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Sample records for acid dna base

  1. A fluorescence-based analysis of aristolochic acid-derived DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Sidorenko, Victoria; Rosenquist, Thomas A; Whyard, Terry; Grollman, Arthur P

    2012-08-01

    Aristolochic acids (AAs), major components of plant extracts from Aristolochia species, form (after metabolic activation) pro-mutagenic DNA adducts in renal tissue. The DNA adducts can be used as biomarkers for studies of AA toxicity. Identification of these adducts is a complicated and time-consuming procedure. We present here a fast, nonisotopic, fluorescence-based assay for the detection of AA-DNA adducts in multiple samples. This approach allows analysis of AA adducts in synthetic DNA with known nucleotide composition and analysis of DNA adducts formed from chemically diverse AAs in vitro. The method can be applied to compare AA-DNA adduct formation in cells and tissues.

  2. [The effect of spermine on acid-base equilibrium in DNA molecule].

    PubMed

    Slonitskiĭ, S V; Kuptsov, V Iu

    1990-01-01

    The influence of spermine (Sp) on the acid-induced predenaturational and denaturational transitions in the DNA molecule structure has been studied by means of circular dichroism, spectrophotometric and viscometric titration at supporting electrolyte concentration 10 mM NaCl. The data available indicate that at [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.60 (here [N] and [P] are molar concentrations of Sp nitrogen and DNA phosphours, respectively) the cooperative structural B----B(+)----S transitions are accompanied by the DNA double-helice winding. No competition for proton acceptor sites in the DNA molecule between H+ and Sp4+ cations has been observed when binding to neutral macromolecule. At 0.60 less than or equal to [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.75 the displacement of the B----B(+)----S transitions midpoints to acidic pH region has been established. This is accompanied by DNA condensation and the appearance of differential scattering of circularly polarized light. The calculations carried out in the framework of the two-variable Manning theory have shown that the acid-induced reduction of the effective polyion charge density facilitates the Sp-induced DNA condensation. It has been shown that the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule is determined by local [H+] in the 2-3 A hydrated monolayer of the macromolecule. An adequate estimation of [H+] can be obtained on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzman approach. The data obtained are consistent with recently proposed hypothesis of polyelectrolyte invariance of the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule.

  3. A Concentrated Hydrochloric Acid-based Method for Complete Recovery of DNA from Bone.

    PubMed

    Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M

    2015-11-01

    The successful extraction of DNA from historical or ancient animal bone is important for the analysis of discriminating genetic markers. Methods used currently rely on the digestion of bone with EDTA and proteinase K, followed by purification with phenol/chloroform and silica bed binding. We have developed a simple concentrated hydrochloric acid-based method that precludes the use of phenol/chloroform purification and can lead to a several-fold increase in DNA yield when compared to other commonly used methods. Concentrated hydrochloric acid was shown to dissolve most of the undigested bone and allowed the efficient recovery of DNA fragments <100 bases in length. This method should prove useful for the recovery of DNAs from highly degraded animal bone, such as that found in historical or ancient samples.

  4. Optoelectronic studies on heterocyclic bases of deoxyribonucleic acid for DNA photonics.

    PubMed

    El-Diasty, Fouad; Abdel-Wahab, Fathy

    2015-10-01

    The optoelectronics study of large molecules, particularly π-stacking molecules, such as DNA is really an extremely difficult task. We perform first electronic structure calculations on the heterocyclic bases of 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid based on Lorentz-Fresnel dispersion theory. In the UV-VIS range of spectrum, many of the optoelectronic parameters for DNA four bases namely adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine are calculated and discussed. The results demonstrate that adenine has the highest hyperpolarizability, whereas thymine has the lowest hyperpolarizability. Cytosine has the lower average oscillator energy and the higher lattice energy. Thymine infers the most stable nucleic base with the lower phonon energy. Thymine also has the highest average oscillator energy and the lower lattice energy. Moreover, the four nucleic acid bases have large band gap energies less than 5 eV with a semiconducting behavior. Guanine shows the smallest band gap and the highest Fermi level energy, whereas adenine elucidates the highest band gap energy.

  5. Stable Valence Anions of Nucleic Acid Bases and DNA Strand Breaks Induced by Low Energy Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, Janusz; Mazurkiewicz, Kamil; Kobylecka, Monika; Storoniak, Piotr; Haranczyk, Maciej; Dabkowska, Iwona; Bachorz, Rafal A.; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Radisic, Dunja; Stokes, Sarah T.; Eustis, Soren; Wang, Di; Li, Xiang; Ko, Yeon J.; Bowen, Kit H.

    2008-05-08

    The investigation of structures and properties of nucleic acids has fascinated and challenged researchers ever since the discovery of their relation to genes. Extensive studies have been carried out on these species to unravel the mystery behind the selection of these molecules as genetic material by nature and to explain various physico-chemical properties. However, a vast pool of information is yet to be discovered. DNA constituents, mainly aromatic purine and pyrimidine bases, absorb ultraviolet irradiation efficiently, but the absorbed energy is quickly released in the form of ultrafast nonradiative decays. Recently impressive progress has been made towards the understanding of photophysical and photochemical properties of DNA fragments.

  6. Anionic magnetite nanoparticle conjugated with pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid for DNA base discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadsai, Sudarat; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Nakkuntod, Maliwan; Rutnakornpituk, Metha

    2016-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were surface modified with anionic poly( N-acryloyl glycine) (PNAG) and streptavidin for specific interaction with biotin-conjugated pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Hydrodynamic size ( D h) of PNAG-grafted MNPs varied from 334 to 496 nm depending on the loading ratio of the MNP to NAG in the reaction. UV-visible and fluorescence spectrophotometries were used to confirm the successful immobilization of streptavidin and PNA on the MNPs. About 291 pmol of the PNA/mg MNP was immobilized on the particle surface. The PNA-functionalized MNPs were effectively used as solid supports to differentiate between fully complementary and non-complementary/single-base mismatch DNA using the PNA probe. These novel anionic MNPs can be efficiently applicable for use as a magnetically guidable support for DNA base discrimination.

  7. DNA binding mode of novel tetradentate amino acid based 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.; Selvaganapathy, M.; Mahalakshmi, R.

    2012-10-01

    Few transition metal complexes of tetradentate N2O2 donor Schiff base ligands containing 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine and amino acids (alanine/valine) abbreviated to KHL1/KHL2 have been synthesized. All the metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic data. The Schiff bases KHL1/KHL2 are found to act as tetradentate ligands using N2O2 donor set of atoms leading to a square-planar geometry for the complexes around the metal ions. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA have been investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The DNA binding constants reveal that all these complexes interact with DNA through minor groove binding mode. The studies on mechanism of photocleavage reveal that singlet oxygen (1O2) and superoxide anion radical (O2rad -) may play an important role in the photocleavage. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger, Fusarium solani, Culvularia lunata, Rhizoctonia bataicola and Candida albicans by MIC method.

  8. "Nano-oddities": unusual nucleic acid assemblies for DNA-based nanostructures and nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Mendoza, Oscar; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA is an attractive polymer building material for nanodevices and nanostructures due to its ability for self-recognition and self-assembly. Assembly relies on the formation of base-specific interactions that allow strands to adopt structures in a controllable fashion. Most DNA-based higher order structures such as DNA cages, 2D and 3D DNA crystals, or origamis are based on DNA double helices stabilized by Watson-Crick complementarity. A number of nonclassical pairing patterns are possible between or among DNA strands; these interactions result in formation of unusual structures that include, but are not limited to, G-quadruplexes, i-motifs, triplexes, and parallel-stranded duplexes. These structures create greater diversity of DNA-based building blocks for nanomaterials and have certain advantages over conventional duplex DNA, such as enhanced thermal stability and sensitivity to chemical stimuli. In this Account, we briefly introduce these alternative DNA structures and describe in detail their utilization in a variety of nanomaterials and nanomachines. The field of DNA "nano-oddities" emerged in the late 1990s when for the first time a DNA nanomachine was designed based on equilibrium between B-DNA and noncanonical, left-handed Z-DNA. Soon after, "proof-of-principle" DNA nanomachines based on several DNA "oddities" were reported. These machines were set in motion by the addition of complementary strands (a principle used by many B-DNA-based nanodevices), by the addition of selected cations, small molecules, or proteins, or by a change in pH or temperature. Today, we have fair understanding of the mechanism of action of these devices, excellent control over their performance, and knowledge of basic principles of their design. pH sensors and pH-controlled devices occupy a central niche in the field. They are usually based on i-motifs or triplex DNA, are amazingly simple, robust, and reversible, and create no waste apart from salt and water. G

  9. Development of artificial nucleic acid that recognizes a CG base pair in triplex DNA formation.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    An oligonucleotide that can form a triplex with double-stranded DNA is called a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO). TFOs have gained considerable attention because of their potential as gene targeting tools. However, triplex DNA formation involves inherent problems for practical use. The most important problem is that natural nucleotides in TFO do not have sufficient affinity and base pair-selectivity to pyrimidine-purine base pair, like a CG or TA base pair, within dsDNA. This suggests that dsDNA region including a CG or TA base pair cannot be targeted. Therefore, artificial nucleotides, especially with non-natural nucleobases, capable of direct recognition of a CG or TA base pair via hydrogen bond formation have been developed; however, nucleotides with better selectivity and stronger affinity are necessary for implementing this dsDNA-targeting technology using TFOs. Under such a background, we considered that facile and efficient synthesis of various nucleobase derivatives in TFOs would be useful for finding an ideal nucleobase for recognition of a CG or TA base pair because detailed and rational exploration of nucleobase structures is facilitated. Recently, to develop a nucleobase recognizing a CG base pair, we have used post-elongation modification, i.e., modification after oligonucleotide synthesis, for the facile synthesis of nucleobase derivatives. This review mainly summarizes our recent findings on the development of artificial nucleobases and nucleotides for recognition of a CG base pair in triplexes formed between dsDNA and TFOs.

  10. Influence of amino acids Shiff bases on irradiated DNA stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Karapetyan, N H; Malakyan, M H; Bajinyan, S A; Torosyan, A L; Grigoryan, I E; Haroutiunian, S G

    2013-01-01

    To reveal protective role of the new Mn(II) complexes with Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate and Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate Schiff Bases against ionizing radiation. The DNA of the rats liver was isolated on 7, 14, and 30 days after X-ray irradiation. The differences between the DNA of irradiated rats and rats pre-treated with Mn(II) complexes were studied using the melting, microcalorimetry, and electrophoresis methods. The melting parameters and the melting enthalpy of rats livers DNA were changed after the X-ray irradiation: melting temperature and melting enthalpy were decreased and melting interval was increased. These results can be explained by destruction of DNA molecules. It was shown that pre-treatment of rats with Mn(II) complexes approximates the melting parameters to norm. Agarose gel electrophoresis data confirmed the results of melting studies. The separate DNA fragments were revealed in DNA samples isolated from irradiated animals. The DNA isolated from animals pre-treated with the Mn(II) chelates had better electrophoretic characteristics, which correspond to healthy DNA. Pre-treatment of the irradiated rats with Mn(II)(Nicotinil-L-Tyrosinate) and Mn(II)(Nicotinil-L-Tryptophanate)2 improves the DNA characteristics.

  11. SDR-ELISA: Ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection based on antibody-like DNA nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Wen, Junlin; Chen, Junhua; Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shungui

    2017-04-15

    An ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection system, termed as strand displacement reaction-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (SDR-ELISA), has been developed on the basis of antibody-like DNA nanostructures. Three digoxigenin or biotin modified hairpin probes are utilized to construct antibody-like DNA nanostructures that feature affinity toward streptavidin and anti-digoxigenin antibody via isothermal target-triggered SDR amplification. These antibody-like nanostructures have been employed to conjugate horseradish-peroxidase-labeled anti-digoxigenin antibody with streptavidin that is immobilized on microliter plate wells for enzyme-linked colorimetric assay. The resulting SDR-ELISA system is ultrasensitive for target DNA with a low detection limit of 5 fM. Moreover, the SDR-ELISA system is capable of discriminating DNA sequences with single base mutations, and do so in a high-throughput manner by detection and quantification of up to 96 or 384 DNA samples in a single shot. This detection system is further applied to detect other DNA targets such as Shewanella oneidensis specific DNA sequence, which indicates the generality of proposed SDR-ELISA system. The integration of SDR amplification and convenient ELISA technique advances an intelligent strategy for ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection, which may be amenable for direct visual detection and quantification using an accompanying quantitative color chart.

  12. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: A comparative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sakthivel, A.; Pravin, N.

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 102 to 105 indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical.

  13. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: a comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Raman, N; Sakthivel, A; Pravin, N

    2014-05-05

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 10(2) to 10(5) indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical.

  14. DNA interaction with octahedral and square planar Ni(II) complexes of aspartic-acid Schiff-bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, S. A.; Orabi, A. S.; Abbas, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Ni(II) complexes of (S,E)-2-(2-OHbenzilydene)aspartic acid; (S,E)-2-(2,3-diOHbenzilydene)aspartic acid-; (S,E)-2-(2,4-diOH-benzilydene)aspartic acid; (S,E)-2-(2,5-diOHbenzilydene)aspartic acid and (S,E)-2-((2-OHnaphthalene-1-yl)methylene)aspartic acid Schiff-bases have been synthesized by template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and 1H nmr spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG, DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate or tetradentate donors and the complexes have square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in two or three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  15. Self-assembling DNA hydrogel-based delivery of immunoinhibitory nucleic acids to immune cells.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yu; Ohtsuki, Shozo; Araie, Yuki; Umeki, Yuka; Endo, Masayuki; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Nishikawa, Makiya

    2016-01-01

    Immunoinhibitory oligodeoxynucleotides (INH-ODNs) are promising inhibitors of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) activation. To efficiently deliver INH-ODNs to TLR9-positive cells, we designed a Takumi-shaped DNA (Takumi) consisting of two partially complementary ODNs as the main component of a DNA hydrogel. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that Takumi-containing INH-ODNs (iTakumi) and iTakumi-based DNA hydrogel (iTakumiGel) were successfully generated. Their activity was examined in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and DC2.4 dendritic cells by measuring tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release after the addition of a TLR9 ligand (CpG ODN). Cytokine release was efficiently inhibited by the iTakumiGel. Flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy showed that cellular uptake of INH-ODN was greatly increased by the iTakumiGel. These results indicate that a Takumi-based DNA hydrogel is useful for the delivery of INH-ODNs to immune cells to inhibit TLR9-mediated hyperinduction of proinflammatory cytokines. From the Clinical Editor: Toll-like receptor 9 activation has been reported to be associated with many autoimmune diseases. DNA inhibition using oligodeoxynucleotides is one of the potential treatments. In this article, the authors described hydrogel-based platform for the delivery of the inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotides for enhanced efficacy. The positive findings could indicate a way for the future.

  16. Synthesis, physicochemical studies, embryos toxicity and DNA interaction of some new Iron(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.

    2013-05-01

    New Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, and conductance measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. The investigated Schiff bases exhibited tridentate coordination mode with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O for all amino acids except L-histidine. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their toxicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. The interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA cleavage activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. The thermodynamic Profile of the binding of nphali complex and CT-DNA was constructed by analyzing the experimental data of absorption titration and UV melting studies with the McGhee equation, van't Hoff's equation, and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

  17. Histidine-Based Lipopeptides Enhance Cleavage of Nucleic Acids: Interactions with DNA and Hydrolytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Bélières, M; Déjugnat, C; Chouini-Lalanne, N

    2015-12-16

    Interaction studies and cleavage activity experiments were carried out between plasmid DNA and a series of histidine-based lipopeptides. Specific fluorescent probes (ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342, and pyrene) were used to monitor intercalation, minor groove binding, and self-assembly of lipopeptides, respectively. Association between DNA and lipopeptides was thus evidenced, highlighting the importance of both histidine and hydrophobic tail in the interaction process. DNA cleavage in the presence of lipopeptides was then detected by gel electrophoresis and quantified, showing the importance of histidine and the involvement of its side-chain imidazole in the hydrolysis mechanism. These systems could then be developed as synthetic nucleases while raising concern of introducing histidine in the design of lipopeptide-based transfection vectors.

  18. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  19. DNA Methylation Profiling at Single-Base Resolution Reveals Gestational Folic Acid Supplementation Influences the Epigenome of Mouse Offspring Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Brown, W. Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly more evident that lifestyle, environmental factors, and maternal nutrition during gestation can influence the epigenome of the developing fetus and thus modulate the physiological outcome. Variations in the intake of maternal nutrients affecting one-carbon metabolism may influence brain development and exert long-term effects on the health of the progeny. In this study, we investigated whether supplementation with high maternal folic acid during gestation alters DNA methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of mouse offspring. We used reduced representation bisulfite sequencing to analyze the DNA methylation profile at the single-base resolution level. The genome-wide DNA methylation analysis revealed that supplementation with higher maternal folic acid resulted in distinct methylation patterns (P < 0.05) of CpG and non-CpG sites in the cerebellum of offspring. Such variations of methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring were highly sex-specific, including several genes of the neuronal pathways. These findings demonstrate that alterations in the level of maternal folic acid during gestation can influence methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring. Such changes in the offspring epigenome may alter neurodevelopment and influence the functional outcome of neurologic and psychiatric diseases. PMID:27199632

  20. Investigation of irradiated rats DNA in the presence of Cu(II) chelates of amino acids Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Karapetyan, N H; Torosyan, A L; Malakyan, M; Bajinyan, S A; Haroutiunian, S G

    2016-01-01

    The new synthesized Cu(II) chelates of amino acids Schiff bases were studied as a potential radioprotectors. Male albino rats of Wistar strain were exposed to X-ray whole-body irradiation at 4.8 Gy. This dose caused 30% mortality of the animals (LD30). The survival of animals exposed to radiation after preliminary administration of 10 mg/kg Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate)2 or Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate)2 prior to irradiation was registered about 80 and 100% correspondingly. Using spectrophotometric melting and agarose gel electrophoresis methods, the differences between the DNA isolated from irradiated rats and rats pretreated with Cu(II) chelates were studied. The fragments of DNA with different breaks were revealed in DNA samples isolated from irradiated animals. While, the repair of the DNA structure was observed for animals pretreated with the Cu(II) chelates. The results suggested that pretreatment of the irradiated rats with Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate)2 and Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate)2 compounds improves the liver DNA characteristics.

  1. Label-free DNA biosensor based on a peptide nucleic acid-functionalized microstructured optical fiber-Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candiani, Alessandro; Bertucci, Alessandro; Giannetti, Sara; Konstantaki, Maria; Manicardi, Alex; Pissadakis, Stavros; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Corradini, Roberto; Selleri, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    We describe a novel sensing approach based on a functionalized microstructured optical fiber-Bragg grating for specific DNA target sequences detection. The inner surface of a microstructured fiber, where a Bragg grating was previously inscribed, has been functionalized by covalent linking of a peptide nucleic acid probe targeting a DNA sequence bearing a single point mutation implicated in cystic fibrosis (CF) disease. A solution of an oligonucleotide (ON) corresponding to a tract of the CF gene containing the mutated DNA has been infiltrated inside the fiber capillaries and allowed to hybridize to the fiber surface according to the Watson-Crick pairing. In order to achieve signal amplification, ON-functionalized gold nanoparticles were then infiltrated and used in a sandwich-like assay. Experimental measurements show a clear shift of the reflected high order mode of a Bragg grating for a 100 nM DNA solution, and fluorescence measurements have confirmed the successful hybridization. Several experiments have been carried out on the same fiber using the identical concentration, showing the same modulation trend, suggesting the possibility of the reuse of the sensor. Measurements have also been made using a 100 nM mismatched DNA solution, containing a single nucleotide mutation and corresponding to the wild-type gene, and the results demonstrate the high selectivity of the sensor.

  2. DNA cleavage in red light promoted by copper(II) complexes of alpha-amino acids and photoactive phenanthroline bases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ashis K; Bhowmick, Tuhin; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2008-12-28

    Ternary copper(II) complexes [Cu(L-trp)(B)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (1-3) and [Cu(L-phe)(B)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (4-6) of L-tryptophan (L-trp) and L-phenylalanine (L-phe) having phenanthroline bases (B), viz. 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 1 and 4), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 2 and 5) and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 3 and 6), were prepared and characterized by physico-chemical techniques. Complexes 3 and 6 were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and show the presence of a square pyramidal (4 + 1) CuN(3)O(2) coordination geometry in which the N,O-donor amino acid (L-trp or L-phe) and N,N-donor phenanthroline base bind at the equatorial plane with an aqua ligand coordinated at the elongated axial site. Complex 3 shows significant distortion from the square pyramidal geometry and a strong intramolecular pi-pi stacking interaction between the pendant indole ring of L-trp and the planar dppz aromatic moiety. All the complexes display good binding propensity to the calf thymus DNA giving an order: 3,6 (dppz) > 2,5 (dpq) > 1,4 (phen). The binding constant (K(b)) values are in the range of 2.1 x 10(4)-1.1 x 10(6) mol(-1) with the binding site size (s) values of 0.17-0.63. The phen and dpq complexes are minor groove binders while the dppz analogues bind at the DNA major groove. Theoretical DNA docking studies on 2 and 3 show the close proximity of two photosensitizers, viz. the indole moiety of L-trp and the quinoxaline/phenazine of the dpq/dppz bases, to the complementary DNA strands. Complexes 2 and 3 show oxidative DNA double strand breaks (dsb) of supercoiled (SC) DNA forming a significant quantity of linear DNA along with the nicked circular (NC) form on photoexposure to UV-A light of 365 nm and red light of 647.1 nm (Ar-Kr laser). Complexes 1,5 and 6 show only single strand breaks (ssb) forming NC DNA. The red light induced DNA cleavage involves metal-assisted photosensitization of L-trp and dpq/dppz base resulting in the formation of a reactive

  3. Plant flavone apigenin binds to nucleic acid bases and reduces oxidative DNA damage in prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Haripaul; Kanwal, Rajnee; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Gupta, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked to prostate carcinogenesis as human prostate tissue is vulnerable to oxidative DNA damage. Apigenin, a dietary plant flavone, possesses anti-proliferative and anticancer effects; however, its antioxidant properties have not been fully elucidated. We investigated sub-cellular distribution of apigenin, it's binding to DNA and protective effects against H2O2-induced DNA damage using transformed human prostate epithelial RWPE-1 cells and prostate cancer LNCaP, PC-3 and DU145 cells. Exposure of cells to apigenin exhibited higher accumulation in RWPE-1 and LNCaP cells, compared to PC-3 and DU145 cells. The kinetics of apigenin uptake in LNCaP cells was estimated with a Km value of 5 µmole/L and Vmax of 190 pmoles/million cells/h. Sub-cellular fractionation demonstrated that nuclear matrix retains the highest concentration of apigenin (45.3%), followed by cytosol (23.9%), nuclear membranes (17.9%) and microsomes (12.9%), respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of apigenin with calf-thymus DNA exhibited intercalation as the dominant binding mode to DNA duplex. Apigenin exposure resulted in significant genoprotective effects in H2O2-stressed RWPE-1 cells by reduction in reactive oxygen species levels. In addition, apigenin exposure suppressed the formation of 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine and protected exposed cells from apoptosis. Our studies demonstrate that apigenin is readily taken up by normal prostatic epithelial cells and prostate cancer cells, and is incorporated into their nuclei, where its intercalation with nucleic acid bases may account for its antioxidant and chemopreventive activities.

  4. Genomic DNA Methylation Changes in Response to Folic Acid Supplementation in a Population-Based Intervention Study among Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Robert J.; Hao, Ling; Li, Zhu; Maneval, David; Yang, Thomas P.; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Yang, Quanhe; Zhu, Jiang-Hui; Hu, Dale J.; Bailey, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Folate is a source of one-carbons necessary for DNA methylation, a critical epigenetic modification necessary for genomic structure and function. The use of supplemental folic acid is widespread however; the potential influence on DNA methylation is unclear. We measured global DNA methylation using DNA extracted from samples from a population-based, double-blind randomized trial of folic acid supplementation (100, 400, 4000 µg per day) taken for 6 months; including a 3 month post-supplementation sample. We observed no changes in global DNA methylation in response to up to 4,000 µg/day for 6 months supplementation in DNA extracted from uncoagulated blood (approximates circulating blood). However, when DNA methylation was determined in coagulated samples from the same individuals at the same time, significant time, dose, and MTHFR genotype-dependent changes were observed. The baseline level of DNA methylation was the same for uncoagulated and coagulated samples; marked differences between sample types were observed only after intervention. In DNA from coagulated blood, DNA methylation decreased (−14%; P<0.001) after 1 month of supplementation and 3 months after supplement withdrawal, methylation decreased an additional 23% (P<0.001) with significant variation among individuals (max+17%; min-94%). Decreases in methylation of ≥25% (vs. <25%) after discontinuation of supplementation were strongly associated with genotype: MTHFR CC vs. TT (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 12.9, 95%CI 6.4, 26.0). The unexpected difference in DNA methylation between DNA extracted from coagulated and uncoagulated samples in response to folic acid supplementation is an important finding for evaluating use of folic acid and investigating the potential effects of folic acid supplementation on coagulation. PMID:22163281

  5. Analysis of several methods for the extraction of high quality DNA from acetic acid bacteria in wine and vinegar for characterization by PCR-based methods.

    PubMed

    Jara, C; Mateo, E; Guillamón, J M; Torija, M J; Mas, A

    2008-12-10

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are fastidious microorganisms with poor recovery in culture. Culture-independent methods are currently under examination. Good DNA extraction is a strict requirement of these methods. We compared five methods for extracting the DNA of AAB directly from wine and vinegar samples. Four matrices (white wine, red wine, superficial vinegar and submerged vinegar) contaminated with two AAB strains belonging to Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconacetobacter hansenii were assayed. To improve the yield and quality of the extracted DNA, a sample treatment (washing with polyvinyl pyrrolidone or NaCl) was also tested. DNA quality was measured by amplification of the 16S rRNA gene with conventional PCR. DNA recovery rate was assessed by real-time PCR. DNA amplification was always successful with the Wizard method though DNA recovery was poor. A CTAB-based method and NucleoSpin protocol extracted the highest DNA recoveries from wine and vinegar samples. Both of these methods require treatment to recover suitable DNA for amplification with maximum recovery. Both may therefore be good solutions for DNA extraction in wine and vinegar samples. DNA extraction of Ga hansenii was more effective than that of A. pasteurianus. The fastest and cheapest method we evaluated (the Thermal shock protocol) produced the worst results both for DNA amplification and DNA recovery.

  6. Spectral characterization, cyclic voltammetry, morphology, biological activities and DNA cleaving studies of amino acid Schiff base metal(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, M A; Rusalraj, F; Dharmaraja, J; Johnsonraja, S; Jeyakumar, T; Sankaranarayana Pillai, M

    2008-12-15

    Metal complexes are synthesized with Schiff bases derived from o-phthalaldehyde (opa) and amino acids viz., glycine (gly) l-alanine (ala), l-phenylalanine (pal). Metal ions coordinate in a tetradentate or hexadentate manner with these N(2)O(2) donor ligands, which are characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moments, IR, electronic, (1)H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The elemental analysis suggests the stoichiometry to be 1:1 (metal:ligand). Based on EPR studies, spin-Hamiltonian and bonding parameters have been calculated. The g-values calculated for copper complexes at 300K and in frozen DMSO (77K) indicate the presence of the unpaired electron in the dx2-y2 orbital. The evaluated metal-ligand bonding parameters showed strong in-plane sigma- and pi-bonding. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron micrography (SEM) analysis provide the crystalline nature and the morphology of the metal complexes. The cyclic voltammograms of the Cu(II)/Mn(II)/VO(II) complexes investigated in DMSO solution exhibit metal centered electroactivity in the potential range -1.5 to +1.5V. The electrochemical data obtained for Cu(II) complexes explains the change of structural arrangement of the ligand around Cu(II) ions. The biological activity of the complexes has been tested on eight bacteria and three fungi. Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes show an increased activity in comparison to the controls. The metal complexes of opapal Schiff base were evaluated for their DNA cleaving activities with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) under aerobic conditions. Cu(II) and VO(II) complexes show more pronounced activity in presence of the oxidant.

  7. Spectral characterization, cyclic voltammetry, morphology, biological activities and DNA cleaving studies of amino acid Schiff base metal(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakantan, M. A.; Rusalraj, F.; Dharmaraja, J.; Johnsonraja, S.; Jeyakumar, T.; Sankaranarayana Pillai, M.

    2008-12-01

    Metal complexes are synthesized with Schiff bases derived from o-phthalaldehyde (opa) and amino acids viz., glycine (gly) L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (pal). Metal ions coordinate in a tetradentate or hexadentate manner with these N 2O 2 donor ligands, which are characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moments, IR, electronic, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The elemental analysis suggests the stoichiometry to be 1:1 (metal:ligand). Based on EPR studies, spin-Hamiltonian and bonding parameters have been calculated. The g-values calculated for copper complexes at 300 K and in frozen DMSO (77 K) indicate the presence of the unpaired electron in the d orbital. The evaluated metal-ligand bonding parameters showed strong in-plane σ- and π-bonding. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron micrography (SEM) analysis provide the crystalline nature and the morphology of the metal complexes. The cyclic voltammograms of the Cu(II)/Mn(II)/VO(II) complexes investigated in DMSO solution exhibit metal centered electroactivity in the potential range -1.5 to +1.5 V. The electrochemical data obtained for Cu(II) complexes explains the change of structural arrangement of the ligand around Cu(II) ions. The biological activity of the complexes has been tested on eight bacteria and three fungi. Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes show an increased activity in comparison to the controls. The metal complexes of opapal Schiff base were evaluated for their DNA cleaving activities with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) under aerobic conditions. Cu(II) and VO(II) complexes show more pronounced activity in presence of the oxidant.

  8. Chemical repair of base lesions, AP-sites, and strand breaks on plasmid DNA in dilute aqueous solution by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We report a novel mechanism of radiation protection of DNA by chemical activity of ascorbic acid. •The “chemical repair” of DNA damage was revealed using biochemical assay and chemical kinetics analysis. •We found that ascorbic acid significantly repairs precursors of nucleobase lesions and abasic sites. •However, ascorbic acid seldom repairs precursors of DNA-strand breaks. -- Abstract: We quantified the damage yields produced in plasmid DNA by γ-irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–100 μM) of ascorbic acid, which is a major antioxidant in living systems, to clarify whether it chemically repairs radiation damage in DNA. The yield of DNA single strand breaks induced by irradiation was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis as conformational changes in closed circular plasmids. Base lesions and abasic sites were also observed as additional conformational changes by treating irradiated samples with glycosylase proteins. By comparing the suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, in addition to scavenging of the OH radicals derived from water radiolysis, it was found that ascorbic acid promotes the chemical repair of precursors of AP-sites and base lesions more effectively than those of single strand breaks. We estimated the efficiency of the chemical repair of each lesion using a kinetic model. Approximately 50–60% of base lesions and AP-sites were repaired by 10 μM ascorbic acid, although strand breaks were largely unrepaired by ascorbic acid at low concentrations. The methods in this study will provide a route to understanding the mechanistic aspects of antioxidant activity in living systems.

  9. Principles of DNA architectonics: design of DNA-based nanoobjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, O. A.; Pyshnyi, D. V.

    2012-02-01

    The methods of preparation of monomeric DNA blocks that serve as key building units for the construction of complex DNA objects are described. Examples are given of the formation of DNA blocks based on native and modified oligonucleotide components using hydrogen bonding and nucleic acid-specific types of bonding and also some affinity interactions with RNA, proteins, ligands. The static discrete and periodic two- and three-dimensional DNA objects reported to date are described systematically. Methods used to prove the structures of DNA objects and the prospects for practical application of nanostructures based on DNA and its analogues in biology, medicine and biophysics are considered. The bibliography includes 195 references.

  10. Development of PCR-Based DNA markers flanking three low phytic acid mutant loci in barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytic acid (PA) is the most abundant form of phosphorus (P) in cereal grains. PA chelates mineral cations to form an indigestible salt, and is thus regarded as an antinutritional agent and a contributor to water pollution. Grain with low phytic acid (lpa) genotypes could aid in mitigating this prob...

  11. A label-free signal amplification assay for DNA detection based on exonuclease III and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Aihua; Luo, Ming; Xiang, Dongshan; Xiang, Xia; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2013-09-30

    We have developed a new fluorescence method for specific single-stranded DNA sequences with exonuclease III (Exo III) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I. It is demonstrated by a reverse transcription oligonucleotide sequence (target DNA, 27 bases) of RNA fragment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a model system. In the absence of the target DNA, the hairpin-probe is in the stem-closed structure, the fluorescence of SYBR Green I is very strong. In the presence of the target DNA, the hairpin-probe hybridizes with the target DNA to form double-stranded structure with a blunt 3'-terminus. Thus, in the presence of Exo III, only the 3'-terminus of probe is subjected to digestion. Exo III catalyzes the stepwise removal of mononucleotides from this terminus, releasing the target DNA. The released target DNA then hybridizes with another probe, whence the cycle starts anew. The signal of SYBR Green I decreases greatly. This system provides a detection limit of 160 pM, which is comparable to the existing signal amplification methods that utilized Exo III as a signal amplification nuclease. Due to the unique property of Exo III, this method shows excellent detection selectivity for single-base discrimination. More importantly, superiors to other methods based on Exo III, these probes have the advantages of easier to design, synthesize, purify and thus are much cheaper and more applicable. This new approach could be widely applied to sensitive and selective nucleic acids detection.

  12. A Magnetic Nanoparticle Based Nucleic Acid Isolation and Purification Instrument for DNA Extraction of Escherichia Coli O157: H7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yahui; Lin, Jianhan; Jiang, Qin; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Shengjun; Li, Li

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a nucleic acid isolation and purification instrument using Escherichia coli O157:H7 as the model. The instrument was developed with magnetic nanoparticles for efficiently capturing nucleic acids and an intelligent mechanical unit for automatically performing the whole nucleic acid extraction process. A commercial DNA extraction kit from Huier Nano Company was used as reference. Nucleic acids in 1 ml of E. coli O157: H7 at a concentration of 5 x 10(8) CFU/mL were extracted by using this instrument and the kit in parallel and then detected by an ultraviolet spectrophotometer to obtain A260 values and A260/A280 values for the determination of the extracted DNA's quantity and purity, respectively. The A260 values for the instrument and the kit were 0.78 and 0.61, respectively, and the A260/A280 values were 1.98 and 1.93. The coefficient of variations of these parallel tests ranged from 10.5% to 16.7%. The results indicated that this nucleic acid isolation and purification instrument could extract a comparable level of nucleic acid within 50 min compared to the commercial DNA extraction kit.

