ALD4. More interestingly, the growth rates of all NAD(+)-regenerating strains were prolonged in comparison with the control, indicating that NAD(+) regeneration stimulated cell proliferation. This study not only reveals the reliance of ALD4 activity on NAD(+) availability but also provides a method for regulating the dha regulon. PMID:23794046

  5. Layered compounds derived from vanadyl phosphate dihydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Melanova, K.; Votinsky, J.; Benes, L.; Zima, V.

    1995-09-01

    The layered crystalline solids stable in air with general formula [M(H{sub 2}O)]{sub x}(VO){sub 1{minus}x}PO{sub 4{sup {sm_bullet}}}2H{sub 2}O (M = Al, Cr, Fe, Ga; x = 0.15--0.20) were prepared by reaction of solid V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with a boiling aqueous solution of phosphoric acid and the corresponding metal salt. The elementary cells of these compounds are tetragonal (space symmetry group either P4/n or P4/nmm). The lattice parameters and densities were determined. The results of TG, DTA and magnetic susceptibility measurements are given.

  6. Inhibition of the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of CD38 by carbocyclic NAD analogues.

    PubMed

    Wall, K A; Klis, M; Kornet, J; Coyle, D; Amé, J C; Jacobson, M K; Slama, J T

    1998-11-01

    Carba-NAD and pseudocarba-NAD are carbocyclic analogues of NAD+ in which a 2,3-dihydroxycyclopentane methanol replaces the beta-d-ribonucleotide ring of the nicotinamide riboside moiety of NAD+ [Slama and Simmons (1988) Biochemistry 27, 183-193]. These carbocyclic NAD+ analogues, related to each other as diastereomers, have been tested as inhibitors of the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of human CD38, dog spleen NAD+ glycohydrolase, mouse CD38 and Aplysia californica cADP-ribose synthetase. Pseudocarba-NAD, the carbocyclic dinucleotide in which l-2,3-dihydroxycyclopentane methanol replaces the d-ribose of the nicotinamide riboside moiety of NAD+, was found to be the more potent inhibitor. Pseudocarba-NAD was shown to inhibit the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of human CD38 competitively, with Ki=148 microM determined for the recombinant extracellular protein domain and Ki=180 microM determined for the native protein expressed as a cell-surface enzyme on cultured Jurkat cells. Pseudocarba-NAD was shown to be a non-competitive inhibitor of the purified dog spleen NAD+ glycohydrolase, with Kis=47 miroM and Kii=198 microM. Neither pseudocarba-NAD nor carba-NAD inhibited mouse CD38 or Aplysia californica cADP-ribose synthetase significantly at concentrations up to 1 mM. The results underscore significant species differences in the sensitivity of these enzymes to inhibition, and indicate that pseudocarba-NAD will be useful as an inhibitor of the enzymic activity of human but not mouse CD38 in studies using cultured cells. PMID:9794804

  7. Inhibition of the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of CD38 by carbocyclic NAD analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Wall, K A; Klis, M; Kornet, J; Coyle, D; Amé, J C; Jacobson, M K; Slama, J T

    1998-01-01

    Carba-NAD and pseudocarba-NAD are carbocyclic analogues of NAD+ in which a 2,3-dihydroxycyclopentane methanol replaces the beta-d-ribonucleotide ring of the nicotinamide riboside moiety of NAD+ [Slama and Simmons (1988) Biochemistry 27, 183-193]. These carbocyclic NAD+ analogues, related to each other as diastereomers, have been tested as inhibitors of the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of human CD38, dog spleen NAD+ glycohydrolase, mouse CD38 and Aplysia californica cADP-ribose synthetase. Pseudocarba-NAD, the carbocyclic dinucleotide in which l-2,3-dihydroxycyclopentane methanol replaces the d-ribose of the nicotinamide riboside moiety of NAD+, was found to be the more potent inhibitor. Pseudocarba-NAD was shown to inhibit the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of human CD38 competitively, with Ki=148 microM determined for the recombinant extracellular protein domain and Ki=180 microM determined for the native protein expressed as a cell-surface enzyme on cultured Jurkat cells. Pseudocarba-NAD was shown to be a non-competitive inhibitor of the purified dog spleen NAD+ glycohydrolase, with Kis=47 miroM and Kii=198 microM. Neither pseudocarba-NAD nor carba-NAD inhibited mouse CD38 or Aplysia californica cADP-ribose synthetase significantly at concentrations up to 1 mM. The results underscore significant species differences in the sensitivity of these enzymes to inhibition, and indicate that pseudocarba-NAD will be useful as an inhibitor of the enzymic activity of human but not mouse CD38 in studies using cultured cells. PMID:9794804

  8. Virtual Screening to Identify Lead Inhibitors for Bacterial NAD Synthetase (NADs)

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Whitney Beysselance; Yang, Zhengrong; Kane, Tasha; Brouillette, Christie G.; Brouillette, Wayne J.

    2009-01-01

    Virtual screening was employed to identify new drug-like inhibitors of NAD synthetase (NADs) as antibacterial agents. Four databases of commercially available compounds were docked against three subsites of the NADs active site using FlexX in conjunction with CScore. Over 200 commercial compounds were purchased and evaluated in enzyme inhibition and antibacterial assays. 18 compounds inhibited NADs at or below 100 μM (7.6% hit rate), and two were selected for future SAR studies. PMID:19249205

  9. Influence of an organic and an inorganic additive on the crystallization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anee, T. K.; Meenakshi Sundaram, N.; Arivuoli, D.; Ramasamy, P.; Narayana Kalkura, S.

    2005-12-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was crystallized by single diffusion method under physiological pH, in the presence of cobalt and malic acid. The morphology, composition and microstructure of the grown crystals were analyzed using EDTA titration, UV-Visible, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These analyses showed that the grown crystals were Co 2+-doped DCPD. The temperature has influenced the dopant entry into DCPD crystals, but the dopant content and temperature were having not much influence on the crystal morphology. In pathological crystallization, the size and morphology are very important since they decide the mode of treatment to adopt. The morphological changes arise when the growth assay is doped with cobalt and malic acid. The effect of malic acid on the crystallization was highly specific, adsorbing on certain crystal faces during growth and producing different morphologies. At higher concentration, the morphology showed a feature frequently encountered in biomineralization, the orientational ordering in [0 0 1], leading to elongated crystals.

  10. The Importance of NAD in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Penberthy, W. Todd; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown but it manifests as a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease in the central nervous system (CNS). During chronic CNS inflammation, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) concentrations are altered by (T helper) Th1-derived cytokines through the coordinated induction of both indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and the ADP cyclase CD38 in pathogenic microglia and lymphocytes. While IDO activation may keep auto-reactive T cells in check, hyper-activation of IDO can leave neuronal CNS cells starving for extracellular sources of NAD. Existing data indicate that glia may serve critical functions as an essential supplier of NAD to neurons during times of stress. Administration of pharmacological doses of non-tryptophan NAD precursors ameliorates pathogenesis in animal models of MS. Animal models of MS involve artificially stimulated autoimmune attack of myelin by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or by viral-mediated demyelination using Thieler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). The WldS mouse dramatically resists razor axotomy mediated axonal degeneration. This resistance is due to increased efficiency of NAD biosynthesis that delays stress-induced depletion of axonal NAD and ATP. Although the WldS genotype protects against EAE pathogenesis, TMEV-mediated pathogenesis is exacerbated. In this review, we contrast the role of NAD in EAE versus TMEV demyelinating pathogenesis to increase our understanding of the pharmacotherapeutic potential of NAD signal transduction pathways. We speculate on the importance of increased SIRT1 activity in both PARP-1 inhibition and the potentially integral role of neuronal CD200 interactions through glial CD200R with induction of IDO in MS pathogenesis. A comprehensive review of immunomodulatory control of NAD biosynthesis and degradation in MS pathogenesis is presented. Distinctive pharmacological approaches designed for NAD-complementation or targeting NAD

  11. Vitamins and aging: pathways to NAD+ synthesis.

    PubMed

    Denu, John M

    2007-05-01

    Recent genetic evidence reveals additional salvage pathways for NAD(+) synthesis. In this issue, Belenky et al. (2007) report that nicotinamide riboside, a new NAD(+) precursor, regulates Sir2 deacetylase activity and life span in yeast. The ability of nicotinamide riboside to enhance life span does not depend on calorie restriction. PMID:17482537

  12. Nicotinamide Riboside Kinase Structures Reveal New Pathways to NAD+

    PubMed Central

    Bogan, Katrina L; Belenky, Peter; Wojcik, Marzena; Seidle, Heather F; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Yang, Tianle; Sauve, Anthony A; Park, Hee-Won; Brenner, Charles

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic nicotinamide riboside kinase (Nrk) pathway, which is induced in response to nerve damage and promotes replicative life span in yeast, converts nicotinamide riboside to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by phosphorylation and adenylylation. Crystal structures of human Nrk1 bound to nucleoside and nucleotide substrates and products revealed an enzyme structurally similar to Rossmann fold metabolite kinases and allowed the identification of active site residues, which were shown to be essential for human Nrk1 and Nrk2 activity in vivo. Although the structures account for the 500-fold discrimination between nicotinamide riboside and pyrimidine nucleosides, no enzyme feature was identified to recognize the distinctive carboxamide group of nicotinamide riboside. Indeed, nicotinic acid riboside is a specific substrate of human Nrk enzymes and is utilized in yeast in a novel biosynthetic pathway that depends on Nrk and NAD+ synthetase. Additionally, nicotinic acid riboside is utilized in vivo by Urh1, Pnp1, and Preiss-Handler salvage. Thus, crystal structures of Nrk1 led to the identification of new pathways to NAD+. PMID:17914902

  13. Nicotinamide riboside kinase structures reveal new pathways to NAD+.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Wolfram; Rabeh, Wael M; Bogan, Katrina L; Belenky, Peter; Wojcik, Marzena; Seidle, Heather F; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Yang, Tianle; Sauve, Anthony A; Park, Hee-Won; Brenner, Charles

    2007-10-01

    The eukaryotic nicotinamide riboside kinase (Nrk) pathway, which is induced in response to nerve damage and promotes replicative life span in yeast, converts nicotinamide riboside to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by phosphorylation and adenylylation. Crystal structures of human Nrk1 bound to nucleoside and nucleotide substrates and products revealed an enzyme structurally similar to Rossmann fold metabolite kinases and allowed the identification of active site residues, which were shown to be essential for human Nrk1 and Nrk2 activity in vivo. Although the structures account for the 500-fold discrimination between nicotinamide riboside and pyrimidine nucleosides, no enzyme feature was identified to recognize the distinctive carboxamide group of nicotinamide riboside. Indeed, nicotinic acid riboside is a specific substrate of human Nrk enzymes and is utilized in yeast in a novel biosynthetic pathway that depends on Nrk and NAD+ synthetase. Additionally, nicotinic acid riboside is utilized in vivo by Urh1, Pnp1, and Preiss-Handler salvage. Thus, crystal structures of Nrk1 led to the identification of new pathways to NAD+. PMID:17914902

  14. A Case of Randall's Plugs Associated to Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate Calculi.

    PubMed

    Grases, Felix; Söhnel, Otakar; Costa-Bauza, Antonia; Servera, Antonio; Benejam, Juan

    2016-07-01

    A case of a patient who developed multiple calcium oxalate dihydrate calculi, some of them connected to intratubular calcifications (Randall's plugs), is presented. Randall's plugs were isolated and studied. The mechanism of Randall's plug development is also suggested. PMID:27335788

  15. Lisinopril dihydrate: single-crystal x-ray structure and physicochemical characterization of derived solid forms.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Milena; Catenacci, Laura; Cruickshank, Dyanne L; Caira, Mino R

    2013-10-01

    Screening for new solid forms of the antihypertensive lisinopril was performed by recrystallization of the commercial form, lisinopril dihydrate, from various solvents and by exposing the product of its dehydration to a series of vapors under controlled conditions. Modifications other than the dihydrate encountered in the study included new anhydrous and amorphous forms, with intrinsic dissolution rates significantly greater than that of the dihydrate. Further physicochemical characterization included constant and programmed temperature powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In the course of this study, the single-crystal X-ray structure of lisinopril dihydrate, [a = 14.550(2), b = 5.8917(8), c = 14.238(2) Å, β = 112.832(3)° at T = 173(2) K, space group P21 , Z = 2], was determined for the first time, revealing its double zwitterionic character in the solid state. PMID:23873413

  16. Peganine hydrochloride dihydrate an orally active antileishmanial agent.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Tanvir; Misra, Pragya; Gupta, Swati; Reddy, K Papi; Kant, Ruchir; Maulik, P R; Dube, Anuradha; Narender, T

    2009-05-01

    Protozoic infections caused by genus Leishmania pose an enormous public health threat in developing countries, compounded by the toxicity and resistance to current therapies. Under the aegis of our ongoing program on drug discovery and development on antileishmanial agents from plants, we carried out bioassay guided fractionation on Peganum harmala seeds which resulted in the isolation of 1 as an antileishmanial agent. 2D-NMR spectral data and single crystal X-ray crystallography data indicated 1 as peganine hydrochloride in dihydrated form. The compound 1 exhibited in-vitro activity against both extracellular promastigotes as well as intracellular amastigotes residing within murine macrophages in Leishmania donovani. Furthermore, 1 also exhibited in-vivo activity, 79.6 (+/-8.07)% against established VL in hamsters at a dose of 100mg/kgb.wt. PMID:19339182

  17. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-09-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins.

  18. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-01-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins. PMID:25253464

  19. A laboratory study of the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander D.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the kinetics of crystallisation of ternary H2O-H2SO4-HNO3 mixtures to produce nitric acid hydrate phases, as occurs in the lower stratosphere, have been a long-standing challenge for investigators in the laboratory. Understanding polar stratospheric chlorine chemistry and thereby ozone depletion is increasingly limited by descriptions of nucleation processes. Meteoric smoke particles have been considered in the past as heterogeneous nuclei, however recent studies suggest that these particles will largely dissolve, leaving mainly silica and alumina as solid inclusions. In this study the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrate phases have been measured in microliter droplets at polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) temperatures, using a droplet freezing assay. A clear heterogeneous effect was observed when silica particles were added. A parameterisation based on the number of droplets activated per nuclei surface area (ns) has been developed and compared to global model data. Nucleation experiments on identical droplets have been performed in an X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) to determine the nature of the phase which formed. β-Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) was observed alongside a mixture of Nitric Acid Dihydrate (NAD) phases. It is not possible to determine whether NAT nucleates directly or is formed by a phase transition from NAD (likely requiring the presence of a mediating liquid phase). Regardless, these results demonstrate the possibility of forming NAT on laboratory timescales. In the polar stratosphere, sulfuric acid (present at several weight percent of the liquid under equilibrium conditions) could provide such a liquid phase. This study therefor provides insight into previous discrepancies between phases formed in the laboratory and those observed in the atmosphere. It also provides a basis for future studies into atmospheric nucleation of solid PSCs.

  20. ARTD1 (PARP1) activation and NAD+ in DNA repair and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fouquerel, Elise; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NAD+, is a small metabolite coenzyme that is essential for the progress of crucial cellular pathways including glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and mitochondrial respiration. These processes consume and produce both oxidative and reduced forms of NAD (NAD+ and NADH). NAD+ is also important for ADP(ribosyl)ation reactions mediated by the ADP-ribosyltransferase enzymes (ARTDs) or deacetylation reactions catalysed by the sirtuins (SIRTs) which use NAD+ as a substrate. In this review, we highlight the significance of NAD+ catabolism in DNA repair and cell death through its utilization by ARTDs and SIRTs. We summarize the current findings on the involvement of ARTD1 activity in DNA repair and most specifically its involvement in the trigger of cell death mediated by energy depletion. By sharing the same substrate, the activities of ARTDs and SIRTs are tightly linked and dependent on each other and are thereby involved in the same cellular processes that play an important role in cancer biology, inflammatory diseases and ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:25283336

  1. Phosphate-responsive signaling pathway is a novel component of NAD+ metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shu-Ping; Lin, Su-Ju

    2011-04-22

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential cofactor involved in various cellular biochemical reactions. To date the signaling pathways that regulate NAD(+) metabolism remain unclear due to the dynamic nature and complexity of the NAD(+) metabolic pathways and the difficulty of determining the levels of the interconvertible pyridine nucleotides. Nicotinamide riboside (NmR) is a key pyridine metabolite that is excreted and re-assimilated by yeast and plays important roles in the maintenance of NAD(+) pool. In this study we establish a NmR-specific reporter system and use it to identify yeast mutants with altered NmR/NAD(+) metabolism. We show that the phosphate-responsive signaling (PHO) pathway contributes to control NAD(+) metabolism. Yeast strains with activated PHO pathway show increases in both the release rate and internal concentration of NmR. We further identify Pho8, a PHO-regulated vacuolar phosphatase, as a potential NmR production factor. We also demonstrate that Fun26, a homolog of human ENT (equilibrative nucleoside transporter), localizes to the vacuolar membrane and establishes the size of the vacuolar and cytosolic NmR pools. In addition, the PHO pathway responds to depletion of cellular nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and mediates nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) catabolism, thereby contributing to both NmR salvage and phosphate acquisition. Therefore, NaMN is a putative molecular link connecting the PHO signaling and NAD(+) metabolic pathways. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis and regulation of NAD(+) metabolism in higher eukaryotes. PMID:21349851

  2. Characterization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using a novel hydroxyapatite-based formulation.

    PubMed

    Alge, Daniel L; Santa Cruz, Grace; Goebel, W Scott; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2009-04-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cements are typically prepared using beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) as the base component. However, hydroxyapatite (HA) is an interesting alternative because of its potential for reducing cement acidity, as well as modulating cement properties via ionic substitutions. In the present study, we have characterized DCPD cements prepared with a novel formulation based on monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and HA. Cements were prepared using a 4:1 MCPM:HA molar ratio. The reactivity of HA in this system was verified by showing DCPD formation using poorly crystalline HA, as well as highly crystalline HA. Evaluation of cements prepared with poorly crystalline HA revealed that setting occurs rapidly in the MCPM/HA system, and that the use of a setting regulator is necessary to maintain workability of the cement paste. Compressive testing showed that MCPM/HA cements have strengths comparable to what has previously been published for DCPD cements. However, preliminary in vitro analysis of cement degradation revealed that conversion of DCPD to HA may occur much more rapidly in the MCPM/HA system compared to cements prepared with beta-TCP. Future studies should investigate this property further, as it could have important implications for the use of HA-based DCPD cement formulations. PMID:19349655

  3. Photoaffinity labeling of diphtheria toxin fragment A with NAD: structure of the photoproduct at position 148.

    PubMed

    Carroll, S F; McCloskey, J A; Crain, P F; Oppenheimer, N J; Marschner, T M; Collier, R J

    1985-11-01

    Irradiation of mixtures of diphtheria toxin fragment A and [carbonyl-14C]NAD with UV light (253.7 nm) is known to induce efficient transfer of the radiolabel to position 148, corresponding to glutamic acid in the unmodified protein. Here we report the structure of the photoproduct at position 148, as determined by chemical and photochemical methods, fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. The photoproduct [an alpha-amino-gamma-(6-nicotin-amidyl)butyric acid residue] contains the entire nicotinamide moiety of NAD linked via its number 6 carbon to the decarboxylated gamma-methylene carbon of Glu-148. No portion of the ADP-ribosyl group of NAD is present. These findings are consistent with the idea that Glu-148 lies at or near the catalytic center of diphtheria toxin. PMID:3864158

  4. Binding of NAD+ to pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M D; Irons, L I; van Heyningen, S

    1991-06-24

    The equilibrium dissociation constant of NAD+ and pertussis toxin was determined by equilibrium dialysis and by the quenching of the protein's intrinsic fluorescence on titration with NAD+. A binding constant, Kd, of 24 +/- 2 microM at 30 degrees C was obtained from equilibrium dialysis, consistent with the previously determined value for the Michaelis constant, Km, of 30 +/- 5 microM for NAD+ (when the toxin is catalysing the ADP-ribosylation of water and of dithiothreitol). The intrinsic fluorescence of pertussis toxin was quenched by up to 60% on titration with NAD+, and after correction for dilution and inner filter effects, a Kd value of 27 microM at 30 degrees C was obtained, agreeing well with that found by equilibrium dialysis. The binding constants were measured at a number of temperatures using both techniques, and from this the enthalpy of binding of NAD+ to toxin was determined to be 30 kJ.mol-1, a typical value for a protein-ligand interaction. There is one binding site for NAD+ per toxin molecule. PMID:1648404

  5. Structure and spectral properties of L-histidinium dipicrate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Sethuram, M; Dhandapani, M; Sethu Raman, M; Amirthaganesan, G; Senthilkumar, K

    2014-01-24

    Non-linear optical active L-histidinium dipicrate dihydrate (LHDD) single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method. The Fourier transform FT-IR, FT-Raman, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of the crystal have been recorded and analysed. The spectral analyses confirm the formation of the compound and the stoichiometry. The geometry and spectral characteristics were examined using the density functional theory (DFT) method, B3LYP with 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The first-order hyperpolarisability, energies of frontier molecular orbitals and the Mulliken population analysis were also calculated. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap value 2.73 eV indicates the charge transfer from picrate to histidinium through the hydrogen bond. The second-order NLO properties of the molecule are studied by Kurtz-Perry powder technique. SHG efficiency of the compound is nearly 2.5 times greater than KDP. Theoretical calculations indicate hyperpolarisability of LHDD is 39 times greater than urea. The results show that the title molecule can be used for opto-electronic applications. PMID:24044988

  6. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate, USP material compatibility with gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Quiles, Maritza

    Gamma radiation is a commonly used method to reduce the microbial bioburden in compatible materials when it is applied at appropriate dose levels. Gamma irradiation kills bacteria and mold by breaking down the organism’s DNA and inhibiting cell division. The purpose of this study is to determine the radiation dosage to be used to treat Dibasic Calcium Phosphate Dihydrate, USP (DCPD) and to evaluate its physicochemical effects if any, on this material. This material will be submitted to various doses of gamma radiation that were selected based on literature review and existing regulations that demonstrate that this method is effective to reduce or eliminate microbial bioburden in natural source and synthetic materials. Analytical testing was conducted to the DCPD exposed material in order to demonstrate that gamma radiation does not alter the physicochemical properties and material still acceptable for use in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products. The results obtained through this study were satisfactory and demonstrated that the gamma irradiation dosages from 5 to 30 kGy can be applied to DCPD without altering its physicochemical properties. These are supported by the Assay test data evaluation of lots tested before and after gamma irradiation implementation that show no significant statistical difference between irradiated and non irradiated assay results. The results of this study represent an achievement for the industry since they provide as an alternative the use of Gamma irradiation technology to control the microbial growth in DCPD.

  7. Disruption of NAD+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Mishra, Anurag; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim; Gothe, Scott A; Krynetskiy, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS: We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters (diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding. RESULTS: Using MALDI-TOF analysis, we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94, S98, and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH, we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH in the nuclear fractions of A549, HCT116, and SW48 cancer cells after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis, and estimated enzymatic properties, intranuclear distribution, and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+ (Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99I vs 57 ± 11.1 µmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners. PMID:26629320

  8. Isolation of NAD cycle mutants defective in nicotinamide mononucleotide deamidase in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Cheng, W; Roth, J

    1995-12-01

    The NAD or pyridine nucleotide cycle is the sequence of reactions involved in the breakdown of NAD to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and regeneration of NAD. This cycle is fivefold more active during aerobic growth of Salmonella typhimurium and under this condition breaks down half of the NAD pool every 90 min. DNA ligase is known to convert NAD to NMN but is only a minor contributor to the NAD cycle during aerobic growth. The dominant aerobic route of NMN formation is otherwise uncharacterized. Accumulated NMN generated by either of these routes is potentially dangerous in that it can inhibit the essential enzyme DNA ligase. The reactions which recycle NMN to NAD may serve to minimize the inhibition of ligase and other enzymes by accumulated NMN. The predominant recycling reaction in S. typhimurium appears to be NMN deamidase, which converts NMN directly to the biosynthetic intermediate nicotinic acid mononucleotide. Mutants defective in this recycling step were isolated and characterized. By starting with a ligase-deficient (lig mutant) parent strain that requires deamidase to assimilate exogenous NMN, two classes of mutants that are unable to grow on minimal NMN media were isolated. One class (pncC) maps at 83.7 min and shows only 2% of the wild-type levels of NMN deamidase. Under aerobic conditions, a lig+ allele allows a pncC mutant to grow on NMN and restores some deamidase activity. This growth ability and enzyme activity are not found in lig+ strains grown without oxygen. This suggests that the existence of a second NMN deamidase (pncL) dependent on ligase and stimulated during aerobic growth. The second class of mutants (pncD) gains a requirement for isoleucine plus valine with growth in the presence of exogenous NMN. We propose that pncD mutations reduce the activity of an ilv biosynthetic enzyme that is naturally sensitive to inhibition by NMN. PMID:7592458

  9. PGC1α drives NAD biosynthesis linking oxidative metabolism to renal protection.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mei T; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K; Berg, Anders H; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bhasin, Manoj K; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B; Stillman, Isaac E; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P; Parikh, Samir M

    2016-03-24

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischaemia. Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients. Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α, is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis. Following renal ischaemia, Pgc1α(-/-) (also known as Ppargc1a(-/-)) mice develop local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (NAM, also known as nicotinamide), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Notably, exogenous NAM improves local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischaemic Pgc1α(-/-) mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulate the effects of NAM supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischaemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulates the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuates the de novo pathway. NAM enhances NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augments production of the fat breakdown product β-hydroxybutyrate, leading to increased production of prostaglandin PGE2 (ref. 5), a secreted autacoid that maintains renal function. NAM treatment reverses established ischaemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-hydroxybutyrate signalling or prostaglandin production similarly abolishes PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in ageing and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate NAM and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance. PMID:26982719

  10. Novel Type II and Monomeric NAD+ Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenases: Phylogenetic Affinity, Enzymatic Characterization, and Evolutionary Implication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Lv, Changqi; Zhu, Guoping

    2015-01-01

    NAD+ use is an ancestral trait of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), and the NADP+ phenotype arose through evolution as an ancient adaptation event. However, no NAD+-specific IDHs have been found among type II IDHs and monomeric IDHs. In this study, novel type II homodimeric NAD-IDHs from Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901 IDH (OlIDH) and Micromonas sp. RCC299 (MiIDH), and novel monomeric NAD-IDHs from Campylobacter sp. FOBRC14 IDH (CaIDH) and Campylobacter curvus (CcIDH) were reported for the first time. The homodimeric OlIDH and monomeric CaIDH were determined by size exclusion chromatography and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. All the four IDHs were demonstrated to be NAD+-specific, since OlIDH, MiIDH, CaIDH and CcIDH displayed 99-fold, 224-fold, 61-fold and 37-fold preferences for NAD+ over NADP+, respectively. The putative coenzyme discriminating amino acids (Asp326/Met327 in OlIDH, Leu584/Asp595 in CaIDH) were evaluated, and the coenzyme specificities of the two mutants, OlIDH R326H327 and CaIDH H584R595, were completely reversed from NAD+ to NADP+. The detailed biochemical properties, including optimal reaction pH and temperature, thermostability, and metal ion effects, of OlIDH and CaIDH were further investigated. The evolutionary connections among OlIDH, CaIDH, and all the other forms of IDHs were described and discussed thoroughly. PMID:25775177

  11. Single sample extraction and HPLC processing for quantification of NAD and NADH levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sporty, J; Kabir, M M; Turteltaub, K; Ognibene, T; Lin, S; Bench, G

    2008-01-10

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, approximately 10{sup 8} yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under non-oxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50-mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH{sub 3}CN + 50-mM ammonium acetate (3:1; v:v) was added to the cell lysates. After sample centrifugation to pellet precipitated proteins, organic solvent removal was performed on supernatants by chloroform extraction. The remaining aqueous phase was dried and resuspended in 50-mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV-VIS absorbance detection. Applicability of this procedure for quantifying NAD and NADH levels was evaluated by culturing yeast under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. NAD and NADH contents are similar to previously reported levels in yeast obtained using enzymatic assays performed separately on acid (for NAD) and alkali (for NADH) extracts. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (1) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in mammalian and bacterial cell cultures; and (2) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures.

  12. The plant mitochondrial mat-r gene/nad1 gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wolstenhome, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    We have completed sequencing segments of the maize mitochondrial (mt) DNA that contains all five of the exons (A-E) of the gene (nad1) for subunit I of the respiratory chain NADH dehydrogenase. Analysis of these sequences indicates that exons B and C are joined by a continuous group II intron, but the remaining exons are associated with partial group II introns and are encoded at widely separated locations in the maize mtDNA molecule. We have shown that mature transcripts of the maize nad1 gene contain 23 edited nucleotides, and that transcripts of maize and soybean mat-r genes contain 15 and 14 edits, respectively. The majority of edits in nad1 transcripts result in amino acid replacements that increase similarity between the maize NAD1 protein and NAD1 proteins of other plant species and of animal species. We found that the intron between exons b and c is not edited. From data obtained using PCR and sequencing we have shown that transcripts containing all possible exon combinations exist in maize mitochondria.

  13. [Photoinduced reduction of NAD(P) in the cells of green sulfur bacteria].

    PubMed

    Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    1975-01-01

    The spectrum of a photoinduced increase in luminescence of the cells of the gree sulphur bacterium Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum, within the range of 400 to 520 nm, was found to correspond to the spectrum of luminescence of NADH in the protein-bound form. Photoinduced reduction of NAD(P) in green bacteria, contrary to purple bacteria, is not susceptible to the action of p-chlorocarbonylcyanide phenlhydrazone which uncouples photophosphorylation. Therefore, in Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum, NAD(P) is reduced by direct non-cyclic transport of electrons via the photosynthetic chain. NAD(P)H is utilized mainly in the system of CO2 fixation; the process is inhibited by fluoroacetate, and the inhibition is eliminated by substrates of the cycle of carboxylic acids. PMID:2843

  14. 7 CFR 614.15 - Implementation of final NAD determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Implementation of final NAD determinations. 614.15 Section 614.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... Implementation of final NAD determinations. (a) No later than 30 days after a NAD determination becomes a...

  15. 7 CFR 614.15 - Implementation of final NAD determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Implementation of final NAD determinations. 614.15 Section 614.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES... Implementation of final NAD determinations. (a) No later than 30 days after a NAD determination becomes a...

  16. Growth of L-lysine monohydrochloride dihydrate bulk single crystal by Sankaranarayanan—Ramasamy (SR) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh Babu, R.; Sethuraman, K.; Gopalakrishnan, R.; Ramasamy, P.

    2006-12-01

    Unidirectional bulk semi-organic nonlinear optical single crystal of L-lysine monohydrochloride dihydrate ( L-LMHCl) has been grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method. The growth conditions have been optimized. The optical transparency of the grown crystal was measured.

  17. Synthesis, growth, optical, dielectric and thermal studies of lithium hydrogen phthalate dihydrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil, A.; Ramasamy, P.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2009-04-01

    The semi-organic lithium hydrogen phthalate dihydrate (LHP dihydrate) was synthesized. The LHP dihydrate single crystal was grown by slow evaporation solution technique with water as solvent. Transparent, colourless crystal of size 10 mm×10 mm×50 mm with well-defined morphology was grown. The grown crystals were characterized by powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, UV-vis, fluorescence, dielectric, TG/DTA and micro hardness studies. The crystal structure and the unit cell parameters were analyzed from the X-ray diffraction studies. The structural perfection of the grown crystal has been analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) rocking curve measurements. The FT-IR spectrum analysis has confirmed the functional group in the LHP dihydrate single crystals. The range and percentage of optical transmission are ascertained by recording the UV-vis spectrum. The thermal behavior of the crystals has been investigated by TG/DTA analysis.

  18. Identification of arylazido-. beta. -alanyl NAD/sup +/ modified site in the rabbit muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydeogenase by microsequencing and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Lee, T.D.; Legesse, K.; Shively, J.E.

    1985-05-01

    Arylazido-BETA-alanyl NAD/sup +/, A3'-0-((3-(N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl) amino) propionyl)) NAD/sup +/, is a photoaffinity analog of NAD/sup +/. The NAD/sup +/ analog has been previously demonstrated to modify glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in a very specific manner and probably at the active site of the enzyme. The labeling experiment utilizing (/sup 3/H)-arylazido-..beta..-alanyl NAD/sup +/ revealed that the analog is associated exclusively with a tryptic peptide which has the sequence as Ile-Val-Ser-Asn-Ala-Ser-Cys-Thr-Thr-Asn. In comparison to the amino acid sequence of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydeogenase from other species this peptide is in a highly conserved region and is part of the active site of enzyme. The cysteine residue at position seven was predominantly labeled and suggested to be the site modified by arylazido-..beta..-alanyl NAD/sup +/. This cysteins residue corresponds to the Cys-149 in the pig muscle enzyme and which has been shown to be an essential residue for the enzyme activity. These results demonstrate that arylazido-..beta..-alanyl NAD/sup +/ is a useful photoaffinity probe to characterize the active site of NAD(H) dependent enzymes.

  19. Plant Defensins NaD1 and NaD2 Induce Different Stress Response Pathways in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Dracatos, Peter M; Payne, Jennifer; Di Pietro, Antonio; Anderson, Marilyn A; Plummer, Kim M

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana alata defensins 1 and 2 (NaD1 and NaD2) are plant defensins from the ornamental tobacco that have antifungal activity against a variety of fungal pathogens. Some plant defensins interact with fungal cell wall O-glycosylated proteins. Therefore, we investigated if this was the case for NaD1 and NaD2, by assessing the sensitivity of the three Aspergillus nidulans (An) O-mannosyltransferase (pmt) knockout (KO) mutants (An∆pmtA, An∆pmtB, and An∆pmtC). An∆pmtA was resistant to both defensins, while An∆pmtC was resistant to NaD2 only, suggesting NaD1 and NaD2 are unlikely to have a general interaction with O-linked side chains. Further evidence of this difference in the antifungal mechanism was provided by the dissimilarity of the NaD1 and NaD2 sensitivities of the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) signalling knockout mutants from the cell wall integrity (CWI) and high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. HOG pathway mutants were sensitive to both NaD1 and NaD2, while CWI pathway mutants only displayed sensitivity to NaD2. PMID:27598152

  20. The Peroxisomal NAD Carrier from Arabidopsis Imports NAD in Exchange with AMP1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schroers, Martin G.; Wiese, Jan; Facchinelli, Fabio; Wilkinson, Sabrina; Charton, Lennart; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Waterham, Hans R.

    2016-01-01

    Cofactors such as NAD, AMP, and Coenzyme A (CoA) are essential for a diverse set of reactions and pathways in the cell. Specific carrier proteins are required to distribute these cofactors to different cell compartments, including peroxisomes. We previously identified a peroxisomal transport protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) called the peroxisomal NAD carrier (PXN). When assayed in vitro, this carrier exhibits versatile transport functions, e.g. catalyzing the import of NAD or CoA, the exchange of NAD/NADH, and the export of CoA. These observations raise the question about the physiological function of PXN in plants. Here, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to address this question. First, we confirmed that PXN, when expressed in yeast, is active and targeted to yeast peroxisomes. Secondl, detailed uptake analyses revealed that the CoA transport function of PXN can be excluded under physiological conditions due to its low affinity for this substrate. Third, we expressed PXN in diverse mutant yeast strains and investigated the suppression of the mutant phenotypes. These studies provided strong evidences that PXN was not able to function as a CoA transporter or a redox shuttle by mediating a NAD/NADH exchange, but instead catalyzed the import of NAD into peroxisomes against AMP in intact yeast cells. PMID:27208243

  1. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  2. Evidence for a Direct Effect of the NAD+ Precursor Acipimox on Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Humans

    PubMed Central

    van de Weijer, Tineke; Phielix, Esther; Bilet, Lena; Williams, Evan G.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Bierwagen, Alessandra; Livingstone, Roshan; Nowotny, Peter; Sparks, Lauren M.; Paglialunga, Sabina; Szendroedi, Julia; Havekes, Bas; Moullan, Norman; Pirinen, Eija; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B.; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Recent preclinical studies showed the potential of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) precursors to increase oxidative phosphorylation and improve metabolic health, but human data are lacking. We hypothesize that the nicotinic acid derivative acipimox, an NAD+ precursor, would directly affect mitochondrial function independent of reductions in nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. In a multicenter randomized crossover trial, 21 patients with type 2 diabetes (age 57.7 ± 1.1 years, BMI 33.4 ± 0.8 kg/m2) received either placebo or acipimox 250 mg three times daily dosage for 2 weeks. Acipimox treatment increased plasma NEFA levels (759 ± 44 vs. 1,135 ± 97 μmol/L for placebo vs. acipimox, P < 0.01) owing to a previously described rebound effect. As a result, skeletal muscle lipid content increased and insulin sensitivity decreased. Despite the elevated plasma NEFA levels, ex vivo mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle increased. Subsequently, we showed that acipimox treatment resulted in a robust elevation in expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene sets and a mitonuclear protein imbalance, which may indicate activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Further studies in C2C12 myotubes confirmed a direct effect of acipimox on NAD+ levels, mitonuclear protein imbalance, and mitochondrial oxidative capacity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that NAD+ boosters can also directly affect skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in humans. PMID:25352640

  3. CD73 protein as a source of extracellular precursors for sustained NAD+ biosynthesis in FK866-treated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Grozio, Alessia; Sociali, Giovanna; Sturla, Laura; Caffa, Irene; Soncini, Debora; Salis, Annalisa; Raffaelli, Nadia; De Flora, Antonio; Nencioni, Alessio; Bruzzone, Santina

    2013-09-01

    NAD(+) is mainly synthesized in human cells via the "salvage" pathways starting from nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, or nicotinamide riboside (NR). The inhibition with FK866 of the enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), catalyzing the first reaction in the "salvage" pathway from nicotinamide, showed potent antitumor activity in several preclinical models of solid and hematologic cancers. In the clinical studies performed with FK866, however, no tumor remission was observed. Here we demonstrate that low micromolar concentrations of extracellular NAD(+) or NAD(+) precursors, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and NR, can reverse the FK866-induced cell death, this representing a plausible explanation for the failure of NAMPT inhibition as an anti-cancer therapy. NMN is a substrate of both ectoenzymes CD38 and CD73, with generation of NAM and NR, respectively. In this study, we investigated the roles of CD38 and CD73 in providing ectocellular NAD(+) precursors for NAD(+) biosynthesis and in modulating cell susceptibility to FK866. By specifically silencing or overexpressing CD38 and CD73, we demonstrated that endogenous CD73 enables, whereas CD38 impairs, the conversion of extracellular NMN to NR as a precursor for intracellular NAD(+) biosynthesis in human cells. Moreover, cell viability in FK866-treated cells supplemented with extracellular NMN was strongly reduced in tumor cells, upon pharmacological inhibition or specific down-regulation of CD73. Thus, our study suggests that genetic or pharmacologic interventions interfering with CD73 activity may prove useful to increase cancer cell sensitivity to NAMPT inhibitors. PMID:23880765

  4. Physiology-based kinetic modeling of neuronal energy metabolism unravels the molecular basis of NAD(P)H fluorescence transients.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Kann, Oliver; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2015-09-01

    Imaging of the cellular fluorescence of the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) is one of the few metabolic readouts that enable noninvasive and time-resolved monitoring of the functional status of mitochondria in neuronal tissues. Stimulation-induced transient changes in NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity frequently display a biphasic characteristic that is influenced by various molecular processes, e.g., intracellular calcium dynamics, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, the malate-aspartate shuttle, the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle, oxygen supply or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) demand. To evaluate the relative impact of these processes, we developed and validated a detailed physiologic mathematical model of the energy metabolism of neuronal cells and used the model to simulate metabolic changes of single cells and tissue slices under different settings of stimulus-induced activity and varying nutritional supply of glucose, pyruvate or lactate. Notably, all experimentally determined NAD(P)H responses could be reproduced with one and the same generic cellular model. Our computations reveal that (1) cells with quite different metabolic status may generate almost identical NAD(P)H responses and (2) cells of the same type may quite differently contribute to aggregate NAD(P)H responses recorded in brain slices, depending on the spatial location within the tissue. Our computational approach reconciles different and sometimes even controversial experimental findings and improves our mechanistic understanding of the metabolic changes underlying live-cell NAD(P)H fluorescence transients. PMID:25899300

  5. Exploring NAD+ metabolism in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Inês; Varela, Patrícia; Belinha, Ana; Gaifem, Joana; Laforge, Mireille; Vergnes, Baptiste; Estaquier, Jérôme; Silvestre, Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a vital molecule found in all living cells. NAD(+) intracellular levels are dictated by its synthesis, using the de novo and/or salvage pathway, and through its catabolic use as co-enzyme or co-substrate. The regulation of NAD(+) metabolism has proven to be an adequate drug target for several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative or inflammatory diseases. Increasing interest has been given to NAD(+) metabolism during innate and adaptive immune responses suggesting that its modulation could also be relevant during host-pathogen interactions. While the maintenance of NAD(+) homeostatic levels assures an adequate environment for host cell survival and proliferation, fluctuations in NAD(+) or biosynthetic precursors bioavailability have been described during host-pathogen interactions, which will interfere with pathogen persistence or clearance. Here, we review the double-edged sword of NAD(+) metabolism during host-pathogen interactions emphasizing its potential for treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:26718485

  6. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  7. A Novel Type II NAD+-Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from the Marine Bacterium Congregibacter litoralis KT71

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Cai; Tian, Chang-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Xu, Lei; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In most living organisms, isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) convert isocitrate into ɑ-ketoglutarate (ɑ-KG). Phylogenetic analyses divide the IDH protein family into two subgroups: types I and II. Based on cofactor usage, IDHs are either NAD+-specific (NAD-IDH) or NADP+-specific (NADP-IDH); NADP-IDH evolved from NAD-IDH. Type I IDHs include NAD-IDHs and NADP-IDHs; however, no type II NAD-IDHs have been reported to date. This study reports a novel type II NAD-IDH from the marine bacterium Congregibacter litoralis KT71 (ClIDH, GenBank accession no. EAQ96042). His-tagged recombinant ClIDH was produced in Escherichia coli and purified; the recombinant enzyme was NAD+-specific and showed no detectable activity with NADP+. The Km values of the enzyme for NAD+ were 262.6±7.4 μM or 309.1±11.2 μM with Mg2+ or Mn2+ as the divalent cation, respectively. The coenzyme specificity of a ClIDH Asp487Arg/Leu488His mutant was altered, and the preference of the mutant for NADP+ was approximately 24-fold higher than that for NAD+, suggesting that ClIDH is an NAD+-specific ancestral enzyme in the type II IDH subgroup. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation analyses revealed the homohexameric structure of ClIDH, which is the first IDH hexamer discovered thus far. A 163-amino acid segment of CIIDH is essential to maintain its polymerization structure and activity, as a truncated version lacking this region forms a non-functional monomer. ClIDH was dependent on divalent cations, the most effective being Mn2+. The maximal activity of purified recombinant ClIDH was achieved at 35°C and pH 7.5, and a heat inactivation experiment showed that a 20-min incubation at 33°C caused a 50% loss of ClIDH activity. The discovery of a NAD+-specific, type II IDH fills a gap in the current classification of IDHs, and sheds light on the evolution of type II IDHs. PMID:25942017

  8. NADS — Nuclear and Atomic Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, Michael S.; Beck, Bret; McNabb, Dennis

    2005-05-01

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations of the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V, and ENDF/B-VI, as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/.

  9. NADS - Nuclear And Atomic Data System

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Beck, B; McNabb, D

    2004-09-17

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross-sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/

  10. NadA Diversity and Carriage in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Caugant, Dominique A.; Mora, Marirosa; Brunelli, Brunella; Capecchi, Barbara; Ciucchi, Laura; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2004-01-01

    NadA is a novel vaccine candidate recently identified in Neisseria meningitidis and involved in adhesion to host tissues. The nadA gene has been found in approximately 50% of the strains isolated from patients and in three of the four hypervirulent lineages of non-serogroup A strains. Here we investigated the presence of the nadA gene in 154 meningococcal strains isolated from healthy people (carrier strains). Only 25 (16.2%) of the 154 carrier isolates harbored the nadA gene. The commensal species Neisseria lactamica was also found not to have the nadA gene. Eighteen of the carrier strains belonged to the ET-5 and ET-37 hypervirulent clusters, indicating that only the 5.1% of the genuine carrier population actually harbored nadA (7 of 136 strains). Five of the seven strains harbored a novel allele of the nadA gene that was designated nadA4. The NadA4 protein was present on the bacterial surface as heat-stable high-molecular-weight oligomers. Antibodies against the recombinant NadA4 protein were bactericidal against homologous strains, whereas the activity against other NadA alleles was weak. In conclusion, the nadA gene segregates differently in the population of strains isolated from healthy individuals and in the population of strains isolated from patients. The presence of NadA can therefore be used as a tool to study the dynamics of meningococcal infections and understand why this bacterium, which is mostly a commensal, can become a severe pathogen. PMID:15213166

  11. NadA diversity and carriage in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Caugant, Dominique A; Mora, Marirosa; Brunelli, Brunella; Capecchi, Barbara; Ciucchi, Laura; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2004-07-01

    NadA is a novel vaccine candidate recently identified in Neisseria meningitidis and involved in adhesion to host tissues. The nadA gene has been found in approximately 50% of the strains isolated from patients and in three of the four hypervirulent lineages of non-serogroup A strains. Here we investigated the presence of the nadA gene in 154 meningococcal strains isolated from healthy people (carrier strains). Only 25 (16.2%) of the 154 carrier isolates harbored the nadA gene. The commensal species Neisseria lactamica was also found not to have the nadA gene. Eighteen of the carrier strains belonged to the ET-5 and ET-37 hypervirulent clusters, indicating that only the 5.1% of the genuine carrier population actually harbored nadA (7 of 136 strains). Five of the seven strains harbored a novel allele of the nadA gene that was designated nadA4. The NadA4 protein was present on the bacterial surface as heat-stable high-molecular-weight oligomers. Antibodies against the recombinant NadA4 protein were bactericidal against homologous strains, whereas the activity against other NadA alleles was weak. In conclusion, the nadA gene segregates differently in the population of strains isolated from healthy individuals and in the population of strains isolated from patients. The presence of NadA can therefore be used as a tool to study the dynamics of meningococcal infections and understand why this bacterium, which is mostly a commensal, can become a severe pathogen. PMID:15213166

  12. [Enzymes related with NAD synthesis promote conversion of 1,4-butanediol to 4-hydroxybutyrate].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Chen, Guoqiang

    2011-12-01

    Besides medical application, 4-hydroxybutyrate (4-HB) is a precursor of P3HB4HB, a bioplastic showing excellent physical properties and degradability. Escherichia coli S17-1 (pZL-dhaT-aldD) can transform 1, 4-butanediol (1,4-BD) into 4HB with participation of cofactor NAD. To enhance productivity, nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (PncB) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase (NadE) were overexpressed to increase intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentration and promote reaction process. The shake flask fermentation result showed that the conversion rate increased by 13.03% with help of PncB-NadE, leading to 4.87 g/L 4HB from 10 g/L 1,4-BD, and productivity was increased by 40.91% to 1.86 g/g. These results demonstrated that expression of PncB and NadE is beneficial for conversion of 1,4-BD to 4HB. PMID:22506415

  13. Gene Transfers Shaped the Evolution of De Novo NAD+ Biosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ternes, Chad M.; Schönknecht, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    NAD+ is an essential molecule for life, present in each living cell. It can function as an electron carrier or cofactor in redox biochemistry and energetics, and serves as substrate to generate the secondary messenger cyclic ADP ribose and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Although de novo NAD+ biosynthesis is essential, different metabolic pathways exist in different eukaryotic clades. The kynurenine pathway starting with tryptophan was most likely present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes, and is active in fungi and animals. The aspartate pathway, detected in most photosynthetic eukaryotes, was probably acquired from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that gave rise to chloroplasts. An evolutionary analysis of enzymes catalyzing de novo NAD+ biosynthesis resulted in evolutionary trees incongruent with established organismal phylogeny, indicating numerous gene transfers. Endosymbiotic gene transfers probably introduced the aspartate pathway into eukaryotes and may have distributed it among different photosynthetic clades. In addition, several horizontal gene transfers substituted eukaryotic genes with bacterial orthologs. Although horizontal gene transfer is accepted as a key mechanism in prokaryotic evolution, it is supposed to be rare in eukaryotic evolution. The essential metabolic pathway of de novo NAD+ biosynthesis in eukaryotes was shaped by numerous gene transfers. PMID:25169983

  14. Surrogate analyte approach for quantitation of endogenous NAD(+) in human acidified blood samples using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liling; Cui, Zhiyi; Deng, Yuzhong; Dean, Brian; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Liang, Xiaorong

    2016-02-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for the quantitative determination of NAD(+) in human whole blood using a surrogate analyte approach was developed and validated. Human whole blood was acidified using 0.5N perchloric acid at a ratio of 1:3 (v:v, blood:perchloric acid) during sample collection. 25μL of acidified blood was extracted using a protein precipitation method and the resulting extracts were analyzed using reverse-phase chromatography and positive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. (13)C5-NAD(+) was used as the surrogate analyte for authentic analyte, NAD(+). The standard curve ranging from 0.250 to 25.0μg/mL in acidified human blood for (13)C5-NAD(+) was fitted to a 1/x(2) weighted linear regression model. The LC-MS/MS response between surrogate analyte and authentic analyte at the same concentration was obtained before and after the batch run. This response factor was not applied when determining the NAD(+) concentration from the (13)C5-NAD(+) standard curve since the percent difference was less than 5%. The precision and accuracy of the LC-MS/MS assay based on the five analytical QC levels were well within the acceptance criteria from both FDA and EMA guidance for bioanalytical method validation. Average extraction recovery of (13)C5-NAD(+) was 94.6% across the curve range. Matrix factor was 0.99 for both high and low QC indicating minimal ion suppression or enhancement. The validated assay was used to measure the baseline level of NAD(+) in 29 male and 21 female human subjects. This assay was also used to study the circadian effect of endogenous level of NAD(+) in 10 human subjects. PMID:26766786

  15. Ratios of Fatty Acids at the sn-2 Position of Triacylglycerols Containing Dihydroxy Fatty Acids in Castor Oil by Mass Sprectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The triacylglycerols (TAG) containing dihydroxy fatty acids have been recently identified by mass spectrometry in castor oil. These new dihydroxy fatty acids were proposed earlier as 11,12-dihydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid (diOH18:1), 11,12-dihydroxy-9,13-octadecadienoic acid (diOH18:2) and 11,12-dihydr...

  16. Regulation of NAD biosynthetic enzymes modulates NAD-sensing processes to shape mammalian cell physiology under varying biological cues.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Silverio; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2015-09-01

    In addition to its role as a redox coenzyme, NAD is a substrate of various enzymes that split the molecule to either catalyze covalent modifications of target proteins or convert NAD into biologically active metabolites. The coenzyme bioavailability may be significantly affected by these reactions, with ensuing major impact on energy metabolism, cell survival, and aging. Moreover, through the activity of the NAD-dependent deacetylating sirtuins, NAD behaves as a beacon molecule that reports the cell metabolic state, and accordingly modulates transcriptional responses and metabolic adaptations. In this view, NAD biosynthesis emerges as a highly regulated process: it enables cells to preserve NAD homeostasis in response to significant NAD-consuming events and it can be modulated by various stimuli to induce, via NAD level changes, suitable NAD-mediated metabolic responses. Here we review the current knowledge on the regulation of mammalian NAD biosynthesis, with focus on the relevant rate-limiting enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. PMID:25770681

  17. NAD+ glycohydrolase, an ecto-enzyme of calf spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Muller, H M; Muller, C D; Schuber, F

    1983-01-01

    By using a sensitive fluorimetric assay of NAD+ glycohydrolase (EC 3.2.2.6), we showed that calf spleen cells are able to hydrolyse 1,N6-etheno-NAD+ given in the medium. The observed rates of substrate hydrolysis and product accumulation in the medium are equivalent. Moreover, the splenocytes are able to cleave the nicotinamide-ribose bond of a water-soluble polymer of NAD+, and their NAD+ glycohydrolase activity is fully inhibited by a high-molecular-weight Blue Dextran. Selective permeation of the cellular membrane digitonin revealed an intracellular pool of NAD+ glycohydrolase, which accounts for 25% of the total activity. We conclude that NAD+ glycohydrolase associated with the splenocytes has the characteristics of an ecto-enzyme. PMID:6192807

  18. Strength and nature of hydrogen bonding interactions in mono- and di-hydrated formamide complexes.

    PubMed

    Angelina, Emilio L; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2011-05-12

    In this work, mono- and di-hydrated complexes of the formamide were studied. The calculations were performed at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of approximation. The atoms in molecules theory (AIM), based on the topological properties of the electronic density distribution, was used to characterize the different types of bonds. The analysis of the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in the most stable mono- and di-hydrated formamide complexes shows a mutual reinforcement of the interactions, and some of these complexes can be considered as "bifunctional hydrogen bonding hydration complexes". In addition, we analyzed how the strength and the nature of the interactions, in mono-hydrated complexes, are modified by the presence of a second water molecule in di-hydrated formamide complexes. Structural changes, cooperativity, and electron density redistributions demonstrate that the H-bonds are stronger in the di-hydrated complexes than in the corresponding mono-hydrated complexes, wherein the σ- and π-electron delocalization were found. To explain the nature of such interactions, we carried out the atoms in molecules theory in conjunction with reduced variational space self-consistent field (RVS) decomposition analysis. On the basis of the local Virial theorem, the characteristics of the local electron energy density components at the bond critical points (BCPs) (the 1/4∇ (2)ρ(b) component of electron energy density and the kinetic energy density) were analyzed. These parameters were used in conjunction with the electron density and the Laplacian of the electron density to analyze the characteristics of the interactions. The analysis of the interaction energy components for the systems considered indicates that the strengthening of the hydrogen bonds is manifested by an increased contribution of the electrostatic energy component represented by the kinetic energy density at the BCP. PMID:21506592

  19. NAD- and NADP-dependent 7alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases from bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, I A; Williams, C N; Mahony, D E; Christie, W M

    1975-03-28

    Twenty strains of Bacteroides fragilis were screened for hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase activity in cell-free preparations. Eighteen strains were shown to contain NAD-dependent 7alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Sixteen of the strains containing the NAD-dependent enzyme also contained NADP-depedent 7alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, but invariably in lesser amounts. A strain particulary rich in both 7alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities was selected for further study. Measurement of activity as a function of pH revealed a fairly sharp optimal activity range of 9.5--10.0 for the NAD-dependent enzyme and a broad flat optimal range of 7.0--9.0 for the NADP-dependent enzyme. Michaelis constants for trihydroxy-bile acids for the NAD-dependent enzyme were in the range of 0.32--0.34 mM, whereas dihydroxy-bile acids gave a Km of 0.1 mM. Thin-layer chromatography studies on the oxidation product of 3alpha, 7alpha-dihydroxy-5beta-cholanoic acid (chenodeoxycholic acid) by the dehydrogenase revealed a band corresponding to that of synthetic 3alpha-hydroxy, 7-keto-5beta-cholanoic acid. Similarly the oxidation product of chenodeoxycholic acid by both 7alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and commercially available 3alpha-hy-droxysteroid dehydrogenase revealed a band corresponding to that of synthetic 3,7-diketo-5beta-cholanoic acid. Neither of these two oxidation products could be distinguished from those by the Escherichia coli dehydrogenase oxidation previously reported. Disc-gel electrophoresis of a cell-free lyophilized preparation indicated one active band for NAD-dependent activity of mobility similar to that for the NADP-dependent E. coli enzyme. The NADP-dependent dehydrogenase was unstable and rapidly lost activity after polyacylamide disc-gel electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, freezing on refrigeration at 4 degrees C. No 3 alpha- or 12alpha-oriented oxidoreductase activity was demonstrated in any of the strains examined. PMID:236764

  20. Nucleation and morphology of sodium metaborate dihydrate from NaOH solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shiyue; Zhang, Yifei; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Szaibelyite ore is an important boron mineral used for producing boron compounds. Sodium metaborate dihydrate can be prepared through leaching of the szaibelyite ore in NaOH solution and the leaching liquor mainly consists of NaBO2 and NaOH. In this work, the induction time for sodium metaborate dihydrate crystallized in NaOH solution from 30 to 50 °C was systematically investigated. The primary nucleation and growth mechanism were determined on the basis of the induction time measurements. The crystals of various morphologies under different crystallization conditions were obtained: the rod-like crystals preferred to form at low temperature, while the plate-like crystals formed at high temperature; when the crystallization temperature was 30 °C, the flat rod-like crystals formed at low supersaturation, while the slim rod-like crystals formed at high supersaturation. Finally, the growth mechanism of the sodium metaborate dihydrate was identified with various models and the 2D nucleation-mediated model gave satisfactory fitting results.