  13. Multiplex paper-based colorimetric DNA sensor using pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid-induced AgNPs aggregation for detecting MERS-CoV, MTB and HPV oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Tee-Ngam, Prinjaporn; Siangproh, Weena; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Chailapakul, Orawon; Henry, Charles S

    2017-04-10

    The development of simple fluorescent and colorimetric assays that enable point-of-care DNA and RNA detection has been a topic of significant research because of the utility of such assays in resource limited settings. The most common motifs utilize hybridization to a complementary detection strand coupled with a sensitive reporter molecule. Here, apaper-based colorimetric assay for DNA detection based on pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA)-induced nanoparticle aggregationis reported as an alternative to traditional colorimetric approaches. PNA probes are an attractive alternative to DNA and RNA probes because they are chemically and biologically stable, easily synthesized, and hybridize efficiently with the complementary DNA strands. The acpcPNA probe contains a single positive charge from the lysine at C-terminus and causes aggregation of citrate anion-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the absence of complementary DNA. In the presence of target DNA, formation of the anionic DNA-acpcPNA duplex results in dispersion of the AgNPs as a result of electrostatic repulsion, giving rise to a detectable color change. Factors affecting the sensitivity and selectivity of this assay were investigated, including ionic strength, AgNP concentration, PNA concentration, and DNA strand mismatches. The method was used for screening of synthetic Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and human papillomavirus (HPV)DNA based on a colorimetric paper-based analytical device developed using the aforementioned principle. The oligonucleotide targets were detected by measuring the color change of AgNPs, giving detection limits of 1.53 nM (MERS-CoV), 1.27 nM (MTB) and 1.03 nM (HPV).The acpcPNA probe exhibited high selectivity for the complementary oligonucleotides over single-base-mismatch, two-base-mismatch and non-complementary DNA targets. The proposed paper-based colorimetric DNA sensor has potential to be an alternative

  14. Detection of trace amounts of target DNA from massive background of nucleic acids by using LM-PCR-based pre-amplification method.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoming; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yanfang; Dong, Ping; Li, Chunchuan; Liang, Xingguo

    2016-11-08

    The sensitivity and specificity of DNA detection may decrease when the target DNA is in very low abundance. To effectively detect trace amounts of target DNA from massive background of nucleic acids, we have developed a powerful multiplex pre-amplification method based on ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR) that can greatly enrich multiple target DNAs from massive backgrounds. By employing type IIS restriction endonuclease (REase) and specifically designed oligonucleotide adapters, target DNA can be pre-amplified with high efficiency and sensitivity. Combining with normal PCR, ten copies of target DNA was effectively detected from over 10(8) times more excessive backgrounds with high specificity and ten times more effectively than conventional PCR. In particular, the usage of universal primer in the pre-amplification PCR (pre-amp PCR) ensured that multiple targets could be equivalently amplified, which was confirmed by quantitative PCR (qPCR), indicating it could meet the demands of high-throughput detection. The flexibility and applicability of pre-amp PCR was validated by using different microorganisms DNA as targets and employing two different type IIS REases. The results suggest that the pre-amp PCR method has broad application prospects in various gene detection fields. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Improved DNA hybridization parameters by Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uffe Vest

    2012-01-01

    This thesis establishes oligonucleotide design rules and applications of a novel group of DNA stabilizing molecules collectively called Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid - TINA. Three peer-reviewed publications form the basis for the thesis. One publication describes an improved and rapid method for determination of DNA melting points and two publications describe the effects of positioning TINA molecules in parallel triplex helix and antiparallel duplex helix forming DNA structures. The third publication establishes that TINA molecules containing oligonucleotides improve an antiparallel duplex hybridization based capture assay's analytical sensitivity compared to conventionel DNA oligonucleotides. Clinical microbiology is traditionally based on pathogenic microorganisms' culture and serological tests. The introduction of DNA target amplification methods like PCR has improved the analytical sensitivity and total turn around time involved in clinical diagnostics of infections. Due to the relatively weak hybridization between the two strands of double stranded DNA, a number of nucleic acid stabilizing molecules have been developed to improve the sensitivity of DNA based diagnostics through superior binding properties. A short introduction is given to Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen based DNA binding and the derived DNA structures. A number of other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules are described. The stabilizing effect of TINA molecules on different DNA structures is discussed and considered in relation to other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules and in relation to future use of TINA containing oligonucleotides in clinical diagnostics and therapy. In conclusion, design of TINA modified oligonucleotides for antiparallel duplex helixes and parallel triplex helixes follows simple purpose dependent rules. TINA molecules are well suited for improving multiplex PCR assays and can be used as part of novel technologies. Future research should test whether combinations of TINA

  16. Metal based pharmacologically active agents: Synthesis, structural characterization, molecular modeling, CT-DNA binding studies and in vitro antimicrobial screening of iron(II) bromosalicylidene amino acid chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Ismael, Mohamed; Seleem, Amin Abdou

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been focused on Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes as cytotoxic and antitumor drugs. Thus a series of new iron(II) complexes based on Schiff bases amino acids ligands have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (bs) and α-amino acids (L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (phala), L-aspartic acid (aspa), L-histidine (his) and L-arginine (arg)). The structure of the investigated iron(II) complexes was elucidated using elemental analyses, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Moreover, the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the prepared complexes have been determined spectrophotometrically. The results suggest that 5-bromosalicylaldehyde amino acid Schiff bases (bs:aa) behave as dibasic tridentate ONO ligands and coordinate to Fe(II) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Fe(bs:aa)2]ṡnH2O. The conductivity values between 37 and 64 ohm-1 mol-1 cm2 in ethanol imply the presence of nonelectrolyte species. The structure of the complexes was validated using quantum mechanics calculations based on accurate DFT methods. Geometry optimization of the Fe-Schiff base amino acid complexes showed that all complexes had octahedral coordination. In addition, the interaction of these complexes with (CT-DNA) was investigated at pH = 7.2, by using UV-vis absorption, viscosity and agarose gel electrophoresis measurements. Results indicated that the investigated complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via intercalative mode and showed a different DNA binding according to the sequence: bsari > bshi > bsali > bsasi > bsphali. Moreover, the prepared compounds are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus

  17. Nucleic Acid Engineering: RNA Following the Trail of DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejin; Park, Yongkuk; Kim, Jieun; Jeong, Jaepil; Han, Sangwoo; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-02-08

    The self-assembly feature of the naturally occurring biopolymer, DNA, has fascinated researchers in the fields of materials science and bioengineering. With the improved understanding of the chemical and structural nature of DNA, DNA-based constructs have been designed and fabricated from two-dimensional arbitrary shapes to reconfigurable three-dimensional nanodevices. Although DNA has been used successfully as a building block in a finely organized and controlled manner, its applications need to be explored. Hence, with the myriad of biological functions, RNA has recently attracted considerable attention to further the application of nucleic acid-based structures. This Review categorizes different approaches of engineering nucleic acid-based structures and introduces the concepts, principles, and applications of each technique, focusing on how DNA engineering is applied as a guide to RNA engineering.

  18. The effects of linear assembly of two carbazole groups on acid-base and DNA-binding properties of a ruthenium(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xue, Long-Xin; Ju, Chun-Chuan; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    A novel Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hbcpip)](ClO4)2 {where bpy=2,2-bipyridine, Hbcpip=2-(4-(9H-3,9'-bicarbazol-9-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} is synthesized and characterized. Calf-thymus DNA-binding properties of the complex were studied by UV-vis absorption and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6](4-), DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and DNA viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the complex partially intercalated into the DNA with a binding constant of (5.5±1.4)×10(5) M(-1) in buffered 50 mM NaCl. The acid-base properties of the complex were also studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, and ground- and excited-state acidity ionization constant values were derived.

  19. Synthesis, spectral characterization and DNA binding of Schiff-base metal complexes derived from 2-amino-3-hydroxyprobanoic acid and acetylacetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosny, Nasser Mohammed; Hussien, Mostafa A.; Radwan, Fatima M.; Nawar, Nagwa

    2014-11-01

    Four new metal complexes derived from the reaction of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) acetates with the Schiff-base ligand (H3L) resulted from the condensation of the amino acid 2-amino-3-hydroxyprobanoic acid (serine) and acetylacetone have been synthesized and characterized by, elemental analyses, ES-MS, IR, UV-Vis., 1H NMR, 13C NMR, ESR, thermal analyses (TGA and DTG) and magnetic measurements. The results showed that the Schiff-base ligand acts as bi-negative tridentate through the azomethine nitrogen, the deprotonated carboxylate oxygen and the enolic carbonyl oxygen. The optical band gaps measurements indicated the semi-conducting nature of these complexes. Molecular docking was used to predict the binding between the Schiff base ligand with the receptor of prostate cancer mutant H874Y. The interactions between the Cu(II) complex and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been studied by UV spectra. The results confirm that the Cu(II) complex binds to CT-DNA in an intercalative mode.

  20. DNA based molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Jens; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Kügel, Wolfgang; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the essential cellular processes such as polymerisation reactions, gene expression and regulation are governed by mechanical processes. Controlled mechanical investigations of these processes are therefore required in order to take our understanding of molecular biology to the next level. Single-molecule manipulation and force spectroscopy have over the last 15 years been developed into extremely powerful techniques. Applying these techniques to the investigation of proteins and DNA molecules has led to a mechanistic understanding of protein function on the level of single molecules. As examples for DNA based molecular machines we will describe single-molecule experiments on RNA polymerases as well as on the packaging of DNA into a viral capsid-a process that is driven by one of the most powerful molecular motors.

  1. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on poly(2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) modified glassy carbon electrode for the determination of anticancer drug gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Tığ, Gözde Aydoğdu; Zeybek, Bülent; Pekyardımcı, Şule

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a simple methodology was used to develop a new electrochemical DNA biosensor based on poly(2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) (P(PDCA)) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). This modified electrode was used to monitor for the electrochemical interaction between the dsDNA and gemcitabine (GEM) for the first time. A decrease in oxidation signals of guanine after the interaction of the dsDNA with the GEM was used as an indicator for the selective determination of the GEM via differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The guanine oxidation peak currents were linearly proportional to the concentrations of the GEM in the range of 1-30mgL(‒1). Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were found to be 0.276mgL(‒1) and 0.922mgL(‒1), respectively. The reproducibility, repeatability, and applicability of the analysis to pharmaceutical dosage forms and human serum samples were also examined. In addition to DPV method, UV-vis and viscosity measurements were utilized to propose the interaction mechanism between the GEM and the dsDNA. The novel DNA biosensor could serve for sensitive, accurate and rapid determination of the GEM.

  2. Design, characterization, teratogenicity testing, antibacterial, antifungal and DNA interaction of few high spin Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H; El-Khatib, Rafat M; Nassr, Lobna A E; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M; Lashin, Fakhr El-Din

    2013-07-01

    In this study, new Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid chelates derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized via elemental, thermogravimetric analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic, mass spectra and magnetic moment measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. Correlation of all spectroscopic data suggested that Schiff bases ligands exhibited tridentate with ONO sites coordinating to the metal ions via protonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N and carboxylate-O with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate via deprotonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N, carboxylate-O and N-imidazole ring ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL=mono anion and L=dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their teratogenicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. Moreover, the interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometric and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA activity with the sequence: nhi>nari>nali>nasi>nphali. Furthermore, the free ligands and their complexes are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus flavus and Trichotheium rosium in order to assess their antimicrobial potential. The results show that the metal complexes are more reactive with respect to their corresponding Schiff base amino acid ligands.

  3. Design, characterization, teratogenicity testing, antibacterial, antifungal and DNA interaction of few high spin Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Lashin, Fakhr El-Din

    2013-07-01

    In this study, new Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid chelates derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized via elemental, thermogravimetric analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic, mass spectra and magnetic moment measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. Correlation of all spectroscopic data suggested that Schiff bases ligands exhibited tridentate with ONO sites coordinating to the metal ions via protonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N and carboxylate-O with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate via deprotonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N, carboxylate-O and N-imidazole ring ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their teratogenicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. Moreover, the interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometric and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. Furthermore, the free ligands and their complexes are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus flavus and Trichotheium rosium in order to assess their antimicrobial potential. The results show that the metal complexes are more reactive with respect to their corresponding Schiff base amino acid ligands.

  4. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen.

  5. Nucleic acid sensing with enzyme-DNA binding protein conjugates cascade and simple DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Gülsen Betül; Skouridou, Vasso; Masip, Lluis

    2017-03-22

    A versatile and universal DNA sensing platform is presented based on enzyme-DNA binding protein tags conjugates and simple DNA nanostructures. Two enzyme conjugates were thus prepared, with horseradish peroxidase linked to the dimeric single-chain bacteriophage Cro repressor protein (HRP-scCro) and glucose oxidase linked to the dimeric headpiece domain of Escherichia coli LacI repressor protein (GOx-dHP), and used in conjunction with a hybrid ssDNA-dsDNA detection probe. This probe served as a simple DNA nanostructure allowing first for target recognition through its target-complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) part and then for signal generation after conjugate binding on the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing the specific binding sites for the dHP and scCro DNA binding proteins. The DNA binding proteins chosen in this work have different sequence specificity, high affinity, and lack of cross-reactivity. The proposed sensing system was validated for the detection of model target ssDNA from high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV16) and the limits of detection of 45, 26, and 21 pM were achieved using the probes with scCro/dHP DNA binding sites ratio of 1:1, 2:1, and 1:2, respectively. The performance of the platform in terms of limit of detection was comparable to direct HRP systems using target-specific oligonucleotide-HRP conjugates. The ratio of the two enzymes can be easily manipulated by changing the number of binding sites on the detection probe, offering further optimization possibilities of the signal generation step. Moreover, since the signal is obtained in the absence of externally added hydrogen peroxide, the described platform is compatible with paper-based assays for molecular diagnostics applications. Finally, just by changing the ssDNA part of the detection probe, this versatile nucleic acid platform can be used for the detection of different ssDNA target sequences or in a multiplex detection configuration without the need to change any of the

  6. A facile, sensitive, and highly specific trinitrophenol assay based on target-induced synergetic effects of acid induction and electron transfer towards DNA-templated copper nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyin; Chang, Jiafu; Hou, Ting; Ge, Lei; Li, Feng

    2016-11-01

    Reliable, selective and sensitive approaches for trinitrophenol (TNP) detection are highly desirable with respect to national security and environmental protection. Herein, a simple and novel fluorescent strategy for highly sensitive and specific TNP assay has been successfully developed, which is based on the quenching of the fluorescent poly(thymine)-templated copper nanoclusters (DNA-CuNCs), through the synergetic effects of acid induction and electron transfer. Upon the addition of TNP, donor-acceptor complexes between the electron-deficient nitro-groups in TNP and the electron-donating DNA templates are formed, resulting in the close proximity between TNP and CuNCs. Moreover, the acidity of TNP contributes to the pH decrease of the system. These factors combine to dramatically quench the fluorescence of DNA-CuNCs, providing a "signal-off" strategy for TNP sensing. The as-proposed strategy demonstrates high sensitivity for TNP assay, and a detection limit of 0.03μM is obtained, which is lower than those reported by using organic fluorescent materials. More significantly, this approach shows outstanding selectivity over a number of TNP analogues, such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), 3-nitrophenol (NP), nitrobenzene (NB), phenol (BP), and toluene (BT). Compared with previous studies, this method does not need complex DNA sequence design, fluorescent dye labeling, or sophisticated organic reactions, rendering the strategy with additional advantages of simplicity and cost-effectiveness. In addition, the as-proposed strategy has been adopted for the detection of TNP in natural water samples, indicating its great potential to be applied in the fields of public safety and environmental monitoring.

  7. Spectral characterization, optical band gap calculations and DNA binding of some binuclear Schiff-base metal complexes derived from 2-amino-ethanoic acid and acetylacetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussien, Mostafa A.; Nawar, Nagwa; Radwan, Fatima M.; Hosny, Nasser Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Bi-nuclear metal complexes derived from the reaction of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) acetates with the Schiff-base ligand (H2L) resulted from the condensation of 2-amino-ethanoic acid (glycine) and acetylacetone have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, Raman spectra, FT-IR, ES-MS, UV-Vis., 1H NMR, ESR, thermal analyses (TG, DTG and DTA) and magnetic measurements. The results showed that, the Schiff base ligand can bind two metal ions in the same time. It coordinates to the first metal ion as mono-negative bi-dentate through azomethine nitrogen and enolic carbonyl after deprotonation. At the same time, it binds to the second metal ion via carboxylate oxygen after deprotonation. The thermodynamic parameters E∗, ΔH∗, ΔG∗ and ΔS∗ have been calculated by Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzger (HM) methods. The optical band gaps of the isolated complexes have been calculated from absorption spectra and the results indicated semi-conducting nature of the investigated complexes. The interactions between the copper (II) complex and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been studied by UV spectra. The results confirm that the Cu(II) complex binds to CT-DNA.

  8. DNA-LCEB: a high-capacity and mutation-resistant DNA data-hiding approach by employing encryption, error correcting codes, and hybrid twofold and fourfold codon-based strategy for synonymous substitution in amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Ibbad; Khan, Asifullah; Qadir, Abdul

    2014-11-01

    Data-hiding in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences can be used to develop an organic memory and to track parent genes in an offspring as well as in genetically modified organism. However, the main concerns regarding data-hiding in DNA sequences are the survival of organism and successful extraction of watermark from DNA. This implies that the organism should live and reproduce without any functional disorder even in the presence of the embedded data. Consequently, performing synonymous substitution in amino acids for watermarking becomes a primary option. In this regard, a hybrid watermark embedding strategy that employs synonymous substitution in both twofold and fourfold codons of amino acids is proposed. This work thus presents a high-capacity and mutation-resistant watermarking technique, DNA-LCEB, for hiding secret information in DNA of living organisms. By employing the different types of synonymous codons of amino acids, the data storage capacity has been significantly increased. It is further observed that the proposed DNA-LCEB employing a combination of synonymous substitution, lossless compression, encryption, and Bose-Chaudary-Hocquenghem coding is secure and performs better in terms of both capacity and robustness compared to existing DNA data-hiding schemes. The proposed DNA-LCEB is tested against different mutations, including silent, miss-sense, and non-sense mutations, and provides substantial improvement in terms of mutation detection/correction rate and bits per nucleotide. A web application for DNA-LCEB is available at http://111.68.99.218/DNA-LCEB.

  9. The effects of structural variations of thiophene-containing Ru(II) complexes on the acid-base and DNA binding properties.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cui-Li; Zhang, An-Guo; Zheng, Ze-Bo; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-03-01

    A phenylthiophenyl-bearing Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hbptip)](PF₆)₂ {bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, Hbptip = 2-(4-phenylthiophen-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ¹H NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The ground- and excited-state acid-base properties of the complex were studied by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations and the negative logarithm values of the ground-state acid ionization constants were derived to be pK(a1) = 1.31 ± 0.09 and pK(a2) = 5.71 ± 0.11 with the pK(a2) associated deprotonation/protonation process occurring over 3 pK(a) units more acidic than thiophenyl-free parent complex of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hpip)]²⁺ {Hpip = 2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline}. The calf thymus DNA-binding properties of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hbptip)]²⁺ in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.1 and 50 mM NaCl) were investigated by DNA viscosities and density functional theoretical calculations as well as UV-visible and emission spectroscopy techniques of UV-visible and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)₆]⁴⁻, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, DNA melting experiments, and reverse salt effects. The complex was evidenced to bind to the DNA intercalatively with binding affinity being greater than those for previously reported analogs of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hip)]²⁺, [Ru(bpy)₂(Htip)]²⁺, and [Ru(bpy)₂(Haptip)]²⁺ {Hip = 1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, Htip = 2-thiophenimidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, Haptip = 2-(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline}.

  10. Establishment of the 1st World Health Organization International Standard for Plasmodium falciparum DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Padley, David J; Heath, Alan B; Sutherland, Colin; Chiodini, Peter L; Baylis, Sally A

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to harmonize results for the detection and quantification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA by nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays, a World Health Organization (WHO) collaborative study was performed, evaluating a series of candidate standard preparations. Methods Fourteen laboratories from 10 different countries participated in the collaborative study. Four candidate preparations based upon blood samples parasitaemic for P. falciparum were evaluated in the study. Sample AA was lyophilized, whilst samples BB, CC and DD were liquid/frozen preparations. The candidate standards were tested by each laboratory at a range of dilutions in four independent assays, using both qualitative and quantitative NAT-based assays. The results were collated and analysed statistically. Results Twenty sets of data were returned from the participating laboratories and used to determine the mean P. falciparum DNA content for each sample. The mean log10 "equivalents"/ml were 8.51 for sample AA, 8.45 for sample BB, 8.35 for sample CC, and 5.51 for sample DD. The freeze-dried preparation AA, was examined by accelerated thermal degradation studies and found to be highly stable. Conclusion On the basis of the collaborative study, the freeze-dried material, AA (NIBSC code No. 04/176) was established as the 1st WHO International Standard for P. falciparum DNA NAT-based assays and has been assigned a potency of 109 International Units (IU) per ml. Each vial contains 5 × 108 IU, equivalent to 0.5 ml of material after reconstitution. PMID:18652656

  11. Cinnamate-based DNA photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lang; Romulus, Joy; Li, Minfeng; Sha, Ruojie; Royer, John; Wu, Kun-Ta; Xu, Qin; Seeman, Nadrian C.; Weck, Marcus; Chaikin, Paul

    2013-08-01

    As demonstrated by means of DNA nanoconstructs, as well as DNA functionalization of nanoparticles and micrometre-scale colloids, complex self-assembly processes require components to associate with particular partners in a programmable fashion. In many cases the reversibility of the interactions between complementary DNA sequences is an advantage. However, permanently bonding some or all of the complementary pairs may allow for flexibility in design and construction. Here, we show that the substitution of a cinnamate group for a pair of complementary bases provides an efficient, addressable, ultraviolet light-based method to bond complementary DNA covalently. To show the potential of this approach, we wrote micrometre-scale patterns on a surface using ultraviolet light and demonstrated the reversible attachment of conjugated DNA and DNA-coated colloids. Our strategy enables both functional DNA photolithography and multistep, specific binding in self-assembly processes.

  12. QPSO-based adaptive DNA computing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Karakose, Mehmet; Cigdem, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) computing that is a new computation model based on DNA molecules for information storage has been increasingly used for optimization and data analysis in recent years. However, DNA computing algorithm has some limitations in terms of convergence speed, adaptability, and effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach for improvement of DNA computing is proposed. This new approach aims to perform DNA computing algorithm with adaptive parameters towards the desired goal using quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO). Some contributions provided by the proposed QPSO based on adaptive DNA computing algorithm are as follows: (1) parameters of population size, crossover rate, maximum number of operations, enzyme and virus mutation rate, and fitness function of DNA computing algorithm are simultaneously tuned for adaptive process, (2) adaptive algorithm is performed using QPSO algorithm for goal-driven progress, faster operation, and flexibility in data, and (3) numerical realization of DNA computing algorithm with proposed approach is implemented in system identification. Two experiments with different systems were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with comparative results. Experimental results obtained with Matlab and FPGA demonstrate ability to provide effective optimization, considerable convergence speed, and high accuracy according to DNA computing algorithm.

  13. DNA-based soft phases.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Tommaso; Cerbino, Roberto; Zanchetta, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews the state-of-the-art in the study of molecular or colloidal systems whose mutual interactions are mediated by DNA molecules. In the last decade, the robust current knowledge of DNA interactions has enabled an impressive growth of self-assembled DNA-based structures that depend crucially on the properties of DNA-DNA interactions. In many cases, structures are built on design by exploiting the programmable selectivity of DNA interactions and the modularity of their strength. The study of DNA-based materials is definitely an emerging field in condensed matter physics, nanotechnology, and material science. This chapter will consider both systems that are entirely constructed by DNA and hybrid systems in which latex or metal colloidal particles are coated by DNA strands. We will confine our discussion to systems in which DNA-mediated interactions promote the formation of "phases," that is structures extending on length scales much larger than the building blocks. Their self-assembly typically involves a large number of interacting particles and often features hierarchical stages of structuring. Because of the possibility of fine-tuning the geometry and strength of the DNA-mediated interactions, these systems are characterized by a wide variety of patterns of self-assembly, ranging from amorphous, to liquid crystalline, to crystalline in one, two, or three dimensions.

  14. Comparison of Five Commercial Nucleic Acid Extraction Kits for the PCR-based Detection of Burkholderia Pseudomallei DNA in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    PubMed

    Obersteller, Sonja; Neubauer, Heinrich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Frickmann, Hagen

    2016-09-29

    The extraction and further processing of nucleic acids (NA) from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues for microbiological diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approaches is challenging. Here, we assessed the effects of five different commercially available nucleic acid extraction kits on the results of real-time PCR. FFPE samples from organs of Burkholderia pseudomallei-infected Swiss mice were subjected to processing with five different extraction kits from QIAGEN (FFPE DNA Tissue Kit, EZ1 DNA Tissue Kit, DNA Mini Kit, DNA Blood Mini Kit, and FlexiGene DNA Kit) in combination with three different real-time PCRs targeting B. pseudomallei-specific sequences of varying length after 16 years of storage. The EZ1 DNA Tissue Kit and the DNA Mini Kit scored best regarding the numbers of successful PCR reactions. In case of positive PCR, differences regarding the cycle-threshold (Ct) values were marginal. The impact of the applied extraction kits on the reliability of PCR from FFPE material seems to be low. Interfering factors like the quality of the dewaxing procedure or the sample age appear more important than the selection of specialized FFPE kits.

  15. DNA-based hybrid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the DNA are key to achieve high enantioselectivities and, often, additional rate accelerations in catalysis. Nowadays, current efforts are focused on improved designs, understanding the origin of the enantioselectivity and DNA-induced rate accelerations, expanding the catalytic scope of the concept and further increasing the practicality of the method for applications in synthesis. Herein, the recent developments will be reviewed and the perspectives for the emerging field of DNA-based hybrid catalysis will be discussed.

  16. Carbohydrate-interactive pDNA and siRNA gene vectors based on boronic acid functionalized poly(amido amine)s.

    PubMed

    Piest, Martin; Ankoné, Marc; Engbersen, Johan F J

    2013-08-10

    In order to evaluate the influence of incorporation of boronic acid groups on the properties of poly(amido amine)s as gene vectors, a novel poly(amido amine) copolymer p(CBA-ABOL/2AMPBA) containing ortho-aminomethylphenylboronic acid (2AMPBA) moieties was prepared by Michael-type polyaddition of a mixture of 1,4-aminobutanol (ABOL) and 2-((4-aminobutylamino)methyl)phenyl boronic acid to N,N'-cystamine bisacrylamide (CBA). It appeared that the presence of the boronic acid moieties as side groups along the polymer chain strongly enhances the stability of the self-assembled nanoparticles and nanosized polyplexes formed from this polymer; no aggregation was observed after storage for 6days at 37°C. This strong stabilization can be attributed to intermolecular Lewis acid-base interactions between the 2AMPBA groups and the alcohol and amine groups present in the polymer, leading to dynamical (reversible) crosslinking in the nanoparticles. Moreover, since the boronic acids can reversibly form boronic esters with vicinal diol groups, the presence of the 2AMPBA groups add carbohydrate-interactive properties to these polymers that strongly influence their behavior as gene delivery vectors. DNA transfection with p(CBA-ABOL/2AMPBA) polyplexes gave transfection efficiencies that were approximately similar to commercial PEI in different cell lines (COS-7, HUH-6 and H1299-Fluc), but lower than those obtained with reference polyplexes from p(CBA-ABOL). It is hypothesized that the uptake of the boronated polyplexes is suppressed by binding to the glycocalyx of the cells. This is supported by the observation that addition of sorbitol or dextran to the transfection medium significantly enhances the transfection efficiency, which can be attributed to increased cellular uptake of the polyplexes due to boronic ester formation with these agents. AFM, SEM and confocal microscopy showed that polyplexes of p(CBA-ABOL/2AMPBA) become decorated with a dextran layer in the presence of 0.9% (w

  17. DNA Tetrominoes: The Construction of DNA Nanostructures Using Self-Organised Heterogeneous Deoxyribonucleic Acids Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hui San; Rahim, Mohd Syafiq; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan

    2015-01-01

    The unique programmability of nucleic acids offers alternative in constructing excitable and functional nanostructures. This work introduces an autonomous protocol to construct DNA Tetris shapes (L-Shape, B-Shape, T-Shape and I-Shape) using modular DNA blocks. The protocol exploits the rich number of sequence combinations available from the nucleic acid alphabets, thus allowing for diversity to be applied in designing various DNA nanostructures. Instead of a deterministic set of sequences corresponding to a particular design, the protocol promotes a large pool of DNA shapes that can assemble to conform to any desired structures. By utilising evolutionary programming in the design stage, DNA blocks are subjected to processes such as sequence insertion, deletion and base shifting in order to enrich the diversity of the resulting shapes based on a set of cascading filters. The optimisation algorithm allows mutation to be exerted indefinitely on the candidate sequences until these sequences complied with all the four fitness criteria. Generated candidates from the protocol are in agreement with the filter cascades and thermodynamic simulation. Further validation using gel electrophoresis indicated the formation of the designed shapes. Thus, supporting the plausibility of constructing DNA nanostructures in a more hierarchical, modular, and interchangeable manner. PMID:26258940

  18. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  19. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  20. Development of a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on elongated hexagonal-pyramid CdS and poly-isonicotinic acid composite film.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Delun; Wang, Qingxiang; Gao, Feng; Wang, Qinghua; Qiu, Weiwei; Gao, Fei

    2014-10-15

    Three CdS materials with different shapes (i.e., irregular, rod-like, and elongated hexagonal-pyramid) were hydrothermally synthesized through controlling the molar ratio of Cd(2+) to thiourea. Electrochemical experiments showed that the elongated hexagonal-pyramid CdS (eh-CdS) modified on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) had the higher electrical conductivity than the other two forms. Then the eh-CdS modified GCE was further modified with a layer of poly-isonicotinic acid (PIA) through electro-polymerization in IA solution to enhance the stability and functionality of the interface. The layer-by-layer modification process was characterized by atomic force microscopy and electrochemistry. Then 5'-amino functionalized DNA was immobilized on the electrode surface through coupling with the carboxylic groups derived from PIA-eh-CdS composite film. The hybridization performance of the developed biosensor was evaluated using methylene blue as redox indicator, and the results showed that the peak currents of methylene blue varied with target concentrations in a wide linear range from 1.0 × 10(-14)M to 1.0 × 10(-9)M with a low detection limit of 3.9 × 10(-15)M. The biosensor also showed high stability and good discrimination ability to the one-base, three-base mismatched and non-complementary sequence.

  1. Why DNA Is a More Effective Scaffold than RNA in Nucleic Acid-Based Asymmetric Catalysis-Supramolecular Control of Cooperative Effects.

    PubMed

    Marek, Jasmin J; Hennecke, Ulrich

    2017-04-05

    Nucleic acids can form efficient hybrid catalysts for asymmetric catalysis upon binding of low-molecular-weight metal complexes. Up to now DNA has been the preferred nucleic acid component, while RNA was largely ignored. It is shown that despite RNA's successful use in ribozymes, RNA is less suited for use in hybrid catalysts for asymmetric catalysis. A common dimethyl bipyridine copper complex does not form highly active and enantioselective hybrid catalysts with RNA due to the absence of synergistic effects between the copper complex and dsRNA.

  2. DNA adsorption to and elution from silica surfaces: influence of amino acid buffers.

    PubMed

    Vandeventer, Peter E; Mejia, Jorge; Nadim, Ali; Johal, Malkiat S; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-09-19

    Solid phase extraction and purification of DNA from complex samples typically requires chaotropic salts that can inhibit downstream polymerase amplification if carried into the elution buffer. Amino acid buffers may serve as a more compatible alternative for modulating the interaction between DNA and silica surfaces. We characterized DNA binding to silica surfaces, facilitated by representative amino acid buffers, and the subsequent elution of DNA from the silica surfaces. Through bulk depletion experiments, we found that more DNA adsorbs to silica particles out of positively compared to negatively charged amino acid buffers. Additionally, the type of the silica surface greatly influences the amount of DNA adsorbed and the final elution yield. Quartz crystal microbalance experiments with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) revealed multiphasic DNA adsorption out of stronger adsorbing conditions such as arginine, glycine, and glutamine, with DNA more rigidly bound during the early stages of the adsorption process. The DNA film adsorbed out of glutamate was more flexible and uniform throughout the adsorption process. QCM-D characterization of DNA elution from the silica surface indicates an uptake in water mass during the initial stage of DNA elution for the stronger adsorbing conditions, which suggests that for these conditions the DNA film is partly dehydrated during the prior adsorption process. Overall, several positively charged and polar neutral amino acid buffers show promise as an alternative to methods based on chaotropic salts for solid phase DNA extraction.

  3. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  4. Spectrophotometric quantitation of DNA on blots after ethanol-solubilization of the MTT-formazan from anti-digoxigenin-based detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Colgan, D J

    1993-01-01

    The tetrazolium salt, 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) has recently been established as a substitute for Nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBT) in stain mixtures using antibody-conjugated alkaline phosphatase for the location of proteins on Western blots (Heegaard, 1990). Experiments reported here show that MTT is as sensitive as NBT in digoxigenin-labeled probe localization (on nucleic acid blots) utilizing alkaline-phosphatase-labelled, anti-digoxigenin antibodies. Moreover, as the formazan from MTT is soluble in ethanol, it is shown that spectrophotometric quantitation can be used to estimate the amount of target DNA on dot and Southern blots. For dot blotting, pBR328 was used as the probe and pBR322 as target. For Southern blots, human rDNA was used as the probe and total genomic calf DNA as the target. Staining response was linear over at least six twofold DNA dilutions in both types of blot.

  5. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  6. DNA Transfection to Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using a Novel Type of Pseudodendrimer Based on 2,2-Bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic Acid.

    PubMed

    Lancelot, Alexandre; González-Pastor, Rebeca; Concellón, Alberto; Sierra, Teresa; Martín-Duque, Pilar; Serrano, José L

    2017-03-13

    In the search for effective vehicles to carry genetic material into cells, we present here new pseudodendrimers that consist of a hyperbranched polyester core surrounded by amino-terminated 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid (bis-MPA) dendrons. The pseudodendrimers are readily synthesized from commercial hyperbranched bis-MPA polyesters of the second, third, and fourth generations and third-generation bis-MPA dendrons, bearing eight peripheral glycine moieties, coupled by the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). This approach provides globular macromolecular structures bearing 128, 256, and 512 terminal amino groups, and these can complex pDNA. The toxicity of the three pseudodendrimers was studied on two cell lines, mesenchymal stem cells, and HeLa, and it was demonstrated that these compounds do not affect negatively cell viability up to 72 h. The complexation with DNA was investigated in terms of N-to-P ratio and dendriplex stability. The three generations were found to promote internalizing of pDNA into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and their transfection capacity was compared with two nonviral commercial transfection agents, Lipofectamine and TransIT-X2. The highest generations were able to transfect these cells at levels comparable to both commercial reagents.

  7. The role of molecular structure of sugar-phosphate backbone and nucleic acid bases in the formation of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Poltev, Valeri; Anisimov, Victor M; Danilov, Victor I; Garcia, Dolores; Sanchez, Carolina; Deriabina, Alexandra; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Rivas, Francisco; Polteva, Nina

    2014-06-01

    Our previous DFT computations of deoxydinucleoside monophosphate complexes with Na(+)-ions (dDMPs) have demonstrated that the main characteristics of Watson-Crick (WC) right-handed duplex families are predefined in the local energy minima of dDMPs. In this work, we study the mechanisms of contribution of chemically monotonous sugar-phosphate backbone and the bases into the double helix irregularity. Geometry optimization of sugar-phosphate backbone produces energy minima matching the WC DNA conformations. Studying the conformational variability of dDMPs in response to sequence permutation, we found that simple replacement of bases in the previously fully optimized dDMPs, e.g. by constructing Pyr-Pur from Pur-Pyr, and Pur-Pyr from Pyr-Pur sequences, while retaining the backbone geometry, automatically produces the mutual base position characteristic of the target sequence. Based on that, we infer that the directionality and the preferable regions of the sugar-phosphate torsions, combined with the difference of purines from pyrimidines in ring shape, determines the sequence dependence of the structure of WC DNA. No such sequence dependence exists in dDMPs corresponding to other DNA conformations (e.g., Z-family and Hoogsteen duplexes). Unlike other duplexes, WC helix is unique by its ability to match the local energy minima of the free single strand to the preferable conformations of the duplex.

  8. DNA Based Molecular Scale Nanofabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-04

    water adsorption on DNA origami template and its impact on DNA-mediated chemical reactions. We also extended the concept of DNA-mediated reaction to...other nanoscale templates, (b) Studied the thermal and chemical stability of DNA origami template. The result shows that the DNA nanostructures can be...potentially used in very harsh chemical environments, (c) Studied the effect of DNA origami template on the growth of self-assembled monolayer (SAM

  9. Synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides containing C5-ethynylbenzenesulfonamide-modified nucleotides (EBNA) by polymerases towards the construction of base functionalized nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Goubet, Astrid; Chardon, Antoine; Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Veedu, Rakesh N

    2013-02-01

    C5-Ethynylbenzenesulfonamide-modified nucleotide (EBNA) was investigated as substrate of various DNA polymerases. The experiments revealed that KOD, Phusion and Klenow DNA polymerases successfully accepted EBNA-T nucleotide as a substrate and yielded the fully extended DNA. KOD DNA polymerase was found to be the most efficient enzyme to furnish EBNA-T containing DNA in good yields. Phusion DNA polymerase efficiently amplified the template containing EBNA-T nucleotides by PCR.

  10. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms. PMID:17535434

  11. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  12. Engineering DNA-based functional materials.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Hoon; Ruiz, Roanna C H; Peng, Songming; Lee, Jong Bum; Luo, Dan

    2011-12-01

    While DNA is a genetic material, it is also an inherently polymeric material made from repeating units called nucleotides. Although DNA's biological functions have been studied for decades, the polymeric features of DNA have not been extensively exploited until recently. In this tutorial review, we focus on two aspects of using DNA as a polymeric material: (1) the engineering methods, and (2) the potential real-world applications. More specifically, various strategies for constructing DNA-based building blocks and materials are introduced based on DNA topologies, which include linear, branched/dendritic, and networked. Different applications in nanotechnology, medicine, and biotechnology are further reviewed.

  13. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Dawson, John

    1993-01-01

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source.

  14. [Stewart's acid-base approach].

    PubMed

    Funk, Georg-Christian

    2007-01-01

    In addition to paCO(2), Stewart's acid base model takes into account the influence of albumin, inorganic phosphate, electrolytes and lactate on acid-base equilibrium. It allows a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of acid-base disorders. Particularly simultaneous and mixed metabolic acid-base disorders, which are common in critically ill patients, can be assessed. Stewart's approach is therefore a valuable tool in addition to the customary acid-base approach based on bicarbonate or base excess. However, some chemical aspects of Stewart's approach remain controversial.

  15. Therapeutic option of plasmid-DNA based gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Kunugiza, Yasuo; Iekushi, Kazuma; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common method in clinical cases because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. In this situation, more efficient plasmid DNA gene transfer is needed all over the world. This review focuses on plasmid DNA gene transfer and its enhancement, including ultrasound with microbubbles, electroporation, hydrodynamic method, gene gun, jet injection, cationic lipids and cationic polymers.

  16. DNA base identification by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bell, David C; Thomas, W Kelley; Murtagh, Katelyn M; Dionne, Cheryl A; Graham, Adam C; Anderson, Jobriah E; Glover, William R

    2012-10-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing, based on fluorescent microscopy, have transformed many areas of biological research. However, only relatively short molecules can be sequenced by these technologies. Dramatic improvements in genomic research will require accurate sequencing of long (>10,000 base-pairs), intact DNA molecules. Our approach directly visualizes the sequence of DNA molecules using electron microscopy. This report represents the first identification of DNA base pairs within intact DNA molecules by electron microscopy. By enzymatically incorporating modified bases, which contain atoms of increased atomic number, direct visualization and identification of individually labeled bases within a synthetic 3,272 base-pair DNA molecule and a 7,249 base-pair viral genome have been accomplished. This proof of principle is made possible by the use of a dUTP nucleotide, substituted with a single mercury atom attached to the nitrogenous base. One of these contrast-enhanced, heavy-atom-labeled bases is paired with each adenosine base in the template molecule and then built into a double-stranded DNA molecule by a template-directed DNA polymerase enzyme. This modification is small enough to allow very long molecules with labels at each A-U position. Image contrast is further enhanced by using annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM). Further refinements to identify additional base types and more precisely determine the location of identified bases would allow full sequencing of long, intact DNA molecules, significantly improving the pace of complex genomic discoveries.

  17. Interactions of carcinogens with DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Shapiro, R.

    1989-10-01

    The principal goal of this research has been the determination of the conformational changes produced in DNA by the covalent binding of a carcinogenic aromatic amine, and the correlation of these changes with the mutations and carcinogenic effects initiated by the same substances. To this end, we have devised new synthetic methods for the preparation of oligonucleotides modified by derivatives af 4-aminobiphenyl and aniline. We have also performed potential energy minimization studies on the above substances and on single and double stranded DNA fragments bearing the above amines as well as acetylaminofluorene, aminofluorene, aminopyrene and the antibiotic mitomycin. Our computations have been carried out on DOE supercomputers using our program, DUPLEX. We have defined a number of novel structures for these modified DNAs, including Hoogsteen, wedge'' (see below) denatured, cross-linked and intercalated forms. Some suggestions have been made about the relation of these forms to mutagenesis. 7 refs.

  18. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  19. NMR analysis of base-pair opening kinetics in DNA.

    PubMed

    Szulik, Marta W; Voehler, Markus; Stone, Michael P

    2014-12-12

    Base pairing in nucleic acids plays a crucial role in their structure and function. Differences in the base-pair opening and closing kinetics of individual double-stranded DNA sequences or between chemically modified base pairs provide insight into the recognition of these base pairs by DNA processing enzymes. This unit describes how to quantify the kinetics for localized base pairs by observing changes in the imino proton signals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The determination of all relevant parameters using state-of-the art techniques and NMR instrumentation, including cryoprobes, is discussed.

  20. Beyond DNA origami: the unfolding prospects of nucleic acid nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Michelotti, Nicole; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Manzo, Anthony J; Walter, Nils G

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acid nanotechnology exploits the programmable molecular recognition properties of natural and synthetic nucleic acids to assemble structures with nanometer-scale precision. In 2006, DNA origami transformed the field by providing a versatile platform for self-assembly of arbitrary shapes from one long DNA strand held in place by hundreds of short, site-specific (spatially addressable) DNA 'staples'. This revolutionary approach has led to the creation of a multitude of two-dimensional and three-dimensional scaffolds that form the basis for functional nanodevices. Not limited to nucleic acids, these nanodevices can incorporate other structural and functional materials, such as proteins and nanoparticles, making them broadly useful for current and future applications in emerging fields such as nanomedicine, nanoelectronics, and alternative energy.

  1. Oligonucleotide-based systems: DNA, microRNAs, DNA/RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Pawan; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    There are an increasing number of applications that have been developed for oligonucleotide-based biosensing systems in genetics and biomedicine. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors are those where the probe to capture the analyte is a strand of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) or a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring nucleic acids. This review will shed light on various types of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA (particularly microRNAs), their role and their application in biosensing. It will also cover DNA/RNA aptamers, which can be used as bioreceptors for a wide range of targets such as proteins, small molecules, bacteria and even cells. It will also highlight how the invention of synthetic oligonucleotides such as peptide nucleic acid (PNA) or locked nucleic acid (LNA) has pushed the limits of molecular biology and biosensor development to new perspectives. These technologies are very promising albeit still in need of development in order to bridge the gap between the laboratory-based status and the reality of biomedical applications. PMID:27365033

  2. Metallic Nanostructures Based on DNA Nanoshapes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Linko, Veikko; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Toppari, Jari Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures have inspired extensive research over several decades, particularly within the field of nanoelectronics and increasingly in plasmonics. Due to the limitations of conventional lithography methods, the development of bottom-up fabricated metallic nanostructures has become more and more in demand. The remarkable development of DNA-based nanostructures has provided many successful methods and realizations for these needs, such as chemical DNA metallization via seeding or ionization, as well as DNA-guided lithography and casting of metallic nanoparticles by DNA molds. These methods offer high resolution, versatility and throughput and could enable the fabrication of arbitrarily-shaped structures with a 10-nm feature size, thus bringing novel applications into view. In this review, we cover the evolution of DNA-based metallic nanostructures, starting from the metallized double-stranded DNA for electronics and progress to sophisticated plasmonic structures based on DNA origami objects. PMID:28335274

  3. Tunable and regenerative DNA zipper based spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landon, Preston; Mo, Alexander; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Lal, Ratnesh

    2012-02-01

    We report a DNA zipper based actuator device termed `DNA- spring' with tunable and repeated cycles of extension and contraction ability. DNA zipper is a double-stranded DNA system engineered to open upon its specific interaction with appropriately designed single strand DNA (ssDNA), opening of the zipper is driven by binding energy differences between the DNA strands. The zipper system is incorporated with defined modifications to function like a spring, capable of delivering approximately 9 pN force over a distance of approximately 13 nm, producing approximately 116 kJ/mol of work. Time-lapse fluorescence and fluorescent DNA gel electrophoresis analysis is utilized to evaluate and confirm the spring action. A second zipper incorporated into the spring provides the ability to couple/decouple to an object/substrate. Such devices would have wide application, including for conditionally triggered molecular delivery systems and as actuators in nano-devices. zippers.

  4. Amino acid racemization in amber-entombed insects: implications for DNA preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, J. L.; Wang, X. S.; Poinar, H. N.; Paabo, S.; Poinar, G. O.

    1994-01-01

    DNA depurination and amino acid racemization take place at similar rates in aqueous solution at neutral pH. This relationship suggests that amino acid racemization may be useful in accessing the extent of DNA chain breakage in ancient biological remains. To test this suggestion, we have investigated the amino acids in insects entombed in fossilized tree resins ranging in age from <100 years to 130 million years. The amino acids present in 40 to 130 million year old amber-entombed insects resemble those in a modern fly and are probably the most ancient, unaltered amino acids found so far on Earth. In comparison to other geochemical environments on the surface of the Earth, the amino acid racemization rate in amber insect inclusions is retarded by a factor of >10(4). These results suggest that in amber insect inclusions DNA depurination rates would also likely be retarded in comparison to aqueous solution measurements, and thus DNA fragments containing many hundreds of base pairs should be preserved. This conclusion is consistent with the reported successful retrieval of DNA sequences from amber-entombed organisms.

  5. Selection of DNA aptamers with two modified bases.

    PubMed

    Gawande, Bharat N; Rohloff, John C; Carter, Jeffrey D; von Carlowitz, Ira; Zhang, Chi; Schneider, Daniel J; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2017-03-14

    The nucleobases comprising DNA and RNA aptamers provide considerably less chemical diversity than protein-based ligands, limiting their versatility. The introduction of novel functional groups at just one of the four bases in modified aptamers has recently led to dramatic improvement in the success rate of identifying nucleic acid ligands to protein targets. Here we explore the benefits of additional enhancement in physicochemical diversity by selecting modified DNA aptamers that contain amino-acid-like modifications on both pyrimidine bases. Using proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 as a representative protein target, we identify specific pairwise combinations of modifications that result in higher affinity, metabolic stability, and inhibitory potency compared with aptamers with single modifications. Such doubly modified aptamers are also more likely to be encoded in shorter sequences and occupy nonoverlapping epitopes more frequently than aptamers with single modifications. These highly modified DNA aptamers have broad utility in research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications.

  6. Reversible Data Hiding Based on DNA Computing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Biocomputing, especially DNA, computing has got great development. It is widely used in information security. In this paper, a novel algorithm of reversible data hiding based on DNA computing is proposed. Inspired by the algorithm of histogram modification, which is a classical algorithm for reversible data hiding, we combine it with DNA computing to realize this algorithm based on biological technology. Compared with previous results, our experimental results have significantly improved the ER (Embedding Rate). Furthermore, some PSNR (peak signal-to-noise ratios) of test images are also improved. Experimental results show that it is suitable for protecting the copyright of cover image in DNA-based information security. PMID:28280504

  7. Reversible Data Hiding Based on DNA Computing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Xie, Yingjie; Zhou, Shihua; Zhou, Changjun; Zheng, Xuedong

    2017-01-01

    Biocomputing, especially DNA, computing has got great development. It is widely used in information security. In this paper, a novel algorithm of reversible data hiding based on DNA computing is proposed. Inspired by the algorithm of histogram modification, which is a classical algorithm for reversible data hiding, we combine it with DNA computing to realize this algorithm based on biological technology. Compared with previous results, our experimental results have significantly improved the ER (Embedding Rate). Furthermore, some PSNR (peak signal-to-noise ratios) of test images are also improved. Experimental results show that it is suitable for protecting the copyright of cover image in DNA-based information security.

  8. Spherical Nucleic Acids: A New Form of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Joshua Isaac

    Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs) are a new class of nucleic acid-based nanomaterials that exhibit unique properties currently being explored in the contexts of gene-based cancer therapies and in the design of programmable nanoparticle-based materials. The properties of SNAs differ from canonical, linear nucleic acids by virtue of their dense packing into an oriented 3-dimensional array. SNAs can be synthesized from a number of useful nanoparticle templates, such as plasmonic gold and silver, magnetic oxides, luminescent semi-conductor quantum dots, and silica. In addition, by crosslinking the oligonucleotides and dissolving the core, they can be made in a hollow form as well. This dissertation describes the evolution of SNAs from initial studies of inorganic nanoparticle-based materials densely functionalized with oligonucleotides to the proving of a hypothesis that their unique properties can be observed in a core-less structure if the nucleic acids are densely packed and highly oriented. Chapter two describes the synthesis of densely functionalized polyvalent oligonucleotide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. These particles are shown to exhibit cooperative binding in a density- and salt concentration-dependent fashion, with nearly identical behaviors to those of SNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles. Importantly, these particles are the first non-gold particles shown to be capable of entering cells in high numbers via the SNA-mediated cellular uptake pathway, and provided the first evidence that SNA-mediated cellular uptake is core-independent. In the third chapter, a gold nanoparticle catalyzed alkyne cross-linking reaction is described that is capable of forming hollow organic nanoparticles using polymers with alkyne-functionalized backbones. With this method, the alkyne-modified polymers adsorb to the particle surfaces, cross-link on the surface, allowing the gold nanoparticle to be

  9. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-03-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection.

  10. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-01-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection. PMID:26940532

  11. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal. In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948. Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = −0.88 (−1.62, −0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = −2.68 (−3.42, −1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend

  12. Kinetics of DNA Strand Displacement Systems with Locked Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Olson, Xiaoping; Kotani, Shohei; Yurke, Bernard; Graugnard, Elton; Hughes, William L

    2017-03-30

    Locked nucleic acids (LNAs) are conformationally restricted RNA nucleotides. Their increased thermal stability and selectivity toward their complements make them well-suited for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although the structural and thermodynamic properties of LNA-LNA, LNA-RNA, and LNA-DNA hybridizations are known, the kinetic effects of incorporating LNA nucleotides into DNA strand displacement systems are not. Here, we thoroughly studied the strand displacement kinetics as a function of the number and position of LNA nucleotides in DNA oligonucleotides. When compared to that of an all-DNA control, with an identical sequence, the leakage rate constant was reduced more than 50-fold, to an undetectable level, and the invasion rate was preserved for a hybrid DNA/LNA system. The total performance enhancement ratio also increased more than 70-fold when calculating the ratio of the invading rate to the leakage rate constants for a hybrid system. The rational substitution of LNA nucleotides for DNA nucleotides preserves sequence space while improving the signal-to-noise ratio of strand displacement systems. Hybrid DNA/LNA systems offer great potential for high-performance chemical reaction networks that include catalyzed hairpin assemblies, hairpin chain reactions, motors, walkers, and seesaw gates.

  13. Discovery of Benzothiazole Scaffold-Based DNA Gyrase B Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gjorgjieva, Marina; Tomašič, Tihomir; Barančokova, Michaela; Katsamakas, Sotirios; Ilaš, Janez; Tammela, Päivi; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija; Kikelj, Danijel

    2016-10-13

    Bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control the topological state of DNA during replication and are validated targets for antibacterial drug discovery. Starting from our recently reported 4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[1,2-d]thiazole-based DNA gyrase B inhibitors, we replaced their central core with benzothiazole-2,6-diamine scaffold and interchanged substituents in positions 2 and 6. This resulted in equipotent nanomolar inhibitors of DNA gyrase from Escherichia coli displaying improved inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from both bacteria. Compound 27 was the most balanced inhibitor of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from both E. coli and S. aureus. The crystal structure of the 2-((2-(4,5-dibromo-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxamido)benzothiazol-6-yl)amino)-2-oxoacetic acid (24) in complex with E. coli DNA gyrase B revealed the binding mode of the inhibitor in the ATP-binding pocket. Only some compounds possessed weak antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. These results provide a basis for structure-based optimization toward dual DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors with antibacterial activity.

  14. Switchable reconfiguration of nucleic acid nanostructures by stimuli-responsive DNA machines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: The base sequence in DNA dictates structural and reactivity features of the biopolymer. These properties are implemented to use DNA as a unique material for developing the area of DNA nanotechnology. The design of DNA machines represents a rapidly developing research field in the area of DNA nanotechnology. The present Account discusses the switchable reconfiguration of nucleic acid nanostructures by stimuli-responsive DNA machines, and it highlights potential applications and future perspectives of the area. Programmed switchable DNA machines driven by various fuels and antifuels, such as pH, Hg(2+) ions/cysteine, or nucleic acid strands/antistrands, are described. These include the assembly of DNA tweezers, walkers, a rotor, a pendulum, and more. Using a pH-oscillatory system, the oscillatory mechanical operation of a DNA pendulum is presented. Specifically, the synthesis and "mechanical" properties of interlocked DNA rings are described. This is exemplified with the preparation of interlocked DNA catenanes and a DNA rotaxane. The dynamic fuel-driven reconfiguration of the catenane/rotaxane structures is followed by fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of DNA machines as functional scaffolds to reconfigurate Au nanoparticle assemblies and to switch the fluorescence features within fluorophore/Au nanoparticle conjugates between quenching and surface-enhanced fluorescence states are addressed. Specifically, the fluorescence features of the different DNA machines are characterized as a function of the spatial separation between the fluorophore and Au nanoparticles. The experimental results are supported by theoretical calculations. The future development of reconfigurable stimuli-responsive DNA machines involves fundamental challenges, such as the synthesis of molecular devices exhibiting enhanced complexities, the introduction of new fuels and antifuels, and the integration of new payloads being reconfigured by the molecular devices, such as enzymes or

  15. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, A.M.; Dawson, J.

    1993-12-14

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source. 6 figures.

  16. DNA Based Electrochromic and Photovoltaic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT...9550-09-1-0647 final 01-09-2009 ; 30-11-2011 DNA Based Electrochromic and Photovoltaic Cells FA 9550-09-1-0647 Pawlicka, Agnieszka, J. Instituto de...as well as DNA-CTMA and DNA-DODA were also obtained and characterized. High ionic conductivity results combined with transparency and adhesion to the

  17. Age dependency of base modification in rabbit liver DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, O.; Fuji, I.; Yoshida, T.; Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Age-related modifications of DNA bases have been observed in the liver of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a lagomorph with a median life span in captivity of 5-7 yr. The ages of the animals studied ranged from 6 wk to 9 yr. After the DNA had been extracted from the liver cell nuclei and hydrolyzed with acid, the bases were analyzed by column chromatography with Cellulofine gels (GC-15-m). Two peaks in the chromatogram, which eluted before the four DNA bases, contained modified bases. Those materials, which were obtained in relatively large amounts from old animals, were highly fluorescent, and were shown to be crosslinked base products by mass spectrometry. The yield of crosslinked products versus rabbit age (greater than 0.5 yr) can be fitted by an exponential function (correlation coefficient: 0.76 +/- 0.09).

  18. DNA as a Binary Code: How the Physical Structure of Nucleotide Bases Carries Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallister, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The DNA triplet code also functions as a binary code. Because double-ring compounds cannot bind to double-ring compounds in the DNA code, the sequence of bases classified simply as purines or pyrimidines can encode for smaller groups of possible amino acids. This is an intuitive approach to teaching the DNA code. (Contains 6 figures.)

  19. Alternative DNA base pairing through metal coordination.

    PubMed

    Clever, Guido H; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Base-pairing in the naturally occurring DNA and RNA oligonucleotide duplexes is based on π-stacking, hydrogen bonding, and shape complementarity between the nucleobases adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine as well as on the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance in aqueous media. This complex system of multiple supramolecular interactions is the product of a long-term evolutionary process and thus highly optimized to serve its biological functions such as information storage and processing. After the successful implementation of automated DNA synthesis, chemists have begun to introduce artificial modifications inside the core of the DNA double helix in order to study various aspects of base pairing, generate new base pairs orthogonal to the natural ones, and equip the biopolymer with entirely new functions. The idea to replace the hydrogen bonding interactions with metal coordination between ligand-like nucleosides and suitable transition metal ions culminated in the development of a plethora of artificial base-pairing systems termed "metal base-pairs" which were shown to strongly enhance the DNA duplex stability. Furthermore, they show great potential for the use of DNA as a molecular wire in nanoscale electronic architectures. Although single electrons have proven to be transmitted by natural DNA over a distance of several base pairs, the high ohmic resistance of unmodified oligonucleotides was identified as a serious obstacle. By exchanging some or all of the Watson-Crick base pairs in DNA with metal complexes, this problem may be solved. In the future, these research efforts are supposed to lead to DNA-like materials with superior conductivity for nano-electronic applications. Other fields of potential application such as DNA-based supramolecular architecture and catalysis may be strongly influenced by these developments as well. This text is meant to illustrate the basic concepts of metal-base pairing and give an outline over recent developments in this field.

  20. Thermodynamics of the interactions of m-AMSA and o-AMSA with nucleic acids: influence of ionic strength and DNA base composition.

    PubMed Central

    Wadkins, R M; Graves, D E

    1989-01-01

    The equilibrium binding of the antitumor agent m-AMSA and its biologically inactive analog o-AMSA to native and synthetic DNAs are compared over a wide range of ionic strengths and temperatures. Although o-AMSA binds DNA with a higher affinity than m-AMSA it is not effective as an antitumor agent. Both m-AMSA and o-AMSA bind DNA in an intercalative manner. Indepth investigations into the thermodynamic parameters of these interactions reveal the interaction of m-AMSA with DNA to be an enthalpy driven process. In contrast, the structurally similar but biologically inactive o-AMSA binds DNA through an entropy driven process. The differences in thermodynamic mechanisms of binding between the two isomers reveal that the electronic and/or steric factors resulting from the position of the methoxy substituent group on the anilino ring directs the DNA binding properties of these compounds and ultimately the biological effectiveness as an antitumor agent. PMID:2602146

  1. Magnetophoretic-based microfluidic device for DNA Concentration.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sangjo; Shim, Jiwook; Taylor, William R; Kosari, Farhad; Vasmatzis, George; Ahlquist, David A; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-04-01

    Nucleic acids serve as biomarkers of disease and it is highly desirable to develop approaches to extract small number of such genomic extracts from human bodily fluids. Magnetic particles-based nucleic acid extraction is widely used for concentration of small amount of samples and is followed by DNA amplification in specific assays. However, approaches to integrate such magnetic particles based capture with micro and nanofluidic based assays are still lacking. In this report, we demonstrate a magnetophoretic-based approach for target-specific DNA extraction and concentration within a microfluidic device. This device features a large chamber for reducing flow velocity and an array of μ-magnets for enhancing magnetic flux density. With this strategy, the device is able to collect up to 95 % of the magnetic particles from the fluidic flow and to concentrate these magnetic particles in a collection region. Then an enzymatic reaction is used to detach the DNA from the magnetic particles within the microfluidic device, making the DNA available for subsequent analysis. Concentrations of over 1000-fold for 90 bp dsDNA molecules is demonstrated. This strategy can bridge the gap between detection of low concentration analytes from clinical samples and a range of micro and nanofluidic sensors and devices including nanopores, nano-cantilevers, and nanowires.

  2. Integrating DNA-strand-displacement circuitry with self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongbao; Song, Tingjie; Sun, Xianbao; Xiao, Shiyan; Huang, Fujian; Liang, Haojun

    2015-11-11

    Programmable and algorithmic behaviors of DNA molecules allow one to control the structures of DNA-assembled materials with nanometer precision and to construct complex networks with digital and analog behaviors. Here we developed a way of integrating a DNA-strand-displacement circuit with self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids, wherein a single DNA strand was used to initiate and catalyze the operation of upstream circuits to release a single strand that subsequently triggers self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids in downstream circuits, realizing a programmable kinetic control of self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids. Through utilizing this method, single-nucleotide polymorphisms or indels occurring at different positions of a sequence of oligonucleotide were unambiguously discriminated. We provide here a sophisticated way of combining the DNA-strand-displacement-based characteristic of DNA with the distinct assembly properties of inorganic nanoparticles, which may find broad potential applications in the fabrication of a wide range of complex multicomponent devices and architectures.

  3. Flexibility of nucleic acids: From DNA to RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bao; Xi, Zhang; Lei, Jin; Zhi-Jie, Tan

    2016-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB933600), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175132, 11575128, and 11374234), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents, China (Grant No. NCET 08-0408).

  4. Enhanced Binding Affinity for an i-Motif DNA Substrate Exhibited by a Protein Containing Nucleobase Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaoguang; Talukder, Poulami; Daskalova, Sasha M; Roy, Basab; Chen, Shengxi; Li, Zhongxian; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2017-03-17

    Several variants of a nucleic acid binding motif (RRM1) of putative transcription factor hnRNP LL containing nucleobase amino acids at specific positions have been prepared and used to study binding affinity for the BCL2 i-motif DNA. Molecular modeling suggested a number of amino acids in RRM1 likely to be involved in interaction with the i-motif DNA, and His24 and Arg26 were chosen for modification based on their potential ability to interact with G14 of the i-motif DNA. Four nucleobase amino acids were introduced into RRM1 at one or both of positions 24 and 26. The introduction of cytosine nucleobase 2 into position 24 of RRM1 increased the affinity of the modified protein for the i-motif DNA, consistent with the possible Watson-Crick interaction of 2 and G14. In comparison, the introduction of uracil nucleobase 3 had a minimal effect on DNA affinity. Two structurally simplified nucleobase analogues (1 and 4) lacking both the N-1 and the 2-oxo substituents were also introduced in lieu of His24. Again, the RRM1 analogue containing 1 exhibited enhanced affinity for the i-motif DNA, while the protein analogue containing 4 bound less tightly to the DNA substrate. Finally, the modified protein containing 1 in lieu of Arg26 also bound to the i-motif DNA more strongly than the wild-type protein, but a protein containing 1 both at positions 24 and 26 bound to the DNA less strongly than wild type. The results support the idea of using nucleobase amino acids as protein constituents for controlling and enhancing DNA-protein interaction. Finally, modification of the i-motif DNA at G14 diminished RRM1-DNA interaction, as well as the ability of nucleobase amino acid 1 to stabilize RRM1-DNA interaction.

  5. Nonenzymatic synthesis of RNA and DNA oligomers on hexitol nucleic acid templates: the importance of the A structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Politis, P. K.; Van Aerschot, A.; Busson, R.; Herdewijn, P.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Dolan, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Hexitol nucleic acid (HNA) is an analogue of DNA containing the standard nucleoside bases, but with a phosphorylated 1,5-anhydrohexitol backbone. HNA oligomers form duplexes having the nucleic acid A structure with complementary DNA or RNA oligomers. The HNA decacytidylate oligomer is an efficient template for the oligomerization of the 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of guanosine or deoxyguanosine. Comparison of the oligomerization efficiencies on HNA, RNA, and DNA decacytidylate templates under various conditions suggests strongly that only nucleic acid double helices with the A structure support efficient template-directed synthesis when 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of nucleosides are used as substrates.

  6. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  7. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on avidin-biotin conjugation for influenza virus (type A) detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Da-Jung; Kim, Ki-Chul; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-09-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor (E-DNA biosensor) was fabricated by avidin-biotin conjugation of a biotinylated probe DNA, 5'-biotin-ATG AGT CTT CTA ACC GAG GTC GAA-3', and an avidin-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to detect the influenza virus (type A). An avidin-modified GCE was prepared by the reaction of avidin and a carboxylic acid-modified GCE, which was synthesized by the electrochemical reduction of 4-carboxyphenyl diazonium salt. The current value of the E-DNA biosensor was evaluated after hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The current value decreased after the hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA. The DNA that was used follows: complementary target DNA, 5'-TTC GAC CTC GGT TAG AAG ACT CAT-3' and two-base mismatched DNA, 5'-TTC GAC AGC GGT TAT AAG ACT CAT-3'.

  8. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  9. Quantum interference in DNA bases probed by graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Heejeong; Seul Kim, Han; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Dongho; Hoon Kim, Yong; Huh, Nam

    2013-07-01

    Based on first-principles nonequilibrium Green's function calculations, we demonstrate quantum interference (QI) effects on the tunneling conductance of deoxyribonucleic acid bases placed between zigzag graphene nanoribbon electrodes. With the analogy of QI in hydrocarbon ring structures, we hypothesize that QI can be well preserved in the π-π coupling between the carbon-based electrode and a single DNA base. We demonstrate indications of QI, such as destructively interfered anti-resonance or Fano-resonance, that affect the variation of tunneling conductance depending on the orientation of a base. We find that guanine, with a 10-fold higher transverse conductance, can be singled out from the other bases.

  10. A Ru(II) complex with 2-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline: synthesis, characterization, and acid-base and DNA-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Yuan, Cui-Li; Jia, Hai-Shun; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2011-09-01

    A new Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hmspip)]Cl2 {in which bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, Hmspip=2-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} have been synthesized and characterized. The ground- and excited-state acid-base properties of [Ru(bpy)2(Hmspip)]Cl2 and its parent complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hpip)]Cl2 {Hpip=2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} have been studied by UV-visible (UV-vis) and emission spectrophotometric pH titrations. [Ru(bpy)2(Hmspip)]Cl2 acts as a calf thymus DNA intercalators with a binding constant of 4.0×10(5) M(-1) in buffered 50 mM NaCl, as evidenced by UV-vis and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6]4-, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, reverse salt titrations and viscosity measurements.

  11. Single-quantum-dot-based DNA nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Yang; Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Kuroki, Marcos T.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2005-11-01

    Rapid and highly sensitive detection of DNA is critical in diagnosing genetic diseases. Conventional approaches often rely on cumbersome, semi-quantitative amplification of target DNA to improve detection sensitivity. In addition, most DNA detection systems (microarrays, for example), regardless of their need for target amplification, require separation of unhybridized DNA strands from hybridized stands immobilized on a solid substrate, and are thereby complicated by solution-surface binding kinetics. Here, we report an ultrasensitive nanosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) capable of detecting low concentrations of DNA in a separation-free format. This system uses quantum dots (QDs) linked to DNA probes to capture DNA targets. The target strand binds to a dye-labelled reporter strand thus forming a FRET donor-acceptor ensemble. The QD also functions as a concentrator that amplifies the target signal by confining several targets in a nanoscale domain. Unbound nanosensors produce near-zero background fluorescence, but on binding to even a small amount of target DNA (~50 copies or less) they generate a very distinct FRET signal. A nanosensor-based oligonucleotide ligation assay has been demonstrated to successfully detect a point mutation typical of some ovarian tumours in clinical samples.

  12. Selection of DNA aptamers with two modified bases

    PubMed Central

    Gawande, Bharat N.; Rohloff, John C.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; von Carlowitz, Ira; Zhang, Chi; Schneider, Daniel J.; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2017-01-01

    The nucleobases comprising DNA and RNA aptamers provide considerably less chemical diversity than protein-based ligands, limiting their versatility. The introduction of novel functional groups at just one of the four bases in modified aptamers has recently led to dramatic improvement in the success rate of identifying nucleic acid ligands to protein targets. Here we explore the benefits of additional enhancement in physicochemical diversity by selecting modified DNA aptamers that contain amino-acid–like modifications on both pyrimidine bases. Using proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 as a representative protein target, we identify specific pairwise combinations of modifications that result in higher affinity, metabolic stability, and inhibitory potency compared with aptamers with single modifications. Such doubly modified aptamers are also more likely to be encoded in shorter sequences and occupy nonoverlapping epitopes more frequently than aptamers with single modifications. These highly modified DNA aptamers have broad utility in research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. PMID:28265062

  13. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  14. DNA-Based Enzyme Reactors and Systems

    PubMed Central

    Linko, Veikko; Nummelin, Sami; Aarnos, Laura; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J. Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2016-01-01

    During recent years, the possibility to create custom biocompatible nanoshapes using DNA as a building material has rapidly emerged. Further, these rationally designed DNA structures could be exploited in positioning pivotal molecules, such as enzymes, with nanometer-level precision. This feature could be used in the fabrication of artificial biochemical machinery that is able to mimic the complex reactions found in living cells. Currently, DNA-enzyme hybrids can be used to control (multi-enzyme) cascade reactions and to regulate the enzyme functions and the reaction pathways. Moreover, sophisticated DNA structures can be utilized in encapsulating active enzymes and delivering the molecular cargo into cells. In this review, we focus on the latest enzyme systems based on novel DNA nanostructures: enzyme reactors, regulatory devices and carriers that can find uses in various biotechnological and nanomedical applications. PMID:28335267

  15. DNA Diagnostics: Nanotechnology-enhanced Electrochemical Detection of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang; Lillehoj, Peter B.; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The detection of mismatched base pairs in DNA plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of genetic-related diseases and conditions, especially for early stage treatment. Among the various biosensors that have been employed for DNA detection, electrochemical sensors show great promise since they are capable of precise DNA recognition and efficient signal transduction. Advancements in micro- and nanotechnologies, specifically fabrication techniques and new nanomaterials, have enabled for the development of highly sensitive, highly specific sensors making them attractive for the detection of small sequence variations. Furthermore, the integration of sensors with sample preparation and fluidic processes enables for rapid, multiplexed DNA detection for point-of-care (POC) clinical diagnostics. PMID:20075759

  16. DNA tetrahedron and star trigon nanostructures for target recycling detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueran; Chen, Xifeng; Wang, Bidou; Liu, Guangxing; Tang, Yuguo; Miao, Peng

    2016-06-07

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus which attacks the human body's immune system and further leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Nucleic acid detection is of great importance in the medical diagnosis of such diseases. Herein, we develop a simple and enzyme-free electrochemical method for the target recycling detection of nuclei acid. DNA tetrahedron and star trigon nanostructures are designed and constructed on the electrode interface for target capture and signal enrichment. This strategy is convenient and sensitive, with a limit of detection as low as 1 fM, and can also successfully distinguish single-base mismatched DNA. Therefore, the proposed method has a promising potential application for HIV DNA detection.

  17. Auto-assembly of nanometer thick, water soluble layers of plasmid DNA complexed with diamines and basic amino acids on graphite: Greatest DNA protection is obtained with arginine.

    PubMed

    Khalil, T T; Boulanouar, O; Heintz, O; Fromm, M

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the ability of diamines as well as basic amino acids to condense DNA onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite with minimum damage after re-dissolution in water. Based on a bibliographic survey we briefly summarize DNA binding properties with diamines as compared to basic amino acids. Thus, solutions of DNA complexed with these linkers were drop-cast in order to deposit ultra-thin layers on the surface of HOPG in the absence or presence of Tris buffer. Atomic Force Microscopy analyses showed that, at a fixed ligand-DNA mixing ratio of 16, the mean thickness of the layers can be statistically predicted to lie in the range 0-50nm with a maximum standard deviation ±6nm, using a simple linear law depending on the DNA concentration. The morphology of the layers appears to be ligand-dependent. While the layers containing diamines present holes, those formed in the presence of basic amino acids, except for lysine, are much more compact and dense. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements provide compositional information indicating that, compared to the maximum number of DNA sites to which the ligands may bind, the basic amino acids Arg and His are present in large excess. Conservation of the supercoiled topology of the DNA plasmids was studied after recovery of the complex layers in water. Remarkably, arginine has the best protection capabilities whether Tris was present or not in the initial solution.

  18. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes’ properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate – for the first time – complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  19. Ultratrace DNA Detection Based on the Condensing-Enrichment Effect of Superwettable Microchips.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ping; Chen, Yanxia; Yang, Gao; Shi, Wanxin; Dai, Bing; Li, Guannan; Cao, Yanhua; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Shutao

    2015-11-18

    A sensitive nucleic acid detection platform based on superhydrophilic microwells spotted on a superhydrophobic substrate is fabricated. Due to the wettability differences, ultratrace DNA molecules are enriched and the fluorescent signals are amplified to allow more sensitive detection. The biosensing interface based on superwettable materials provides a simple and cost-effective way for ultratrace DNA sensing.