  1. Influence of crystal shape on the tableting performance of L-lysine monohydrochloride dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Sun, C; Grant, D J

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of crystal shape on the tableting performance of L-lysine monohydrochloride (LMH) dihydrate, using the method of data analysis developed by Joiris E et al. 1998. Pharm Res 15:1122-1130. Phase-pure crystals of LMH dihydrate, prism-shaped (S) and plate-shaped (T), were prepared by adjusting the composition of the crystallization solvent. At the same compaction pressure, T always gives stronger tablets than S, (i.e.; the tabletability of T is greater). The porosity of tablets from T crystals is always greater than that of S crystals when compressed at the same pressure, (i.e.; the compressibility of T is lower). The tensile strength of T tablets, at the same porosity, is greater than that of S tablets, (i.e.; the compactibility of T is greater). Therefore, the greater tabletability of T is a result of its better compactibility that overcomes the negative effects by its lower compressibility. The greater compactibility of T is related to favorable orientation of the slip planes in the tablet, corresponding to greater plasticity under load. The yield strengths of T and S crystals are essentially the same (20 MPa). Therefore, the crystal shape influences the tableting performance but does not, in principle, affect the yield strength of LMH dihydrate. PMID:11288101

  2. DEVELOPMENT, CHARACTERIZATION AND SOLUBILITY STUDY OF SOLID DISPERSIONS OF AZITHROMYCIN DIHYDRATE BY SOLVENT EVAPORATION METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Arora, S.C.; Sharma, P.K.; Irchhaiya, Raghuveer; Khatkar, Anurag; Singh, Neeraj; Gagoria, Jagbir

    2010-01-01

    Azithromycin Dihydrate (Poorly water soluble drug), when prepared as solid dispersion showed improved solubility and dissolution. So the main purpose of this investigation was to increase the solubility and dissolution rate of Azithromycin Dihydrate by the preparation of its solid dispersion with urea using solvent evaporation method. Physical mixtures and solid dispersions of Azithromycin Dihydrate were prepared by using urea as water-soluble carrier in various proportions (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4, 1:5, 1:6, 1:7 by weight), by employing solvent evaporation method. The drug release profile was studied and it was found that the dissolution rate and the dissolution parameters of the drug from the physical mixture as well as solid dispersion were higher than those of the intact drug. FT- IR spectra revealed no chemical incompatibility between drug and urea. Drug-polymer interactions were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Powder X-Ray Diffraction (PXRD). PMID:22247849

  3. NAD(+) biosynthesis and salvage--a phylogenetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Gossmann, Toni I; Ziegler, Mathias; Puntervoll, Pål; de Figueiredo, Luis F; Schuster, Stefan; Heiland, Ines

    2012-09-01

    NAD is best known as an electron carrier and a cosubstrate of various redox reactions. However, over the past 20 years, NAD(+) has been shown to be a key signaling molecule that mediates post-translational protein modifications and serves as precursor of ADP-ribose-containing messenger molecules, which are involved in calcium mobilization. In contrast to its role as a redox carrier, NAD(+)-dependent signaling processes involve the release of nicotinamide (Nam) and require constant replenishment of cellular NAD(+) pools. So far, very little is known about the evolution of NAD(P) synthesis in eukaryotes. In the present study, genes involved in NAD(P) metabolism in 45 species were identified and analyzed with regard to similarities and differences in NAD(P) synthesis. The results show that the Preiss-Handler pathway and NAD(+) kinase are present in all organisms investigated, and thus seem to be ancestral routes. Additionally, two pathways exist that convert Nam to NAD(+); we identified several species that have apparently functional copies of both biosynthetic routes, which have been thought to be mutually exclusive. Furthermore, our findings suggest the parallel phylogenetic appearance of Nam N-methyltransferase, Nam phosphoribosyl transferase, and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. PMID:22404877

  4. Critical role for NAD glycohydrolase in regulation of erythropoiesis by hematopoietic stem cells through control of intracellular NAD content.

    PubMed

    Nam, Tae-Sik; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Kim, Byung-Ju; Han, Myung-Kwan; Kim, Youngho; Moss, Joel; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2014-06-01

    NAD glycohydrolases (NADases) catalyze the hydrolysis of NAD to ADP-ribose and nicotinamide. Although many members of the NADase family, including ADP-ribosyltransferases, have been cloned and characterized, the structure and function of NADases with pure hydrolytic activity remain to be elucidated. Here, we report the structural and functional characterization of a novel NADase from rabbit reticulocytes. The novel NADase is a glycosylated, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface protein exclusively expressed in reticulocytes. shRNA-mediated knockdown of the NADase in bone marrow cells resulted in a reduction of erythroid colony formation and an increase in NAD level. Furthermore, treatment of bone marrow cells with NAD, nicotinamide, or nicotinamide riboside, which induce an increase in NAD content, resulted in a significant decrease in erythroid progenitors. These results indicate that the novel NADase may play a critical role in regulating erythropoiesis of hematopoietic stem cells by modulating intracellular NAD. PMID:24759100

  5. Ratios of regioisomers of triacylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The triacylglycerols (TAG) containing dihydroxy fatty acids have been recently identified by mass spectrometry in castor oil. These new dihydroxy fatty acids were proposed earlier as 11,12-dihydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid (diOH18:1), 11,12-dihydroxy-9,13-octadecadienoic acid (diOH18:2) and 11,12-dihydr...

  6. Regiospecific Quantification of Triacylglycerols Containing Dihydroxy Fatty Acids in Castor Oil by Mass Spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The triacylglycerols (TAG) containing dihydroxy fatty acids have been recently identified by mass spectrometry in castor oil. These new dihydroxy fatty acids were proposed earlier as 11,12-dihydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid (diOH18:1), 11,12-dihydroxy-9,13-octadecadienoic acid (diOH18:2) and 11,12-dihydr...

  7. Agents for replacement of NAD+/NADH system in enzymatic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.; Kerr, John B.; Lo, Christine H.

    2004-04-06

    Novel agents acting as co-factors for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H co-enzyme systems in enzymatic oxido-reductive reactions. Agents mimicking the action of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system in enzymatic oxidation/reduction of substrates into reduced or oxidized products. A method for selection and preparation of the mimicking agents for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system and a device comprising co-factors for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system.

  8. Reassessing the role of NAD as a prosurvival factor

    PubMed Central

    Preyat, Nicolas; Leo, Oberdan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms regulating the choice of cell demise remain largely unknown. NAD+, a key metabolite with well-known roles in cell metabolism, has been shown to counteract apoptosis while promoting necroptosis, a form of proinflammatory cell death. This observation identifies NAD+ availability as an important parameter with contrasting roles in the regulation of distinct regulated cell death programs. PMID:27308572

  9. In search for new antipsoriatic agents: NAD topical composition.

    PubMed

    Wozniacka, A; Szajerski, P; Adamus, J; Gebicki, J; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), adenosine precursor, in 37 patients suffering from psoriasis. As NAD(+) is known to be relatively unstable, the second goal was to establish the proper conditions for the satisfactory stability of topical NAD(+) composition. In each patient, two matching plaques were selected for the study. Topical treatment with 1 or 0.3% NAD(+) in Vaseline ointment administered twice daily was compared with overnight therapy with 0.1% anthralin applied for 12 h and placebo. The enzymatic method was applied to determine the stability of NAD(+) in Vaseline ointment. After a 4-week application, the reduction in erythema, infiltration and desquamation caused by 1 or 0.3% topical NAD(+) composition was similar to the reduction caused by 0.1% anthralin. It was demonstrated that NAD(+) underwent a considerable decomposition at room temperature, while it was sufficiently stable at 5 degrees C; thus, for a longer use the agent should be stored at fridge temperature. NAD(+) therapy combines good efficacy, cosmetic acceptability and convenient twice-daily application. PMID:17035720

  10. Boosting NAD+ for the prevention and treatment of liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Djouder, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide yet has limited therapeutic options. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of de novo nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) synthesis is responsible for DNA damage, thereby initiating hepatocarcinogenesis. We propose that boosting NAD+ levels might be used as a prophylactic or therapeutic approach in HCC. PMID:27308492

  11. Boosting NAD(+) for the prevention and treatment of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Djouder, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide yet has limited therapeutic options. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of de novo nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) synthesis is responsible for DNA damage, thereby initiating hepatocarcinogenesis. We propose that boosting NAD(+) levels might be used as a prophylactic or therapeutic approach in HCC. PMID:27308492

  12. Reduced Ssy1-Ptr3-Ssy5 (SPS) Signaling Extends Replicative Life Span by Enhancing NAD+ Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Felicia; James, Christol; Kato, Michiko; Myers, Victoria; Ilyas, Irtqa; Tsang, Matthew; Lin, Su-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Attenuated nutrient signaling extends the life span in yeast and higher eukaryotes; however, the mechanisms are not completely understood. Here we identify the Ssy1-Ptr3-Ssy5 (SPS) amino acid sensing pathway as a novel longevity factor. A null mutation of SSY5 (ssy5Δ) increases replicative life span (RLS) by ∼50%. Our results demonstrate that several NAD+ homeostasis factors play key roles in this life span extension. First, expression of the putative malate-pyruvate NADH shuttle increases in ssy5Δ cells, and deleting components of this shuttle, MAE1 and OAC1, largely abolishes RLS extension. Next, we show that Stp1, a transcription factor of the SPS pathway, directly binds to the promoter of MAE1 and OAC1 to regulate their expression. Additionally, deletion of SSY5 increases nicotinamide riboside (NR) levels and phosphate-responsive (PHO) signaling activity, suggesting that ssy5Δ increases NR salvaging. This increase contributes to NAD+ homeostasis, partially ameliorating the NAD+ deficiency and rescuing the short life span of the npt1Δ mutant. Moreover, we observed that vacuolar phosphatase, Pho8, is partially required for ssy5Δ-mediated NR increase and RLS extension. Together, our studies present evidence that supports SPS signaling is a novel NAD+ homeostasis factor and ssy5Δ-mediated life span extension is likely due to concomitantly increased mitochondrial and vacuolar function. Our findings may contribute to understanding the molecular basis of NAD+ metabolism, cellular life span, and diseases associated with NAD+ deficiency and aging. PMID:25825491

  13. Reduced Ssy1-Ptr3-Ssy5 (SPS) signaling extends replicative life span by enhancing NAD+ homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Felicia; James, Christol; Kato, Michiko; Myers, Victoria; Ilyas, Irtqa; Tsang, Matthew; Lin, Su-Ju

    2015-05-15

    Attenuated nutrient signaling extends the life span in yeast and higher eukaryotes; however, the mechanisms are not completely understood. Here we identify the Ssy1-Ptr3-Ssy5 (SPS) amino acid sensing pathway as a novel longevity factor. A null mutation of SSY5 (ssy5Δ) increases replicative life span (RLS) by ∼50%. Our results demonstrate that several NAD(+) homeostasis factors play key roles in this life span extension. First, expression of the putative malate-pyruvate NADH shuttle increases in ssy5Δ cells, and deleting components of this shuttle, MAE1 and OAC1, largely abolishes RLS extension. Next, we show that Stp1, a transcription factor of the SPS pathway, directly binds to the promoter of MAE1 and OAC1 to regulate their expression. Additionally, deletion of SSY5 increases nicotinamide riboside (NR) levels and phosphate-responsive (PHO) signaling activity, suggesting that ssy5Δ increases NR salvaging. This increase contributes to NAD(+) homeostasis, partially ameliorating the NAD(+) deficiency and rescuing the short life span of the npt1Δ mutant. Moreover, we observed that vacuolar phosphatase, Pho8, is partially required for ssy5Δ-mediated NR increase and RLS extension. Together, our studies present evidence that supports SPS signaling is a novel NAD(+) homeostasis factor and ssy5Δ-mediated life span extension is likely due to concomitantly increased mitochondrial and vacuolar function. Our findings may contribute to understanding the molecular basis of NAD(+) metabolism, cellular life span, and diseases associated with NAD(+) deficiency and aging. PMID:25825491

  14. Unidirectional growth of largest L-LMHCl dihydrate crystal by SR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil, A.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Balamurugan, N.; Ramasamy, P.

    2009-01-01

    Large diameter semi-organic L-lysine monohydrochloride dihydrate ( L-LMHCl) single crystal was grown using Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method. The solubility and the nucleation of the material for different temperatures have been studied. The metastable zone width for L-LMHCl has been investigated. The growth rate along <0 1¯ 1>, <0 1 1¯>, <0 1 1> and <1 0 0> orientations was studied. The effect of gravity driven concentration gradient on SR method was investigated. The grown crystal was characterized by transmission and dielectric studies.

  15. Growth and characterization of NLO based L-arginine maleate dihydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraniraj, T.; Philominathan, P.

    2010-01-01

    Single crystals of L-arginine maleate dihydrate (LAMD) were successfully grown from aqueous solution by solvent evaporation technique. As-grown crystals were analyzed by different instrumentation techniques such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and UV-vis near infrared (NIR) transmittance spectra. Thermal behavior has been studied with TGA/DTA analyses. The optical second harmonic generation (SHG) conversion efficiency of LAMD was determined using Kurtz powder technique and found to be 1.5 times that of KDP.

  16. Growth and optical property of methyl para hydroxybenzoate sodium dihydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunagaran, N.; Ramasamy, P.

    2013-06-01

    Methyl parahydroxybenzoate sodium dihydrate (MHBN), a novel semiorganic single crystal has been grown by slow evaporation solution technique (SEST). Single crystal of MHBN with the size of 30 × 30 × 10 mm3 has been grown using methanol as a solvent. The crystal structure of MHBN has been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The grown crystals were subjected to powder X-ray diffraction studies. The optical transparency was studied using UV-VIS spectrophotometer and it was found that the crystal is having good optical transparency. The mechanical strength of the grown crystal is measured using Vickers microhardness tester. Thermal properties of the MHBN crystals were studied.

  17. Enzymology of mammalian NAD metabolism in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Magni, Giulio; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Raffelli, Nadia; Ruggieri, Silverio

    2008-01-01

    Mounting evidence attests to the paramount importance of the non-redox NAD functions. Indeed, NAD homeostasis is related to the free radicals-mediated production of reactive oxygen species responsible for irreversible cellular damage in infectious disease, diabetes, inflammatory syndromes, neurodegeneration and cancer. Because the cellular redox status depends on both the absolute concentration of pyridine dinucleotides and their respective ratios of oxidized and reduced forms (i.e., NAD/NADH and NADP/NADPH), it is conceivable that an altered regulation of the synthesis and degradation of NAD impairs the cell redox state and likely contributes to the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of the above mentioned diseases. Taking into account the recent appearance in the literature of comprehensive reviews covering different aspects of the significance of NAD metabolism, with particular attention to the enzymes involved in NAD cleavage, this monograph includes the most recent results on NAD biosynthesis in mammals and humans. Due to recent findings on nicotinamide riboside as a nutrient, its inclusion under "niacins" is proposed. Here, the enzymes involved in the de novo and reutilization pathways are overviewed. PMID:18508649

  18. NAD + -dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Alekseeva, A.A.; Savin, S.S.; Tishkov, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH, EC 1.2.1.2) widely occurs in nature. FDH consists of two identical subunits and contains neither prosthetic groups nor metal ions. This type of FDH was found in different microorganisms (including pathogenic ones), such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and plants. As opposed to microbiological FDHs functioning in cytoplasm, plant FDHs localize in mitochondria. Formate dehydrogenase activity was first discovered as early as in 1921 in plant; however, until the past decade FDHs from plants had been considerably less studied than the enzymes from microorganisms. This review summarizes the recent results on studying the physiological role, properties, structure, and protein engineering of plant formate dehydrogenases. PMID:22649703

  19. A Nampt inhibitor FK866 mimics vitamin B3 deficiency by causing senescence of human fibroblastic Hs68 cells via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Tuzz-Ying; Yeh, Shu-Lan; Hu, Miao-Lin; Chen, Mei-Yau; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B3 (niacin) deficiency can cause pellagra with symptoms of dermatitis, diarrhea and dementia. However, it is unclear whether the vitamin B3 deficiency causes human aging. FK866 (a Nampt inhibitor) can reduce intracellular NAD(+) level and induce senescence of human Hs68 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells are unclear. In this study, we used FK866 to mimic the effects of vitamin B3 deficiency to reduce the NAD(+) level and investigated the mechanisms of FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells. We hypothesized that FK866 induced the senescence of Hs68 cells via an attenuation of NAD(+)-silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling. We found that FK866 induced cell senescence and diminished cellular NAD(+) levels and SIRT1 activity (detected by acetylation of p53), and these effects were dramatically antagonized by co-treatment with nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, or NAD(+). In contrast, the protein expression of SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) was not affected by FK866. In addition, the role of GSH in the FK866-induced cells senescence may be limited, as N-acetylcysteine did not antagonize FK866-induced cell senescence. These results suggest that FK866 induces cell senescence via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling. The effects of vitamin B3 deficiency on human aging warrant further investigation. PMID:26330291

  20. Simulations of the Vertical Redistribution of HNO3 by NAT or NAD PSCs: The Sensitivity to the Number of Cloud Particles Formed and the Cloud Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Toon, Owen B.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Recent satellite and in situ measurements have indicated that limited denitrification can occur in the Arctic stratosphere. In situ measurements from the SOLVE campaign indicate polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) composed of small numbers (about 3 x 10^ -4 cm^-3) of 10-20 micron particles (probably NAT or NAD). These observations raise the issue of whether low number density NAT PSCs can substantially denitrify the air with reasonable cloud lifetimes. In this study, we use a one dimensional cloud model to investigate the verticle redistribution of HNO3 by NAT/NAD PSCs. The cloud formation is driven by a temperature oscillation which drops the temperature below the NAT/NAD formation threshold (about 195 K) for a few days. We assume that a small fraction of the available aerosols act as NAT nuclei when the saturation ratio of HNO3 over NAT(NAD) exceeds 10(l.5). The result is a cloud between about 16 and 20 km in the model, with NAT/NAD particle effective radii as large as about 10 microns (in agreement with the SOLVE data). We find that for typical cloud lifetimes of 2-3 days or less, the net depletion of HNO3 is no more than 1-2 ppbv, regardless of the NAT or NAD particle number density. Repeated passes of the air column through the cold pool build up the denitrification to 3-4 ppbv, and the cloud altitude steadily decreases due to the downward transport of nitric acid. Increasing the cloud lifetime results in considerably more effective denitrification, even with very low cloud particle number densities. As expected, the degree of denitrification by NAT clouds is much larger than that by NAD Clouds. Significant denitrification by NAD Clouds is only possible if the cloud lifetime is several days or more. The clouds also cause a local maximum HNO3 mixing ratio at cloud base where the cloud particles sublimate.

  1. Faster Rubisco Is the Key to Superior Nitrogen-Use Efficiency in NADP-Malic Enzyme Relative to NAD-Malic Enzyme C4 Grasses1

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, Oula; Evans, John R.; Chow, Wah Soon; Andrews, T. John; Conroy, Jann P.; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    In 27 C4 grasses grown under adequate or deficient nitrogen (N) supplies, N-use efficiency at the photosynthetic (assimilation rate per unit leaf N) and whole-plant (dry mass per total leaf N) level was greater in NADP-malic enzyme (ME) than NAD-ME species. This was due to lower N content in NADP-ME than NAD-ME leaves because neither assimilation rates nor plant dry mass differed significantly between the two C4 subtypes. Relative to NAD-ME, NADP-ME leaves had greater in vivo (assimilation rate per Rubisco catalytic sites) and in vitro Rubisco turnover rates (kcat; 3.8 versus 5.7 s−1 at 25°C). The two parameters were linearly related. In 2 NAD-ME (Panicum miliaceum and Panicum coloratum) and 2 NADP-ME (Sorghum bicolor and Cenchrus ciliaris) grasses, 30% of leaf N was allocated to thylakoids and 5% to 9% to amino acids and nitrate. Soluble protein represented a smaller fraction of leaf N in NADP-ME (41%) than in NAD-ME (53%) leaves, of which Rubisco accounted for one-seventh. Soluble protein averaged 7 and 10 g (mmol chlorophyll)−1 in NADP-ME and NAD-ME leaves, respectively. The majority (65%) of leaf N and chlorophyll was found in the mesophyll of NADP-ME and bundle sheath of NAD-ME leaves. The mesophyll-bundle sheath distribution of functional thylakoid complexes (photosystems I and II and cytochrome f) varied among species, with a tendency to be mostly located in the mesophyll. In conclusion, superior N-use efficiency of NADP-ME relative to NAD-ME grasses was achieved with less leaf N, soluble protein, and Rubisco having a faster kcat. PMID:15665246

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of ferredoxin-NAD(P)+ reductase from Chlorobium tepidum

    PubMed Central

    Muraki, Norifumi; Seo, Daisuke; Shiba, Tomoo; Sakurai, Takeshi; Kurisu, Genji

    2008-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P)+ reductase (FNR) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the photoreduction of NAD(P)+ to generate NAD(P)H during the final step of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. FNR from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a homodimeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 90 kDa; it shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity to thioredoxin reductase rather than to conventional plant-type FNRs. In order to understand the structural basis of the ferredoxin-dependency of this unique photosynthetic FNR, C. tepidum FNR has been heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized in two forms. Form I crystals belong to space group C2221 and contain one dimer in the asymmetric unit, while form II crystals belong to space group P4122 or P4322. Diffraction data were collected from a form I crystal to 2.4 Å resolution on the synchrotron-radiation beamline NW12 at the Photon Factory. PMID:18323604

  3. Gene cloning and characterization of the very large NAD-dependent l-glutamate dehydrogenase from the psychrophile Janthinobacterium lividum, isolated from cold soil.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ryushi; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2007-08-01

    NAD-dependent l-glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) activity was detected in cell extract from the psychrophile Janthinobacterium lividum UTB1302, which was isolated from cold soil and purified to homogeneity. The native enzyme (1,065 kDa, determined by gel filtration) is a homohexamer composed of 170-kDa subunits (determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). Consistent with these findings, gene cloning and sequencing enabled deduction of the amino acid sequence of the subunit, which proved to be comprised of 1,575 amino acids with a combined molecular mass of 169,360 Da. The enzyme from this psychrophile thus appears to belong to the GDH family characterized by very large subunits, like those expressed by Streptomyces clavuligerus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (about 180 kDa). The entire amino acid sequence of the J. lividum enzyme showed about 40% identity with the sequences from S. clavuligerus and P. aeruginosa enzymes, but the central domains showed higher homology (about 65%). Within the central domain, the residues related to substrate and NAD binding were highly conserved, suggesting that this is the enzyme's catalytic domain. In the presence of NAD, but not in the presence of NADP, this GDH exclusively catalyzed the oxidative deamination of l-glutamate. The stereospecificity of the hydride transfer to NAD was pro-S, which is the same as that of the other known GDHs. Surprisingly, NAD-GDH activity was markedly enhanced by the addition of various amino acids, such as l-aspartate (1,735%) and l-arginine (936%), which strongly suggests that the N- and/or C-terminal domains play regulatory roles and are involved in the activation of the enzyme by these amino acids. PMID:17526698

  4. EPR and optical absorption studies of Cu2+ doped lithium maleate dihydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kripal, Ram; Pandey, Shri Devi

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of Cu2+ doped lithium maleate dihydrate single crystal is done at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). Four hyperfine lines are observed in all directions, i.e. only a single site is observed. The spin Hamiltonian parameters are determined from EPR spectra: gx=2.100±0.002, gy=2.162±0.002, gz=2.215±0.002, Ax=(55±5)×10-4 cm-1, Ay=(52±5)×10-4 cm-1, Az=(50±5)×10-4 cm-1. The results indicate that the copper ion enters the lattice interstitially. Using the spin Hamiltonian parameters obtained from EPR study the ground state wave function of Cu2+ ion in the lattice is determined. The optical absorption study of Cu2+ doped lithium maleate dihydrate at room temperature is also performed. With the help of optical and EPR data, the nature of bonding in the complex is discussed.

  5. Circadian Clock NAD+ Cycle Drives Mitochondrial Oxidative Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Clara Bien; Affinati, Alison H.; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Yu, Wei; Sena, Laura A.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Marcheva, Biliana; Kobayashi, Yumiko; Omura, Chiaki; Levine, Daniel C.; Bacsik, David J.; Gius, David; Newgard, Christopher B.; Goetzman, Eric; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Denu, John M.; Mrksich, Milan; Bass, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks are self-sustained cellular oscillators that synchronize oxidative and reductive cycles in anticipation of the solar cycle. We found that the clock transcription feedback loop produces cycles of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis, adenosine triphosphate production, and mitochondrial respiration through modulation of mitochondrial protein acetylation to synchronize oxidative metabolic pathways with the 24-hour fasting and feeding cycle. Circadian control of the activity of the NAD+-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) generated rhythms in the acetylation and activity of oxidative enzymes and respiration in isolated mitochondria, and NAD+ supplementation restored protein deacetylation and enhanced oxygen consumption in circadian mutant mice. Thus, circadian control of NAD+ bioavailability modulates mitochondrial oxidative function and organismal metabolism across the daily cycles of fasting and feeding. PMID:24051248

  6. SARM1 activation triggers axon degeneration locally via NAD+ destruction

    PubMed Central

    Gerdts, Josiah; Brace, E.J.; Sasaki, Yo; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Axon degeneration is an intrinsic self-destruction program that underlies axon loss during injury and disease. Sterile alpha and TIR motif containing 1 (SARM1) protein is an essential mediator of axon degeneration. We report that SARM1 initiates a local destruction program involving rapid breakdown of NAD+ after injury. We used an engineered protease-sensitized SARM1 to demonstrate that SARM1 activity is required after axon injury to induce axon degeneration. Dimerization of the Toll-Interleukin Receptor (TIR) domain of SARM1 alone was sufficient to induce locally-mediated axon degeneration. Formation of the SARM1 TIR dimer triggered rapid breakdown of NAD+, whereas SARM1-induced axon destruction could be counteracted by increased NAD+ synthesis. SARM1-induced depletion of NAD+ may explain the potent axon protection in Wallerian Degeneration slow (Wlds) mutant mice. PMID:25908823

  7. Common features of the NAD-binding and catalytic site of ADP-ribosylating toxins.

    PubMed

    Domenighini, M; Magagnoli, C; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1994-10-01

    Computer analysis of the three-dimensional structure of ADP-ribosylating toxins showed that in all toxins the NAD-binding site is located in a cavity. This cavity consists of 18 contiguous amino acids that form an alpha-helix bent over a beta-strand. The tertiary folding of this structure is strictly conserved despite the differences in the amino acid sequence. Catalysis is supported by two spatially conserved amino acids, each flanking the NAD-binding site. These are: a glutamic acid that is conserved in all toxins, and a nucleophilic residue, which is a histidine in the diphtheria toxin and Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and an arginine in the cholera toxin, the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins, the pertussis toxin and the mosquitocidal toxin of Bacillus sphaericus. The latter group of toxins presents an additional histidine that appears important for catalysis. This structure suggests a general mechanism of ADP-ribosylation evolved to work on different target proteins. PMID:7830559

  8. Physiological and pathophysiological roles of NAMPT and NAD metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garten, Antje; Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; de Giorgis, Tommaso; Kiess, Wieland

    2015-09-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a regulator of the intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) pool. NAD is an essential coenzyme involved in cellular redox reactions and is a substrate for NAD-dependent enzymes. In various metabolic disorders and during ageing, levels of NAD are decreased. Through its NAD-biosynthetic activity, NAMPT influences the activity of NAD-dependent enzymes, thereby regulating cellular metabolism. In addition to its enzymatic function, extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT) has cytokine-like activity. Abnormal levels of eNAMPT are associated with various metabolic disorders. NAMPT is able to modulate processes involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and related disorders such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by influencing the oxidative stress response, apoptosis, lipid and glucose metabolism, inflammation and insulin resistance. NAMPT also has a crucial role in cancer cell metabolism, is often overexpressed in tumour tissues and is an experimental target for antitumour therapies. In this Review, we discuss current understanding of the functions of NAMPT and highlight progress made in identifying the physiological role of NAMPT and its relevance in various human diseases and conditions, such as obesity, NAFLD, T2DM, cancer and ageing. PMID:26215259

  9. NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD Metabolism in Vascular Repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Li, Wen-Lin; Liu, Jian-Min; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Vascular repair plays important roles in postischemic remodeling and rehabilitation in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a well-known coenzyme involved in electron transport chain for generation of adenosine triphosphate, has emerged as an important controller regulating various biological signaling pathways. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD biosynthesis in mammals. NAMPT may also act in a nonenzymatic manner, presumably mediated by unknown receptor(s). Rapidly accumulating data in the past decade show that NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism regulate fundamental biological functions in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial progenitor cells. The NAD-consuming proteins, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38, may contribute to the regulatory effects of NAMPT-NAD axis in these cells and vascular repair. This review discusses the current data regarding NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism in vascular repair and the clinical potential translational application of NAMPT-related products in treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. PMID:26485210

  10. NMNAT expression and its relation to NAD metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, H N; Kusumanchi, P; Yalowitz, J A

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferease (NMNAT), a rate-limiting enzyme present in all organisms, reversibly catalyzes the important step in the biosynthesis of NAD from ATP and NMN. NAD and NADP are used reversibly in anabolic and catabolic reactions. NAD is necessary for cell survival in oxidative stress and DNA damage. Based on their localization, three different NMNAT's have been recognized, NMNAT-1 (homohexamer) in the nucleus (chromosome 1 p32-35), NMNAT-2 (homodimer) in the cytoplasm (chromosome 1q25) and NMNAT-3 (homotetramer) in the mitochondria. NMNAT also catalyzes the metabolic conversion of potent antitumor prodrugs like tiazofurin and benzamide riboside to their active forms which are analogs of NAD. NAD synthase-NMNAT acts as a chaperone to protect against neurodegeneration, injury-induced axonal degeneration and also correlates with DNA synthesis during cell cycle. Since its activity is rather low in tumor cells it can be exploited as a source for therapeutic targeting. Steps involved in NAD synthesis are being utilized as targets for chemoprevention, radiosensitization and therapy of wide range of diseases, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration and Huntington's disease. PMID:21517776

  11. New Therapeutic Concept of NAD Redox Balance for Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kwak, Tae Hwan; So, Hong-Seob

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various tumors. In addition to its antitumor activity, cisplatin affects normal cells and may induce adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and peripheral neuropathy. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses are closely associated with cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity; however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. Recent studies have demonstrated associations between disturbance in intracellular NAD+ levels and clinical progression of various diseases through the production of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that reduction of the intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio is critically involved in cisplatin-induced kidney damage through inflammation and oxidative stress and that increase of the cellular NAD+/NADH ratio suppresses cisplatin-induced kidney damage by modulation of potential damage mediators such as oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the role of NAD+ metabolism in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and discuss a potential strategy for the prevention or treatment of cisplatin-induced adverse effects with a particular focus on NAD+-dependent cellular pathways. PMID:26881219

  12. NAD+/NADH and skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations to exercise

    PubMed Central

    White, Amanda T.

    2012-01-01

    The pyridine nucleotides, NAD+ and NADH, are coenzymes that provide oxidoreductive power for the generation of ATP by mitochondria. In skeletal muscle, exercise perturbs the levels of NAD+, NADH, and consequently, the NAD+/NADH ratio, and initial research in this area focused on the contribution of redox control to ATP production. More recently, numerous signaling pathways that are sensitive to perturbations in NAD+(H) have come to the fore, as has an appreciation for the potential importance of compartmentation of NAD+(H) metabolism and its subsequent effects on various signaling pathways. These pathways, which include the sirtuin (SIRT) proteins SIRT1 and SIRT3, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins PARP1 and PARP2, and COOH-terminal binding protein (CtBP), are of particular interest because they potentially link changes in cellular redox state to both immediate, metabolic-related changes and transcriptional adaptations to exercise. In this review, we discuss what is known, and not known, about the contribution of NAD+(H) metabolism and these aforementioned proteins to mitochondrial adaptations to acute and chronic endurance exercise. PMID:22436696

  13. Identification of structural determinants of NAD(P)H selectivity and lysine binding in lysine N(6)-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Heba; Robinson, Reeder; Rodriguez, Pedro; Adly, Camelia; El-Sohaimy, Sohby; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-09-15

    l-lysine (l-Lys) N(6)-monooxygenase (NbtG), from Nocardia farcinica, is a flavin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of l-Lys in the presence of oxygen and NAD(P)H in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore nocobactin. NbtG displays only a 3-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, different from well-characterized related enzymes, which are highly selective for NADPH. The structure of NbtG with bound NAD(P)(+) or l-Lys is currently not available. Herein, we present a mutagenesis study targeting M239, R301, and E216. These amino acids are conserved and located in either the NAD(P)H binding domain or the l-Lys binding pocket. M239R resulted in high production of hydrogen peroxide and little hydroxylation with no change in coenzyme selectivity. R301A caused a 300-fold decrease on kcat/Km value with NADPH but no change with NADH. E216Q increased the Km value for l-Lys by 30-fold with very little change on the kcat value or in the binding of NAD(P)H. These results suggest that R301 plays a major role in NADPH selectivity by interacting with the 2'-phosphate of the adenine-ribose moiety of NADPH, while E216 plays a role in l-Lys binding. PMID:27503802

  14. Loss of NAD Homeostasis Leads to Progressive and Reversible Degeneration of Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Frederick, David W; Loro, Emanuele; Liu, Ling; Davila, Antonio; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Silverman, Ian M; Quinn, William J; Gosai, Sager J; Tichy, Elisia D; Davis, James G; Mourkioti, Foteini; Gregory, Brian D; Dellinger, Ryan W; Redpath, Philip; Migaud, Marie E; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Khurana, Tejvir S; Baur, Joseph A

    2016-08-01

    NAD is an obligate co-factor for the catabolism of metabolic fuels in all cell types. However, the availability of NAD in several tissues can become limited during genotoxic stress and the course of natural aging. The point at which NAD restriction imposes functional limitations on tissue physiology remains unknown. We examined this question in murine skeletal muscle by specifically depleting Nampt, an essential enzyme in the NAD salvage pathway. Knockout mice exhibited a dramatic 85% decline in intramuscular NAD content, accompanied by fiber degeneration and progressive loss of both muscle strength and treadmill endurance. Administration of the NAD precursor nicotinamide riboside rapidly ameliorated functional deficits and restored muscle mass despite having only a modest effect on the intramuscular NAD pool. Additionally, lifelong overexpression of Nampt preserved muscle NAD levels and exercise capacity in aged mice, supporting a critical role for tissue-autonomous NAD homeostasis in maintaining muscle mass and function. PMID:27508874

  15. Posterior C1-C2 calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Isaac Bing-Yi; Arkun, Knarik; Riesenburger, Ron I

    2016-01-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease rarely occurs in the posterior aspect of the craniocervical junction (CCJ). To the best of our knowledge, there have been only 2 previously reported cases of patients with posterior CPPD lesions in this region that have led to cervical myelopathy. We report the case of a 70-year-old man presenting with neck pain and cervical myelopathy with multilevel stenosis from C1-C6. The stenosis was worst at C1-C2, secondary to compression by a CPPD lesion posterior to the spinal cord. The patient underwent a C2-C6 laminectomy and fusion with resection of the CPPD lesion. In this report, we discuss the patient and present a novel theory to explain the preponderance of CPPD lesions in the CCJ occurring anteriorly and not posteriorly to the spinal cord. PMID:26976840

  16. Diffusion properties of aqueous slurries in evaporative spray drying of copper (II) chloride dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowikowski, M.; Naterer, G. F.; Odukoya, A.

    2014-09-01

    This study examines the evaporative heat transfer and diffusive mass transfer of a droplet of CuCl2 solution. The validation of a new predictive model involves comparisons with experimental data from previous studies of different fluids based on non-dimensional analysis. The study provides new insight about the effects of different concentrations of water on the CuCl2 slurry drying at low to moderate air temperatures. Predictive correlations of heat and mass transfer are developed for the aqueous solution, subject to various drying conditions. The analysis is performed for moist air in contact with a sprayed aqueous solution of copper (II) chloride dihydrate [CuCl2·(2H2O)]. Results are presented and discussed for the drying processes.

  17. Suppression of NDA-Type Alternative Mitochondrial NAD(P)H Dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis thaliana Modifies Growth and Metabolism, but not High Light Stimulation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Wallström, Sabá V.; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Araújo, Wagner L.; Escobar, Matthew A.; Geisler, Daniela A.; Aidemark, Mari; Lager, Ida; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Rasmusson, Allan G.

    2014-01-01

    The plant respiratory chain contains several pathways which bypass the energy-conserving electron transport complexes I, III and IV. These energy bypasses, including type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases and the alternative oxidase (AOX), may have a role in redox stabilization and regulation, but current evidence is inconclusive. Using RNA interference, we generated Arabidopsis thaliana plants simultaneously suppressing the type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase genes NDA1 and NDA2. Leaf mitochondria contained substantially reduced levels of both proteins. In sterile culture in the light, the transgenic lines displayed a slow growth phenotype, which was more severe when the complex I inhibitor rotenone was present. Slower growth was also observed in soil. In rosette leaves, a higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio and elevated levels of lactate relative to sugars and citric acid cycle metabolites were observed. However, photosynthetic performance was unaffected and microarray analyses indicated few transcriptional changes. A high light treatment increased AOX1a mRNA levels, in vivo AOX and cytochrome oxidase activities, and levels of citric acid cycle intermediates and hexoses in all genotypes. However, NDA-suppressing plants deviated from the wild type merely by having higher levels of several amino acids. These results suggest that NDA suppression restricts citric acid cycle reactions, inducing a shift towards increased levels of fermentation products, but do not support a direct association between photosynthesis and NDA proteins. PMID:24486764

  18. Enzymatic Properties of Populus α- and β-NAD-ME Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinwen; Yu, Qiguo; Elsheery, Nabil I.; Cheng, Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    Plant mitochondrial NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME), which is composed of α- and β-subunits in many species, participates in many plant biosynthetic pathways and in plant respiratory metabolism. However, little is known about the properties of woody plant NAD-MEs. In this study, we analyzed four NAD-ME genes (PtNAD-ME1 through PtNAD-ME4) in the genome of Populus trichocarpa. PtNAD-ME1 and -2 encode putative α-subunits, while PtNAD-ME3 and -4 encode putative β-subunits. The Populus NAD-MEs were expressed in Escherichia coli cells as GST-tagged fusion proteins. Each recombinant GST-PtNAD-ME protein was purified to near homogeneity by glutathione-Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography. Milligram quantities of each native protein were obtained from 1 L bacterial cultures after cleavage of the GST tag. Analysis of the enzymatic properties of these proteins in vitro indicated that α-NAD-MEs are more active than β-NAD-MEs and that α- and β-NAD-MEs presented different kinetic properties (Vmax, kcat and kcat/Km). The effect of different amounts of metabolites on the activities of Populus α- and β-NAD-MEs was assessed in vitro. While none of the metabolites evaluated in our assays activated Populus NAD-ME, oxalacetate and citrate inhibited all α- and β-NAD-MEs and glucose-6-P and fructose inhibited only the α-NAD-MEs. PMID:23797660

  19. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of the effect of 4-hydroxynonenal on endogenous NAD(P)H in living cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorvatova, Alzbeta; Aneba, Swida; Mateasik, Anton; Chorvat, Dusan; Comte, Blandine

    2013-06-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a major biochemical consequence of the oxidative deterioration of polyunsaturated lipids in cell membranes and causes damage to membrane integrity and loss of protein function. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), one of the most reactive products of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation of membrane phospholipids, has been shown to be capable of affecting both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) reduced [NAD(P)H] as well as NADH production. However, the understanding of its effects in living cardiac cells is still lacking. Our goal was to therefore investigate HNE effects on NAD(P)H noninvasively in living cardiomyocytes. Spectrally resolved lifetime detection of endogenous fluorescence, an innovative noninvasive technique, was employed. Individual fluorescence components were resolved by spectral linear unmixing approach. Gathered results revealed that HNE reduced the amplitude of both resolved NAD(P)H components in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, HNE increased flavoprotein fluorescence and responsiveness of the NAD(P)H component ratio to glutathione reductase (GR) inhibitor. HNE also increased the percentage of oxidized nucleotides and decreased maximal NADH production. Presented data indicate that HNE provoked an important cell oxidation by acting on NAD(P)H regulating systems in cardiomyocytes. Understanding the precise role of oxidative processes and their products in living cells is crucial for finding new noninvasive tools for biomedical diagnostics of pathophysiological states.

  20. Isolation and characterization of an inducible NAD-dependent butyraldehyde dehydrogenase from clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, W.; Duerre, P.

    1996-12-31

    A NAD-dependent butyraldehyde dehydrogenase (BAD) has been purified from C. acetobutylicum DSM 792 and DSM 173 1. This key enzyme of butanol production, catalyzing the conversion of butyryl-CoA to butyraldehyde, was induced shortly before the onset of butanol production and proved to be oxygen-sensitive. A one step purification procedure on reactive green 19 allowed to purify the enzyme to homogeneity. The purified protein was found to be extremely unstable and could only partially be stabilized by addition of mercaptoethanol and storage below -20{degrees}C. The enzyme subunit had a molecular mass of 39.5 kDa. In the reverse reaction (butyryl-CoA-forming) the apparent pH optimum was 9.75 and Vmax was significantly higher with butyraldehyde and propionaldehyde than with acetaldehyde. BAD could also use NADP+, but NAD+ was the preferred coenzyme for the reverse reaction. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the C. acetobutylicurn DSM 792 protein showed high homology to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAP), especially to the protein of C. pasteurianum. Genomic libraries of C. acetobutylicum DSM 792 were screened by hybridization using PCR-generated heterologous probes encoding the gap gene of C. pasteurianum. Sequence analysis of the positive clones revealed high homology, but no identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the butyraldehyde dehydrogenase. Thus, BAD from C. acetobutylicum is distinctly different from other reported aldehyde dehydrogenases with butyraldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  1. The Tuberculosis Necrotizing Toxin kills macrophages by hydrolyzing NAD

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jim; Siroy, Axel; Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Speer, Alexander; Doornbos, Kathryn S.; Cingolani, Gino; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces necrosis of infected cells to evade immune responses. Recently, we found that Mtb utilizes the protein CpnT to kill human macrophages by secreting its C-terminal domain, named tuberculosis necrotizing toxin (TNT) that induces necrosis by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that TNT gains access to the cytosol of Mtb-infected macrophages, where it hydrolyzes the essential co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Expression or injection of a non-catalytic TNT mutant showed no cytotoxicity in macrophages or zebrafish zygotes, respectively, demonstrating that the NAD+-glycohydrolase activity is required for TNT-induced cell death. To prevent self-poisoning, Mtb produces an immunity factor for TNT (IFT) that binds TNT and inhibits its activity. The crystal structure of the TNT-IFT complex revealed a novel NAD+-glycohydrolase fold of TNT, which constitutes the founding member of a toxin family wide-spread in pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26237511

  2. The tuberculosis necrotizing toxin kills macrophages by hydrolyzing NAD.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jim; Siroy, Axel; Lokareddy, Ravi K; Speer, Alexander; Doornbos, Kathryn S; Cingolani, Gino; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces necrosis of infected cells to evade immune responses. Recently, we found that Mtb uses the protein CpnT to kill human macrophages by secreting its C-terminal domain, named tuberculosis necrotizing toxin (TNT), which induces necrosis by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that TNT gains access to the cytosol of Mtb-infected macrophages, where it hydrolyzes the essential coenzyme NAD(+). Expression or injection of a noncatalytic TNT mutant showed no cytotoxicity in macrophages or in zebrafish zygotes, respectively, thus demonstrating that the NAD(+) glycohydrolase activity is required for TNT-induced cell death. To prevent self-poisoning, Mtb produces an immunity factor for TNT (IFT) that binds TNT and inhibits its activity. The crystal structure of the TNT-IFT complex revealed a new NAD(+) glycohydrolase fold of TNT, the founding member of a toxin family widespread in pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26237511

  3. NAD+ Biosynthesis Ameliorates a Zebrafish Model of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goody, Michelle F.; Kelly, Meghan W.; Reynolds, Christine J.; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D.; Henry, Clarissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex– or integrin alpha7–deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin

  4. NAD+ biosynthesis ameliorates a zebrafish model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Reynolds, Christine J; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D; Henry, Clarissa A

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex- or integrin alpha7-deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin alpha

  5. NAD+ metabolism and the control of energy homeostasis - a balancing act between mitochondria and the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Menzies, Keir; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    NAD+ has emerged as a vital cofactor that can rewire metabolism, activate sirtuins and maintain mitochondrial fitness through mechanisms such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. This improved understanding of NAD+ metabolism revived interest in NAD+ boosting strategies to manage a wide spectrum of diseases, ranging from diabetes to cancer. In this review, we summarize how NAD+ metabolism links energy status with adaptive cellular and organismal responses and how this knowledge can be therapeutically exploited. PMID:26118927

  6. The high-resolution crystal structure of periplasmic Haemophilus influenzae NAD nucleotidase reveals a novel enzymatic function of human CD73 related to NAD metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Silvia; Bruzzone, Santina; Cassani, Camilla; Canella, Laura; Allegrone, Gianna; Sturla, Laura; Mannino, Elena; Millo, Enrico; De Flora, Antonio; Rizzi, Menico

    2012-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a major pathogen of the respiratory tract in humans that has developed the capability to exploit host NAD(P) for its nicotinamide dinucleotide requirement. This strategy is organized around a periplasmic enzyme termed NadN (NAD nucleotidase), which plays a central role by degrading NAD into adenosine and NR (nicotinamide riboside), the latter being subsequently internalized by a specific permease. We performed a biochemical and structural investigation on H. influenzae NadN which determined that the enzyme is a Zn2+-dependent 5'-nucleotidase also endowed with NAD(P) pyrophosphatase activity. A 1.3 Å resolution structural analysis revealed a remarkable conformational change that occurs during catalysis between the open and closed forms of the enzyme. NadN showed a broad substrate specificity, recognizing either mono- or di-nucleotide nicotinamides and different adenosine phosphates with a maximal activity on 5'-adenosine monophosphate. Sequence and structural analysis of H. influenzae NadN led us to discover that human CD73 is capable of processing both NAD and NMN, therefore disclosing a possible novel function of human CD73 in systemic NAD metabolism. Our data may prove to be useful for inhibitor design and disclosed unanticipated fascinating evolutionary relationships. PMID:21933152

  7. Interaction Signatures Stabilizing the NAD(P)-Binding Rossmann Fold: A Structure Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Upadhyay, Roopali; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2012-01-01

    The fidelity of the folding pathways being encoded in the amino acid sequence is met with challenge in instances where proteins with no sequence homology, performing different functions and no apparent evolutionary linkage, adopt a similar fold. The problem stated otherwise is that a limited fold space is available to a repertoire of diverse sequences. The key question is what factors lead to the formation of a fold from diverse sequences. Here, with the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann fold domains as a case study and using the concepts of network theory, we have unveiled the consensus structural features that drive the formation of this fold. We have proposed a graph theoretic formalism to capture the structural details in terms of the conserved atomic interactions in global milieu, and hence extract the essential topological features from diverse sequences. A unified mathematical representation of the different structures together with a judicious concoction of several network parameters enabled us to probe into the structural features driving the adoption of the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann fold. The atomic interactions at key positions seem to be better conserved in proteins, as compared to the residues participating in these interactions. We propose a “spatial motif” and several “fold specific hot spots” that form the signature structural blueprints of the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann fold domain. Excellent agreement of our data with previous experimental and theoretical studies validates the robustness and validity of the approach. Additionally, comparison of our results with statistical coupling analysis (SCA) provides further support. The methodology proposed here is general and can be applied to similar problems of interest. PMID:23284738

  8. The NAD/NARB System: Advertising Self-Regulation at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Robert

    Self-regulation, as defined by the National Advertising Division/National Advertising Review Board (NAD/NARB), is a process whereby the advertising industry regulates itself and turns to the federal government only if the system fails. The NAD/NARB system involves a two-step process: complaints are initially handled by the NAD and then are either…

  9. Differentiation of Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate and Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate Stones Using Quantitative Morphological Information from Micro-Computerized and Clinical Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Qu, Mingliang; Wang, Jia; Trevathan, James; Vrtiska, Terri; Williams, James C.; Krambeck, Amy; Lieske, John; McCollough, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We differentiated calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate kidney stones using micro and clinical computerized tomography images. Materials and Methods A total of 22 calcium oxalate monohydrate and 15 calcium oxalate dihydrate human kidney stones were scanned using a commercial micro-computerized tomography scanner with a pixel size of 7 to 23 μm. Under an institutional review board approved protocol, image data on 10 calcium oxalate monohydrate and 9 calcium oxalate dihydrate stones greater than 5 mm were retrieved from a total of 80 patients who underwent clinical dual energy computerized tomography for clinical indications and had stones available for infrared spectroscopic compositional analysis. Micro and clinical computerized tomography images were processed using in-house software, which quantified stone surface morphology with curvature based calculations. A shape index was generated as a quantitative shape metric to differentiate calcium oxalate monohydrate from calcium oxalate dihydrate stones. Statistical tests were used to test the performance of the shape index. Results On micro-computerized tomography images the shape index of calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones significantly differed (ROC curve AUC 0.92, p <0.0001). At the optimal cutoff sensitivity was 0.93 and specificity was 0.91. On clinical computerized tomography images a significant morphological difference was also detected (p = 0.007). AUC, sensitivity and specificity were 0.90, 1 and 0.73, respectively. Conclusions On micro and clinical computerized tomography images a morphological difference was detectable in calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones larger than 5 mm. The shape index is a highly promising method that can distinguish calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones with reasonable accuracy. PMID:23142201

  10. High early strength calcium phosphate bone cement: effects of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and absorbable fibers.

    PubMed

    Burguera, Elena F; Xu, Hockin H K; Takagi, Shozo; Chow, Laurence C

    2005-12-15

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) sets in situ to form resorbable hydroxyapatite with chemical and crystallographic similarity to the apatite in human bones, hence it is highly promising for clinical applications. The objective of the present study was to develop a CPC that is fast setting and has high strength in the early stages of implantation. Two approaches were combined to impart high early strength to the cement: the use of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate with a high solubility (which formed the cement CPC(D)) instead of anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (which formed the conventional cement CPC(A)), and the incorporation of absorbable fibers. A 2 x 8 design was tested with two materials (CPC(A) and CPC(D)) and eight levels of cement reaction time: 15 min, 30 min, 1 h, 1.5 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h. An absorbable suture fiber was incorporated into cements at 25% volume fraction. The Gilmore needle method measured a hardening time of 15.8 min for CPC(D), five-fold faster than 81.5 min for CPC(A), at a powder:liquid ratio of 3:1. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of nanosized rod-like hydroxyapatite crystals and platelet crystals in the cements. At 30 min, the flexural strength (mean +/- standard deviation; n = 5) was 0 MPa for CPC(A) (the paste did not set), (4.2 +/- 0.3) MPa for CPC(D), and (10.7 +/- 2.4) MPa for CPC(D)-fiber specimens, significantly different from each other (Tukey's at 0.95). The work of fracture (toughness) was increased by two orders of magnitude for the CPC(D)-fiber cement. The high early strength matched the reported strength for cancellous bone and sintered porous hydroxyapatite implants. The composite strength S(c) was correlated to the matrix strength S(m): S(c) = 2.16S(m). In summary, substantial early strength was imparted to a moldable, self-hardening and resorbable hydroxyapatite via two synergistic approaches: dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, and absorbable fibers. The new fast-setting and strong cement may help prevent

  11. NadA, a Novel Vaccine Candidate of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Brunelli, Brunella; Adu-Bobie, Jeannette; Aricò, Beatrice; Capecchi, Barbara; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Masignani, Vega; Santini, Laura; Savino, Silvana; Granoff, Dan M.; Caugant, Dominique A.; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Mora, Marirosa

    2002-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen, which, in spite of antibiotic therapy, is still a major cause of mortality due to sepsis and meningitis. Here we describe NadA, a novel surface antigen of N. meningitidis that is present in 52 out of 53 strains of hypervirulent lineages electrophoretic types (ET) ET37, ET5, and cluster A4. The gene is absent in the hypervirulent lineage III, in N. gonorrhoeae and in the commensal species N. lactamica and N. cinerea. The guanine/cytosine content, lower than the chromosome, suggests acquisition by horizontal gene transfer and subsequent limited evolution to generate three well-conserved alleles. NadA has a predicted molecular structure strikingly similar to a novel class of adhesins (YadA and UspA2), forms high molecular weight oligomers, and binds to epithelial cells in vitro supporting the hypothesis that NadA is important for host cell interaction. NadA induces strong bactericidal antibodies and is protective in the infant rat model suggesting that this protein may represent a novel antigen for a vaccine able to control meningococcal disease caused by three hypervirulent lineages. PMID:12045242

  12. TEMPOL increases NAD+ and improves redox imbalance in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamato, Mayumi; Kawano, Kimika; Yamanaka, Yuki; Saiga, Misako; Yamada, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction–oxidation (redox) processes. NAD+ and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD+ production in the ascorbic acid–glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to investigate the effects of antioxidants and NAD+/NADH modulators on the metabolic imbalance in obese mice. Increases in the NAD+/NADH ratio by TEMPOL ameliorated the metabolic imbalance when combined with a dietary intervention, changing from a high-fat diet to a normal diet. Plasma levels of the superoxide marker dihydroethidium were higher in mice receiving the dietary intervention compared with a control diet, but were normalized with TEMPOL consumption. These findings provide novel insights into redox regulation in obesity. PMID:26942863

  13. NadA, a novel vaccine candidate of Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Brunelli, Brunella; Adu-Bobie, Jeannette; Aricò, Beatrice; Capecchi, Barbara; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Masignani, Vega; Santini, Laura; Savino, Silvana; Granoff, Dan M; Caugant, Dominique A; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Mora, Marirosa

    2002-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen, which, in spite of antibiotic therapy, is still a major cause of mortality due to sepsis and meningitis. Here we describe NadA, a novel surface antigen of N. meningitidis that is present in 52 out of 53 strains of hypervirulent lineages electrophoretic types (ET) ET37, ET5, and cluster A4. The gene is absent in the hypervirulent lineage III, in N. gonorrhoeae and in the commensal species N. lactamica and N. cinerea. The guanine/cytosine content, lower than the chromosome, suggests acquisition by horizontal gene transfer and subsequent limited evolution to generate three well-conserved alleles. NadA has a predicted molecular structure strikingly similar to a novel class of adhesins (YadA and UspA2), forms high molecular weight oligomers, and binds to epithelial cells in vitro supporting the hypothesis that NadA is important for host cell interaction. NadA induces strong bactericidal antibodies and is protective in the infant rat model suggesting that this protein may represent a novel antigen for a vaccine able to control meningococcal disease caused by three hypervirulent lineages. PMID:12045242

  14. In vitro metabolic engineering for the salvage synthesis of NAD(.).

    PubMed

    Honda, Kohsuke; Hara, Naoya; Cheng, Maria; Nakamura, Anna; Mandai, Komako; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2016-05-01

    Excellent thermal and operational stabilities of thermophilic enzymes can greatly increase the applicability of biocatalysis in various industrial fields. However, thermophilic enzymes are generally incompatible with thermo-labile substrates, products, and cofactors, since they show the maximal activities at high temperatures. Despite their pivotal roles in a wide range of enzymatic redox reactions, NAD(P)(+) and NAD(P)H exhibit relatively low stabilities at high temperatures, tending to be a major obstacle in the long-term operation of biocatalytic chemical manufacturing with thermophilic enzymes. In this study, we constructed an in vitro artificial metabolic pathway for the salvage synthesis of NAD(+) from its degradation products by the combination of eight thermophilic enzymes. The enzymes were heterologously produced in recombinant Escherichia coli and the heat-treated crude extracts of the recombinant cells were directly used as enzyme solutions. When incubated with experimentally optimized concentrations of the enzymes at 60°C, the NAD(+) concentration could be kept almost constant for 15h. PMID:26912312

  15. R22(8) motifs in Aminopyrimidine sulfonate/carboxylate interactions: Crystal structures of pyrimethaminium benzenesulfonate monohydrate (2:2:1) and 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyrimidinium sulfosalicylate dihydrate (4:2:2)

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramani, Kasthuri; Muthiah, Packianathan Thomas; Lynch, Daniel E

    2007-01-01

    Background Pyrimethamine [2,4-diamino-5-(p-chlorophenyl)-6-ethylpyrimidine] is an antifolate drug used in anti-malarial chemotherapy. Pyrimidine and aminopyrimidine derivatives are biologically important compounds owing to their natural occurrence as components of nucleic acids. Results In the crystal structures of two organic salts, namely pyrimethaminium benzenesulfonate monohydrate 1 and 2-amino-4, 6-dimethylpyrimidinium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate dihydrate 2, pyrimethamine (PMN) and 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine (AMPY) are protonated at one of the nitrogens in the pyrimidine rings. In both the PMN and AMPY sulfonate complexes, the protonated pyrimidine rings are hydrogen bonded to the sulfonate groups, forming a hydrogen-bonded bimolecular ring motif with graph-set notation R22(8). The sulfonate group mimics the carboxylate anion's mode of association, which is more commonly seen when binding with 2-aminopyrimidines. In compound 1, the PMN moieties are centrosymmetrically paired through a complementary DADA array of hydrogen bonds. In compound 2, two types of bimolecular cyclic hydrogen bonded R22(8) motifs (one involving the carboxylate group and the other involving sulfonate group) coexist. Furthermore, this compound is stabilized by intra and intermolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds. Conclusion The crystal structures of pyrimethaminium benzenesulfonate monohydrate and 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyrimidinium sulfosalicylate dihydrate have been investigated in detail. In compound 1, the R22(8) motif involving the sulfonate group is present. The role the sulfonic acid group plays in mimicking the carboxylate anions is thus evident. In compound 2, two types of bimolecular cyclic hydrogen bonded R22(8) motifs (one involving the carboxylate group and the other involving sulfonate group) coexist. In both the compounds base pairing also occurs. Thus homo and hetero synthons are present. PMID:17999751

  16. Small kernel 1 encodes a pentatricopeptide repeat protein required for mitochondrial nad7 transcript editing and seed development in maize (Zea mays) and rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jie; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Hou, Mingming; Sun, Feng; Shen, Yun; Xiu, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Xiaomin; Chen, Zong-Liang; Sun, Samuel S M; Small, Ian; Tan, Bao-Cai

    2014-09-01

    RNA editing modifies cytidines (C) to uridines (U) at specific sites in the transcripts of mitochondria and plastids, altering the amino acid specified by the DNA sequence. Here we report the identification of a critical editing factor of mitochondrial nad7 transcript via molecular characterization of a small kernel 1 (smk1) mutant in Zea mays (maize). Mutations in Smk1 arrest both the embryo and endosperm development. Cloning of Smk1 indicates that it encodes an E-subclass pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein that is targeted to mitochondria. Loss of SMK1 function abolishes the C → U editing at the nad7-836 site, leading to the retention of a proline codon that is edited to encode leucine in the wild type. The smk1 mutant showed dramatically reduced complex-I assembly and NADH dehydrogenase activity, and abnormal biogenesis of the mitochondria. Analysis of the ortholog in Oryza sativa (rice) reveals that rice SMK1 has a conserved function in C → U editing of the mitochondrial nad7-836 site. T-DNA knock-out mutants showed abnormal embryo and endosperm development, resulting in embryo or seedling lethality. The leucine at NAD7-279 is highly conserved from bacteria to flowering plants, and analysis of genome sequences from many plants revealed a molecular coevolution between the requirement for C → U editing at this site and the existence of an SMK1 homolog. These results demonstrate that Smk1 encodes a PPR-E protein that is required for nad7-836 editing, and this editing is critical to NAD7 function in complex-I assembly in mitochondria, and hence to embryo and endosperm development in maize and rice. PMID:24923534

  17. Characterization of NAD salvage pathways and their role in virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael D L; Echlin, Haley; Dao, Tina H; Rosch, Jason W

    2015-11-01

    NAD is a necessary cofactor present in all living cells. Some bacteria cannot de novo synthesize NAD and must use the salvage pathway to import niacin or nicotinamide riboside via substrate importers NiaX and PnuC, respectively. Although homologues of these two importers and their substrates have been identified in other organisms, limited data exist in Streptococcus pneumoniae, specifically, on its effect on overall virulence. Here, we sought to characterize the substrate specificity of NiaX and PnuC in Str. pneumoniae TIGR4 and the contribution of these proteins to virulence of the pathogen. Although binding affinity of each importer for nicotinamide mononucleotide may overlap, we found NiaX to specifically import nicotinamide and nicotinic acid, and PnuC to be primarily responsible for nicotinamide riboside import. Furthermore, a pnuC mutant is completely attenuated during both intranasal and intratracheal infections in mice. Taken together, these findings underscore the importance of substrate salvage in pneumococcal pathogenesis and indicate that PnuC could potentially be a viable small-molecule therapeutic target to alleviate disease progression in the host. PMID:26311256

  18. Ligand Binding and Structural Changes Associated with Allostery in Yeast NAD+-specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, McAlister-Henn

    2011-01-01

    Yeast NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an octameric enzyme composed of four each of regulatory IDH1 and catalytic IDH2 subunits that share 42% sequence identity. IDH2 contains catalytic isocitrate/Mg2+ and NAD+ binding sites whereas IDH1 contains homologous binding sites, respectively, for cooperative binding of isocitrate and for allosteric binding of AMP. Ligand binding is highly ordered in vitro, and IDH exhibits the unusual property of half-site binding for all ligands. The structures of IDH solved in the absence or presence of ligands have shown: (a) a heterodimer to be the basic structural/functional unit of the enzyme, (b) the organization of heterodimers to form tetramer and octamer structures, (c) structural differences that may underlie cooperative and allosteric regulatory mechanisms, and (d) the possibility for formation of a disulfide bond that could reduce catalytic activity. In vivo analyses of mutant enzymes have elucidated the physiological importance of catalytic activity and allosteric regulation of this tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme. Other studies have established the importance of a disulfide bond in regulation of IDH activity in vivo, as well as contributions of this bond to the property of half-site ligand binding exhibited by the wild-type enzyme. PMID:22008468

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of yeast NAD{sup +}-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Gang; Taylor, Alexander B.; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Hart, P. John

    2005-05-01

    Yeast NAD{sup +}-isocitrate dehydrogenase has been purified and crystallized using sodium citrate, a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme, as a precipitant. Preliminary X-ray analyses indicate the molecular boundaries of the molecule and large continuous solvent channels in the crystal. NAD{sup +}-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH; EC 1.1.1.41) is a complex allosterically regulated enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Yeast IDH is believed to be an octamer containing four catalytic IDH2 and four regulatory IDH1 subunits. Crystals of yeast IDH have been obtained and optimized using sodium citrate, a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme, as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = 302.0, c = 112.1 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å from a native crystal and to 4.0 Å using multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) methods from an osmium derivative. Initial electron-density maps reveal large solvent channels and the molecular boundaries of the allosteric IDH multimer.