  20. Unzipping of DNA with correlated base sequence.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, A E; Gevorkian, Zh S; Hu, Chin-Kun; Wu, Ming-Chya

    2004-06-01

    We consider force-induced unzipping transition for a heterogeneous DNA model with a correlated base sequence. Both finite-range and long-range correlated situations are considered. It is shown that finite-range correlations increase stability of DNA with respect to the external unzipping force. Due to long-range correlations the number of unzipped base pairs displays two widely different scenarios depending on the details of the base sequence: either there is no unzipping phase transition at all, or the transition is realized via a sequence of jumps with magnitude comparable to the size of the system. Both scenarios are different from the behavior of the average number of unzipped base pairs (non-self-averaging). The results can be relevant for explaining the biological purpose of correlated structures in DNA.

  1. Synthesis of circular double-stranded DNA having single-stranded recognition sequence as molecular-physical probe for nucleic acid hybridization detection based on atomic force microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Koji; Matsunaga, Hideshi; Murata, Masaharu; Soh, Nobuaki; Imato, Toshihiko

    2009-08-01

    A new class of DNA probes having a mechanically detectable tag is reported. The DNA probe, which consists of a single-stranded recognition sequence and a double-stranded circular DNA entity, was prepared by polymerase reaction. M13mp18 single strand and a 32mer oligodeoxynucleotide whose 5'-end is decorated with the recognition sequence were used in combination as template and primer, respectively. We have successfully demonstrated that the DNA probe is useful for bioanalytical purposes: by deliberately attaching target DNA molecules onto Au(111) substrates and by mechanically reading out the tag-entity using a high-resolution microscopy including atomic force microscopy, visualization/detection of the individual target/probe DNA conjugate was possible simply yet straightforwardly. The present DNA probe can be characterized as a 100%-nucleic acid product material. It is simply available by one-pod synthesis. A surface topology parameter, image roughness, has witnessed its importance as a quantitative analysis index with particular usability in the present visualization/detection method.

  2. Non-intercalative, deoxyribose binding of boric acid to calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ayse; Gursaclı, Refiye Tekiner; Tekinay, Turgay

    2014-05-01

    The present study characterizes the effects of the boric acid binding on calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) by spectroscopic and calorimetric methods. UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to characterize binding properties. Changes in the secondary structure of ct-DNA were determined by CD spectroscopy. Sizes and morphologies of boric acid-DNA complexes were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The kinetics of boric acid binding to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). ITC results revealed that boric acid exhibits a moderate affinity to ct-DNA with a binding constant (K a) of 9.54 × 10(4) M(-1). FT-IR results revealed that boric acid binds to the deoxyribose sugar of DNA without disrupting the B-conformation at tested concentrations.

  3. One-stop genomic DNA extraction by salicylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhongwu; Kadam, Ulhas S; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-11-15

    Salicylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles were prepared via a modified one-step synthesis and used for a one-stop extraction of genomic DNA from mammalian cells. The synthesized magnetic particles were used for magnetic separation of cells from the media by nonspecific binding of the particles as well as extraction of genomic DNA from the lysate. The quantity and quality were confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction. The entire process of extraction and isolation can be completed within 30 min. Compared with traditional methods based on centrifugation and filtration, the established method is fast, simple, reliable, and environmentally friendly.

  4. Nucleic acid determinants for selective deamination of DNA over RNA by activation-induced deaminase.

    PubMed

    Nabel, Christopher S; Lee, Jae W; Wang, Laura C; Kohli, Rahul M

    2013-08-27

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID), a member of the larger AID/APOBEC family, is the key catalyst in initiating antibody somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination. The DNA deamination model accounting for AID's functional role posits that AID deaminates genomic deoxycytosine bases within the immunoglobulin locus, activating downstream repair pathways that result in antibody maturation. Although this model is well supported, the molecular basis for AID's selectivity for DNA over RNA remains an open and pressing question, reflecting a broader need to elucidate how AID/APOBEC enzymes engage their substrates. To address these questions, we have synthesized a series of chimeric nucleic acid substrates and characterized their reactivity with AID. These chimeric substrates feature targeted variations at the 2'-position of nucleotide sugars, allowing us to interrogate the steric and conformational basis for nucleic acid selectivity. We demonstrate that modifications to the target nucleotide can significantly alter AID's reactivity. Strikingly, within a substrate that is otherwise DNA, a single RNA-like 2'-hydroxyl substitution at the target cytosine is sufficient to compromise deamination. Alternatively, modifications that favor a DNA-like conformation (or sugar pucker) are compatible with deamination. AID's closely related homolog APOBEC1 is similarly sensitive to RNA-like substitutions at the target cytosine. Inversely, with unreactive 2'-fluoro-RNA substrates, AID's deaminase activity was rescued by introducing a trinucleotide DNA patch spanning the target cytosine and two nucleotides upstream. These data suggest a role for nucleotide sugar pucker in explaining the molecular basis for AID's DNA selectivity and, more generally, suggest how other nucleic acid-modifying enzymes may distinguish DNA from RNA.

  5. Power of surface-based DNA computation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Weiping; Condon, A.E.; Corn, R.M.

    1997-12-01

    A new model of DNA computation that is based on surface chemistry is studied. Such computations involve the manipulation of DNA strands that are immobilized on a surface, rather than in solution as in the work of Adleman. Surface-based chemistry has been a critical technology in many recent advances in biochemistry and offers several advantages over solution-based chemistry, including simplified handling of samples and elimination of loss of strands, which reduce error in the computation. The main contribution of this paper is in showing that in principle, surface-based DNA chemistry can efficiently support general circuit computation on many inputs in parallel. To do this, an abstract model of computation that allows parallel manipulation of binary inputs is described. It is then shown that this model can be implemented by encoding inputs as DNA strands and repeatedly modifying the strands in parallel on a surface, using the chemical processes of hybridization, exonuclease degradation, polymerase extension, and ligation. Thirdly, it is shown that the model supports efficient circuit simulation in the following sense: exactly those inputs that satisfy a circuit can be isolated and the number of parallel operations needed to do this is proportional to the size of the circuit. Finally, results are presented on the power of the model when another resource of DNA computation is limited, namely strand length. 12 refs.

  6. Duplex-Selective Ruthenium-based DNA Intercalators

    PubMed Central

    Shade, Chad M.; Kennedy, Robert D.; Rouge, Jessica L.; Rosen, Mari S.; Wang, Mary X.; Seo, Soyoung E.; Clingerman, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and synthesis of small molecules that exhibit enhanced luminescence in the presence of duplex rather than single-stranded DNA. The local environment presented by a well-known [Ru(dipyrido[2,3-a:3',2'-c]phenazine)L2]2+-based DNA intercalator was modified by functionalizing the bipyridine ligands with esters and carboxylic acids. By systematically varying the number and charge of the pendant groups, it was determined that decreasing the electrostatic interaction between the intercalator and the anionic DNA backbone reduced single-strand interactions and translated to better duplex specificity. In studying this class of complexes, a single RuII complex emerged that selectively luminesces in the presence of duplex DNA with little to no background from interacting with single stranded DNA. This complex shows promise as a new dye capable of selectively staining double versus single-stranded DNA in gel electrophoresis, which cannot be done with conventional SYBR dyes. PMID:26119581

  7. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs.

    PubMed

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5 x 10(-50) cm(4)s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  8. Assessment of okadaic acid effects on cytotoxicity, DNA damage and DNA repair in human cells.

    PubMed

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Méndez, Josefina; Pásaro, Eduardo; Cemeli, Eduardo; Anderson, Diana; Laffon, Blanca

    2010-07-07

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a phycotoxin produced by several types of dinoflagellates causing diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) in humans. Symptoms induced by DSP toxins are mainly gastrointestinal, but the intoxication does not appear to be fatal. Despite this, this toxin presents a potential threat to human health even at concentrations too low to induce acute toxicity, since previous animal studies have shown that OA has very potent tumour promoting activity. However, its concrete action mechanism has not been described yet and the results reported with regard to OA cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are often contradictory. In the present study, the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of OA on three different types of human cells (peripheral blood leukocytes, HepG2 hepatoma cells, and SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells) were evaluated. Cells were treated with a range of OA concentrations in the presence and absence of S9 fraction, and MTT test and Comet assay were performed in order to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively. The possible effects of OA on DNA repair were also studied by means of the DNA repair competence assay, using bleomycin as DNA damage inductor. Treatment with OA in absence of S9 fraction induced not statistically significant decrease in cell viability and significant increase in DNA damage in all cell types at the highest concentrations investigated. However, only SHSY5Y cells showed OA induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in presence of S9 fraction. Furthermore, we found that OA can induce modulations in DNA repair processes when exposure was performed prior to BLM treatment, in co-exposure, or during the subsequent DNA repair process.

  9. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators.

  10. Determination of DNA adducts by combining acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and chromatographic analysis of the carcinogen-modified nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Leung, Elvis M K; Deng, Kailin; Wong, Tin-Yan; Chan, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The commonly used method of analyzing carcinogen-induced DNA adducts involves the hydrolysis of carcinogen-modified DNA samples by using a mixture of enzymes, followed by (32)P-postlabeling or liquid chromatography (LC)-based analyses of carcinogen-modified mononucleotides/nucleosides. In the present study, we report the development and application of a new approach to DNA adduct analysis by combining the H(+)/heat-catalyzed release of carcinogen-modified nucleobases and the use of LC-based methods to analyze DNA adducts. Results showed that heating the carcinogen-modified DNA samples at 70 °C for an extended period of 4 to 6 h in the presence of 0.05% HCl can efficiently induce DNA depurination, releasing the intact carcinogen-modified nucleobases for LC analyses. After optimizing the hydrolysis conditions, DNA samples with C8- and N (2) -modified 2'-deoxyguanosine, as well as N (6) -modified 2'-deoxyadenosine, were synthesized by reacting DNA with 1-nitropyrene, acetaldehyde, and aristolochic acids, respectively. These samples were then hydrolyzed, and the released nucleobase adducts were analyzed using LC-based analytical methods. Analysis results demonstrated a dose-dependent release of target DNA adducts from carcinogen-modified DNA samples, indicating that the developed H(+)/heat-catalyzed hydrolysis method was quantitative. Comparative studies with enzymatic digestion method on carcinogen-modified DNA samples revealed that the two hydrolysis methods did not yield systematically different results.

  11. Comparison of commercial systems for extraction of nucleic acids from DNA/RNA respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Genyan; Erdman, Dean E; Kodani, Maja; Kools, John; Bowen, Michael D; Fields, Barry S

    2011-01-01

    This study compared six automated nucleic acid extraction systems and one manual kit for their ability to recover nucleic acids from human nasal wash specimens spiked with five respiratory pathogens, representing Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pyogenes), Gram-negative bacteria (Legionella pneumophila), DNA viruses (adenovirus), segmented RNA viruses (human influenza virus A), and non-segmented RNA viruses (respiratory syncytial virus). The robots and kit evaluated represent major commercially available methods that are capable of simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from respiratory specimens, and included platforms based on magnetic-bead technology (KingFisher mL, Biorobot EZ1, easyMAG, KingFisher Flex, and MagNA Pure Compact) or glass fiber filter technology (Biorobot MDX and the manual kit Allprep). All methods yielded extracts free of cross-contamination and RT-PCR inhibition. All automated systems recovered L. pneumophila and adenovirus DNA equivalently. However, the MagNA Pure protocol demonstrated more than 4-fold higher DNA recovery from the S. pyogenes than other methods. The KingFisher mL and easyMAG protocols provided 1- to 3-log wider linearity and extracted 3- to 4-fold more RNA from the human influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus. These findings suggest that systems differed in nucleic acid recovery, reproducibility, and linearity in a pathogen specific manner.

  12. A DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification-bridged two-stage exonuclease III-assisted recycling strategy for label-free multi-amplified biosensing of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Lv, Yanqin; Cui, Hui; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng

    2015-01-26

    An autonomous DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification (RCA)-bridged two-stage exonuclease III (Exo III)-induced recycling amplification (Exo III-RCA-Exo III) was developed for label-free and highly sensitive homogeneous multi-amplified detection of DNA combined with sensitive fluorescence detection technique. According to the configuration, the analysis of DNA is accomplished by recognizing the target to a unlabeled molecular beacon (UMB) that integrates target-binding and signal transducer within one multifunctional design, followed by the target-binding of UMB in duplex DNA removed stepwise by Exo III accompanied by the releasing of target DNA for the successive hybridization and cleavage process and autonomous generation of the primer that initiate RCA process with a rational designed padlock DNA. The RCA products containing thousands of repeated catalytic sequences catalytically hybridize with a hairpin reporter probe that includes a "caged" inactive G-quadruplex sequence (HGP) and were then detected by Exo III-assisted recycling amplification, liberating the active G-quadruplex and generating remarkable ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex fluorescence signals with the help of zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX). The proposed strategy showed a wide dynamic range over 7 orders of magnitude with a low limit of detection of 0.51 aM. In addition, this designed protocol can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA, and holds a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  13. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  14. Comparison of Levels of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 RNA in Plasma as Measured by the NucliSens Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification and Quantiplex Branched-DNA Assays

    PubMed Central

    Ginocchio, C. C.; Tetali, S.; Washburn, D.; Zhang, F.; Kaplan, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    This study compared levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the Quantiplex branched-DNA and NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays. RNA was detectable in 118 of 184 samples (64.13%) by the Quantiplex assay and in 171 of 184 samples (92.94%) by the NucliSens assay. Regression analysis indicated that a linear relationship existed between the two sets of values (P < 0.0001), although the Quantiplex and NucliSens values were significantly different (P < 0.001), with the NucliSens values being approximately 0.323 log higher. Spearman correlation analysis indicated that the overall changes in patient viral load patterns were highly correlative between the two assays: r = 0.912, P < 0.0001. The lower limits of sensitivity were determined to be approximately 100 copies/ml and 1,200 to 1,400 copies/ml for the NucliSens and Quantiplex assays, respectively. PMID:10074556

  15. Comparison of levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification and Quantiplex branched-DNA assays.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, C C; Tetali, S; Washburn, D; Zhang, F; Kaplan, M H

    1999-04-01

    This study compared levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the Quantiplex branched-DNA and NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays. RNA was detectable in 118 of 184 samples (64.13%) by the Quantiplex assay and in 171 of 184 samples (92.94%) by the NucliSens assay. Regression analysis indicated that a linear relationship existed between the two sets of values (P < 0.0001), although the Quantiplex and NucliSens values were significantly different (P < 0.001), with the NucliSens values being approximately 0.323 log higher. Spearman correlation analysis indicated that the overall changes in patient viral load patterns were highly correlative between the two assays: r = 0.912, P < 0.0001. The lower limits of sensitivity were determined to be approximately 100 copies/ml and 1,200 to 1,400 copies/ml for the NucliSens and Quantiplex assays, respectively.

  16. Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    COVERED (From - To) 6 Jul 08 – 11 Jul 08 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RANDOM CODING BOUNDS FOR DNA CODES BASED ON FIBONACCI ENSEMBLES OF DNA SEQUENCES ... sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci sequences . 15. SUBJECT TERMS DNA Codes, Fibonacci Ensembles, DNA Computing, Code Optimization 16...coding bound on the rate of DNA codes is proved. To obtain the bound, we use some ensembles of DNA sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci

  17. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanchen; Yang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Dongsheng

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Most biological processes happen at the nanometer scale, and understanding the energy transformations and material transportation mechanisms within living organisms has proved challenging. To better understand the secrets of life, researchers have investigated artificial molecular motors and devices over the past decade because such systems can mimic certain biological processes. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures is one system that has played an important role in these investigations. In this Account, we summarize recent advances in functional DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures. The i-motif is a DNA quadruplex that occurs as four stretches of cytosine repeat sequences form C·CH(+) base pairs, and their stabilization requires slightly acidic conditions. This unique property has produced the first DNA molecular motor driven by pH changes. The motor is reliable, and studies show that it is capable of millisecond running speeds, comparable to the speed of natural protein motors. With careful design, the output of these types of motors was combined to drive micrometer-sized cantilevers bend. Using established DNA nanostructure assembly and functionalization methods, researchers can easily integrate the motor within other DNA assembled structures and functional units, producing DNA molecular devices with new functions such as suprahydrophobic/suprahydrophilic smart surfaces that switch, intelligent nanopores triggered by pH changes, molecular logic gates, and DNA nanosprings. Recently, researchers have produced motors driven by light and electricity, which have allowed DNA motors to be integrated within silicon-based nanodevices. Moreover, some devices based on i-motif structures have proven useful for investigating processes within living cells. The pH-responsiveness of the i-motif structure also provides a way to control the stepwise assembly of DNA nanostructures. In addition, because of the stability of the i-motif, this

  18. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  19. Synthesis and DNA-binding properties of novel DNA cyclo-intercalators containing purine-glucuronic acid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renshuai; Chen, Shaopeng; Wang, Xueting; Yu, Rilei; Li, Mingjing; Ren, Sumei; Jiang, Tao

    2016-06-24

    Novel DNA cyclo-intercalators, which incorporated two intercalator subunits linked by two bridges, were synthesized. Binding of the compounds to calf-thymus DNA was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and docking simulations were used to predict the binding modes of these cyclic compounds. The spectral data demonstrated that all of these compounds can interact with CT-DNA. The sugar moiety played an important role in the process of binding between the intercalators containing glucuronic acid and DNA. The length and flexibility of the connecting bridges affected the binding affinity of the resultant cyclo-intercalators. Docking simulations showed that compounds 7 and 8 interact with DNA as mono-intercalators.

  20. Biosensors based on DNA-Functionalized Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnubhotla, Ramya; Ping, Jinglei; Vrudhula, Amey; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    Since its discovery, graphene has been used for sensing applications due to its outstanding electrical properties and biocompatibility. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of field effect transistors (FETs) based on CVD-grown graphene functionalized with commercially obtained DNA oligomers and aptamers for detection of various biomolecular targets (e.g., complementary DNA and small molecule drug targets). Graphene FETs were created with a scalable photolithography process that produces arrays consisting of 50-100 FETs with a layout suitable for multiplexed detection of four molecular targets. FETs were characterized via AFM to confirm the presence of the aptamer. From the measured electrical characteristics, it was determined that binding of molecular targets by the DNA chemical recognition element led to a reproducible, concentration-dependent shift in the Dirac voltage. This biosensor class is potentially suitable for applications in drug detection. This work is funded by NIH through the Center for AIDS Research at the University of Pennsylvania.

  1. Electron and hole transfer from DNA base radicals to oxidized products of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhongli; Sevilla, Michael D

    2003-03-01

    An investigation of electron and hole transfer to oxidized guanine bases in DNA is reported. Guanine in DNA was preferentially oxidized by Br(2)(*-) at 298 K to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8-oxo-G) and higher oxidation products. HPLC-EC analysis of irradiated DNA shows that the formation of 8-oxo-G could not be increased above the ratio of one 8-oxo-G to 127 +/- 6 bp regardless of dose. 8-oxo-G can be produced only at low levels because it is further oxidized to other species. These oxidation products of guanine have been extensively investigated and identified by others. Our electron spin resonance studies suggest that at 77 K 8-oxo-G is a trap for radiation-produced holes, but certain further oxidation products of 8-oxo-G (G(ox)) are found to be efficient electron traps. Gamma irradiation of oxidized DNA samples in frozen (D(2)O) aqueous ices and glassy 7 M LiBr solutions resulted in radicals formed by electron attachment to the G(ox) sites that were monitored by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) at 77 K. These ESR spectra suggest that those oxidation products of 8-oxo-G containing alpha-diketo groups account for the electron traps (G(ox)) in oxidized DNA with oxaluric acid a likely major trap. Electron transfer from DNA anion radicals to G(ox) was followed by monitoring of their ESR signals with time at 77 K. Using typical values for the tunneling constant beta estimates of the relative amount of G(ox) to base pairs were obtained. Radicals formed by UV photolysis of oxidized DNA in 8 M NaClO(4) glassy aqueous solutions were also investigated. The 8-oxo-G cation accounts for less than 10% of all the radicals observed after either gamma irradiation of oxidized DNA in frozen (D(2)O) aqueous solution or UV photolysis of oxidized DNA in 8 M NaClO(4) glassy aqueous solutions. We estimate hole transfer distances of about 7 +/- 1 bp at 1 min from G(*+) to 8-oxo-G.

  2. DNA-Based Nanostructures: Changes of Mechanical Properties of DNA upon Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, Yury; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Gursky, Georgy; Nechipurenko, Dmitry; Polozov, Robert

    The formation of DNA-based nanostructures involves the binding of different kinds of ligands to DNA as well as the interaction of DNA molecules with each other. Complex formation between ligand and DNA can alter physicochemical properties of the DNA molecule. In the present work, the accessibility of DNA-ligand complexes to cleavage by DNase I are considered, and the exact algorithms for analysis of diagrams of DNase I footprinting for ligand-DNA complexes are obtained. Changes of mechanical properties of the DNA upon ligand binding are also demonstrated by the cleavage patterns generated upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes. Propagation of the mechanical perturbations along DNA in the presence of bound ligands is considered in terms of a string model with a heterogeneity corresponding to the position of a bound ligand on DNA. This model can reproduce qualitatively the cleavage patterns obtained upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes.

  3. Capillary electrophoresis-systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment selection of base- and sugar-modified DNA aptamers: target binding dominated by 2'-O,4'-C-methylene-bridged/locked nucleic acid primer.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yuuya; Irisawa, Yuuta; Fujita, Hiroto; Yahara, Aiko; Ozaki, Hiroaki; Obika, Satoshi; Kuwahara, Masayasu

    2013-05-21

    Chemically modified DNA aptamers specific to human α-thrombin were obtained from oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) libraries by using a capillary electrophoresis-systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (CE-SELEX) method. These libraries contained 2'-O,4'-C-methylene-bridged/linked bicyclic ribonucleotides (B/L nucleotides) in the primer region and/or C5-modified thymidine bearing N(6)-ethyladenine (t) in the nonprimer region. Modified DNA aptamers showed high binding affinities to the target, with dissociation constants (Kd) values in the range of subnanomolar to several ten nanomolar levels. The introduction of base modification significantly suppressed the frequency of G-quadruplex motifs, which are often seen in thrombin-binding DNA aptamers. The resulting alternatives contained the 10-mer consensus sequence t5Gt2G2, which is frequently found in modified DNA aptamers with subnanomolar protein binding affinities. Furthermore, some base- and sugar-modified DNA aptamers with the 12-mer consensus sequence t2G2tC(A/G)A2G2t displayed binding activities that were dependent on the presence of B/L nucleotides in the primer region. Such aptamers were interestingly not recovered from a natural DNA library or from DNA libraries modified with either B/L nucleotides or t's. This emerging characteristic binding property will enable the creation of a direct selection methodology for DNA-based molecular switches that are triggered by chemical conversion of B/L nucleotides introduced to constant sequence regions in ODN libraries.

  4. All-atom polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-06-15

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field (FF) for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages, and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting quantum mechanical (QM) data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude FF yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100-ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduce (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII substates of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive FF, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA.

  5. The structural basis for recognition of base J containing DNA by a novel DNA binding domain in JBP1.

    PubMed

    Heidebrecht, Tatjana; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Chalmers, Michael J; Jan, Sabrina; Ter Riet, Bas; Grover, Rajesh K; Joosten, Robbie P; Littler, Dene; van Luenen, Henri; Griffin, Patrick R; Wentworth, Paul; Borst, Piet; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2011-07-01

    The J-binding protein 1 (JBP1) is essential for biosynthesis and maintenance of DNA base-J (β-d-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil). Base-J and JBP1 are confined to some pathogenic protozoa and are absent from higher eukaryotes, prokaryotes and viruses. We show that JBP1 recognizes J-containing DNA (J-DNA) through a 160-residue domain, DB-JBP1, with 10 000-fold preference over normal DNA. The crystal structure of DB-JBP1 revealed a helix-turn-helix variant fold, a 'helical bouquet' with a 'ribbon' helix encompassing the amino acids responsible for DNA binding. Mutation of a single residue (Asp525) in the ribbon helix abrogates specificity toward J-DNA. The same mutation renders JBP1 unable to rescue the targeted deletion of endogenous JBP1 genes in Leishmania and changes its distribution in the nucleus. Based on mutational analysis and hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass-spectrometry data, a model of JBP1 bound to J-DNA was constructed and validated by small-angle X-ray scattering data. Our results open new possibilities for targeted prevention of J-DNA recognition as a therapeutic intervention for parasitic diseases.

  6. Communication: Electron ionization of DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2016-04-01

    No reliable experimental data exist for the partial and total electron ionization cross sections for DNA bases, which are very crucial for modeling radiation damage in genetic material of living cell. We have measured a complete set of absolute partial electron ionization cross sections up to 500 eV for DNA bases for the first time by using the relative flow technique. These partial cross sections are summed to obtain total ion cross sections for all the four bases and are compared with the existing theoretical calculations and the only set of measured absolute cross sections. Our measurements clearly resolve the existing discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results, thereby providing for the first time reliable numbers for partial and total ion cross sections for these molecules. The results on fragmentation analysis of adenine supports the theory of its formation in space.

  7. Dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding amino acid residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ponnuraj, Karthe; Saravanan, Konda Mani

    2017-04-01

    A protein can interact with DNA or RNA molecules to perform various cellular processes. Identifying or analyzing DNA/RNA binding site amino acid residues is important to understand molecular recognition process. It is quite possible to accurately model DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues in experimental protein-DNA/RNA complex by using the electron density map whereas, locating/modeling the binding site amino acid residues in the predicted three dimensional structures of DNA/RNA binding proteins is still a difficult task. Considering the above facts, in the present work, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding site amino acid residues by using a classical Ramachandran map. We have computed backbone dihedral angles of non-DNA/RNA binding residues and used as control dataset to make a comparative study. The dihedral angle preference of DNA and RNA binding site residues of twenty amino acid type is presented. Our analysis clearly revealed that the dihedral angles (φ, ψ) of DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues prefer to occupy (-89° to -60°, -59° to -30°) bins. The results presented in this paper will help to model/locate DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues with better accuracy.

  8. Prooxidant action of chebulinic acid and tellimagrandin I: causing copper-dependent DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zong-Chun; Liu, Yan-Ze; Li, Hai-Xia; Wang, Zhao

    2009-04-01

    The prooxidant activity of two hydrolysable tannins, chebulinic acid and tellimagrandin I, on plasmid DNA and genomic DNA of cultured MRC-5 human embryo lung fibroblasts was assessed. The results revealed that both hydrolysable tannins in combination with Cu(II) induced DNA strand breaks in pBR322 plasmid DNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Chebulinic acid and tellimagrandin I also induced genomic DNA strand breaks of MRC-5 human embryo lung fibroblasts in the presence of Cu(II). After treatment with chebulinic acid or tellimagrandin I alone, the pBR322 plasmid DNA and genomic DNA in MRC-5 cells kept intact. In addition, addition of Cu(I) reagent bathocuproinedisulfonic acid or catalase markedly inhibited the copper-dependent DNA strand breaks by both tannins. However, three typical hydroxyl radical scavengers, DMSO, ethanol and mannitol, did not inhibit the DNA strand breaks. Both tannins were able to reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I). These results indicated that chebulinic acid and tellimagrandin I induced the copper-dependent strand breaks of pBR322 plasmid DNA and MRC-5 genomic DNA with prooxidant action, in which Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox cycle and H(2)O(2) were involved and hydroxyl radical formation is important in the hypothetical mechanism by which DNA strand breaks are formed.

  9. Nucleic acid based logical systems.

    PubMed

    Han, Da; Kang, Huaizhi; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Cuichen; Zhou, Cuisong; You, Mingxu; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2014-05-12

    Researchers increasingly visualize a significant role for artificial biochemical logical systems in biological engineering, much like digital logic circuits in electrical engineering. Those logical systems could be utilized as a type of servomechanism to control nanodevices in vitro, monitor chemical reactions in situ, or regulate gene expression in vivo. Nucleic acids (NA), as carriers of genetic information with well-regulated and predictable structures, are promising materials for the design and engineering of biochemical circuits. A number of logical devices based on nucleic acids (NA) have been designed to handle various processes for technological or biotechnological purposes. This article focuses on the most recent and important developments in NA-based logical devices and their evolution from in vitro, through cellular, even towards in vivo biological applications.

  10. Drug delivery systems based on nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan Willem; Zhang, Feng; Herrmann, Andreas

    2013-12-10

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has progressed rapidly in recent years and hence a large variety of 1D-, 2D- and 3D DNA nanostructures with various sizes, geometries and shapes is readily accessible. DNA-based nanoobjects are fabricated by straight forward design and self-assembly processes allowing the exact positioning of functional moieties and the integration of other materials. At the same time some of these nanosystems are characterized by a low toxicity profile. As a consequence, the use of these architectures in a biomedical context has been explored. In this review the progress and possibilities of pristine nucleic acid nanostructures and DNA hybrid materials for drug delivery will be discussed. For the latter class of structures, a distinction is made between carriers with an inorganic core composed of gold or silica and amphiphilic DNA block copolymers that exhibit a soft hydrophobic interior.

  11. Information transfer from DNA to peptide nucleic acids by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Christensen, L.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are analogs of nucleic acids in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is replaced by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. Oligocytidylates have been shown to act as templates for formation of longer oligomers of G from PNA G2 dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from DNA to PNA. DNA C4T2C4 is an efficient template for synthesis of PNA G4A2G4 using G2 and A2 units as substrates. The corresponding synthesis of PNA G4C2G4 on DNA C4G2C4 is less efficient. Incorporation of PNA T2 into PNA products on DNA C4A2C4 is the least efficient of the three reactions. These results, obtained using PNA dimers as substrates, parallel those obtained using monomeric activated nucleotides.

  12. DNA methylation profiling using bisulfite-based epityping of pooled genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Sophia J; Davis, Oliver S P; Haworth, Claire M A; Plomin, Robert; Mill, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    DNA methylation plays a vital role in normal cellular function, with aberrant methylation signatures being implicated in a growing number of human pathologies and complex human traits. Methods based on the modification of genomic DNA with sodium bisulfite are considered the 'gold-standard' for DNA methylation profiling on genomic DNA; however they require large amounts of DNA and may be prohibitively expensive when used on the large sample sizes necessary to detect small effects. DNA pooling approaches are already widely used in large-scale studies of DNA sequence and gene expression. In this paper, we describe the application of this economical DNA pooling technique to the study of DNA methylation profiles. This method generates accurate quantitative assessments of group DNA methylation averages, reducing the time, cost and amount of DNA starting material required for large-scale epigenetic investigation of disease phenotypes.

  13. Potent protection of gallic acid against DNA oxidation: results of human and animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Ferk, Franziska; Chakraborty, Asima; Jäger, Walter; Kundi, Michael; Bichler, Julia; Mišík, Miroslav; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haidinger, Gerald; Hoelzl, Christine; Nersesyan, Armen; Dušinská, Maria; Simić, Tatjana; Knasmüller, Siegfried

    2011-10-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) is a constituent of plant derived foods, beverages and herbal remedies. We investigated its DNA protective properties in a placebo controlled human intervention trial in single cell gel electrophoresis experiments. Supplementation of drinking water with GA (12.8 mg/person/d) for three days led to a significant reduction of DNA migration attributable to oxidised pyrimidines (endonuclease III sensitive sites) and oxidised purines (formamidopyrimidine glycosylase sensitive sites) in lymphocytes of healthy individuals by 75% and 64% respectively. Also DNA damage caused by treatment of the cells with reactive oxygen species (ROS) was reduced after GA consumption (by 41%). These effects were paralleled by an increase of the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathion-S-transferase-π) and a decrease of intracellular ROS concentrations in lymphocytes, while no alterations of the total antioxidant capacity (TAC), of malondialdehyde levels in serum and of the urinary excretion of isoprostanes were found. Experiments with rats showed that GA reduces oxidatively damaged DNA in lymphocytes, liver, colon and lungs and protects these organs against γ-irradiation-induced strand breaks and formation of oxidatively damaged DNA-bases. Furthermore, the number of radiation-induced preneoplastic hepatic foci was decreased by 43% after oral administration of the phenolic. Since we did not find alterations of the TAC in plasma and lipid peroxidation of cell membranes but intracellular effects it is likely that the antioxidant properties of GA seen in vivo are not due to direct scavenging of radicals but rather to indirect mechanisms (e.g. protection against ROS via activation of transcription factors). As the amount of GA used in the intervention trial is similar to the daily intake in Middle Europe (18 mg/person/day), our findings indicate that it may contribute to prevention of formation

  14. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  15. DNA sequencing by synthesis based on elongation delay detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manturov, Alexey O.; Grigoryev, Anton V.

    2015-03-01

    The one of most important problem in modern genetics, biology and medicine is determination of the primary nucleotide sequence of the DNA of living organisms (DNA sequencing). This paper describes the label-free DNA sequencing approach, based on the observation of a discrete dynamics of DNA sequence elongation phase. The proposed DNA sequencing principle are studied by numerical simulation. The numerical model for proposed label-free DNA sequencing approach is based on a cellular automaton, which can simulate the elongation stage (growth of DNA strands) and dynamics of nucleotides incorporation to rising DNA strand. The estimates for number of copied DNA sequences for required probability of nucleotide incorporation event detection and correct DNA sequence determination was obtained. The proposed approach can be applied at all known DNA sequencing devices with "sequencing by synthesis" principle of operation.

  16. Translocation of single stranded DNA through the α-hemolysin protein nanopore in acidic solutions

    PubMed Central

    de Zoysa, Ranulu Samanthi S.; Krishantha, D.M. Milan; Zhao, Qitao; Gupta, Jyoti; Guan, Xiyun

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acidic pH on the translocation of single-stranded DNA through the α-hemolysin pore is investigated. Two significantly different types of events, i.e., deep blockades and shallow blockades, are observed at low pH. The residence times of the shallow blockades are not significantly different from those of the DNA translocation events obtained at or near physiological pH, while the deep blockades have much larger residence times and blockage amplitudes. With a decrease in the pH of the electrolyte solution, the percentage of the deep blockades in the total events increases. Furthermore, the mean residence time of these long-lived events is dependent on the length of DNA, and also varies with the nucleotide base, suggesting that they are appropriate for use in DNA analysis. In addition to be used as an effective approach to affect DNA translocation in the nanopore, manipulation of the pH of the electrolyte solution provides a potential means to greatly enhance the sensitivity of nanopore stochastic sensing. PMID:21997574

  17. Target-catalyzed autonomous assembly of dendrimer-like DNA nanostructures for enzyme-free and signal amplified colorimetric nucleic acids detection.

    PubMed

    He, Hongfei; Dai, Jianyuan; Duan, Zhijuan; Meng, Yan; Zhou, Cuisong; Long, Yuyin; Zheng, Baozhan; Du, Juan; Guo, Yong; Xiao, Dan

    2016-12-15

    Self-assembly of DNA nanostructures is of great importance in nanomedicine, nanotechnology and biosensing. Herein, a novel target-catalyzed autonomous assembly pathway for the formation of dendrimer-like DNA nanostructures that only employing target DNA and three hairpin DNA probes was proposed. We use the sticky-ended Y shape DNA (Y-DNA) as the assembly monomer and it was synthesized by the catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) instead of the DNA strand annealing method. The formed Y-DNA was equipped with three ssDNA sticky ends and two of them were predesigned to be complementary to the third one, then the dendrimer-like DNA nanostructures can be obtained via an autonomous assembly among these sticky-ended Y-DNAs. The resulting nanostructure has been successfully applied to develop an enzyme-free and signal amplified gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based colorimetric nucleic acids assay.

  18. Excess Electron Localization in Solvated DNA Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Maeve; Kohanoff, Jorge

    2011-06-10

    We present a first-principles molecular dynamics study of an excess electron in condensed phase models of solvated DNA bases. Calculations on increasingly large microsolvated clusters taken from liquid phase simulations show that adiabatic electron affinities increase systematically upon solvation, as for optimized gas-phase geometries. Dynamical simulations after vertical attachment indicate that the excess electron, which is initially found delocalized, localizes around the nucleobases within a 15 fs time scale. This transition requires small rearrangements in the geometry of the bases.

  19. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  20. A simple DNA-based translation system.