  20. Molecular Basis of Ligand-Dependent Regulation of NadR, the Transcriptional Repressor of Meningococcal Virulence Factor NadA.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Alessia; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Fagnocchi, Luca; Cantini, Francesca; Haag, Andreas F; Brier, Sébastien; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Delany, Isabel; Bottomley, Matthew J

    2016-04-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is present on the meningococcal surface and contributes to adhesion to and invasion of human cells. NadA is also one of three recombinant antigens in the recently-approved Bexsero vaccine, which protects against serogroup B meningococcus. The amount of NadA on the bacterial surface is of direct relevance in the constant battle of host-pathogen interactions: it influences the ability of the pathogen to engage human cell surface-exposed receptors and, conversely, the bacterial susceptibility to the antibody-mediated immune response. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms which regulate nadA expression levels, which are predominantly controlled by the transcriptional regulator NadR (Neisseria adhesin A Regulator) both in vitro and in vivo. NadR binds the nadA promoter and represses gene transcription. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA), a catabolite present in human saliva both under physiological conditions and during bacterial infection, the binding of NadR to the nadA promoter is attenuated and nadA expression is induced. NadR also mediates ligand-dependent regulation of many other meningococcal genes, for example the highly-conserved multiple adhesin family (maf) genes, which encode proteins emerging with important roles in host-pathogen interactions, immune evasion and niche adaptation. To gain insights into the regulation of NadR mediated by 4-HPA, we combined structural, biochemical, and mutagenesis studies. In particular, two new crystal structures of ligand-free and ligand-bound NadR revealed (i) the molecular basis of 'conformational selection' by which a single molecule of 4-HPA binds and stabilizes dimeric NadR in a conformation unsuitable for DNA-binding, (ii) molecular explanations for the binding specificities of different hydroxyphenylacetate ligands, including 3Cl,4-HPA which is produced during inflammation, (iii) the presence of a leucine residue essential for dimerization and conserved in

  1. Neuronal death induced by misfolded prion protein is due to NAD+ depletion and can be relieved in vitro and in vivo by NAD+ replenishment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Minghai; Ottenberg, Gregory; Sferrazza, Gian Franco; Hubbs, Christopher; Fallahi, Mohammad; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Brantley, Alicia F.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal death in protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases are poorly understood. We used a highly toxic misfolded prion protein (TPrP) model to understand neurotoxicity induced by prion protein misfolding. We show that abnormal autophagy activation and neuronal demise is due to severe, neuron-specific, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) depletion. Toxic prion protein-exposed neuronal cells exhibit dramatic reductions of intracellular NAD+ followed by decreased ATP production, and are completely rescued by treatment with NAD+ or its precursor nicotinamide because of restoration of physiological NAD+ levels. Toxic prion protein-induced NAD+ depletion results from PARP1-independent excessive protein ADP-ribosylations. In vivo, toxic prion protein-induced degeneration of hippocampal neurons is prevented dose-dependently by intracerebral injection of NAD+. Intranasal NAD+ treatment of prion-infected sick mice significantly improves activity and delays motor impairment. Our study reveals NAD+ starvation as a novel mechanism of autophagy activation and neurodegeneration induced by a misfolded amyloidogenic protein. We propose the development of NAD+ replenishment strategies for neuroprotection in prion diseases and possibly other protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25678560

  2. Molecular Basis of Ligand-Dependent Regulation of NadR, the Transcriptional Repressor of Meningococcal Virulence Factor NadA

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Alessia; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Fagnocchi, Luca; Cantini, Francesca; Haag, Andreas F.; Brier, Sébastien; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Delany, Isabel; Bottomley, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is present on the meningococcal surface and contributes to adhesion to and invasion of human cells. NadA is also one of three recombinant antigens in the recently-approved Bexsero vaccine, which protects against serogroup B meningococcus. The amount of NadA on the bacterial surface is of direct relevance in the constant battle of host-pathogen interactions: it influences the ability of the pathogen to engage human cell surface-exposed receptors and, conversely, the bacterial susceptibility to the antibody-mediated immune response. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms which regulate nadA expression levels, which are predominantly controlled by the transcriptional regulator NadR (Neisseria adhesin A Regulator) both in vitro and in vivo. NadR binds the nadA promoter and represses gene transcription. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA), a catabolite present in human saliva both under physiological conditions and during bacterial infection, the binding of NadR to the nadA promoter is attenuated and nadA expression is induced. NadR also mediates ligand-dependent regulation of many other meningococcal genes, for example the highly-conserved multiple adhesin family (maf) genes, which encode proteins emerging with important roles in host-pathogen interactions, immune evasion and niche adaptation. To gain insights into the regulation of NadR mediated by 4-HPA, we combined structural, biochemical, and mutagenesis studies. In particular, two new crystal structures of ligand-free and ligand-bound NadR revealed (i) the molecular basis of ‘conformational selection’ by which a single molecule of 4-HPA binds and stabilizes dimeric NadR in a conformation unsuitable for DNA-binding, (ii) molecular explanations for the binding specificities of different hydroxyphenylacetate ligands, including 3Cl,4-HPA which is produced during inflammation, (iii) the presence of a leucine residue essential for dimerization and conserved in

  3. Increasing NAD Synthesis in Muscle via Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Is Not Sufficient to Promote Oxidative Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, David W.; Davis, James G.; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  4. Increasing NAD synthesis in muscle via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is not sufficient to promote oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Frederick, David W; Davis, James G; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A

    2015-01-16

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  5. A Rare Case of Tumoral Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease of the Wrist Joint

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Osamu; Kaji, Yoshio; Yamagami, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Kounosuke; Nishimura, Hideki; Fukuoka, Natsuko; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease (CPPDCD), also known as tophaceous calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPDD), is a tumorlike lesion, and it should be distinguished from usual CPDD that causes severe joint inflammation and arthralgia. A case of tumoral CPPDCD of the wrist joint that required differentiation from synovial osteochondromatosis is described. Case Presentation. The patient was a 78-year-old woman with a 5-year history of nodular lesions at the right wrist that had gradually increased in size. An excisional biopsy and a histological examination of the excised nodular lesions by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining were performed, demonstrating numerous polarizable, rhabdoid, and rectangular crystals, surrounded by fibroblasts, macrophages, and foreign body-type giant cells, consistent with tumoral CPPDCD. Conclusion. Tumoral CPPDCD, especially at the wrist joint, is rare, and, to the best of our knowledge, only 2 articles have been published. This case seems to need further follow-up for recurrence, because tumoral CPPDCD may recur after complete or incomplete surgical excision. PMID:26783477

  6. Mitogenic effects of hydroxyapatite and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals on cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cheung, H S; Story, M T; McCarty, D J

    1984-06-01

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals in 1% serum stimulated 3H thymidine uptake into quiescent canine synovial fibroblasts and human foreskin fibroblast cultures, as did 10% serum. The onset of stimulation and peak uptake of thymidine after crystal addition were delayed by 2-3 hours as compared with the effects produced by 10% serum. Stimulation of 3H thymidine uptake was proportional to the serum concentration used. HA crystals (50 micrograms/ml) stimulated nuclide uptake at each serum concentration used. 3H thymidine uptake was also proportional to the dose of HA or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals, although larger doses of the latter crystal were required to produce equivalent effects. Not all particulates were effective mitogenic agents. Latex beads and diamond crystals had no effect. Monosodium urate crystals modestly stimulated and calcium urate crystals markedly stimulated nuclide uptake. The more complex crystals found in a naturally occurring condition (calcinosis) were as mitogenic as the pure synthetic HA. The synovial cell hyperplasia sometimes associated with crystals might be explained in part by their mitogenic activity. PMID:6329235

  7. 90-Day subchronic toxicity study of sodium molybdate dihydrate in rats.

    PubMed

    Murray, F Jay; Sullivan, Frank M; Tiwary, Asheesh K; Carey, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the subchronic toxicity of molybdenum (Mo) in Sprague-Dawley rats given sodium molybdate dihydrate in the diet for 90days at dose levels of 0, 5, 17 or 60mgMo/kgbw/day. The study complied with OECD Test Guideline (TG) 408, with additional examination of estrus cycles and sperm count, motility, and morphology from OECD TG 416. The overall no-observed-adverse-effect level was 17mgMo/kgbw/day, based on effects on body weight, body weight gain, food conversion efficiency and renal histopathology (females only) at 60mgMo/kgbw/day. No treatment-related adverse effects on reproductive organ weights or histopathology, estrus cycles or sperm parameters were observed at any dose level. No adverse effects were observed in the high dose animals after the 60-day recovery period, with the exception that male rats did not fully recover from reduced body weight. Serum blood, liver and kidney samples were analyzed for molybdenum, copper, zinc, manganese, iron, cobalt and selenium; high levels of molybdenum and copper were found in the serum, blood, liver and kidneys of rats treated with 60mgMo/kgbw/day. In conclusion, the LOAEL and NOAEL for molybdenum were determined to be 60 and 17mgMo/kgbw/day, respectively. PMID:24041747

  8. Sequence divergence and diversity suggests ongoing functional diversification of vertebrate NAD metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gossmann, Toni I; Ziegler, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    NAD is not only an important cofactor in redox reactions but has also received attention in recent years because of its physiological importance in metabolic regulation, DNA repair and signaling. In contrast to the redox reactions, these regulatory processes involve degradation of NAD and therefore necessitate a constant replenishment of its cellular pool. NAD biosynthetic enzymes are common to almost all species in all clades, but the number of NAD degrading enzymes varies substantially across taxa. In particular, vertebrates, including humans, have a manifold of NAD degrading enzymes which require a high turnover of NAD. As there is currently a lack of a systematic study of how natural selection has shaped enzymes involved in NAD metabolism we conducted a comprehensive evolutionary analysis based on intraspecific variation and interspecific divergence. We compare NAD biosynthetic and degrading enzymes in four eukaryotic model species and subsequently focus on human NAD metabolic enzymes and their orthologs in other vertebrates. We find that the majority of enzymes involved in NAD metabolism are subject to varying levels of purifying selection. While NAD biosynthetic enzymes appear to experience a rather high level of evolutionary constraint, there is evidence for positive selection among enzymes mediating NAD-dependent signaling. This is particularly evident for members of the PARP family, a diverse protein family involved in DNA damage repair and programmed cell death. Based on haplotype information and substitution rate analysis we pinpoint sites that are potential targets of positive selection. We also link our findings to a three dimensional structure, which suggests that positive selection occurs in domains responsible for DNA binding and polymerization rather than the NAD catalytic domain. Taken together, our results indicate that vertebrate NAD metabolism is still undergoing functional diversification. PMID:25084685

  9. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD(+) is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD(+) homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD(+) metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD(+) metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD(+) metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD(+) metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD(+) metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD(+) metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD(+)-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD(+) intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD(+) homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD(+) and NAD(+) intermediates

  10. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD+ is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD+ homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD+ metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD+ metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD+ metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD+ metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD+ metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD+ metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD+-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD+ intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD+ homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD+ and NAD+ intermediates shuttle between different

  11. Flavonoid apigenin is an inhibitor of the NAD+ ase CD38: implications for cellular NAD+ metabolism, protein acetylation, and treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Escande, Carlos; Nin, Veronica; Price, Nathan L; Capellini, Verena; Gomes, Ana P; Barbosa, Maria Thereza; O'Neil, Luke; White, Thomas A; Sinclair, David A; Chini, Eduardo N

    2013-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a growing health problem worldwide. It is therefore imperative to develop new strategies to treat this pathology. In the past years, the manipulation of NAD(+) metabolism has emerged as a plausible strategy to ameliorate metabolic syndrome. In particular, an increase in cellular NAD(+) levels has beneficial effects, likely because of the activation of sirtuins. Previously, we reported that CD38 is the primary NAD(+)ase in mammals. Moreover, CD38 knockout mice have higher NAD(+) levels and are protected against obesity and metabolic syndrome. Here, we show that CD38 regulates global protein acetylation through changes in NAD(+) levels and sirtuin activity. In addition, we characterize two CD38 inhibitors: quercetin and apigenin. We show that pharmacological inhibition of CD38 results in higher intracellular NAD(+) levels and that treatment of cell cultures with apigenin decreases global acetylation as well as the acetylation of p53 and RelA-p65. Finally, apigenin administration to obese mice increases NAD(+) levels, decreases global protein acetylation, and improves several aspects of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Our results show that CD38 is a novel pharmacological target to treat metabolic diseases via NAD(+)-dependent pathways. PMID:23172919

  12. The potential regulatory roles of NAD(+) and its metabolism in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Ping; Hu, Jiong-Yu; Huang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    (Macro)autophagy mediates the bulk degradation of defective organelles, long-lived proteins and protein aggregates in lysosomes and plays a critical role in cellular and tissue homeostasis. Defective autophagy processes have been found to contribute to a variety of metabolic diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy are not fully understood. Increasing data indicate that nicotinamide adenine nucleotide (NAD(+)) homeostasis correlates intimately with autophagy. NAD(+) is a ubiquitous coenzyme that functions primarily as an electron carrier of oxidoreductase in multiple redox reactions. Both NAD(+) homeostasis and its metabolism are thought to play critical roles in regulating autophagy. In this review, we discuss how the regulation of NAD(+) and its metabolism can influence autophagy. We focus on the regulation of NAD(+)/NADH homeostasis and the effects of NAD(+) consumption by poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation by sirtuins and NAD(+) metabolites on autophagy processes and the underlying mechanisms. Future studies should provide more direct evidence for the regulation of autophagy processes by NAD(+). A better understanding of the critical roles of NAD(+) and its metabolites on autophagy will shed light on the complexity of autophagy regulation, which is essential for the discovery of new therapeutic tools for autophagy-related diseases. PMID:26975537

  13. Sources and implications of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance in diabetes and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Zheng, Hong; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    NAD+ is a fundamental molecule in metabolism and redox signaling. In diabetes and its complications, the balance between NADH and NAD+ can be severely perturbed. On one hand, NADH is overproduced due to influx of hyperglycemia to the glycolytic and Krebs cycle pathways and activation of the polyol pathway. On the other hand, NAD+ can be diminished or depleted by overactivation of poly ADP ribose polymerase that uses NAD+ as its substrate. Moreover, sirtuins, another class of enzymes that also use NAD+ as their substrate for catalyzing protein deacetylation reactions, can also affect cellular content of NAD+. Impairment of NAD+ regeneration enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and complex I in mitochondria can also contribute to NADH accumulation and NAD+ deficiency. The consequence of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance is initially reductive stress that eventually leads to oxidative stress and oxidative damage to macromolecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. Accordingly, redox imbalance-triggered oxidative damage has been thought to be a major factor contributing to the development of diabetes and its complications. Future studies on restoring NADH/NAD+ redox balance could provide further insights into design of novel antidiabetic strategies. PMID:27274295

  14. BRCA1 as a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent metabolic switch in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Chen, Na-Na; Cao, Ji-Min; Sun, Wu-Ping; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Li, Chun-Yan; Wang, Xiu-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Both hereditary factors (e.g., BRCA1) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent metabolic pathways are implicated in the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer. However, whether crosstalk exists between BRCA1 and NAD metabolism remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that: (i) BRCA1 inactivation events (mutation and promoter methylation) were accompanied by elevated levels of NAD; (ii) the knockdown or overexpression of BRCA1 was an effective way to induce an increase or decrease of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)-related NAD synthesis, respectively; and (iii) BRCA1 expression patterns were inversely correlated with NAD levels in human ovarian cancer specimens. In addition, it is worth noting that: (i) NAD incubation induced increased levels of BRCA1 in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) Nampt knockdown-mediated reduction in NAD levels was effective at inhibiting BRCA1 expression; and (iii) the overexpression of Nampt led to higher NAD levels and a subsequent increase in BRCA1 levels in primary ovarian cancer cells and A2780, HO-8910 and ES2 ovarian cancer cell lines. These results highlight a novel link between BRCA1 and NAD. Our findings imply that genetic (e.g., BRCA1 inactivation) and NAD-dependent metabolic pathways are jointly involved in the malignant progression of ovarian cancer. PMID:25486197

  15. Sources and implications of NADH/NAD(+) redox imbalance in diabetes and its complications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Zheng, Hong; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    NAD(+) is a fundamental molecule in metabolism and redox signaling. In diabetes and its complications, the balance between NADH and NAD(+) can be severely perturbed. On one hand, NADH is overproduced due to influx of hyperglycemia to the glycolytic and Krebs cycle pathways and activation of the polyol pathway. On the other hand, NAD(+) can be diminished or depleted by overactivation of poly ADP ribose polymerase that uses NAD(+) as its substrate. Moreover, sirtuins, another class of enzymes that also use NAD(+) as their substrate for catalyzing protein deacetylation reactions, can also affect cellular content of NAD(+). Impairment of NAD(+) regeneration enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and complex I in mitochondria can also contribute to NADH accumulation and NAD(+) deficiency. The consequence of NADH/NAD(+) redox imbalance is initially reductive stress that eventually leads to oxidative stress and oxidative damage to macromolecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. Accordingly, redox imbalance-triggered oxidative damage has been thought to be a major factor contributing to the development of diabetes and its complications. Future studies on restoring NADH/NAD(+) redox balance could provide further insights into design of novel antidiabetic strategies. PMID:27274295

  16. Distinct role of Arabidopsis mitochondrial P-type pentatricopeptide repeat protein-modulating editing protein, PPME, in nad1 RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Kuan-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Huei-Jing; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mitochondrion is an important power generator in most eukaryotic cells. To preserve its function, many essential nuclear-encoded factors play specific roles in mitochondrial RNA metabolic processes, including RNA editing. RNA editing consists of post-transcriptional deamination, which alters specific nucleotides in transcripts to mediate gene expression. In plant cells, many pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs) participate in diverse organellar RNA metabolic processes, but only PLS-type PPRs are involved in RNA editing. Here, we report a P-type PPR protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, P-type PPR-Modulating Editing (PPME), which has a distinct role in mitochondrial nad1 RNA editing via RNA binding activity. In the homozygous ppme mutant, cytosine (C)-to-uracil (U) conversions at both the nad1-898 and 937 sites were abolished, disrupting Arg300-to-Trp300 and Pro313-to-Ser313 amino acid changes in the mitochondrial NAD1 protein. NAD1 is a critical component of mitochondrial respiration complex I; its activity is severely reduced in the homozygous ppme mutant, resulting in significantly altered growth and development. Both abolished RNA editing and defective complex I activity were completely rescued by CaMV 35S promoter- and PPME native promoter-driven PPME genomic fragments tagged with GFP in a homozygous ppme background. Our experimental results demonstrate a distinct role of a P-type PPR protein, PPME, in RNA editing in plant organelles. PMID:27149614

  17. Distinct role of Arabidopsis mitochondrial P-type pentatricopeptide repeat protein-modulating editing protein, PPME, in nad1 RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Leu, Kuan-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Huei-Jing; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondrion is an important power generator in most eukaryotic cells. To preserve its function, many essential nuclear-encoded factors play specific roles in mitochondrial RNA metabolic processes, including RNA editing. RNA editing consists of post-transcriptional deamination, which alters specific nucleotides in transcripts to mediate gene expression. In plant cells, many pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs) participate in diverse organellar RNA metabolic processes, but only PLS-type PPRs are involved in RNA editing. Here, we report a P-type PPR protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, P-type PPR-Modulating Editing (PPME), which has a distinct role in mitochondrial nad1 RNA editing via RNA binding activity. In the homozygous ppme mutant, cytosine (C)-to-uracil (U) conversions at both the nad1-898 and 937 sites were abolished, disrupting Arg(300)-to-Trp(300) and Pro(313)-to-Ser(313) amino acid changes in the mitochondrial NAD1 protein. NAD1 is a critical component of mitochondrial respiration complex I; its activity is severely reduced in the homozygous ppme mutant, resulting in significantly altered growth and development. Both abolished RNA editing and defective complex I activity were completely rescued by CaMV 35S promoter- and PPME native promoter-driven PPME genomic fragments tagged with GFP in a homozygous ppme background. Our experimental results demonstrate a distinct role of a P-type PPR protein, PPME, in RNA editing in plant organelles. PMID:27149614

  18. NMR study on cis-N-[4-[4-(1,2-benzisozole-3-yl)-1-piperazinyl] butyl]cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboximide monohydrochloride dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongbin; Lin, Jimao; Lin, Zhenguang; Li, Hongmei

    2006-02-01

    Cis-N-[4-[4-(1,2-benzisozole-3-yl)-1-piperazinyl]butyl]cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboximide monohydrochloride dihydrate was studied spectroscopically. Complete NMR assignments were made using DEPT, H-H COSY, as well as HMQC and HMBC heteronuclear correlation techniques. The hydrochloride salt was found at delta > 10. The dihydrate was present in the region delta 3-4 in DMSO-d6 solvent. Asymmetry carbon C3 brought chemical-shift-nonequivalent of cis-cyclohexanyl group, splitting four systems H1, H1', H2 and H2'. Diamagnetic anisotropy of benzisozolyl group results in three troops peaks of piperazinyl group. PMID:16406787

  19. Electron-transfer mediator for a NAD-glucose dehydrogenase-based glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Min; Kim, Min-yeong; Reddy, Sanapalli S; Cho, Jaegeol; Cho, Chul-ho; Jung, Suntae; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2013-12-01

    A new electron-transfer mediator, 5-[2,5-di (thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl]-1,10-phenanthroline iron(III) chloride (FePhenTPy) oriented to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent-glucose dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) system was synthesized through a Paal-Knorr condensation reaction. The structure of the mediator was confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, proton and carbon nucler magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy, and its electron-transfer characteristic for a glucose sensor was investigated using voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. A disposable amperometric glucose sensor with NAD-GDH was constructed with FePhenTPy as an electron-transfer mediator on a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) and its performance was evaluated, where the addition of reduces graphene oxide (RGO) to the mediator showed the enhanced sensor performance. The experimental parameters to affect the analytical performance and the stability of the proposed glucose sensor were optimized, and the sensor exhibited a dynamic range between 30 mg/dL and 600 mg/dL with the detection limit of 12.02 ± 0.6 mg/dL. In the real sample experiments, the interference effects by acetaminophen, ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid, caffeine, and other monosaccharides (fructose, lactose, mannose, and xylose) were completely avoided through coating the sensor surface with the Nafion film containing lead(IV) acetate. The reliability of proposed glucose sensor was evaluated by the determination of glucose in artificial blood and human whole blood samples. PMID:24199942

  20. Poly(Propylene Fumarate) Reinforced Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate Cement Composites for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Alge, Daniel L.; Bennet, Jeffrey; Treasure, Trevor; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry; Goebel, W. Scott; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements have many desirable properties for bone tissue engineering, including osteoconductivity, resorbability, and amenability to rapid prototyping based methods for scaffold fabrication. In this study, we show that dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cements, which are highly resorbable but also inherently weak and brittle, can be reinforced with poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) to produce strong composites with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering. Characterization of DCPD-PPF composites revealed significant improvements in mechanical properties for cements with a 1.0 powder to liquid ratio. Compared to non-reinforced controls, flexural strength improved from 1.80 ± 0.19 MPa to 16.14 ± 1.70 MPa, flexural modulus increased from 1073.01 ± 158.40 MPa to 1303.91 ± 110.41 MPa, maximum displacement during testing increased from 0.11 ± 0.04 mm to 0.51 ± 0.09 mm, and work of fracture improved from 2.74 ± 0.78 J/m2 to 249.21 ± 81.64 J/m2. To demonstrate the utility of our approach for scaffold fabrication, 3D macroporous scaffolds were prepared with rapid prototyping technology. Compressive testing revealed that PPF reinforcement increased scaffold strength from 0.31 ± 0.06 MPa to 7.48 ± 0.77 MPa. Finally, 3D PPF-DCPD scaffolds were implanted into calvarial defects in rabbits for 6 weeks. Although the addition of mesenchymal stem cells to the scaffolds did not significantly improve the extent of regeneration, numerous bone nodules with active osteoblasts were observed within the scaffold pores, especially in the peripheral regions. Overall, the results of this study suggest that PPF-DCPD composites may be promising scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:22489012

  1. In vivo (31) P MRS assessment of intracellular NAD metabolites and NAD(+) /NADH redox state in human brain at 4 T.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-01

    NAD(+) and NADH play key roles in cellular respiration. Intracellular redox state defined by the NAD(+) /NADH ratio (RX) reflects the cellular metabolic and physiopathological status. By taking advantage of high/ultrahigh magnetic field strengths, we have recently established a novel in vivo (31) P MRS-based NAD assay for noninvasive and quantitative measurements of intracellular NAD concentrations and redox state in animal and human brains at 16.4 T, 9.4 T and 7 T. To explore its potential for clinical application, in this study we investigated the feasibility of assessing the NAD metabolism and redox state in human brain at a lower field of 4 T by incorporating the (1) H-decoupling technique with the in vivo (31) P NAD assay. The use of (1) H decoupling significantly narrowed the linewidths of NAD and α-ATP resonances, resulting in higher sensitivity and better spectral resolution as compared with the (1) H-coupled (31) P spectrum. These improvements made it possible to reliably quantify cerebral NAD concentrations and RX, consistent with previously reported results obtained from similar age human subjects at 7 T. In summary, this work demonstrates the capability and utility of the (1) H-decoupled (31) P MRS-based NAD assay at lower field strength; thus, it opens new opportunities for studying intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in human brain at clinical settings. This conclusion is supported by the simulation results, indicating that similar performance and reliability as observed at 4T can be achieved at 3 T with the same signal-to-noise ratio. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27257783

  2. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  3. Dual emission fluorescent silver nanoclusters for sensitive detection of the biological coenzyme NAD+/NADH.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yufeng; Huang, Kehan; Chang, Mengfang; Qin, Cuifang; Zhang, Sanjun; Pan, Haifeng; Chen, Yan; Xu, Jianhua

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) displaying dual-excitation and dual-emission properties have been developed for the specific detection of NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form). With the increase of NAD(+) concentrations, the longer wavelength emission (with the peak at 550 nm) was gradually quenched due to the strong interactions between the NAD(+) and Ag NCs, whereas the shorter wavelength emission (peaking at 395 nm) was linearly enhanced. More important, the dual-emission intensity ratio (I395/I550), fitting by a single-exponential decay function, can efficiently detect various NAD(+) levels from 100 to 4000 μM, as well as label NAD(+)/NADH (reduced form of NAD) ratios in the range of 1-50. PMID:26452612

  4. Solid acid-catalyzed depolymerization of barley straw driven by ball milling.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Laura; Haverinen, Jasmiina; Jaakkola, Mari; Lassi, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    This study describes a time and energy saving, solvent-free procedure for the conversion of lignocellulosic barley straw into reducing sugars by mechanocatalytical pretreatment. The catalytic conversion efficiency of several solid acids was tested which revealed oxalic acid dihydrate as a potential catalyst with high conversion rate. Samples were mechanically treated by ball milling and subsequently hydrolyzed at different temperatures. The parameters of the mechanical treatment were optimized in order to obtain sufficient amount of total reducing sugar (TRS) which was determined following the DNS assay. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis (CE) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) were carried out. Under optimal conditions TRS 42% was released using oxalic acid dihydrate as a catalyst. This study revealed that the acid strength plays an important role in the depolymerization of barley straw and in addition, showed, that the oxalic acid-catalyzed reaction generates low level of the degradation product 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). PMID:26859328

  5. Modulation of Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate Growth by Selective Crystal-face Binding of Phosphorylated Osteopontin and Polyaspartate Peptide Showing Occlusion by Sectoral (Compositional) Zoning*

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yung-Ching; Masica, David L.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Nguyen, Sarah; Vali, Hojatollah; McKee, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) mineral and the urinary protein osteopontin/uropontin (OPN) are commonly found in kidney stones. To investigate the effects of OPN on COD growth, COD crystals were grown with phosphorylated OPN or a polyaspartic acid-rich peptide of OPN (DDLDDDDD, poly-Asp86–93). Crystals grown with OPN showed increased dimensions of the {110} prismatic faces attributable to selective inhibition at this crystallographic face. At high concentrations of OPN, elongated crystals with dominant {110} faces were produced, often with intergrown, interpenetrating twin crystals. Poly-Asp86–93 dose-dependently elongated crystal morphology along the {110} faces in a manner similar to OPN. In crystal growth studies using fluorescently tagged poly-Asp86–93 followed by imaging of crystal interiors using confocal microscopy, sectoral (compositional) zoning in COD was observed resulting from selective binding and incorporation (occlusion) of peptide exclusively into {110} crystal sectors. Computational modeling of poly-Asp86–93 adsorption to COD {110} and {101} surfaces also suggests increased stabilization of the COD {110} surface and negligible change to the natively stable {101} surface. Ultrastructural, colloidal-gold immunolocalization of OPN by transmission electron microscopy in human stones confirmed an intracrystalline distribution of OPN. In summary, OPN and its poly-Asp86–93 sequence similarly affect COD mineral growth; the {110} crystallographic faces become enhanced and dominant attributable to {110} face inhibition by the protein/peptide, and peptides can incorporate into the mineral phase. We, thus, conclude that the poly-Asp86–93 domain is central to the OPN ability to interact with the {110} faces of COD, where it binds to inhibit crystal growth with subsequent intracrystalline incorporation (occlusion). PMID:19581305

  6. Dynamics of NAD in cortical nephron segments: Effect of nicotinamide and of dietary phosphate intake

    SciTech Connect

    Yusufi, A.N.K.; Kiebzak, G.M.; Kusano, E.; Werness, J.L.; Homma, S.; Dousa, T.P. )

    1987-08-01

    NAD content and the rate of NAD hydrolysis were determined in proximal convoluted tubules (PCT), proximal straight tubules (PST), and adjacent cortical nephron segments microdissected from kidneys of tyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) rats. In the basal state, rats fed a normal phosphate diet had an NAD content higher in PCT, PST, and in cortical ascending limb (CAL) than in glomeruli. After intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide, the NAD content increased significantly in all nephron segments except CAL. In experiments conducted on TPTX rats stabilized on a low-phosphorus diet, NAD content increased in response to a nicotinamide injection in PCT, but did not change significantly in PST. The catabolism of NAD was determined by generation of ({sup 3}H)adenosine, a major metabolite of (adenine-2,8-{sup 3}H)NAD. The rate of ({sup 3}H)adenosine generation from ({sup 3}H)NAD was significantly higher in PST than in PCT. The authors conclude that, in response to nicotinamide administration in vivo, the NAD content increases more in PCT than in PST and that this difference may be, at least partly, due to a lower rate of NAD breakdown in PCT. In a state of dietary phosphate deprivation, NAD also increases significantly in response to intraperitoneal nicotinamide in PCT, but it does not increase significantly in PST. The nicotinamide-elicited increase of NAD content in proximal tubules, mainly in PCT, may be related to inhibition of Na{sup +}-gradient-dependent inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) reabsorption across the brush-border membrane proximal tubules and to the phosphaturic effect of nicotinamide in rats red normal-P{sub i} diet.

  7. Yeast Life-Span Extension by Calorie Restriction Is Independent of NAD Fluctuation

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Ana Rute; Lavu, Siva; Medvedik, Oliver; Taylor, Christopher; Howitz, Konrad T.; Santos, Helena; Sinclair, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) slows aging in numerous species. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this effect requires Sir2, a conserved NAD+-dependent deacetylase. We report that CR reduces nuclear NAD+ levels in vivo. Moreover, the activity of Sir2 and its human homologue SIRT1 are not affected by physiological alterations in the NAD+:NADH ratio. These data implicate alternate mechanisms of Sir2 regulation by CR. PMID:14605207

  8. Photolabelling of mutant forms of the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin with NAD+.

    PubMed Central

    Cieplak, W; Locht, C; Mar, V L; Burnette, W N; Keith, J M

    1990-01-01

    The S1 subunit of pertussis toxin catalyses the hydrolysis of NAD+ (NAD+ glycohydrolysis) and the NAD(+)-dependent ADP-ribosylation of guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins. Recently, the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin was shown to be photolabelled by using radiolabelled NAD+ and u.v.; the primary labelled residue was Glu-129, thereby implicating this residue in the binding of NAD+. Studies from various laboratories have shown that the N-terminal portion of the S1 subunit, which shows sequence similarity to cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin, is important to the maintenance of both glycohydrolase and transferase activity. In the present study the photolabelling technique was applied to the analysis of a series of recombinant-derived S1 molecules that possessed deletions or substitutions near the N-terminus of the S1 molecule. The results revealed a positive correlation between the extent of photolabelling with NAD+ and the magnitude of specific NAD+ glycohydrolase activity exhibited by the mutants. Enzyme kinetic analyses of the N-terminal mutants also identified a mutant with substantially reduced activity, a depressed photolabelling efficiency and a markedly increased Km for NAD+. The results support a direct role for the N-terminal region of the S1 subunit in the binding of NAD+, thereby providing a rationale for the effect of mutations in this region on enzymic activity. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2363691

  9. Influence of shot peening on corrosion properties of biocompatible magnesium alloy AZ31 coated by dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD).

    PubMed

    Mhaede, Mansour; Pastorek, Filip; Hadzima, Branislav

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials for biomedical applications because of many outstanding properties like biodegradation, bioactivity and their specific density and Young's modulus are closer to bone than the commonly used metallic implant materials. Unfortunately their fatigue properties and low corrosion resistance negatively influenced their application possibilities in the field of biomedicine. These problems could be diminished through appropriate surface treatments. This study evaluates the influence of a surface pre-treatment by shot peening and shot peening+coating on the corrosion properties of magnesium alloy AZ31. The dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating (DCPD) was electrochemically deposited in a solution containing 0.1M Ca(NO3)2, 0.06M NH4H2PO4 and 10mL/L of H2O2. The effect of shot peening on the surface properties of magnesium alloy was evaluated by microhardness and surface roughness measurements. The influence of the shot peening and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate layer on the electrochemical characteristics of AZ31 magnesium alloy was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.9% NaCl solution at a temperature of 22±1°C. The obtained results were analyzed by the Tafel-extrapolation method and equivalent circuit method. The results showed that the application of shot peening process followed by DCPD coating improves the properties of the AZ31 surface from corrosion and mechanical point of view. PMID:24863232

  10. Three-dimensional structure prediction of the NAD binding site of proton-pumping transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fjellström, O; Olausson, T; Hu, X; Källebring, B; Ahmad, S; Bragg, P D; Rydström, J

    1995-02-01

    A three-dimensional structure of the NAD site of Escherichia coli transhydrogenase has been predicted. The model is based on analysis of conserved residues among the transhydrogenases from five different sources, homologies with enzymes using NAD as cofactors or substrates, hydrophilicity profiles, and secondary structure predictions. The present model supports the hypothesis that there is one binding site, located relatively close to the N-terminus of the alpha-subunit. The proposed structure spans residues alpha 145 to alpha 287, and it includes five beta-strands and five alpha-helices oriented in a typical open twisted alpha/beta conformation. The amino acid sequence following the GXGXXG dinucleotide binding consensus sequence (residues alpha 172 to alpha 177) correlates exactly to a typical fingerprint region for ADP binding beta alpha beta folds in dinucleotide binding enzymes. In the model, aspartic acid alpha 195 forms hydrogen bonds to one or both hydroxyl groups on the adenosine ribose sugar moiety. Threonine alpha 196 and alanine alpha 256, located at the end of beta B and beta D, respectively, create a hydrophobic sandwich with the adenine part of NAD buried inside. The nicotinamide part is located in a hydrophobic cleft between alpha A and beta E. Mutagenesis work has been carried out in order to test the predicted model and to determine whether residues within this domain are important for proton pumping directly. All data support the predicted structure, and no residue crucial for proton pumping was detected. Since no three-dimensional structure of transhydrogenase has been solved, a well based tertiary structure prediction is of great value for further experimental design in trying to elucidate the mechanism of the energy-linked proton pump. PMID:7777492

  11. Transmission electron microscopic identification of silicon-containing particles in synovial fluid: potential confusion with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate and apatite crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, T; Schumacher, H R; Lansaman, J; Rothfuss, S; Dryll, A

    1984-01-01

    Silicon-containing particles were identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in thin sections of two synovial fluids, which also contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals, aspirated during acute attacks of pseudogout. Such particles, which are interpreted as probably being artefacts from glassware, were electron dense and similar in appearance to some CPPD or hydroxyapatite crystals. Images PMID:6476921

  12. Production of concentrates of mono- and dihydric phenols from the total water-soluble phenols formed in the high-speed pyrolysis of brown coals

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, E.I.; Belov, P.S.; Korenev, K.P.; Molchanova, I.V.

    1982-01-01

    The results are given of the separation of the water-soluble phenols obtained in the high-speed pyrolysis of Kansk-Achinsk coals into uniform concentrates of mono- and dihydric phenols. It has been shown that the concentrate of monhydric phenols is suitable for working up by a known technology into phenolic products.

  13. Pharmacological Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an Enzyme Essential for NAD+ Biosynthesis, in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bo; Young, Debra A.; Lu, Zhao-Hai; Wang, Tao; Meier, Timothy I.; Shepard, Robert L.; Roth, Kenneth; Zhai, Yan; Huss, Karen; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Gillig, James; Parthasarathy, Saravanan; Burkholder, Timothy P.; Smith, Michele C.; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Zhao, Genshi

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the first rate-limiting step in converting nicotinamide to NAD+, essential for cellular metabolism, energy production, and DNA repair. NAMPT has been extensively studied because of its critical role in these cellular processes and the prospect of developing therapeutics against the target, yet how it regulates cellular metabolism is not fully understood. In this study we utilized liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and serine biosynthesis in cancer cells and tumor xenografts. We show for the first time that NAMPT inhibition leads to the attenuation of glycolysis at the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step due to the reduced availability of NAD+ for the enzyme. The attenuation of glycolysis results in the accumulation of glycolytic intermediates before and at the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step, promoting carbon overflow into the pentose phosphate pathway as evidenced by the increased intermediate levels. The attenuation of glycolysis also causes decreased glycolytic intermediates after the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step, thereby reducing carbon flow into serine biosynthesis and the TCA cycle. Labeling studies establish that the carbon overflow into the pentose phosphate pathway is mainly through its non-oxidative branch. Together, these studies establish the blockade of glycolysis at the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step as the central metabolic basis of NAMPT inhibition responsible for ATP depletion, metabolic perturbation, and subsequent tumor growth inhibition. These studies also suggest that altered metabolite levels in tumors can be used as robust pharmacodynamic markers for evaluating NAMPT inhibitors in the clinic. PMID:23239881

  14. Crystal structure of tetra-methyl-tetra-thia-fulvalenium (1S)-camphor-10-sulfonate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Mathieu; Allain, Magali; Mézière, Cécile; Pop, Flavia; Giffard, Michel

    2015-07-01

    Electro-oxidation of tetra-methyl-tetra-thia-fulvalene (TMTTF) in the presence of the chiral anion (1S)-camphor-10-sulfonate (S-camphSO3 (-)) in tetra-hydro-furan/water medium afforded a 1/1 salt formulated as TMTTF·S-camphSO3·2H2O or 2-(4,5-dimethyl-1,3-di-thiol-2-yl-idene)-4,5-dimethyl-1,3-di-thiole radical ion (1+) [(1S)-7,7-dimethyl-2-oxobi-cyclo-[2.2.1]heptan-1-yl]methane-sulfonate dihydrate, C10H12S4 (+)·C10H15O4S(-)·2H2O. In this salt, two independent TMTTF units are present but, in both cases, the observed bond lengths and especially the central C=C distance [1.392 (6) and 1.378 (6) Å] are in agreement with a complete oxidation of TMTTF which is thus present as TMTTF (.) (+) radical cations. These cations form one-dimensional stacks in which they are associated two by two, forming dimers with short [3.472 (1) to 3.554 (2) Å] S⋯S contacts. The two S-camphSO3 anions present also form stacks and are connected with each other via the water mol-ecules with many O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds ranging from 1.86 (3) to 2.15 (4) Å; the O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding network can be described as being constituted of C 2 (2)(6) chains bearing R 3 (3)(11) lateral rings. On the other hand, the columns of cations and anions are connected through C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a system expanding in three directions; finally, the result is a three-dimensional network of O-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:26279858

  15. Injectable and rapid-setting calcium phosphate bone cement with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Burguera, Elena F; Xu, Hockin H K; Weir, Michael D

    2006-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) sets in situ with intimate adaptation to the contours of defect surfaces, and forms an implant having a structure and composition similar to hydroxyapatite, the putative mineral in teeth and bones. The objective of the present study was to develop an injectable CPC using dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) with a high solubility for rapid setting. Two agents were incorporated to impart injectability and fast-hardening to the cement: a hardening accelerator (sodium phosphate) and a gelling agent (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, HPMC). The cement with DCPD was designated as CPC(D), and the conventional cement was referred to as CPC(A). Using water without sodium phosphate, CPC(A) had a setting time of 82 +/- 6 min. In contrast, CPC(D) exhibited rapid setting with a time of 17 +/- 1 min. At 0.2 mol/L sodium phosphate, setting time for CPC(D) was 15 +/- 1 min, significantly faster than 40 +/- 2 min for CPC(A) (Tukey's at 0.95). Sodium phosphate decreased the paste injectability (measured as the paste mass extruded from the syringe divided by the original paste mass inside the syringe). However, the addition of HPMC dramatically increased the paste injectability. For CPC(D), the injectability was increased from 65% +/- 12% without HPMC to 98% +/- 1% with 1% HPMC. Injectability of CPC(A) was also doubled to 99% +/- 1%. The injectable and rapid-setting CPC(D) possessed flexural strength and elastic modulus values overlapping the reported values for sintered porous hydroxyapatite implants and cancellous bone. In summary, the rapid setting and relatively high strength and elastic modulus of CPC(D) should help the graft to quickly attain strength and geometrical integrity within a short period of time postoperatively. Furthermore, the injectability of CPC(D) may have potential for procedures involving defects with limited accessibility or narrow cavities, when there is a need for precise placement of the paste, and when using minimally invasive

  16. Catalases are NAD(P)H-dependent tellurite reductases.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Iván L; Arenas, Felipe A; Pérez, José Manuel; Fuentes, Derie E; Araya, Manuel A; Saavedra, Claudia P; Tantaleán, Juan C; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Youderian, Philip A; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2006-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species damage intracellular targets and are implicated in cancer, genetic disease, mutagenesis, and aging. Catalases are among the key enzymatic defenses against one of the most physiologically abundant reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide. The well-studied, heme-dependent catalases accelerate the rate of the dismutation of peroxide to molecular oxygen and water with near kinetic perfection. Many catalases also bind the cofactors NADPH and NADH tenaciously, but, surprisingly, NAD(P)H is not required for their dismutase activity. Although NAD(P)H protects bovine catalase against oxidative damage by its peroxide substrate, the catalytic role of the nicotinamide cofactor in the function of this enzyme has remained a biochemical mystery to date. Anions formed by heavy metal oxides are among the most highly reactive, natural oxidizing agents. Here, we show that a natural isolate of Staphylococcus epidermidis resistant to tellurite detoxifies this anion thanks to a novel activity of its catalase, and that a subset of both bacterial and mammalian catalases carry out the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of soluble tellurite ion (TeO(3)(2-)) to the less toxic, insoluble metal, tellurium (Te(o)), in vitro. An Escherichia coli mutant defective in the KatG catalase/peroxidase is sensitive to tellurite, and expression of the S. epidermidis catalase gene in a heterologous E. coli host confers increased resistance to tellurite as well as to hydrogen peroxide in vivo, arguing that S. epidermidis catalase provides a physiological line of defense against both of these strong oxidizing agents. Kinetic studies reveal that bovine catalase reduces tellurite with a low Michaelis-Menten constant, a result suggesting that tellurite is among the natural substrates of this enzyme. The reduction of tellurite by bovine catalase occurs at the expense of producing the highly reactive superoxide radical. PMID:17183702

  17. Engineering NAD+ availability for Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalysis: a case study for dihydroxyacetone production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whole-cell redox biocatalysis has been intensively explored for the production of valuable compounds because excellent selectivity is routinely achieved. Although the cellular cofactor level, redox state and the corresponding enzymatic activity are expected to have major effects on the performance of the biocatalysts, our ability remains limited to predict the outcome upon variation of those factors as well as the relationship among them. Results In order to investigate the effects of cofactor availability on whole-cell redox biocatalysis, we devised recombinant Escherichia coli strains for the production of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) catalyzed by the NAD+-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase (GldA). In this model system, a water-forming NAD+ oxidase (NOX) and a NAD+ transporter (NTT4) were also co-expressed for cofactor regeneration and extracellular NAD+ uptake, respectively. We found that cellular cofactor level, NAD+/NADH ratio and NOX activity were not only strain-dependent, but also growth condition-dependent, leading to significant differences in specific DHA titer among different whole-cell biocatalysts. The host E. coli DH5α had the highest DHA specific titer of 0.81 g/gDCW with the highest NAD+/NADH ratio of 6.7 and NOX activity of 3900 U. The biocatalyst had a higher activity when induced with IPTG at 37°C for 8 h compared with those at 30°C for 8 h and 18 h. When cells were transformed with the ntt4 gene, feeding NAD+ during the cell culture stage increased cellular NAD(H) level by 1.44 fold and DHA specific titer by 1.58 fold to 2.13 g/gDCW. Supplementing NAD+ during the biotransformation stage was also beneficial to cellular NAD(H) level and DHA production, and the highest DHA productivity reached 0.76 g/gDCW/h. Cellular NAD(H) level, NAD+/NADH ratio, and NOX and GldA activity dropped over time during the biotransformation process. Conclusions High NAD+/NADH ratio driving by NOX was very important for DHA production. Once cofactor was

  18. Biochemical Issues in Estimation of Cytosolic Free NAD/NADH Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiansheng; Hu, Xun

    2012-01-01

    Cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio is fundamentally important in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis but current techniques cannot distinguish between protein-bound and free NAD/NADH. Williamson et al reported a method to estimate this ratio by cytosolic lactate/pyruvate (L/P) based on the principle of chemical equilibrium. Numerous studies used L/P ratio to estimate the cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio by assuming that the conversion in cells was at near-equilibrium but not verifying how near it was. In addition, it seems accepted that cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio was a dependent variable responding to the change of L/P ratio. In this study, we show (1) that the change of lactate/glucose (percentage of glucose that converts to lactate by cells) and L/P ratio could measure the status of conversion between pyruvate + NADH and lactate + NAD that tends to or gets away from equilibrium; (2) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH could be accurately estimated by L/P only when the conversion is at or very close to equilibrium otherwise a calculation error by one order of magnitude could be introduced; (3) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH is stable and L/P is highly labile, that the highly labile L/P is crucial to maintain the homeostasis of NAD/NADH; (4) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH is dependent on oxygen levels. Our study resolved the key issues regarding accurate estimation of cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio and the relationship between NAD/NADH and L/P. PMID:22570687

  19. Biochemical and Structural Studies of Uncharacterized Protein PA0743 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Revealed NAD+-dependent l-Serine Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Singer, Alexander; Brown, Greg; Flick, Robert; Evdokimova, Elena; Tan, Kemin; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2012-01-01

    The β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases form a large family of ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze oxidation of various β-hydroxy acid substrates to corresponding semialdehydes. Several known enzymes include β-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, 2-(hydroxymethyl)glutarate dehydrogenase, and phenylserine dehydrogenase, but the vast majority of β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases remain uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that the predicted β-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase PA0743 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa catalyzes an NAD+-dependent oxidation of l-serine and methyl-l-serine but exhibits low activity against β-hydroxyisobutyrate. Two crystal structures of PA0743 were solved at 2.2–2.3-Å resolution and revealed an N-terminal Rossmann fold domain connected by a long α-helix to the C-terminal all-α domain. The PA0743 apostructure showed the presence of additional density modeled as HEPES bound in the interdomain cleft close to the predicted catalytic Lys-171, revealing the molecular details of the PA0743 substrate-binding site. The structure of the PA0743-NAD+ complex demonstrated that the opposite side of the enzyme active site accommodates the cofactor, which is also bound near Lys-171. Site-directed mutagenesis of PA0743 emphasized the critical role of four amino acid residues in catalysis including the primary catalytic residue Lys-171. Our results provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and activity of β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:22128181

  20. Bioluminescent Cell-Based NAD(P)/NAD(P)H Assays for Rapid Dinucleotide Measurement and Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Leippe, Donna; Sobol, Mary; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Cali, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The central role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in cellular energy metabolism and signaling makes them important nodes that link the metabolic state of cells with energy homeostasis and gene regulation. In this study, we describe the implementation of cell-based bioluminescence assays for rapid and sensitive measurement of those important redox cofactors. We show that the sensitivity of the assays (limit of detection ∼0.5 nM) enables the selective detection of total amounts of nonphosphorylated or phosphorylated dinucleotides directly in cell lysates. The total amount of NAD+NADH or NADP+NADPH levels can be detected in as low as 300 or 600 cells/well, respectively. The signal remains linear up to 5,000 cells/well with the maximum signal-to-background ratios ranging from 100 to 200 for NAD+NADH and from 50 to 100 for NADP+NADPH detection. The assays are robust (Z′ value >0.7) and the inhibitor response curves generated using a known NAD biosynthetic pathway inhibitor FK866 correlate well with the reported data. More importantly, by multiplexing the dinucleotide detection assays with a fluorescent nonmetabolic cell viability assay, we show that dinucleotide levels can be decreased dramatically (>80%) by FK866 treatment before changes in cell viability are detected. The utility of the assays to identify modulators of intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels was further confirmed using an oncology active compound library, where novel dinucleotide regulating compounds were identified. For example, the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat was a potent inhibitor of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides, whereas the selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene unexpectedly caused a twofold increase in cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels. PMID:25506801

  1. NAD(P) biosynthesis enzymes as potential targets for selective drug design.

    PubMed

    Magni, G; Di Stefano, M; Orsomando, G; Raffaelli, N; Ruggieri, S

    2009-01-01

    NAD(P) biosynthetic pathways can be considered a generous source of enzymatic targets for drug development. Key reactions for NAD(P) biosynthesis in all organisms, common to both de novo and salvage routes, are catalyzed by NMN/NaMN adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), NAD synthetase (NADS), and NAD kinase (NADK). These reactions represent a three-step pathway, present in the vast majority of living organisms, which is responsible for the generation of both NAD and NADP cellular pools. The validation of these enzymes as drug targets is based on their essentiality and conservation among a large variety of pathogenic microorganisms, as well as on their differential structural features or their differential metabolic contribution to NAD(P) homeostasis between microbial and human cell types. This review describes the structural and functional properties of eubacterial and human enzymes endowed with NMNAT, NADS, and NADK activities, as well as with nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NamPRT) and nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) activities, highlighting the species-related differences, with emphasis on their relevance for drug design. In addition, since the overall NMNAT activity in humans is accounted by multiple isozymes differentially involved in the metabolic activation of antineoplastic compounds, their individual diagnostic value for early therapy optimization is outlined. The involvement of human NMNAT in neurodegenerative disorders and its role in neuroprotection is also discussed. PMID:19355893

  2. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  3. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  4. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  5. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  6. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  7. Detection of NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme activity with dynamic luminescence quenching of terbium complexes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroki; Terai, Takuya; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Komatsu, Toru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2015-05-14

    We discovered that positively charged terbium complexes bearing 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane functionalized with amide ligands are highly sensitive to dynamic luminescence quenching by NAD(P)H. We exploited this phenomenon to establish a general time-resolved luminescence-based assay platform for sensitive detection of NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme activities. PMID:25879812

  8. 33 CFR 110.168 - Hampton Roads, Virginia and adjacent waters (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... explosives, as defined in 49 CFR 173.50. Dangerous cargo means “certain dangerous cargo” as defined in § 160... adjacent waters (Datum: NAD 83). 110.168 Section 110.168 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD..., Virginia and adjacent waters (Datum: NAD 83). (a) Anchorage Grounds—(1) Anchorage A . The waters bounded...

  9. Mild reductions in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in altered nitrate assimilation and pigmentation but do not impact growth.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Sulpice, Ronan; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Leisse, Andrea; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Hodges, Michael; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated expressing a fragment of the mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlIDH1) in the antisense orientation. The transgenic plants displayed a mild reduction in the activity of the target enzyme in the leaves but essentially no visible alteration in growth from the wild-type. Fruit size and yield were, however, reduced. These plants were characterized by relatively few changes in photosynthetic parameters, but they displayed a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm). Furthermore, a clear reduction in flux through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was observed in the transformants. Additionally, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines exhibited considerably altered metabolism, being characterized by slight decreases in the levels of amino acids, intermediates of the TCA cycle, photosynthetic pigments, starch, and NAD(P)H levels, but increased levels of nitrate and protein. Results from these studies show that even small changes in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in nitrate assimilation and suggest the presence of different strategies by which metabolism is reprogrammed to compensate for this deficiency. PMID:20035036

  10. NAD kinase levels control the NADPH concentration in human cells.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Nadine; Niere, Marc; Ziegler, Mathias

    2007-11-16

    NAD kinases (NADKs) are vital, as they generate the cellular NADP pool. As opposed to three compartment-specific isoforms in plants and yeast, only a single NADK has been identified in mammals whose cytoplasmic localization we established by immunocytochemistry. To understand the physiological roles of the human enzyme, we generated and analyzed cell lines stably deficient in or overexpressing NADK. Short hairpin RNA-mediated down-regulation led to similar (about 70%) decrease of both NADK expression, activity, and the NADPH concentration and was accompanied by increased sensitivity toward H(2)O(2). Overexpression of NADK resulted in a 4-5-fold increase in the NADPH, but not NADP(+), concentration, although the recombinant enzyme phosphorylated preferentially NAD(+). Surprisingly, NADK overexpression and the ensuing increase of the NADPH level only moderately enhanced protection against oxidant treatment. Apparently, to maintain the NADPH level for the regeneration of oxidative defense systems human cells depend primarily on NADP-dependent dehydrogenases (which re-reduce NADP(+)), rather than on a net increase of NADP. The stable shifts of the NADPH level in the generated cell lines were also accompanied by alterations in the expression of peroxiredoxin 5 and Nrf2. Because the basal oxygen radical level in the cell lines was only slightly changed, the redox state of NADP may be a major transmitter of oxidative stress. PMID:17855339

  11. Bacterial Na+-translocating ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Biegel, Eva; Müller, Volker

    2010-10-19

    The anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii carries out a unique type of Na(+)-motive, anaerobic respiration with caffeate as electron acceptor, termed "caffeate respiration." Central, and so far the only identified membrane-bound reaction in this respiration pathway, is a ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase (Fno) activity. Here we show that inverted membrane vesicles of A. woodii couple electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to NAD(+) with the transport of Na(+) from the outside into the lumen of the vesicles. Na(+) transport was electrogenic, and accumulation was inhibited by sodium ionophores but not protonophores, demonstrating a direct coupling of Fno activity to Na(+) transport. Results from inhibitor studies are consistent with the hypothesis that Fno activity coupled to Na(+) translocation is catalyzed by the Rnf complex, a membrane-bound, iron-sulfur and flavin-containing electron transport complex encoded by many bacterial and some archaeal genomes. Fno is a unique type of primary Na(+) pump and represents an early evolutionary mechanism of energy conservation that expands the redox range known to support life. In addition, it explains the lifestyle of many anaerobic bacteria and gives a mechanistic explanation for the enigma of the energetic driving force for the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADH plus H(+) as reductant in a number of aerobic bacteria. PMID:20921383

  12. NADS: A Web Applet for Manipulation and Graphical Viewing of Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Beck, B R; McNabb, D P

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a program called NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System) which provides a web-based, user-friendly interface for viewing nuclear data. NADS uses a client/server model. The client is a Java applet that runs in a web browser. The server is a Python code that delivers pointwise data to the applet per user request and then plots the data. The data is also stored in tables for viewing and modifying. NADS can display 2-D, 3-D and 4-D (time sliced) data in a powerful, user-friendly environment. Currently, evaluated nuclear data are available from ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, JENDL, JEF and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ENDL databases. LLNL's ENDL database has data for neutron, gamma and charged particles as projectiles. In addition to displaying and saving data, NADS has the capability to perform computations with the data. NADS is accessible over the Internet at http://nuclear.llnl.gov/.

  13. Neuroprotective effect of ethyl pyruvate against Zn(2+) toxicity via NAD replenishment and direct Zn(2+) chelation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Woo; Lee, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Ja-Kyeong

    2016-06-01

    Ethyl pyruvate (EP) is a simple aliphatic ester of pyruvic acid and has been shown to have robust protective effect in various pathological conditions. A variety of mechanisms have been reported to underlie the protective effects of EP, which include anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic functions. Recently, we reported that EP suppressed high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) release from primary microglial cells via direct Ca(2+) chelation. In the present study, we investigated whether and how EP chelates Zn(2+) in neurons when it is present at toxic levels. In cortical neurons treated with 40 μM of Zn(2+) for 24 h, both EP and pyruvate significantly suppressed neuronal cell death, although the potency of pyruvate was greater than that of EP, and that NAD replenishment contributed to the neuroprotective effects of both pyruvate and EP. However, when cortical neurons were exposed to acute treatment of Zn(2+) (400 μM, 15 min), EP, but not pyruvate, significantly suppressed neuronal death, despite the fact that NAD replenishment by EP was weaker than that by pyruvate. Spectrophotometric studies revealed that EP directly chelates Zn(2+), and this was confirmed in physiological contexts, such as, NMDA-treated primary cortical cultures and OGD-subjected hippocampal slice cultures, in which EP suppressed intracellular Zn(2+) elevation and neuronal cell death. In addition, EP markedly reduced the expressions of PARP-1 and of the NADPH oxidase subunit in Zn(2+)-treated primary cortical neurons, well known Zn(2+)-induced downstream processes. Together, these results show EP suppresses Zn(2+) induced neurotoxicity via dual functions, chelating Zn(2+) and promoting NAD replenishment. PMID:26850126

  14. Genetically encoded fluorescent indicator for imaging NAD+/NADH ratio changes in different cellular compartments

    PubMed Central

    Bilan, Dmitry S.; Matlashov, Mikhail E.; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu.; Schultz, Carsten; Enikolopov, Grigori; Belousov, Vsevolod V.

    2014-01-01

    Background The ratio of NAD+/NADH is a key indicator that reflects the overall redox state of the cells. Until recently, there were no methods for real time NAD+/NADH monitoring in living cells. Genetically encoded fluorescent probes for NAD+/NADH are fundamentally new approach for studying the NAD+/NADH dynamics. Methods We developed a genetically encoded probe for the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NAD(H), redox state changes by inserting circularly permuted YFP into redox sensor T-REX from Thermus aquaticus. We characterized the sensor in vitro using spectrofluorometry and in cultured mammalian cells using confocal fluorescent microscopy. Results The sensor, named RexYFP, reports changes in the NAD+/NADH ratio in different compartments of living cells. Using RexYFP, we were able to track changes in NAD+/NADH in cytoplasm and mitochondrial matrix of cells under a variety of conditions. The affinity of the probe enables comparison of NAD+/NADH in compartments with low (cytoplasm) and high (mitochondria) NADH concentration. We developed a method of eliminating pH-driven artifacts by normalizing the signal to the signal of the pH sensor with the same chromophore. Conclusion RexYFP is suitable for detecting the NAD(H) redox state in different cellular compartments. General significance RexYFP has several advantages over existing NAD+/NADH sensors such as smallest size and optimal affinity for different compartments. Our results show that normalizing the signal of the sensor to the pH changes is a good strategy for overcoming pH-induced artifacts in imaging. PMID:24286672

  15. Neuronal NAD(P)H Oxidases Contribute to ROS Production and Mediate RGC Death after Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Grant, Jeff; Santos, Andrea Rachelle C.; Hernandez, Eleut; Ivanov, Dmitry

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To study the role of neuronal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] oxidase–dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death after ischemia. Methods. Ischemic injury was induced by unilateral elevation of intraocular pressure via direct corneal cannulation. For in vitro experiments, RGCs isolated by immunopanning from retinas were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). The expression levels of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits were evaluated by quantitative PCR, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry. The level of ROS generated was assayed by dihydroethidium. The NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors were then tested to determine if inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase altered the production of ROS within the RGCs and promoted cell survival. Results. It was reported that RGCs express catalytic Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, Duox1, as well as regulatory Ncf1/p47phox, Ncf2/p67phox, Cyba/p22phox, Noxo1, and Noxa1 subunits of NAD(P)H oxidases under normal conditions and after ischemia. However, whereas RGCs express only low levels of catalytic Nox2, Nox4, and Duox1, and regulatory Ncf1/p47, Ncf2/p67 subunits, they exhibit significantly higher levels of catalytic subunit Nox1 and the subunits required for optimal activity of Nox1. It was observed that the nonselective NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors VAS-2870, AEBSF, and the Nox1 NAD(P)H oxidase–specific inhibitor ML-090 decreased the ROS burst stimulated by OGD, which was associated with a decreased level of RGC death. Conclusions. The findings suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase activity in RGCs renders them vulnerable to ischemic death. Importantly, high levels of Nox1 NAD(P)H oxidase subunits in RGCs suggest that this enzyme could be a major source of ROS in RGCs produced by NAD(P)H oxidases. PMID:22467573

  16. NAMPT-Mediated Salvage Synthesis of NAD+ Controls Morphofunctional Changes of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Venter, Gerda; Oerlemans, Frank T. J. J.; Willemse, Marieke; Wijers, Mietske; Fransen, Jack A. M.; Wieringa, Bé

    2014-01-01

    Functional morphodynamic behavior of differentiated macrophages is strongly controlled by actin cytoskeleton rearrangements, a process in which also metabolic cofactors ATP and NAD(H) (i.e. NAD+ and NADH) and NADP(H) (i.e. NADP+ and NADPH) play an essential role. Whereas the link to intracellular ATP availability has been studied extensively, much less is known about the relationship between actin cytoskeleton dynamics and intracellular redox state and NAD+-supply. Here, we focus on the role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), found in extracellular form as a cytokine and growth factor, and in intracellular form as one of the key enzymes for the production of NAD+ in macrophages. Inhibition of NAD+ salvage synthesis by the NAMPT-specific drug FK866 caused a decrease in cytosolic NAD+ levels in RAW 264.7 and Maf-DKO macrophages and led to significant downregulation of the glycolytic flux without directly affecting cell viability, proliferation, ATP production capacity or mitochondrial respiratory activity. Concomitant with these differential metabolic changes, the capacity for phagocytic ingestion of particles and also substrate adhesion of macrophages were altered. Depletion of cytoplasmic NAD+ induced cell-morphological changes and impaired early adhesion in phagocytosis of zymosan particles as well as spreading performance. Restoration of NAD+ levels by NAD+, NMN, or NADP+ supplementation reversed the inhibitory effects of FK866. We conclude that direct coupling to local, actin-based, cytoskeletal dynamics is an important aspect of NAD+’s cytosolic role in the regulation of morphofunctional characteristics of macrophages. PMID:24824795

  17. Characterization of the functional role of allosteric site residue Asp102 in the regulatory mechanism of human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (malic enzyme)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) (malic enzyme) can be specifically and allosterically activated by fumarate. X-ray crystal structures have revealed conformational changes in the enzyme in the absence and in the presence of fumarate. Previous studies have indicated that fumarate is bound to the allosteric pocket via Arg67 and Arg91. Mutation of these residues almost abolishes the activating effect of fumarate. However, these amino acid residues are conserved in some enzymes that are not activated by fumarate, suggesting that there may be additional factors controlling the activation mechanism. In the present study, we tried to delineate the detailed molecular mechanism of activation of the enzyme by fumarate. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace Asp102, which is one of the charged amino acids in the fumarate binding pocket and is not conserved in other decarboxylating malate dehydrogenases. In order to explore the charge effect of this residue, Asp102 was replaced by alanine, glutamate or lysine. Our experimental data clearly indicate the importance of Asp102 for activation by fumarate. Mutation of Asp102 to Ala or Lys significantly attenuated the activating effect of fumarate on the enzyme. Kinetic parameters indicate that the effect of fumarate was mainly to decrease the Km values for malate, Mg2+ and NAD+, but it did not notably elevate kcat. The apparent substrate Km values were reduced by increasing concentrations of fumarate. Furthermore, the greatest effect of fumarate activation was apparent at low malate, Mg2+ or NAD+ concentrations. The Kact values were reduced with increasing concentrations of malate, Mg2+ and NAD+. The Asp102 mutants, however, are much less sensitive to regulation by fumarate. Mutation of Asp102 leads to the desensitization of the co-operative effect between fumarate and substrates of the enzyme. PMID:15989682

  18. Studies on the growth, thermal and optical properties of 4-aminopyridinium p-aminobenzoate dihydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornamurthy, B. M.; Peramaiyan, G.; Pandi, P.; Das, S.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Manivannan, V.; Mohan Kumar, R.

    2014-07-01

    4-aminopyridinium p-aminobenzoate dihydrate (4APAB) compound was synthesized successfully and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study was conducted to evaluate the cell parameters of grown crystal. The crystalline perfection of 4APAB crystal was assessed by HRXRD studies. Thermal studies revealed the thermal stability of grown crystal up to 126 °C. The optical transmittance window and lower cut-off wavelength of 4APAB crystal were estimated by using UV-vis-NIR studies. The second harmonic efficiency of 4APAB was measured by powder test using Nd:YAG laser radiation. The dielectric tensor studies revealed that 4APAB crystal shows normal dielectric behavior. The single and multiple shots laser damage threshold values of grown crystal were measured.

  19. Synthesis, growth, structural, optical, photoconductivity and dielectric studies on potassium p-nitrophenolate dihydrate: A new semiorganic nonlinear optical material

    SciTech Connect

    Milton Boaz, B.; Palanichamy, M.; Varghese, Babu; Justin Raj, C.; Jerome Das, S.

    2008-12-01

    Potassium p-nitrophenolate dihydrate, a potential semiorganic nonlinear optical material, has been synthesized and grown by slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Single crystal X-ray analysis presents an unprecedented bonding between ions in the crystal with acentric structure. In the new structural investigation, p-nitrophenolate instead of producing bond between phenolic O{sup -} and K{sup +}, it seems to put nitro group in bonding with the metal ion. Optical absorption shows excellent transmission in the entire visible and near-infrared region. Room temperature photocurrent, transport properties are carried out in order to enhance the application for second harmonic generation and opto-electronic devices. Dielectric constant is found to be independent at higher frequencies. The crystal possesses prominent positive photoconduction in the presence of photoactive centers formed with trap energy level. The nonlinear optical activity is confirmed by Kurtz powder test.

  20. Growth, structural, thermal, dielectric, mechanical and optical characterization of 2, 3-Dimethoxy-10-oxostrychnidinium hydrogen oxalate dihydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, P.; Gayathri, K.; Jayasakthi, M.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anbalagan, G.

    2013-11-01

    Single crystal of 2, 3-Dimethoxy-10-oxostrychnidinium hydrogen oxalate dihydrate has been grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique (SEST) using ethanol-water solution at room temperature. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with space group of P212121. The crystalline perfection of the grown single crystal has been examined by high resolution X-ray diffraction analysis (HRXRD). The optical absorption studies show that the crystal is transparent in the visible region with a lower cut-off wavelength of 342 nm and the optical energy band gap Eg is found to be 3.52 eV. The electrical properties have been assessed by dielectric measurement at different temperatures. Hardness values measured using Vickers hardness indenter show considerable anisotropy. Laser damage threshold study is also carried out for the grown crystal.

  1. Efficient Whole-Cell Biocatalyst for Acetoin Production with NAD+ Regeneration System through Homologous Co-Expression of 2,3-Butanediol Dehydrogenase and NADH Oxidase in Engineered Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Zhiming; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Yang, Taowei; Xu, Zhenghong; Yang, Shangtian

    2014-01-01

    Acetoin (3-hydroxy-2-butanone), an extensively-used food spice and bio-based platform chemical, is usually produced by chemical synthesis methods. With increasingly requirement of food security and environmental protection, bio-fermentation of acetoin by microorganisms has a great promising market. However, through metabolic engineering strategies, the mixed acid-butanediol fermentation metabolizes a certain portion of substrate to the by-products of organic acids such as lactic acid and acetic acid, which causes energy cost and increases the difficulty of product purification in downstream processes. In this work, due to the high efficiency of enzymatic reaction and excellent selectivity, a strategy for efficiently converting 2,3-butandiol to acetoin using whole-cell biocatalyst by engineered Bacillus subtilis is proposed. In this process, NAD+ plays a significant role on 2,3-butanediol and acetoin distribution, so the NADH oxidase and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase both from B. subtilis are co-expressed in B. subtilis 168 to construct an NAD+ regeneration system, which forces dramatic decrease of the intracellular NADH concentration (1.6 fold) and NADH/NAD+ ratio (2.2 fold). By optimization of the enzymatic reaction and applying repeated batch conversion, the whole-cell biocatalyst efficiently produced 91.8 g/L acetoin with a productivity of 2.30 g/(L·h), which was the highest record ever reported by biocatalysis. This work indicated that manipulation of the intracellular cofactor levels was more effective than the strategy of enhancing enzyme activity, and the bioprocess for NAD+ regeneration may also be a useful way for improving the productivity of NAD+-dependent chemistry-based products. PMID:25036158

  2. Efficient whole-cell biocatalyst for acetoin production with NAD+ regeneration system through homologous co-expression of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase in engineered Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Teng; Zhang, Xian; Rao, Zhiming; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Yang, Taowei; Xu, Zhenghong; Yang, Shangtian

    2014-01-01

    Acetoin (3-hydroxy-2-butanone), an extensively-used food spice and bio-based platform chemical, is usually produced by chemical synthesis methods. With increasingly requirement of food security and environmental protection, bio-fermentation of acetoin by microorganisms has a great promising market. However, through metabolic engineering strategies, the mixed acid-butanediol fermentation metabolizes a certain portion of substrate to the by-products of organic acids such as lactic acid and acetic acid, which causes energy cost and increases the difficulty of product purification in downstream processes. In this work, due to the high efficiency of enzymatic reaction and excellent selectivity, a strategy for efficiently converting 2,3-butandiol to acetoin using whole-cell biocatalyst by engineered Bacillus subtilis is proposed. In this process, NAD+ plays a significant role on 2,3-butanediol and acetoin distribution, so the NADH oxidase and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase both from B. subtilis are co-expressed in B. subtilis 168 to construct an NAD+ regeneration system, which forces dramatic decrease of the intracellular NADH concentration (1.6 fold) and NADH/NAD+ ratio (2.2 fold). By optimization of the enzymatic reaction and applying repeated batch conversion, the whole-cell biocatalyst efficiently produced 91.8 g/L acetoin with a productivity of 2.30 g/(L·h), which was the highest record ever reported by biocatalysis. This work indicated that manipulation of the intracellular cofactor levels was more effective than the strategy of enhancing enzyme activity, and the bioprocess for NAD+ regeneration may also be a useful way for improving the productivity of NAD+-dependent chemistry-based products. PMID:25036158

  3. Structures of Iridoid Synthase from Cantharanthus roseus with Bound NAD(+) , NADPH, or NAD(+) /10-Oxogeranial: Reaction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yumei; Liu, Weidong; Malwal, Satish R; Zheng, Yingying; Feng, Xinxin; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chun-Chi; Xu, Zhongxia; Liu, Meixia; Han, Xu; Gao, Jian; Oldfield, Eric; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2015-12-14

    Structures of the iridoid synthase nepetalactol synthase in the presence of NAD(+) , NADPH or NAD(+) /10-oxogeranial were solved. The 10-oxogeranial substrate binds in a transoid-O1-C3 conformation and can be reduced by hydride addition to form the byproduct S-10-oxo-citronellal. Tyr178 Oζ is positioned 2.5 Å from the substrate O1 and provides the second proton required for reaction. Nepetalactol product formation requires rotation about C1-C2 to form the cisoid isomer, leading to formation of the cis-enolate, together with rotation about C4-C5, which enables cyclization and lactol production. The structure is similar to that of progesterone-5β-reductase, with almost identical positioning of NADP, Lys146(147), Tyr178(179), and F342(343), but only Tyr178 and Phe342 appear to be essential for activity. The transoid 10-oxogeranial structure also serves as a model for β-face hydride attack in progesterone 5β-reductases and is of general interest in the context of asymmetric synthesis. PMID:26768532

  4. Upcoming replacements for NAD83, NAVD88 and IGLD85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. A.; Snay, R.

    2009-05-01

    The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is responsible for defining, maintaining and providing access to the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) for the United States. The NSRS is the official system to which all civil federal mapping agencies should refer, and contains, amongst other things, the official geopotential (historically "vertical") datum of NAVD 88, the 3-D geometric reference system (historically "horizontal datum") of NAD 83 and great lakes datum (IGLD 85). Although part of the United States NSRS, all three of these datums have been created through international partnerships across North America. Unfortunately, time has shown both the systematic errors existent within these datums, as well as the inherent weaknesses of relying exclusively on passive monuments to define and provide access to these datums. In recognition of these issues, the National Geodetic Survey has issued a "10 year plan", available online, which outlines steps which will be taken to update NAD 83, NAVD 88 and IGLD 85 concurrently around the year 2018. The primary source of success will be in the refinement of the CORS network and the upcoming execution of the GRAV-D project (Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum). Conversations are ongoing with colleagues in Canada, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean in order to coordinate all of these efforts across the entire continent. The largest changes expected to occur are the removal of over 2 meters of non-geocentricity in NAD 83; the removal of decimeters of bias and over a meter of tilt in NAVD 88; the addition of the ability to track crustal motions (subsidence, tectonics, etc) in the datums; the removal of leveling as a tool for long-line height differencing; the use of a "best" geoid as the orthometric height reference surface; the addition of datum velocities (motions of the 3-D geometric reference system origin and motions of the geoid

  5. Solubilization and Separation of a Plant Plasma Membrane NADPH-O2- Synthase from Other NAD(P)H Oxidoreductases.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gestelen, P.; Asard, H.; Caubergs, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    Solubilization and ion-exchange chromatography of plasma membrane proteins obtained from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings resulted in a single NAD(P)H-O2--synthase protein peak. This enzyme showed a high preference toward NADPH as a substrate (reaction rate, 27.4 nmol O2- produced min-1 mg-1 protein), whereas NADH reactions ranged from 0 to maximally 15% of the NADPH reactions. The protein functions as an oxidase and it was clearly resolved from NAD(P)H dehydrogenases identified with commonly used strong oxidants (ferricyanide, cytochrome c, DCIP, and oxaloacetate). The involvement of peroxidases in O2- production is excluded on the basis of potassium-cyanide insensitivity and NADPH specificity. The NADPH oxidase is only moderately stimulated by flavins (1.5-fold with 25 [mu]M flavine adenine dinucleotide and 2.5-fold with 25 [mu]M flavin mononucleotide) and inhibited by 100 [mu]M p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid, 200 [mu]M diphenyleneiodonium, 10 mM quinacrine, 40 mM pyridine, and 20 mM imidazole. The presence of flavins was demonstrated in the O2-synthase fraction, but no b-type cytochromes were detected. The effect of these inhibitors and the detection of flavins and cytochromes in the plant O2- synthase make it possible to compare this enzyme with the NADPH O2- synthase of animal neutrophil cells. PMID:12223822

  6. NAMPT-Mediated NAD(+) Biosynthesis in Adipocytes Regulates Adipose Tissue Function and Multi-organ Insulin Sensitivity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Stromsdorfer, Kelly L; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Yoon, Myeong Jin; Moseley, Anna C; Franczyk, Michael P; Kelly, Shannon C; Qi, Nathan; Imai, Shin-Ichiro; Yoshino, Jun

    2016-08-16

    Obesity is associated with adipose tissue dysfunction and multi-organ insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms of such obesity-associated systemic metabolic complications are not clear. Here, we characterized mice with adipocyte-specific deletion of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a rate-limiting NAD(+) biosynthetic enzyme known to decrease in adipose tissue of obese and aged rodents and people. We found that adipocyte-specific Nampt knockout mice had severe insulin resistance in adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscle and adipose tissue dysfunction, manifested by increased plasma free fatty acid concentrations and decreased plasma concentrations of a major insulin-sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin. Loss of Nampt increased phosphorylation of CDK5 and PPARγ (serine-273) and decreased gene expression of obesity-linked phosphorylated PPARγ targets in adipose tissue. These deleterious alterations were normalized by administering rosiglitazone or a key NAD(+) intermediate, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN). Collectively, our results provide important mechanistic and therapeutic insights into obesity-associated systemic metabolic derangements, particularly multi-organ insulin resistance. PMID:27498863

  7. N-arylazido-. beta. -alanyl-NAD sup + , a new NAD sup + photoaffinity analogue. Synthesis and labeling of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, P.S.K.; Chen, S. ); Hatefi, Y. )

    1990-01-30

    N-Arylaziod-{beta}-alanyl-NAD{sup +}(N3{prime}-0-(3-(N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino)propionyl)NAD{sup +}) has been prepared by alkaline phosphatase treatment of arylaziod-{beta}-alanyl-NADP{sup +} (N3{prime}-O-(3-(N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino)propionyl)NADP{sup +}). This NAD{sup +} analogue was found to be a potent competitive inhibitor with respect to NADH for the purified bovine heart mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase. The enzyme was irreversibly inhibited as well as covalently labeled by this analogue upon photoirradiation. A stoichiometry of 1.15 mol of N-arylazido-{beta}-alanyl-NAD{sup +} bound/mol of enzyme, at 100% inactivation, was determined from incorporation studies using tritium-labeled analogue. Among the three subunits, 0.85 mol of the analogue was bound to the M{sub r} = 51,000 subunit, and each of the two smaller subunits contained 0.15 mol of the analogue when the dehydrogenase was completely inhibited upon photolysis. Both the irreversible inactivation and the covalent incorporation could be prevented by the presence of NADH during photolysis. These results indicate that N-arylaziod-{beta}-alanyl-NAD{sup +} is an active-site-directed photoaffinity label for the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase, and are further evidence that the M{sub r} = 51,000 subunit contain the NADH binding site. Results are also presented to show that N-arylazido-{beta}-alanyl-NAD{sup +} binds the dehydrogenase in a more effective manner than A-arylazido-{beta}-alanyl-NAD{sup +}.

  8. Regulation of the Nampt-mediated NAD salvage pathway and its therapeutic implications in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ju, Huai-Qiang; Zhuang, Zhuo-Nan; Li, Hao; Tian, Tian; Lu, Yun-Xin; Fan, Xiao-Qiang; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Mo, Hai-Yu; Sheng, Hui; Chiao, Paul J; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2016-08-28

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a crucial cofactor for the redox reactions in the metabolic pathways of cancer cells that have elevated aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect). Cancer cells are reported to rely on NAD recycling and inhibition of the NAD salvage pathway causes metabolic collapse and cell death. However, the underlying regulatory mechanisms and clinical implications for the NAD salvage pathway in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain unclear. This study showed that the expression of Nampt, the rate-limiting enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway, was significantly increased in PDAC cells and PDAC tissues. Additionally, inhibition of Nampt impaired tumor growth in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, which was accompanied by a decreased cellular NAD level and glycolytic activity. Mechanistically, the Nampt expression was independent of Kras and p16 status, but it was directly regulated by miR-206, which was inversely correlated with the expression of Nampt in PDAC tissues. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of Nampt by its inhibitor, FK866, significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of gemcitabine in PDAC cells and in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. In conclusion, the present study revealed a novel regulatory mechanism for Nampt in PDAC and suggested that Nampt inhibition may override gemcitabine resistance by decreasing the NAD level and suppressing glycolytic activity, warranting further clinical investigation for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:27233476

  9. Tributyltin induces mitochondrial fission through NAD-IDH dependent mitofusin degradation in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro; Nakano, Mizuho; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2015-08-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are well-known endocrine disruptors. TBT acts at the nanomolar level through genomic pathways via the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR). We recently reported that TBT inhibits cell growth and the ATP content in the human embryonic carcinoma cell line NT2/D1 via a non-genomic pathway involving NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which metabolizes isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NAD-IDH mediates TBT toxicity remain unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of TBT on mitochondrial NAD-IDH and energy production. Staining with MitoTracker revealed that nanomolar TBT levels induced mitochondrial fragmentation. TBT also degraded the mitochondrial fusion proteins, mitofusins 1 and 2. Interestingly, apigenin, an inhibitor of NAD-IDH, mimicked the effects of TBT. Incubation with an α-ketoglutarate analogue partially recovered TBT-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the involvement of NAD-IDH. Our data suggest that nanomolar TBT levels impair mitochondrial quality control via NAD-IDH in NT2/D1 cells. Thus, mitochondrial function in embryonic cells could be used to assess cytotoxicity associated with metal exposure. PMID:25909344

  10. Monocyte-derived extracellular Nampt-dependent biosynthesis of NAD(+) protects the heart against pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Yano, Masamichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Toru; Yabumoto, Chizuru; Kudo-Sakamoto, Yoko; Kamo, Takehiro; Shimizu, Yu; Yagi, Hiroki; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Lee, Jong-Kook; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Yasushi; Komuro, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the salvage pathway for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) biosynthesis, and thereby regulates the deacetylase activity of sirtuins. Here we show accommodative regulation of myocardial NAD(+) by monocyte-derived extracellular Nampt (eNampt), which is essential for hemodynamic compensation to pressure overload. Although intracellular Nampt (iNampt) expression was decreased in pressure-overloaded hearts, myocardial NAD(+) concentration and Sirt1 activity were preserved. In contrast, iNampt was up-regulated in spleen and monocytes, and circulating eNampt protein and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), a key precursor of NAD(+), were significantly increased. Pharmacological inhibition of Nampt by FK866 or depletion of monocytes/macrophages by clodronate liposomes disrupted the homeostatic mechanism of myocardial NAD(+) levels and NAD(+)-dependent Sirt1 activity, leading to susceptibility to cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac decompensation in pressure-overloaded mice. These biochemical and hemodynamic defects were prevented by systemic administration of NMN. Our studies uncover a crucial role of monocyte-derived eNampt in myocardial adaptation to pressure overload, and highlight a potential intervention controlling myocardial NAD(+) against heart failure. PMID:26522369

  11. Biochemical characterization of isocitrate dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus reveals a unique NAD+-dependent homotetrameric enzyme.

    PubMed

    Stokke, Runar; Madern, Dominique; Fedøy, Anita-Elin; Karlsen, Solveig; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Steen, Ida Helene

    2007-05-01

    The gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) of Methylococcus capsulatus (McIDH) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was NAD+-dependent with a thermal optimum for activity at 55-60 degrees C and an apparent midpoint melting temperature (Tm) of 70 degrees C. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) revealed a homotetrameric state, and McIDH thus represents the first homotetrameric NAD+-dependent IDH that has been characterized. Based on a structural alignment of McIDH and homotetrameric homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HDH) from Thermus thermophilus (TtHDH), we identified the clasp-like domain of McIDH as a likely site for tetramerization. McIDH showed moreover, higher sequence identity (48%) to TtHDH than to previously characterized IDHs. Putative NAD+-IDHs with high sequence identity (48-57%) to McIDH were however identified in a variety of bacteria showing that NAD+-dependent IDHs are indeed widespread within the domain, Bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis including these new sequences revealed a close relationship with eukaryal allosterically regulated NAD+-IDH and the subfamily III of IDH was redefined to include bacterial NAD+- and NADP+-dependent IDHs. This apparent relationship suggests that the mitochondrial genes encoding NAD+-IDH are derived from the McIDH-like IDHs. PMID:17160675

  12. Dimerization of Plant Defensin NaD1 Enhances Its Antifungal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Fung T.; Mills, Grant D.; Poon, Ivan K. H.; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Kirby, Nigel; Baxter, Amy A.; van der Weerden, Nicole L.; Dogovski, Con; Perugini, Matthew A.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Kvansakul, Marc; Hulett, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The plant defensin, NaD1, from the flowers of Nicotiana alata, is a member of a family of cationic peptides that displays growth inhibitory activity against several filamentous fungi, including Fusarium oxysporum. The antifungal activity of NaD1 has been attributed to its ability to permeabilize membranes; however, the molecular basis of this function remains poorly defined. In this study, we have solved the structure of NaD1 from two crystal forms to high resolution (1.4 and 1.58 Å, respectively), both of which contain NaD1 in a dimeric configuration. Using protein cross-linking experiments as well as small angle x-ray scattering analysis and analytical ultracentrifugation, we show that NaD1 forms dimers in solution. The structural studies identified Lys4 as critical in formation of the NaD1 dimer. This was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis of Lys4 that resulted in substantially reduced dimer formation. Significantly, the reduced ability of the Lys4 mutant to dimerize correlated with diminished antifungal activity. These data demonstrate the importance of dimerization in NaD1 function and have implications for the use of defensins in agribiotechnology applications such as enhancing plant crop protection against fungal pathogens. PMID:22511788

  13. Divergent RNA editing frequencies in hornwort mitochondrial nad5 sequences.

    PubMed

    Duff, R Joel

    2006-02-01

    Hornwort mitochondrial genomes have some of the highest rates of RNA editing among plants. Comparison of eleven partial mitochondrial nad5 genomic and cDNA sequences from diverse taxa of hornworts reveal 125 edited sites in only 1107 nt. No single sample exhibits more than half of these sites. Ten of the 11 hornwort taxa have between 35 and 54 edited sties each; whereas, the eleventh taxon, Leiosporoceros, which represents a potential sister taxa to all other hornworts, has only eight sites. Comparison of multiple cDNA sequences from several individuals reveals the presence of many immature transcripts showing the heterogonous nature of the progression of editing. Phylogenetic analyses of hornwort genomic and cDNAs sequences reveal that 65 of the 94 phylogenetically informative sites within the hornwort clade are edited positions. PMID:16376027

  14. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    PubMed

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases. PMID:25280628

  15. Elongator Plays a Positive Role in Exogenous NAD-Induced Defense Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    An, Chuanfu; Ding, Yezhang; Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chenggang; Mou, Zhonglin

    2016-05-01

    Extracellular NAD is emerging as an important signal molecule in animal cells, but its role in plants has not been well-established. Although it has been shown that exogenous NAD(+) activates defense responses in Arabidopsis, components in the exogenous NAD(+)-activated defense pathway remain to be fully discovered. In a genetic screen for mutants insensitive to exogenous NAD(+) (ien), we isolated a mutant named ien2. Map-based cloning revealed that IEN2 encodes ELONGATA3 (ELO3)/AtELP3, a subunit of the Arabidopsis Elongator complex, which functions in multiple biological processes, including histone modification, DNA (de)methylation, and transfer RNA modification. Mutations in the ELO3/AtELP3 gene compromise exogenous NAD(+)-induced expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes and resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326, and transgenic expression of the coding region of ELO3/AtELP3 in elo3/Atelp3 restores NAD(+) responsiveness to the mutant plants, demonstrating that ELO3/AtELP3 is required for exogenous NAD(+)-induced defense responses. Furthermore, mutations in genes encoding the other five Arabidopsis Elongator subunits (ELO2/AtELP1, AtELP2, ELO1/AtELP4, AtELP5, and AtELP6) also compromise exogenous NAD(+)-induced PR gene expression and resistance to P. syringae pv. maculicola ES4326. These results indicate that the Elongator complex functions as a whole in exogenous NAD(+)-activated defense signaling in Arabidopsis. PMID:26926998

  16. NAD+-Carrying Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles Can Prevent Oxidative Stress-Induced Energy Failures of Both Rodent Astrocytes and PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Jixi; Ma, Yingxin; Wang, Caixia; Zhou, Ying; Gu, Hongchen; Ying, Weihai

    2013-01-01

    Aim To test the hypothesis that NAD+-carrying mesoporous silica nanoparticles (M-MSNs@NAD+) can effectively deliver NAD+ into cells to produce cytoprotective effects. Methods & Materials NAD+ was incorporated into M-MSNs. Primary rat astrocyte cultures and PC12 cells were treated with H2O2, followed by post-treatment with M-MSNs@NAD+. After various durations of the post-treatment, intracellular NAD+ levels, intracellular ATP levels and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were determined. Results & Discussion M-MSNs can be effectively loaded with NAD+. The M-MSNs@NAD+ can significantly attenuate H2O2-induced NAD+ and ATP decreases in both astrocyte cultures and PC12 cells. M-MSNs@NAD+ can also partially prevent the H2O2-induced LDH release from both astrocyte cultures and PC12 cells. In contrast, the NAD+ that is spontaneously released from the M-MSNs@NAD+ is insufficient to prevent the H2O2-induced damage. Conclusions Our study has suggested the first approach that can effectively deliver NAD+ into cells, which provides an important basis both for elucidating the roles of intracellular NAD+ in biological functions and for therapeutic applications of NAD+. Our study has also provided the first direct evidence demonstrating a key role of NAD+ depletion in oxidative stress-induced ATP decreases. PMID:24040179

  17. The effect of antioxidant supplementation on fatigue during exercise: potential role for NAD+(H).

    PubMed

    Mach, John; Midgley, Adrian W; Dank, Steve; Grant, Ross S; Bentley, David J

    2010-03-01

    This study compared serum pyridine levels (NAD(+)/NADH) in trained (n = 6) and untrained (n = 7) subjects after continuous progressive exercise at 50%, 70% then 95% of physical work capacity until fatigue (TTF) after consuming a placebo or antioxidant (AO) cocktail (Lactaway(©)). An increase of 17% in TTF was observed in AO as compared to placebo (p = 0.032). This was accompanied by a significant increase in serum NAD(+) levels (p = 0.037) in the AO supplemented group post exercise. The increases in NAD(+) and improved endurance reflect lower oxidative stress-induced suppression of aerobic respiration. PMID:22254024

  18. Evaluation of NAD(P)-Dependent Dehydrogenase Activities in Neutrophilic Granulocytes by the Bioluminescent Method.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, A A

    2015-09-01

    Bioluminescent method for measurements of the neutrophilic NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases (lactate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase, NADP-dependent decarboxylating malate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase) is developed. The sensitivity of the method allows minimization of the volume of biological material for measurements to 104 neutrophils per analysis. The method is tried in patients with diffuse purulent peritonitis. Low levels of NADPH synthesis enzymes and high levels of enzymes determining the substrate flow by the Krebs cycle found in these patients can lead to attenuation of functional activity of cells. PMID:26468025

  19. The Effect of Antioxidant Supplementation on Fatigue during Exercise: Potential Role for NAD+(H)

    PubMed Central

    Mach, John; Midgley, Adrian W.; Dank, Steve; Grant, Ross S.; Bentley, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared serum pyridine levels (NAD+ /NADH) in trained (n = 6) and untrained (n = 7) subjects after continuous progressive exercise at 50%, 70% then 95% of physical work capacity until fatigue (TTF) after consuming a placebo or antioxidant (AO) cocktail (Lactaway©). An increase of 17% in TTF was observed in AO as compared to placebo (p = 0.032). This was accompanied by a significant increase in serum NAD+ levels (p = 0.037) in the AO supplemented group post exercise. The increases in NAD+ and improved endurance reflect lower oxidative stress-induced suppression of aerobic respiration. PMID:22254024

  20. The MTCY428.08 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Codes for NAD+ Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Rita; Branzoni, Manuela; Labò, Monica; Rizzi, Menico; Riccardi, Giovanna

    1998-01-01

    The product of the MTCY428.08 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows sequence homology with several NAD+ synthetases. The MTCY428.08 gene was cloned into the expression vectors pGEX-4T-1 and pET-15b. Expression in Escherichia coli led to overproduction of glutathione S-transferase fused and His6-tagged gene products, which were enzymatically assayed for NAD synthetase activity. Our results demonstrate that the MTCY428.08 gene of M. tuberculosis is the structural gene for NAD+ synthetase. PMID:9620974

  1. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD[superscript +] and triclosan

    SciTech Connect

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2010-11-19

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD{sup +} has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure (PDB code 2jjy) which is bound to only NAD{sup +} reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD{sup +} cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors.

  2. From heterochromatin islands to the NAD World: a hierarchical view of aging through the functions of mammalian Sirt1 and systemic NAD biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2009-10-01

    For the past couple of decades, aging science has been rapidly evolving, and powerful genetic tools have identified a variety of evolutionarily conserved regulators and signaling pathways for the control of aging and longevity in model organisms. Nonetheless, a big challenge still remains to construct a comprehensive concept that could integrate many distinct layers of biological events into a systemic, hierarchical view of aging. The "heterochromatin island" hypothesis was originally proposed 10 years ago to explain deterministic and stochastic aspects of cellular and organismal aging, which drove the author to the study of evolutionarily conserved Sir2 proteins. Since a surprising discovery of their NAD-dependent deacetylase activity, Sir2 proteins, now called "sirtuins," have been emerging as a critical epigenetic regulator for aging. In this review, I will follow the process of conceptual development from the heterochromatin island hypothesis to a novel, comprehensive concept of a systemic regulatory network for mammalian aging, named "NAD World," summarizing recent studies on the mammalian NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirt1 and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)-mediated systemic NAD biosynthesis. This new concept of the NAD World provides critical insights into a systemic regulatory mechanism that fundamentally connects metabolism and aging and also conveys the ideas of functional hierarchy and frailty for the regulation of aging in mammals. PMID:19289152

  3. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 inducer activity of some novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S; Higgins, Maureen; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Shahat, Abdelaaty A; Elghazawy, Nehal H; Arafa, Reem K

    2016-01-01

    The Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response elements pathway enables cells to survive oxidative stress conditions through regulating the expression of cytoprotective enzymes such as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). This work presents the design and synthesis of novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives (2–16a) and evaluation of their NQO1 inducer activity in murine cells. Molecular docking of the new compounds was performed to assess their ability to inhibit Keap1–Nrf2 protein–protein interaction through occupying the Keap1–Nrf2-binding domain, which leads to Nrf2 accumulation and enhanced gene expression of NQO1. Docking results showed that all compounds can potentially interact with Keap1; however, 1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-4-(2-phenylquinazolin-4-ylamino)-1,2-dihydropyrazol-3-one (9), the most potent inducer, showed the largest number of interactions with key amino acids in the binding pocket (Arg483, Tyr525, and Phe478) compared to the native ligand or any other compound in this series. PMID:27540279

  4. Purification and Characterization of a Novel NAD(P)+-Farnesol Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves.

    PubMed

    Ahmad-Sohdi, Nor-Ain-Shahajar; Seman-Kamarulzaman, Ahmad-Faris; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Hassan, Maizom

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile hormones have attracted attention as safe and selective targets for the design and development of environmentally friendly and biorational insecticides. In the juvenile hormone III biosynthetic pathway, the enzyme farnesol dehydrogenase catalyzes the oxidation of farnesol to farnesal. In this study, farnesol dehydrogenase was extracted from Polygonum minus leaves and purified 204-fold to apparent homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography using DEAE-Toyopearl, SP-Toyopearl, and Super-Q Toyopearl, followed by three successive purifications by gel filtration chromatography on a TSK-gel GS3000SW. The enzyme is a heterodimer comprised of subunits with molecular masses of 65 kDa and 70 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH were 35°C and pH 9.5, respectively. Activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents, metal-chelating agents and heavy metal ions. The enzyme utilized both NAD+ and NADP+ as coenzymes with Km values of 0.74 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Trans, trans-farnesol was the preferred substrate for the P. minus farnesol dehydrogenase. Geometrical isomers of trans, trans-farnesol, cis, trans-farnesol and cis, cis-farnesol were also oxidized by the enzyme with lower activity. The Km values for trans, trans-farnesol, cis, trans-farnesol and cis, cis-farnesol appeared to be 0.17 mM, 0.33 mM and 0.42 mM, respectively. The amino acid sequences of 4 tryptic peptides of the enzyme were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS spectrometry, and showed no significant similarity to those of previously reported farnesol dehydrogenases. These results suggest that the purified enzyme is a novel NAD(P)+-dependent farnesol dehydrogenase. The purification and characterization established in the current study will serve as a basis to provide new information for recombinant production of the enzyme. Therefore, recombinant farnesol dehydrogenase may provide a useful molecular tool in manipulating juvenile hormone biosynthesis to generate transgenic plants for pest control. PMID:26600471

  5. Purification and Characterization of a Novel NAD(P)+-Farnesol Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Seman-Kamarulzaman, Ahmad-Faris; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile hormones have attracted attention as safe and selective targets for the design and development of environmentally friendly and biorational insecticides. In the juvenile hormone III biosynthetic pathway, the enzyme farnesol dehydrogenase catalyzes the oxidation of farnesol to farnesal. In this study, farnesol dehydrogenase was extracted from Polygonum minus leaves and purified 204-fold to apparent homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography using DEAE-Toyopearl, SP-Toyopearl, and Super-Q Toyopearl, followed by three successive purifications by gel filtration chromatography on a TSK-gel GS3000SW. The enzyme is a heterodimer comprised of subunits with molecular masses of 65 kDa and 70 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH were 35°C and pH 9.5, respectively. Activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents, metal-chelating agents and heavy metal ions. The enzyme utilized both NAD+ and NADP+ as coenzymes with Km values of 0.74 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Trans, trans-farnesol was the preferred substrate for the P. minus farnesol dehydrogenase. Geometrical isomers of trans, trans-farnesol, cis, trans-farnesol and cis, cis-farnesol were also oxidized by the enzyme with lower activity. The Km values for trans, trans-farnesol, cis, trans-farnesol and cis, cis-farnesol appeared to be 0.17 mM, 0.33 mM and 0.42 mM, respectively. The amino acid sequences of 4 tryptic peptides of the enzyme were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS spectrometry, and showed no significant similarity to those of previously reported farnesol dehydrogenases. These results suggest that the purified enzyme is a novel NAD(P)+-dependent farnesol dehydrogenase. The purification and characterization established in the current study will serve as a basis to provide new information for recombinant production of the enzyme. Therefore, recombinant farnesol dehydrogenase may provide a useful molecular tool in manipulating juvenile hormone biosynthesis to generate transgenic plants for pest control. PMID:26600471

  6. Theophylline prevents NAD{sup +} depletion via PARP-1 inhibition in human pulmonary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moonen, Harald J.J. . E-mail: h.moonen@grat.unimaas.nl; Geraets, Liesbeth; Vaarhorst, Anika; Bast, Aalt; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Hageman, Geja J.

    2005-12-30

    Oxidative DNA damage, as occurs during exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), highly activates the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). This can lead to cellular depletion of its substrate NAD{sup +}, resulting in an energy crisis and ultimately in cell death. Inhibition of PARP-1 results in preservation of the intracellular NAD{sup +} pool, and of NAD{sup +}-dependent cellular processes. In this study, PARP-1 activation by hydrogen peroxide decreased intracellular NAD{sup +} levels in human pulmonary epithelial cells, which was found to be prevented in a dose-dependent manner by theophylline, a widely used compound in the treatment of COPD. This enzyme inhibition by theophylline was confirmed in an ELISA using purified human PARP-1 and was found to be competitive by nature. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the therapeutic effect of theophylline in oxidative stress-induced lung pathologies.

  7. Stereospecificity of NAD+/NADH Reactions: A Project Experiment for Advanced Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrey, Jonathan S.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Presents background information, materials needed, and experimental procedures to study enzymes dependent on pyridine nucleotide coenzymes (NAD/NADH). The experiments, suitable for advanced organic or biochemistry courses, require approximately 10-15 hours to complete. (SK)

  8. Deletion or Overexpression of Mitochondrial NAD+ Carriers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Alters Cellular NAD and ATP Contents and Affects Mitochondrial Metabolism and the Rate of Glycolysis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Agrimi, Gennaro; Brambilla, Luca; Frascotti, Gianni; Pisano, Isabella; Porro, Danilo; Vai, Marina; Palmieri, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The modification of enzyme cofactor concentrations can be used as a method for both studying and engineering metabolism. We varied Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial NAD levels by altering expression of its specific mitochondrial carriers. Changes in mitochondrial NAD levels affected the overall cellular concentration of this coenzyme and the cellular metabolism. In batch culture, a strain with a severe NAD depletion in mitochondria succeeded in growing, albeit at a low rate, on fully respiratory media. Although the strain increased the efficiency of its oxidative phosphorylation, the ATP concentration was low. Under the same growth conditions, a strain with a mitochondrial NAD concentration higher than that of the wild type similarly displayed a low cellular ATP level, but its growth rate was not affected. In chemostat cultures, when cellular metabolism was fully respiratory, both mutants showed low biomass yields, indicative of impaired energetic efficiency. The two mutants increased their glycolytic fluxes, and as a consequence, the Crabtree effect was triggered at lower dilution rates. Strikingly, the mutants switched from a fully respiratory metabolism to a respirofermentative one at the same specific glucose flux as that of the wild type. This result seems to indicate that the specific glucose uptake rate and/or glycolytic flux should be considered one of the most important independent variables for establishing the long-term Crabtree effect. In cells growing under oxidative conditions, bioenergetic efficiency was affected by both low and high mitochondrial NAD availability, which suggests the existence of a critical mitochondrial NAD concentration in order to achieve optimal mitochondrial functionality. PMID:21335394

  9. Reverse reaction of malic enzyme for HCO3- fixation into pyruvic acid to synthesize L-malic acid with enzymatic coenzyme regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoko; Nakamori, Toshihiko; Zheng, Haitao; Suye, Shin-ichiro

    2008-05-01

    Malic enzyme [L-malate: NAD(P)(+) oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.39)] catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of L-malic acid to produce pyruvic acid using the oxidized form of NAD(P) (NAD(P)(+)). We used a reverse reaction of the malic enzyme of Pseudomonas diminuta IFO 13182 for HCO(3)(-) fixation into pyruvic acid to produce L-malic acid with coenzyme (NADH) generation. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC1.1.1.49) of Leuconostoc mesenteroides was suitable for coenzyme regeneration. Optimum conditions for the carboxylation of pyruvic acid were examined, including pyruvic acid, NAD(+), and both malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase concentrations. Under optimal conditions, the ratio of HCO(3)(-) and pyruvic acid to malic acid was about 38% after 24 h of incubation at 30 degrees C, and the concentration of the accumulated L-malic acid in the reaction mixture was 38 mM. The malic enzyme reverse reaction was also carried out by the conjugated redox enzyme reaction with water-soluble polymer-bound NAD(+). PMID:18460807

  10. Specific binding of nucleotides and NAD+ to Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M D; Borriello, S P

    1992-02-24

    Binding of nucleotides, a tetrapolyphosphate, and NAD+ to purified toxin A of Clostridium difficile was determined by monitoring changes in intrinsic fluorescence following excitation at 280 nm, and recording emissions at 340 nm. Binding was specific for concentrations over the range 5 to 100 microM for ATP, GTP, and their respective non-hydrolysable analogues AMP-PNP and Gpp(NH)p, tetrapolyphosphate and NAD+. PMID:1544441

  11. Mitochondria-localized NAD biosynthesis by nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) heterotrophic tissues.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Catello; Pallotta, Maria Luigia

    2011-10-01

    Current studies in plants suggest that the content of the coenzyme NAD is variable and potentially important in determining cell fate. In cases that implicate NAD consumption, re-synthesis must occur to maintain dinucleotide pools. Despite information on the pathways involved in NAD synthesis in plants, the existence of a mitochondrial nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT) activity which catalyses NAD synthesis from nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and ATP has not been reported. To verify the latter assumed pathway, experiments with purified and bioenergetically active mitochondria prepared from tubers of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) were performed. To determine whether NAD biosynthesis might occur, NMN was added to Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria (JAM) and NAD biosynthesis was tested by means of HPLC and spectroscopically. Our results indicate that JAM contain a specific NMNAT inhibited by Na-pyrophosphate, AMP and ADP-ribose. The dependence of NAD synthesis rate on NMN concentration shows saturation kinetics with K (m) and V (max) values of 82 ± 1.05 μM and 4.20 ± 0.20 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, respectively. The enzyme's pH and temperature dependence were also investigated. Fractionation studies revealed that mitochondrial NMNAT activity was present in the soluble matrix fraction. The NAD pool needed constant replenishment that might be modulated by environmental inputs. Thus, the mitochondrion in heterotrophic plant tissues ensures NAD biosynthesis by NMNAT activity and helps to orchestrate NAD metabolic network in implementing the survival strategy of cells. PMID:21598001

  12. Mitochondrial NAD(P)H In vivo: Identifying Natural Indicators of Oxidative Phosphorylation in the 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Kevin E.; Ali, Amir S.; Flores, Brandon; Jubrias, Sharon A.; Shankland, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    Natural indicators provide intrinsic probes of metabolism, biogenesis and oxidative protection. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolites (NAD(P)) are one class of indicators that have roles as co-factors in oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, and anti-oxidant protection, as well as signaling in the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway. These many roles are made possible by the distinct redox states (NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H), which are compartmentalized between cytosol and mitochondria. Here we provide evidence for detection of NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H in separate mitochondrial and cytosol pools in vivo in human tissue by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS). These NAD(P) pools are identified by chemical standards (NAD+, NADP+, and NADH) and by physiological tests. A unique resonance reflecting mitochondrial NAD(P)H is revealed by the changes elicited by elevation of mitochondrial oxidation. The decline of NAD(P)H with oxidation is matched by a stoichiometric rise in the NAD(P)+ peak. This unique resonance also provides a measure of the improvement in mitochondrial oxidation that parallels the greater phosphorylation found after exercise training in these elderly subjects. The implication is that the dynamics of the mitochondrial NAD(P)H peak provides an intrinsic probe of the reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction in elderly muscle. Thus, non-invasive detection of NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H in cytosol vs. mitochondria yields natural indicators of redox compartmentalization and sensitive intrinsic probes of the improvement of mitochondrial function with an intervention in human tissues in vivo. These natural indicators hold the promise of providing mechanistic insight into metabolism and mitochondrial function in vivo in a range of tissues in health, disease and with treatment. PMID:27065875

  13. The NAD+-Dependent SIRT1 Deacetylase Translates a Metabolic Switch into Regulatory Epigenetics in Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryall, James G.; Dell’Orso, Stefania; Derfoul, Assia; Juan, Aster; Zare, Hossein; Feng, Xuesong; Clermont, Daphney; Koulnis, Miroslav; Gutierrez-Cruz, Gustavo; Fulco, Marcella; Sartorelli, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Stem cells undergo a shift in metabolic substrate utilization during specification and/or differentiation, a process that has been termed metabolic reprogramming. Here, we report that during the transition from quiescence to proliferation, skeletal muscle stem cells experience a metabolic switch from fatty acid oxidation to glycolysis. This reprogramming of cellular metabolism decreases intracellular NAD+ levels and the activity of the histone deacetylase SIRT1, leading to elevated H4K16 acetylation and activation of muscle gene transcription. Selective genetic ablation of the SIRT1 deacetylase domain in skeletal muscle results in increased H4K16 acetylation and deregulated activation of the myogenic program in SCs. Moreover, mice with muscle-specific inactivation of the SIRT1 deacetylase domain display reduced myofiber size, impaired muscle regeneration, and derepression of muscle developmental genes. Overall, these findings reveal how metabolic cues can be mechanistically translated into epigenetic modifications that regulate skeletal muscle stem cell biology. PMID:25600643

  14. NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO1), protects melanin-producing cells from cytotoxicity of rhododendrol.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Ayaka; Yasuhira, Shinji; Shibazaki, Masahiko; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Akasaka, Toshihide; Masuda, Tomoyuki; Maesawa, Chihaya

    2016-05-01

    Rhododendrol (RD) is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor that is metabolized to RD-quinone by tyrosinase, which may underlie the cytotoxicity of RD and leukoderma of the skin that may result. We have examined how forced expression of the NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO1), a major quinone-reducing enzyme in cytosol, affects the survival of RD-treated cells. We found that treatment of the mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6 or normal human melanocytes with carnosic acid, a transcriptional inducer of the NQO1 gene, notably suppressed the cell killing effect of RD. This effect was mostly abolished by ES936, a highly specific NQO1 inhibitor. Moreover, conditional overexpression of the human NQO1 transgene in B16BL6 led to an expression-dependent increase of cell survival after RD treatment. Our results suggest that NQO1 attenuates the cytotoxicity of RD and/or its metabolites. PMID:26847926

  15. Hydrolysis of oxaliplatin-evaluation of the acid dissociation constant for the oxalato monodentate complex.

    PubMed

    Jerremalm, Elin; Eksborg, Staffan; Ehrsson, Hans

    2003-02-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis of the platinum anticancer drug oxaliplatin gives the oxalato monodentate complex and the dihydrated oxaliplatin complex in two consecutive steps. The acid dissociation constant for the oxalato monodentate intermediate was determined by a kinetic approach. The pK(a) value was estimated as 7.23. The monodentate intermediate is assumed to rapidly react with endogenous compounds, resulting in a continuous conversion of oxaliplatin via the monodentate form. PMID:12532393

  16. Roles of NAD in Protection of Axon against Degeneration via SIRT1 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Guo, Wei-Hua; Qi, Xiao-Xia; Li, Gui-Bao; Hu, Yan-Lai; Wu, Qi; Ding, Zhao-Xi; Li, Hong-Yu; Hao, Jing; Sun, Jin-Hao

    2016-04-30

    Axonal degeneration is a common pathological change of neurogenical disease which often arises before the neuron death. But it had not found any effective method to protect axon from degeneration. In this study we intended to confirm the protective effect of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), investigate the optimal administration dosage and time of NAD, and identify the relationship between silence signal regulating factor 1 (SIRT1) and axonal degeneration. An axonal degeneration model was established using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons injured by vincristine to observe the protective effects of NAD to the injured axons. In addition, the potential contribution of the SIRT1 in axonal degeneration was also investigated. Through the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, immunochemistry staining, axons counting and length measuring, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation, we demonstrated that NAD played an important role in preventing axonal degeneration. Further study revealed that the expression of SIRT1 and phosphorylated Akt1 (p-Akt1) was up-regulated when NAD was added into the culturing medium. Taking together, our results demonstrated that NAD might delay the axonal degeneration through SIRT1/Akt1 pathways. PMID:27080463

  17. A regulatory role of NAD redox status on flavin cofactor homeostasis in S. cerevisiae mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Locato, Vittoria; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H) and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms). A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H) destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18), which is inhibited by NAD(+) and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24078860

  18. Cloning and analysis of the C4 photosynthetic NAD-dependent malic enzyme of amaranth mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Long, J J; Wang, J L; Berry, J O

    1994-01-28

    In some C4 plant species, a mitochondrial NAD-dependent malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.39) (NAD-ME) catalyzes the decarboxylation of 4 carbon malate in the bundle sheath cells, releasing CO2 for the Calvin cycle of photosynthesis. In amaranth, a dicotyledonous NAD-ME-type C4 plant, the photosynthetic NAD-ME purified as two subunits of 65 and 60 kDa, designated alpha and beta, respectively. Antiserum raised against the alpha subunit reacted only with the 65-kDa protein in immunoblot analysis. Immunogold electron microscopy using the alpha subunit antiserum demonstrated that this protein was localized specifically to the mitochondrial matrix of bundle sheath cells. The complete nucleotide sequence of a 2300-base pair alpha subunit cDNA clone showed that this gene encodes a protein that contains all of the motifs required for a complete and functional malic enzyme. The alpha subunit has significant similarity along its entire length to other known NAD- and NADP-dependent malic enzymes from plants, animals, and bacteria. The findings presented here provide new insights about the C4 photosynthetic NAD-ME and its evolutionary relationship to other forms of malic enzyme present in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. PMID:8300616

  19. NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase as a novel target of tributyltin in human embryonic carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Kurihara, Masaaki; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2014-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is known to cause developmental defects as endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs). At nanomoler concentrations, TBT actions were mediated by genomic pathways via PPAR/RXR. However, non-genomic target of TBT has not been elucidated. To investigate non-genomic TBT targets, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses using human embryonic carcinoma NT2/D1 cells. We found that 100 nM TBT reduced the amounts of α-ketoglutarate, succinate and malate. We further found that TBT decreased the activity of NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in the TCA cycle. In addition, TBT inhibited cell growth and enhanced neuronal differentiation through NAD-IDH inhibition. Furthermore, studies using bacterially expressed human NAD-IDH and in silico simulations suggest that TBT inhibits NAD-IDH due to a possible interaction. These results suggest that NAD-IDH is a novel non-genomic target of TBT at nanomolar levels. Thus, a metabolomic approach may provide new insights into the mechanism of EDC action.