    PubMed

    Garibotti, Alejandra V; Liao, Shiping; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2007-02-01

    We have used DNA double crossover (DX) molecules to produce a translation system that generates unique molecular products. The particular species of DX molecule used contains an even number of half-turns between crossover points, so there is a continuous strand on both sides of the molecule. One of these strands acts as the input strand containing the message, and a second strand acts as the product of translation. The crossover strands carry the "code" that connects the two sides of the molecule. This system is more robust, more extendable, and simpler than previous DNA-based translation systems that have been reported. It is designed to be useful in a variety of applications that utilize the concept of translating from one code to another.

  1. Biodegradable DNA-brush Block Copolymer Spherical Nucleic Acids Enable Transfection Agent-Free Intracellular Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuan; Hao, Liangliang; Calabrese, Colin M.; Zhou, Yu; Choi, Chung Hang J.; Xing, Hang; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    A new strategy for synthesizing spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanostructures from biodegradable DNA block copolymers is reported. Multiple DNA strands are grafted to one end of a polyester chain (poly-caprolactone) to generate an amphiphilic DNA brush block copolymer (DBBC) structure capable of assembling into spherical micelles in aqueous solution. These novel DBBC-based micelle-SNAs exhibit a higher surface density of nucleic acids compared to micelle structures assembled from an analogous linear DNA block copolymer (DBC), which endows them with the ability to more efficiently enter cells without the need for transfection agents. Importantly, the new SNAs show effective gene regulation without observable cellular toxicity in mammalian cell culture. PMID:26297167

  2. Estrogens protect against hydrogen peroxide and arachidonic acid induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tang, M; Subbiah, M T

    1996-01-19

    The ability of estrogens to protect against DNA damage induced by either hydrogen peroxide or arachidonic acid alone or in combination with Cu2+ was investigated. DNA strand breaks were determined by conversion of double stranded supercoiled OX-174 RFI DNA to double stranded open circular DNA and linear single stranded DNA. Estradiol-17 beta significantly decreased the formation of single and double strand breaks in DNA induced by H2O2 alone or with Cu2+. Equilin (an equine estrogen) was more effective than estradiol-17 beta at the doses tested. Arachidonic acid in the presence of Cu2+ caused the formation of high levels of linear DNA which was protected by estrogen with equilen being more effective. These studies suggest that estrogens through this protective effect on DNA damage might contribute to cardioprotection.

  3. Towards DNA-Based Programmable Matter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-28

    that moves along a DNA track and mediates autonomous multistep organic synthesis in a single isothermal solution.35 McKee et al. recently used a DNA...functionalize a variety of mesoscale materials with DNA oligonucleotides. Finally, we demonstrated the ability of these DNA-linked surfaces to mediate ...these DNA-linked surfaces to mediate surface-surface interactions in a DNA sequence-specific manner. In a second line of research, we applied these

  4. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  5. Radiation-induced degradation of DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douki, T.; Delatour, T.; Martini, R.; Cadet, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radio-induced degradation of DNA involves radical processes. A series of lesions among the major bases degradation products has been measured in isolated DNA exposed to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. Degradation can be accounted for by the formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water (indirect effect). The four bases are degraded in high yield. Direct effect has been mimicked by photo-induced electron abstraction from the bases producing their radical cation. Quantification of the modified bases showed that guanine is the preferential target. This can be explained by its lower oxidation potential and charge transfer phenomena. La décomposition radio-induite de l'ADN fait intervenir des processus radicalaires. Une série de lésions choisies parmi les produits majeurs de dégradation des bases a été mesurée dans de l'ADN isolé exposé au rayonnement en solution aqueuse aérée. Les modifications sont alors dues aux radicaux hydroxyles produits par la radiolyse de l'eau (effet indirect) et les quatre bases sont efficacement dégradées. L'arrachement d'électrons aux bases par photosensibilisation pour produire leur radical cation, a été utilisé comme modèle de l'effet direct. La quantification des bases modifiées montre que la guanine est préférentiellement dégradée. Cette observation peut s'expliquer par le plus faible potentiel d'oxydation de cette base ainsi que par les phénomènes de transfert de charge vers les guanines.

  6. Role of Amino Acid Insertions on Intermolecular Forces between Arginine Peptide Condensed DNA Helices

    PubMed Central

    DeRouchey, Jason E.; Rau, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    In spermatogenesis, chromatin histones are replaced by arginine-rich protamines to densely compact DNA in sperm heads. Tight packaging is considered necessary to protect the DNA from damage. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing protamine-DNA assemblies and their dependence on amino acid content, the effect of neutral and negatively charged amino acids on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces was studied using model peptides containing six arginines. We have previously observed that the neutral amino acids in salmon protamine decrease the net attraction between protamine-DNA helices compared with the equivalent homo-arginine peptide. Using osmotic stress coupled with x-ray scattering, we have investigated the component attractive and repulsive forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance as a function of the chemistry, position, and number of the amino acid inserted. Neutral amino acids inserted into hexa-arginine increase the short range repulsion while only slightly affecting longer range attraction. The amino acid content alone of salmon protamine is enough to rationalize the forces that package DNA in sperm heads. Inserting a negatively charged amino acid into hexa-arginine dramatically weakens the net attraction. Both of these observations have biological implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm heads. PMID:21994948

  7. DNA biosensors based on self-assembled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, S G; Wang, Ruili; Sellin, P J; Zhang, Qing

    2004-12-24

    DNA biosensors based on self-assembled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were described in this paper, in which the probe DNA oligonucleotides were immobilized by forming covalent amide bonds between carboxyl groups at the nanotubes and amino groups at the ends of the DNA oligonucleotides. Hybridization between the probe and target DNA oligonucleotides was confirmed by the changes in the voltammetric peak of the indicator of methylene blue. Our results demonstrate that the DNA biosensors based on self-assembled MWNTs had a higher hybridization efficiency compared to those based on random MWNTs. In addition, the developed DNA biosensors also had a high selectivity of hybridization detection.

  8. Envisioning the molecular choreography of DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S S; Mol, C D; Hosfield, D J; Tainer, J A

    1999-02-01

    Recent breakthroughs integrate individual DNA repair enzyme structures, biochemistry and biology to outline the structural cell biology of the DNA base excision repair pathways that are essential to genome integrity. Thus, we are starting to envision how the actions, movements, steps, partners and timing of DNA repair enzymes, which together define their molecular choreography, are elegantly controlled by both the nature of the DNA damage and the structural chemistry of the participating enzymes and the DNA double helix.

  9. DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-24

    DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes Eliot F. Gomez1, Vishak Venkatraman1, James G. Grote2 & Andrew J. Steckl1...45433-7707 USA. We report on the use of nucleic acid bases (NBs) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). NBs are small molecules that are the basic...polymer has been a frequent natural material integrated in electronic devices. DNA has been used in organic light - emitting diodes (OLEDs)4,5,7–14

  10. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  11. Molecular switching behavior in isosteric DNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Jissy, A K; Konar, Sukanya; Datta, Ayan

    2013-04-15

    The structures and proton-coupled behavior of adenine-thymine (A-T) and a modified base pair containing a thymine isostere, adenine-difluorotoluene (A-F), are studied in different solvents by dispersion-corrected density functional theory. The stability of the canonical Watson-Crick base pair and the mismatched pair in various solvents with low and high dielectric constants is analyzed. It is demonstrated that A-F base pairing is favored in solvents with low dielectric constant. The stabilization and conformational changes induced by protonation are also analyzed for the natural as well as the mismatched base pair. DNA sequences capable of changing their sequence conformation on protonation are used in the construction of pH-based molecular switches. An acidic medium has a profound influence in stabilizing the isostere base pair. Such a large gain in stability on protonation leads to an interesting pH-controlled molecular switch, which can be incorporated in a natural DNA tract.

  12. Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on hemorrhagic fever DNA.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Derzon, Mark Steven; McClain, Jaime; Achyuthan, Komandoor

    2006-11-01

    Columbia University has developed a sensitive highly multiplexed system for genetic identification of nucleic acid targets. The primary obstacle to implementing this technology is the high rate of false positives due to high levels of unbound reporters that remain within the system after hybridization. The ability to distinguish between free reporters and reporters bound to targets limits the use of this technology. We previously demonstrated a new electrokinetic method for binary separation of kb pair long DNA molecules and oligonucleotides. The purpose of this project 99864 is to take these previous demonstrations and further develop the technique and hardware for field use. Specifically, our objective was to implement separation in a heterogeneous sample (containing target DNA and background oligo), to perform the separation in a flow-based device, and to develop all of the components necessary for field testing a breadboard prototype system.

  13. DNA nanostructure-based imaging probes and drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Pengfei; Jiang, Qiao; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Li, Na; Yu, Haiyin; Ding, Baoquan

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures are well-defined nanoscale shapes, with uniform sizes, precise spatial addressability, and excellent biocompatibility. With these features, DNA nanostructures show great potential for biomedical applications; various DNA-based biomedical imaging probes or payload delivery carriers have been developed. In this review, we summarize the recent developments of DNA-based nanostructures as tools for diagnosis and cancer therapy. The biological effects that are brought about by DNA nanostructures are highlighted by in vitro and in vivo imaging, antitumor drug delivery, and immunostimulatory therapy. The challenges and perspectives of DNA nanostructures in the field of nanomedicine are discussed.

  14. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and they promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5'-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER. PMID:26596511

  15. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and they promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5′-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER. PMID:26466358

  16. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-11-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and such lesions can promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5'-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER.

  17. Inhibition of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutagenicity and DNA methylation by ellagic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, R; Gold, B

    1986-01-01

    Ellagic acid, a naturally occurring plant phenol, inhibits the activity of the direct-acting mutagen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MeNU) in Salmonella typhimurium TA100. Ellagic acid at 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 mM inhibited the mutagenicity of MeNU (0.40 mM) by 3%, 13%, 45%, and 60%, respectively. Ellagic acid (3 mM) also inhibited the mutagenic activity of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine (25-200 mM) in the presence of pyrazole-induced rat liver fraction S-9. The effect of ellagic acid on DNA methylation was studied by incubating 0, 0.72, 1.32, 2.64, and 6.60 mM ellagic acid with DNA (0.9 mM nucleotide) and [3H]MeNU (0.66 mM). HPLC analysis of DNA hydrolysates showed that ellagic acid caused a dose-dependent 36-84% decrease in O6-methylguanine but only a 20% decrease in the 7-methylguanine adduct. Under conditions where methylation at the O6 position of guanine in double-stranded DNA was inhibited 65% by ellagic acid, no significant inhibition of either O6- or 7-methylguanine formation was detected in single-stranded DNA. Affinity-binding studies revealed that [3H]ellagic acid binds equally to double-stranded or single-stranded DNA but that poly(dA X dT) binds 1.5 times as much ellagic acid as does poly(dG X dC). The binding of ellagic acid to DNA is dependent on the concentration of both ellagic acid and DNA. The specific inhibition of O6-methylguanine formation only in double-stranded DNA and the relatively low inhibition of 7-methylguanine formation rule out the possibility that ellagic acid prevents DNA alkylation by scavenging the electrophilic intermediate generated in the hydrolysis of MeNU. The results suggest that ellagic acid inhibition of MeNU-induced mutagenicity is due to specific inhibition of methylation at the O6 position of guanine through an ellagic acid-duplex DNA affinity-binding mechanism. PMID:3464940

  18. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  19. Direct detection of circulating free DNA extracted from serum samples of breast cancer using locked nucleic acid molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Gui, Zhen; Wang, Quanbo; Li, Jinchang; Zhu, Mingchen; Yu, Lili; Xun, Tang; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-07-01

    As an emerging noninvasive blood biomarker, circulating free DNA (cfDNA) can be utilized to assess diagnosis, progression and evaluate prognosis of cancer. However, cfDNAs are not "naked", they can be part of complexes, or are bound to the surface of the cells via proteins, which make the detection more challenging. Here, a simple method for the detection of Ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1) DNA exacted from serum of breast cancer (BC) has been developed using a novel locked nucleic acid molecular beacon (LNA-MB). In order to enhance the stability and detection efficiency of the probe in biofluids, we design a shared-stem molecular beacon containing a 27-mer loop and a 4-mer stem with DNA/LNA alternating bases. The fluorescence is released in the presence of target. The detection procedure is simple and can be completed within 1h. This method shows a sensitive response to UHRF1 DNA with a dynamic range of 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection is 11nM (S/N=3) with excellent selectivity. It can discriminate UHRF1 DNA from three-base mismatched DNA with a high specificity. More importantly, this method can distinguish the expression of serum UHRF1 DNA among 5 breast cancer patients and 5 healthy controls. The mentioned superiority may suggest that this assay can be served as a promising noninvasive detection tool for early BC diagnosis and monitoring.

  20. Barcode DNA length polymorphisms vs fatty acid profiling for adulteration detection in olive oil.

    PubMed

    Uncu, Ali Tevfik; Uncu, Ayse Ozgur; Frary, Anne; Doganlar, Sami

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of a DNA-barcode assay with fatty acid profile analysis to authenticate the botanical origin of olive oil. To achieve this aim, we performed a PCR-capillary electrophoresis (PCR-CE) approach on olive oil: seed oil blends using the plastid trnL (UAA) intron barcode. In parallel to genomic analysis, we subjected the samples to gas chromatography analysis of fatty acid composition. While the PCR-CE assay proved equally efficient as gas chromatography analysis in detecting adulteration with soybean, palm, rapeseed, sunflower, sesame, cottonseed and peanut oils, it was superior to the widely utilized analytical chemistry approach in revealing the adulterant species and detecting small quantities of corn and safflower oils in olive oil. Moreover, the DNA-based test correctly identified all tested olive oil: hazelnut oil blends whereas it was not feasible to detect hazelnut oil adulteration through fatty acid profile analysis. Thus, the present research has shown the feasibility of a PCR-CE barcode assay to detect adulteration in olive oil.

  1. Fabrication of uniform DNA-conjugated hydrogel microparticles via replica molding for facile nucleic acid hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christina L; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-07-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of the probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined, these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high-capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high-throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection.

  2. FRET based characterization of DNA-based assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckhout-White, Susan; Gray, Rochester; Ancona, Mario; Goldman, Ellen R.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2014-05-01

    The "spectroscopic ruler" based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is explored as a method for detailed structural characterization of DNA nanostructures in solution. The approach is most directly useful for assessing the positional relationships among chromophores organized by the DNA, but it can also be used to characterize the geometry and kinematics of the DNA scaffold itself. By accumulating data for the distances separating various donor-acceptor pairs, and correlating them with the expected distances, one can quantify the shape and deformability of the structure. A 8x16nm "mini-origami" rectangle is used as the model test structure and the dye-pairs are chosen to investigate anisotropy in the origami's mechanical properties. Not unexpectedly, our analysis finds a strong anisotropy in the stiffness, with the measured spacing across the origami weave deviating much more from expectation than the spacing aligned along the weave pattern.

  3. Nucleic acid chemistry in the organic phase: from functionalized oligonucleotides to DNA side chain polymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Zheng, Lifei; Liu, Qing; de Vries, Jan Willem; Gerasimov, Jennifer Y; Herrmann, Andreas

    2014-10-08

    DNA-incorporating hydrophobic moieties can be synthesized by either solid-phase or solution-phase coupling. On a solid support the DNA is protected, and hydrophobic units are usually attached employing phosphoramidite chemistry involving a DNA synthesizer. On the other hand, solution coupling in aqueous medium results in low yields due to the solvent incompatibility of DNA and hydrophobic compounds. Hence, the development of a general coupling method for producing amphiphilic DNA conjugates with high yield in solution remains a major challenge. Here, we report an organic-phase coupling strategy for nucleic acid modification and polymerization by introducing a hydrophobic DNA-surfactant complex as a reactive scaffold. A remarkable range of amphiphile-DNA structures (DNA-pyrene, DNA-triphenylphosphine, DNA-hydrocarbon, and DNA block copolymers) and a series of new brush-type DNA side-chain homopolymers with high DNA grafting density are produced efficiently. We believe that this method is an important breakthrough in developing a generalized approach to synthesizing functional DNA molecules for self-assembly and related technological applications.

  4. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  5. Universal Dynamic DNA Assembly-Programmed Surface Hybridization Effect for Single-Step, Reusable, and Amplified Electrochemical Nucleic Acid Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Fang, Li; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2017-03-07

    The traditional sensitive electrochemical biosensors are commonly confronted with the cumbersome interface operation and washing procedures and the inclusion of extra exogenous reagents, which impose the challenge on the detection simplicity, reliability, and reusability. Herein, we present the proof-of-principle of a unique biosensor architecture based on dynamic DNA assembly programmed surface hybridization, which confers the single-step, reusable, and enzyme-free amplified electrochemical nucleic acid analysis. To demonstrate the fabrication universality three dynamic DNA assembly strategies including DNA-fueled target recycling, catalytic hairpin DNA assembly, and hybridization chain reaction were flexibly harnessed to convey the homogeneous target recognition and amplification events into various DNA scaffolds for the autonomous proximity-based surface hybridization. The current biosensor architecture features generalizability, simplicity, low cost, high sensitivity, and specificity over the traditional nucleic acid-related amplified biosensors. The lowest detection limit of 50 aM toward target DNA could be achieved by hybridization chain reaction-programmed surface hybridization. The reliable working ability for both homogeneous solution and heterogeneous inteface facilitates the target analysis with a robust reliability and reproducibility, also making it to be readily extended for the integration with the kinds of detecting platforms. Thus, it may hold great potential for the biosensor fabrication served for the point-of-care applications in resource constrained regions.

  6. Highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection of specific DNA sequences with molecular beacons and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhai, Kun; Xiang, Wenjun; Wang, Lianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescence method of quantitative detection for specific DNA sequence is developed based on molecular beacon (MB) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I by synchronous fluorescence analysis. It is demonstrated by an oligonucleotide sequence of wild-type HBV (target DNA) as a model system. In this strategy, the fluorophore of MB is designed to be 6-carboxyfluorescein group (FAM), and the maximum excitation wavelength and maximum emission wavelength are both very close to that of SYBR Green I. In the presence of targets DNA, the MBs hybridize with the targets DNA and form double-strand DNA (dsDNA), the fluorophore FAM is separated from the quencher BHQ-1, thus the fluorophore emit fluorescence. At the same time, SYBR Green I binds to dsDNA, the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I is significantly enhanced. When targets DNA are detected by synchronous fluorescence analysis, the fluorescence peaks of FAM and SYBR Green I overlap completely, so the fluorescence signal of system will be significantly enhanced. Thus, highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection for DNA can be realized. Under the optimum conditions, the total fluorescence intensity of FAM and SYBR Green I exhibits good linear dependence on concentration of targets DNA in the range from 2×10(-11) to 2.5×10(-9)M. The detection limit of target DNA is estimated to be 9×10(-12)M (3σ). Compared with previously reported methods of detection DNA with MB, the proposed method can significantly enhance the detection sensitivity.

  7. Site-Selective Binding of Nanoparticles to Double-Stranded DNA via Peptide Nucleic Acid "Invasion"

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, A.L.; van der Lelie, D.; Sun, D.; Maye, M. M.; Gang, O.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for by-design placement of nano-objects along double-stranded (ds) DNA. A molecular intercalator, designed as a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA chimera, is able to invade dsDNA at the PNA-side due to the hybridization specificity between PNA and one of the duplex strands. At the same time, the single-stranded (ss) DNA tail of the chimera, allows for anchoring of nano-objects that have been functionalized with complementary ssDNA. The developed method is applied for interparticle attachment and for the fabrication of particle clusters using a dsDNA template. This method significantly broadens the molecular toolbox for constructing nanoscale systems by including the most conventional not yet utilized DNA motif, double helix DNA.

  8. Measurement of oxidized and methylated DNA bases by HPLC with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Kaur, H; Halliwell, B

    1996-08-15

    Oxidative DNA damage is thought to be an important contributor to cancer development and to be affected by dietary constituents, so its accurate measurement is important. DNA methylation is recognized as an important mechanism affecting gene expression. In the present paper we describe an HPLC-with-electrochemical-detection procedure that allows rapid and sensitive measurement of four oxidized (2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine, 5-hydroxyuracil, 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine) and three methylated (7-methylguanine, 1-methylguanine, O6-methylguanine) bases in acid hydrolysates of DNA. Guanine was also detected, but was clearly separated from the other bases.

  9. DNA-Templated Polymerization of Side-Chain-Functionalized Peptide Nucleic Acid Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Ralph E.; Brudno, Yevgeny; Birnbaum, Michael E.; Liu, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The DNA-templated polymerization of synthetic building blocks provides a potential route to the laboratory evolution of sequence-defined polymers with structures and properties not necessarily limited to those of natural biopolymers. We previously reported the efficient and sequence-specific DNA-templated polymerization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) aldehydes. Here, we report the enzyme-free, DNA-templated polymerization of side-chain-functionalized PNA tetramer and pentamer aldehydes. We observed that the polymerization of tetramer and pentamer PNA building blocks with a single lysine-based side chain at various positions in the building block could proceed efficiently and sequence-specifically. In addition, DNA-templated polymerization also proceeded efficiently and in a sequence-specific manner with pentamer PNA aldehydes containing two or three lysine side chains in a single building block to generate more densely functionalized polymers. To further our understanding of side-chain compatibility and expand the capabilities of this system, we also examined the polymerization efficiencies of 20 pentamer building blocks each containing one of five different side-chain groups and four different side-chain regio- and stereochemistries. Polymerization reactions were efficient for all five different side-chain groups and for three of the four combinations of side-chain regio- and stereochemistries. Differences in the efficiency and initial rate of polymerization correlate with the apparent melting temperature of each building block, which is dependent on side-chain regio- and stereochemistry, but relatively insensitive to side-chain structure among the substrates tested. Our findings represent a significant step towards the evolution of sequence-defined synthetic polymers and also demonstrate that enzyme-free nucleic acid-templated polymerization can occur efficiently using substrates with a wide range of side-chain structures, functionalization positions within each

  10. Nucleic acid (cDNA) and amino acid sequences of the maize endosperm protein glutelin-2.

    PubMed Central

    Prat, S; Cortadas, J; Puigdomènech, P; Palau, J

    1985-01-01

    The cDNA coding for a glutelin-2 protein from maize endosperm has been cloned and the complete amino acid sequence of the protein derived for the first time. An immature maize endosperm cDNA bank was screened for the expression of a beta-lactamase:glutelin-2 (G2) fusion polypeptide by using antibodies against the purified 28 kd G2 protein. A clone corresponding to the 28 kd G2 protein was sequenced and the primary structure of this protein was derived. Five regions can be defined in the protein sequence: an 11 residue N-terminal part, a repeated region formed by eight units of the sequence Pro-Pro-Pro-Val-His-Leu, an alternating Pro-X stretch 21 residues long, a Cys rich domain and a C-terminal part rich in Gln. The protein sequence is preceded by 19 residues which have the characteristics of the signal peptide found in secreted proteins. Unlike zeins, the main maize storage proteins, 28 kd glutelin-2 has several homologous sequences in common with other cereal storage proteins. Images PMID:3839076

  11. CUPRAC colorimetric and electroanalytical methods determining antioxidant activity based on prevention of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Uzunboy, Seda; Çekiç, Sema Demirci; Eksin, Ece; Erdem, Arzum; Apak, Reşat

    2017-02-01

    An unbalanced excess of oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) can give oxidative hazard to DNA and other biomacromolecules under oxidative stress conditions. While the 'comet' assay for measuring DNA damage is neither specific nor practical, monitoring oxidative changes on individual DNA bases and other oxidation products needs highly specialized equipment and operators. Thus, we developed a modified CUPRAC (cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity) colorimetric method to determine the average total damage on DNA produced by Fenton oxidation, taking advantage of the fact that the degradation products of DNA but not the original macromolecule is CUPRAC-responsive. The DNA-protective effects of water-soluble antioxidants were used to devise a novel antioxidant activity assay, considered to be physiologically more realistic than those using artificial probes. Our method, based on the measurement of DNA oxidative products with CUPRAC colorimetry proved to be 2 orders-of-magnitude more sensitive than the widely used TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) colorimetric assay used as reference. Additionally, the DNA damage was electrochemically investigated using pencil graphite electrodes (PGEs) as DNA sensor platform in combination with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The interaction of the radical species with DNA in the absence/presence of antioxidants was detected according to the changes in guanine oxidation signal.

  12. Physics of base-pairing dynamics in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, Manoel; Destainville, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    As a key molecule of life, Deoxyribo-Nucleic Acid (DNA) is the focus of numbers of investigations with the help of biological, chemical and physical techniques. From a physical point of view, both experimental and theoretical works have brought quantitative insights into DNA base-pairing dynamics that we review in this Report, putting emphasis on theoretical developments. We discuss the dynamics at the base-pair scale and its pivotal coupling with the polymer one, with a polymerization index running from a few nucleotides to tens of kilo-bases. This includes opening and closure of short hairpins and oligomers as well as zipping and unwinding of long macromolecules. We review how different physical mechanisms are either used by Nature or utilized in biotechnological processes to separate the two intertwined DNA strands, by insisting on quantitative results. They go from thermally-assisted denaturation bubble nucleation to force- or torque-driven mechanisms. We show that the helical character of the molecule, possibly supercoiled, can play a key role in many denaturation and renaturation processes. We categorize the mechanisms according to the relative timescales associated with base-pairing and chain orientational degrees of freedom such as bending and torsional elastic ones. In some specific situations, these chain orientational degrees of freedom can be integrated out, and the quasi-static approximation is valid. The complex dynamics then reduces to the diffusion in a low-dimensional free-energy landscape. In contrast, some important cases of experimental interest necessarily appeal to far-from-equilibrium statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics.

  13. On the role of DNA in DNA-based catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Dijk, Ewold W; Boersma, Arnold J; Feringa, Ben L; Roelfes, Gerard

    2010-09-07

    A kinetic study of DNA-based catalytic enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation and Michael addition reactions showed that DNA affects the rate of these reactions significantly. Whereas in the presence of DNA, a large acceleration was found for the Friedel-Crafts alkylation and a modest acceleration in the Michael addition of dimethyl malonate, a deceleration was observed when using nitromethane as nucleophile. Also, the enantioselectivities proved to be dependent on the DNA sequence. In comparison with the previously reported Diels-Alder reaction, the results presented here suggest that DNA plays a similar role in both cycloaddition and conjugate addition reactions.

  14. Novel materials based on DNA-CTMA and lanthanide (Ce(3+) , Pr(3+) ).

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cosmina Andreea; Kajzar, François; Mihaly, Maria; Rogozea, Adina Elena; Petcu, Adina Roxana; Olteanu, Nicoleta Liliana; Rau, Ileana

    2016-09-01

    New, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) based compounds, functionalized with hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTMA) and lanthanide hydroxide nanoparticles were synthesized. The spectral measurements suggest that between the DNA-CTMA complex and the lanthanide (III) ions a chemical interaction takes place. The obtained materials exhibit an improved fluorescence efficiency, showing a potential interest for application in photonics, and more particularly, in light emitting devices. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 613-617, 2016.

  15. Analytical Devices Based on Direct Synthesis of DNA on Paper.

    PubMed

    Glavan, Ana C; Niu, Jia; Chen, Zhen; Güder, Firat; Cheng, Chao-Min; Liu, David; Whitesides, George M

    2016-01-05

    This paper addresses a growing need in clinical diagnostics for parallel, multiplex analysis of biomarkers from small biological samples. It describes a new procedure for assembling arrays of ssDNA and proteins on paper. This method starts with the synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides covalently linked to paper and proceeds to assemble microzones of DNA-conjugated paper into arrays capable of simultaneously capturing DNA, DNA-conjugated protein antigens, and DNA-conjugated antibodies. The synthesis of ssDNA oligonucleotides on paper is convenient and effective with 32% of the oligonucleotides cleaved and eluted from the paper substrate being full-length by HPLC for a 32-mer. These ssDNA arrays can be used to detect fluorophore-linked DNA oligonucleotides in solution, and as the basis for DNA-directed assembly of arrays of DNA-conjugated capture antibodies on paper, detect protein antigens by sandwich ELISAs. Paper-anchored ssDNA arrays with different sequences can be used to assemble paper-based devices capable of detecting DNA and antibodies in the same device and enable simple microfluidic paper-based devices.

  16. The use of carrier RNA to enhance DNA extraction from microfluidic-based silica monoliths.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Thain, Lauren; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-10-12

    DNA extraction was carried out on silica-based monoliths within a microfluidic device. Solid-phase DNA extraction methodology was applied in which the DNA binds to silica in the presence of a chaotropic salt, such as guanidine hydrochloride, and is eluted in a low ionic strength solution, such as water. The addition of poly-A carrier RNA to the chaotropic salt solution resulted in a marked increase in the effective amount of DNA that could be recovered (25ng) compared to the absence of RNA (5ng) using the silica-based monolith. These findings confirm that techniques utilising nucleic acid carrier molecules can enhance DNA extraction methodologies in microfluidic applications.

  17. A Novel DNA-Based Vaccine Methodology for Aids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    A., Beck, T.W., Grant, R.F., Bischofberger, N., Benveniste, R.E., Black, R. 1995. Prevention of SIV infection in macaques by (R)-9-(2...enhancement of CTL. Gene gun-based DNA immunization of rhesus macaques resulted in further refinement of DNA delivery parameters based on the degree of...responses by gene gun-based DNA immunization. In addition, we initiated 2 challenge studies in the SIV macaque model to test the role of CTL and mucosal

  18. DNA vs. mirror-image DNA: a universal approach to tune the absolute configuration in DNA-based asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jocelyn; Benedetti, Erica; Bethge, Lucas; Vonhoff, Stefan; Klussmann, Sven; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Cossy, Janine; Smietana, Michael; Arseniyadis, Stellios

    2013-10-25

    Mirror mirror on the wall: By taking advantage of the unique structural features of L-DNA, the first examples of left-helical enantioselective induction in the field of DNA-based asymmetric catalysis were realized. Most importantly, this approach is the only one that allows a reliable and predictable access to both enantiomers for any given reaction.

  19. Nucleic acid (cDNA) and amino acid sequences of alpha-type gliadins from wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed Central

    Kasarda, D D; Okita, T W; Bernardin, J E; Baecker, P A; Nimmo, C C; Lew, E J; Dietler, M D; Greene, F C

    1984-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence for an alpha-type gliadin protein of wheat (Triticum aestivum Linnaeus) endosperm has been derived from a cloned cDNA sequence. An additional cDNA clone that corresponds to about 75% of a similar alpha-type gliadin has been sequenced and shows some important differences. About 97% of the composite sequence of A-gliadin (an alpha-type gliadin fraction) has also been obtained by direct amino acid sequencing. This sequence shows a high degree of similarity with amino acid sequences derived from both cDNA clones and is virtually identical to one of them. On the basis of sequence information, after loss of the signal sequence, the mature alpha-type gliadins may be divided into five different domains, two of which may have evolved from an ancestral gliadin gene, whereas the remaining three contain repeating sequences that may have developed independently. Images PMID:6589619

  20. Detecting Chemically Modified DNA Bases Using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Aoune; Halas, Naomi J

    2011-12-15

    Post-translational modifications of DNA- changes in the chemical structure of individual bases that occur without changes in the DNA sequence- are known to alter gene expression. They are believed to result in frequently deleterious phenotypic changes, such as cancer. Methylation of adenine, methylation and hydroxymethylation of cytosine, and guanine oxidation are the primary DNA base modifications identified to date. Here we show it is possible to use surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect these primary DNA base modifications. SERS detection of modified DNA bases is label-free and requires minimal additional sample preparation, reducing the possibility of additional chemical modifications induced prior to measurement. This approach shows the feasibility of DNA base modification assessment as a potentially routine analysis that may be further developed for clinical diagnostics.

  1. How to make DNA count: DNA-based diagnostic tools in veterinary parasitology.

    PubMed

    Hunt, P W; Lello, J

    2012-05-04

    Traditional methods for the diagnosis of parasitic helminth infections of livestock have a number of limitations, such as the inability to distinguish mixed-species infections, a heavy reliance on technical experience and also sub-sampling errors. Some of these limitations may be overcome through the development of rapid and accurate DNA-based tests. For example, DNA-based tests can specifically detect individual species in a mixed infection at either the larval or egg stages, in the absence of morphological differences among species. Even so, some diagnostic problems remain the same, irrespective of whether a DNA-based or traditional method is used. For example, sub-sampling errors from an aggregated distribution are likely to persist. It is proposed, however, that DNA-based diagnostic technologies offer an opportunity to expand diagnostic capabilities, and are discussed in the current review. The future introduction of DNA-based diagnostic technologies into routine diagnostic settings will also be discussed.

  2. High Fidelity of Base Paring by 2-Selenothymidine in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, A.; Sheng, J; Zhang, W; Huang, Z

    2010-01-01

    The base pairs are the contributors to the sequence-dependent recognition of nucleic acids, genetic information storage, and high fidelity of DNA polymerase replication. However, the wobble base pairing, where T pairs with G instead of A, reduces specific base-pairing recognition and compromises the high fidelity of the enzymatic polymerization. Via the selenium atomic probing at the 2-position of thymidine, we have investigated the wobble discrimination by manipulating the steric and electronic effects at the 2-exo position, providing a unique chemical strategy to enhance the base pair specificity. We report here the first synthesis of the novel 2-Se-thymidine ({sup Se}T) derivative, its phosphoramidite, and the Se-DNAs. Our biophysical and structural studies of the 2-Se-T DNAs reveal that the bulky 2-Se atom with a weak hydrogen-bonding ability can largely increase mismatch discriminations (including T/G wobble and T/C mismatched base pairs) while maintaining the {sup Se}T/A virtually identical to the native T/A base pair. The 2-Se atom bulkiness and the electronic effect are probably the main factors responsible for the discrimination against the formation of the wobble {sup Se}T/G base pair. Our investigations provide a potential novel tool to investigate the specific recognition of base pairs, which is the basis of high fidelity during replication, transcription, and translation. Furthermore, this Se-atom-specific substitution and probing are useful for X-ray crystal structure and function studies of nucleic acids.

  3. High fidelity of base pairing by 2-selenothymidine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Abdalla E A; Sheng, Jia; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Zhen

    2010-02-24

    The base pairs are the contributors to the sequence-dependent recognition of nucleic acids, genetic information storage, and high fidelity of DNA polymerase replication. However, the wobble base pairing, where T pairs with G instead of A, reduces specific base-pairing recognition and compromises the high fidelity of the enzymatic polymerization. Via the selenium atomic probing at the 2-position of thymidine, we have investigated the wobble discrimination by manipulating the steric and electronic effects at the 2-exo position, providing a unique chemical strategy to enhance the base pair specificity. We report here the first synthesis of the novel 2-Se-thymidine ((Se)T) derivative, its phosphoramidite, and the Se-DNAs. Our biophysical and structural studies of the 2-Se-T DNAs reveal that the bulky 2-Se atom with a weak hydrogen-bonding ability can largely increase mismatch discriminations (including T/G wobble and T/C mismatched base pairs) while maintaining the (Se)T/A virtually identical to the native T/A base pair. The 2-Se atom bulkiness and the electronic effect are probably the main factors responsible for the discrimination against the formation of the wobble (Se)T/G base pair. Our investigations provide a potential novel tool to investigate the specific recognition of base pairs, which is the basis of high fidelity during replication, transcription, and translation. Furthermore, this Se-atom-specific substitution and probing are useful for X-ray crystal structure and function studies of nucleic acids.

  4. A novel bio-sensor based on DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaolong; Wang, Zhiyu; Deng, Chenyan; Song, Tao; Pan, Linqiang; Chen, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    DNA strand displacement technology performs well in sensing and programming DNA segments. In this work, we construct DNA molecular systems based on DNA strand displacement performing computation of logic gates. Specifically, a class of so-called "DNA neurons" are achieved, in which a "smart" way inspired by biological neurons encoding information is developed to encode and deliver information using DNA molecules. The "DNA neuron" is bistable, that is, it can sense DNA molecules as input signals, and release "negative" or "positive" signals DNA molecules. We design intelligent DNA molecular systems that are constructed by cascading some particularly organized "DNA neurons", which could perform logic computation, including AND, OR, XOR logic gates, automatically. Both simulation results using visual DSD (DNA strand displacement) software and experimental results are obtained, which shows that the proposed systems can detect DNA signals with high sensitivity and accretion; moreover, the systems can process input signals automatically with complex nonlinear logic. The method proposed in this work may provide a new way to construct a sensitive molecular signal detection system with neurons spiking behavior in vitro, and can be used to develop intelligent molecular processing systems in vivo.