  20. Time-resolved spectroscopy of endogenous NAD(P)H in Gluconobacter oxydans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horilova, J.; Kromkova, K.; Bucko, M.; Illesova, A.; Vikartovska, A.; Stefuca, V.; Mateasik, A.; Chorvat, D.; Chorvatova, A.

    2013-02-01

    The genus Gluconobacter is frequently used for biotechnological and/or nanotechnological applications. We studied endogenous fluorescence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H), indicator of the oxidative metabolic state in mammalian cells, in Gluconobacter oxydans (G. oxydans). Time-resolved measurements (excitation by 375nm pulsed diode laser) were employed to record the bacterial fluorescence intensity, as well as its modifications by metabolic modulation. Results were gathered on fresh bacteria, on de-frozen ones, as well as on bacteria encapsulated in alginate beads. NAD(P)H fluorescence increased linearly with the concentration of bacteria. Freezing, which has little effect on the viability of bacteria or the concentration-dependent fluorescence rise, affected the temperature-dependence of NAD(P)H fluorescence. Sodium cyanide (10 mM) provoked significant rise in the NAD(P)H fluorescence, while dinitrophenol (200 μM) induced its decrease, confirming the bacterial NAD(P)H fluorescence sensitivity to modulators of electron transport chain. Gathered results demonstrate that endogenous NAD(P)H fluorescence can be successfully recorded in the bacterial strain G. oxydans using time-resolved measurements.

  1. NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase as a novel target of tributyltin in human embryonic carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Kurihara, Masaaki; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2014-01-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is known to cause developmental defects as endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs). At nanomoler concentrations, TBT actions were mediated by genomic pathways via PPAR/RXR. However, non-genomic target of TBT has not been elucidated. To investigate non-genomic TBT targets, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses using human embryonic carcinoma NT2/D1 cells. We found that 100 nM TBT reduced the amounts of α-ketoglutarate, succinate and malate. We further found that TBT decreased the activity of NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in the TCA cycle. In addition, TBT inhibited cell growth and enhanced neuronal differentiation through NAD-IDH inhibition. Furthermore, studies using bacterially expressed human NAD-IDH and in silico simulations suggest that TBT inhibits NAD-IDH due to a possible interaction. These results suggest that NAD-IDH is a novel non-genomic target of TBT at nanomolar levels. Thus, a metabolomic approach may provide new insights into the mechanism of EDC action. PMID:25092173

  2. Kinetics and regulation of hepatoma mitochondrial NAD(P) malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Teller, J K; Fahien, L A; Davis, J W

    1992-05-25

    Kinetic studies of Morris 7777 hepatoma mitochondrial NAD(P) malic enzyme were consistent with an ordered mechanism where NAD adds to the enzyme before malate and dissociation of NADH from the enzyme is rate-limiting. In addition to its active site, malate apparently also associates with a lower affinity with an activator site. The activator fumarate competes with malate at the activator site and facilitates dissociation of NADH from the enzyme. The ratio of NAD(P) malic enzyme to malate dehydrogenase activity in the hepatoma mitochondrial extract was found to be too low, even in the presence of known inhibitors of malate dehydrogenase, to account for the known ability of NAD(P) malic enzyme to intercept exogenous malate from malate dehydrogenase in intact tumor mitochondria (Moreadith, R.W., and Lehninger, A.L. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 6215-6221). However, NAD(P) malic enzyme may be able to intercept exogenous malate because according to the present results, it can associate with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, which could localize NAD(P) malic enzyme in the vicinity of the inner mitochondrial membrane. The activity levels of some key metabolic enzymes were found to be different in Morris 7777 mitochondria than in liver or mitochondria of other rapidly dividing tumors. These results are discussed in terms of differences among tumors in their ability to utilize malate, glutamate, and citrate as respiratory fuels. PMID:1587826

  3. A Regulatory Role of NAD Redox Status on Flavin Cofactor Homeostasis in S. cerevisiae Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H) and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms). A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H) destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18), which is inhibited by NAD+ and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24078860

  4. Crystal growth, structural, thermal and mechanical behavior of L-arginine 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol dihydrate (LAPP) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, M.; Ramachandran, K.; Anandan, P.; Arivanandhan, M.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Single crystals of L-arginine 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol dihydrate (LAPP) have been grown successfully from the solution of L-arginine and 4-nitrophenol. Slow evaporation of solvent technique was adopted to grow the bulk single crystals. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the grown crystal has monoclinic crystal system with space group of P21. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis shows the good crystalline nature. The crystalline perfection of the grown single crystals was analyzed by HRXRD by employing a multicrystal X-ray diffractometer. The functional groups were identified from proton NMR spectroscopic analysis. Linear and nonlinear optical properties were determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometer and Kurtz powder technique respectively. It is found that the grown crystal has no absorption in the green wavelength region and the SHG efficiency was found to be 2.66 times that of the standard KDP. The Thermal stability of the crystal was found by obtaining TG/DTA curve. The mechanical behavior of the grown crystal has been studied by Vicker's microhardness method.

  5. Surfactant-assisted intercalation of high molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide) into vanadyl phosphate di-hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Joao Paulo L.; Oliveira, Herenilton P.

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: CuK{sub {alpha}} X-ray diffraction patterns of the VOPO{sub 4}/PEO (A) e VOPO{sub 4}/CTA (B) and VOPO{sub 4}/CTA/PEO (C). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VOPO{sub 4}/PEO has been synthesized by using CTAB, thereby improving PEO intercalation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The d-spacing increase from 1.30 nm (VOPO{sub 4}/PEO) to 2.94 nm (VOPO{sub 4}/CTA/PEO). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This strategy was viable for intercalation of PEO with high molecular weight. -- Abstract: A high molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide)/layered vanadyl phosphate di-hydrate intercalation compound was synthesized via the surfactant-assisted approach. Results confirmed that surfactant molecules were replaced with the polymer, while the lamellar structure of the matrix was retained, and that the material presents high specific surface area. In addition, intercalation produced a more thermally stable polymer as evidenced by thermal analysis.

  6. Dry powder aerosols generated by standardized entrainment tubes from alternative sugar blends: 3. Trehalose dihydrate and D-mannitol carriers.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Heidi M; Xu, Zhen; Hickey, Anthony J

    2010-08-01

    The relationship between physicochemical properties of drug/carrier blends and aerosol drug powder delivery was evaluated. Four pulmonary drugs each representing the major pulmonary therapeutic classes and with a different pharmacological action were employed. Specifically, the four pulmonary drugs were albuterol sulfate, ipratropium bromide monohydrate, disodium cromoglycate, and fluticasone propionate. The two carrier sugars, each representing a different sugar class, were D-mannitol and trehalose dihydrate. Dry powder aerosols (2%, w/w, drug in carrier) delivered using standardized entrainment tubes (SETs) were characterized by twin-stage liquid impinger. The fine particle fraction (FPF) was correlated with SET shear stress, tau(s), and the maximum fine particle fraction (FPF(max)) was correlated with a deaggregation constant, k(d), by using a powder aerosol deaggregation equation (PADE) by nonlinear and linear regression analyses applied to pharmaceutical inhalation aerosol systems in the solid state. For the four pulmonary drugs representing the major pulmonary therapeutic classes and two chemically distinct pulmonary sugar carriers (non-lactose types) aerosolized with SETs having well-defined shear stress values, excellent correlation and predictive relationships were demonstrated for the novel and rigorous application of PADE for dry powder inhalation aerosol dispersion within a well-defined shear stress range, in the context of pulmonary drug/sugar carrier physicochemical and interfacial properties. PMID:20229601

  7. Nucleation kinetics, growth, crystalline perfection, mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical characterization of brucinium 2-carboxy-6-nitrophthalate dihydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, P.; Gayathri, K.; Sivakumar, N.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anbalagan, G.

    2014-06-01

    Single crystals of brucinium 2-carboxy-6-nitrophthalate dihydrate (B2C6ND) have been grown by the slow evaporation solution technique at room temperature using water-ethanol (1:1) mixed solvent. The metastable zone width and induction period have been experimentally determined for the growth conditions. Nucleation kinetics and fundamental growth parameters such as surface free energy, critical radius and critical free energy change are also evaluated according to the experimental data. The crystal system and the lattice parameters have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystalline perfection of the grown B2C6ND crystals has been characterized by HRXRD method. Optical band gap and Urbach tail width of the sample have been studied employing UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The Vickers microhardness number (Hv), yield strength (σv) and stiffness constant (C11) of the grown crystal have been evaluated. The dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss of the grown B2C6ND crystal have been investigated as a function of frequency in the temperature range 313-353 K. The laser damage threshold value of B2C6ND crystal was estimated to be 2.8 GW/cm2 using a Nd:YAG laser.

  8. Preparation and properties of calcium phosphate cements incorporated gelatin microspheres and calcium sulfate dihydrate as controlled local drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shu; Zhai, Yujia; Xu, Guohua; Lu, Shanshan; Zhou, Wei; Ye, Xiaojian

    2011-11-01

    To develop high macroporous and degradable bone cements which can be used as the substitute of bone repairing and drug carriers, cross-linked gelatin microspheres (GMs) and calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD) powder were incorporated into calcium phosphate bone cement (CPC) to induce macropores, adjust drug release and control setting time of α-TCP-liquid mixtures after degradation of GMs and dissolution of CSD. In this study, CSD was introduced into CPC/10GMs composites to offset the prolonged setting time caused by the incorporation of GMs, and gentamicin sulphate (GS) was chosen as the model drug entrapped within the GMs. The effects of CSD amount on the cement properties, drug release ability and final macroporosity after GMs degradation were studied in comparison with CPC/GMs cements. The resulting cements presented reduced setting time and increased compressive strength as the content of CSD below 5 wt%. Sustained release of GS was obtained on at least 21 days, and release rates were found to be chiefly controlled by the GMs degradation rate. After 4 weeks of degradation study, the resulting composite cements appeared macroporous, degradable and suitable compressive strength, suggesting that they have potential as controlled local drug delivery system and for cancellous bone applications. PMID:21894539

  9. NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent intracellular and extracellular O2·- production in coronary arterial myocytes from CD38 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Xia, Min; Li, Xiao-Xue; Ritter, Joseph K; Zhang, Fan; Li, Pin-Lan

    2011-01-01

    Activation of NAD(P)H oxidase has been reported to produce superoxide (O2 ·-) extracellularly as an autocrine/paracrine regulator or intracellularly as a signaling messenger in a variety of mammalian cells. However, it remains unknown how the activity of NAD(P)H oxidase is regulated in arterial myocytes. Recently, CD38-associated ADP-ribosylcyclase has been reported to use NAD(P)H oxidase product, NAD+ or NADP+ to produce cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) or nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), which mediates intracellular Ca2+ signaling. The present study was designed to test a hypothesis that CD38/cADPR pathway as a downstream event exerts feedback regulatory action on the NAD(P)H oxidase activity in production of extra- or intracellular O2 ·-in mouse coronary arterial myocytes (CAMs). By fluorescent microscopic imaging, we simultaneously monitored extra- and intracellular O2 ·-production in wild-type (CD38+/+) and CD38 knockout (CD38-/-) CAMs in response to oxotremorine (OXO), a muscarinic type 1 (M1) receptor agonist. It was found that CD38 deficiency prevented OXO-induced intracellular but not extracellular O2 ·-production in CAMs. Consistently, the OXO-induced intracellular O2 ·-production was markedly inhibited by CD38 shRNA or CD38 inhibitor nicotinamide in CD38+/+ CAMs. Further, Nox4 siRNA inhibited OXO-induced intracellular but not extracellular O2 ·- production, whereas Nox1 siRNA attenuated both intracellular and extracellular O2 ·-production in CD38+/+ CAMs. Direct delivery of exogenous cADPR into CAMs markedly elevated intracellular Ca2+ concentration and restored intracellular O2 ·-production in CD38-/- CAMs. Functionally, CD38 deficiency or Nox1 siRNA and Nox4 siRNA prevented OXO-induced contraction in isolated perfused coronary arteries in CD38 WT mice. These results provide direct evidence that CD38/cADPR pathway importantly controls Nox4-mediated intracellular O2 ·-production and that CD38-dependent intracellular O2

  10. Plastidial NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase is critical for embryo development and heterotrophic metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Beeler, Seraina; Liu, Hung-Chi; Stadler, Martha; Schreier, Tina; Eicke, Simona; Lue, Wei-Ling; Truernit, Elisabeth; Zeeman, Samuel C; Chen, Jychian; Kötting, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    In illuminated chloroplasts, one mechanism involved in reduction-oxidation (redox) homeostasis is the malate-oxaloacetate (OAA) shuttle. Excess electrons from photosynthetic electron transport in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced are used by NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (MDH) to reduce OAA to malate, thus regenerating the electron acceptor NADP. NADP-MDH is a strictly redox-regulated, light-activated enzyme that is inactive in the dark. In the dark or in nonphotosynthetic tissues, the malate-OAA shuttle was proposed to be mediated by the constitutively active plastidial NAD-specific MDH isoform (pdNAD-MDH), but evidence is scarce. Here, we reveal the critical role of pdNAD-MDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. A pdnad-mdh null mutation is embryo lethal. Plants with reduced pdNAD-MDH levels by means of artificial microRNA (miR-mdh-1) are viable, but dark metabolism is altered as reflected by increased nighttime malate, starch, and glutathione levels and a reduced respiration rate. In addition, miR-mdh-1 plants exhibit strong pleiotropic effects, including dwarfism, reductions in chlorophyll levels, photosynthetic rate, and daytime carbohydrate levels, and disordered chloroplast ultrastructure, particularly in developing leaves, compared with the wild type. pdNAD-MDH deficiency in miR-mdh-1 can be functionally complemented by expression of a microRNA-insensitive pdNAD-MDH but not NADP-MDH, confirming distinct roles for NAD- and NADP-linked redox homeostasis. PMID:24453164

  11. [Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Shimizu, S

    1999-10-01

    Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide are called niacin. They are the antipellagra vitamin essential to many animals for growth and health. In human being, niacin is believed necessary together with other vitamins for the prevention and cure of pellagra. Niacin is widely distributed in nature; appreciable amounts are found in liver, fish, yeast and cereal grains. Nicotinamide is a precursor of the coenzyme NAD and NADP. Some of the most understood metabolic processes that involve niacin are glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and respiration. Niacin is also related to the following diseases: Hartnup disease; blue diaper syndrome; tryptophanuria; hydroxykynureninuria; xanthurenic aciduria; Huntington's disease. PMID:10540864

  12. Major Role of NAD-Dependent Lactate Dehydrogenases in Aerobic Lactate Utilization in Lactobacillus plantarum during Early Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Goffin, Philippe; Lorquet, Frédérique; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    NAD-independent lactate dehydrogenases are commonly thought to be responsible for lactate utilization during the stationary phase of aerobic growth in Lactobacillus plantarum. To substantiate this view, we constructed single and double knockout mutants for the corresponding genes, loxD and loxL. Lactate-to-acetate conversion was not impaired in these strains, while it was completely blocked in mutants deficient in NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase activities, encoded by the ldhD and ldhL genes. We conclude that NAD-dependent but not NAD-independent lactate dehydrogenases are involved in this process. PMID:15375150

  13. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Onkar; O’Seaghdha, Maghnus; Velarde, Jorge J.; Wessels, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS) has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase). When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO), and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase) that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells. PMID:26938870

  14. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Onkar; O'Seaghdha, Maghnus; Velarde, Jorge J; Wessels, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS) has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase). When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO), and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase) that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells. PMID:26938870

  15. Changes in NAD(P)H fluorescence and membrane current produced by glutamate uptake into salamander Müller cells.

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, B; Magnus, C; Szatkowski, M; Gray, P T; Attwell, D

    1993-01-01

    1. Glutamate uptake into isolated, whole-cell patch-clamped glial cells was studied by monitoring the increase of cell fluorescence generated as glutamate and NAD(P) were converted into alpha-ketoglutarate and NAD(P)H by glutamate dehydrogenase. The current generated by the glutamate uptake carrier was recorded simultaneously. 2. L-Glutamate evoked an increase of cell fluorescence and an inward uptake current. L- and D-aspartate generated an uptake current but no fluorescence response, consistent with the amino acid specificity of glutamate dehydrogenase. 3. In the absence of external sodium the glutamate-evoked fluorescence response and uptake current were abolished, showing that there is no sodium-independent glutamate uptake across the cell membrane. 4. Varying the glutamate concentration altered both the fluorescence response and the uptake current. The fluorescence response saturated at a lower glutamate concentration than the uptake current, and depended in a Michaelis-Menten fashion on the uptake current. 5. The fluorescence response and the uptake current were reduced by membrane depolarization, and also by removal of intracellular potassium. 6. The dependence of the fluorescence response on uptake current when membrane potential was altered or intracellular potassium was removed was the same as that seen when the external glutamate concentration was altered. 7. These fluorescence studies show that glutamate uptake is inhibited by depolarization and by removal of intracellular potassium, consistent with the conclusion of earlier work in which uptake was monitored solely as a membrane current. The data are consistent with high-affinity electrogenic sodium- and potassium-dependent glutamate uptake with fixed stoichiometry being the only significant influx route for glutamate. Other possible interpretations of the data are also discussed. PMID:8105078

  16. Mitochondrial NAD+-dependent malic enzyme from Anopheles stephensi: a possible novel target for malaria mosquito control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anopheles stephensi mitochondrial malic enzyme (ME) emerged as having a relevant role in the provision of pyruvate for the Krebs' cycle because inhibition of this enzyme results in the complete abrogation of oxygen uptake by mitochondria. Therefore, the identification of ME in mitochondria from immortalized A. stephensi (ASE) cells and the investigation of the stereoselectivity of malate analogues are relevant in understanding the physiological role of ME in cells of this important malaria parasite vector and its potential as a possible novel target for insecticide development. Methods To characterize the mitochondrial ME from immortalized ASE cells (Mos. 43; ASE), mass spectrometry analyses of trypsin fragments of ME, genomic sequence analysis and biochemical assays were performed to identify the enzyme and evaluate its activity in terms of cofactor dependency and inhibitor preference. Results The encoding gene sequence and primary sequences of several peptides from mitochondrial ME were found to be highly homologous to the mitochondrial ME from Anopheles gambiae (98%) and 59% homologous to the mitochondrial NADP+-dependent ME isoform from Homo sapiens. Measurements of ME activity in mosquito mitochondria isolated from ASE cells showed that (i) Vmax with NAD+ was 3-fold higher than that with NADP+, (ii) addition of Mg2+ or Mn2+ increased the Vmax by 9- to 21-fold, with Mn2+ 2.3-fold more effective than Mg2+, (iii) succinate and fumarate increased the activity by 2- and 5-fold, respectively, at sub-saturating concentrations of malate, (iv) among the analogs of L-malate tested as inhibitors of the NAD+-dependent ME catalyzed reaction, small (2- to 3-carbons) organic diacids carrying a 2-hydroxyl/keto group behaved as the most potent inhibitors of ME activity (e.g., oxaloacetate, tartronic acid and oxalate). Conclusions The biochemical characterization of Anopheles stephensi ME is of critical relevance given its important role in bioenergetics, suggesting

  17. Crystal structure of NH3-dependent NAD+ synthetase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzi, M; Nessi, C; Mattevi, A; Coda, A; Bolognesi, M; Galizzi, A

    1996-01-01

    NAD+ synthetase catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The three-dimensional structure of NH3-dependent NAD+ synthetase from Bacillus subtilis, in its free form and in complex with ATP, has been solved by X-ray crystallography (at 2.6 and 2.0 angstroms resolution, respectively) using a combination of multiple isomorphous replacement and density modification techniques. The enzyme consists of a tight homodimer with alpha/beta subunit topology. The catalytic site is located at the parallel beta-sheet topological switch point, where one AMP molecule, one pyrophosphate and one Mg2+ ion are observed. Residue Ser46, part of the neighboring 'P-loop', is hydrogen bonded to the pyrophosphate group, and may play a role in promoting the adenylation of deamido-NAD+ during the first step of the catalyzed reaction. The deamido-NAD+ binding site, located at the subunit interface, is occupied by one ATP molecule, pointing towards the catalytic center. A conserved structural fingerprint of the catalytic site, comprising Ser46, is very reminiscent of a related protein region observed in glutamine-dependent GMP synthetase, supporting the hypothesis that NAD+ synthetase belongs to the newly discovered family of 'N-type' ATP pyrophosphatases. Images PMID:8895556

  18. Structural Basis for NADH/NAD+ Redox Sensing by a Rex Family Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, K.J.; Soares, A.; Strain-Damerell, C. M.; Xie, K.; Brekasis, D.; Pagent, M. S. B.; Kielkopf, C. L.

    2010-05-28

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides have emerged as key signals of the cellular redox state. Yet the structural basis for allosteric gene regulation by the ratio of reduced NADH to oxidized NAD{sup +} is poorly understood. A key sensor among Gram-positive bacteria, Rex represses alternative respiratory gene expression until a limited oxygen supply elevates the intracellular NADH:NAD{sup +} ratio. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism for NADH/NAD{sup +} sensing among Rex family members by determining structures of Thermus aquaticus Rex bound to (1) NAD{sup +}, (2) DNA operator, and (3) without ligand. Comparison with the Rex/NADH complex reveals that NADH releases Rex from the DNA site following a 40{sup o} closure between the dimeric subunits. Complementary site-directed mutagenesis experiments implicate highly conserved residues in NAD-responsive DNA-binding activity. These rare views of a redox sensor in action establish a means for slight differences in the nicotinamide charge, pucker, and orientation to signal the redox state of the cell.

  19. Single sample extraction protocol for the quantification of NAD and NADH redox states in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sporty, Jennifer L.; Kabir, Md. Mohiuddin; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Ognibene, Ted; Lin, Su-Ju; Bench, Graham

    2009-01-01

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under nonoxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50 mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH3CN/50 mM ammonium acetate (3:1 v/v) was added to the cell lysates. Chloroform extractions were performed on supernatants to remove organic solvent. Samples were lyophilized and resuspended in 50 mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV–Vis absorbance detection. NAD and NADH levels were evaluated in yeast grown under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (i) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in other cell cultures; and (ii) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures. PMID:18763242

  20. Single sample extraction protocol for the quantification of NAD and NADH redox states in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sporty, Jennifer L; Kabir, Md Mohiuddin; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Ognibene, Ted; Lin, Su-Ju; Bench, Graham

    2008-10-01

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under nonoxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50 mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH(3)CN/50 mM ammonium acetate (3:1 v/v) was added to the cell lysates. Chloroform extractions were performed on supernatants to remove organic solvent. Samples were lyophilized and resuspended in 50 mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV-Vis absorbance detection. NAD and NADH levels were evaluated in yeast grown under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (i) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in other cell cultures; and (ii) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures. PMID:18763242

  1. A rise in NAD precursor nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) after injury promotes axon degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Di Stefano, M; Nascimento-Ferreira, I; Orsomando, G; Mori, V; Gilley, J; Brown, R; Janeckova, L; Vargas, M E; Worrell, L A; Loreto, A; Tickle, J; Patrick, J; Webster, J R M; Marangoni, M; Carpi, F M; Pucciarelli, S; Rossi, F; Meng, W; Sagasti, A; Ribchester, R R; Magni, G; Coleman, M P; Conforti, L

    2015-01-01

    NAD metabolism regulates diverse biological processes, including ageing, circadian rhythm and axon survival. Axons depend on the activity of the central enzyme in NAD biosynthesis, nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2), for their maintenance and degenerate rapidly when this activity is lost. However, whether axon survival is regulated by the supply of NAD or by another action of this enzyme remains unclear. Here we show that the nucleotide precursor of NAD, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), accumulates after nerve injury and promotes axon degeneration. Inhibitors of NMN-synthesising enzyme NAMPT confer robust morphological and functional protection of injured axons and synapses despite lowering NAD. Exogenous NMN abolishes this protection, suggesting that NMN accumulation within axons after NMNAT2 degradation could promote degeneration. Ectopic expression of NMN deamidase, a bacterial NMN-scavenging enzyme, prolongs survival of injured axons, providing genetic evidence to support such a mechanism. NMN rises prior to degeneration and both the NAMPT inhibitor FK866 and the axon protective protein WldS prevent this rise. These data indicate that the mechanism by which NMNAT and the related WldS protein promote axon survival is by limiting NMN accumulation. They indicate a novel physiological function for NMN in mammals and reveal an unexpected link between new strategies for cancer chemotherapy and the treatment of axonopathies. PMID:25323584

  2. Insights into the Sirtuin Mechanism from Ternary Complexes Containing NAD[superscript +] and Acetylated Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Kevin G.; Avalos, Jose L.; Sens, Kristin; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-07-22

    Sirtuin proteins comprise a unique class of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylases. Although several structures of sirtuins have been determined, the mechanism by which NAD{sup +} cleavage occurs has remained unclear. We report the structures of ternary complexes containing NAD{sup +} and acetylated peptide bound to the bacterial sirtuin Sir2Tm and to a catalytic mutant (Sir2Tm{sup H116Y}). NAD{sup +} in these structures binds in a conformation different from that seen in previous structures, exposing the {alpha} face of the nicotinamide ribose to the carbonyl oxygen of the acetyl lysine substrate. The NAD{sup +} conformation is identical in both structures, suggesting that proper coenzyme orientation is not dependent on contacts with the catalytic histidine. We also present the structure of Sir2Tm{sup H116A} bound to deacteylated peptide and 3{prime}-O-acetyl ADP ribose. Taken together, these structures suggest a mechanism for nicotinamide cleavage in which an invariant phenylalanine plays a central role in promoting formation of the O-alkylamidate reaction intermediate and preventing nicotinamide exchange.

  3. Correlative NAD(P)H-FLIM and oxygen sensing-PLIM for metabolic mapping.

    PubMed

    Kalinina, Sviatlana; Breymayer, Jasmin; Schäfer, Patrick; Calzia, Enrico; Shcheslavskiy, Vladislav; Becker, Wolfgang; Rück, Angelika

    2016-08-01

    Cellular responses to oxygen tension have been studied extensively. Oxygen tension can be determined by considering the phosphorescence lifetime of a phosphorescence sensor. The simultaneous usage of FLIM of coenzymes as NAD(P)H and FAD(+) and PLIM of oxygen sensors could provide information about correlation of metabolic pathways and oxygen tension. We investigated correlative NAD(P)H-FLIM and oxygen sensing-PLIM for simultaneously analyzing cell metabolism and oxygen tension. Cell metabolism and pO2 were observed under different hypoxic conditions in squamous carcinoma cell cultures and in complex ex vivo systems. Increased hypoxia induced an increase of the phosphorescence lifetime of Ru(BPY)3 and in most cases a decrease in the lifetime of NAD(P)H which is in agreement to the expected decrease of the protein-bound NAD(P)H during hypoxia. Oxygen was modulated directly in the mitochondrial membrane. Blocking of complex III and accumulation of oxygen could be observed by both the decrease of the phosphorescence lifetime of Ru(BPY)3 and a reduction of the lifetime of NAD(P)H which was a clear indication of acute changes in the redox state of the cells. For the first time simultaneous FLIM/PLIM has been shown to be able to visualize intracellular oxygen tension together with a change from oxidative to glycolytic phenotype. PMID:26990032

  4. Structure of the meningococcal vaccine antigen NadA and epitope mapping of a bactericidal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Malito, Enrico; Biancucci, Marco; Faleri, Agnese; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Scarselli, Maria; Maruggi, Giulietta; Lo Surdo, Paola; Veggi, Daniele; Liguori, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Bertoldi, Isabella; Petracca, Roberto; Marchi, Sara; Romagnoli, Giacomo; Cartocci, Elena; Vercellino, Irene; Savino, Silvana; Spraggon, Glen; Norais, Nathalie; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Masignani, Vega; Bottomley, Matthew James

    2014-01-01

    Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) is a major cause of severe sepsis and invasive meningococcal disease, which is associated with 5–15% mortality and devastating long-term sequelae. Neisserial adhesin A (NadA), a trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA) that acts in adhesion to and invasion of host epithelial cells, is one of the three antigens discovered by genome mining that are part of the MenB vaccine that recently was approved by the European Medicines Agency. Here we present the crystal structure of NadA variant 5 at 2 Å resolution and transmission electron microscopy data for NadA variant 3 that is present in the vaccine. The two variants show similar overall topology with a novel TAA fold predominantly composed of trimeric coiled-coils with three protruding wing-like structures that create an unusual N-terminal head domain. Detailed mapping of the binding site of a bactericidal antibody by hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS shows that a protective conformational epitope is located in the head of NadA. These results provide information that is important for elucidating the biological function and vaccine efficacy of NadA. PMID:25404323

  5. Lycopene Pretreatment Ameliorates Acute Ethanol Induced NAD+ Depletion in Human Astroglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Jade; Heng, Benjamin; Grant, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with reduced brain volume and cognition. While the mechanisms by which ethanol induces these deleterious effects in vivo are varied most are associated with increased inflammatory and oxidative processes. In order to further characterise the effect of acute ethanol exposure on oxidative damage and NAD+ levels in the brain, human U251 astroglioma cells were exposed to physiologically relevant doses of ethanol (11 mM, 22 mM, 65 mM, and 100 mM) for ≤ 30 minutes. Ethanol exposure resulted in a dose dependent increase in both ROS and poly(ADP-ribose) polymer production. Significant decreases in total NAD(H) and sirtuin 1 activity were also observed at concentrations ≥ 22 mM. Similar to U251 cells, exposure to ethanol (≥22 mM) decreased levels of NAD(H) in primary human astrocytes. NAD(H) depletion in primary astrocytes was prevented by pretreatment with 1 μM of lycopene for 3.5 hours. Unexpectedly, in U251 cells lycopene treatment at concentrations ≥ 5 μM resulted in significant reductions in [NAD(H)]. This study suggests that exposure of the brain to alcohol at commonly observed blood concentrations may cause transitory oxidative damage which may be at least partly ameliorated by lycopene. PMID:26075038

  6. Purification and characterization of the plastid-localized NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    An, Yan; Cao, Youzhi; Xu, Yingwu

    2016-07-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) ubiquitously exists in living organisms and has many isoforms in a single species. MDHs from some classes have been characterized for their catalytic properties, which show significant variations despite that they share high sequence identity for the active sites. One class MDH, the plastid-localized NAD-dependent MDH (plNAD-MDH) is known to be important for plant survival in a dark environment, but its biochemical and enzymatic properties have not been well characterized. This study attempts to fill the gap. plNAD-MDH was expressed in an Escherichia coli system and purified using nickel-affinity chromatography followed by size exclusion chromatography. The N-terminal fusion his-tag was removed by protease cleavage. The gel filtration assay and glutaraldehyde cross-linking results showed that the active enzyme was a homodimer in solution. Further assay indicated that plNAD-MDH is most active at a neutral pH value. The Km values for oxaloacetate and NADH are found in the submillimolar order, a median range for most MDHs. The maximum reaction rate values, however, are dramatically different from other plant MDHs, indicating that plNAD-MDH has different substrate specificity. Moreover, we obtained crystals for this enzyme, which laid the groundwork for further analysis of the enzymatic mechanism from structural stand point. PMID:26095832

  7. SIRT3, a Mitochondrial NAD+-Dependent Deacetylase, Is Involved in the Regulation of Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Khalek, Waed; Cortade, Fabienne; Ollendorff, Vincent; Lapasset, Laure; Tintignac, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), one of the seven mammalian sirtuins, is a mitochondrial NAD+-dependent deacetylase known to control key metabolic pathways. SIRT3 deacetylases and activates a large number of mitochondrial enzymes involved in the respiratory chain, in ATP production, and in both the citric acid and urea cycles. We have previously shown that the regulation of myoblast differentiation is tightly linked to mitochondrial activity. Since SIRT3 modulates mitochondrial activity, we decide to address its role during myoblast differentiation. For this purpose, we first investigated the expression of endogenous SIRT3 during C2C12 myoblast differentiation. We further studied the impact of SIRT3 silencing on both the myogenic potential and the mitochondrial activity of C2C12 cells. We showed that SIRT3 protein expression peaked at the onset of myoblast differentiation. The inhibition of SIRT3 expression mediated by the stable integration of SIRT3 short inhibitory RNA (SIRT3shRNA) in C2C12 myoblasts, resulted in: 1) abrogation of terminal differentiation - as evidenced by a marked decrease in the myoblast fusion index and a significant reduction of Myogenin, MyoD, Sirtuin 1 and Troponin T protein expression - restored upon MyoD overexpression; 2) a decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) and citrate synthase protein expression reflecting an alteration of mitochondrial density; and 3) an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mirrored by the decreased activity of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Altogether our data demonstrate that SIRT3 mainly regulates myoblast differentiation via its influence on mitochondrial activity. PMID:25489948

  8. Intracellular NAD+ levels are associated with LPS-induced TNF-α release in pro-inflammatory macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shabany, Abbas Jawad; Moody, Alan John; Foey, Andrew David; Billington, Richard Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism and immune responses have been shown to be closely linked and as our understanding increases, so do the intricacies of the level of linkage. NAD+ has previously been shown to regulate tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) synthesis and TNF-α has been shown to regulate NAD+ homoeostasis providing a link between a pro-inflammatory response and redox status. In the present study, we have used THP-1 differentiation into pro- (M1-like) and anti- (M2-like) inflammatory macrophage subset models to investigate this link further. Pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages showed different resting NAD+ levels and expression levels of NAD+ homoeostasis enzymes. Challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a pro-inflammatory stimulus for macrophages, caused a large, biphasic and transient increase in NAD+ levels in pro- but not anti-inflammatory macrophages that were correlated with TNF-α release and inhibition of certain NAD+ synthesis pathways blocked TNF-α release. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation also caused changes in mRNA levels of some NAD+ homoeostasis enzymes in M1-like cells. Surprisingly, despite M2-like cells not releasing TNF-α or changing NAD+ levels in response to lipopolysaccharide, they showed similar mRNA changes compared with M1-like cells. These data further strengthen the link between pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages and NAD+. The agonist-induced rise in NAD+ shows striking parallels to well-known second messengers and raises the possibility that NAD+ is acting in a similar manner in this model. PMID:26764408

  9. Crystal structure of 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium hydrogen oxalate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Diop, Mouhamadou Birame; Diop, Libasse; Plasseraud, Laurent; Cattey, Hélène

    2016-08-01

    Single crystals of the title mol-ecular salt, C4H7N2 (+)·HC2O4 (-)·2H2O, were isolated from the reaction of 2-methyl-1H-imidazole and oxalic acid in a 1:1 molar ratio in water. In the crystal, the cations and anions are positioned alternately along an infinite [010] ribbon and linked together through bifurcated N-H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds. The water mol-ecules of crystallization link the chains into (10-1) bilayers, with the methyl groups of the cations organized in an isotactic manner. PMID:27536393

  10. Crystal structure of 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium hydrogen oxalate dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Mouhamadou Birame; Diop, Libasse; Plasseraud, Laurent; Cattey, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Single crystals of the title mol­ecular salt, C4H7N2 +·HC2O4 −·2H2O, were isolated from the reaction of 2-methyl-1H-imidazole and oxalic acid in a 1:1 molar ratio in water. In the crystal, the cations and anions are positioned alternately along an infinite [010] ribbon and linked together through bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds. The water mol­ecules of crystallization link the chains into (10-1) bilayers, with the methyl groups of the cations organized in an isotactic manner. PMID:27536393

  11. Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase2. Gene structure, activity, and tissue-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, A K

    1994-05-20

    Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase2 (NQO2) gene, 1336 base pairs (bp) of the 5'-flanking region and 165 bp of the 3'-flanking region, have been sequenced. NQO2 gene is 20 kilobase pairs in length and have seven exons interrupted by six introns as compared to the previously cloned NQO1 gene which contains six exons. 187 bp of the first exon in the NQO2 gene are noncoding and are absent in the NQO1 gene. 92 bp of the second exon in the NQO2 gene corresponded to the first exon of the NQO1 gene and so on. The sizes and nucleotide sequences of exons 3-6 are highly conserved between NQO2 and NQO1 genes. The last exon in the NQO2 gene is 1603 bp shorter than the last exon of the NQO1 gene and encodes for 58 amino acids as compared to 101 amino acids encoded by the NQO1 gene. This makes NQO2 protein 43 amino acids shorter than the NQO1 protein. The high degree of conservation between NQO2 and NQO1 gene organization and sequence confirmed that NQO2 gene encodes for a second member of the NQO gene family in human. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the NQO2 gene revealed presence of four SP1 binding sites at positions -214, -170, -106, and -75, a single copy of the antioxidant response element (ARE) at nucleotide -936, and three copies of xenobiotic response element (XRE) at positions -708, -557, and -51. ARE and XRE elements have previously been found in the promoters of the NQO1 and glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit genes and mediate increases in their expression in response to polycyclic aromatic compounds, phenolic antioxidants, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), respectively. The NQO2 cDNA-derived protein in monkey kidney COS1 cells efficiently catalyzed nitroreduction of anti-tumor compound CB10-200, an analog of nitrophenylaziridine. Northern blot analysis indicates that NQO2 gene is expressed in human heart, brain, lung, liver, and skeletal muscle but does not express in placenta. In contrast, the NQO1 gene was expressed in

  12. Bioorthogonally Functionalized NAD(+) Analogues for In-Cell Visualization of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Formation.

    PubMed

    Wallrodt, Sarah; Buntz, Annette; Wang, Yan; Zumbusch, Andreas; Marx, Andreas

    2016-06-27

    Poly(ADP-ribos)ylation (PARylation) is a major posttranslational modification and signaling event in most eukaryotes. Fundamental processes like DNA repair and transcription are coordinated by this transient polymer and its binding to proteins. ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) build complex ADP-ribose chains from NAD(+) onto various acceptor proteins. Molecular studies of PARylation thus remain challenging. Herein, we present the development of bioorthogonally functionalized NAD(+) analogues for the imaging of PARylation in vitro and in cells. Our results show that 2-modified NAD(+) analogues perform remarkably well and can be applied to the in-cell visualization of PARylation simultaneously in two colors. This tool gives insight into the substrate scope of ARTs and will help to further elucidate the biological role of PARylation by offering fast optical, multichannel read-outs. PMID:27080423

  13. Inhibition of de novo NAD(+) synthesis by oncogenic URI causes liver tumorigenesis through DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Krishna S; Gomes, Ana L; Yilmaz, Mahmut; Graña, Osvaldo; Bakiri, Latifa; Ruppen, Isabel; Ximénez-Embún, Pilar; Sheshappanavar, Vinayata; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Pisano, David G; Wagner, Erwin F; Djouder, Nabil

    2014-12-01

    Molecular mechanisms responsible for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain largely unknown. Using genetically engineered mouse models, we show that hepatocyte-specific expression of unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor (URI) leads to a multistep process of HCC development, whereas its genetic reduction in hepatocytes protects against diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC. URI inhibits aryl hydrocarbon (AhR)- and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated transcription of enzymes implicated in L-tryptophan/kynurenine/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) metabolism, thereby causing DNA damage at early stages of tumorigenesis. Restoring NAD(+) pools with nicotinamide riboside (NR) prevents DNA damage and tumor formation. Consistently, URI expression in human HCC is associated with poor survival and correlates negatively with L-tryptophan catabolism pathway. Our results suggest that boosting NAD(+) can be prophylactic or therapeutic in HCC. PMID:25453901

  14. Structural Basis of Inhibition of the Human NAD+ -Dependent Deacetylase SIRT5 by Suramin

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz,A.; Min, J.; Antoshenko, T.; Wang, C.; Allali-Hassani, A.; Dong, A.; Loppnau, P.; vedadi, M.; Bochkarev, A.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases and are emerging as molecular targets for the development of pharmaceuticals to treat human metabolic and neurological diseases and cancer. To date, several sirtuin inhibitors and activators have been identified, but the structural mechanisms of how these compounds modulate sirtuin activity have not yet been determined. We identified suramin as a compound that binds to human SIRT5 and showed that it inhibits SIRT5 NAD+-dependent deacetylase activity with an IC50 value of 22 {mu}M. To provide insights into how sirtuin function is altered by inhibitors, we determined two crystal structures of SIRT5, one in complex with ADP-ribose, the other bound to suramin. Our structural studies provide a view of a synthetic inhibitory compound in a sirtuin active site revealing that suramin binds into the NAD+, the product, and the substrate-binding site. Finally, our structures may enable the rational design of more potent inhibitors.

  15. NaD excess objects and its implications on initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sukyoung K.; Jeong, Hyunjin

    2015-04-01

    van Dokkum and Conroy (2010) have heralded the possible implication of NaI 8200A lines on extra bottom-heavy IMF of bright elliptical galaxies. A flurry of papers have followed it and revisited the half a century old issue all over again from various angles. For a sanity check, we investigate on the issue this time using the better measured NaD 5900A line instead. We found from the SDSS database that a large (~ 10%) fraction of galaxies (both early and late types) exhibit strong NaD lines and that the same bottom-heavy models of van Dokkum and Conroy that reproduced the strong NaI 8200 lines of elliptical galaxies are not capable of reproducing NaD line strengths at all. The mystery prevails. This article is mainly a review of our recent paper (Jeong et al. 2013).

  16. Pharmacological NAD-Boosting Strategies Improve Mitochondrial Homeostasis in Human Complex I-Mutant Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Felici, Roberta; Lapucci, Andrea; Cavone, Leonardo; Pratesi, Sara; Berlinguer-Palmini, Rolando; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are devastating genetic diseases for which efficacious therapies are still an unmet need. Recent studies report that increased availability of intracellular NAD obtained by inhibition of the NAD-consuming enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 or supplementation with the NAD-precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) ameliorates energetic derangement and symptoms in mouse models of mitochondrial disorders. Whether these pharmacological approaches also improve bioenergetics of human cells harboring mitochondrial defects is unknown. It is also unclear whether the same signaling cascade is prompted by PARP-1 inhibitors and NR supplementation to improve mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, we show that human fibroblasts mutant for the NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 1 (NDUFS1) subunit of respiratory complex I have similar ATP, NAD, and mitochondrial content compared with control cells, but show reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, mutant cells also show increased transcript levels of mitochondrial DNA but not nuclear DNA respiratory complex subunits, suggesting activation of a compensatory response. At variance with prior work in mice, however, NR supplementation, but not PARP-1 inhibition, increased intracellular NAD content in NDUFS1 mutant human fibroblasts. Conversely, PARP-1 inhibitors, but not NR supplementation, increased transcription of mitochondrial transcription factor A and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes constitutively induced in mutant cells. Still, both NR and PARP-1 inhibitors restored mitochondrial membrane potential and increased organelle content as well as oxidative activity of NDUFS1-deficient fibroblasts. Overall, data provide the first evidence that in human cells harboring a mitochondrial respiratory defect exposure to NR or PARP-1, inhibitors activate different signaling pathways that are not invariantly prompted by NAD increases, but equally able to improve energetic

  17. Chlamydia trachomatis Transports NAD via the Npt1 ATP/ADP Translocase

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Derek J.; Fernández, Reinaldo E.

    2013-01-01

    Obligate intracellular bacteria comprising the order Chlamydiales lack the ability to synthesize nucleotides de novo and must acquire these essential compounds from the cytosol of the host cell. The environmental protozoan endosymbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25 encodes five nucleotide transporters with specificities for different nucleotide substrates, including ATP, GTP, CTP, UTP, and NAD. In contrast, the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis encodes only two nucleotide transporters, the ATP/ADP translocase C. trachomatis Npt1 (Npt1Ct) and the nucleotide uniporter Npt2Ct, which transports GTP, UTP, CTP, and ATP. The notable absence of a NAD transporter, coupled with the lack of alternative nucleotide transporters on the basis of bioinformatic analysis of multiple C. trachomatis genomes, led us to re-evaluate the previously characterized transport properties of Npt1Ct. Using [adenylate-32P]NAD, we demonstrate that Npt1Ct expressed in Escherichia coli enables the transport of NAD with an apparent Km and Vmax of 1.7 μM and 5.8 nM mg−1 h−1, respectively. The Km for NAD transport is comparable to the Km for ATP transport of 2.2 μM, as evaluated in this study. Efflux and substrate competition assays demonstrate that NAD is a preferred substrate of Npt1Ct compared to ATP. These results suggest that during reductive evolution, the pathogenic chlamydiae lost individual nucleotide transporters, in contrast to their environmental endosymbiont relatives, without compromising their ability to obtain nucleotides from the host cytosol through relaxation of transport specificity. The novel properties of Npt1Ct and its conservation in chlamydiae make it a potential target for the development of antimicrobial compounds and a model for studying the evolution of transport specificity. PMID:23708130

  18. Infrared optical constants of H2O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Jordon, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. We have also found the infrared optical constants of H2O ice. We measured the transmission of infrared light throught thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500/cm at temperatures below 200 K. We developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. We used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds.

  19. Exploitation of mitochondrial nad6 as a complementary marker for studying population variability in Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Brandão, Karina L.; Lyra, Mariana L.; Santos, Thiago V.; Seraphim, Noemy; Albernaz, Karina C.; Pavinato, Vitor A.C.; Martinelli, Samuel; Cônsoli, Fernando L.; Omoto, Celso

    2011-01-01

    The applicability of mitochondrial nad6 sequences to studies of DNA and population variability in Lepidoptera was tested in four species of economically important moths and one of wild butterflies. The genetic information so obtained was compared to that of cox1 sequences for two species of Lepidoptera. nad6 primers appropriately amplified all the tested DNA targets, the generated data proving to be as informative and suitable in recovering population structures as that of cox1. The proposal is that, to obtain more robust results, this mitochondrial region can be complementarily used with other molecular sequences in studies of low level phylogeny and population genetics in Lepidoptera. PMID:22215980

  20. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans. PMID:24814483

  1. The Ferredoxin:NAD+ Oxidoreductase (Rnf) from the Acetogen Acetobacterium woodii Requires Na+ and Is Reversibly Coupled to the Membrane Potential*

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii has a novel Na+-translocating electron transport chain that couples electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to NAD+ with the generation of a primary electrochemical Na+ potential across its cytoplasmic membrane. In previous assays in which Ti3+ was used to reduce ferredoxin, Na+ transport was observed, but not a Na+ dependence of the electron transfer reaction. Here, we describe a new biological reduction system for ferredoxin in which ferredoxin is reduced with CO, catalyzed by the purified acetyl-CoA synthase/CO dehydrogenase from A. woodii. Using CO-reduced ferredoxin, NAD+ reduction was highly specific and strictly dependent on ferredoxin and occurred at a rate of 50 milliunits/mg of protein. Most important, this assay revealed for the first time a strict Na+ dependence of this electron transfer reaction. The Km was 0.2 mm. Na+ could be partly substituted by Li+. Na+ dependence was observed at neutral and acidic pH values, indicating the exclusive use of Na+ as a coupling ion. Electron transport from reduced ferredoxin to NAD+ was coupled to electrogenic Na+ transport, indicating the generation of Δμ̃Na+. Vice versa, endergonic ferredoxin reduction with NADH as reductant was possible, but only in the presence of Δμ̃Na+, and was accompanied by Na+ efflux out of the vesicles. This is consistent with the hypothesis that Rnf also catalyzes ferredoxin reduction at the expense of an electrochemical Na+ gradient. The physiological significance of this finding is discussed. PMID:24045950

  2. The ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase (Rnf) from the acetogen Acetobacterium woodii requires Na+ and is reversibly coupled to the membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Hess, Verena; Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii has a novel Na(+)-translocating electron transport chain that couples electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to NAD(+) with the generation of a primary electrochemical Na(+) potential across its cytoplasmic membrane. In previous assays in which Ti(3+) was used to reduce ferredoxin, Na(+) transport was observed, but not a Na(+) dependence of the electron transfer reaction. Here, we describe a new biological reduction system for ferredoxin in which ferredoxin is reduced with CO, catalyzed by the purified acetyl-CoA synthase/CO dehydrogenase from A. woodii. Using CO-reduced ferredoxin, NAD(+) reduction was highly specific and strictly dependent on ferredoxin and occurred at a rate of 50 milliunits/mg of protein. Most important, this assay revealed for the first time a strict Na(+) dependence of this electron transfer reaction. The Km was 0.2 mm. Na(+) could be partly substituted by Li(+). Na(+) dependence was observed at neutral and acidic pH values, indicating the exclusive use of Na(+) as a coupling ion. Electron transport from reduced ferredoxin to NAD(+) was coupled to electrogenic Na(+) transport, indicating the generation of ΔμNa(+). Vice versa, endergonic ferredoxin reduction with NADH as reductant was possible, but only in the presence of ΔμNa(+), and was accompanied by Na(+) efflux out of the vesicles. This is consistent with the hypothesis that Rnf also catalyzes ferredoxin reduction at the expense of an electrochemical Na(+) gradient. The physiological significance of this finding is discussed. PMID:24045950

  3. Nrk2b-mediated NAD+ production regulates cell adhesion and is required for muscle morphogenesis in vivo: Nrk2b and NAD+ in muscle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Lessard, Kevin N; Khalil, Andre; Henry, Clarissa A

    2010-08-15

    Cell-matrix adhesion complexes (CMACs) play fundamental roles during morphogenesis. Given the ubiquitous nature of CMACs and their roles in many cellular processes, one question is how specificity of CMAC function is modulated. The clearly defined cell behaviors that generate segmentally reiterated axial skeletal muscle during zebrafish development comprise an ideal system with which to investigate CMAC function during morphogenesis. We found that Nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b (Nrk2b) cell autonomously modulates the molecular composition of CMACs in vivo. Nrk2b is required for normal Laminin polymerization at the myotendinous junction (MTJ). In Nrk2b-deficient embryos, at MTJ loci where Laminin is not properly polymerized, muscle fibers elongate into adjacent myotomes and are abnormally long. In yeast and human cells, Nrk2 phosphorylates Nicotinamide Riboside and generates NAD+ through an alternative salvage pathway. Exogenous NAD+ treatment rescues MTJ development in Nrk2b-deficient embryos, but not in laminin mutant embryos. Both Nrk2b and Laminin are required for localization of Paxillin, but not beta-Dystroglycan, to CMACs at the MTJ. Overexpression of Paxillin in Nrk2b-deficient embryos is sufficient to rescue MTJ integrity. Taken together, these data show that Nrk2b plays a specific role in modulating subcellular localization of discrete CMAC components that in turn plays roles in musculoskeletal development. Furthermore, these data suggest that Nrk2b-mediated synthesis of NAD+ is functionally upstream of Laminin adhesion and Paxillin subcellular localization during MTJ development. These results indicate a previously unrecognized complexity to CMAC assembly in vivo and also elucidate a novel role for NAD+ during morphogenesis. PMID:20566368

  4. Computed phase diagrams for the system: Sodium hydroxide-uric acid-hydrochloric acid-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. E.; Gregory, T. M.; Füredi-Milhofer, H.

    1987-07-01

    Renal stone formation is made complex by the variety of solid phases that are formed, by the number of components in the aqueous phase, and by the multiplicity of ionic dissociation and association processes that are involved. In the present work we apply phase diagrams calculated by the use of equilibrium constants from the ternary system sodium hydroxide-uric acid-water to simplify and make more rigorous the understanding of the factors governing dissolution and precipitation of uric acid (anhydrous and dihydrate) and sodium urate monohydrate. The system is then examined in terms of four components. Finally, procedures are described for fluids containing more than four components. The isotherms, singular points, and fields of supersaturation and undersaturation are shown in various forms of phase diagrams. This system has two notable features: (1) in the coordinates -log[H 2U] versus -log[NaOH], the solubility isotherms for anhydrous uric acid and uric acid dihydrate approximate straight lines with slopes equal to +1 over a wide range of concentrations. As a result, substantial quantities of sodium acid urate monohydrate can precipitate from solution or dissolve without changing the degree of saturation of uric acid significantly. (2) The solubility isotherm for NaHU·H 2O has a deltoid shape with the low-pH branch having a slope of infinity. As a result of the vertical slope of this isotherm, substantial quantities of uric acid can dissolve or precipitate without changing the degree of saturation of sodium acid urate monohydrate significantly. The H 2U-NaOH singular point has a pH of 6.87 at 310 K in the ternary system.

  5. Crystal and molecular structure of the dihydrate of the artificial sweetener lactitol: 4-O-β- D-galactopyranosyl- D-glucitol.2H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanter, Jan A.; Schouten, Arie; van Bommel, Mark

    1990-10-01

    Crystallization of lactitol from aqueous ethanol readily yields crystals of the monohydrate, the structure of which has recently been reported. Slow evaporation of very concentrated aqueous syrups results in the crystalline dihydrate. The space group is P4 32 12 with a = 8.762(2), c = 45.508(8) Å, V = 3493.8(13) Å 3, Z = 8, Dc = 1.446 g cm -3, R = 0.037 for 2017 unique observed reflections and 310 variables. The galactopyranosyl ring has the 4C1 chair conformation and the carbon chain of the glucitol fragment has a non-planar, bent MAA conformation. The conformations about the glycosidic C(1)O(1) and O(1)C(14) bonds are different from those observed in the monohydrate: the torsion angles O(5)C(1)O(1)C(14) and C(1)O(1)C(14)C(13) differ by 29.6° and 15.0°, respectively. The orientations of the terminal C(11)O(11) bonds with respect to the carbon-atom chain of the glucitol fragment also differ appreciably: in the dihydrate the pertinent torsion angle is -47.3(3)° and in the monohydrate 75.5(2)°. All hydroxyl groups are involved in a complex three-dimensional system of hydrogen bonds, in which the two water molecules constitute an important cohesive element

  6. Isolation and characterization of a Chinese hamster ovary cell line deficient in fatty alcohol:NAD sup + oxidoreductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    James, P.F.; Lee, J. ); Rizzo, W.B.; Zoeller, R.A. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have isolated a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line that is defective in long-chain fatty alcohol oxidation. The ability of the mutant cells to convert labeled hexadecanol to the corresponding fatty acid in vivo was reduced to 5% of the parent strain. Whole-cell homogenates from the mutant strain, FAA.1, were deficient in long-chain fatty alcohol:NAD{sup +} oxidoreductase activity, which catalyzes the oxidation of hexadecanol to hexadecanoic acid, although the intermediate fatty aldehyde was formed normally. A direct measurement of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase showed that the FAA.1, strain was defective in this component of FAO activity. FAA.1 is a two-stage mutant that was selected from a previously described parent strain, ZR-82, which is defective in ether lipid biosynthesis and peroxisome assembly. Because of combined defects in ether lipid biosynthesis and fatty alcohol oxidation, the ability of the FAA.1 cells to incorporate hexadecanol into complex lipids was greatly impaired, resulting in a 60-fold increase in cellular fatty alcohol levels. As the FAO deficiency in FAA.1 cells appears to be identical to the defect associated with the human genetic disorder Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome, the FAA.1 cell line may be useful in studying this disease.

  7. Crystal structure of tetra­methyl­tetra­thia­fulvalenium (1S)-camphor-10-sulfonate dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Mathieu; Allain, Magali; Mézière, Cécile; Pop, Flavia; Giffard, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Electro-oxidation of tetra­methyl­tetra­thia­fulvalene (TMTTF) in the presence of the chiral anion (1S)-camphor-10-sulfonate (S-camphSO3 −) in tetra­hydro­furan/water medium afforded a 1/1 salt formulated as TMTTF·S-camphSO3·2H2O or 2-(4,5-dimethyl-1,3-di­thiol-2-yl­idene)-4,5-dimethyl-1,3-di­thiole radical ion (1+) [(1S)-7,7-dimethyl-2-oxobi­cyclo­[2.2.1]heptan-1-yl]methane­sulfonate dihydrate, C10H12S4 +·C10H15O4S−·2H2O. In this salt, two independent TMTTF units are present but, in both cases, the observed bond lengths and especially the central C=C distance [1.392 (6) and 1.378 (6) Å] are in agreement with a complete oxidation of TMTTF which is thus present as TMTTF. + radical cations. These cations form one-dimensional stacks in which they are associated two by two, forming dimers with short [3.472 (1) to 3.554 (2) Å] S⋯S contacts. The two S-camphSO3 anions present also form stacks and are connected with each other via the water mol­ecules with many O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds ranging from 1.86 (3) to 2.15 (4) Å; the O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding network can be described as being constituted of C 2 2(6) chains bearing R 3 3(11) lateral rings. On the other hand, the columns of cations and anions are connected through C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a system expanding in three directions; finally, the result is a three-dimensional network of O—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:26279858

  8. Intracellular NAD+ depletion enhances bortezomib-induced anti-myeloma activity

    PubMed Central

    Cagnetta, Antonia; Calimeri, Teresa; Acharya, Chirag; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Zhong, Mike Y.; Patrone, Franco; Nencioni, Alessio; Gobbi, Marco; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) inhibition depletes intracellular NAD+ content leading, to autophagic multiple myeloma (MM) cell death. Bortezomib has remarkably improved MM patient outcome, but dose-limiting toxicities and development of resistance limit its long-term utility. Here we observed higher Nampt messenger RNA levels in bortezomib-resistant patient MM cells, which correlated with decreased overall survival. We demonstrated that combining the NAD+ depleting agent FK866 with bortezomib induces synergistic anti-MM cell death and overcomes bortezomib resistance. This effect is associated with (1) activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, and downregulation of Mcl-1; (2) enhanced intracellular NAD+ depletion; (3) inhibition of chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like proteasome activities; (4) inhibition of nuclear factor κB signaling; and (5) inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, Nampt knockdown significantly enhances the anti-MM effect of bortezomib, which can be rescued by ectopically overexpressing Nampt. In a murine xenograft MM model, low-dose combination FK866 and Bortezomib is well tolerated, significantly inhibits tumor growth, and prolongs host survival. Taken together, these findings indicate that intracellular NAD+ level represents a major determinant in the ability of bortezomib to induce apoptosis in MM cells and provide proof of concept for the combination with FK866 as a new strategy to enhance sensitivity or overcome resistance to bortezomib. PMID:23823317

  9. 78 FR 36571 - North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official Protraction Diagram (OPDs) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM),...

  10. NAD+-Metabolizing Ectoenzymes in Remodeling Tumor–Host Interactions: The Human Myeloma Model

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, Alberto L.; Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Zito, Andrea; Roato, Ilaria; Morandi, Fabio; Marimpietri, Danilo; Bolzoni, Marina; Toscani, Denise; Oldham, Robert J.; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Sasser, A. Kate; Pistoia, Vito; Giuliani, Nicola; Malavasi, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an essential co-enzyme reported to operate both intra- and extracellularly. In the extracellular space, NAD+ can elicit signals by binding purinergic P2 receptors or it can serve as the substrate for a chain of ectoenzymes. As a substrate, it is converted to adenosine (ADO) and then taken up by the cells, where it is transformed and reincorporated into the intracellular nucleotide pool. Nucleotide-nucleoside conversion is regulated by membrane-bound ectoenzymes. CD38, the main mammalian enzyme that hydrolyzes NAD+, belongs to the ectoenzymatic network generating intracellular Ca2+-active metabolites. Within this general framework, the extracellular conversion of NAD+ can vary significantly according to the tissue environment or pathological conditions. Accumulating evidence suggests that tumor cells exploit such a network for migrating and homing to protected areas and, even more importantly, for evading the immune response. We report on the experience of this lab to exploit human multiple myeloma (MM), a neoplastic expansion of plasma cells, as a model to investigate these issues. MM cells express high levels of surface CD38 and grow in an environment prevalently represented by closed niches hosted in the bone marrow (BM). An original approach of this study derives from the recent use of the clinical availability of therapeutic anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in perturbing tumor viability and enzymatic functions in conditions mimicking what happens in vivo. PMID:26393653

  11. Purification and characterization of a NAD+-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase from Japanese pear fruit.

    PubMed

    Oura, Y; Yamada, K; Shiratake, K; Yamaki, S

    2000-07-01

    NAD+-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase NAD-SDH, EC 1.1.1.14) from Japanese pear fruit was purified to apparent homogeneity (single band by SDS-PAGE with silver staining), and had a specific activity of 916.7 nKatal/mg protein. The molecular of the native enzyme was calculated to be 160 kDa by gel filtration, whereas SDS-PAGE gave a subunit size of 40 kDa, indicating that the native enzyme is a homotetramer. The protein immunologically reacted with an antibody raised in rabbit against the fusion protein expressed in E. coli harboring an apple NAD-SDH cDNA. The Km, values for sorbitol and fructose were 96.4+/-8.60 and 4239+/-33.5 mM, respectively, and optimum pH for sorbitol oxidation was 9.0 and 7.0 for fructose reduction. Pear NAD-SDH had a very narrow substrate specificity, that is, sorbitol, L-iditol, xylitol and L-threitol were oxidized but not any of the other alcohols tested. These data suggest the structural importance of an S configuration at C-2 and an R configuration at C-4 in the substrate(s). Its enzymatic activity was strongly inhibited both by heavy metal ions such as mercury, and by thiol compounds, such as L-cysteine. However, the addition of zinc ion reversed the enzyme inactivation caused by addition of L-cysteine. PMID:10963448

  12. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  13. Regulation of NAD(P)H oxidases by AMPK in cardiovascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are ubiquitously produced in cardiovascular systems. Under physiological conditions, ROS/RNS function as signaling molecules that are essential in maintaining cardiovascular function. Aberrant concentrations of ROS/RNS have been demonstrated in cardiovascular diseases due to increased production or decreased scavenging, which have been considered as common pathways for the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, (re)stenosis, and congestive heart failure. NAD(P)H oxidases are primary sources of ROS and can be induced or activated by all known cardiovascular risk factors. Stresses, hormones, vasoactive agents, and cytokines via different signaling cascades control the expression and activity of these enzymes and of their regulatory subunits. But the molecular mechanisms by which NAD(P)H oxidase is regulated in cardiovascular systems remain poorly characterized. Investigations by us and others suggest that adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), as an energy sensor and modulator, is highly sensitive to ROS/RNS. We have also obtained convincing evidence that AMPK is a physiological suppressor of NAD(P)H oxidase in multiple cardiovascular cell systems. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how AMPK functions as a physiological repressor of NAD(P)H oxidase. PMID:22357101

  14. The evolution of substrate specificity-associated residues and Ca(2+) -binding motifs in EF-hand-containing type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Hao, Meng-Shu; Rasmusson, Allan G

    2016-07-01

    Most eukaryotic organisms, except some animal clades, have mitochondrial alternative electron transport enzymes that allow respiration to bypass the energy coupling in oxidative phosphorylation. The energy bypass enzymes in plants include the external type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases (DHs) of the NDB family, which are characterized by an EF-hand domain for Ca(2+) binding. Here we investigate these plant enzymes by combining molecular modeling with evolutionary analysis. Molecular modeling of the Arabidopsis thaliana AtNDB1 with the yeast ScNDI1 as template revealed distinct similarities in the core catalytic parts, and highlighted the interaction between the pyridine nucleotide and residues correlating with NAD(P)H substrate specificity. The EF-hand domain of AtNDB1 has no counterpart in ScNDI1, and was instead modeled with Ca(2+) -binding signal transducer proteins. Combined models displayed a proximity of the AtNDB1 EF-hand domain to the substrate entrance side of the catalytic part. Evolutionary analysis of the eukaryotic NDB-type proteins revealed ancient and recent reversions between the motif observed in proteins specific for NADH (acidic type) and NADPH (non-acidic type), and that the clade of enzymes with acidic motifs in angiosperms derives from non-acidic-motif NDB-type proteins present in basal plants, fungi and protists. The results suggest that Ca(2+) -dependent external NADPH oxidation is an ancient process, indicating that it has a fundamental importance for eukaryotic cellular redox metabolism. In contrast, the external NADH DHs in plants are products of a recent expansion, mirroring the expansion of the alternative oxidase family. PMID:27079180

  15. Loss of NADH Oxidase Activity in Streptococcus mutans Leads to Rex-Mediated Overcompensation in NAD+ Regeneration by Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J. L.; Derr, A. M.; Faustoferri, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies of the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans have determined that this Gram-positive facultative anaerobe mounts robust responses to both acid and oxidative stresses. The water-forming NADH oxidase (Nox; encoded by nox) is thought to be critical for the regeneration of NAD+, for use in glycolysis, and for the reduction of oxygen, thereby preventing the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species. In this study, the free NAD+/NADH ratio in a nox deletion strain (Δnox) was discovered to be remarkably higher than that in the parent strain, UA159, when the strains were grown in continuous culture. This unanticipated result was explained by significantly elevated lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh; encoded by ldh) activity and ldh transcription in the Δnox strain, which was mediated in part by the redox-sensing regulator Rex. cDNA microarray analysis of S. mutans cultures exposed to simultaneous acid stress (growth at a low pH) and oxidative stress (generated through the deletion of nox or the addition of exogenous oxygen) revealed a stress response synergistically heightened over that with either stress alone. In the Δnox strain, this elevated stress response included increased glucose phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) activity, which appeared to be due to elevated manL transcription, mediated in part, like elevated ldh transcription, by Rex. While the Δnox strain does possess a membrane composition different from that of the parent strain, it did not appear to have defects in either membrane permeability or ATPase activity. However, the altered transcriptome and metabolome of the Δnox strain were sufficient to impair its ability to compete with commensal peroxigenic oral streptococci during growth under aerobic conditions. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus mutans is an oral pathogen whose ability to outcompete commensal oral streptococci is strongly linked to the formation of dental caries. Previous work has demonstrated that the S

  16. Atomic-Resolution Structures of Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase with NAD[superscript +] and Fluoroalcohols Define Strained Michaelis Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2013-01-16

    Structures of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with NAD{sup +} and unreactive substrate analogues, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol, were determined at 100 K at 1.12 or 1.14 {angstrom} resolution, providing estimates of atomic positions with overall errors of 0.02 {angstrom}, the geometry of ligand binding, descriptions of alternative conformations of amino acid residues and waters, and evidence of a strained nicotinamide ring. The four independent subunits from the two homodimeric structures differ only slightly in the peptide backbone conformation. Alternative conformations for amino acid side chains were identified for 50 of the 748 residues in each complex, and Leu-57 and Leu-116 adopt different conformations to accommodate the different alcohols at the active site. Each fluoroalcohol occupies one position, and the fluorines of the alcohols are well-resolved. These structures closely resemble the expected Michaelis complexes with the pro-R hydrogens of the methylene carbons of the alcohols directed toward the re face of C4N of the nicotinamide rings with a C-C distance of 3.40 {angstrom}. The oxygens of the alcohols are ligated to the catalytic zinc at a distance expected for a zinc alkoxide (1.96 {angstrom}) and participate in a low-barrier hydrogen bond (2.52 {angstrom}) with the hydroxyl group of Ser-48 in a proton relay system. As determined by X-ray refinement with no restraints on bond distances and planarity, the nicotinamide rings in the two complexes are slightly puckered (quasi-boat conformation, with torsion angles of 5.9{sup o} for C4N and 4.8{sup o} for N1N relative to the plane of the other atoms) and have bond distances that are somewhat different compared to those found for NAD(P){sup +}. It appears that the nicotinamide ring is strained toward the transition state on the path to alcohol oxidation.

  17. Amperometric lactate biosensor for flow injection analysis based on a screen-printed carbon electrode containing Meldola's Blue-Reinecke salt, coated with lactate dehydrogenase and NAD+.

    PubMed

    Piano, M; Serban, S; Pittson, R; Drago, G A; Hart, J P

    2010-06-30

    A biosensor for the measurement of lactate in serum has been developed, which is based on a screen-printed carbon electrode, modified with Meldola's Blue-Reinecke Salt (MBRS-SPCE), coated with the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase NAD(+) dependent (from Porcine heart), and NAD(+). A cellulose acetate layer was deposited on the top of the device to act as a permselective membrane. The biosensor was incorporated into a commercially available, thin-layer, amperometric flow cell operated at a potential of only +0.05 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The mobile phase consisted of 0.2 M phosphate buffer pH 10 containing 0.1 M potassium chloride solution; a flow rate of 0.8 ml min(-1) was used throughout the investigation. The biosensor response was linear over the range 0.55-10 mM lactate; the former represents the detection limit. The precision of the system was determined by carrying out 10 repeat injections of 10 mM l(+)lactic acid standard; the calculated coefficient of variation was 4.28%. It was demonstrated that this biosensor system could be applied to the direct measurement of lactate in serum without pre-treatment; therefore, this would allow high throughput-analysis, at low cost, for this clinically important analyte. PMID:20685431

  18. Activation of endothelial NAD(P)H oxidase accelerates early glomerular injury in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagasu, Hajime; Satoh, Minoru; Kiyokage, Emi; Kidokoro, Kengo; Toida, Kazunori; Channon, Keith M; Kanwar, Yashpal S; Sasaki, Tamaki; Kashihara, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common denominative pathogenic mechanism underlying vascular and renal complications in diabetes mellitus. Endothelial NAD(P)H oxidase is a major source of vascular ROS, and it has an important role in endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesized that activation of endothelial NAD(P)H oxidase initiates and worsens the progression of diabetic nephropathy, particularly in the development of albuminuria. We used transgenic mice with endothelial-targeted overexpression of the catalytic subunit of NAD(P)H oxidase, Nox2 (NOX2TG). NOX2TG mice were crossed with Akita insulin-dependent diabetic (Akita) mice that develop progressive hyperglycemia. We compared the progression of diabetic nephropathy in Akita versus NOX2TG-Akita mice. NOX2TG-Akita mice and Akita mice developed significant albuminuria above the baseline at 6 and 10 weeks of age, respectively. Compared with Akita mice, NOX2TG-Akita mice exhibited higher levels of NAD(P)H oxidase activity in glomeruli, developed glomerular endothelial perturbations, and attenuated expression of glomerular glycocalyx. Moreover, in contrast to Akita mice, the NOX2TG-Akita mice had numerous endothelial microparticles (blebs), as detected by scanning electron microscopy, and increased glomerular permeability. Furthermore, NOX2TG-Akita mice exhibited distinct phenotypic changes in glomerular mesangial cells expressing α-smooth muscle actin, and in podocytes expressing increased levels of desmin, whereas the glomeruli generated increased levels of ROS. In conclusion, activation of endothelial NAD(P)H oxidase in the presence of hyperglycemia initiated and exacerbated diabetic nephropathy characterized by the development of albuminuria. Moreover, ROS generated in the endothelium compounded glomerular dysfunctions by altering the phenotypes of mesangial cells and compromising the integrity of the podocytes. PMID:26552047

  19. Probing the Druggability Limits for Enzymes of the NAD Biosynthetic Network in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Padiadpu, Jyothi; Mishra, Madhulika; Sharma, Eshita; Mala, Uchurappa; Somasundaram, Kumar; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2016-05-23

    The biosynthesis of NAD constitutes an important metabolic module in the cell, since NAD is an essential cofactor involved in several metabolic reactions. NAD concentrations are known to be significantly increased in several cancers, particularly in glioma, consistent with the observation of up-regulation of several enzymes of the network. Modulating NAD biosynthesis in glioma is therefore an attractive therapeutic strategy. Here we report reconstruction of a biochemical network of NAD biosynthesis consisting of 22 proteins, 36 metabolites, and 86 parameters, tuned to mimic the conditions in glioma. Kinetic simulations of the network provide comprehensive insights about the role of individual enzymes. Further, quantitative changes in the same network between different states of health and disease enable identification of drug targets, based on specific alterations in the given disease. Through simulations of enzyme inhibition titrations, we identify NMPRTase as a potential drug target, while eliminating other possible candidates NMNAT, NAPRTase, and NRK. We have also simulated titrations of both binding affinities as well as inhibitor concentrations, which provide insights into the druggability limits of the target, a novel aspect that can provide useful guidelines for designing inhibitors with optimal affinities. Our simulations suggest that an inhibitor affinity of 10 nM used in a concentration range of 0.1 to 10 μM achieves a near maximal inhibition response for NMPRTase and that increasing the affinity any further is not likely to have a significant advantage. Thus, the quantitative appreciation defines a maximal extent of inhibition possible for a chosen enzyme in the context of its network. Knowledge of this type enables an upper affinity threshold to be defined as a goal in lead screening and refinement stages in drug discovery. PMID:26958865

  20. Presence of extracellular NAD(+) and NADH in cultures of wood-degrading fungi.

    PubMed

    Kido, Ryuta; Takeeda, Midori; Manabe, Mitsuhiro; Miyagawa, Yutaka; Itakura, Shuji; Tanaka, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies indicated that extracellular glycoproteins produced by some white-rot and brown-rot basidiomycetous fungi reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) and O2 to H2O2 and produce hydroxyl radicals. The continuous generation of hydroxyl radicals requires a constant supply of O2 and an electron donor for the reduction of oxidized forms of the glycoproteins to the reduced forms. However, electron donors for this reaction, such as NADH, have not been identified. In this study, the amounts of the extracellular pyridine coenzymes, NAD(+) and NADH, were measured in agar cultures of four white-rot fungi, one brown-rot fungus, and three soft-rot fungi. The sums of NAD(+) and NADH detected in wood-containing cultures of all five basidiomycetes were greater than those in glucose cultures. The amounts of NAD(+) were higher than those of NADH in all wood-containing cultures except that of Irpex lacteus, and NAD(+) was greater than NADH in all glucose cultures except that of Fomitopsis palustris. Significant amounts of pyridine coenzymes were present in glucose and wood-containing cultures of the three soft-rot fungi. The non-wood-degrading fungus, Penicillium funiculosum, did not produce NAD(+) or NADH in either glucose or wood-containing cultures. The extracellular pyridine coenzyme levels were relatively high compared to the rates of extracellular hydroxyl radical generation in wood-degrading fungal cultures. Thus, white-, brown-, and soft-rot fungi produce pyridine coenzymes that could serve as electron donors for the production of hydroxyl radicals during wood degradation. PMID:26133508

  1. The evolving role of the NAD+/nicotinamide metabolome in skin homeostasis, cellular bioenergetics, and aging.

    PubMed

    Oblong, John E

    2014-11-01

    Human skin is exposed to daily environmental insults, particularly solar radiation, that triggers a range of molecular responses. These perturbations to the normal homeostatic state can lead to cellular dysfunction and, ultimately, impacts tissue integrity and accelerates skin aging (photoaging). One of the responses is increased oxidative stress which has been shown to disrupt cellular bioenergetics. This can be detected by depletion of the nucleotide energy metabolites NAD+ and ATP as both an acute transient decrease and, over time, a more permanent chronic reduction due in part to cumulative damage of mitochondria. NAD+ and its primary precursor nicotinamide have been known for some time to impact skin homeostasis based on linkages to dietary requirements, treatment of various inflammatory conditions, photoaging, and prevention of cancer. Cellular NAD+ pools are known to be lower in aged skin and treatment with nicotinamide is hypothesized to restore these levels, thereby mitigating cellular bioenergetics dysfunction. In dermal fibroblasts, nicotinamide is able to protect against oxidative stress to glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation as well as increase mitochondrial efficiency via sirtuin-dependent selective mitophagy. Recent research has found that NAD+ cellular pools are more dynamic than previously thought, oscillating in tandem with free nicotinamide, and serves as a regulatory point and feedback loop in cellular metabolism regulation, maintenance of mitochondrial efficiency, and circadian rhythmicity. Since UV-induced oxidative stress in skin can disrupt these processes, continued molecular understanding of the role of NAD+ and nicotinamide in skin biology is important to identify interventions that would help maintain its normal homeostatic functions and efficient cellular bioenergetics. PMID:24794404

  2. Decline in NAD(P)H autofluorescence precedes apoptotic cell death from chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toms, Steven A.; Muhammad, Osman; Jackson, Heather; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2005-11-01

    OBJECTIVE: Optical spectroscopic tools exist that allow open surgical and minimally invasive assays of intrinsic tissue optics. Optical detection of cellular and tissue viability may offer a minimally invasive way to assess tumor responsiveness to chemotherapies. We report on an optical spectroscopic change that precedes apoptotic cell death and appears related to NAD(P)H autofluorescence. METHODS: The cell lines SW 480 and U87-MG were grown in culture and treated with cisplatin 100 μg/ml and tamoxifen 10 μM, respectively. Fluorescence spectroscopy at 355 nm excitation and 460 nm emission were collected. MTS assays were used to determine cell viability. Cell lysates were analyzed for NAD(P)H concentrations by mass spectroscopy. RESULTS: Autoflourescence at 355 nm excitation and 460 nm emission declines markedly despite normalization for cell number and total protein concentration after treatment with tamoxifen or cisplatin. The autofluorescence drop precedes the loss of cell viability as measured by MTS assay. For example, the relative viability of the U87-MG cell treated with tamoxifen at hours 0, 8, 12 and 24 of treatment was 100 +/- 6, 85 +/- 6, 53 +/- 9 and 0 +/- 3. The relative fluorescence at the same time points were 100 +/- 2, 57 +/- 6, 47 +/- 3, and 0 +/- 1. TUNNEL assays confirm that cell death is via apoptosis. The key cellular fluorophore at these wavelengths is NAD(P)H. Mass spectroscopic analysis of cell lysates at these time points reveals a drop in NAD(P)H concentrations that is parallel to the loss of fluorescence signal. CONCLUSIONS: NAD(P)H autofluoresence decline precedes apoptotic cell death. This may allow the design of minimally invasive spectroscopic tools to monitor chemotherapeutic response.

  3. Isolation, characterization, and biological activity of ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase from the methane oxidizer Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y P; Yoch, D C

    1989-01-01

    A ferredoxin-NAD+ oxidoreductase (EC 1.18.1.3) has been isolated from extracts of the obligate methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This enzyme was shown to couple electron flow from formate dehydrogenase (NAD+ requiring) to ferredoxin. Ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase was purified to homogeneity by conventional chromatography techniques and was shown to be a flavoprotein with a molecular weight of 36,000 +/- 1,000. This ferredoxin reductase was specific for NADH (Km, 125 microM) and coupled electron flow to the native ferredoxin and to ferredoxins from spinach, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Rhodospirillum rubrum (ferredoxin II). M. trichosporium ferredoxin saturated the ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase at a concentration 2 orders of magnitude lower (3 nM) than did spinach ferredoxin (0.4 microM). Ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase also had transhydrogenase activity which transferred electrons and protons from NADH to thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (Km, 9 microM) and from NADPH to 3-acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide (Km, 16 microM). Reconstitution of a soluble electron transport pathway that coupled formate oxidation to ferredoxin reduction required formate dehydrogenase, NAD+, and ferredoxin-NAD+ reductase. Images PMID:2768195

  4. Novel assay for simultaneous measurement of pyridine mononucleotides synthesizing activities allows dissection of the NAD(+) biosynthetic machinery in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zamporlini, Federica; Ruggieri, Silverio; Mazzola, Francesca; Amici, Adolfo; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    The redox coenzyme NAD(+) is also a rate-limiting co-substrate for several enzymes that consume the molecule, thus rendering its continuous re-synthesis indispensable. NAD(+) biosynthesis has emerged as a therapeutic target due to the relevance of NAD(+) -consuming reactions in complex intracellular signaling networks whose alteration leads to many neurologic and metabolic disorders. Distinct metabolic routes, starting from various precursors, are known to support NAD(+) biosynthesis with tissue/cell-specific efficiencies, probably reflecting differential expression of the corresponding rate-limiting enzymes, i.e. nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase, nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase. Understanding the contribution of these enzymes to NAD(+) levels depending on the tissue/cell type and metabolic status is necessary for the rational design of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating NAD(+) availability. Here we report a simple, fast and sensitive coupled fluorometric assay that enables simultaneous determination of the four activities in whole-cell extracts and biological fluids. Its application to extracts from various mouse tissues, human cell lines and plasma yielded for the first time an overall picture of the tissue/cell-specific distribution of the activities of the various enzymes. The screening enabled us to gather novel findings, including (a) the presence of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase in all examined tissues/cell lines, indicating that quinolinate and nicotinamide riboside are relevant NAD(+) precursors, and (b) the unexpected occurrence of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase in human plasma. PMID:25223558

  5. Isolation and characterization of an NAD+-degrading bacterium PTX1 and its role in chromium biogeochemical cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Puzon, Geoffrey J.; Huang, Yan C.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xun, Luying

    2008-06-01

    Microorganisms can reduce toxic chromate to less toxic trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. Besides Cr(OH)3 precipitates, some soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes are readily formed upon microbial, enzymatic, and chemical reduction of chromate. However, the biotransformation of the organo-Cr(III) complexes has not been characterized. We have previously reported the formation of a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-Cr(III) complex after enzymatic reduction of chromate. Although the NAD+-Cr(III) complex was stable under sterile conditions, microbial cells were identified as precipitates in a non-sterile NAD+-Cr(III) solution after extended incubation. The most dominant bacterium PTX1 was isolated and assigned to Leifsonia genus by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. PTX1 grew slowly on NAD+ with a doubling time of 17 h, and even more slowly on the NAD+-Cr(III) complex with an estimated doubling time of 35 days. The slow growth suggests that PTX1 passively grew on trace NAD+ dissociated from the NAD+-Cr(III) complex, facilitating further dissociation of the complex and formation of Cr(III) precipitates. Thus, organo-Cr(III) complexes might be an intrinsic link of the chromium biogeochemical cycle; they can be produced during chromate reduction and then further mineralized by microorganisms.

  6. Human heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 interferes with Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA)-mediated adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Paolo; Bozza, Giuseppe; Capecchi, Barbara; Caproni, Elena; Barrile, Riccardo; Norais, Nathalie; Capitani, Mirco; Sallese, Michele; Cecchini, Paola; Ciucchi, Laura; Gao, Zhenai; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Merola, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    NadA (N eisseria meningitidisadhesin A), a meningococcal surface protein, mediates adhesion to and invasion of human cells, an activity in which host membrane proteins have been implicated. While investigating these host factors in human epithelial cells by affinity chromatography, we discovered an unanticipated interaction of NadA with heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, a molecular chaperone. The specific in vitro interaction of recombinant soluble NadA and Hsp90 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations, dot and far-Western blot. Intriguingly, ADP, but not ATP, was required for this association, and the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG promoted complex formation. Hsp90 binding to an Escherichia coli strain used as carrier to express surface exposed NadA confirmed these results in live bacteria. We also examined RNA interference, plasmid-driven overexpression, addition of exogenous rHsp90 and 17-AAG inhibition in human epithelial cells to further elucidate the involvement of Hsp90 in NadA-mediated adhesion and invasion. Together, these data suggest an inverse correlation between the amount of host Hsp90 and the NadA adhesive/invasive phenotype. Confocal microscopy also demonstrated that meningococci interact with cellular Hsp90, a completely novel finding. Altogether our results show that variation of host Hsp90 expression or activity interferes with adhesive and invasive events driven by NadA. PMID:22066472

  7. Relative Catalytic Efficiency of ldhL- and ldhD-Encoded Products Is Crucial for Optical Purity of Lactic Acid Produced by Lactobacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaojuan; Sheng, Binbin; Zhang, Haiwei; Gao, Chao; Su, Fei

    2012-01-01

    NAD-dependent l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases coexist in Lactobacillus genomes and may convert pyruvic acid into l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid, respectively. Our findings suggest that the relative catalytic efficiencies of ldhL- and ldhD-encoded products are crucial for the optical purity of lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus strains. PMID:22344644

  8. In Situ Investigation of a Self-Accelerated Cocrystal Formation by Grinding Pyrazinamide with Oxalic Acid.

    PubMed

    Kulla, Hannes; Greiser, Sebastian; Benemann, Sigrid; Rademann, Klaus; Emmerling, Franziska

    2016-01-01

    A new cocrystal of pyrazinamide with oxalic acid was prepared mechanochemically and characterized by PXRD, Raman spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, DTA-TG, and SEM. Based on powder X-ray diffraction data the structure was solved. The formation pathway of the reaction was studied in situ using combined synchrotron PXRD and Raman spectroscopy. Using oxalic acid dihydrate the initially neat grinding turned into a rapid self-accelerated liquid-assisted grinding process by the release of crystallization water. Under these conditions, the cocrystal was formed directly within two minutes. PMID:27428942

  9. Infrared optical constants of crystalline sodium chloride dihydrate: application to study the crystallization of aqueous sodium chloride solution droplets at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Schnaiter, Martin

    2012-08-23

    Complex refractive indices of sodium chloride dihydrate, NaCl·2H(2)O, have been retrieved in the 6000-800 cm(-1) wavenumber regime from the infrared extinction spectra of crystallized aqueous NaCl solution droplets. The data set is valid in the temperature range from 235 to 216 K and was inferred from crystallization experiments with airborne particles performed in the large coolable aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The retrieval concept was based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship for a complex function of the optical constants n and k whose imaginary part is proportional to the optical depth of a small particle absorption spectrum in the Rayleigh approximation. The appropriate proportionality factor was inferred from a fitting algorithm applied to the extinction spectra of about 1 μm sized particles, which, apart from absorption, also featured a pronounced scattering contribution. NaCl·2H(2)O is the thermodynamically stable crystalline solid in the sodium chloride-water system below the peritectic at 273.3 K; above 273.3 K, the anhydrous NaCl is more stable. In contrast to anhydrous NaCl crystals, the dihydrate particles reveal prominent absorption signatures at mid-infrared wavelengths due to the hydration water molecules. Formation of NaCl·2H(2)O was only detected at temperatures clearly below the peritectic and was first evidenced in a crystallization experiment conducted at 235 K. We have employed the retrieved refractive indices of NaCl·2H(2)O to quantify the temperature dependent partitioning between anhydrous and dihydrate NaCl particles upon crystallization of aqueous NaCl solution droplets. It was found that the temperature range from 235 to 216 K represents the transition regime where the composition of the crystallized particle ensemble changes from almost only NaCl to almost only NaCl·2H(2)O particles. Compared to the findings on the NaCl/NaCl·2H(2)O partitioning from a recent study conducted with micron

  10. Crystal structure of 1,3-bis-(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-1-yl)urea dihydrate: a urea-based anion receptor.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Felipe; Lujano, Sergio; Godoy-Alcántar, Carolina; Tlahuext, Hugo

    2014-11-01

    The whole mol-ecule of the title compound, C17H10N4O5·2H2O, is generated by twofold rotation symmetry and it crystallized as a dihydrate. The planes of the phthalimide moieties and the urea unit are almost normal to one another, with a dihedral angle of 78.62 (9)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional framework structure. The crystal packing also features C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and slipped parallel π-π inter-actions [centroid-centroid distance = 3.6746 (15) Å] involving the benzene rings of neighbouring phthalimide moieties. PMID:25484749

  11. Crystal structure of 1-(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazole dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Haslinger, Simone; Laus, Gerhard; Wurst, Klaus; Schottenberger, Herwig

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C12H11N5·2H2O, which crystallizes as a dihydrate, was obtained by CuI-catalysed azide–alkyne cyclo­addition from 2-azido-1-methyl­imidazole and phenyl­ethyne. The dihedral angles between the central triazole ring (r.m.s. deviation = 0.004 Å) and the pendant imidazole (r.m.s. deviation = 0.006 Å) and phenyl rings are 12.3 (2) and 2.54 (19)°, respectively. In the crystal, the water mol­ecules are connected into [010] chains by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, while O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds connect the water mol­ecules to the organic mol­ecules, generating corrugated (100) sheets. PMID:26870543

  12. Refractive index, birefringence, third-order non-linearity and piezoelectric resonance studies of L-lysine monohydrochloride dihydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, V.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2011-11-01

    The principal refractive indices of L-lysine monohydrochloride dihydrate (L-LMHCl) single crystal for different wavelengths were measured by minimum deviation method at room temperature. The experimental values of refractive indices fit well with the theoretical Cauchy's equations. The birefringence and the crossing angle between the optical axes were calculated. The parameters of Sellmeier's single term dispersion equation were determined by least square method. A simple interferometric technique was used to observe the interference patterns along the optic plane and to qualitatively analyze the optical homogeneity of the grown crystal. The nonlinear refractive index ( n2) and nonlinear absorption coefficient ( β) were also determined using Z-scan technique. The piezoelectric resonance in dielectric dispersions was observed at room temperature.

  13. Transferred multipolar atom model for 10β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate obtained from the biotransformation of methyloestrenolone.

    PubMed

    Faroque, Muhammad Umer; Yousuf, Sammer; Zafar, Salman; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Ahmed, Maqsood

    2016-05-01

    Biotransformation is the structural modification of compounds using enzymes as the catalysts and it plays a key role in the synthesis of pharmaceutically important compounds. 10β,17β-Dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate, C19H28O3·2H2O, was obtained from the fungal biotransformation of methyloestrenolone. The structure was refined using the classical independent atom model (IAM) and a transferred multipolar atom model using the ELMAM2 database. The results from the two refinements have been compared. The ELMAM2 refinement has been found to be superior in terms of the refinement statistics. It has been shown that certain electron-density-derived properties can be calculated on the basis of the transferred parameters for crystals which diffract to ordinary resolution. PMID:27146568

  14. CLearance of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals in vivo. II. Studies using triclinic crystals doubly labeled with 45Ca and 85Sr.

    PubMed

    McCarty, D J; Palmer, D W; James, C

    1979-10-01

    The clearance rate of isotopically labeled synthetic triclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals injection into rabbit joints was estimated by serial counting. Kinetic analysis using a four compartment model showed that half of the injected dose was cleared from 4 rabbit knee joints in 19.1 +/- 0.42 (SEM) days. Profound hypomagnesemia, produced in 2 rabbits with a low magnesium diet, did not affect the rate of crystal clearance detectably. Lavage of joints with solutions known to promote CPPD crystal solubility failed to remove detectable radioactivity. The previous finding of CPPD crystals in synovial phagocytes by electron microscopy, together with the finding of nuclide activity in the synovium and the failure to remove such activity by joint lavage, suggests that endocytosis by synovial cells is an important, effective mechanism controlling the synovial fluid concentration of crystals in patients with CPPD crystal deposition disease. PMID:226098

  15. Accurate standard hydrogen electrode potential and applications to the redox potentials of vitamin C and NAD/NADH.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2015-01-15

    We computationally evaluated the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in aqueous phase and the Gibbs energy of a proton from the experimental pKa values of alcohol molecules. From the "golden standard" CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level calculation, we estimated the SHE potential as 4.48 V, which is very close to the IUPAC-recommended experimental value of 4.44 V. As applications to the Gaussian-3 (G3) methods, which also reproduce the "golden standard" level calculations, we computed various pKa values and redox potentials for a vitamin series. For vitamin C, we support the experimental result of +0.35 V and predict the pKa value of d-ascorbic acid to be 3.7-3.9. Using a model molecule for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), we reproduced the redox potential and determined the order of the proton/electron addition, based on both the proton affinity and redox potential. PMID:25514626

  16. P7C3 Neuroprotective Chemicals Function by Activating the Rate-limiting Enzyme in NAD Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gelin; Han, Ting; Nijhawan, Deepak; Theodoropoulos, Pano; Naidoo, Jacinth; Yadavalli, Sivaramakrishnan; Mirzaei, Hamid; Pieper, Andrew A.; Ready, Joseph M.; McKnight, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The P7C3 class of aminopropyl carbazole chemicals fosters the survival of neurons in a variety of rodent models of neurodegeneration or nerve cell injury. To uncover its mechanism of action, an active derivative of P7C3 was modified to contain both a benzophenone for photo-crosslinking and an alkyne for CLICK chemistry. This derivative was found to bind nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate limiting enzyme involved in the conversion of nicotinamide into nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). Administration of active P7C3 chemicals to cells treated with doxorubicin, which induces NAD depletion, led to a rebound in intracellular levels of NAD and concomitant protection from doxorubicin-mediated toxicity. Active P7C3 variants likewise enhanced the activity of the purified NAMPT enzyme, providing further evidence that they act by increasing NAD levels through its NAMPT-mediated salvage. PMID:25215490

  17. Divergent intron conservation in the mitochondrial nad2 gene: signatures for the three bryophyte classes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) and the lycophytes.

    PubMed

    Pruchner, Dagmar; Beckert, Susanne; Muhle, Hermann; Knoop, Volker

    2002-09-01

    The slow-evolving mitochondrial DNAs of plants have potentially conserved information on the phylogenetic branching of the earliest land plants. We present the nad2 gene structures in hornworts and liverworts and in the presumptive earliest-branching vascular land plant clade, the Lycopodiopsida. Taken together with the recently obtained nad2 data for mosses, each class of bryophytes presents another pattern of angiosperm-type introns conserved in nad2: intron nad2i1 in mosses; intron nad2i3 in liverworts; and both introns, nad2i3 and nad2i4, in hornworts. The lycopods Isoetes and Lycopodium show diverging intron conservation and feature a unique novel intron, termed nad2i3b. Hence, mitochondrial introns in general are positionally stable in the bryophytes and provide significant intraclade phylogenetic information, but the nad2 introns, in particular, cannot resolve the interclade relationships of the bryophyte classes and to the tracheophytes. The necessity for RNA editing to reconstitute conserved codon entities in nad2 is obvious for all clades except the marchantiid liverworts. Finally, we find that particularly small group II introns appear as a general feature of the Isoetes chondriome. Plant mitochondrial peculiarities such as RNA editing frequency, U-to-C type of RNA editing, and small group II introns appear to be genus-specific rather than gene-specific features. PMID:12187380

  18. An NAD(P)H-Dependent Artificial Transfer Hydrogenase for Multienzymatic Cascades.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yasunori; Köhler, Valentin; Ward, Thomas R

    2016-05-11

    Enzymes typically depend on either NAD(P)H or FADH2 as hydride source for reduction purposes. In contrast, organometallic catalysts most often rely on isopropanol or formate to generate the reactive hydride moiety. Here we show that incorporation of a Cp*Ir cofactor possessing a biotin moiety and 4,7-dihydroxy-1,10-phenanthroline into streptavidin yields an NAD(P)H-dependent artificial transfer hydrogenase (ATHase). This ATHase (0.1 mol%) catalyzes imine reduction with 1 mM NADPH (2 mol%), which can be concurrently regenerated by a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) using only 1.2 equiv of glucose. A four-enzyme cascade consisting of the ATHase, the GDH, a monoamine oxidase, and a catalase leads to the production of enantiopure amines. PMID:27100673

  19. Inhibition of an NAD+ Salvage Pathway Provides Efficient and Selective Toxicity to Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, Erin M.; Oleson, Bryndon J.; Broniowska, Katarzyna A.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Chadwick, Alexandra C.; Diers, Anne R.; Hu, Qinghui; Sahoo, Daisy; Hogg, Neil; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Corbett, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The tumorigenic potential of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is a major limitation to the widespread use of hPSC derivatives in the clinic. Here, we demonstrate that the small molecule STF-31 is effective at eliminating undifferentiated hPSCs across a broad range of cell culture conditions with important advantages over previously described methods that target metabolic processes. Although STF-31 was originally described as an inhibitor of glucose transporter 1, these data support the reclassification of STF-31 as a specific NAD+ salvage pathway inhibitor through the inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). These findings demonstrate the importance of an NAD+ salvage pathway in hPSC biology and describe how inhibition of NAMPT can effectively eliminate hPSCs from culture. These results will advance and accelerate the development of safe, clinically relevant hPSC-derived cell-based therapies. PMID:25834119

  20. Defective Mitophagy in XPA via PARP1 Hyperactivation and NAD+/SIRT1 Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Brace, Lear E.; Kassahun, Henok; SenGupta, Tanima; Nilsen, Hilde; Mitchell, James R.; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature in neurodegeneration and aging. We identify mitochondrial dysfunction in xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA), a nucleotide excision DNA repair disorder with severe neurodegeneration, in silico and in vivo. XPA deficient cells show defective mitophagy with excessive cleavage of PINK1 and increased mitochondrial membrane potential. The mitochondrial abnormalities appear to be caused by decreased activation of the NAD+-SIRT1-PGC-1α axis triggered by hyperactivation of the DNA damage sensor PARP1. This phenotype is rescued by PARP1 inhibition or by supplementation with NAD+ precursors that also rescue the lifespan defect in xpa-1 nematodes. Importantly, this pathogenesis appears common to ataxia-telangiectasia and Cockayne syndrome, two other DNA repair disorders with neurodegeneration, but absent in XPC, a DNA repair disorder without neurodegeneration. Our findings reveal a novel nuclear-mitochondrial cross-talk that is critical for the maintenance of mitochondrial health. PMID:24813611

  1. Gentamicin differentially alters cellular metabolism of cochlear hair cells as revealed by NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zholudeva, Lyandysha V.; Ward, Kristina G.; Nichols, Michael G.; Smith, Heather Jensen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Aminoglycoside antibiotics are implicated as culprits of hearing loss in more than 120,000 individuals annually. Research has shown that the sensory cells, but not supporting cells, of the cochlea are readily damaged and/or lost after use of such antibiotics. High-frequency outer hair cells (OHCs) show a greater sensitivity to antibiotics than high- and low-frequency inner hair cells (IHCs). We hypothesize that variations in mitochondrial metabolism account for differences in susceptibility. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy was used to quantify changes in NAD(P)H in sensory and supporting cells from explanted murine cochleae exposed to mitochondrial uncouplers, inhibitors, and an ototoxic antibiotic, gentamicin (GM). Changes in metabolic state resulted in a redistribution of NAD(P)H between subcellular fluorescence lifetime pools. Supporting cells had a significantly longer lifetime than sensory cells. Pretreatment with GM increased NAD(P)H intensity in high-frequency sensory cells, as well as the NAD(P)H lifetime within IHCs. GM specifically increased NAD(P)H concentration in high-frequency OHCs, but not in IHCs or pillar cells. Variations in NAD(P)H intensity in response to mitochondrial toxins and GM were greatest in high-frequency OHCs. These results demonstrate that GM rapidly alters mitochondrial metabolism, differentially modulates cell metabolism, and provides evidence that GM-induced changes in metabolism are significant and greatest in high-frequency OHCs. PMID:25688541

  2. Conformational Change Near the Redox Center of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Induced by NAD(+) to Regulate the Enzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Fukamichi, Tomoe; Nishimoto, Etsuko

    2015-05-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH) transfers two electrons from dihydrolipoamide (DHL) to NAD(+) mediated by FAD. Since this reaction is the final step of a series of catalytic reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase multi-enzyme complex (PDC), LipDH is a key enzyme to maintain the fluent metabolic flow. We reported here the conformational change near the redox center of LipDH induced by NAD(+) promoting the access of the DHL to FAD. The increase in the affinity of DHL to redox center was evidenced by the decrease in K M responding to the increase in the concentration of NAD(+) in Lineweaver-Burk plots. The fluorescence intensity of FAD transiently reduced by the addition of DHL was not recovered but rather reduced by the binding of NAD(+) with LipDH. The fluorescence decay lifetimes of FAD and Trp were prolonged in the presence of NAD(+) to show that FAD would be free from the electron transfer from the neighboring Tyrs and the resonance energy transfer efficiency between Trp and FAD lowered. These results consistently reveal that the conformation near the FAD and the surroundings would be so rearranged by NAD(+) to allow the easier access of DHL to the redox center of LipDH. PMID:25757537

  3. High-Throughput Screening of Coenzyme Preference Change of Thermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD+, and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. This screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT. PMID:27587230

  4. The NAD+ precursor nicotinamide riboside enhances oxidative metabolism and protects against high-fat diet induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Pirinen, Eija; Youn, Dou Y.; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Cen, Yana; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Andreux, Pénélope A.; Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Gademann, Karl; Rinsch, Chris; Schoonjans, Kristina; Sauve, Anthony A.; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY As NAD+ is a rate-limiting co-substrate for the sirtuin enzymes, its modulation is emerging as a valuable tool to regulate sirtuin function and, consequently, oxidative metabolism. In line with this premise, decreased activity of PARP-1 or CD38 —both NAD+ consumers— increases NAD+ bioavailability, resulting in SIRT1 activation and protection against metabolic disease. Here we evaluated whether similar effects could be achieved by increasing the supply of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a recently described natural NAD+ precursor with the ability to increase NAD+ levels, Sir2-dependent gene silencing and replicative lifespan in yeast. We show that NR supplementation in mammalian cells and mouse tissues increases NAD+ levels and activates SIRT1 and SIRT3, culminating in enhanced oxidative metabolism and protection against high fat diet-induced metabolic abnormalities. Consequently, our results indicate that the natural vitamin, NR, could be used as a nutritional supplement to ameliorate metabolic and age-related disorders characterized by defective mitochondrial function. PMID:22682224

  5. The NAD(+) precursor nicotinamide riboside enhances oxidative metabolism and protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Carles; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Pirinen, Eija; Youn, Dou Y; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Cen, Yana; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Andreux, Pénélope A; Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Gademann, Karl; Rinsch, Chris; Schoonjans, Kristina; Sauve, Anthony A; Auwerx, Johan

    2012-06-01

    As NAD(+) is a rate-limiting cosubstrate for the sirtuin enzymes, its modulation is emerging as a valuable tool to regulate sirtuin function and, consequently, oxidative metabolism. In line with this premise, decreased activity of PARP-1 or CD38-both NAD(+) consumers-increases NAD(+) bioavailability, resulting in SIRT1 activation and protection against metabolic disease. Here we evaluated whether similar effects could be achieved by increasing the supply of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a recently described natural NAD(+) precursor with the ability to increase NAD(+) levels, Sir2-dependent gene silencing, and replicative life span in yeast. We show that NR supplementation in mammalian cells and mouse tissues increases NAD(+) levels and activates SIRT1 and SIRT3, culminating in enhanced oxidative metabolism and protection against high-fat diet-induced metabolic abnormalities. Consequently, our results indicate that the natural vitamin NR could be used as a nutritional supplement to ameliorate metabolic and age-related disorders characterized by defective mitochondrial function. PMID:22682224

  6. SIRT1-mediated eNAMPT secretion from adipose tissue regulates hypothalamic NAD+ and function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Myeong Jin; Yoshida, Mitsukuni; Johnson, Sean; Takikawa, Akiko; Usui, Isao; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yoshino, Jun; Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the key NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme, has two different forms, intra- and extracellular (iNAMPT and eNAMPT), in mammals. However, the significance of eNAMPT secretion remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that deacetylation of iNAMPT by the mammalian NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 predisposes the protein to secretion in adipocytes. NAMPT mutants reveal that SIRT1 deacetylates lysine 53 and enhances eNAMPT activity and secretion. Adipose tissue-specific Nampt knockout and knockin (ANKO and ANKI) mice show reciprocal changes in circulating eNAMPT, affecting hypothalamic NAD+/SIRT1 signaling and physical activity accordingly. The defect in physical activity observed in ANKO mice is ameliorated by nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN). Furthermore, administration of a NAMPT-neutralizing antibody decreases hypothalamic NAD+ production, and treating ex vivo hypothalamic explants with purified eNAMPT enhances NAD+, SIRT1 activity, and neural activation. Thus, our findings indicate a critical role of adipose tissue as a modulator for the regulation of NAD+ biosynthesis at a systemic level. PMID:25921090

  7. Gentamicin differentially alters cellular metabolism of cochlear hair cells as revealed by NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholudeva, Lyandysha V.; Ward, Kristina G.; Nichols, Michael G.; Smith, Heather Jensen

    2015-05-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are implicated as culprits of hearing loss in more than 120,000 individuals annually. Research has shown that the sensory cells, but not supporting cells, of the cochlea are readily damaged and/or lost after use of such antibiotics. High-frequency outer hair cells (OHCs) show a greater sensitivity to antibiotics than high- and low-frequency inner hair cells (IHCs). We hypothesize that variations in mitochondrial metabolism account for differences in susceptibility. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy was used to quantify changes in NAD(P)H in sensory and supporting cells from explanted murine cochleae exposed to mitochondrial uncouplers, inhibitors, and an ototoxic antibiotic, gentamicin (GM). Changes in metabolic state resulted in a redistribution of NAD(P)H between subcellular fluorescence lifetime pools. Supporting cells had a significantly longer lifetime than sensory cells. Pretreatment with GM increased NAD(P)H intensity in high-frequency sensory cells, as well as the NAD(P)H lifetime within IHCs. GM specifically increased NAD(P)H concentration in high-frequency OHCs, but not in IHCs or pillar cells. Variations in NAD(P)H intensity in response to mitochondrial toxins and GM were greatest in high-frequency OHCs. These results demonstrate that GM rapidly alters mitochondrial metabolism, differentially modulates cell metabolism, and provides evidence that GM-induced changes in metabolism are significant and greatest in high-frequency OHCs.

  8. High-Throughput Screening of Coenzyme Preference Change of Thermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP(+) to NAD(.).

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP(+) to NAD(+). Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD(+), and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP(+) to NAD(+). This screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT. PMID:27587230

  9. The mechanism of RNA 5′ capping with NAD+, NADH and desphospho-CoA.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jeremy G; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Yuan; Panova, Natalya; Barvík, Ivan; Greene, Landon; Liu, Min; Buckley, Brian; Krásný, Libor; Lee, Jeehiun K; Kaplan, Craig D; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2016-07-21

    The chemical nature of the 5′ end of RNA is a key determinant of RNA stability, processing, localization and translation efficiency, and has been proposed to provide a layer of ‘epitranscriptomic’ gene regulation. Recently it has been shown that some bacterial RNA species carry a 5′-end structure reminiscent of the 5′ 7-methylguanylate ‘cap’ in eukaryotic RNA. In particular, RNA species containing a 5′-end nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) or 3′-desphospho-coenzyme A (dpCoA) have been identified in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. It has been proposed that NAD+, reduced NAD+ (NADH) and dpCoA caps are added to RNA after transcription initiation, in a manner analogous to the addition of 7-methylguanylate caps. Here we show instead that NAD+, NADH and dpCoA are incorporated into RNA during transcription initiation, by serving as non-canonical initiating nucleotides (NCINs) for de novo transcription initiation by cellular RNA polymerase (RNAP). We further show that both bacterial RNAP and eukaryotic RNAP II incorporate NCIN caps, that promoter DNA sequences at and upstream of the transcription start site determine the efficiency of NCIN capping, that NCIN capping occurs in vivo, and that NCIN capping has functional consequences. We report crystal structures of transcription initiation complexes containing NCIN-capped RNA products. Our results define the mechanism and structural basis of NCIN capping, and suggest that NCIN-mediated ‘ab initio capping’ may occur in all organisms. PMID:27383794

  10. Structure of Nampt/PBEF/visfatin, a mammalian NAD[superscript +]biosynthetic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xiangbin; Bheda, Poonam; Revollo, Javier R.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-07-22

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) synthesizes nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide in a mammalian NAD{sup +} biosynthetic pathway and is required for SirT1 activity in vivo. Nampt has also been presumed to be a cytokine (PBEF) or a hormone (visfatin). The crystal structure of Nampt in the presence and absence of NMN shows that Nampt is a dimeric type II phosphoribosyltransferase and provides insights into the enzymatic mechanism.

  11. Oxidation of butane to butanol coupled to electrochemical redox reaction of NAD+/NADH.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye Sun; Na, Byung Kwan; Park, Doo Hyun

    2007-08-01

    A crude cell extract from a butane-utilizing bacterium, Alcaligenes sp., catalyzed the oxidation of butane to butanol coupled to NADH. A graphite electrode modified with Neutral Red (NR-electrode) catalyzed the reduction of NAD(+) to NADH. About 4.9 mM butanol was produced from 50% n-butane/O(2) mixture through the combined reactions of the crude enzyme and the NR-electrode in 250 ml reactor for 3 h. PMID:17549436

  12. Dynamic changes in nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotide content in normal human epidermal keratinocytes and their effect on retinoic acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkas-Sarafova, Adriana . E-mail: apinkassaraf@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Markova, N.G. . E-mail: nmarkova@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Simon, M. . E-mail: marsimon@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

    2005-10-21

    The function of many enzymes that regulate metabolism and transcription depends critically on the nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotides. To understand the role of NAD(P)(H) in physiology and pathophysiology, it is imperative to estimate both their amount and ratios in a given cell type. In human epidermis and in cultured epidermal keratinocytes, we found that the total dinucleotide content is in the low millimolar range. The dinucleotide pattern changes during proliferation and maturation of keratinocytes in culture. Differences in the concentrations of NAD(P)(H) of 1.5- to 12-fold were observed. This resulted in alteration of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P) ratio, which could impact the differential regulation of both transcriptional and metabolic processes. In support of this notion, we provide evidence that the two-step oxidation of retinol to retinoic acid, a nuclear hormone critical for epidermal homeostasis, can be regulated by the relative physiological amounts of the pyridine dinucleotides.

  13. Ozone affects pollen viability and NAD(P)H oxidase release from Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Stefania; Tedeschini, Emma; Frenguelli, Giuseppe; Wopfner, Nicole; Ferreira, Fatima; D'Amato, Gennaro; Ederli, Luisa

    2011-10-01

    Air pollution is frequently proposed as a cause of the increased incidence of allergy in industrialised countries. We investigated the impact of ozone (O(3)) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and allergen content of ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia). Pollen was exposed to acute O(3) fumigation, with analysis of pollen viability, ROS and nitric oxide (NO) content, activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase, and expression of major allergens. There was decreased pollen viability after O(3) fumigation, which indicates damage to the pollen membrane system, although the ROS and NO contents were not changed or were only slightly induced, respectively. Ozone exposure induced a significant enhancement of the ROS-generating enzyme NAD(P)H oxidase. The expression of the allergen Amb a 1 was not affected by O(3), determined from the mRNA levels of the major allergens. We conclude that O(3) can increase ragweed pollen allergenicity through stimulation of ROS-generating NAD(P)H oxidase. PMID:21605929

  14. On-line characterization of peroxidation intermediates of NAD{sup +} by CE-ESI-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhongxi; Udseth, H.R.; Smith, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Equine liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) is one of the NAD-dependent enzymes with various physiological functions. LADH also exhibits several alternative catalytic activities. Among them, the most unusual one is the LADH-catalyzed degradation of NAD+ in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. A two-step reaction mechanism has been proposed for this enzymatic peroxidation. In the first (fast) step, NAD+ catalyzed by LADH is converted to a (so far) unidentified intermediate: {open_quotes}compound I{close_quotes}. The following slower step is enzyme independent and consists of at least two distinct processes; one of them leads to another unknown substance: {open_quotes}compound Y{close_quotes} which is the product of further reaction of {open_quotes}compound I{close_quotes} with excess H{sub 2}O{sub 2}; another process converts {open_quotes}compound I{close_quotes} to adenosine(5{prime})- diphospho(5)-{Beta}-D-ribose-NHCH=C(CHO)CONH{sub 2} (NADX) if catalase is added to destroy excess H{sub 2}O{sub 2} soon after the end of the faster enzymatic step. One of the advantages of capillary electrophoresis (CE) is its fast operation cycle, which could be utilized to monitor relatively slow reaction processes. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) has the capability of high resolution separations coupled with highly sensitive and selective detection providing crucial molecular weight and structural information.