  5. Determination of the drug-DNA binding modes using fluorescence-based assays.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alicia K; Dasilva, Sofia Cheliout; Bhatta, Ankit; Rawal, Baibhav; Liu, Melinda; Korobkova, Ekaterina A

    2012-03-15

    Therapeutic drugs and environmental pollutants may exhibit high reactivity toward DNA bases and backbone. Understanding the mechanisms of drug-DNA binding is crucial for predicting their potential genotoxicity. We developed a fluorescence analytical method for the determination of the preferential binding mode for drug-DNA interactions. Two nucleic acid dyes were employed in the method: TO-PRO-3 iodide (TP3) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). TP3 binds DNA by intercalation, whereas DAPI exhibits minor groove binding. Both dyes exhibit significant fluorescence magnification on binding to DNA. We evaluated the DNA binding constant, K(b), for each dye. We also performed fluorescence quenching experiments with 11 molecules of various structures and measured a C(50) value for each compound. We determined preferential binding modes for the aforementioned molecules and found that they bound to DNA consistently, as indicated by other studies. The values of the likelihood of DNA intercalation were correlated with the partition coefficients of the molecules. In addition, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the interactions with calf thymus DNA for the three molecules. The results were consistent with the fluorescence method described above. Thus, we conclude that the fluorescence method we developed provides a reliable determination of the likelihoods of the two different DNA binding modes.

  6. [Studies on the interaction of the metal complex of hydrazide of podophyllic acid with DNA].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Liu-Fang; Song, Yu-Min; Qu, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Ying-Qian

    2006-05-01

    The interaction between the metal complex of hydrazide of podophyllic acid and calf thymus (CT) DNA was studied by using absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and DNA heat denaturation. It was found that the intensity of the maximal absorption peaks from absorption spectra is weakened in the presence of the metal complex of hydrazide of podophyllic acid compared with that in the absence of the metal complex. All the experimental results show that the intercalation mode was proved to exist between HDPP-Ni complexes and CT DNA.

  7. A prediction of the amino acids and structures involved in DNA recognition by type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, S S; Dryden, D T

    1997-01-01

    The S subunits of type I DNA restriction/modification enzymes are responsible for recognising the DNA target sequence for the enzyme. They contain two domains of approximately 150 amino acids, each of which is responsible for recognising one half of the bipartite asymmetric target. In the absence of any known tertiary structure for type I enzymes or recognisable DNA recognition motifs in the highly variable amino acid sequences of the S subunits, it has previously not been possible to predict which amino acids are responsible for sequence recognition. Using a combination of sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction methods to analyse the sequences of S subunits, we predict that all of the 51 known target recognition domains (TRDs) have the same tertiary structure. Furthermore, this structure is similar to the structure of the TRD of the C5-cytosine methyltransferase, Hha I, which recognises its DNA target via interactions with two short polypeptide loops and a beta strand. Our results predict the location of these sequence recognition structures within the TRDs of all type I S subunits. PMID:9254696

  8. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment. PMID:27446026

  9. Investigation of a Sybr-Green-Based Method to Validate DNA Sequences for DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    stranded DNA . We previously demonstrated that this technique can be exploited to distinguish between stably-hybridized Watson - Crick duplexes and...et al., 2004) we described the difference between the canonical Watson - Crick base pairs of DNA and the usually less stable mismatches that can also...computing, cross-hybridized duplexes represent errors. It is therefore crucial that DNA sequences be designed so that the formation of a Watson - Crick

  10. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  11. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  12. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  13. Breaking the dogma: PCB-derived semiquinone free radicals do not form covalent adducts with DNA, GSH, and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Wangpradit, Orarat; Rahaman, Asif; Mariappan, S. V. Santhana; Buettner, Garry R.; Robertson, Larry W.; Luthe, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Covalent bond formations of free radical metabolites with biomolecules like DNA and proteins are thought to constitute a major mechanism of toxicity and carcinogenesis. Glutathione (GSH) is generally accepted as a radical scavenger protecting the cell. In the present study, we investigated a semiquinone radical (SQ•-) metabolite of the semivolatile 4-chlorobiphenyl, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and oxygen consumption. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were also employed to elucidate the radical interaction with DNA, amino acids, and GSH. We found that DNA and oligonucleotides stabilized SQ•- by electron delocalization in the π-stacking system, resulting in persistent radical intercalated, rather than forming a covalent bond with SQ•-. This finding was strongly supported by the semiempirical calculation of the semioccupied molecular orbital and the linear combination of the atomic orbitals, indicating 9.8 kcal mol−1 energy gain. The insertion of SQ•- into the DNA strand may result in DNA strand breaks and interruption of DNA replication process or even activate radical mediated secondary reactions. The presence of amino acids resulted in a decrease of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of SQ•- and correlated with their isoelectric points. The pH shifts the equilibrium of the dianions of hydroquinone and influenced indirectly the formation of SQ•-. Similar findings were observed with GSH and Cys. GSH and Cys functioned as indirect radical scavengers; their activities depend on their chemical equilibria with the corresponding quinones, and their further reaction via Michael addition. The generally accepted role of GSH as radical scavenger in biological systems should be reconsidered based upon these findings, questioning the generally accepted view of radical interaction of semiquinones with biologically active compounds, like DNA, amino acids, proteins

  14. The Conjugate Acid-Base Chart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties that beginning chemistry students have in understanding acid-base chemistry. Describes the use of conjugate acid-base charts in helping students visualize the conjugate relationship. Addresses chart construction, metal ions, buffers and pH titrations, and the organic functional groups and nonaqueous solvents. (TW)

  15. Students' Alternate Conceptions on Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Hanqing; Henriques, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Knowing what students bring to the classroom can and should influence how we teach them. This study is a review of the literature associated with secondary and postsecondary students' ideas about acids and bases. It was found that there are six types of alternate ideas about acids and bases that students hold. These are: macroscopic properties of…

  16. The Kidney and Acid-Base Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeppen, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the topic of the role of the kidneys in the regulation of acid base balance was last reviewed from a teaching perspective (Koeppen BM. Renal regulation of acid-base balance. Adv Physiol Educ 20: 132-141, 1998), our understanding of the specific membrane transporters involved in H+, HCO , and NH transport, and especially how these…

  17. Fluorescence determination of DNA with 1-pyrenebutyric acid nanoparticles coated with β-cyclodextrin as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lun; Bian, Guirong; Wang, Leyu; Dong, Ling; Chen, Hongqi; Xia, Tingting

    2005-04-01

    A novel ultrasonication method has been successfully developed for the preparation of 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBAC)/β-cyclodextrin(β-CD) complex nanoparticles. The as-prepared nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy. Complex nanoparticles prepared with ultrasonication are smaller and better dispersed than single PBAC nanoparticles. At pH 3.0, the relative fluorescence intensity of complex nanoparticles of PBAC/β-CD can be quenched by the concentration of DNA. Based on this, a novel fluorimetric method has been developed for rapid determination of DNA. In comparison with single organic fluorophores, these nanoparticle probes are better water-solubility, more stable and do not suffer from blinking. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range 0.2-15 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.3-12 μg mL -1 for fish sperm DNA (fs-DNA). The corresponding detection limit is 0.01 μg mL -1 for ct-DNA and 0.02 μg mL -1 for fs-DNA. The relative standard deviation of seven replicate measurements is 1.2% for 2.0 μg mL -1 ct-DNA and 1.4% for 2.0 μg mL -1 fs-DNA, respectively. The method is simple and sensitive. The recovery and relative standard deviation are very satisfactory. A mechanism proposed to explain the process also has been studied.

  18. DNA base excision repair nanosystem engineering: model development.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, B A

    2005-01-01

    DNA base damage results from a combination of endogenous sources, (normal metabolism, increased metabolism due to obesity, stress from diseases such as arthritis and diabetes, and ischemia) and the environment (ingested toxins, ionizing radiation, etc.). If unrepaired DNA base damage can lead to diminished cell function, and potentially diseases and eventually mutations that lead to cancer. Sophisticated DNA repair mechanisms have evolved in all living cells to preserve the integrity of inherited genetic information and transcriptional control. Understanding a system like DNA repair is greatly enhanced by using engineering methods, in particular modeling interactions and using predictive simulation to analyze the impact of perturbations. We describe the use of such a "nanosystem engineering" approach to analyze the DNA base excision repair pathway in human cells, and use simulation to predict the impact of varying enzyme concentration on DNA repair capacity.

  19. Quantitative and qualitative validations of a sonication-based DNA extraction approach for PCR-based molecular biological analyses.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaohu; Chen, Sisi; Li, Ning; Yan, Han

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to comprehensively validate the sonication-based DNA extraction method, in hope of the replacement of the so-called 'standard DNA extraction method' - the commercial kit method. Microbial cells in the digested sludge sample, containing relatively high amount of PCR-inhibitory substances, such as humic acid and protein, were applied as the experimental alternatives. The procedure involving solid/liquid separation of sludge sample and dilution of both DNA templates and inhibitors, the minimum templates for PCR-based analyses, and the in-depth understanding from the bias analysis by pyrosequencing technology were obtained and confirmed the availability of the sonication-based DNA extraction method.

  20. An Evolution Based Biosensor Receptor DNA Sequence Generation Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eungyeong; Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M.; Lee, Jaewan; Zang, Yupeng

    2010-01-01

    A biosensor is composed of a bioreceptor, an associated recognition molecule, and a signal transducer that can selectively detect target substances for analysis. DNA based biosensors utilize receptor molecules that allow hybridization with the target analyte. However, most DNA biosensor research uses oligonucleotides as the target analytes and does not address the potential problems of real samples. The identification of recognition molecules suitable for real target analyte samples is an important step towards further development of DNA biosensors. This study examines the characteristics of DNA used as bioreceptors and proposes a hybrid evolution-based DNA sequence generating algorithm, based on DNA computing, to identify suitable DNA bioreceptor recognition molecules for stable hybridization with real target substances. The Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) approach is applied in the proposed algorithm to evaluate the safety and fitness of the generated DNA sequences. This approach improves efficiency and stability for enhanced and variable-length DNA sequence generation and allows extension to generation of variable-length DNA sequences with diverse receptor recognition requirements. PMID:22315543

  1. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  2. Method Optimization of Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Thin Films for Biotronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Added to the Spin-coater ......................................................................4 3.3 Comparison of Spin - Coating Speed and Sample...precipitate after centrifugation. ..............................3 Figure 3. Diagram of spin - coating method. First, the DNA-CTMA solution was pipetted onto... spin - coating speeds. ...................................................................................................................6 Figure 5

  3. Uracil misincorporation into DNA and folic acid supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Folate deficiency decreases thymidylate synthesis from deoxyuridylate, which results in an imbalance of deoxyribonucleotide that may lead to excessive uracil misincorporation (UrMis) into DNA during replication and repair. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the relation between UrMis in different ...

  4. Controlling charge current through a DNA based molecular transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnia, S.; Fathizadeh, S.; Ziaei, J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular electronics is complementary to silicon-based electronics and may induce electronic functions which are difficult to obtain with conventional technology. We have considered a DNA based molecular transistor and study its transport properties. The appropriate DNA sequence as a central chain in molecular transistor and the functional interval for applied voltages is obtained. I-V characteristic diagram shows the rectifier behavior as well as the negative differential resistance phenomenon of DNA transistor. We have observed the nearly periodic behavior in the current flowing through DNA. It is reported that there is a critical gate voltage for each applied bias which above it, the electrical current is always positive.

  5. Sequential injection redox or acid-base titration for determination of ascorbic acid or acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lenghor, Narong; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Vilen, Michael; Sara, Rolf; Christian, Gary D; Grudpan, Kate

    2002-12-06

    Two sequential injection titration systems with spectrophotometric detection have been developed. The first system for determination of ascorbic acid was based on redox reaction between ascorbic acid and permanganate in an acidic medium and lead to a decrease in color intensity of permanganate, monitored at 525 nm. A linear dependence of peak area obtained with ascorbic acid concentration up to 1200 mg l(-1) was achieved. The relative standard deviation for 11 replicate determinations of 400 mg l(-1) ascorbic acid was 2.9%. The second system, for acetic acid determination, was based on acid-base titration of acetic acid with sodium hydroxide using phenolphthalein as an indicator. The decrease in color intensity of the indicator was proportional to the acid content. A linear calibration graph in the range of 2-8% w v(-1) of acetic acid with a relative standard deviation of 4.8% (5.0% w v(-1) acetic acid, n=11) was obtained. Sample throughputs of 60 h(-1) were achieved for both systems. The systems were successfully applied for the assays of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets and acetic acid content in vinegars, respectively.

  6. Alkylation of nucleic acids by DNA-targeted 4-anilinoquinolinium aniline mustards: kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C J; Denny, W A; Fan, J Y

    1991-01-01

    The rate of constant for hydrolysis of a series of 4-substituted aniline mustards Ar-X-pC6H4-N(CH2CH2Cl)2, where Ar is 4-anilinoquinolinium and X = O, CH2, CONH and CO, have been measured in water and 0.02 M imidazole buffer at 37 degrees C and in 50% aqueous acetone at 66 degrees C. The equilibrium binding constants of the compounds and their hydrolysis products to nucleic acids of differing base composition have been determined at varying ionic strengths, and the results are consistent with the compounds binding as expected in the DNA minor groove. The alkylating reactivity of the mustards towards these nucleic acids has been measured in water at 37 degrees C and in 0.01 M HEPES buffer over a range of temperatures from 25 degrees C to 60 degrees C. Evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters for these kinetic and equilibrium studies suggests that the interaction with nucleic acids is via an internal SN2 mechanism involving an aziridinium ion.

  7. RAGE is a nucleic acid receptor that promotes inflammatory responses to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sirois, Cherilyn M.; Jin, Tengchuan; Miller, Allison L.; Bertheloot, Damien; Nakamura, Hirotaka; Horvath, Gabor L.; Mian, Abubakar; Jiang, Jiansheng; Schrum, Jacob; Bossaller, Lukas; Pelka, Karin; Garbi, Natalio; Brewah, Yambasu; Tian, Jane; Chang, ChewShun; Chowdhury, Partha S.; Sims, Gary P.; Kolbeck, Roland; Coyle, Anthony J.; Humbles, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of DNA and RNA molecules derived from pathogens or self-antigen is one way the mammalian immune system senses infection and tissue damage. Activation of immune signaling receptors by nucleic acids is controlled by limiting the access of DNA and RNA to intracellular receptors, but the mechanisms by which endosome-resident receptors encounter nucleic acids from the extracellular space are largely undefined. In this study, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) promoted DNA uptake into endosomes and lowered the immune recognition threshold for the activation of Toll-like receptor 9, the principal DNA-recognizing transmembrane signaling receptor. Structural analysis of RAGE–DNA complexes indicated that DNA interacted with dimers of the outermost RAGE extracellular domains, and could induce formation of higher-order receptor complexes. Furthermore, mice deficient in RAGE were unable to mount a typical inflammatory response to DNA in the lung, indicating that RAGE is important for the detection of nucleic acids in vivo. PMID:24081950

  8. Deoxyribonucleic acid base compositions of dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Davison, F D; Mackenzie, D W; Owen, R J

    1980-06-01

    DNA was extracted and purified from 55 dermatophyte isolates representing 34 species of Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton. The base compositions of the chromosomal DNA were determined by CsCl density gradient centrifugation and were found to be in the narrow range of 48.7 to 50.3 mol % G + C. A satellite DNA component assumed to be of mitochondrial origin was present in most strains, with a G + C content ranging from 14.7 to 30.8 mol % G + C. Heterogeneity in microscopic and colonial characteristics was not reflected in differences in the mean G + C content of the chromosomal DNAs. Strains varied in the G + C contents of satelite DNA, but these did not correlate with traditional species concepts.

  9. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1987-10-07

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  10. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1990-10-09

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  11. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Moyzis, Robert K.; Ratliff, Robert L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Stewart, Carleton C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed.

  12. Design of electrochemical biosensor systems for the detection of specific DNA sequences in PCR-amplified nucleic acids related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val108/158Met polymorphism based on intrinsic guanine signal.

    PubMed

    Ozkan-Ariksoysal, Dilsat; Tezcanli, Burcin; Kosova, Buket; Ozsoz, Mehmet

    2008-02-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common and complex diseases that show polygenic and multifactorial heredity. A single nucleotide polymorphism (Val108/158Met) in the catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) gene is related to many psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, alcoholism, bipolar disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Schizophrenia is a complex disorder and a single nucleotide polymorphism (Val108/158Met) at the COMT gene is related to schizophrenia susceptibility. A novel hybridization-based disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of a common functional polymorphism in the COMT gene from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons has been described without using an external label. This developed technology combined with a disposable carbon graphite electrode and differential pulse voltammetry was performed by using short synthetic oligonucleotides and PCR amplicons in length 203 bp to measure the change of guanine oxidation signal obtained at approximately +1.0 V after DNA hybridization between probe and target (synthetic target or denatured PCR samples). COMT-specific oligonucleotides were immobilized onto the carbon surface with a simple adsorption method in two different modes: (a) Guanine-containing targets were attached or (b) inosine-substituted probes were attached onto an electrode. By controlling the surface coverage of the target DNA, the hybridization event between the probes and their synthetic targets or specific PCR products was optimized. The wild-type or polymorphic allele-specific probes/targets were also interacted with an equal amount of noncomplementary and one-base mismatch-containing DNAs in order to measure the sensor selectivity. The decrease or appearance in the intrinsic guanine signal simplified the detection procedure and shortened the assay time because protocol eliminates the label-binding step. The nonspecific binding effects were minimized by using sodium dodecyl sulfate with different washing methods

  13. Activation of cellular signaling by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1-initiated DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    German, Peter; Szaniszlo, Peter; Hajas, Gyorgy; Radak, Zsolt; Bacsi, Attila; Hazra, Tapas K; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-10-01

    Accumulation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) in the DNA results in genetic instability and mutagenesis, and is believed to contribute to carcinogenesis, aging processes and various aging-related diseases. 8-OxoG is removed from the DNA via DNA base excision repair (BER), initiated by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1). Our recent studies have shown that OGG1 binds its repair product 8-oxoG base with high affinity at a site independent from its DNA lesion-recognizing catalytic site and the OGG1•8-oxoG complex physically interacts with canonical Ras family members. Furthermore, exogenously added 8-oxoG base enters the cells and activates Ras GTPases; however, a link has not yet been established between cell signaling and DNA BER, which is the endogenous source of the 8-oxoG base. In this study, we utilized KG-1 cells expressing a temperature-sensitive mutant OGG1, siRNA ablation of gene expression, and a variety of molecular biological assays to define a link between OGG1-BER and cellular signaling. The results show that due to activation of OGG1-BER, 8-oxoG base is released from the genome in sufficient quantities for activation of Ras GTPase and resulting in phosphorylation of the downstream Ras targets Raf1, MEK1,2 and ERK1,2. These results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism for cellular responses to OGG1-initiated DNA BER.

  14. Unique base-pair breathing dynamics in PNA-DNA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Leijon, M; Sehlstedt, U; Nielsen, P E; Gräslund, A

    1997-08-22

    Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, derived from 1H-NMR measurements of the imino proton exchange rates upon titration with the exchange catalyst ammonia, are reported for two mixed-sequence peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA hybrids and their counterpart DNA duplex. The exchange times of the imino protons in the PNA strands extrapolate to very short base-pair lifetimes in the limit of infinite exchange catalyst concentration. This is not due to generally less stable base-pairs in PNA-DNA hybrids, since the lifetimes, apparent dissociation constants and thermodynamic stability (DeltaG degrees ) of the innermost DNA guanine imino protons are similar in the hybrid duplexes and in the DNA duplex. In addition, the apparent dissociation constants determined for PNA bases of the hybrids are of the same order as those of the corresponding bases in the DNA duplex. An exchange process from the closed state was found to be inconsistent with the experimental data. From these results, we conclude that opening and closing rates of the PNA guanine and thymine bases are at least two orders of magnitude higher than those of the corresponding bases in the DNA duplex. Unusual kinetics in the hybrids is also evident from the destabilization of the complementary DNA strand thymine bases, which exhibit base-pair dissociation constants increased by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to what is observed in the DNA duplex, while the DNA strand guanine bases are largely unaffected. The general pattern of the base-pair dynamics in the hybrids obtained when using trimethylamine as an exchange catalyst is the same as when using ammonia. However, the long base-pair lifetimes i. e. those of the DNA duplex and the guanine bases of the DNA strands in the hybrids, are approximately three to five times longer than when using ammonia. Thus, all opening events sensed by ammonia are not accessible to trimethylamine. These observations are discussed in regard to the mechanism of base

  15. The nitrosated bile acid DNA lesion O6-carboxymethylguanine is a substrate for the human DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Senthong, Pattama; Millington, Christopher L.; Wilkinson, Oliver J.; Marriott, Andrew S.; Watson, Amanda J.; Reamtong, Onrapak; Eyers, Claire E.; Williams, David M.; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Povey, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of red meat is a risk factor in human colorectal cancer (CRC). One hypothesis is that red meat facilitates the nitrosation of bile acid conjugates and amino acids, which rapidly convert to DNA-damaging carcinogens. Indeed, the toxic and mutagenic DNA adduct O6-carboxymethylguanine (O6-CMG) is frequently present in human DNA, increases in abundance in people with high levels of dietary red meat and may therefore be a causative factor in CRC. Previous reports suggested that O6-CMG is not a substrate for the human version of the DNA damage reversal protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which protects against the genotoxic effects of other O6-alkylguanine lesions by removing alkyl groups from the O6-position. We now show that synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing the known MGMT substrate O6-methylguanine (O6-MeG) or O6-CMG effectively inactivate MGMT in vitro (IC50 0.93 and 1.8 nM, respectively). Inactivation involves the removal of the O6-alkyl group and its transfer to the active-site cysteine residue of MGMT. O6-CMG is therefore an MGMT substrate, and hence MGMT is likely to be a protective factor in CRC under conditions where O6-CMG is a potential causative agent. PMID:23335782

  16. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-02-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody-epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification.

  17. Calcium-activated gene transfection from DNA/poly(amic acid-co-imide) complexes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Szu-Yuan; Chang, Li-Ting; Peng, Sydeny; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized a water-soluble poly(amic acid-co-imide) (PA-I) from ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) and 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine) that possesses comparable transfection efficiency to that of polyethylenimine (PEI), when prepared in combination with divalent calcium cations. The polycondensation of monomers afforded poly(amic acid) (PA) precursors, and subsequent thermal imidization resulted in the formation of PA-I. At a polymer/DNA ratio (indicated by the molar ratio of nitrogen in the polymer to phosphate in DNA) of 40, complete retardation of the DNA band was observed by gel electrophoresis, indicating the strong association of DNA with PA-I. A zeta potential of -22 mV was recorded for the PA-I polymer solution, and no apparent cytotoxicity was observed at concentrations up to 500 μg·mL(-1). In the presence of divalent Ca(2+), the transfection efficiency of PA-I was higher than that of PA, due to the formation of a copolymer/Ca(2+)/DNA polyplex and the reduction in negative charge due to thermal cyclization. Interestingly, a synergistic effect of Ca(2+) and the synthesized copolymer on DNA transfection was observed. The use of Ca(2+) or copolymer alone resulted in unsatisfactory delivery, whereas the formation of three-component polyplexes synergistically increased DNA transfection. Our findings demonstrated that a PA-I/Ca(2+)/DNA polyplex could serve as a promising candidate for gene delivery.

  18. Identification of dairy lactic acid bacteria by tRNAAla-23S rDNA-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Andrea; Lazzi, Camilla; Bernini, Valentina; Neviani, Erasmo; Gatti, Monica

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of target tRNA(Ala)-23S ribosomal DNA for identification of lactic acid bacteria strains associated with dairy ecosystem. For this purpose tRNA(Ala)-23S ribosomal DNA Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-RFLP) was compared with two widely used DNA fingerprinting methods - P1 Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), (GTG)5 repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) - for their ability to identify different species on a set of 10 type and 34 reference strains. Moreover, 75 unknown isolates collected during different stages of Grana Padano cheese production and ripening were identified using tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-RFLP and compared to the RFLP profiles of the strains in the reference database. This study demonstrated that the target tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA has high potential in bacterial identification and tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-RFLP is a promising method for reliable species-level identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in dairy products.

  19. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-Ni-nanostrands composites for EMI shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchen, Fahima; Wilson, Benjamin G.; Yaney, Perry P.; Salour, Michael M.; Grote, James G.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the use of DNA-CTMA (DC) in combination with Nickel Nanostrands (NiNs) for application in Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding. The addition of NiNs fillers to DC led to films with higher shielding effectiveness (SE) than when Silver nanoparticles were used. An enhanced EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) was also achieved by the fabrication of the DC-NiNs shielding film structure in a layered architecture. Very thin layer of Guanine ( 60 nm) were inserted between layers of DNA-NiNs ( 100um each) to total a thickness of 500um of the shielding film. An increase of the SE by 6-8 dB for the layered structure as compared to the bulk thick film with NiNs loadings up to 10 wt%. At higher loadings (>10 wt. %), a significant physical degradation of the films was observed for all films regardless of the thickness or the process of fabrication.

  20. Role of amino acid insertions on intermolecular forces between arginine peptide condensed DNA helices: implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm.

    PubMed

    DeRouchey, Jason E; Rau, Donald C

    2011-12-09

    In spermatogenesis, chromatin histones are replaced by arginine-rich protamines to densely compact DNA in sperm heads. Tight packaging is considered necessary to protect the DNA from damage. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing protamine-DNA assemblies and their dependence on amino acid content, the effect of neutral and negatively charged amino acids on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces was studied using model peptides containing six arginines. We have previously observed that the neutral amino acids in salmon protamine decrease the net attraction between protamine-DNA helices compared with the equivalent homo-arginine peptide. Using osmotic stress coupled with x-ray scattering, we have investigated the component attractive and repulsive forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance as a function of the chemistry, position, and number of the amino acid inserted. Neutral amino acids inserted into hexa-arginine increase the short range repulsion while only slightly affecting longer range attraction. The amino acid content alone of salmon protamine is enough to rationalize the forces that package DNA in sperm heads. Inserting a negatively charged amino acid into hexa-arginine dramatically weakens the net attraction. Both of these observations have biological implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm heads.

  1. Switchable mechanical DNA ``arms'' operating on nucleic acid scaffolds associated with electrodes or semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelossof, Gilad; Tel-Vered, Ran; Liu, Xiaoqing; Willner, Itamar

    2013-09-01

    Functional footholds linked to DNA scaffolds associated with surfaces provide nano-engineered assemblies acting as switching devices. By the assembly of a β-cyclodextrin receptor on one foothold, and a ferrocene-modified nucleic acid on a second foothold, the switchable and reversible, fuel-driven activation of ``molecular arms'' proceeds, transduced by electrochemical or optical signals.Functional footholds linked to DNA scaffolds associated with surfaces provide nano-engineered assemblies acting as switching devices. By the assembly of a β-cyclodextrin receptor on one foothold, and a ferrocene-modified nucleic acid on a second foothold, the switchable and reversible, fuel-driven activation of ``molecular arms'' proceeds, transduced by electrochemical or optical signals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures, time-dependent deactivation of a DNA ``arm'' using a DNA anti-fuel, and control experiments, excluding β-cyclodextrin from the systems. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02653a

  2. Acid and base degraded products of ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Salaris, Margherita; Nieddu, Maria; Rubattu, Nicola; Testa, Cecilia; Luongo, Elvira; Rimoli, Maria Grazia; Boatto, Gianpiero

    2010-06-05

    The stability of ketorolac tromethamine was investigated in acid (0.5M HCl) and alkaline conditions (0.5M NaOH), using the same procedure reported by Devarajan et al. [2]. The acid and base degradation products were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

  3. Ultra-sensitive detection of zinc oxide nanowires using a quartz crystal microbalance and phosphoric acid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Kuewhan; You, Juneseok; Park, Chanhoo; Park, Hyunjun; Choi, Jaeyeong; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Park, Jinsung; Lee, Howon; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-09-01

    Recent advancements of nanomaterials have inspired numerous scientific and industrial applications. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) is one of the most important nanomaterials due to their extraordinary properties. However, studies performed over the past decade have reported toxicity of ZnO NWs. Therefore, there has been increasing demand for effective detection of ZnO NWs. In this study, we propose a method for the detection of ZnO NW using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and DNA probes. The detection method is based on the covalent interaction between ZnO NWs and the phosphoric acid group of single-stranded DNA (i.e., linker DNA), and DNA hybridization between the linker DNA and the probe DNA strand on the QCM electrode. Rapid, high sensitivity, in situ detection of ZnO NWs was demonstrated for the first time. The limit of detection was 10-4 μg ml-1 in deionized water, which represents a sensitivity that is 100000 times higher than the toxic ZnO NW concentration level. Moreover, the selectivity of the ZnO NW detection method was demonstrated by comparison with other types of nanowires and the method was able to detect ZnO NWs in tap water sensitively even after stored for 14 d in a refrigerator. The performance of our proposed method was sufficient to achieve detection of ZnO NW in the ‘real-world’ environment.

  4. SNP-Based Quantification of Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Patterns by Pyrosequencing®.

    PubMed

    Busato, Florence; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of allele-specific DNA methylation patterns has recently attracted much interest as loci of allele-specific DNA methylation overlap with known risk loci for complex diseases and the analysis might contribute to the fine-mapping and interpretation of non-coding genetic variants associated with complex diseases and improve the understanding between genotype and phenotype. In the presented protocol, we present a method for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns on both alleles separately using heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) as anchor for allele-specific PCR amplification followed by analysis of the allele-specific DNA methylation patterns by Pyrosequencing(®). Pyrosequencing is an easy-to-handle, quantitative real-time sequencing method that is frequently used for genotyping as well as for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns. The protocol consists of three major steps: (1) identification of individuals heterozygous for a SNP in a region of interest using Pyrosequencing; (2) analysis of the DNA methylation patterns surrounding the SNP on bisulfite-treated DNA to identify regions of potential allele-specific DNA methylation; and (3) the analysis of the DNA methylation patterns associated with each of the two alleles, which are individually amplified using allele-specific PCR. The enrichment of the targeted allele is re-enforced by modification of the allele-specific primers at the allele-discriminating base with Locked Nucleic Acids (LNA). For the proof-of-principle of the developed approach, we provide assay details for three imprinted genes (IGF2, IGF2R, and PEG3) within this chapter. The mean of the DNA methylation patterns derived from the individual alleles corresponds well to the overall DNA methylation patterns and the developed approach proved more reliable compared to other protocols for allele-specific DNA methylation analysis.

  5. Beyond DNA origami: A look on the bright future of nucleic acid nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Michelotti, Nicole; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Manzo, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acid nanotechnology exploits the programmable molecular recognition properties of natural and synthetic nucleic acids to assemble structures with nanometer-scale precision. In 2006, DNA origami transformed the field by providing a versatile platform for self-assembly of arbitrary shapes from one long DNA strand held in place by hundreds of short, site-specific (spatially addressable) DNA ”staples”. This revolutionary approach has led to the creation of a multitude of 2D and 3D scaffolds that form the basis for functional nanodevices. Not limited to nucleic acids, these nanodevices can incorporate other structural and functional materials, such as proteins and nanoparticles, making them broadly useful for current and future applications in emerging fields such as nanomedicine, nanoelectronics, and alternative energy. PMID:22131292

  6. Genomewide expression analysis in amino acid-producing bacteria using DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F

    2004-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has become an important research tool for biotechnology and microbiology. It is now possible to characterize genetic diversity and gene expression in a genomewide manner. DNA microarrays have been applied extensively to study the biology of many bacteria including Escherichia coli, but only recently have they been developed for the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum. Both bacteria are widely used for biotechnological amino acid production. In this article, in addition to the design and generation of microarrays as well as their use in hybridization experiments and subsequent data analysis, we describe recent applications of DNA microarray technology regarding amino acid production in C. glutamicum and E. coli. We also discuss the impact of functional genomics studies on fundamental as well as applied aspects of amino acid production with C. glutamicum and E. coli.

  7. Forensic aspects of DNA-based human identity testing.

    PubMed

    Roper, Stephen M; Tatum, Owatha L

    2008-01-01

    The forensic applications of DNA-based human identity laboratory testing are often underappreciated. Molecular biology has seen an exponential improvement in the accuracy and statistical power provided by identity testing in the past decade. This technology, dependent upon an individual's unique DNA sequence, has cemented the use of DNA technology in the forensic laboratory. This paper will discuss the state of modern DNA-based identity testing, describe the technology used to perform this testing, and describe its use as it relates to forensic applications. We will also compare individual technologies, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern Blotting, that are used to detect the molecular differences that make all individuals unique. An increasing reliance on DNA-based identity testing dictates that healthcare providers develop an understanding of the background, techniques, and guiding principles of this important forensic tool.

  8. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Christopher B.; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, Andre

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  9. Functional nucleic acid-based hydrogels for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Mo, Liuting; Lu, Chun-Hua; Fu, Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-03-07

    Hydrogels are crosslinked hydrophilic polymers that can absorb a large amount of water. By their hydrophilic, biocompatible and highly tunable nature, hydrogels can be tailored for applications in bioanalysis and biomedicine. Of particular interest are DNA-based hydrogels owing to the unique features of nucleic acids. Since the discovery of the DNA double helical structure, interest in DNA has expanded beyond its genetic role to applications in nanotechnology and materials science. In particular, DNA-based hydrogels present such remarkable features as stability, flexibility, precise programmability, stimuli-responsive DNA conformations, facile synthesis and modification. Moreover, functional nucleic acids (FNAs) have allowed the construction of hydrogels based on aptamers, DNAzymes, i-motif nanostructures, siRNAs and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides to provide additional molecular recognition, catalytic activities and therapeutic potential, making them key players in biological analysis and biomedical applications. To date, a variety of applications have been demonstrated with FNA-based hydrogels, including biosensing, environmental analysis, controlled drug release, cell adhesion and targeted cancer therapy. In this review, we focus on advances in the development of FNA-based hydrogels, which have fully incorporated both the unique features of FNAs and DNA-based hydrogels. We first introduce different strategies for constructing DNA-based hydrogels. Subsequently, various types of FNAs and the most recent developments of FNA-based hydrogels for bioanalytical and biomedical applications are described with some selected examples. Finally, the review provides an insight into the remaining challenges and future perspectives of FNA-based hydrogels.