  15. Dissecting the Diphenylene Iodonium-Sensitive NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase of Zucchini Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Trost, P.; Foscarini, S.; Preger, V.; Bonora, P.; Vitale, L.; Pupillo, P.

    1997-01-01

    Quinone oxidoreductase activities dependent on pyridine nucleotides are associated with the plasma membrane (PM) in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyls. In the presence of NADPH, lipophilic ubiquinone homologs with up to three isoprenoid units were reduced by intact PM vesicles with a Km of 2 to 7 [mu]M. Affinities for both NADPH and NADH were similar (Km of 62 and 51 [mu]M, respectively). Two NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase forms were identified. The first, labeled as peak I in gel-filtration experiments, behaves as an intrinsic membrane complex of about 300 kD, it slightly prefers NADH over NADPH, it is markedly sensitive to the inhibitor diphenylene iodonium, and it is active with lipophilic quinones. The second form (peak II) is an NADPH-preferring oxidoreductase of about 90 kD, weakly bound to the PM. Peak II is diphenylene iodonium-insensitive and resembles, in many properties, the soluble NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase that is also present in the same tissue. Following purification of peak I, however, the latter gave rise to a quinone oxidoreductase of the soluble type (peak II), based on substrate and inhibitor specificities and chromatographic and electrophoretic evidence. It is proposed that a redox protein of the same class as the soluble NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (F. Sparla, G. Tedeschi, and P. Trost [1996] Plant Physiol. 112:249-258) is a component of the diphenylene iodonium-sensitive PM complex capable of reducing lipophilic quinones. PMID:12223742

  16. Identification of the NAD(P)H binding site of eukaryotic UDP-galactopyranose mutase.

    PubMed

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Solano, Luis M; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Robinson, Reeder M; Ellerbrock, Jacob F; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J

    2012-10-31

    UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) plays an essential role in galactofuranose biosynthesis in microorganisms by catalyzing the conversion of UDP-galactopyranose to UDP-galactofuranose. The enzyme has gained attention recently as a promising target for the design of new antifungal, antitrypanosomal, and antileishmanial agents. Here we report the first crystal structure of UGM complexed with its redox partner NAD(P)H. Kinetic protein crystallography was used to obtain structures of oxidized Aspergillus fumigatus UGM (AfUGM) complexed with NADPH and NADH, as well as reduced AfUGM after dissociation of NADP(+). NAD(P)H binds with the nicotinamide near the FAD isoalloxazine and the ADP moiety extending toward the mobile 200s active site flap. The nicotinamide riboside binding site overlaps that of the substrate galactopyranose moiety, and thus NADPH and substrate binding are mutually exclusive. On the other hand, the pockets for the adenine of NADPH and uracil of the substrate are distinct and separated by only 6 Å, which raises the possibility of designing novel inhibitors that bind both sites. All 12 residues that contact NADP(H) are conserved among eukaryotic UGMs. Residues that form the AMP pocket are absent in bacterial UGMs, which suggests that eukaryotic and bacterial UGMs have different NADP(H) binding sites. The structures address the longstanding question of how UGM binds NAD(P)H and provide new opportunities for drug discovery. PMID:23036087

  17. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  18. Complementation of mitochondrial electron transport chain by manipulation of the NAD+/NADH ratio.

    PubMed

    Titov, Denis V; Cracan, Valentin; Goodman, Russell P; Peng, Jun; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-04-01

    A decline in electron transport chain (ETC) activity is associated with many human diseases. Although diminished mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate production is recognized as a source of pathology, the contribution of the associated reduction in the ratio of the amount of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to that of its reduced form (NADH) is less clear. We used a water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactobacillus brevis (LbNOX) as a genetic tool for inducing a compartment-specific increase of the NAD(+)/NADH ratio in human cells. We used LbNOX to demonstrate the dependence of key metabolic fluxes, gluconeogenesis, and signaling on the cytosolic or mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADH ratios. Expression of LbNOX in the cytosol or mitochondria ameliorated proliferative and metabolic defects caused by an impaired ETC. The results underscore the role of reductive stress in mitochondrial pathogenesis and demonstrate the utility of targeted LbNOX for direct, compartment-specific manipulation of redox state. PMID:27124460

  19. Enhanced Degradation of Dihydrofolate Reductase through Inhibition of NAD Kinase by Nicotinamide Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yi-Ching; Tedeschi, Philip; AdeBisi Lawal, Rialnat; Banerjee, Debabrata; Scotto, Kathleen; Kerrigan, John E.; Lee, Kuo-Chieh; Johnson-Farley, Nadine; Bertino, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), because of its essential role in DNA synthesis, has been targeted for the treatment of a wide variety of human diseases, including cancer, autoimmune diseases, and infectious diseases. Methotrexate (MTX), a tight binding inhibitor of DHFR, is one of the most widely used drugs in cancer treatment and is especially effective in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and osteosarcoma. Limitations to its use in cancer include natural resistance and acquired resistance due to decreased cellular uptake and decreased retention due to impaired polyglutamylate formation and toxicity at higher doses. Here, we describe a novel mechanism to induce DHFR degradation through cofactor depletion in neoplastic cells by inhibition of NAD kinase, the only enzyme responsible for generating NADP, which is rapidly converted to NADPH by dehydrogenases/reductases. We identified an inhibitor of NAD kinase, thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPS), which led to accelerated degradation of DHFR and to inhibition of cancer cell growth. Of importance, combination treatment of NADPS with MTX displayed significant synergy in a metastatic colon cancer cell line and was effective in a MTX-transport resistant leukemic cell line. We suggest that NAD kinase is a valid target for further inhibitor development for cancer treatment. PMID:23197646

  20. Mutations in adenine-binding pockets enhance catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cahn, J K B; Baumschlager, A; Brinkmann-Chen, S; Arnold, F H

    2016-01-01

    NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in metabolism and cellular processes and are also of great interest for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Here, we present a structure-guided enzyme engineering strategy for improving catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes toward native or native-like reactions using mutations to the enzyme's adenine-binding pocket, distal to the site of catalysis. Screening single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries identified mutations that increased catalytic efficiency up to 10-fold in 7 out of 10 enzymes. The enzymes improved in this study represent three different cofactor-binding folds (Rossmann, DHQS-like, and FAD/NAD binding) and utilize both NADH and NADPH. Structural and biochemical analyses show that the improved activities are accompanied by minimal changes in other properties (cooperativity, thermostability, pH optimum, uncoupling), and initial tests on two enzymes (ScADH6 and EcFucO) show improved functionality in Escherichia coli. PMID:26512129

  1. ARTD1/PARP1 negatively regulates glycolysis by inhibiting hexokinase 1 independent of NAD+ depletion

    PubMed Central

    Fouquerel, Elise; Goellner, Eva M.; Yu, Zhongxun; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; de Moura, Michelle Barbi; Feinstein, Tim; Wheeler, David; Redpath, Philip; Li, Jianfeng; Romero, Guillermo; Migaud, Marie; Van Houten, Bennett; Poirier, Guy G.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary ARTD1 (PARP1) is a key enzyme involved in DNA repair by synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in response to strand breaks and plays an important role in cell death following excessive DNA damage. ARTD1-induced cell death is associated with NAD+ depletion and ATP loss, however the molecular mechanism of ARTD1-mediated energy collapse remains elusive. Using real-time metabolic measurements, we directly compared the effects of ARTD1 activation and direct NAD+ depletion. We found that ARTD1-mediated PAR synthesis, but not direct NAD+ depletion, resulted in a block to glycolysis and ATP loss. We then established a proteomics based PAR-interactome after DNA damage and identified hexokinase 1 (HK1) as a PAR binding protein. HK1 activity is suppressed following nuclear ARTD1 activation and binding by PAR. These findings help explain how prolonged activation of ARTD1 triggers energy collapse and cell death, revealing new insight on the importance of nucleus to mitochondria communication via ARTD1 activation. PMID:25220464

  2. A novel NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase specifically expressed in the thyroidectomized chicken fatty liver: catalytic properties and crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yudai; Sone, Takeki; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Shibata, Takeshi; Yoneda, Kazunari

    2015-10-01

    A gene encoding a functionally unknown protein that is specifically expressed in the thyroidectomized chicken fatty liver and has a predicted amino acid sequence similar to that of NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli; its product was purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme was an NAD(P)H-dependent broad substrate specificity carbonyl reductase and was inhibited by arachidonic acid at 1.5 μm. Enzymological characterization indicated that the enzyme could be classified as a cytosolic-type carbonyl reductase. The enzyme's 3D structure was determined using the molecular replacement method at 1.98 Å resolution in the presence of NADPH and ethylene glycol. The asymmetric unit consisted of two subunits, and a noncrystallographic twofold axis generated the functional dimer. The structures of the subunits, A and B, differed from each other. In subunit A, the active site contained an ethylene glycol molecule absent in subunit B. Consequently, Tyr172 in subunit A rotated by 103.7° in comparison with subunit B, which leads to active site closure in subunit A. In Y172A mutant, the Km value for 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (model substrate) was 12.5 times higher than that for the wild-type enzyme, indicating that Tyr172 plays a key role in substrate binding in this carbonyl reductase. Because the Tyr172-containing active site lid structure (Ile164-Gln174) is not conserved in all known carbonyl reductases, our results provide new insights into substrate binding of carbonyl reductase. The catalytic properties and crystal structure revealed that thyroidectomized chicken fatty liver carbonyl reductase is a novel enzyme. PMID:26206323

  3. NAD(P)+-Malic Enzyme Mutants of Sinorhizobium sp. Strain NGR234, but Not Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571, Maintain Symbiotic N2 Fixation Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Aono, Toshihiro; Poole, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    C4-dicarboxylic acids appear to be metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in N2-fixing bacteria (bacteroids) within legume nodules. In Sinorhizobium meliloti bacteroids from alfalfa, NAD+-malic enzyme (DME) is required for N2 fixation, and this activity is thought to be required for the anaplerotic synthesis of pyruvate. In contrast, in the pea symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum, pyruvate synthesis occurs via either DME or a pathway catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and pyruvate kinase (PYK). Here we report that dme mutants of the broad-host-range Sinorhizobium sp. strain NGR234 formed nodules whose level of N2 fixation varied from 27 to 83% (plant dry weight) of the wild-type level, depending on the host plant inoculated. NGR234 bacteroids had significant PCK activity, and while single pckA and single dme mutants fixed N2 at reduced rates, a pckA dme double mutant had no N2-fixing activity (Fix−). Thus, NGR234 bacteroids appear to synthesize pyruvate from TCA cycle intermediates via DME or PCK pathways. These NGR234 data, together with other reports, suggested that the completely Fix− phenotype of S. meliloti dme mutants may be specific to the alfalfa-S. meliloti symbiosis. We therefore examined the ME-like genes azc3656 and azc0119 from Azorhizobium caulinodans, as azc3656 mutants were previously shown to form Fix− nodules on the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata. We found that purified AZC3656 protein is an NAD(P)+-malic enzyme whose activity is inhibited by acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and stimulated by succinate and fumarate. Thus, whereas DME is required for symbiotic N2 fixation in A. caulinodans and S. meliloti, in other rhizobia this activity can be bypassed via another pathway(s). PMID:22307295

  4. Inhibition of the NAD-Dependent Protein Deacetylase SIRT2 Induces Granulocytic Differentiation in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sunami, Yoshitaka; Araki, Marito; Hironaka, Yumi; Morishita, Soji; Kobayashi, Masaki; Liew, Ei Leen; Edahiro, Yoko; Tsutsui, Miyuki; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuins, NAD-dependent protein deacetylases, play important roles in cellular functions such as metabolism and differentiation. Whether sirtuins function in tumorigenesis is still controversial, but sirtuins are aberrantly expressed in tumors, which may keep cancerous cells undifferentiated. Therefore, we investigated whether the inhibition of sirtuin family proteins induces cellular differentiation in leukemic cells. The sirtuin inhibitors tenovin-6 and BML-266 induce granulocytic differentiation in the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line NB4. This differentiation is likely caused by an inhibition of SIRT2 deacetylase activity, judging from the accumulation of acetylated α-tubulin, a major SIRT2 substrate. Unlike the clinically used differentiation inducer all-trans retinoic acid, tenovin-6 shows limited effects on promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RAR-α) stability and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body formation in NB4 cells, suggesting that tenovin-6 does not directly target PML-RAR-α activity. In agreement with this, tenovin-6 induces cellular differentiation in the non-APL cell line HL-60, where PML-RAR-α does not exist. Knocking down SIRT2 by shRNA induces granulocytic differentiation in NB4 cells, which demonstrates that the inhibition of SIRT2 activity is sufficient to induce cell differentiation in NB4 cells. The overexpression of SIRT2 in NB4 cells decreases the level of granulocytic differentiation induced by tenovin-6, which indicates that tenovin-6 induces granulocytic differentiation by inhibiting SIRT2 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that targeting SIRT2 is a viable strategy to induce leukemic cell differentiation. PMID:23460888

  5. Nicotinamide riboside promotes Sir2 silencing and extends lifespan via Nrk and Urh1/Pnp1/Meu1 pathways to NAD+.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Racette, Frances G; Bogan, Katrina L; McClure, Julie M; Smith, Jeffrey S; Brenner, Charles

    2007-05-01

    Although NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for Sir2 functions and replicative lifespan in yeast, alterations in NAD(+) precursors have been reported to accelerate aging but not to extend lifespan. In eukaryotes, nicotinamide riboside is a newly discovered NAD(+) precursor that is converted to nicotinamide mononucleotide by specific nicotinamide riboside kinases, Nrk1 and Nrk2. In this study, we discovered that exogenous nicotinamide riboside promotes Sir2-dependent repression of recombination, improves gene silencing, and extends lifespan without calorie restriction. The mechanism of action of nicotinamide riboside is totally dependent on increased net NAD(+) synthesis through two pathways, the Nrk1 pathway and the Urh1/Pnp1/Meu1 pathway, which is Nrk1 independent. Additionally, the two nicotinamide riboside salvage pathways contribute to NAD(+) metabolism in the absence of nicotinamide-riboside supplementation. Thus, like calorie restriction in the mouse, nicotinamide riboside elevates NAD(+) and increases Sir2 function. PMID:17482543

  6. A new method for quantitative determination of two uronic acids by CZE with direct UV detection.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong-gang; Liang, Jun; Yang, Bing-you; Wang, Qiu-hong; Kuang, Hai-xue

    2011-09-01

    A new method using capillary zone electrophoresis was developed for the rapid quantification of two common uronic acids, galacturonic acid and glucuronic acid, based on utilization of an alkaline background electrolyte with reversed electroosmotic flow (EOF) within 16 min. The method relies on in-capillary reaction and direct UV detection at the wavelength 270 nm. The optimum electrolyte solution was prepared of 130 mm sodium hydroxide, 36 mm disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate and 0.5 mm cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. EOF was reversed to detect uronic acids and to improve the separation of neutral sugars. The established method was validated and the results showed good linearity, high precision and satisfactory sensitivity. The newly developed method was successfully applied to analyze galacturonic acid and glucuronic acid content in Forsythia suspensa polysaccharides. The method is fast since only sample hydrolysis and dilution are required in the sample preparation. PMID:21154888

  7. Enhancing NAD+ Salvage Pathway Reverts the Toxicity of Primary Astrocytes Expressing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked Mutant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1).

    PubMed

    Harlan, Benjamin A; Pehar, Mariana; Sharma, Deep R; Beeson, Gyda; Beeson, Craig C; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2016-05-13

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) participates in redox reactions and NAD(+)-dependent signaling pathways. Although the redox reactions are critical for efficient mitochondrial metabolism, they are not accompanied by any net consumption of the nucleotide. On the contrary, NAD(+)-dependent signaling processes lead to its degradation. Three distinct families of enzymes consume NAD(+) as substrate: poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, ADP-ribosyl cyclases (CD38 and CD157), and sirtuins (SIRT1-7). Because all of the above enzymes generate nicotinamide as a byproduct, mammalian cells have evolved an NAD(+) salvage pathway capable of resynthesizing NAD(+) from nicotinamide. Overexpression of the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, increases total and mitochondrial NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Moreover, targeting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase to the mitochondria also enhances NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes. Supplementation with the NAD(+) precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside also increases NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations account for up to 20% of familial ALS and 1-2% of apparently sporadic ALS cases. Primary astrocytes isolated from mutant human superoxide dismutase 1-overexpressing mice as well as human post-mortem ALS spinal cord-derived astrocytes induce motor neuron death in co-culture. Increasing total and mitochondrial NAD(+) content in ALS astrocytes increases oxidative stress resistance and reverts their toxicity toward co-cultured motor neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancing the NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target to prevent astrocyte-mediated motor neuron death in ALS. PMID:27002158

  8. A LED-based method for monitoring NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence in cell cultures and brain slices.

    PubMed

    Rösner, Jörg; Liotta, Agustin; Schmitz, Dietmar; Heinemann, Uwe; Kovács, Richard

    2013-01-30

    Nicotinamide- and flavine-adenine-dinucleotides (NAD(P)H and FADH₂) are electron carriers involved in cellular energy metabolism and in a multitude of enzymatic processes. As reduced NAD(P)H and oxidised FAD molecules are fluorescent, changes in tissue auto-fluorescence provide valuable information on the cellular redox state and energy metabolism. Since fluorescence excitation, by mercury arc lamps (HBO) is inherently coupled to photo-bleaching and photo-toxicity, microfluorimetric monitoring of energy metabolism might benefit from the replacement of HBO lamps by light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here we describe a LED-based custom-built setup for monitoring NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence at the level of single cells (HEK293) and of brain slices. We compared NAD(P)H bleaching characteristics with two light sources (HBO lamp and LED) as well as sensitivity and signal to noise ratio of three different detector types (multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC), photomultiplier tube (PMT) and photodiode). LED excitation resulted in reduced photo-bleaching at the same fluorescence output in comparison to excitation with the HBO lamp. Transiently increasing LED power resulted in reversible bleaching of NAD(P)H fluorescence. Recovery kinetics were dependent on metabolic substrates indicating coupling of NAD(P)H fluorescence to metabolism. Electrical stimulation of brain slices induced biphasic redox changes, as indicated by NAD(P)H/FAD fluorescence transients. Increasing the gain of PMT and decreasing the LED power resulted in similar sensitivity as obtained with the MPPC and the photodiode, without worsening the signal to noise ratio. In conclusion, replacement of HBO lamp with LED might improve conventional PMT based microfluorimetry of tissue auto-fluorescence. PMID:23142181

  9. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ng, Chyan Leong

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold) to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that’s highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate specificity

  10. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant.

    PubMed

    Seman-Kamarulzaman, Ahmad-Faris; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ng, Chyan Leong; Hassan, Maizom

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold) to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that's highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate specificity towards

  11. Transgenic Perturbation of the Decarboxylation Phase of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Alters Physiology and Metabolism But Has Only a Small Effect on Growth1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dever, Louisa V.; Boxall, Susanna F.; Kneřová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial NAD-malic enzyme (ME) and/or cytosolic/plastidic NADP-ME combined with the cytosolic/plastidic pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) catalyze two key steps during light-period malate decarboxylation that underpin secondary CO2 fixation in some Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. We report the generation and phenotypic characterization of transgenic RNA interference lines of the obligate CAM species Kalanchoë fedtschenkoi with reduced activities of NAD-ME or PPDK. Transgenic line rNAD-ME1 had 8%, and rPPDK1 had 5% of the wild-type level of activity, and showed dramatic changes in the light/dark cycle of CAM CO2 fixation. In well-watered conditions, these lines fixed all of their CO2 in the light; they thus performed C3 photosynthesis. The alternative malate decarboxylase, NADP-ME, did not appear to compensate for the reduction in NAD-ME, suggesting that NAD-ME was the key decarboxylase for CAM. The activity of other CAM enzymes was reduced as a consequence of knocking out either NAD-ME or PPDK activity, particularly phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) and PPDK in rNAD-ME1. Furthermore, the circadian clock-controlled phosphorylation of PPC in the dark was reduced in both lines, especially in rNAD-ME1. This had the consequence that circadian rhythms of PPC phosphorylation, PPC kinase transcript levels and activity, and the classic circadian rhythm of CAM CO2 fixation were lost, or dampened toward arrhythmia, under constant light and temperature conditions. Surprisingly, oscillations in the transcript abundance of core circadian clock genes also became arrhythmic in the rNAD-ME1 line, suggesting that perturbing CAM in K. fedtschenkoi feeds back to perturb the central circadian clock. PMID:25378692

  12. Nitric oxide-dependent NAD linkage to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: possible involvement of a cysteine thiyl radical intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, M; Pietraforte, D; Di Stasi, A M; Mallozzi, C

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) undergoes NAD(H) linkage to an active site thiol when it comes into contact with .NO-related oxidants. We found that a free-radical generator 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH), which does not release either .NO or .NO-related species, was indeed able to induce the NAD(H) linkage to GAPDH. We performed spin-trapping studies with purified apo-GAPDH to identify a putative thiol intermediate produced by AAPH as well as by .NO-related oxidants. As .NO sources we used .NO gas and two .NO-donors, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine and 3-morpholinosydno-nimine hydrochloride (SIN-1). Because SIN-1 produces .NO and a superoxide radical simultaneously, we also tested the effects of peroxynitrite. All the .NO-related oxidants were able to induce the linkage of NAD(H) to GAPDH and the formation of a protein free-radical identified as a thiyl radical (inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide). .NO gas and the .NO-donors required molecular oxygen to induce the formation of the GAPDH thiyl radical, suggesting the possible involvement of higher nitrogen oxides. Thiyl radical formation was decreased by the reconstitution of GAPDH with NAD+. Apo-GAPDH was a strong scavenger of AAPH radicals, but its scavenging ability was decreased when its cysteine residues were alkylated or when it was reconstituted with NAD+. In addition, after treatment with AAPH, a thiyl radical of GAPDH was trapped at high enzyme concentrations. We suggest that the NAD(H) linkage to GAPDH is mediated by a thiyl radical intermediate not specific to .NO or .NO-related oxidants. The cysteine residue located at the active site of GAPDH (Cys-149) is oxidized by free radicals to a thiyl radical, which reacts with the neighbouring coenzyme to form Cys-NAD(H) linkages. Studies with the NAD+ molecule radio-labelled in the nicotinamide or adenine portion revealed that both portions of the NAD+ molecule are linked to GAPDH

  13. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  14. The structural requirements of organophosphorus insecticides (OPI) for reducing chicken embryo NAD(+) content in OPI-induced teratogenesis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the structural requirements of organophosphorus insecticides (OPI) for reducing chicken embryo nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) content in OPI-induced teratogenesis and compare them with those needed for OPI inhibition of yolk sac membrane kynurenine formamidase (KFase), the proposed primary target for OPI teratogens in chicken embryos. The comparative molecular field analysis (COMFA) of three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) revealed the electrostatic and steric fields as good predictors of OPI structural requirements to reduce NAD(+) content in chicken embryos. The dominant electrostatic interactions were localized at nitrogen-1, nitrogen-3, nitrogen of 2-amino substituent of the pyrimidinyl of pyrimidinyl phosphorothioates, and at the oxygen of crotonamide carbonyl in crotonamide phosphates. Bulkiness of the substituents at carbon-6 of the pyrimidinyls and/or N-substituents of crotonamides was the steric structural component that contributed to superiority of those OPI for reducing embryonic NAD(+) levels. Both electrostatic and steric requirements are similar to those defined in our previous study for OPI inhibition of chicken embryo yolk sac membrane KFase. The findings of this study provide another piece of evidence for the cause-and-effect relationship between yolk sac membrane KFase inhibition and reduced embryo NAD(+) content in NAD-associated OPI-induced teratogenesis in chickens. PMID:27017880

  15. AMPK activation protects cells from oxidative stress-induced senescence via autophagic flux restoration and intracellular NAD(+) elevation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaojuan; Tai, Haoran; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jiao; Wei, Xiawei; Ding, Yi; Gong, Hui; Mo, Chunfen; Zhang, Jie; Qin, Jianqiong; Ma, Yuanji; Huang, Ning; Xiang, Rong; Xiao, Hengyi

    2016-06-01

    AMPK activation is beneficial for cellular homeostasis and senescence prevention. However, the molecular events involved in AMPK activation are not well defined. In this study, we addressed the mechanism underlying the protective effect of AMPK on oxidative stress-induced senescence. The results showed that AMPK was inactivated in senescent cells. However, pharmacological activation of AMPK by metformin and berberine significantly prevented the development of senescence and, accordingly, inhibition of AMPK by Compound C was accelerated. Importantly, AMPK activation prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced impairment of the autophagic flux in senescent cells, evidenced by the decreased p62 degradation, GFP-RFP-LC3 cancellation, and activity of lysosomal hydrolases. We also found that AMPK activation restored the NAD(+) levels in the senescent cells via a mechanism involving mostly the salvage pathway for NAD(+) synthesis. In addition, the mechanistic relationship of autophagic flux and NAD(+) synthesis and the involvement of mTOR and Sirt1 activities were assessed. In summary, our results suggest that AMPK prevents oxidative stress-induced senescence by improving autophagic flux and NAD(+) homeostasis. This study provides a new insight for exploring the mechanisms of aging, autophagy and NAD(+) homeostasis, and it is also valuable in the development of innovative strategies to combat aging. PMID:26890602

  16. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. Deficient activity of the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase component of fatty alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, W B; Craft, D A

    1991-01-01

    Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is an inherited disorder associated with impaired fatty alcohol oxidation due to deficient activity of fatty alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase (FAO). FAO is a complex enzyme which consists of two separate proteins that sequentially catalyze the oxidation of fatty alcohol to fatty aldehyde and fatty acid. To determine which enzymatic component of FAO was deficient in SLS, we assayed fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) and fatty alcohol dehydrogenase in cultured fibroblasts from seven unrelated SLS patients. All SLS cells were selectively deficient in the FALDH component of FAO, and had normal activity of fatty alcohol dehydrogenase. The extent of FALDH deficiency in SLS cells depended on the aliphatic aldehyde used as substrate, ranging from 62% of mean normal activity using propionaldehyde as substrate to 8% of mean normal activity with octadecanal. FALDH activity in obligate SLS heterozygotes was partially decreased to 49 +/- 7% of mean normal activity using octadecanal as substrate. Differential centrifugation studies in fibroblasts indicated that this FALDH enzyme was largely particulate; soluble FALDH activity was normal in SLS cells. Intact SLS fibroblasts oxidized octadecanol to fatty acid at less than 10% of the normal rate, but oxidized free octadecanal normally, suggesting that the FALDH affected in SLS is chiefly involved in the oxidation of fatty alcohol to fatty acid. These results show that the primary enzymatic defect in SLS is the FALDH component of the FAO complex, which leads to deficient oxidation of fatty aldehyde derived from fatty alcohol. PMID:1939650

  17. Classical Raman spectroscopic studies of NADH and NAD+ bound to liver alcohol dehydrogenase by difference techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Yue, K.T.; Martin, C.; Rhee, K.W.; Sloan, D.; Callender, R.

    1987-07-28

    We report the Raman spectra of reduced and oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+, respectively) and adenosine 5'-diphosphate ribose (ADPR) when bound to the coenzyme site of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). The bound NADH spectrum is calculated by taking the classical Raman difference spectrum of the binary complex, LADH/NADH, with that of LADH. We have investigated how the bound NADH spectrum is affected when the ternary complexes with inhibitors are formed with dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) or isobutyramide (IBA), i.e., LADH/NADH/Me2SO or LADH/NADH/IBA. Similarly, the difference spectra of LADH/NAD+/pyrazole or LADH/ADPR with LADH are calculated. The magnitude of these difference spectra is on the order of a few percent of the protein Raman spectrum. We report and discuss the experimental configuration and control procedures we use in reliably calculating such small difference signals. These sensitive difference techniques could be applied to a large number of problems where the classical Raman spectrum of a ''small'' molecule, like adenine, bound to the active site of a protein is of interest. The spectrum of bound ADPR allows an assignment of the bands of the bound NADH and NAD+ spectra to normal coordinates located primarily on either the nicotinamide or the adenine moiety. By comparing the spectra of the bound coenzymes with model compound data and through the use of deuterated compounds, we confirm and characterize how the adenine moiety is involved in coenzyme binding and discuss the validity of the suggestion that the adenine ring is protonated upon binding. The nicotinamide moiety of NADH shows significant molecular changes upon binding.

  18. Predicted Role of NAD Utilization in the Control of Circadian Rhythms during DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Luna, Augustin; McFadden, Geoffrey B; Aladjem, Mirit I; Kohn, Kurt W

    2015-05-01

    The circadian clock is a set of regulatory steps that oscillate with a period of approximately 24 hours influencing many biological processes. These oscillations are robust to external stresses, and in the case of genotoxic stress (i.e. DNA damage), the circadian clock responds through phase shifting with primarily phase advancements. The effect of DNA damage on the circadian clock and the mechanism through which this effect operates remains to be thoroughly investigated. Here we build an in silico model to examine damage-induced circadian phase shifts by investigating a possible mechanism linking circadian rhythms to metabolism. The proposed model involves two DNA damage response proteins, SIRT1 and PARP1, that are each consumers of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a metabolite involved in oxidation-reduction reactions and in ATP synthesis. This model builds on two key findings: 1) that SIRT1 (a protein deacetylase) is involved in both the positive (i.e. transcriptional activation) and negative (i.e. transcriptional repression) arms of the circadian regulation and 2) that PARP1 is a major consumer of NAD during the DNA damage response. In our simulations, we observe that increased PARP1 activity may be able to trigger SIRT1-induced circadian phase advancements by decreasing SIRT1 activity through competition for NAD supplies. We show how this competitive inhibition may operate through protein acetylation in conjunction with phosphorylation, consistent with reported observations. These findings suggest a possible mechanism through which multiple perturbations, each dominant during different points of the circadian cycle, may result in the phase advancement of the circadian clock seen during DNA damage. PMID:26020938

  19. The NAD(+) salvage pathway modulates cancer cell viability via p73.

    PubMed

    Sharif, T; Ahn, D-G; Liu, R-Z; Pringle, E; Martell, E; Dai, C; Nunokawa, A; Kwak, M; Clements, D; Murphy, J P; Dean, C; Marcato, P; McCormick, C; Godbout, R; Gujar, S A; Lee, P W K

    2016-04-01

    The involvement of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) salvage pathway in cancer cell survival is poorly understood. Here we show that the NAD(+) salvage pathway modulates cancer cell survival through the rarely mutated tumour suppressor p73. Our data show that pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a rate-limiting enzyme in the NAD(+) salvage pathway, enhances autophagy and decreases survival of cancer cells in a p53-independent manner. Such NAMPT inhibition stabilizes p73 independently of p53 through increased acetylation and decreased ubiquitination, resulting in enhanced autophagy and cell death. These effects of NAMPT inhibition can be effectively reversed using nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzymatic product of NAMPT. Similarly, knockdown of p73 also decreases NAMPT inhibition-induced autophagy and cell death, whereas overexpression of p73 alone enhances these effects. We show that the breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468) harbour significantly higher levels of NAMPT and lower levels of p73 than does the normal cell line (MCF-10A), and that NAMPT inhibition is cytotoxic exclusively to the cancer cells. Furthermore, data from 176 breast cancer patients demonstrate that higher levels of NAMPT and lower levels of p73 correlate with poorer patient survival, and that high-grade tumours have significantly higher NAMPT/p73 mRNA ratios. Therefore, the inverse relationship between NAMPT and p73 demonstrable in vitro is also reflected from the clinical data. Taken together, our studies reveal a new NAMPT-p73 nexus that likely has important implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. PMID:26586573

  20. Predicted Role of NAD Utilization in the Control of Circadian Rhythms during DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Augustin; McFadden, Geoffrey B.; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Kohn, Kurt W.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a set of regulatory steps that oscillate with a period of approximately 24 hours influencing many biological processes. These oscillations are robust to external stresses, and in the case of genotoxic stress (i.e. DNA damage), the circadian clock responds through phase shifting with primarily phase advancements. The effect of DNA damage on the circadian clock and the mechanism through which this effect operates remains to be thoroughly investigated. Here we build an in silico model to examine damage-induced circadian phase shifts by investigating a possible mechanism linking circadian rhythms to metabolism. The proposed model involves two DNA damage response proteins, SIRT1 and PARP1, that are each consumers of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a metabolite involved in oxidation-reduction reactions and in ATP synthesis. This model builds on two key findings: 1) that SIRT1 (a protein deacetylase) is involved in both the positive (i.e. transcriptional activation) and negative (i.e. transcriptional repression) arms of the circadian regulation and 2) that PARP1 is a major consumer of NAD during the DNA damage response. In our simulations, we observe that increased PARP1 activity may be able to trigger SIRT1-induced circadian phase advancements by decreasing SIRT1 activity through competition for NAD supplies. We show how this competitive inhibition may operate through protein acetylation in conjunction with phosphorylation, consistent with reported observations. These findings suggest a possible mechanism through which multiple perturbations, each dominant during different points of the circadian cycle, may result in the phase advancement of the circadian clock seen during DNA damage. PMID:26020938

  1. Crystallization and immersion freezing ability of oxalic and succinic acid in multicomponent aqueous organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of immersed oxalic and succinic acid crystals in the temperature range from 245 to 215 K, as investigated with expansion cooling experiments using suspended particles. In contrast to previous laboratory work with emulsified solution droplets where the precipitation of solid inclusions required a preceding freezing/evaporation cycle, we show that immersed solids readily form by homogeneous crystallization within aqueous solution droplets of multicomponent organic mixtures, which have noneutonic compositions with an excess of oxalic or succinic acid. Whereas succinic acid crystals did not act as heterogeneous ice nuclei, immersion freezing by oxalic acid dihydrate crystals led to a reduction of the ice saturation ratio at freezing onset by 0.066-0.072 compared to homogeneous freezing, which is by a factor of 2 higher than previously reported laboratory data. These observations emphasize the importance of oxalic acid in heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  2. The unique kinetic behavior of the very large NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Janthinobacterium lividum.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ryushi; Oyama, Masaki; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of a very large NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Janthinobacterium lividum showed positive cooperativity toward alpha-ketoglutarate and NADH, and the Michaelis-Menten type toward ammonium chloride in the absence of the catalytic activator, L-aspartate. An increase in the maximum activity accompanied the decrease in the S(0.5) values for alpha-ketoglutarate and NADH with the addition of L-aspartate, and the kinetic response for alpha-ketoglutarate changed completely to a typical Michaelis-Menten type in the presence of 10 mM L-aspartate. PMID:20378971

  3. Role of NAD+ and ADP-Ribosylation in the Maintenance of the Golgi Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Alexander; Colanzi, Antonino; Silletta, Maria Giuseppina; Fiucci, Giusy; Flati, Silvio; Fusella, Aurora; Polishchuk, Roman; Mironov, Alexander; Tullio, Giuseppe Di; Weigert, Roberto; Malhotra, Vivek; Corda, Daniela; Matteis, Maria Antonietta De; Luini, Alberto

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the ADP- ribosylation induced by brefeldin A (BFA) in the mechanisms controlling the architecture of the Golgi complex. BFA causes the rapid disassembly of this organelle into a network of tubules, prevents the association of coatomer and other proteins to Golgi membranes, and stimulates the ADP-ribosylation of two cytosolic proteins of 38 and 50 kD (GAPDH and BARS-50; De Matteis, M.A., M. DiGirolamo, A. Colanzi, M. Pallas, G. Di Tullio, L.J. McDonald, J. Moss, G. Santini, S. Bannykh, D. Corda, and A. Luini. 1994. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91:1114–1118; Di Girolamo, M., M.G. Silletta, M.A. De Matteis, A. Braca, A. Colanzi, D. Pawlak, M.M. Rasenick, A. Luini, and D. Corda. 1995. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 92:7065–7069). To study the role of ADP-ribosylation, this reaction was inhibited by depletion of NAD+ (the ADP-ribose donor) or by using selective pharmacological blockers in permeabilized cells. In NAD+-depleted cells and in the presence of dialized cytosol, BFA detached coat proteins from Golgi membranes with normal potency but failed to alter the organelle's structure. Readdition of NAD+ triggered Golgi disassembly by BFA. This effect of NAD+ was mimicked by the use of pre–ADP- ribosylated cytosol. The further addition of extracts enriched in native BARS-50 abolished the ability of ADP-ribosylated cytosol to support the effect of BFA. Pharmacological blockers of the BFA-dependent ADP-ribosylation (Weigert, R., A. Colanzi, A. Mironov, R. Buccione, C. Cericola, M.G. Sciulli, G. Santini, S. Flati, A. Fusella, J. Donaldson, M. DiGirolamo, D. Corda, M.A. De Matteis, and A. Luini. 1997. J. Biol. Chem. 272:14200–14207) prevented Golgi disassembly by BFA in permeabilized cells. These inhibitors became inactive in the presence of pre–ADP-ribosylated cytosol, and their activity was rescued by supplementing the cytosol with a native BARS-50–enriched fraction. These results indicate that ADP-ribosylation plays a role in the

  4. Production of L-malic acid with fixation of HCO3(-) by malic enzyme-catalyzed reaction based on regeneration of coenzyme on electrode modified by layer-by-layer self-assembly method.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haitao; Ohno, Yoko; Nakamori, Toshihiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Malic enzyme prepared and purified from Brevundimonas diminuta IFO13182 catalyzed the decarboxylation reaction of malate to pyruvate and CO2 using NAD+ as the coenzyme, and the reverse reaction was used in the present study for L-malic acid production with fixation of HCO3(-) as a model compound for carbon source. The L-malic acid production was based on electrochemical regeneration of NADH on a carbon plate electrode modified by layer-by-layer adsorption of polymer-bound mediator (Alginic acid bound viologen derivative, Alg-V), polymer-bound coenzyme (Alginic acid bound NAD+, Alg-NAD+), and lipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH). Electrochemical reduction of immobilized NAD+ catalyzed by LipDH in a multilayer film was achieved, and the L-malic acid production with HCO3(-) fixation system with layer-by-layer immobilization of Alg-V/LipDH/Alg-NAD+/malic enzyme multilayer film on the electrode gave an L-malic acid production of nearly 11.9 mmol and an HCO3(-) fixation rate of nearly 47.4% in a buffer containing only KHCO3 and pyruvic acid potassium salt, using a cation exchange membrane. The total turnover number of NADH within 48 h was about 19,000, which suggests that efficient NADH regeneration and fast electron transfer were achieved within the multilayer film, and that the modified electrode is a potential method for the fixation of HCO3(-) without addition of free coenzyme. PMID:19147103

  5. Detection of NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme activity by time-domain ratiometry of terbium luminescence.

    PubMed

    Terai, Takuya; Ito, Hiroki; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Komatsu, Toru; Ueno, Tasuku; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2016-05-01

    NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases play important roles in biology. Recently, we reported that the luminescence lifetime of some Tb(3+) complexes is sensitive to NAD(P)H, and we used this phenomenon to detect activities of these enzymes. However, conventional time-resolved luminescence assays are susceptible to static quenchers such as ATP. Herein we describe a detection methodology that overcomes this issue: the intensity of the sample is measured twice with different delay times and the intensity ratio value is used as an index of NAD(P)H concentration. The method is more robust than single-point measurement, and is compatible with high-throughput assays using conventional microplate readers. PMID:27013390

  6. The Conformation of NAD+ Bound to Lactate Dehydrogenase Determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance with Suppression of Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Sebastien J. F.; Zwahlen, Catherine; Post, Carol Beth; Burgner, John W.; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    1997-04-01

    We have reinvestigated the conformation of NAD+ bound to dogfish lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) by using an NMR experiment that allows one to exploit nuclear Overhauser effects to determine internuclear distances between pairs of protons, without perturbation of spin-diffusion effects from other protons belonging either to the cofactor or to the binding pocket of the enzyme. The analysis indicates that the structure of bound NAD+ is in accord with the conformation determined in the solid state by x-ray diffraction for the adenosine moiety, but deviates significantly from that of the nicotinamide. The NMR data indicate conformational averaging about the glycosidic bond of the nicotinamide nucleotide. In view of the strict stereospecificity of catalysis by LDH and the conformational averaging of bound NAD+ that we infer from solution-state NMR, we suggest that LDH binds the cofactor in both syn and anti conformations, but that binding interactions in the syn conformation are not catalytically productive.

  7. Hydroperoxidic inhibitor of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase activity, tightly bound to the enzyme-NAD+ complex, characteristically degrades the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Skurský, L; Rezác, M; Khan, A N; Zídek, L; Rocek, J

    1992-01-01

    The strong inhibition of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLAD) by p-methylbenzyl hydroperoxide (XyHP) is only transient, XyHP behaves also as a pseudo-substrate of the enzyme and in the presence of NAD+, is degraded by HLAD to (as yet unidentified) non-inhibiting products while the NAD+ is converted to a derivative similar to the "NADX", originally observed in an analogous reaction of HLAD with hydrogen peroxide. The apparent KM for XyHP is approximately 10(4) times smaller than that for H2O2. The catalytic constant kcat for HLAD degradation of XyHP is two orders of magnitude less than that for ethanol dehydrogenation. XyHP inhibits both directions of the alcohol-aldehyde interconversion with equal potency. The first step of the inhibition mechanism is a tight binding of XyHP to the binary HLAD-NAD+ complex. PMID:1284958

  8. Reactions of aromatic nitro-compounds. LV. Anionic sigma-complexes of sym-trinitrobenzene with the alkoxides of dihydric alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Mel'nikov, A.I.; Gitis, S.S.; Kaminskii, A.Ya.

    1986-12-20

    The reactions of alkoxides of dihydric alcohols with 2,4,6-trinitroanisole and picryl chloride have been studied. The reaction between 2,4,6-trinitroanisole and sodium 2-hydroxyethoxide, 3-hydroxypropoxide, 4-hydroxybutoxide, and 2-methoxyethoxide gives the unsymmetrical 1-methoxy-1-hydroxyalkoxy-2,4,6-trinitrocyclohexa-2,5-dienate sigma-complexes, which are converted on heating into the 1,1-dihydroxyalkoxy-2,4-6-trinitrocyclohexa-2,5-dienate sigma-complexes. In the case of sodium 1-methoxy-1-(..beta..-hydroxyethoxy)-2,4,6-trinitrocyclohexa-2,5-dienate, heating results in intramolecular spirocyclization of the ..beta..-hydroxyethoxy grouping to give sodium 6,8,10-trinitro-1,4-dioxaspiro(4,5)deca-6,9-dienate. The reaction of sodium 3-hydroxy-propoxide, 4-hydroxybutoxide, 2-methoxyethoxide, and diethyleneglycolate with picryl chloride gives the symmetrical 1,1-dihyroxyalkoxy sigma-complexes, while sodium 2-hydroxyethoxide forms a sigma-complex with a 1,3-dioxolane spiro-ring. The composition and structures of the sigma-complexes, isolated as their sodium salts, were established by their elemental analyses and PMR and IR spectroscopy.

  9. Unidirectional growth of organic nonlinear optical L-arginine maleate dihydrate single crystal by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charoen-In, Urit; Ramasamy, P.; Manyum, P.

    2011-03-01

    Unidirectional organic nonlinear optical L-arginine maleate dihydrate (LAMD) single crystal has been successfully grown by the Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method. The SR as-grown crystal was transparent and the size was 65 mm in length and 15 mm in diameter. The grown LAMD crystals have been subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), piezoelectric, dielectrics, UV-vis-NIR, Vickers microhardness and second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency study and the results were discussed. The lattice parameters of the grown LAMD crystal are confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction and the morphology is investigated in the conventional grown LAMD crystal. Crystalline perfection is observed from HRXRD analysis. Piezoelectric charge coefficients of the grown crystal have been determined. The dielectric constant and loss measurement were made as function of temperature in the range between 40 and 140 °C. The improved transparency of the grown crystal is investigated by recording UV-vis analysis. Microhardness measurements reveal that the mechanical strength of the SR-grown LAMD crystal is higher than the that of the conventional method grown crystal. SHG measurements indicate that the SHG efficiency of the grown LAMD crystal at a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm is roughly 1.4 times that of KDP.

  10. Study on third order nonlinear optical properties of a metal organic complex-Monothiourea-cadmium Sulphate Dihydrate single crystals grown in silica gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanandan, T.; Kalainathan, S.

    2015-04-01

    The third order nonlinear optical properties of Monothiourea-cadmium Sulphate Dihydrate crystal were measured using a He-Ne laser (λ=632.8 nm) by a Z-scan technique. The magnitude of nonlinear refractive index (n2) and nonlinear absorption coefficient was found to be 4.4769×10-11 m2/W and 1.233×10-2 m/W respectively. The third order non-linear optical susceptibility χ(3) was found to be in the order of 3.6533×10-2 esu. The negative sign of non-linear refractive index shows the self-defocusing nature of the gel grown crystal. The second-order molecular hyperpolarizability γ of the grown crystal is 1.2822×10-33 esu. Laser damage threshold was measured by using an Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm). Photoconductivity studies of the gel grown crystal revealed that the crystal possesses positive photoconducting nature. The results obtained from Z-scan, laser damage threshold and photoconducting studies reveal that the crystal can be a possible candidate material for photonics device, optical switches, and optical power limiting application.

  11. Role of NADH/NAD+ transport activity and glycogen store on skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise: in silico studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjun; Dash, Ranjan K.; Kim, Jaeyeon; Saidel, Gerald M.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can maintain ATP concentration constant during the transition from rest to exercise, whereas metabolic reaction rates may increase substantially. Among the key regulatory factors of skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise, the dynamics of cytosolic and mitochondrial NADH and NAD+ have not been characterized. To quantify these regulatory factors, we have developed a physiologically based computational model of skeletal muscle energy metabolism. This model integrates transport and reaction fluxes in distinct capillary, cytosolic, and mitochondrial domains and investigates the roles of mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ transport (shuttling) activity and muscle glycogen concentration (stores) during moderate intensity exercise (60% maximal O2 consumption). The underlying hypothesis is that the cytosolic redox state (NADH/NAD+) is much more sensitive to a metabolic disturbance in contracting skeletal muscle than the mitochondrial redox state. This hypothesis was tested by simulating the dynamic metabolic responses of skeletal muscle to exercise while altering the transport rate of reducing equivalents (NADH and NAD+) between cytosol and mitochondria and muscle glycogen stores. Simulations with optimal parameter estimates showed good agreement with the available experimental data from muscle biopsies in human subjects. Compared with these simulations, a 20% increase (or ∼20% decrease) in mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ shuttling activity led to an ∼70% decrease (or ∼3-fold increase) in cytosolic redox state and an ∼35% decrease (or ∼25% increase) in muscle lactate level. Doubling (or halving) muscle glycogen concentration resulted in an ∼50% increase (or ∼35% decrease) in cytosolic redox state and an ∼30% increase (or ∼25% decrease) in muscle lactate concentration. In both cases, changes in mitochondrial redox state were minimal. In conclusion, the model simulations of exercise response are consistent with the hypothesis that mitochondrial NADH/NAD

  12. Regulation of SIRT 1 mediated NAD dependent deacetylation: A novel role for the multifunctional enzyme CD38

    SciTech Connect

    Aksoy, Pinar; Escande, Carlos; White, Thomas A.; Thompson, Michael; Soares, Sandra; Benech, Juan Claudio; Chini, Eduardo N. . E-mail: chini.eduardo@mayo.edu

    2006-10-13

    The SIRT 1 enzyme is a NAD dependent deacetylase implicated in ageing, cell protection, and energy metabolism in mammalian cells. How the endogenous activity of SIRT 1 is modulated is not known. The enzyme CD38 is a multifunctional enzyme capable of synthesis of the second messenger, cADPR, NAADP, and ADPR. However, the major enzymatic activity of CD38 is the hydrolysis of NAD. Of particular interest is the fact that CD38 is present on the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we investigate the modulation of the SIRT 1 activity by CD38. We propose that by modulating availability of NAD to the SIRT1 enzyme, CD38 may regulate SIRT1 enzymatic activity. We observed that in CD38 knockout mice, tissue levels of NAD are significantly increased. We also observed that incubation of purified recombinant SIRT1 enzyme with CD38 or nuclear extracts of wild-type mice led to a significant inhibition of its activity. In contrast, incubation of SIRT1 with cellular extract from CD38 knockout mice was without effect. Furthermore, the endogenous activity of SIRT1 was several time higher in nuclear extracts from CD38 knockout mice when compared to wild-type nuclear extracts. Finally, the in vivo deacetylation of the SIRT1 substrate P53 is increased in CD38 knockout mice tissue. Our data support the novel concept that nuclear CD38 is a major regulator of cellular/nuclear NAD level, and SIRT1 activity. These findings have strong implications for understanding the basic mechanisms that modulate intracellular NAD levels, energy homeostasis, as well as ageing and cellular protection modulated by the SIRT enzymes.

  13. Role of the Dinitrogenase Reductase Arginine 101 Residue in Dinitrogenase Reductase ADP-Ribosyltransferase Binding, NAD Binding, and Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ludden, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Dinitrogenase reductase is posttranslationally regulated by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) via ADP-ribosylation of the arginine 101 residue in some bacteria. Rhodospirillum rubrum strains in which the arginine 101 of dinitrogenase reductase was replaced by tyrosine, phenylalanine, or leucine were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the nifH gene. The strain containing the R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase retains 91%, the strain containing the R101Y form retains 72%, and the strain containing the R101L form retains only 28% of in vivo nitrogenase activity of the strain containing the dinitrogenase reductase with arginine at position 101. In vivo acetylene reduction assays, immunoblotting with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, and [adenylate-32P]NAD labeling experiments showed that no switch-off of nitrogenase activity occurred in any of the three mutants and no ADP-ribosylation of altered dinitrogenase reductases occurred either in vivo or in vitro. Altered dinitrogenase reductases from strains UR629 (R101Y) and UR630 (R101F) were purified to homogeneity. The R101F and R101Y forms of dinitrogenase reductase were able to form a complex with DRAT that could be chemically cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide. The R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase and DRAT together were not able to cleave NAD. This suggests that arginine 101 is not critical for the binding of DRAT to dinitrogenase reductase but that the availability of arginine 101 is important for NAD cleavage. Both DRAT and dinitrogenase reductase can be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD individually upon UV irradiation, but most 14C label is incorporated into DRAT when both proteins are present. The ability of R101F dinitrogenase reductase to be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD suggested that Arg 101 is not absolutely required for NAD binding. PMID:11114923

  14. Roles of NAD+, PARP-1, and Sirtuins in Cell Death, Ischemic Brain Injury, and Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray-Induced Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    NAD+ plays crucial roles in a variety of biological processes including energy metabolism, aging, and calcium homeostasis. Multiple studies have also shown that NAD+ administration can profoundly decrease oxidative cell death and ischemic brain injury. A number of recent studies have further indicated that NAD+ administration can decrease ischemic brain damage, traumatic brain damage and synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced tissue injury by such mechanisms as inhibiting inflammation, decreasing autophagy, and reducing DNA damage. Our latest study that applies nano-particles as a NAD+ carrier has also provided first direct evidence demonstrating a key role of NAD+ depletion in oxidative stress-induced ATP depletion. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and sirtuins are key NAD+-consuming enzymes that mediate multiple biological processes. Recent studies have provided new information regarding PARP-1 and sirtuins in cell death, ischemic brain damage and synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced tissue damage. These findings have collectively supported the hypothesis that NAD+ metabolism, PARP-1 and sirtuins play fundamental roles in oxidative stress-induced cell death, ischemic brain injury, and radiation injury. The findings have also supported “the Central Regulatory Network Hypothesis”, which proposes that a fundamental network that consists of ATP, NAD+ and Ca2+ as its key components is the essential network regulating various biological processes. PMID:24386592

  15. Rates and mechanisms of conversion of ice nanocrystals to hydrates of HCl and HBr: acid diffusion in the ionic hydrates.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul; Gulluru, Dheeraj B; Buch, Victoria

    2005-03-01

    This FTIR study focuses on solid-state chemistry associated with formation and interconversion of the ionic HX (X = Cl, Br) hydrates. Kinetic data are reported for conversions of ice nanocrystal arrays exposed to the saturation pressure of the acids in the 110 approximately 125 K range. The product is amorphous acid dihydrate in the case of HBr, and amorphous monohydrate for HCl. The rate-determining step is identified as HX diffusion through the hydrate product crust toward the interfacial reaction zone, rather than diffusion through ice, as commonly believed. Slowing of the conversion process is thus observed with increasing thickness of the crust. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) and activation energy values for HX diffusion through the hydrates were evaluated with the help of the shrinking-core model. Hydrate crystallization occurs as a separate step, upon heating above 130 K. Subsequently, rates of reversible transitions between crystal di- and monohydrates were observed upon exposure to acid vapor and acid evacuation. In conversion from di- to monohydrate, the rate slows after fast formation of several layers; subsequently, diffusion through the product crust appears to be the rate-controlling step. The activation energy for HBr diffusion through crystal dihydrate is found to be significantly higher than that for the amorphous analogue. Conjecture is offered for a molecular mechanism of HX transport through the crystal hydrate, based on (i) spectroscopic/computational evidence for the presence of molecular HX bonded to X(-) in each of the ionic hydrate phases and (ii) the relative E(a) values found for HBr and HCl diffusion. Monte Carlo modeling suggests acid transport to the reaction zone along boundaries between "nanocrystallites" generated by multiple hydrate nucleation events at the particle surfaces. The reverse conversion, of crystalline monohydrate particles to the dihydrate phase, as well as dihydrate to trihydrate, displays nearly constant rate

  16. The 1.8 Å Cholix Toxin Crystal Structure in Complex with NAD+ and Evidence for a New Kinetic Model

    PubMed Central

    Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Jørgensen, René; Lugo, Miguel R.; Merrill, A. Rod

    2012-01-01

    Certain Vibrio cholerae strains produce cholix, a potent protein toxin that has diphthamide-specific ADP-ribosyltransferase activity against eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Here we present a 1.8 Å crystal structure of cholix in complex with its natural substrate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). We also substituted hallmark catalytic residues by site-directed mutagenesis and analyzed both NAD+ binding and ADP-ribosyltransferase activity using a fluorescence-based assay. These data are the basis for a new kinetic model of cholix toxin activity. Further, the new structural data serve as a reference for continuing inhibitor development for this toxin class. PMID:22535961

  17. Declining NAD(+) induces a pseudohypoxic state disrupting nuclear-mitochondrial communication during aging.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana P; Price, Nathan L; Ling, Alvin J Y; Moslehi, Javid J; Montgomery, Magdalene K; Rajman, Luis; White, James P; Teodoro, João S; Wrann, Christiane D; Hubbard, Basil P; Mercken, Evi M; Palmeira, Carlos M; de Cabo, Rafael; Rolo, Anabela P; Turner, Nigel; Bell, Eric L; Sinclair, David A

    2013-12-19

    Ever since eukaryotes subsumed the bacterial ancestor of mitochondria, the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes have had to closely coordinate their activities, as each encode different subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, but its causes are debated. We show that, during aging, there is a specific loss of mitochondrial, but not nuclear, encoded OXPHOS subunits. We trace the cause to an alternate PGC-1α/β-independent pathway of nuclear-mitochondrial communication that is induced by a decline in nuclear NAD(+) and the accumulation of HIF-1α under normoxic conditions, with parallels to Warburg reprogramming. Deleting SIRT1 accelerates this process, whereas raising NAD(+) levels in old mice restores mitochondrial function to that of a young mouse in a SIRT1-dependent manner. Thus, a pseudohypoxic state that disrupts PGC-1α/β-independent nuclear-mitochondrial communication contributes to the decline in mitochondrial function with age, a process that is apparently reversible. PMID:24360282

  18. Oxidation of External NAD(P)H by Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Rugolo, Michela; Zannoni, Davide

    1992-01-01

    The functional interaction between the externally located NAD(P)H dehydrogenase and the Q-pool acceptor site(s) in Percoll-purified mitochondria from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. cv OB1) mitochondria has been investigated. Oxidation of exogenous NADH is stimulated by ubiquinone (UQ1) with a parallel decrease of the apparent Km for NADH. In the presence of saturating amounts of UQ1 as electron acceptor, the Km (NADH) is not affected by variations of the ionic strength. Conversely, the Km for UQ1 is decreased by the screening effect of negative charges on the outer membrane surface. Under low-ionic strength, the hydroxyflavone platanetin progressively inhibits NADH oxidation with a mean inhibition dose of approximately 3 nanomoles of inhibitor per milligram of protein. Interestingly, under high-ionic strength, oxidation of NADH proceeds through two platanetin binding sites, one of which has a lower affinity for the inhibitor (mean inhibition dose = 20 nanomoles per milligram protein), because it is located near the outer surface of the membrane. This latter site is the one involved in the oxidation of external NADPH and, possibly, also affected by spermine and spermidine. Similarly to NADH, oxidation of NADPH is fully sensitive to micromolar concentrations of free Ca2+ ions; in addition, similar concentrations of the sulfhydryl reagent mersalyl are required to inhibit both NADH and NADPH oxidative activities. The results are interpreted as evidence for the presence of a single nonspecific NAD(P)H dehydrogenase. PMID:16668968

  19. Purification, kinetic behavior, and regulation of NAD(P)+ malic enzyme of tumor mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Lehninger, A L

    1984-05-25

    The purification and kinetic characterization of an NAD(P)+-malic enzyme from 22aH mouse hepatoma mitochondria are described. The enzyme was purified 328-fold with a final yield of 51% and specific activity of 38.1 units/mg of protein by employing DEAE-cellulose chromatography and an ATP affinity column. Sephadex G-200 chromatography yielded a native Mr = 240,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a major subunit with Mr = 61,000, suggesting a tetrameric structure, and also showed that the preparation contained less than 10% polypeptide impurities. Use of the ATP affinity column required the presence of MnCl2 and fumarate (an allosteric activator) in the elution buffers. In the absence of fumarate, the Michaelis constants for malate, NAD+, and NADP+ were 3.6 mM, 55 microM, and 72 microM, respectively; in the presence of fumarate (2 mM), the constants were 0.34 mM, 9 microM, and 13 microM, respectively. ATP was shown to be an allosteric inhibitor, competitive with malate. However, the inhibition by ATP displayed hyperbolic competitive kinetics with a KI (ATP) of 80 microM (minus fumarate) and 0.5 mM (plus 2 mM fumarate). The allosteric properties of the enzyme are integrated into a rationale for its specific role in the pathways of malate and glutamate oxidation in tumor mitochondria. PMID:6725250

  20. Drosophila NMNAT Maintains Neural Integrity Independent of Its NAD Synthesis Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, R. Grace; Cao, Yu; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Zhou, Yi; Mehta, Sunil Q; Schulze, Karen L; Verstreken, Patrik; Bellen, Hugo J

    2006-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration refers to a loss of the distal part of an axon after nerve injury. Wallerian degeneration slow (Wlds) mice overexpress a chimeric protein containing the NAD synthase NMNAT (nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1) and exhibit a delay in axonal degeneration. Currently, conflicting evidence raises questions as to whether NMNAT is the protecting factor and whether its enzymatic activity is required for such a possible function. Importantly, the link between nmnat and axon degeneration is at present solely based on overexpression studies of enzymatically active protein. Here we use the visual system of Drosophila as a model system to address these issues. We have isolated the first nmnat mutations in a multicellular organism in a forward genetic screen for synapse malfunction in Drosophila. Loss of nmnat causes a rapid and severe neurodegeneration that can be attenuated by blocking neuronal activity. Furthermore, in vivo neuronal expression of mutated nmnat shows that enzymatically inactive NMNAT protein retains strong neuroprotective effects and rescues the degeneration phenotype caused by loss of nmnat. Our data indicate an NAD-independent requirement of NMNAT for maintaining neuronal integrity that can be exploited to protect neurons from neuronal activity-induced degeneration by overexpression of the protein. PMID:17132048

  1. Allosteric Motions in Structures of Yeast NAD+-Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor,A.; Hu, G.; Hart, P.; McAlister-Henn, L.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) are key regulators of flux through biosynthetic and oxidative pathways in response to cellular energy levels. Here we present the first structures of a eukaryotic member of this enzyme family, the allosteric, hetero-octameric, NAD+-specific IDH from yeast in three forms: (1) without ligands, (2) with bound analog citrate, and (3) with bound citrate + AMP. The structures reveal the molecular basis for ligand binding to homologous but distinct regulatory and catalytic sites positioned at the interfaces between IDH1 and IDH2 subunits and define pathways of communication between heterodimers and heterotetramers in the hetero-octamer. Disulfide bonds observed at the heterotetrameric interfaces in the unliganded IDH hetero-octamer are reduced in the ligand-bound forms, suggesting a redox regulatory mechanism that may be analogous to the 'on-off' regulation of non-allosteric bacterial IDHs via phosphorylation. The results strongly suggest that eukaryotic IDH enzymes are exquisitely tuned to ensure that allosteric activation occurs only when concentrations of isocitrate are elevated.