  10. Functional nucleic acid-based hydrogels for bioanalytical and biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Liuting; Lu, Chun-Hua; Fu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels are crosslinked hydrophilic polymers that can absorb a large amount of water. By their hydrophilic, biocompatible and highly tunable nature, hydrogels can be tailored for applications in bioanalysis and biomedicine. Of particular interest are DNA-based hydrogels owing to the unique features of nucleic acids. Since the discovery of DNA double helical structure, interest in DNA has expanded beyond its genetic role to applications in nanotechnology and materials science. In particular, DNA-based hydrogels present such remarkable features as stability, flexibility, precise programmability, stimuli-responsive DNA conformations, facile synthesis and modification. Moreover, functional nucleic acids (FNAs) have allowed the construction of hydrogels based on aptamers, DNAzymes, i-motif nanostructures, siRNAs and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides to provide additional molecular recognition, catalytic activities and therapeutic potential, making them key players in biological analysis and biomedical applications. To date, a variety of applications have been demonstrated with FNA-based hydrogels, including biosensing, environmental analysis, controlled drug release, cell adhesion and targeted cancer therapy. In this review, we focus on advances in the development of FNA-based hydrogels, which have fully incorporated both the unique features of FNAs and DNA-based hydrogels. We first introduce different strategies for constructing DNA-based hydrogels. Subsequently, various types of FNAs and the most recent developments of FNA-based hydrogels for bioanalytical and biomedical applications are described with some selected examples. Finally, the review provides an insight into the remaining challenges and future perspectives of FNA-based hydrogels. PMID:26758955

  11. Superimposed Code Theoretic Analysis of Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Codes and DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    hybridization that occurs between a DNA strand and its Watson - Crick complement can be used to perform mathematical computation. This research addresses how the...are 5′→3′ and strands with strikethrough are 3′→5′. A dsDNA duplex formed between a strand and its reverse complement is called a Watson - Crick (WC...3’ 5’ 3’ 5’TACGCGACTTTC3’ 5’GAAAGTCGCGTA3’ ATCAAACGATGC GCATCGTTTGAT Watson Crick (WC) Duplexes TACGCGACTTTC

  12. DNA tile based self-assembly: building complex nanoarchitectures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chenxiang; Liu, Yan; Rinker, Sherri; Yan, Hao

    2006-08-11

    DNA tile based self-assembly provides an attractive route to create nanoarchitectures of programmable patterns. It also offers excellent scaffolds for directed self-assembly of nanometer-scale materials, ranging from nanoparticles to proteins, with potential applications in constructing nanoelectronic/nanophotonic devices and protein/ligand nanoarrays. This Review first summarizes the currently available DNA tile toolboxes and further emphasizes recent developments toward self-assembling DNA nanostructures with increasing complexity. Exciting progress using DNA tiles for directed self-assembly of other nanometer scale components is also discussed.

  13. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of ssDNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide using graphene based nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Berghian-Grosan, Camelia; Biris, Alexandru Radu; Coros, Maria; Pogacean, Florina; Pruneanu, Stela

    2015-06-01

    The oxidative damage of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been intensively studied due to its role in the occurrence of some diseases. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the reactive oxygen species (ROS). It can induce oxidation of DNA bases, sugar lesions or DNA strand breaks. The Pt/Gr-Au-3 modified electrode was employed for the analysis of four ssDNA samples: single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), ssDNA pre-treated with hydrogen peroxide (ssDNA-H2O2), ssDNA pre-treated with graphene-gold nanoparticles (ssDNA-Gr-Au) and ssDNA-Gr-Au complex pre-treated with hydrogen peroxide (ssDNA-Gr-Au-H2O2). By monitoring the changes of the purine oxidation peaks currents, we obtained valuable information about the damage induced by the hydrogen peroxide onto the un-treated or graphene pre-treated ssDNA and also about the interaction between ssDNA and graphene-based nanomaterial. The FTIR analysis has been also used to obtain information about the ssDNA damage. These findings allowed us to prove the utility of graphene-based nanomaterials (mainly Gr-Au-3) not only for the investigation of the oxidative damage induced by a non-radical oxidant, but also for the determination of the type of interaction between ssDNA and graphene surface. The stability of the ssDNA-Gr-Au-3 complex against the damage induced by H2O2, in the absence of reduced transition metals, was also established.

  14. Solid Acid Based Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    superprotonic solid acids with elements such as P, As, Si and Ge, which have greater affinities to oxygen , we anticipate that the reduction reaction will be...bulk material consisted of an apatite phase (hexagonal symmetry) of variable composition, LixLa10-x(SiO4)6O3-x, with excess lithium residing in the...in Tables 1 and 2, indicate that this compound is a rather conventional apatite with fixed stoichiometry, LiLa9(SiO4)6O2 (x = 1). Such a result is

  15. Nucleic acid-based nanoengineering: novel structures for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanying; LaBean, Thomas H.; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoengineering exploits the interactions of materials at the nanometre scale to create functional nanostructures. It relies on the precise organization of nanomaterials to achieve unique functionality. There are no interactions more elegant than those governing nucleic acids via Watson–Crick base-pairing rules. The infinite combinations of DNA/RNA base pairs and their remarkable molecular recognition capability can give rise to interesting nanostructures that are only limited by our imagination. Over the past years, creative assembly of nucleic acids has fashioned a plethora of two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanostructures with precisely controlled size, shape and spatial functionalization. These nanostructures have been precisely patterned with molecules, proteins and gold nanoparticles for the observation of chemical reactions at the single molecule level, activation of enzymatic cascade and novel modality of photonic detection, respectively. Recently, they have also been engineered to encapsulate and release bioactive agents in a stimulus-responsive manner for therapeutic applications. The future of nucleic acid-based nanoengineering is bright and exciting. In this review, we will discuss the strategies to control the assembly of nucleic acids and highlight the recent efforts to build functional nucleic acid nanodevices for nanomedicine. PMID:23050076

  16. DNA-based cryptographic methods for data hiding in DNA media.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Samiha; Shawish, Ahmed; Nagaty, Khaled

    2016-12-01

    Information security can be achieved using cryptography, steganography or a combination of them, where data is firstly encrypted using any of the available cryptography techniques and then hid into any hiding medium. Recently, the famous genomic DNA has been introduced as a hiding medium, known as DNA steganography, due to its notable ability to hide huge data sets with a high level of randomness and hence security. Despite the numerous cryptography techniques, to our knowledge only the vigenere cipher and the DNA-based playfair cipher have been combined with the DNA steganography, which keeps space for investigation of other techniques and coming up with new improvements. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis between the DNA-based playfair, vigenere, RSA and the AES ciphers, each combined with a DNA hiding technique. The conducted analysis reports the performance diversity of each combined technique in terms of security, speed, hiding capacity in addition to both key size and data size. Moreover, this paper proposes a modification of the current combined DNA-based playfair cipher technique, which makes it not only simple and fast but also provides a significantly higher hiding capacity and security. The conducted extensive experimental studies confirm such outstanding performance in comparison with all the discussed combined techniques.

  17. Associations between whole peripheral blood fatty acids and DNA methylation in humans

    PubMed Central

    de la Rocha, Carmen; Pérez-Mojica, J. Eduardo; León, Silvia Zenteno-De; Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E.; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Alvarado-Caudillo, Yolanda; Carmona, F. Javier; Esteller, Manel; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Zaina, Silvio; Lund, Gertrud

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) modify DNA methylation in vitro, but limited information is available on whether corresponding associations exist in vivo and reflect any short-term effect of the diet. Associations between global DNA methylation and FAs were sought in blood from lactating infants (LI; n = 49) and adult males (AMM; n = 12) equally distributed across the three conventional BMI classes. AMM provided multiple samples at 2-hour intervals during 8 hours after either a single Western diet-representative meal (post-prandial samples) or no meal (fasting samples). Lipid/glucose profile, HDAC4 promoter and PDK4 5’UTR methylation were determined in AMM. Multiple regression analysis revealed that global (in LI) and both global and PDK4-specific DNA methylation (in AMM) were positively associated with eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acid. HDAC4 methylation was inversely associated with arachidonic acid post-prandially in AMM. Global DNA methylation did not show any defined within-day pattern that would suggest a short-term response to the diet. Nonetheless, global DNA methylation was higher in normal weight subjects both post-prandially and in fasting and coincided with higher polyunsaturated relative to monounsaturated and saturated FAs. We show for the first time strong associations of DNA methylation with specific FAs in two human cohorts of distinct age, diet and postnatal development stage. PMID:27181711

  18. Adsorption of peptide nucleic acid and DNA decamers at electrically charged surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Fojta, M; Vetterl, V; Tomschik, M; Jelen, F; Nielsen, P; Wang, J; Palecek, E

    1997-01-01

    Adsorption behavior of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and DNA decamers (GTAGATCACT and the complementary sequence) on a mercury surface was studied by means of AC impedance measurements at a hanging mercury drop electrode. The nucleic acid was first attached to the electrode by adsorption from a 5-microliter drop of PNA (or DNA) solution, and the electrode with the adsorbed nucleic acid layer was then washed and immersed in the blank background electrolyte where the differential capacity C of the electrode double layer was measured as a function of the applied potential E. It was found that the adsorption behavior of the PNA with an electrically neutral backbone differs greatly from that of the DNA (with a negatively charged backbone), whereas the DNA-PNA hybrid shows intermediate behavior. At higher surface coverage PNA molecules associate at the surface, and the minimum value of C is shifted to negative potentials because of intermolecular interactions of PNA at the surface. Prolonged exposure of PNA to highly negative potentials does not result in PNA desorption, whereas almost all of the DNA is removed from the surface at these potentials. Adsorption of PNA decreases with increasing NaCl concentration in the range from 0 to 50 mM NaCl, in contrast to DNA, the adsorption of which increases under the same conditions. PMID:9129832

  19. DNA-based computing of strategic assignment problems.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qi-Wen; Yong, Kian-Yan

    2011-05-06

    DNA-based computing is a novel technique to tackle computationally difficult problems, in which computing time grows exponentially corresponding to problematic size. A strategic assignment problem is a typical nondeterministic polynomial problem, which is often associated with strategy applications. In this Letter, a new approach dealing with strategic assignment problems is proposed based on manipulating DNA strands, which is believed to be better than the conventional silicon-based computing in solving the same problem.

  20. Unique magnetic signatures of mismatched base pairs in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apalkov, Vadim; Berashevich, Julia; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic properties of DNA containing mispairs, such as different conformations of the GṡA mispair, or a GṡT mispair inserted into the DNA chain, have been theoretically investigated. The essential ingredients for these studies, the charge transfer integrals, were evaluated from the DNA sequences containing the mispair and optimized in the solvent. We find that the magnetic susceptibilities of the host DNA chain containing a large number of Watson-Crick base pairs are significantly altered in the presence of the mispairs, and the effects depend on the choice of mispairs. In particular, insertion of even a single GṡA mispair changes the nature of magnetization (sign of the susceptibility) of the host DNA. We propose that measurement of the magnetic properties of DNA might provide a direct route to detection and identification of those mispairs.

  1. Binding of retinoic acid receptor heterodimers to DNA. A role for histones NH2 termini.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Formstecher, P

    1998-05-15

    The retinoic acid signaling pathway is controlled essentially through two types of nuclear receptors, RARs and RXRs. Ligand dependent activation or repression of retinoid-regulated genes is dependent on the binding of retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/9-cis-retinoic acid receptor (RXR) heterodimers to retinoic acid response element (RARE). Although unliganded RXR/RAR heterodimers bind constitutively to DNA in vitro, a clear in vivo ligand-dependent occupancy of the RARE present in the RARbeta2 gene promoter has been reported (Dey, A., Minucci, S., and Ozato, K. (1994) Mol. Cell. Biol. 14, 8191-8201). Nucleosomes are viewed as general repressors of the transcriptional machinery, in part by preventing the access of transcription factors to DNA. The ability of hRXRalpha/hRARalpha heterodimers to bind to a nucleosomal template in vitro has therefore been examined. The assembly of a fragment from the RARbeta2 gene promoter, which contains a canonical DR5 RARE, into a nucleosome core prevented hRXRalpha/hRARalpha binding to this DNA, in conditions where a strong interaction is observed with a linear DNA template. However, histone tails removal by limited proteolysis and histone hyperacetylation yielded nucleosomal RAREs able to bind to hRXRalpha/hRARalpha heterodimers. These data establish therefore the role of histones NH2 termini as a major impediment to retinoid receptors access to DNA, and identify histone hyperacetylation as a potential physiological regulator of retinoid-induced transcription.

  2. Ability of hypochlorous acid and N-chloramines to chlorinate DNA and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Naomi R; Pattison, David I; Hawkins, Clare L

    2010-07-19

    Myeloperoxidase is a heme enzyme released by activated phagocytes that is responsible for the generation of the strong oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Although HOCl has potent bactericidal properties and plays an important role in the human immune system, this oxidant also causes damage to tissues, particularly under inflammatory conditions. There is a strong link between chronic inflammation and the incidence of many cancers, which may be associated with the ability of HOCl and related oxidants such as N-chloramines to damage DNA. However, in contrast to HOCl, little is known about the reactivity of N-chloramines with DNA and its constituents. In this study, we examine the ability of HOCl and various N-chloramines to form chlorinated base products on nucleosides, nucleotides, DNA, and in cellular systems. Experiments were performed with N-chloramines formed on Nalpha-acetyl-histidine (His-C), Nalpha-acetyl-lysine (Lys-C), glycine (Gly-C), taurine (Tau-C), and ammonia (Mono-C). Treatment of DNA and related materials with HOCl and His-C resulted in the formation of 5-chloro-2'-deoxycytidine (5CldC), 8-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (8CldA) and 8-chloro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8CldG). With the nucleosides, 8CldG was the favored product in each case, and HOCl was the most efficient chlorinating agent. 5Cl(d)C was the most abundant product on exposure of the nucleotides and DNA to HOCl and His-C, with only low levels of chlorinated products observed with Lys-C, Gly-C, Tau-C, and Mono-C. 5CldC was also formed on exposure of smooth muscle cells to either HOCl or His-C. Cellular RNA was also a target for HOCl and His-C, with evidence for the formation of 5-chloro-cytidine (5ClC). This study shows that HOCl and the model N-chloramine, His-C, are able to chlorinate cellular genetic material, which may play a role in the development of various inflammatory cancers.

  3. Whole body acid-base modeling revisited.

    PubMed

    Ring, Troels; Nielsen, Søren

    2017-04-01

    The textbook account of whole body acid-base balance in terms of endogenous acid production, renal net acid excretion, and gastrointestinal alkali absorption, which is the only comprehensive model around, has never been applied in clinical practice or been formally validated. To improve understanding of acid-base modeling, we managed to write up this conventional model as an expression solely on urine chemistry. Renal net acid excretion and endogenous acid production were already formulated in terms of urine chemistry, and we could from the literature also see gastrointestinal alkali absorption in terms of urine excretions. With a few assumptions it was possible to see that this expression of net acid balance was arithmetically identical to minus urine charge, whereby under the development of acidosis, urine was predicted to acquire a net negative charge. The literature already mentions unexplained negative urine charges so we scrutinized a series of seminal papers and confirmed empirically the theoretical prediction that observed urine charge did acquire negative charge as acidosis developed. Hence, we can conclude that the conventional model is problematic since it predicts what is physiologically impossible. Therefore, we need a new model for whole body acid-base balance, which does not have impossible implications. Furthermore, new experimental studies are needed to account for charge imbalance in urine under development of acidosis.

  4. Osmium-Based Pyrimidine Contrast Tags for Enhanced Nanopore-Based DNA Base Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Henley, Robert Y; Vazquez-Pagan, Ana G; Johnson, Michael; Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-01-01

    Nanopores are a promising platform in next generation DNA sequencing. In this platform, an individual DNA strand is threaded into nanopore using an electric field, and enzyme-based ratcheting is used to move the strand through the detector. During this process the residual ion current through the pore is measured, which exhibits unique levels for different base combinations inside the pore. While this approach has shown great promise, accuracy is not optimal because the four bases are chemically comparable to one another, leading to small differences in current obstruction. Nucleobase-specific chemical tagging can be a viable approach to enhancing the contrast between different bases in the sequence. Herein we show that covalent modification of one or both of the pyrimidine bases by an osmium bipyridine complex leads to measureable differences in the blockade amplitudes of DNA molecules. We qualitatively determine the degree of osmylation of a DNA strand by passing it through a solid-state nanopore, and are thus able to gauge T and C base content. In addition, we show that osmium bipyridine reacts with dsDNA, leading to substantially different current blockade levels than exhibited for bare dsDNA. This work serves as a proof of principle for nanopore sequencing and mapping via base-specific DNA osmylation.

  5. Synthesis of new kojic acid based unnatural α-amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, C; Payili, Nagaraju; Yennam, Satyanarayana; Devi, P Uma; Behera, Manoranjan

    2015-11-01

    An efficient method for the preparation of kojic acid based α-amino acid derivatives by alkylation of glycinate schiff base with bromokojic acids have been described. Using this method, mono as well as di alkylated kojic acid-amino acid conjugates have been prepared. This is the first synthesis of C-linked kojic acid-amino acid conjugate where kojic acid is directly linked to amino acid through a C-C bond.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of G-DNA and perspectives on the simulation of nucleic acid structures

    PubMed Central

    šponer, Jiří; Cang, Xiaohui; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews the application of biomolecular simulation methods to understand the structure, dynamics and interactions of nucleic acids with a focus on explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of guanine quadruplex (G-DNA and G-RNA) molecules. While primarily dealing with these exciting and highly relevant four-stranded systems, where recent and past simulations have provided several interesting results and novel insight into G-DNA structure, the review provides some general perspectives on the applicability of the simulation techniques to nucleic acids. PMID:22525788

  7. Zinc complexes of the antibacterial drug oxolinic acid: structure and DNA-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Tarushi, Alketa; Psomas, George; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P

    2009-06-01

    The neutral mononuclear zinc complexes with the quinolone antibacterial drug oxolinic acid in the absence or presence of a nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligand 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline have been synthesized and characterized. The experimental data suggest that oxolinic acid is on deprotonated mode acting as a bidentate ligand coordinated to the metal ion through the ketone and one carboxylato oxygen atoms. The crystal structures of (chloro)(oxolinato)(2,2'-bipyridine)zinc(II), 2, and bis(oxolinato)(1,10-phenanthroline)zinc(II), 3, have been determined with X-ray crystallography. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) with UV and fluorescence spectroscopies. UV studies of the interaction of the complexes with DNA have shown that they can bind to CT DNA and the DNA-binding constants have been calculated. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have shown that complex 3 exhibits the ability to displace the DNA-bound EB indicating that it binds to DNA in strong competition with EB.

  8. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA using boric acid-functionalized nano-microsphere fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Yan; Wei, Jing-Ru; Pan, Jiong-Xiu; Zhang, Wei; Dang, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-15

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is the sixth base of DNA. It is involved in active DNA demethylation and can be a marker of diseases such as cancer. In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive 2-(4-boronophenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid modified poly (glycidyl methacrylate (PBAQA-PGMA) fluorescent probe to detect the 5hmC content of genomic DNA based on T4 β-glucosyltransferase-catalyzed glucosylation of 5hmC. The fluorescence-enhanced intensity recorded from the DNA sample was proportional to its 5-hydroxymethylcytosine content and could be quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The developed probe showed good detection sensitivity and selectivity and a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of 5 hmC within a 0-100nM range. Compared with other fluorescence detection methods, this method not only could determine trace amounts of 5 hmC from genomic DNA but also could eliminate the interference of fluorescent dyes and the need for purification. It also could avoid multiple labeling. Because the PBAQA-PGMA probe could enrich the content of glycosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2-deoxycytidine from a complex ground substance, it will broaden the linear detection range and improve sensitivity. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.167nM after enrichment. Furthermore, the method was successfully used to detect 5-hydroxymethylcytosine from mouse tissues.

  9. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-01

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10-18 mol l-1 for t-DNA has been achieved.

  10. Integrating DNA-based data into bioassessments improves ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The integration of DNA-based identification methods into bioassessments could result in more accurate representations of species distributions and species-habitat relationships. DNA-based approaches may be particularly informative for tracking the distributions of rare and/or invasive species that can comprise a small proportion of samples or are difficult to identify morphologically. In 2012 and 2013, we used a combination of morphological and DNA-based methods (meta-barcoding) to identify fish eggs and larvae collected in the St. Louis River estuary area, Minnesota. We found a large proportion of cases where a lack of agreement occurred between species identified at a site using morphological versus DNA identification, prompting a discussion of how to best reconcile these differences. Choices made during sampling collection, DNA amplification/extraction, and bioinformatics processing influence the DNA-morphology match. The distribution of some species (including several invasives) and their relationships to habitat changed after DNA-data was incorporated. Results highlight how incorporating of DNA-data may get us closer to the “truth”, which has large ramifications in the search for rare species and when understanding the environmental drivers of species distributions is important for management. not applicable

  11. Size-Expanded yDNA bases: An Ab Initio Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Sumpter, Bobby G; Lipkowski, Pawel; Wells, Jack C

    2006-01-01

    xDNA and yDNA are new classes of synthetic nucleic acids characterized by having base-pairs with one of the bases larger than the natural congeners. Here these larger bases are called x- and y-bases. We recently investigated and reported the structural and electronic properties of the x-bases (Fuentes-Cabrera et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2005, 109, 21135-21139). Here we extend this study by investigating the structure and electronic properties of the y-bases. These studies are framed within our interest that xDNA and yDNA could function as nanowires, for they could have smaller HOMO-LUMO gaps than natural DNA. The limited amount of experimental structural data in these synthetic duplexes makes it necessary to first understand smaller models and, subsequently, to use that information to build larger models. In this paper, we report the results on the chemical and electronic structure of the y-bases. In particular, we predict that the y-bases have smaller HOMO-LUMO gaps than their natural congeners, which is an encouraging result for it indicates that yDNA could have a smaller HOMO-LUMO gap than natural DNA. Also, we predict that the y-bases are less planar than the natural ones. Particularly interesting are our results corresponding to yG. Our studies show that yG is unstable because it is less aromatic and has a Coulombic repulsion that involves the amino group, as compared with a more stable tautomer. However, yG has a very small HOMO-LUMO gap, the smallest of all the size-expanded bases we have considered. The results of this study provide useful information that may allow the synthesis of an yG-mimic that is stable and has a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  12. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system for studying clustered DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Moscariello, M.M.; Sutherland, B.

    2010-08-01

    DNA-damaging agents can induce clustered lesions or multiply damaged sites (MDSs) on the same or opposing DNA strands. In the latter, attempts to repair MDS can generate closely opposed single-strand break intermediates that may convert non-lethal or mutagenic base damage into double-strand breaks (DSBs). We constructed a diploid S. cerevisiae yeast strain with a chromosomal context targeted by integrative DNA fragments carrying different damages to determine whether closely opposed base damages are converted to DSBs following the outcomes of the homologous recombination repair pathway. As a model of MDS, we studied clustered uracil DNA damages with a known location and a defined distance separating the lesions. The system we describe might well be extended to assessing the repair of MDSs with different compositions, and to most of the complex DNA lesions induced by physical and chemical agents.

  14. A novel chaotic based image encryption using a hybrid model of deoxyribonucleic acid and cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayatifar, Rasul; Sadaei, Hossein Javedani; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Lee, Malrey; Isnin, Ismail Fauzi

    2015-08-01

    Currently, there are many studies have conducted on developing security of the digital image in order to protect such data while they are sending on the internet. This work aims to propose a new approach based on a hybrid model of the Tinkerbell chaotic map, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and cellular automata (CA). DNA rules, DNA sequence XOR operator and CA rules are used simultaneously to encrypt the plain-image pixels. To determine rule number in DNA sequence and also CA, a 2-dimension Tinkerbell chaotic map is employed. Experimental results and computer simulations, both confirm that the proposed scheme not only demonstrates outstanding encryption, but also resists various typical attacks.

  15. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  16. Stacking with the unnatural DNA base 6-ethynylpyridone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Douglas J.; van Mourik, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    It was previously reported that the incorporation of 6-ethynylpyridone (E) into a DNA duplex (replacing T in a T:A base pair) leads to DNA duplexes that are more stable than the T:A-containing duplexes. DFT calculations at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) and BLYP-D3/6-31+G(d) levels on various base pairs, stacked bases and stacked base pairs in continuum solvation water suggest that the observed increased stability of E:A-containing duplexes is due to the combined effects of stronger base pairing and enhanced stacking of the E:A base pair.

  17. Development of a DNA Sensor Based on Nanoporous Pt-Rich Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hao, Pham; Thanh, Pham Duc; Xuan, Chu Thi; Hai, Nguyen Hoang; Tuan, Mai Anh

    2017-02-01

    Nanoporous Pt-rich electrodes with 72 at.% Pt composition were fabricated by sputtering a Pt-Ag alloy, followed by an electrochemical dealloying process to selectively etch away Ag atoms. The surface properties of nanoporous membranes were investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), a documentation system, and a gel image system (Gel Doc Imager). A single strand of probe deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was immobilized onto the electrode surface by physical adsorption. The DNA probe and target hybridization were measured using a lock-in amplifier and an electrochemical impedance spectroscope (EIS). The nanoporous Pt-rich electrode-based DNA sensor offers a fast response time of 3.7 s, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.35 × 10-10 M of DNA target.

  18. DNA-based self-assembly for functional nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Baoquan

    2013-07-26

    The unprecedented development of DNA nanotechnology has caused DNA self-assembly to attract close attention in many disciplines. In this research news article, the employment of DNA self-assembly in the fields of materials science and nanotechnology is described. DNA self-assembly can be used to prepare bulk-scale hydrogels and 3D macroscopic crystals with nanoscale internal structures, to induce the crystallization of nanoparticles, to template the fabrication of organic conductive nanomaterials, and to act as drug delivery vehicles for therapeutic agents. The properties and functions are fully tunable because of the designability and specificity of DNA assembly. Moreover, because of the intrinsic dynamics, DNA self-assembly can act as a program switch and can efficiently control stimuli responsiveness. We highlight the power of DNA self-assembly in the preparation and function regulation of materials, aiming to motivate future multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research. Finally, we describe some of the challenges currently faced by DNA assembly that may affect the functional evolution of such materials, and we provide our insights into the future directions of several DNA self-assembly-based nanomaterials.

  19. Multiple Base Substitution Corrections in DNA Sequence Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczuk, M.; Mackiewicz, P.; Szczepanik, D.; Nowicka, A.; Dudkiewicz, M.; Dudek, M. R.; Cebrat, S.

    We discuss the Jukes and Cantor's one-parameter model and Kimura's two-parameter model unability to describe evolution of asymmetric DNA molecules. The standard distance measure between two DNA sequences, which is the number of substitutions per site, should include the effect of multiple base substitutions separately for each type of the base. Otherwise, the respective tables of substitutions cannot reconstruct the asymmetric DNA molecule with respect to the composition. Basing on Kimura's neutral theory, we have derived a linear law for the correlation of the mean survival time of nucleotides under constant mutation pressure and their fraction in the genome. According to the law, the corrections to Kimura's theory have been discussed to describe evolution of genomes with asymmetric nucleotide composition. We consider the particular case of the strongly asymmetric Borrelia burgdorferi genome and we discuss in detail the corrections, which should be introduced into the distance measure between two DNA sequences to include multiple base substitutions.

  20. Operation of a DNA-Based Autocatalytic Network in Serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graugnard, Elton; Cox, Amber; Lee, Jeunghoon; Jorcyk, Cheryl; Yurke, Bernard; Hughes, William L.

    The potential for inferring the presence of cancer by the detection of miRNA in human blood has motivated research into the design and operation of DNA-based chemical amplifiers that can operate in bodily fluids. As a first step toward this goal, we have tested the operation of a DNA-based autocatalytic network in human serum and mouse serum. With the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate to prevent degradation by nuclease activity, the network was found to operate successfully with both DNA and RNA catalysts.

  1. DNA sequence analysis with droplet-based microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Adam R.; Hung, Tony; Sperling, Ralph A.; Mary, Pascaline; Rotem, Assaf; Agresti, Jeremy J.; Weiner, Michael A.; Weitz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic techniques can form and process micrometer scale droplets at thousands per second. Each droplet can house an individual biochemical reaction, allowing millions of reactions to be performed in minutes with small amounts of total reagent. This versatile approach has been used for engineering enzymes, quantifying concentrations of DNA in solution, and screening protein crystallization conditions. Here, we use it to read the sequences of DNA molecules with a FRET-based assay. Using probes of different sequences, we interrogate a target DNA molecule for polymorphisms. With a larger probe set, additional polymorphisms can be interrogated as well as targets of arbitrary sequence. PMID:24185402

  2. Artifacts associated with the measurement of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, J; Douki, T; Ravanat, J L

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we review recent aspects of the measurement of oxidized DNA bases, currently a matter of debate. There has long been an interest in the determination of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA under both normal and oxidative stress conditions. In this respect, the situation is confusing because variations that may be as large as two orders of magnitude have been reported for the yield of the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) in similar DNA samples. However, recent findings clearly show that application of several assays like gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and -32P--postlabeling may lead to a significant overestimation of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA. In particular, the silylation step, which is required to make the samples volatile for the GC-MS analysis, has been shown to induce oxidation of normal bases at the level of about one oxidized base per 10(4) normal bases. This has been found to be a general process that applies in particular to 8-oxoGua, 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydroadenine,5-hydroxycytosine, 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, and 5-formyluracil. Interestingly, prepurification of the oxidized bases from DNA hydrolysate prior to the derivatization reaction prevents artefactual oxidation. Under these conditions, the level of oxidized bases measured by GC-MS is similar to that obtained by HPLC associated with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). It should be added that the level of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2;-deoxyguanosine in control cellular DNA has been found to be about fivefold lower than in earlier HPLC-EC measurements by using appropriate conditions of extraction and enzymatic digestion of DNA. Similar conclusions were reached by measuring formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase sensitive sites as revealed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Images Figure 1. PMID:9349826

  3. Artifacts associated with the measurement of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Cadet, J; Douki, T; Ravanat, J L

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we review recent aspects of the measurement of oxidized DNA bases, currently a matter of debate. There has long been an interest in the determination of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA under both normal and oxidative stress conditions. In this respect, the situation is confusing because variations that may be as large as two orders of magnitude have been reported for the yield of the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) in similar DNA samples. However, recent findings clearly show that application of several assays like gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and -32P--postlabeling may lead to a significant overestimation of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA. In particular, the silylation step, which is required to make the samples volatile for the GC-MS analysis, has been shown to induce oxidation of normal bases at the level of about one oxidized base per 10(4) normal bases. This has been found to be a general process that applies in particular to 8-oxoGua, 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydroadenine,5-hydroxycytosine, 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, and 5-formyluracil. Interestingly, prepurification of the oxidized bases from DNA hydrolysate prior to the derivatization reaction prevents artefactual oxidation. Under these conditions, the level of oxidized bases measured by GC-MS is similar to that obtained by HPLC associated with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). It should be added that the level of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2;-deoxyguanosine in control cellular DNA has been found to be about fivefold lower than in earlier HPLC-EC measurements by using appropriate conditions of extraction and enzymatic digestion of DNA. Similar conclusions were reached by measuring formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase sensitive sites as revealed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay.

  4. Advancing DNA-based Nanotechnology Capabilities and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, Alexandria N.

    Biological systems have inspired interest in developing artificial molecular self-assembly techniques that imitate nature's ability to harness chemical forces to specifically position atoms within intricate assemblies. Of the biomolecules used to mimic nature's abilities, nucleic acids have gained special attention. Specifically, deoxyribonucleic acid is a stable molecule with a readily accessible code that exhibits predictable and programmable intermolecular interactions. These properties are exploited in the revolutionary structural DNA nanotechnology method known as scaffolded DNA origami. For DNA origami to establish itself as a widely used method for creating self-assembling, complex, functional materials, current limitations need to be overcome and new methods need to be established to move forward with developing structures for diverse applications in many fields. The limitations discussed in this dissertation include 1) pushing the scale of well-formed, fully-addressable origami to two and seven times the size of conventional origami, 2) testing cost-effective staple strand synthesis methods for producing pools of oligos for a specified origami, and 3) engineering mechanical properties using non-natural nucleotides in DNA assemblies. After accomplishing the above, we're able to design complex DNA origami structures that incorporate many of the current developments in the field into a useful material with applicability in wide-ranging fields, namely cell biology and photonics.

  5. Conditionally fluorescent molecular probes for detecting single base changes in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Zhang, David Yu; Seelig, Georg

    2013-09-01

    Small variations in nucleic acid sequences can have far-reaching phenotypic consequences. Reliably distinguishing closely related sequences is therefore important for research and clinical applications. Here, we demonstrate that conditionally fluorescent DNA probes are capable of distinguishing variations of a single base in a stretch of target DNA. These probes use a novel programmable mechanism in which each single nucleotide polymorphism generates two thermodynamically destabilizing mismatch bubbles rather than the single mismatch formed during typical hybridization-based assays. Up to a 12,000-fold excess of a target that contains a single nucleotide polymorphism is required to generate the same fluorescence as one equivalent of the intended target, and detection works reliably over a wide range of conditions. Using these probes we detected point mutations in a 198 base-pair subsequence of the Escherichia coli rpoB gene. That our probes are constructed from multiple oligonucleotides circumvents synthesis limitations and enables long continuous DNA sequences to be probed.

  6. Conditionally fluorescent molecular probes for detecting single base changes in double-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Zhang, David Yu; Seelig, Georg

    2013-09-01

    Small variations in nucleic acid sequences can have far-reaching phenotypic consequences. Reliably distinguishing closely related sequences is therefore important for research and clinical applications. Here, we demonstrate that conditionally fluorescent DNA probes are capable of distinguishing variations of a single base in a stretch of target DNA. These probes use a novel programmable mechanism in which each single nucleotide polymorphism generates two thermodynamically destabilizing mismatch bubbles rather than the single mismatch formed during typical hybridization-based assays. Up to a 12,000-fold excess of a target that contains a single nucleotide polymorphism is required to generate the same fluorescence as one equivalent of the intended target, and detection works reliably over a wide range of conditions. Using these probes we detected point mutations in a 198 base-pair subsequence of the Escherichia coli rpoB gene. That our probes are constructed from multiple oligonucleotides circumvents synthesis limitations and enables long continuous DNA sequences to be probed.

  7. Carbon dots based FRET for the detection of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kudr, Jiri; Richtera, Lukas; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Hynek, David; Heger, Zbynek; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-02-09

    Here, we aimed our attention at the synthesis of carbon dots (C-dots) with the ability to interact with DNA to suggest an approach for the detection of DNA damage. Primarily, C-dots modified with amine moieties were synthesized using the one-step microwave pyrolysis of citric acid in the presence of diethylenetriamine. The C-dots showed strong photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 4%. In addition, the C-dots (2.8±0.8nm) possessed a good colloidal stability and exhibited a positive surface charge (ζ=36mV) at a neutral pH. An interaction study of the C-dots and the DNA fragment of λ bacteriophage was performed, and the DNA binding resulted in changes to the photoluminescent and absorption properties of the C-dots. A binding of the C-dots to DNA was also observed as a change to DNA electrophoretic mobility and a decreased ability to intercalate ethidium bromide (EtBr). Moreover, the Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the C-dots and EtBr was studied, in which the C-dots serve as an excitation energy donor and the EtBr serves as an acceptor. When DNA was damaged using ultraviolet (UV) radiation (λ=254nm) and hydroxyl radicals, the intensity of the emitted photoluminescence at 612nm significantly decreased. The concept was proved on analysis of the genomic DNA from PC-3 cells and DNA isolated from melanoma tissues.

  8. Extended weak bonding interactions in DNA: pi-stacking (base-base), base-backbone, and backbone-backbone interactions.

    PubMed

    Matta, Chérif F; Castillo, Norberto; Boyd, Russell J

    2006-01-12

    We report on several weak interactions in nucleic acids, which, collectively, can make a nonnegligible contribution to the structure and stability of these molecules. Fragments of DNA were obtained from previously determined accurate experimental geometries and their electron density distributions calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The electron densities were analyzed topologically according to the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). A web of closed-shell bonding interactions is shown to connect neighboring base pairs in base-pair duplexes and in dinuleotide steps. This bonding underlies the well-known pi-stacking interaction between adjacent nucleic acid bases and is characterized topologically for the first time. Two less widely appreciated modes of weak closed-shell interactions in nucleic acids are also described: (i) interactions between atoms in the bases and atoms belonging to the backbone (base-backbone) and (ii) interactions among atoms within the backbone itself (backbone-backbone). These interactions include hydrogen bonding, dihydrogen bonding, hydrogen-hydrogen bonding, and several other weak closed-shell X-Y interactions (X, Y = O, N, C). While each individual interaction is very weak and typically accompanied by perhaps 0.5-3 kcal/mol, the sum total of these interactions is postulated to play a role in stabilizing the structure of nucleic acids. The Watson-and-Crick hydrogen bonding is also characterized in detail at the experimental geometries as a prelude to the discussion of the modes of interactions listed in the title.