  2. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Love, Nick R; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD(+) kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25605906

  3. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Love, Nick R.; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD+ kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25605906

  4. A High Fat Diet and NAD+ Rescue Premature Aging in Cockayne Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Mitchell, Sarah J.; Fang, Evandro F.; Iyama, Teruaki; Ward, Theresa; Wang, James; Dunn, Christopher A.; Singh, Nagendra; Veith, Sebastian; Hasan, M. Mahdi; Mangerich, Aswin; Wilson, Mark A.; Mattson, Mark P.; Bergersen, Linda H.; Cogger, Victoria C.; Warren, Alessandra; Le Couteur, David G.; Moaddel, Ruin; Wilson, David M.; Croteau, Deborah L.; de Cabo, Rafael; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an accelerated aging disorder characterized by progressive neurodegeneration caused by mutations in the genes encoding the DNA repair proteins CSA or CSB. Csbm/m mice were given a high fat, caloric restricted or resveratrol supplemented diet. The high fat diet rescued the phenotype of Csbm/m mice at the metabolic, transcriptomic and behavioral levels. Additional analysis suggests that the premature aging seen in CS mice, nematodes and human cells results from aberrant PARP activation due to deficient DNA repair leading to decreased SIRT1 activity and mitochondrial dysfunction. Notably, β-hydroxybutyrate levels are increased by the high fat diet; and β-hydroxybutyrate, PARP inhibition, or NAD+ supplementation can activate SIRT1 and rescue CS-associated phenotypes. Mechanistically, CSB is able to displace activated PARP1 from damaged DNA to limit its activity. This study connects two emerging longevity metabolites, β-hydroxybutyrate and NAD+, through the deacetylase SIRT1 and suggests possible interventions for CS. PMID:25440059

  5. The NAD(P)H-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activities of Prevotella ruminicola B(1)4 can be attributed to one enzyme (GdhA), and gdhA expression is regulated in response to the nitrogen source available for growth.

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Z; Morrison, M

    1996-01-01

    Prevotella ruminicola B(1)4 possesses both NADPH- and NADH-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activities, with the greatest specific activity being measured from ammonia-limited cultures. Relative to cells grown in the presence of 1 mM ammonium chloride, the NADPH-dependent activity was decreased approximately 10-fold when peptides were provided as a nitrogen source. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was used to visualize the GDH protein(s) in cell extracts of P. ruminicola. For all growth conditions tested, only one GDH protein was detectable, and its relative abundance, as well as its reactivity with either NAD(P)+ or NAD(P)H, correlated well with the specific activities measured from whole-cell assays. Consistent with the findings from enzyme assays and PAGE activity gels, Northern (RNA) blot analysis revealed that expression of a gene encoding NAD(P)H-GDH activity was greatest in ammonia-grown cultures and that GDH activity is regulated in response to nitrogen source (ammonia versus peptides), probably at the level of transcription. A gene encoding the NAD(P)H-utilizing GDH activity (gdhA) was cloned, and its nucleotide sequence was determined and shown to contain an open reading frame of 1,332 bp which would encode a polypeptide of 48.8 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence possesses three highly conserved motifs typical of family I GDHs, but several unique amino acid substitutions within these motifs were evident. These results are discussed within the context of ruminal nitrogen metabolism and the growth efficiency of succinate- and propionate-producing anaerobic bacteria. PMID:8837439

  6. Biofuel cells: Electro-enzymatic oxidation of formate using formate dehydrogenase, NAD{sup +}, diaphorase, benzyl viologen, and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Palmmore, G.T.R.; Bertschy, H.; Bergens, S.H.; Whitesides, G.M.

    1993-12-31

    The authors have developed an effective electrochemical method to regenerate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) from NADH. Diaphorase (D) was used to oxidize NADH to NAD{sup +} with the concomitant reduction of two equivalents of benzylviologen (BV{sup 2+}) to the mono cation, BV{sup +} to the mono cation, BV{sup +}. The BV{sup +} was then electrochemically oxidized to BV{sup 2+} at a carbon-felt anode: NADH + 2BV{sup 2+} --(D)--> NAD{sup +} + 2BV{sup +} 2BV{sup +}-->(anode)-->2BV{sup 2+}. This system was incorporated into an enzymatic fuel cell that used formate as fuel. Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) was used to oxidize formate to CO{sub 2} with the concomitant 2 e{sup {minus}}, 2H{sup +} reduction of NAD{sup +} to NADH. The NADH was then regenerated using the system described above. The anode of the fuel cell was used to oxidize BV{sup +} to BV{sup 2+}. Blackened Pt gauze as used as the cathode of the fuel cell. The working parameters of the formate/O{sub 2} biofuel cell will be presented including methods to develop this system into the more complex methanol/O{sub 2} biofuel cell.

  7. Thiamine Biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Regulated by the NAD+-Dependent Histone Deacetylase Hst1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingguang; Petteys, Brian J.; McClure, Julie M.; Valsakumar, Veena; Bekiranov, Stefan; Frank, Elizabeth L.; Smith, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoding thiamine biosynthesis enzymes in microorganisms are tightly regulated such that low environmental thiamine concentrations activate transcription and high concentrations are repressive. We have determined that multiple thiamine (THI) genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are also regulated by the intracellular NAD+ concentration via the NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase (HDAC) Hst1 and, to a lesser extent, Sir2. Both of these HDACs associate with a distal region of the affected THI gene promoters that does not overlap with a previously defined enhancer region bound by the thiamine-responsive Thi2/Thi3/Pdc2 transcriptional activators. The specificity of histone H3 and/or H4 deacetylation carried out by Hst1 and Sir2 at the distal promoter region depends on the THI gene being tested. Hst1/Sir2-mediated repression of the THI genes occurs at the level of basal expression, thus representing the first set of transcription factors shown to actively repress this gene class. Importantly, lowering the NAD+ concentration and inhibiting the Hst1/Sum1 HDAC complex elevated the intracellular thiamine concentration due to increased thiamine biosynthesis and transport, implicating NAD+ in the control of thiamine homeostasis. PMID:20439498

  8. Are the Genes nadA and norB Involved in Formation of Aflatoxin G1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Formation of G-group aflatoxins (AFs) from O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST) by certain Aspergillus species initially involves epoxidation reactions by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, OrdA, and CypA. We now show that the genes, norB and nadA, at opposite ends of the AF biosynthesis gene cluster are a...

  9. NAD(+)- dependent deacetylase SIRT3 regulates mitochondrial protein synthesis by deacetylation of the ribosomal protein MRPL10

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A member of the sirtuin family of NAD (+)-dependent deacetylases, SIRT3, is located in mammalian mitochondria and is important for regulation of mitochondrial metabolism, cell survival, and longevity. In this study, MRPL10 (mitochondrial ribosomal protein L10) was identified as the major acetylated ...

  10. A modular system for regeneration of NAD cofactors using graphite particles modified with hydrogenase and diaphorase moieties.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Holly A; Lauterbach, Lars; Ash, Philip A; Lenz, Oliver; Vincent, Kylie A

    2012-02-01

    Pyrolytic graphite particles modified with hydrogenase and an NAD(+)/NADH cycling enzyme provide a modular heterogeneous catalyst system for regeneration of oxidised or reduced nicotinamide cofactors using H(2) and H(+) as electron source or sink. Particles can be tuned for cofactor supply under different conditions by appropriate choice of hydrogenase. PMID:21986817

  11. SIRT1-dependent regulation of chromatin and transcription: linking NAD(+) metabolism and signaling to the control of cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Kraus, W Lee

    2010-08-01

    Sirtuins comprise a family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases. Mammalian SIRT1 - a homolog of yeast Sir2, the prototypical member of the sirtuin family - is an important regulator of metabolism, cell differentiation and senescence, stress response, and cancer. As an NAD(+)-dependent enzyme, SIRT1 regulates gene expression programs in response to cellular metabolic status, thereby coordinating metabolic adaptation of the whole organism. Several important mechanisms have emerged for SIRT1-dependent regulation of transcription. First, SIRT1 can modulate chromatin function through direct deacetylation of histones as well as by promoting alterations in the methylation of histones and DNA, leading to the repression of transcription. The latter is accomplished through the recruitment of other nuclear enzymes to chromatin for histone methylation and DNA CpG methylation, suggesting a broader role of SIRT1 in epigenetic regulation. Second, SIRT1 can interact and deacetylate a broad range of transcription factors and coregulators, thereby regulating target gene expression both positively and negatively. Cellular energy state, specifically NAD(+) metabolism, plays a major role in the regulation of SIRT1 activity. Recent studies on the NAD(+) biosynthetic enzymes in the salvage pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMNAT-1), have revealed important functions for these enzymes in SIRT1-dependent transcription regulation. The collective molecular actions of SIRT1 control specific patterns of gene expression that modulate a wide variety of physiological outcomes. PMID:19879981

  12. Fatty acid biosynthesis during the life cycle of Debaryomyces etchellsii.

    PubMed

    Arous, Fatma; Mechichi, Tahar; Nasri, Moncef; Aggelis, George

    2016-07-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis during the life cycle of the ascomycetous yeast Debaryomyces etchellsii cultivated on a non-fermentable substrate, i.e. glycerol, in nitrogen rich media (NRM) and nitrogen limited media (NLM) has been studied. Although considerable activities of key lipogenic enzymes, such as ATP citrate lyase (ACL) and malic enzyme (ME), were detected in vegetative cells during asexual proliferation (which occurred in the first growth stages in both NRM and NLM), lipid accumulation was restricted due to the high activities of NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD+-ICDH). A similar enzymatic profile has been found in ascii and free ascospores produced in NRM; thus lipid accumulation was low. On the contrary, very high activities of both ACL and ME and low activities of NAD+-ICDH were detected in ascii and free ascospores produced in NLM resulting in lipid accumulation. Neutral lipids (NL) were the predominant fraction of cellular lipids produced in vegetative cells and ascospores in both NRM and NLM. On the other hand, phospholipids (P) were the major polar lipids while glycolipids (G) were synthesized in low proportions. During transition from asexual to sexual phase, the percentage of NL increased with a significant decrease of P and, to a lesser extent, of G. High quantities of linoleic acid were found esterified in polar lipids, especially in P, during the vegetative stage of growth, while, with a few exceptions, during transition from asexual to sexual stage, linoleic acid concentration decreased markedly, mainly in P, while oleic acid concentration increased. PMID:27129978

  13. [Report on a measles epidemic in the Ústí nad Labem Region].

    PubMed

    Trmal, J; Limberková, R

    2015-09-01

    The Czech Republic is a measles free country where only isolated, mostly imported cases have been reported. A measles epidemic that occurred in the Ústí nad Labem Region is presented, with the first case diagnosed early in February 2014 and the last one reported in August 2014. The index case and source of infection to other susceptible patients was an adult male with a history of travel to India. The diagnosis of measles was difficult to make as the patient presented with feverish condition due to co-infection with dengue fever, chikungunya, and measles. The primary measles outbreak occurred in contacts and spread to health workers of the Masaryk Hospital in Ústí nad Labem. The infection further spread to the general population of adults. In total, 305 persons presented with suspected measles. One hundred and eighty-six and of them (61%) met the criteria for a confirmed case (positive clinical symptoms and laboratory test). Fifty (16.4%) patients developed typical clinical symptoms and were epidemiologically linked to confirmed cases, but turned out to be antibody negative. In 69 (22.6%) patients, measles were ruled out. Cases were confirmed by the detection of IgM and IgG antibodies against the measles virus or by RT--PCR. Nearly all cases were verified by the National Reference Laboratory for Rubella, Measles, Mumps, and Parvovirus B 19 of the National Institute of Public Health in Prague. In response to the epidemic, apart from common anti-epidemic measures, emergency vaccination was provided to health professionals of the Masaryk Hospital in Ústí nad Labem. Within two weeks after vaccination, a considerable decline in cases was seen in the vaccinated group. Measles most often occurred in persons born in 1970-1980, but were also observed in the smallest, non-vaccinated children (32 cases). Isolated cases also emerged in duly vaccinated children and adolescents. General recommendations are provided based on practical experience from the epidemic. PMID

  14. Experimental synovitis induced by aluminium phosphate in rabbits. Comparison of the changes produced in synovial tissue and in articular cartilage by aluminium phosphate, carrageenin, calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate, and natural diamond powder.

    PubMed

    Delongeas, J L; Netter, P; Boz, P; Faure, G; Royer, R J; Gaucher, A

    1984-01-01

    The goal of this experimental study was to examine the effect on articular tissue of tribasic aluminium phosphate (crystalline and amorphous forms) after intraarticular injection in rabbit and to compare it with that of various phlogistic compounds such as carrageenin, calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate and diamond powder, as a control. Synovium and cartilage were studied with light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive micro-analysis (EDM). Crystalline and amorphous aluminium phosphate could induce a synovitis with articular effusion in rabbits. With TEM, lysosomal inclusions of phagocytosed material were observed. Through SEM coupled with EDM, aluminium associated with phosphate was found in cellular elements. PMID:6087947

  15. Identification of Isn1 and Sdt1 as glucose- and vitamin-regulated nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinic acid mononucleotide [corrected] 5'-nucleotidases responsible for production of nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Katrina L; Evans, Charles; Belenky, Peter; Song, Peng; Burant, Charles F; Kennedy, Robert; Brenner, Charles

    2009-12-11

    Recently, we discovered that nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside are biosynthetic precursors of NAD(+), which are utilized through two pathways consisting of distinct enzymes. In addition, we have shown that exogenously supplied nicotinamide riboside is imported into yeast cells by a dedicated transporter, and it extends replicative lifespan on high glucose medium. Here, we show that nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside are authentic intracellular metabolites in yeast. Secreted nicotinamide riboside was detected with a biological assay, and intracellular levels of nicotinamide riboside, nicotinic acid riboside, and other NAD(+) metabolites were determined by a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. A biochemical genomic screen indicated that three yeast enzymes possess nicotinamide mononucleotide 5'-nucleotidase activity in vitro. Metabolic profiling of knock-out mutants established that Isn1 and Sdt1 are responsible for production of nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside in cells. Isn1, initially classified as an IMP-specific 5'-nucleotidase, and Sdt1, initially classified as a pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase, are additionally responsible for dephosphorylation of pyridine mononucleotides. Sdt1 overexpression is growth-inhibitory to cells in a manner that depends on its active site and correlates with reduced cellular NAD(+). Expression of Isn1 protein is positively regulated by the availability of nicotinic acid and glucose. These results reveal unanticipated and highly regulated steps in NAD(+) metabolism. PMID:19846558

  16. The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis (CC) of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint on chest radiographs and correlation with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Guillermo; Baynes, Keith; Mautz, Alan; DuBois, Melissa; Cerniglia, Ross; Ryan, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    Digital imaging combined with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) access allows detailed image retrieval and magnification. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals preferentially deposit in fibrocartilages, the cartilage of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint being one such structure. We sought to determine if examination of the AC joints on magnified PACS imaging of chest films would be useful in identifying chondrocalcinosis (CC). Retrospective radiographic readings and chart reviews involving 1,920 patients aged 50 or more who had routine outpatient chest radiographs over a 4-month period were performed. Knee radiographs were available for comparison in 489 patients. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographics, chest film reports, and diagnoses. AC joint CC was identified in 1.1 % (21/1,920) of consecutive chest films. Patients with AC joint CC were 75 years of age versus 65.4 in those without CC (p<0.0002). Four hundred eighty-nine patients had knee films. Six of these patients had AC joint CC, and of these, five also had knee CC (83 %). Of the 483 without AC joint CC, 62 (12 %) had knee CC (p=0.002). Patients with AC joint CC were more likely to have a recorded history of CPPD crystal deposition disease than those without AC joint CC (14 versus 1 %, p=0.0017). The prevalence of AC joint CC increases with age and is associated with knee CC. A finding of AC joint CC should heighten suspicion of pseudogout or secondary osteoarthritis in appropriate clinical settings and, in a young patient, should alert the clinician to the possibility of an associated metabolic condition. PMID:23609408

  17. Activation of S6 kinase in human neutrophils by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals: protein kinase C-dependent and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Tudan, C; Jackson, J K; Charlton, L; Pelech, S L; Sahl, B; Burt, H M

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been shown previously to be a central enzyme in crystal-induced neutrophil activation. Since activation of the 70 kDa S6 kinase (p70S6K) has been shown to be dependent on PI 3-kinase activation in mammalian cells, and since the former is a key enzyme in the transmission of signals to the cell nucleus, activation of p70(S6K) was investigated in crystal-stimulated neutrophils. Cytosolic fractions from calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD)-crystal-activated neutrophils were separated by Mono Q chromatography and analysed for phosphotransferase activity using a range of substrates and probed by Western analysis using antibodies to p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). CPPD crystals induced a robust, transient activation (peak activity at 2 min) of p70(S6K) that was fully inhibited by pretreatment with rapamycin. This is the first report of the activation of p70(S6K) in neutrophil signal transduction pathways induced by an agonist. This crystal-induced activation of p70(S6K) could also be inhibited by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Compound 3), but not by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. CPPD crystals also activated the ERK1 and ERK2 forms of MAP kinase (wortmannin insensitive), PKC (Compound 3 sensitive) and protein kinase B (wortmannin sensitive) in neutrophils. These data suggest that activation of p70(S6K) may proceed through a PI 3-kinase- and protein kinase B-independent but PKC-dependent pathway in crystal-activated neutrophils. PMID:9531494

  18. Immunotoxic effects of sodium tungstate dihydrate on female B6C3F1/N mice when administered in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Frawley, Rachel P; Smith, Matthew J; White, Kimber L; Elmore, Susan A; Herbert, Ron; Moore, Rebecca; Staska, Lauren M; Behl, Mamta; Hooth, Michelle J; Kissling, Grace E; Germolec, Dori R

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring, high-tensile strength element that has been used in a number of consumer products. Tungsten has been detected in soil, waterways, groundwater, and human tissue and body fluids. Elevated levels of tungsten in urine were reported for populations exposed to tungstate in drinking water in areas where natural tungsten formations were prevalent. Published reports indicated that sodium tungstate may modulate hematopoiesis, immune cell populations, and immune responses in rodent models. The objective of this study was to assess potential immunotoxicity of sodium tungstate dihydrate (STD), a drinking water contaminant. Female B6C3F1/N mice received 0-2000 mg STD/L in their drinking water for 28 d, and were evaluated for effects on immune cell populations in spleen and bone marrow, and humoral-mediated, cell-mediated, and innate immunity. Three different parameters of cell-mediated immunity were similarly affected at 1000 mg STD/L. T-cell proliferative responses against allogeneic leukocytes and anti-CD3 were decreased 32%, and 21%, respectively. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity was decreased at all effector:target cell ratios examined. At 2000 mg STD/L, the absolute numbers of CD3(+) T-cell progenitor cells in bone marrow were increased 86%, but the alterations in B-lymphocyte and other progenitor cells were not significant. There were no effects on bone marrow DNA synthesis or colony forming capabilities. STD-induced effects on humoral-mediated immunity, innate immunity, and splenocyte sub-populations were limited. Enhanced histopathology did not detect treatment-related lesions in any of the immune tissues. These data suggest exposure to STD in drinking water may adversely affect cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27223060

  19. In vitro degradation and cytocompatibility of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using the monocalcium phosphate monohydrate/hydroxyapatite system reveals rapid conversion to HA as a key mechanism.

    PubMed

    Alge, Daniel L; Goebel, W Scott; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2012-04-01

    We previously showed that dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cements can be prepared using monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and hydroxyapatite (HA). In this study, we have characterized the degradation properties and biocompatibility of these novel cements. To study the degradation properties, cements were prepared using MCPM:HA molar ratios of 4:1, 2:1, 2:3, and 2:5. Degradation was evaluated in vitro by static soaking in PBS, and changes in pH, mass, compressive strength, and composition were monitored. Conversion of DCPD to HA was noted in the 4:1 group, which initially consisted of pure DCPD. However, the 2:1 group, which initially consisted of DCPD and an intermediate amount of unreacted HA, underwent rapid conversion to HA associated with significantly greater pH drop and mass loss as well as a complete loss of mechanical integrity. On the basis of these results, we directly compared the cytocompatibility of 2:1 MCPM:HA cements to DCPD cements prepared with an equivalent percent molar excess of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) using an in vitro cell viability assay. Viability of cells co-cultured with 2:1 MCPM:HA cements was significantly reduced after just 48 h, while viability of cells cultured with the β-TCP-based cements was no different from control cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that conversion to HA plays an important role in the degradation of DCPD cements prepared with the MCPM/HA system, affecting both physical properties and cytocompatibility. These results could have important clinical implications for MCPM/HA cements. PMID:22323239

  20. Reinjury risk of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals on injured renal epithelial cells: aggravation of crystal adhesion and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Sun, Xin-Yuan; Bhadja, Poonam; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal epithelial cell injury facilitates crystal adhesion to cell surface and serves as a key step in renal stone formation. However, the effects of cell injury on the adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate crystals and the nano-crystal-induced reinjury risk of injured cells remain unclear. Methods African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells were injured with H2O2 to establish a cell injury model. Cell viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malonaldehyde (MDA) content, propidium iodide staining, hematoxylin–eosin staining, reactive oxygen species production, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were determined to examine cell injury during adhesion. Changes in the surface structure of H2O2-injured cells were assessed through atomic force microscopy. The altered expression of hyaluronan during adhesion was examined through laser scanning confocal microscopy. The adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals to Vero cells was observed through scanning electron microscopy. Nano-COM and COD binding was quantitatively determined through inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry. Results The expression of hyaluronan on the cell surface was increased during wound healing because of Vero cell injury. The structure and function of the cell membrane were also altered by cell injury; thus, nano-crystal adhesion occurred. The ability of nano-COM to adhere to the injured Vero cells was higher than that of nano-COD crystals. The cell viability, SOD activity, and Δψm decreased when nano-crystals attached to the cell surface. By contrast, the MDA content, reactive oxygen species production, and cell death rate increased. Conclusion Cell injury contributes to crystal adhesion to Vero cell surface. The attached nano-COM and COD crystals can aggravate Vero cell injury. As a consequence, crystal adhesion and aggregation are enhanced. These findings provide further insights into kidney stone

  1. Identification of an arginine residue in the dual coenzyme-specific glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides that plays a key role in binding NADP+ but not NAD+.

    PubMed

    Levy, H R; Vought, V E; Yin, X; Adams, M J

    1996-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides can utilize either NADP or NAD as coenzyme. The enzyme's three-dimensional structure has been solved (Rowland et al., 1994, Structure 2, 1073-1087) and shown to contain a conventional nucleotide binding domain. NADP+ was modeled into the structure by superimposing the beta alpha beta domain and that of coenzyme-bound 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (Adams et al., 1994, Structure 2, 651-658), enabling us to identify Arg-46 as a potentially important residue for NADP+ binding. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed mutant enzymes in which Arg-46 was replaced by glutamine (R46Q) and alanine (R46A) and examined their kinetic properties. The principal effects in these mutant enzymes were that the Km and Ki values for NADP+ increased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over those of the wild-type enzyme. No other kinetic constant was altered more than 6.5-fold. Changing this single amino acid leads to mutant glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases with coenzyme specificities that favor NAD+, whereas the wild-type enzyme prefers NADP+ as coenzyme. These results confirm that Arg-46 plays a key role in NADP+ binding by contributing a positively charged planar residue that interacts primarily with the 2'-adenosine phosphate. The Arg residue corresponding to Arg-46 in L. mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is conserved in all glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases and, presumably, plays the same role in all these enzymes. PMID:8579362

  2. Differential release of β-NAD+ and ATP upon activation of enteric motor neurons in primate and murine colons

    PubMed Central

    DURNIN, LEONIE; SANDERS, KENTON M.; MUTAFOVA-YAMBOLIEVA, VIOLETA N.

    2012-01-01

    Background The purinergic component of enteric inhibitory neurotransmission is important for normal motility in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Controversies exist about the purine(s) responsible for inhibitory responses in GI muscles: adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) has been assumed to be the purinergic neurotransmitter released from enteric inhibitory motor neurons, however recent studies demonstrate that β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD+) and ADP-ribose mimic the inhibitory neurotransmitter better than ATP in primate and murine colons. The study was designed to clarify the sources of purines in colons of Cynomolgus monkeys and C57BL/6 mice. Methods HPLC with fluorescence detection was used to analyze purines released by stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) and serotonergic 5-HT3 receptors (5-HT3R), known to be present on cell bodies and dendrites of neurons within the myenteric plexus. Key Results nAChR or 5-HT3R agonists increased overflow of ATP and β-NAD+ from tunica muscularis of monkey and murine colon. The agonists did not release purines from circular muscles of monkey colon lacking myenteric ganglia. Agonist-evoked overflow of β-NAD+, but not ATP, was inhibited by tetrodotoxin (0.5 μM) or ω-conotoxin GVIA (50 nM), suggesting that β-NAD+ release requires nerve action potentials and junctional mechanisms known to be critical for neurotransmission. ATP was likely released from nerve cell bodies in myenteric ganglia and not from nerve terminals of motor neurons. Conclusions & Inferences These results support the conclusion that ATP is not a motor neurotransmitter in the colon and are consistent with the hypothesis that β-NAD+, or its metabolites, serve as the purinergic inhibitory neurotransmitter. PMID:23279315

  3. Kinetic and Structural Basis for Acyl-Group Selectivity and NAD(+) Dependence in Sirtuin-Catalyzed Deacylation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Jessica L; Dittenhafer-Reed, Kristin E; Kudo, Norio; Thelen, Julie N; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Denu, John M

    2015-05-19

    Acylation of lysine is an important protein modification regulating diverse biological processes. It was recently demonstrated that members of the human Sirtuin family are capable of catalyzing long chain deacylation, in addition to the well-known NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation activity [Feldman, J. L., Baeza, J., and Denu, J. M. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 31350-31356]. Here we provide a detailed kinetic and structural analysis that describes the interdependence of NAD(+)-binding and acyl-group selectivity for a diverse series of human Sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT3 and SIRT6. Steady-state and rapid-quench kinetic analyses indicated that differences in NAD(+) saturation and susceptibility to nicotinamide inhibition reflect unique kinetic behavior displayed by each Sirtuin and depend on acyl substrate chain length. Though the rate of nucleophilic attack of the 2'-hydroxyl on the C1'-O-alkylimidate intermediate varies with acyl substrate chain length, this step remains rate-determining for SIRT2 and SIRT3; however, for SIRT6, this step is no longer rate-limiting for long chain substrates. Cocrystallization of SIRT2 with myristoylated peptide and NAD(+) yielded a co-complex structure with reaction product 2'-O-myristoyl-ADP-ribose, revealing a latent hydrophobic cavity to accommodate the long chain acyl group, and suggesting a general mechanism for long chain deacylation. Comparing two separately determined co-complex structures containing either a myristoylated peptide or 2'-O-myristoyl-ADP-ribose indicates there are conformational changes at the myristoyl-ribose linkage with minimal structural differences in the enzyme active site. During the deacylation reaction, the fatty acyl group is held in a relatively fixed position. We describe a kinetic and structural model to explain how various Sirtuins display unique acyl substrate preferences and how different reaction kinetics influence NAD(+) dependence. The biological implications are discussed. PMID:25897714

  4. Crystal Structure of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase: NAD[superscript +]/NADH Binding and the Structural Basis of Disease-causing Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Machius, Mischa; Chuang, David T.

    2010-07-13

    Human dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (hE3) is an enzymatic component common to the mitochondrial {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase and glycine decarboxylase complexes. Mutations to this homodimeric flavoprotein cause the often-fatal human disease known as E3 deficiency. To catalyze the oxidation of dihydrolipoamide, hE3 uses two molecules: noncovalently bound FAD and a transiently bound substrate, NAD{sup +}. To address the catalytic mechanism of hE3 and the structural basis for E3 deficiency, the crystal structures of hE3 in the presence of NAD{sup +} or NADH have been determined at resolutions of 2.5 {angstrom} and 2.1 {angstrom}, respectively. Although the overall fold of the enzyme is similar to that of yeast E3, these two structures differ at two loops that protrude from the proteins and at their FAD-binding sites. The structure of oxidized hE3 with NAD{sup +} bound demonstrates that the nicotinamide moiety is not proximal to the FAD. When NADH is present, however, the nicotinamide base stacks directly on the isoalloxazine ring system of the FAD. This is the first time that this mechanistically requisite conformation of NAD{sup +} or NADH has been observed in E3 from any species. Because E3 structures were previously available only from unicellular organisms, speculations regarding the molecular mechanisms of E3 deficiency were based on homology models. The current hE3 structures show directly that the disease-causing mutations occur at three locations in the human enzyme: the dimer interface, the active site, and the FAD and NAD{sup +}-binding sites. The mechanisms by which these mutations impede the function of hE3 are discussed.

  5. Determination of NAD+ and NADH level in a Single Cell Under H2O2 Stress by Capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Wenjun

    2008-01-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method is developed to determine both NAD+ and NADH levels in a single cell, based on an enzymatic cycling reaction. The detection limit can reach down to 0.2 amol NAD+ and 1 amol NADH on a home-made CE-LIF setup. The method showed good reproducibility and specificity. After an intact cell was injected into the inlet of a capillary and lysed using a Tesla coil, intracellular NAD+ and NADH were separated, incubated with the cycling buffer, and quantified by the amount of fluorescent product generated. NADH and NAD+ levels of single cells of three cell lines and primary astrocyte culture were determined using this method. Comparing cellular NAD+ and NADH levels with and without exposure to oxidative stress induced by H2O2, it was found that H9c2 cells respond to the stress by reducing both cellular NAD+ and NADH levels, while astrocytes respond by increasing cellular NADH/NAD+ ratio.

  6. Exogenous NAD(+) decreases oxidative stress and protects H2O2-treated RPE cells against necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Zhao, Ke-Ke; Tong, Yao; Zhou, Ya-Li; Wang, Yi-Xiao; Zhao, Pei-Quan; Wang, Zhao-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress, which can lead to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell death by inducing ATP depletion and DNA repair, is believed to be a prominent pathology in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the present study, we showed that and 0.1 mM nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) administration significantly blocked RPE cell death induced by 300 μM H2O2. Further investigation showed that H2O2 resulted in increased intracellular ROS level, activation of PARP-1 and subsequently necrotic death of RPE cells. Exogenous NAD(+) administration significantly decreased intracellular and intranuclear ROS levels in H2O2-treated RPE cells. In addition, NAD(+) administration to H2O2-treated RPE cells inhibited the activation of PARP-1 and protected the RPE cells against necrotic death. Moreover, exogenous NAD(+) administration up-regulated autophagy in the H2O2-treated RPE cells. Inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 blocked the decrease of intracellular and intranuclear ROS level. Besides, inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 abolished the protection of exogenous NAD(+) against H2O2-induced cell necrotic death. Taken together, our findings indicate that that exogenous NAD(+) administration suppresses H2O2-induced oxidative stress and protects RPE cells against PARP-1 mediated necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy. The results suggest that exogenous NAD(+) administration might be potential value for the treatment of AMD. PMID:27240523

  7. Non-invasive In-cell Determination of Free Cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] Ratios Using Hyperpolarized Glucose Show Large Variations in Metabolic Phenotypes*

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Caspar Elo; Karlsson, Magnus; Winther, Jakob R.; Jensen, Pernille Rose; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that the pyridine nucleotide NAD has far wider biological functions than its classical role in energy metabolism. NAD is used by hundreds of enzymes that catalyze substrate oxidation and, as such, it plays a key role in various biological processes such as aging, cell death, and oxidative stress. It has been suggested that changes in the ratio of free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] reflects metabolic alterations leading to, or correlating with, pathological states. We have designed an isotopically labeled metabolic bioprobe of free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] by combining a magnetic enhancement technique (hyperpolarization) with cellular glycolytic activity. The bioprobe reports free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] ratios based on dynamically measured in-cell [pyruvate]/[lactate] ratios. We demonstrate its utility in breast and prostate cancer cells. The free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio determined in prostate cancer cells was 4 times higher than in breast cancer cells. This higher ratio reflects a distinct metabolic phenotype of prostate cancer cells consistent with previously reported alterations in the energy metabolism of these cells. As a reporter on free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio, the bioprobe will enable better understanding of the origin of diverse pathological states of the cell as well as monitor cellular consequences of diseases and/or treatments. PMID:24302737

  8. Exogenous NAD+ decreases oxidative stress and protects H2O2-treated RPE cells against necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Zhao, Ke-ke; Tong, Yao; Zhou, Ya-li; Wang, Yi-xiao; Zhao, Pei-quan; Wang, Zhao-yang

    2016-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress, which can lead to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell death by inducing ATP depletion and DNA repair, is believed to be a prominent pathology in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the present study, we showed that and 0.1 mM nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) administration significantly blocked RPE cell death induced by 300 μM H2O2. Further investigation showed that H2O2 resulted in increased intracellular ROS level, activation of PARP-1 and subsequently necrotic death of RPE cells. Exogenous NAD+ administration significantly decreased intracellular and intranuclear ROS levels in H2O2-treated RPE cells. In addition, NAD+ administration to H2O2-treated RPE cells inhibited the activation of PARP-1 and protected the RPE cells against necrotic death. Moreover, exogenous NAD+ administration up-regulated autophagy in the H2O2-treated RPE cells. Inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 blocked the decrease of intracellular and intranuclear ROS level. Besides, inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 abolished the protection of exogenous NAD+ against H2O2-induced cell necrotic death. Taken together, our findings indicate that that exogenous NAD+ administration suppresses H2O2-induced oxidative stress and protects RPE cells against PARP-1 mediated necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy. The results suggest that exogenous NAD+ administration might be potential value for the treatment of AMD. PMID:27240523

  9. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2.

    PubMed

    Lavado-Roldán, Angela; Fernández-Chacón, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation. PMID:27454736

  10. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation. PMID:27454736

  11. A NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase coordinates metabolism with cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Beaufay, François; Coppine, Jérôme; Mayard, Aurélie; Laloux, Géraldine; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2015-01-01

    Coupling cell cycle with nutrient availability is a crucial process for all living cells. But how bacteria control cell division according to metabolic supplies remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism that coordinates central metabolism with cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This mechanism involves the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase GdhZ and the oxidoreductase-like KidO. While enzymatically active GdhZ directly interferes with FtsZ polymerization by stimulating its GTPase activity, KidO bound to NADH destabilizes lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments. Both GdhZ and KidO share the same regulatory network to concomitantly stimulate the rapid disassembly of the Z-ring, necessary for the subsequent release of progeny cells. Thus, this mechanism illustrates how proteins initially dedicated to metabolism coordinate cell cycle progression with nutrient availability. PMID:25953831

  12. Primary Kinetic Isotope Effects on Hydride Transfer from Heterocyclic Compounds to NAD+ Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Hyun Joo; Lee, In-Sook Han

    2009-09-01

    Primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), kH/kD, have been determined spectrophotometrically for the reactions of NAD+ analogues (acridinium ions, 1a-e+, and quinolinium ion, 2+) with heteroaromatic compounds such as 3-methyl-2-phenylbenzothiazoline, 3H(D), and 1,3-dimethyl-2-phenylbenzimidazoline, 4H(D) in a mixed solvent containing four parts 2-propanol and one part water at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C. The KIEs decrease from 6.24 to 3.93 as the equilibrium constant, K, is increased from about 1 to 1012 by the structural variation in the hydride acceptor. The Marcus theory of atom transfer in a linear, triatomic model of the reaction, with tunneling, can explain the variation of KIE with K. The Marcus theory is based on a model involving no high-energy intermediates, leading to a one-step mechanism. The present system satisfies this condition.

  13. Kinetic resolution of 2-hydroxybutanoate racemic mixtures by NAD-independent L-lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Wen; Ma, Cuiqing; Liu, Peng; Xu, Ping

    2011-04-01

    Optically active D-2-hydroxybutanoate is an important building block intermediate for medicines and biodegradable poly(2-hydroxybutanoate). Kinetic resolution of racemic 2-hydroxybutanoate may be a green and desirable alternative for D-2-hydroxybutanoate production. In this work, D-2-hydroxybutanoate at a high concentration (0.197 M) and a high enantiomeric excess (99.1%) was produced by an NAD-independent L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-iLDH) containing biocatalyst. 2-Oxobutanoate, another important intermediate, was co-produced at a high concentration (0.193 M). Using a simple ion exchange process with the macroporous anion exchange resin D301, D-2-hydroxybutanoate was separated from the biotransformation system with a high recovery of 84.7%. PMID:21295977

  14. Induction and inhibition of NAD(P)H: quinone reductase in murine and human skin.

    PubMed

    Merk, H; Jugert, F; Bonnekoh, B; Mahrle, G

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the human cutaneous NAD(P)H: quinone reductase (NQR) activity by known inhibitors of different reductases and to compare it with the murine skin and liver NQR activity. This enzyme plays a major role in the defence of cells against oxygen stress because it inhibits the 1-electron reduction of quinones to semiquinones and their subsequent oxidation to quinones termed as quinone redox cycle. It belongs to the aromatic hydrocarbon-responsive (Ah) battery. This gene battery includes Cyp1a1 (cytochrome P-450 IA1), Cyp1a2 (cytochrome P-450 IA2) and Nmo-1 [NAD(P)H: quinone reductase]. In the skin cytochrome P-450 IA1-dependent activity is about 1-5% compared to the corresponding activity in the liver, whereas NQR has the same activity in skin and liver. NQR was determined in the cytoplasm of murine skin, liver, and human keratinocytes using 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol as the substrate. The Ah-receptor binding compounds, such as coal tar constituents, or 3-methylcholanthrene induce cytochrome P-450-dependent activities such as aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase or 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-de-ethylase and NQR, whereas butyl hydroxytoluol, which does not bind to the Ah receptor, induces only NQR. For inhibition studies several known inhibitors of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, aldo-keto and carbonyl reductase activities were used. There was a similar pattern of inhibition of the basal and induced activity in all tissues investigated. Pyrazole, progesterone and phenobarbital did not inhibit, whereas dicoumarol, rutin and indomethacin inhibited NQR activity in murine skin and liver as well as in human keratinocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1768430

  15. MNADK, a Long-Awaited Human Mitochondrion-Localized NAD Kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ren

    2015-08-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its phosphorylated form, NADP, play essential roles in numerous cellular processes in all organisms. NADP maintains a pool of its reducing equivalent, NADPH, which regenerates cellular oxidative defense systems to counteract oxidative damages. Mitochondria represent a major source of oxidative stress, because the majority of superoxide, a reactive oxygen species, is generated from the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Therefore, as universal electron carriers in cellular electron transfer reactions, the pyridine nucleotides are required by mitochondria for both antioxidant protection and biosynthetic pathways. The NAD kinase (NADK) is the sole NADP biosynthetic enzyme. Because NADP is membrane-impermeable, eukaryotes need compartment-specific NADKs for different organelles. Consistently, in both yeast and plants, three compartment-specific NADKs have been identified. In contrast, even though the first human NADK, a cytosolic one, was identified in 2001, the identity of a hypothesized mitochondrial NADK remained elusive, until a recent discovery that the uncharacterized human gene C5ORF33 encodes a mitochondrion-localized NADK, referred to as MNADK. Three groups have characterized MNADK functions based on distinct systems involving yeast, mouse, and human studies, from aspects of both in vitro and in vivo evidence. MNADK is a mitochondrial NADK that is enriched and nutritionally-regulated in mouse liver, and a MNADK-deficient patient exhibits symptoms characteristic of mitochondrial disease. The identification of MNADK provides a key clue to the mechanism involved in mitochondrial NADPH production and the maintenance of redox balance in mammalian cells. The roles of MNADK in physiological and pathological processes have yet to be discovered. PMID:25641397

  16. Purification and properties of NAD-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase from Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, S W; Ljungdahl, L G

    1984-03-25

    An NAD-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase has been purified to homogeneity from autotrophically and heterotrophically grown cells of Acetobacterium woodii. The enzymes from the differently grown cells were indistinguishable by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis and have a final specific activity of 670 units mg-1. The enzyme is oxygen-labile; therefore, it was isolated under anaerobic conditions in the presence of dithiothreitol. The oxidized enzyme can be reactivated with 5 mM dithiothreitol, the half-time of activation being 19 min. The forward and reverse reaction initial velocity kinetics was studied and the enzyme was found to follow a substituted (ping-pong) reaction mechanism. With this model, the Km values for NAD and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate are 4.0 and 0.26 mM, while for NADH and 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate, they are 2.0 and 1.0 mM, respectively. The equilibrium constant at pH 6.7, determined by the Haldane relationship, is approximately equal to 2.0, favoring the formation of NADH and 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate. The purified enzyme is a Mr = 55,000 dimer which lacks 10-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase and 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase activities. At pH 6.7, the conversion of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate occurs at a rate of 98,600 mol min-1 mol-1 of enzyme, while the reverse reaction occurs at a rate of 95,600 mol min-1 mol-1 of enzyme. PMID:6608524

  17. Purification and properties of NAD-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase from Acetobacterium woodii

    SciTech Connect

    Ragsdale, S.W.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1984-03-25

    An NAD-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase has been purified to homogeneity from autotrophically and heterotrophically grown cells of Acetobacterium woodii. The enzymes from the differently grown cells were indistinguishable by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis and have a final specific activity of 670 units mg/sup -1/. The enzyme is oxygen-labile; therefore, it was isolated under anaerobic conditions in the presence of dithiothreitol. The oxidized enzyme can be reactivated with 5 mM dithiothreitol, the half-time of activation being 19 min. The forward and reverse reaction initial velocity kinetics was studied and the enzyme was found to follow a substituted reaction mechanism. With this model, the K/sub m/ values for NAD and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate are 4.0 and 0.26 mM, while for NADH and 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate, they are 2.0 and 1.0 mM, respectively. The equilibrium constant at pH 6.7, determined by the Haldane relationship, is approximately equal to 2.0, favoring the formation of NADH and 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate. The purified enzyme is a M/sub r/ = 55,000 dimer which lacks 10-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase and 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase activities. At pH 6.7, the conversion of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate occurs at a rate of 98,600 mol min/sup -1/ mol/sup -1/ of enzyme, while the reverse reaction occurs at a rate of 95,600 mol min/sup -1/ mol/sup -1/ of enzyme.

  18. Structure of Quinolinate Synthase from Pyrococcus horikoshii in the Presence of Its Product, Quinolinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Esakova, Olga A; Silakov, Alexey; Grove, Tyler L; Saunders, Allison H; McLaughlin, Martin I; Yennawar, Neela H; Booker, Squire J

    2016-06-15

    Quinolinic acid (QA) is a common intermediate in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its derivatives in all organisms that synthesize the molecule de novo. In most prokaryotes, it is formed from the condensation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and aspartate-enamine by the action of quinolinate synthase (NadA). NadA contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster cofactor with a unique, non-cysteinyl-ligated, iron ion (Fea), which is proposed to bind the hydroxyl group of a postulated intermediate in the last step of the reaction to facilitate a dehydration. However, direct evidence for this role in catalysis has yet to be provided. Herein, we present the structure of NadA in the presence of the product of its reaction, QA. We find that N1 and the C7 carboxylate group of QA ligate to Fea in a bidentate fashion, which is confirmed by Hyperfine Sublevel Correlation (HYSCORE) spectroscopy. This binding mode would place the C5 hydroxyl group of the postulated final intermediate distal to Fea and virtually incapable of coordinating to it. The structure shows that three strictly conserved amino acids, Glu198, Tyr109, and Tyr23, are in close proximity to the bound product. Substitution of these amino acids with Gln, Phe, and Phe, respectively, leads to complete loss of activity. PMID:27224840

  19. Decaaqua-dioxidobis[μ(3)-N-(phospho-n-atometh-yl)imino-diacetato]-dizinc(II)-divanadium(IV) dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Silva, Luís; Shi, Fa-Nian; Klinowski, Jacek; Trindade, Tito; Rocha, João; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2007-01-01

    The title compound, [Zn(2)V(2)(C(5)H(6)NO(7)P)(2)O(2)(H(2)O)(10)]·2H(2)O, contains a [V(2)O(2)(pmida)(2)](4-) dimeric anionic unit [where H(4)pmida is N-(phosphono-meth-yl)imino-diacetic acid] lying on a centre of symmetry which is exo-coordinated via the two deprotonated phospho-nate groups to two Zn(2+) cations, with the coordination environment of Zn completed by five water mol-ecules. The crystal packing is mediated by an extensive network of strong and highly directional O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving the water mol-ecules (coordinated and uncoordinated) and the functional groups of pmida(4-), leading to a three-dimensional supra-molecular network. PMID:21200612

  20. Crystal structures of 1,4-di-aza-bicyclo-[2.2.2]octan-1-ium 4-nitro-benzoate dihydrate and 1,4-di-aza-bicyclo-[2.2.2]octane-1,4-diium bis-(4-nitro-benzoate): the influence of solvent upon the stoichiometry of the formed salt.

    PubMed

    Akhmad Aznan, Aina Mardia; Abdullah, Zanariah; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2014-07-01

    The 1:1 co-crystallization of 1,4-di-aza-bicyclo-[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) with 4-nitro-benzoic acid in ethanol-water (3/1) gave the salt dihydrate C6H13N2 (+)·C7H4NO4 (-)·2H2O, (1), whereas from methanol, the salt C6H14N2 (2+)·2C7H4NO4 (-), (2), was isolated. In (1), the cation and anion are linked by a strong N-H⋯O hydrogen bond, and the carboxyl-ate anion is close to planar [dihedral angle between terminal residues = 6.83 (9)°]. In (2), a three-ion aggregate is assembled by two N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and the carboxyl-ate anions are again close to planar [dihedral angles between terminal residues = 1.7 (3) and 5.9 (3)°]. Through the inter-vention of solvent water mol-ecules, which self-assemble into helical supra-molecular chains along the b axis, the three-dimensional architecture in (1) is stabilized by water-DABCO O-H⋯N and water-carboxyl-ate O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, with additional stability afforded by C-H⋯O inter-actions. The global crystal structure comprises alternating layers of water mol-ecules and ion pairs stacked along the c axis. In the crystal of (2), the three-ion aggregates are assembled into a three-dimensional architecture by a large number of methyl-ene-carboxyl-ate/nitro C-H⋯O inter-actions as well as π-π contacts between inversion-related benzene rings [inter-centroid distances = 3.5644 (16) and 3.6527 (16) Å]. The cations and anions assemble into alternating layers along the c axis. PMID:25161500

  1. System-level understanding of the potential acid-tolerance components of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 under extreme acid stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shoushuai; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Wu

    2015-09-01

    In previous study, two extremely acidophilic strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 (collection site: bioleaching leachate) and ZJJN-5 (collection site: bioleaching wastewater) were isolated from a typical industrial bio-heap in China. Here, we unraveled the potential acid-tolerance components of ZJJN-3 by comparing the physiological differences with ZJJN-5 under different acid stresses. The parameters used for comparison included intracellular pH (pHin), capsule morphology, fatty acid composition of cell membrane, transcription of key molecular chaperones, H(+)-ATPase activities and NAD(+)/NADH ratio. It was indicated that the acid-tolerance of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 was systematically regulated. Capsule first thickened and then shed off along with increased acid stress. Cell membrane maintained the intracellular stability by up-regulating the proportion of unsaturated fatty acid and cyclopropane fatty acids. Meanwhile, the transcription of key repair molecular chaperones (GrpE-DnaK-DnaJ) was up-regulated by 2.2-3.5 folds for ensuring the proper folding of peptide. Moreover, low pHin promoted ZJJN-3 to biosynthesize more H(+)-ATPase for pumping H(+) out of cells. Furthermore, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio increased due to the decreased H(+) concentration. Based on the above physiological analysis, the potential acid-tolerance components of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 were first proposed and it would be useful for better understanding how these extremophiles responded to the high acid stress. PMID:26264736

  2. METABOLISM OF DICARBOXYLIC ACIDS IN ACETOBACTER XYLINUM

    PubMed Central

    Benziman, Moshe; Abeliovitz, A.

    1964-01-01

    Benziman, Moshe (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel), and A. Abeliovitz. Metabolism of dicarboxylic acids in Acetobacter xylinum. J. Bacteriol. 87:270–277. 1964.—During the oxidation of fumarate or l-malate by whole cells or extracts of Acetobacter xylinum grown on succinate, a keto acid accumulated in the medium in considerable amounts. This acid was identified as oxaloacetic acid (OAA). No accumulation of OAA was observed when succinate served as substrate. These phenomena could be explained by the kinetics of malate, succinate, and OAA oxidation. OAA did not inhibit malate oxidation, even when present at high concentrations. When cells were incubated with OAA or fumarate in the presence of C14O2, only the beta-carboxyl of residual OAA was found to be labeled. Evidence was obtained indicating that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) are not directly involved in malate oxidation by cell-free extracts. The results suggest that malate oxidation in A. xylinum is irreversible, and is catalyzed by an enzyme which is not NAD- or NADP-linked. PMID:14151044

  3. Biochemical Analysis of the NAD+-Dependent Malate Dehydrogenase, a Substrate of Several Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Ming; Soetaert, Karine; Peirs, Priska; Kalai, Michaël; Fontaine, Véronique; Dehaye, Jean Paul; Lefèvre, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    PknD is one of the eleven eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In vitro phosphorylation assays with the active recombinant PknD showed that the intracellular protein NAD+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is a substrate of this kinase. MDH, an energy-supplying enzyme, catalyzes the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate and plays crucial roles in several metabolic pathways including the citric acid cycle. The phosphorylation site was identified on threonine residues and the phosphorylation inhibited the MDH activity. In vitro, the recombinant MDH could also be phosphorylated by at least five other STPKs, PknA, PknE, PknH, PknJ, and PknG. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that MDH was hyperphosphorylated in the bacteria at the beginning of the stationary and under oxygen-limited conditions by STPKs other than PknD. On the contrary, when PknD-deficient mutant mycobacteria were grown in a phosphate-depleted medium, MDH was not detectably phosphorylated. These results suggest that although the MDH is a substrate of several mycobacterial STPKs, the activity of these kinases can depend on the environment, as we identified PknD as a key element in the MDH phosphorylation assay under phosphate-poor conditions. PMID:25860441

  4. Molecular Clone and Expression of a NAD+-Dependent Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Isozyme Gene from the Halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ma; He, Li-Hong; Yu, Tu-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Glycerol is an important osmotically compatible solute in Dunaliella. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) is a key enzyme in the pathway of glycerol synthesis, which converts dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to glycerol-3-phosphate. Generally, the glycerol-DHAP cycle pathway, which is driven by G3PDH, is considered as the rate-limiting enzyme to regulate the glycerol level under osmotic shocks. Considering the peculiarity in osmoregulation, the cDNA of a NAD+-dependent G3PDH was isolated from D. salina using RACE and RT-PCR approaches in this study. Results indicated that the length of the cDNA sequence of G3PDH was 2,100 bp encoding a 699 amino acid deduced polypeptide whose computational molecular weight was 76.6 kDa. Conserved domain analysis revealed that the G3PDH protein has two independent functional domains, SerB and G3PDH domains. It was predicted that the G3PDH was a nonsecretory protein and may be located in the chloroplast of D. salina. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the D. salina G3PDH had a closer relationship with the G3PDHs from the Dunaliella genus than with those from other species. In addition, the cDNA was subsequently subcloned in the pET-32a(+) vector and was transformed into E. coli strain BL21 (DE3), a expression protein with 100 kDa was identified, which was consistent with the theoretical value. PMID:23626797

  5. Novel Antibiotic-Free Plasmid Selection System Based on Complementation of Host Auxotrophy in the NAD De Novo Synthesis Pathway▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei-Ren; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    The use of antibiotic resistance genes in plasmids causes potential biosafety and clinical hazards, such as the possibility of horizontal spread of resistance genes or the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. This paper introduces a novel auxotrophy complementation system that allowed plasmids and host cells to be effectively selected and maintained without the use of antibiotics. An Escherichia coli strain carrying a defect in NAD de novo biosynthesis was constructed by knocking out the chromosomal quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase) gene. The resistance gene in the plasmids was replaced by the QAPRTase gene of E. coli or the mouse. As a result, only expression of the QAPRTase gene from plasmids can complement and rescue E. coli host cells in minimal medium. This is the first time that a vertebrate gene has been used to construct a nonantibiotic selection system, and it can be widely applied in DNA vaccine and gene therapy. As the QAPRTase gene is ubiquitous in species ranging from bacteria to mammals, the potential environmental biosafety problems caused by horizontal gene transfer can be eliminated. PMID:20118370

  6. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na+-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na+-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  7. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H; Müller, Volker

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD(+)