  9. Label-free detection of DNA single-base mismatches using a simple reflectance-based optical technique.

    PubMed

    Nava, G; Ceccarello, E; Giavazzi, F; Salina, M; Damin, F; Chiari, M; Buscaglia, M; Bellini, T; Zanchetta, G

    2016-05-21

    Rapid and quantitative detection of the binding of nucleic acids to surface-immobilized probes remains a challenge in many biomedical applications. We investigated the hybridization of a set of fully complementary and defected 12-base long DNA oligomers by using the Reflective Phantom Interface (RPI), a recently developed multiplexed label-free detection technique. Based on the simple measurement of reflected light intensity, this technology enables to quantify the hybridization directly as it occurs on the surface with a sensitivity of 10 pg mm(-2). We found a strong effect of single-base mismatches and of their location on hybridization kinetics and equilibrium binding. In line with previous studies, we found that DNA-DNA binding is weaker on a surface than in the bulk. Our data indicate that this effect is a consequence of weak nonspecific binding of the probes to the surface.

  10. DNA methyltransferase detection based on digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine DNA with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Wang, Dandan; Zhou, Yunlei; Wang, Haiyan; Yin, Huanshun; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-06-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) has received a large amount of attention due to its catalyzation of DNA methylation in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, which has a close relationship to cancer and bacterial diseases. Herein, a novel electrochemical strategy based on Dpn I digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine (polyA) DNA with a gold nanoparticles functioned glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs/GCE), is developed for the simple and efficient detection of DNA MTase and inhibitor screening. Only one methylene blue (MB)-labeled DNA hairpin probe and two enzymes are involved in this designed method. In the presence of Dam MTase, the hairpin probe can be methylated and then cleaved by the restriction endonuclease. Thus, a MB-labeled polyA signal-stranded DNA product is introduced to the surface of AuNPs/GCE through the effect between polyA and AuNPs, resulting in an obvious electrochemical signal. On the contrary, in the absence of Dam MTase, the DNA probe cannot be cleaved and a relatively small electrochemical response can be observed. As a result, the as-proposed biosensor offered an efficient way for Dam MTase activity monitoring with a low detection of 0.27 U/mL, a wide linear range and good stability. Additionally, this assay holds great potential for further application in real biological matrices and inhibitors screening, which is expected to be useful in disease diagnosis and drug discovery.

  11. A CLIQUE algorithm using DNA computing techniques based on closed-circle DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Xiyu

    2011-07-01

    DNA computing has been applied in broad fields such as graph theory, finite state problems, and combinatorial problem. DNA computing approaches are more suitable used to solve many combinatorial problems because of the vast parallelism and high-density storage. The CLIQUE algorithm is one of the gird-based clustering techniques for spatial data. It is the combinatorial problem of the density cells. Therefore we utilize DNA computing using the closed-circle DNA sequences to execute the CLIQUE algorithm for the two-dimensional data. In our study, the process of clustering becomes a parallel bio-chemical reaction and the DNA sequences representing the marked cells can be combined to form a closed-circle DNA sequences. This strategy is a new application of DNA computing. Although the strategy is only for the two-dimensional data, it provides a new idea to consider the grids to be vertexes in a graph and transform the search problem into a combinatorial problem.

  12. Mammalian cell DNA damage and repair kinetics of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Yukako; Pals, Justin; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2009-11-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the second most common class of chlorinated water disinfection by-products (DBPs). The single cell gel electrophoresis genotoxicity assay using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was modified to include liquid holding recovery time to measure genomic DNA damage and repair kinetics of three monoHAAs: chloroacetic acid (CAA), bromoacetic acid (BAA), and iodoacetic acid (IAA). The rank order of genotoxic potency was IAA > BAA > CAA from previous research. The concentration of each HAA was chosen to generate approximately the same level of genotoxic damage. No cytotoxicity was expressed during the 24 h liquid holding period. Nuclei from CHO cells treated with BAA showed the lowest rate of DNA repair (t(50) = 296 min) compared to that of CAA or IAA (t(50) = 134 and 84 min, respectively). The different rates of genomic repair expressed by IAA or CAA versus BAA suggest that different distributions of DNA lesions are induced. The use of DNA repair coupled with genomic technologies may lead to the understanding of the biological and genetic mechanisms involved in toxic responses induced by DBPs.

  13. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  14. Design and synthesis of N-benzoyl amino acid derivatives as DNA methylation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garella, Davide; Atlante, Sandra; Borretto, Emily; Cocco, Mattia; Giorgis, Marta; Costale, Annalisa; Stevanato, Livio; Miglio, Gianluca; Cencioni, Chiara; Fernández-de Gortari, Eli; Medina-Franco, José L; Spallotta, Francesco; Gaetano, Carlo; Bertinaria, Massimo

    2016-11-01

    The inhibition of human DNA Methyl Transferases (DNMT) is a novel promising approach to address the epigenetic dysregulation of gene expression in different diseases. Inspired by the validated virtual screening hit NSC137546, a series of N-benzoyl amino acid analogues was synthesized and obtained compounds were assessed for their ability to inhibit DNMT-dependent DNA methylation in vitro. The biological screening allowed the definition of a set of preliminary structure-activity relationships and the identification of compounds promising for further development. Among the synthesized compounds, L-glutamic acid derivatives 22, 23, and 24 showed the highest ability to prevent DNA methylation in a total cell lysate. Compound 22 inhibited DNMT1 and DNMT3A activity in a concentration-dependent manner in the micromolar range. In addition, compound 22 proved to be stable in human serum and it was thus selected as a starting point for further biological studies.

  15. Charge Transport across DNA-Based Three-Way Junctions.

    PubMed

    Young, Ryan M; Singh, Arunoday P N; Thazhathveetil, Arun K; Cho, Vincent Y; Zhang, Yuqi; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Beratan, David N; Ratner, Mark A; Schatz, George C; Berlin, Yuri A; Lewis, Frederick D; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2015-04-22

    DNA-based molecular electronics will require charges to be transported from one site within a 2D or 3D architecture to another. While this has been shown previously in linear, π-stacked DNA sequences, the dynamics and efficiency of charge transport across DNA three-way junction (3WJ) have yet to be determined. Here, we present an investigation of hole transport and trapping across a DNA-based three-way junction systems by a combination of femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Hole transport across the junction is proposed to be gated by conformational fluctuations in the ground state which bring the transiently populated hole carrier nucleobases into better aligned geometries on the nanosecond time scale, thus modulating the π-π electronic coupling along the base pair sequence.

  16. Programmable molecular recognition based on the geometry of DNA nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sungwook; Rothemund, Paul W. K.

    2011-08-01

    From ligand-receptor binding to DNA hybridization, molecular recognition plays a central role in biology. Over the past several decades, chemists have successfully reproduced the exquisite specificity of biomolecular interactions. However, engineering multiple specific interactions in synthetic systems remains difficult. DNA retains its position as the best medium with which to create orthogonal, isoenergetic interactions, based on the complementarity of Watson-Crick binding. Here we show that DNA can be used to create diverse bonds using an entirely different principle: the geometric arrangement of blunt-end stacking interactions. We show that both binary codes and shape complementarity can serve as a basis for such stacking bonds, and explore their specificity, thermodynamics and binding rules. Orthogonal stacking bonds were used to connect five distinct DNA origami. This work, which demonstrates how a single attractive interaction can be developed to create diverse bonds, may guide strategies for molecular recognition in systems beyond DNA nanostructures.

  17. Stability and proton transfer in DNA base pairs of AMD473-DNA adduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmah, Pubalee; Deka, Ramesh C.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the energetics of four different adducts of cisplatin analogue cis-[PtCl 2(NH 3)(2-picoline)] (AMD473) with a duplex DNA using DFT/ONIOM methods to probe their stabilities. Further, we study the possibilities of proton transfer between DNA base pairs of the most stable drug-DNA adduct. The adduct b(2-picoline trans to 3'-G and 2-methyl group directs to the DNA major groove) is found to be the most stable configuration among all the possible adducts. From the proton transfer analysis we found that the single proton transfer between N1 position of guanine (G) and N3 position of cytosine (C) of each GC pair gives a structure energetically as stable as the original one.

  18. Cooperativity-based modeling of heterotypic DNA nanostructure assembly.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Anastasia; Hozeh, Avital; Girshevitz, Olga; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2015-07-27

    DNA origami is a robust method for the fabrication of nanoscale 2D and 3D objects with complex features and geometries. The process of DNA origami folding has been recently studied, however quantitative understanding of it is still elusive. Here, we describe a systematic quantification of the assembly process of DNA nanostructures, focusing on the heterotypic DNA junction-in which arms are unequal-as their basic building block. Using bulk fluorescence studies we tracked this process and identified multiple levels of cooperativity from the arms in a single junction to neighboring junctions in a large DNA origami object, demonstrating that cooperativity is a central underlying mechanism in the process of DNA nanostructure assembly. We show that the assembly of junctions in which the arms are consecutively ordered is more efficient than junctions with randomly-ordered components, with the latter showing assembly through several alternative trajectories as a potential mechanism explaining the lower efficiency. This highlights consecutiveness as a new design consideration that could be implemented in DNA nanotechnology CAD tools to produce more efficient and high-yield designs. Altogether, our experimental findings allowed us to devise a quantitative, cooperativity-based heuristic model for the assembly of DNA nanostructures, which is highly consistent with experimental observations.

  19. Cooperativity-based modeling of heterotypic DNA nanostructure assembly

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Anastasia; Hozeh, Avital; Girshevitz, Olga; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami is a robust method for the fabrication of nanoscale 2D and 3D objects with complex features and geometries. The process of DNA origami folding has been recently studied, however quantitative understanding of it is still elusive. Here, we describe a systematic quantification of the assembly process of DNA nanostructures, focusing on the heterotypic DNA junction—in which arms are unequal—as their basic building block. Using bulk fluorescence studies we tracked this process and identified multiple levels of cooperativity from the arms in a single junction to neighboring junctions in a large DNA origami object, demonstrating that cooperativity is a central underlying mechanism in the process of DNA nanostructure assembly. We show that the assembly of junctions in which the arms are consecutively ordered is more efficient than junctions with randomly-ordered components, with the latter showing assembly through several alternative trajectories as a potential mechanism explaining the lower efficiency. This highlights consecutiveness as a new design consideration that could be implemented in DNA nanotechnology CAD tools to produce more efficient and high-yield designs. Altogether, our experimental findings allowed us to devise a quantitative, cooperativity-based heuristic model for the assembly of DNA nanostructures, which is highly consistent with experimental observations. PMID:26071955

  20. DNA Enzyme-Decorated DNA Nanoladders as Enhancer for Peptide Cleavage-Based Electrochemical Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kou, Bei-Bei; Zhang, Li; Xie, Hua; Wang, Ding; Yuan, Ya-Li; Chai, Ya-Qin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-09-07

    Herein, we developed a label-free electrochemical biosensor for sensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) based on DNA enzyme-decorated DNA nanoladders as enhancer. A peptide and single-stranded DNA S1-modified platinum nanoparticles (P1-PtNPs-S1), which served as recognition nanoprobes, were first immobilized on electrode. When target MMP-7 specifically recognized and cleaved the peptide, the PtNPs-S1 bioconjugates were successfully released from electrode. The remaining S1 on electrode then hybridized with ssDNA1 (I1) and ssDNA2 (I2), which could synchronously trigger two hybridization chain reactions (HCRs), resulting in the in situ formation of DNA nanoladders. The desired DNA nanoladders not only were employed as ideal nanocarriers for enzyme loading, but also maintained its catalytic activity. With the help of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), manganese porphyrin (MnPP) with peroxidase-like activity accelerated the 4-chloro-1-naphthol (4-CN) oxidation with generation of insoluble precipitation on electrode, causing a very low differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) signal for quantitative determination of MMP-7. Under optimal conditions, the developed biosensor exhibited a wide linear ranging from 0.2 pg/mL to 20 ng/mL, and the detection limit was 0.05 pg/mL. This work successfully realized the combination of DNA signal amplification technique with artificial mimetic enzyme-catalyzed precipitation reaction in peptide cleavage-based protein detection, offering a promising avenue for the detection of other proteases.

  1. Calcium-activated gene transfection from DNA/poly(amic acid-co-imide) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Szu-Yuan; Chang, Li-Ting; Peng, Sydeny; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized a water-soluble poly(amic acid-co-imide) (PA-I) from ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) and 2,2′-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine) that possesses comparable transfection efficiency to that of polyethylenimine (PEI), when prepared in combination with divalent calcium cations. The polycondensation of monomers afforded poly(amic acid) (PA) precursors, and subsequent thermal imidization resulted in the formation of PA-I. At a polymer/DNA ratio (indicated by the molar ratio of nitrogen in the polymer to phosphate in DNA) of 40, complete retardation of the DNA band was observed by gel electrophoresis, indicating the strong association of DNA with PA-I. A zeta potential of −22 mV was recorded for the PA-I polymer solution, and no apparent cytotoxicity was observed at concentrations up to 500 μg·mL−1. In the presence of divalent Ca2+, the transfection efficiency of PA-I was higher than that of PA, due to the formation of a copolymer/Ca2+/DNA polyplex and the reduction in negative charge due to thermal cyclization. Interestingly, a synergistic effect of Ca2+ and the synthesized copolymer on DNA transfection was observed. The use of Ca2+ or copolymer alone resulted in unsatisfactory delivery, whereas the formation of three-component polyplexes synergistically increased DNA transfection. Our findings demonstrated that a PA-I/Ca2+/DNA polyplex could serve as a promising candidate for gene delivery. PMID:25767385

  2. Sequence-specific nucleic acid mobility using a reversible block copolymer gel matrix and DNA amphiphiles (lipid-DNA) in capillary and microfluidic electrophoretic separations.

    PubMed

    Wagler, Patrick; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S; Tangen, Uwe; de Vries, Jan Willem; Prusty, Deepak; Kwak, Minseok; Herrmann, Andreas; McCaskill, John S

    2015-10-01

    Reversible noncovalent but sequence-dependent attachment of DNA to gels is shown to allow programmable mobility processing of DNA populations. The covalent attachment of DNA oligomers to polyacrylamide gels using acrydite-modified oligonucleotides has enabled sequence-specific mobility assays for DNA in gel electrophoresis: sequences binding to the immobilized DNA are delayed in their migration. Such a system has been used for example to construct complex DNA filters facilitating DNA computations. However, these gels are formed irreversibly and the choice of immobilized sequences is made once off during fabrication. In this work, we demonstrate the reversible self-assembly of gels combined with amphiphilic DNA molecules, which exhibit hydrophobic hydrocarbon chains attached to the nucleobase. This amphiphilic DNA, which we term lipid-DNA, is synthesized in advance and is blended into a block copolymer gel to induce sequence-dependent DNA retention during electrophoresis. Furthermore, we demonstrate and characterize the programmable mobility shift of matching DNA in such reversible gels both in thin films and microchannels using microelectrode arrays. Such sequence selective separation may be employed to select nucleic acid sequences of similar length from a mixture via local electronics, a basic functionality that can be employed in novel electronic chemical cell designs and other DNA information-processing systems.

  3. Additional base-pair formation in DNA duplexes by a double-headed nucleotide.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Charlotte S; Witzke, Sarah; Kumar, Pawan; Negi, Kushuma; Sharma, Pawan K; Petersen, Michael; Nielsen, Poul

    2012-06-11

    We have designed and synthesised a double-headed nucleotide that presents two nucleobases in the interior of a dsDNA duplex. This nucleotide recognises and forms Watson-Crick base pairs with two complementary adenosines in a Watson-Crick framework. Furthermore, with judicious positioning in complementary strands, the nucleotide recognises itself through the formation of a T:T base pair. Thus, two novel nucleic acid motifs can be defined by using our double-headed nucleotide. Both motifs were characterised by UV melting experiments, CD and NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Both motifs leave the thermostability of the native dsDNA duplex largely unaltered. Molecular dynamics calculations showed that the double-headed nucleotides are accommodated in the dsDNA by entirely local perturbations and that the modified duplexes retain an overall B-type geometry with the dsDNA unwound by around 25 or 60°, respectively, in each of the modified motifs. Both motifs can be accommodated twice in a dsDNA duplex without incurring any loss of stability and extrapolating from this observation and the results of modelling, it is conceivable that both can be multiplied several times within a dsDNA duplex. These new motifs extend the DNA recognition repertoire and may form the basis for a complete series of double-headed nucleotides based on all 16 base combinations of the four natural nucleobases. In addition, both motifs can be used in the design of nanoscale DNA structures in which a specific duplex twist is required.

  4. Responsive DNA-based hydrogels and their applications

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiangling; Zhou, Cuisong; Wu, Cuichen; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    The term hydrogel describes a type of soft and wet material formed by crosslinked hydrophilic polymers. The distinct feature of hydrogels is their ability to absorb a large amount of water and swell. The properties of a hydrogel are usually determined by the type of polymer and crosslinker, the degree of crosslinking, and the water content. However, a group of hydrogels, called “smart hydrogels”, changes properties in response to environmental changes or external stimuli. Recently, DNA or DNA-inspired responsive hydrogels have attracted considerable attention in construction of smart hydrogels because of the intrinsic advantages of DNA. As a biological polymer, DNA is hydrophilic, biocompatible, and highly programmable by Watson-Crick base pairing. DNA can form a hydrogel by itself under certain conditions, and it can also be incorporated into synthetic polymers to form DNA-hybrid hydrogels. Functional DNAs, such as aptamers and DNAzymes, provide additional molecular recognition capabilities and versatility. In this review, we discuss DNA-based hydrogels in terms of their stimulus response, as well as their applications. PMID:23857726

  5. DNA Fragments Assembly Based on Nicking Enzyme System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Yan; Shi, Zhen-Yu; Guo, Ying-Ying; Chen, Jin-Chun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    A couple of DNA ligation-independent cloning (LIC) methods have been reported to meet various requirements in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. The principle of LIC is the assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by single-stranded (ss) DNA overlaps annealing. Here we present a method to generate single-stranded DNA overlaps based on Nicking Endonucleases (NEases) for LIC, the method was termed NE-LIC. Factors related to cloning efficiency were optimized in this study. This NE-LIC allows generating 3′-end or 5′-end ss DNA overlaps of various lengths for fragments assembly. We demonstrated that the 10 bp/15 bp overlaps had the highest DNA fragments assembling efficiency, while 5 bp/10 bp overlaps showed the highest efficiency when T4 DNA ligase was added. Its advantage over Sequence and Ligation Independent Cloning (SLIC) and Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER) was obvious. The mechanism can be applied to many other LIC strategies. Finally, the NEases based LIC (NE-LIC) was successfully applied to assemble a pathway of six gene fragments responsible for synthesizing microbial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB). PMID:23483947

  6. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the thioesterase domain of the rat fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed

    Naggert, J; Witkowski, A; Mikkelsen, J; Smith, S

    1988-01-25

    A cloned cDNA containing the entire coding sequence for the long-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolase (thioesterase I) component as well as the 3'-noncoding region of the fatty acid synthetase has been isolated using an expression vector and domain-specific antibodies. The coding region was assigned to the thioesterase I domain by identification of sequences coding for characterized peptide fragments, amino-terminal analysis of the isolated thioesterase I domain and the presence of the serine esterase active-site sequence motif. The thioesterase I domain is 306 amino acids long with a calculated molecular mass of 33,476 daltons; its DNA is flanked at the 5'-end by a region coding for the acyl carrier protein domain and at the 3'-end by a 1,537-base pairs-long noncoding sequence with a poly(A) tail. The thioesterase I domain exhibits a low, albeit discernible, homology with the discrete medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolases (thioesterase II) from rat mammary gland and duck uropygial gland, suggesting a distant but common evolutionary ancestry for these proteins.

  7. A Novel Image Encryption Algorithm Based on DNA Subsequence Operation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Xue, Xianglian; Wei, Xiaopeng

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel image encryption algorithm based on DNA subsequence operation. Different from the traditional DNA encryption methods, our algorithm does not use complex biological operation but just uses the idea of DNA subsequence operations (such as elongation operation, truncation operation, deletion operation, etc.) combining with the logistic chaotic map to scramble the location and the value of pixel points from the image. The experimental results and security analysis show that the proposed algorithm is easy to be implemented, can get good encryption effect, has a wide secret key's space, strong sensitivity to secret key, and has the abilities of resisting exhaustive attack and statistic attack. PMID:23093912

  8. An Optimal Seed Based Compression Algorithm for DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Gopakumar; Karunakaran, Muralikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a seed based lossless compression algorithm to compress a DNA sequence which uses a substitution method that is similar to the LempelZiv compression scheme. The proposed method exploits the repetition structures that are inherent in DNA sequences by creating an offline dictionary which contains all such repeats along with the details of mismatches. By ensuring that only promising mismatches are allowed, the method achieves a compression ratio that is at par or better than the existing lossless DNA sequence compression algorithms. PMID:27555868

  9. Reaction mechanisms of riboflavin triplet state with nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weizhen; Lu, Changyuan; Du, Fuqiang; Shao, Zhiyong; Han, Zhenhui; Tu, Tiecheng; Yao, Side; Lin, Nianyun

    2006-04-01

    ESR and laser flash photolysis studies have determined a reasonable order of reactivity of nucleotides with triplet riboflavin (3Rb*) for the first time. ESR detection of triplet state reactivity of Rb with nucleoside, polynucleotide and DNA has been obtained simultaneously. In addition, ESR spin elimination measurement of the reactivity of 3Rb* with nucleotides in good accord with laser flash photolysis determination of the corresponding rate constants offers a simple and reliable method to detect the reactivities of nucleic acids and its components with photoexcited flavins. Kinetic, ESR and thermodynamic studies have demonstrated that Rb should be a strong endogenous photosensitizer capable of oxidizing all nucleic acid bases, and preferentially two purine nucleotides with high rate constants.

  10. A Rewritable, Random-Access DNA-Based Storage System.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, S M Hossein Tabatabaei; Yuan, Yongbo; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Huimin; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2015-09-18

    We describe the first DNA-based storage architecture that enables random access to data blocks and rewriting of information stored at arbitrary locations within the blocks. The newly developed architecture overcomes drawbacks of existing read-only methods that require decoding the whole file in order to read one data fragment. Our system is based on new constrained coding techniques and accompanying DNA editing methods that ensure data reliability, specificity and sensitivity of access, and at the same time provide exceptionally high data storage capacity. As a proof of concept, we encoded parts of the Wikipedia pages of six universities in the USA, and selected and edited parts of the text written in DNA corresponding to three of these schools. The results suggest that DNA is a versatile media suitable for both ultrahigh density archival and rewritable storage applications.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Perylenediimide DNA Base Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Markegard, Cade B; Mazaheripour, Amir; Jocson, Jonah-Micah; Burke, Anthony M; Dickson, Mary N; Gorodetsky, Alon A; Nguyen, Hung D

    2015-09-03

    Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimides (PTCDIs) are a well-known class of organic materials. Recently, these molecules have been incorporated within DNA as base surrogates, finding ready applications as probes of DNA structure and function. However, the assembly dynamics and kinetics of PTCDI DNA base surrogates have received little attention to date. Herein, we employ constant temperature molecular dynamics simulations to gain an improved understanding of the assembly of PTCDI dimers and trimers. We also use replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the energetic landscape dictating the formation of stacked PTCDI structures. Our studies provide insight into the equilibrium configurations of multimeric PTCDIs and hold implications for the construction of DNA-inspired systems from perylene-derived organic semiconductor building blocks.

  12. A novel chaos-based image encryption algorithm using DNA sequence operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiuli; Chen, Yiran; Broyde, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    An image encryption algorithm based on chaotic system and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence operations is proposed in this paper. First, the plain image is encoded into a DNA matrix, and then a new wave-based permutation scheme is performed on it. The chaotic sequences produced by 2D Logistic chaotic map are employed for row circular permutation (RCP) and column circular permutation (CCP). Initial values and parameters of the chaotic system are calculated by the SHA 256 hash of the plain image and the given values. Then, a row-by-row image diffusion method at DNA level is applied. A key matrix generated from the chaotic map is used to fuse the confused DNA matrix; also the initial values and system parameters of the chaotic system are renewed by the hamming distance of the plain image. Finally, after decoding the diffused DNA matrix, we obtain the cipher image. The DNA encoding/decoding rules of the plain image and the key matrix are determined by the plain image. Experimental results and security analyses both confirm that the proposed algorithm has not only an excellent encryption result but also resists various typical attacks.

  13. Construction of a fuzzy and Boolean logic gates based on DNA.

    PubMed

    Zadegan, Reza M; Jepsen, Mette D E; Hildebrandt, Lasse L; Birkedal, Victoria; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-04-17

    Logic gates are devices that can perform logical operations by transforming a set of inputs into a predictable single detectable output. The hybridization properties, structure, and function of nucleic acids can be used to make DNA-based logic gates. These devices are important modules in molecular computing and biosensing. The ideal logic gate system should provide a wide selection of logical operations, and be integrable in multiple copies into more complex structures. Here we show the successful construction of a small DNA-based logic gate complex that produces fluorescent outputs corresponding to the operation of the six Boolean logic gates AND, NAND, OR, NOR, XOR, and XNOR. The logic gate complex is shown to work also when implemented in a three-dimensional DNA origami box structure, where it controlled the position of the lid in a closed or open position. Implementation of multiple microRNA sensitive DNA locks on one DNA origami box structure enabled fuzzy logical operation that allows biosensing of complex molecular signals. Integrating logic gates with DNA origami systems opens a vast avenue to applications in the fields of nanomedicine for diagnostics and therapeutics.

  14. Heterogeneous base distribution in mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, P; Holtrop, M; Kroon, A

    1977-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa has a heterogeneous intramolecular base distribution. A contiguous piece, representing at least 30% of the total genome, has a G+C content that is 6% lower than the overall G+C content of the DNA. The genes for both ribosomal RNAs are contained in the remaining, relatively G+C rich, part of the genome. PMID:141040

  15. Sensitive determination of DNA based on the interaction between prulifloxacin-terbium(III) complex and DNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting; Fang, Biyun; Chang, Lin; Liu, Min; Chen, Fang

    2013-01-01

    A simple spectrofluorimetric method is described for the determination of DNA, based on its enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of prulifloxacin (PUFX)-Tb(3+). The luminescence intensity of the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex increased up to 10-fold after adding DNA. The excitation and emission wavelengths were 345 and 545 nm, respectively. Under optimum conditions, variations in the fluorescence intensity showed a good linear relationship with the concentration of hsDNA in the range of 3.0 × 10(-9) to 1.0 × 10(-6) g/mL, with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.997, and the detection limit was 2.1 × 10(-9) g/mL. The method was successfully applied to the determination of DNA in synthetic samples, and recoveries were in the range 97.3-102.0%. The mechanism of fluorescence enhancement of the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex by DNA is also discussed. The mechanism may involve formation of a ternary complex mainly by intercalation binding together with weak electrostatic interaction, which will increase the energy transition from ligand to Tb(3+), increasing the rigidity of the complex, and decreasing the radiationless energy loss through O-H vibration of the H2O molecule in the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex. Compared with the previous DNA probes, the proposed method is not only more robust and friendly to the environment, but also of relatively higher sensitivity.

  16. Human AP Endonuclease I Stimulates Multiple-Turnover Base Excision by Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase†

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Michael R.; O’Brien, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) locates and excises a wide variety of damaged purine bases from DNA, including hypoxanthine that is formed by the oxidative deamination of adenine. We used steady state, pre-steady state, and single-turnover kinetic assays to show that the multiple-turnover excision of hypoxanthine in vitro is limited by release of the abasic DNA product. This suggests the possibility that the product release step is regulated in vivo by interactions with other base excision repair (BER) proteins. Such coordination of BER activities would protect the abasic DNA repair intermediate and ensure its correct processing. AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is the predominant enzyme for processing abasic DNA sites in human cells. Therefore, we have investigated the functional effects of added APE1 on the base excision activity of AAG. We find that APE1 stimulates the multiple-turnover excision of hypoxanthine by AAG, but has no effect on single-turnover excision. Since the amino terminus of AAG has been implicated in other protein-protein interactions we also characterize the deletion mutant lacking the first 79 amino acids. We find that APE1 fully stimulates the multiple-turnover glycosylase activity of this mutant, demonstrating that the amino terminus of AAG is not strictly required for this functional interaction. These results are consistent with a model whereby APE1 displaces AAG from the abasic site, thereby coordinating the first two steps of the base excision repair pathway. PMID:19449863

  17. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by acetylsalicylic acid in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; García-Medina, Sandra; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely

    2014-08-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory widely used due to its low cost and high effectiveness. This compound has been found in water bodies worldwide and is toxic to aquatic organisms; nevertheless its capacity to induce oxidative stress in bioindicators like Daphnia magna remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate toxicity in D. magna induced by acetylsalicylic acid in water, using oxidative stress and DNA damage biomarkers. An acute toxicity test was conducted in order to determine the median lethal concentration (48-h LC50) and the concentrations to be used in the subsequent subacute toxicity test in which the following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation, oxidized protein content, activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and level of DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation level and oxidized protein content were significantly increased (p<0.05), and antioxidant enzymes significantly altered with respect to controls; while the DNA damage were significantly increased (p<0.05) too. In conclusion, acetylsalicylic acid induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in D. magna.

  18. Selection and characterization of single stranded DNA aptamers for the hormone abscisic Acid.

    PubMed

    Grozio, Alessia; Gonzalez, Victor M; Millo, Enrico; Sturla, Laura; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Bagnasco, Luca; Guida, Lucrezia; D'Arrigo, Cristina; De Flora, Antonio; Salis, Annalisa; Martin, Elena M; Bellotti, Marta; Zocchi, Elena

    2013-10-01

    The hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a small molecule involved in pivotal physiological functions in higher plants. Recently, ABA has been also identified as an endogenous hormone in mammals, regulating different cell functions including inflammatory processes, stem cell expansion, insulin release, and glucose uptake. Aptamers are short, single-stranded (ss) oligonucleotidesable to recognize target molecules with high affinity. The small size of the ABA molecule represented a challenge for aptamer development and the aim of this study was to develop specific anti-ABA DNA aptamers. Biotinylated abscisic acid (bio-ABA) was immobilized on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. DNA aptamers against bio-ABA were selected with 7 iterative rounds of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment method (SELEX), each round comprising incubation of the ABA-binding beads with the ssDNA sequences, DNA elution, electrophoresis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The binding affinity of several clones was determined using bio-ABA immobilized on streptavidin-coated plates. Aptamer 2 and aptamer 9 showed the highest binding affinity, with dissociation constants values of 0.98 ± 0.14 μM and 0.80 ± 0.07 μM, respectively. Aptamers 2 and 9 were also able to bind free, unmodified ABA and to discriminate between different ABA enantiomers and isomers. Our findings indicate that ssDNA aptamers can selectively bind ABA and could be used for the development of ABA quantitation assays.

  19. Development of DNA-based Identification methods to track the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ability to track the identity and abundance of larval fish, which are ubiquitous during spawning season, may lead to a greater understanding of fish species distributions in Great Lakes nearshore areas including early-detection of invasive fish species before they become established. However, larval fish are notoriously hard to identify using traditional morphological techniques. While DNA-based identification methods could increase the ability of aquatic resource managers to determine larval fish composition, use of these methods in aquatic surveys is still uncommon and presents many challenges. In response to this need, we have been working with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop field and laboratory methods to facilitate the identification of larval fish using DNA-meta-barcoding. In 2012, we initiated a pilot-project to develop a workflow for conducting DNA-based identification, and compared the species composition at sites within the St. Louis River Estuary of Lake Superior using traditional identification versus DNA meta-barcoding. In 2013, we extended this research to conduct DNA-identification of fish larvae collected from multiple nearshore areas of the Great Lakes by the USFWS. The species composition of larval fish generally mirrored that of fish species known from the same areas, but was influenced by the timing and intensity of sampling. Results indicate that DNA-based identification needs only very low levels of biomass to detect pre

  20. Challenges and progress in making DNA-based AIS early ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ability of DNA barcoding to find additional species in hard-to-sample locations or hard-to-identify samples is well established. Nevertheless, adoption of DNA barcoding into regular monitoring programs has been slow, in part due to issues of standardization and interpretation that need resolving. In this presentation, we describe our progress towards incorporating DNA-based identification into broad-spectrum aquatic invasive species early-detection monitoring in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Our work uses community biodiversity information as the basis for evaluating survey performance for various taxonomic groups. Issues we are tackling in bringing DNA-based data to bear on AIS monitoring design include: 1) Standardizing methodology and work flow from field collection and sample handling through bioinformatics post-processing; 2) Determining detection sensitivity and accounting for inter-species differences in DNA amplification and primer affinity; 3) Differentiating sequencing and barcoding errors from legitimate new finds when range and natural history information is limited; and 4) Accounting for the different nature of morphology- vs. DNA-based biodiversity information in subsequent analysis (e.g., via species accumulation curves, multi-metric indices). not applicable

  1. Measurement of oxidatively generated base damage in cellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2011-06-03

    This survey focuses on the critical evaluation of the main methods that are currently available for monitoring single and complex oxidatively generated damage to cellular DNA. Among chromatographic methods, HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and to a lesser extent HPLC-ECD which is restricted to a few electroactive nucleobases and nucleosides are appropriate for measuring the formation of single and clustered DNA lesions. Such methods that require optimized protocols for DNA extraction and digestion are sensitive enough for measuring base lesions formed under conditions of severe oxidative stress including exposure to ionizing radiation, UVA light and high intensity UVC laser pulses. In contrast application of GC-MS and HPLC-MS methods that are subject to major drawbacks have been shown to lead to overestimated values of DNA damage. Enzymatic methods that are based on the use of DNA repair glycosylases in order to convert oxidized bases into strand breaks are suitable, even if they are far less specific than HPLC methods, to deal with low levels of single modifications. Several other methods including immunoassays and (32)P-postlabeling methods that are still used suffer from drawbacks and therefore are not recommended. Another difficult topic is the measurement of oxidatively generated clustered DNA lesions that is currently achieved using enzymatic approaches and that would necessitate further investigations.

  2. Computational investigation of CNT-based DNA polymerase nanocircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry; Collins, Philip

    2015-03-01

    DNA polymerases are important enzymes that replicate DNA molecules with very low error rates - about one error in 105 bases. Recently, it was found that the replication process can be electrically monitored by attaching a Klenow fragment of polymerase I to the surface of a carbon nanotube and monitoring the current along the tube [1]. In this talk, we report results from computational studies on DNA polymerase nanocircuits. We have first performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) calculations to get snapshots of different enzymatic stages, particularly the open state (no DNA binding) and the closed state (DNA double helix binding). We then used density functional theory (DFT) and Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism to calculate transmission coefficients and currents for each enzymatic state. Our results show that the transmission spectrum and the currents change significantly when the enzyme moves from the open to the closed state. While the initial experiments did not show signal differences between dissimilar bases, the theoretical work in progress is investigating conditions where bases might have distinct signatures, which would allow for DNA sequencing.

  3. Novel molecular beacon DNA probes for protein-nucleic acid interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei J.; Perlette, John; Fang, Xiaohong; Kelley, Shannon; Tan, Weihong

    2000-03-01

    We report a novel approach to study protein-nucleic acid interactions by using molecular beacons (MBs). Molecular beacons are hairpin-shaped DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher, and can report the presence of target DNA/RNA sequences. MBs can also report the existence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) through non-sequence specific binding. The interaction between SSB and MB has resulted in significant fluorescence restoration of the MB. The fluorescence enhancement brought by SSB and by complementary DNA is very comparable. The molar ratio of the binding between SSB and the molecular beacon is 1:1 with a binding constant of 2 X 107 M-1. Using the MB-SSB binding, we are able to determine SSB at 2 X 10-10 M with a conventional spectrometer. We have also applied MB DNA probes for the analysis of an enzyme lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and for the investigation of its binding properties with ssDNA. The biding process between MB and different isoenzymes of LDH has been studied. We also show that there are significant differences in MB binding affinity to different proteins, which will enable selective binding studies of a variety of proteins. This new approach is potentially useful for protein-DNA/RNA interaction studies that require high sensitivity, speed and convenience. The results also open the possibility of using easily obtainable, custom designed, modified DNA molecules for studies of drug interactions and targeting. Our results demonstrate that MB can be effectively used for sensitive protein quantitation and for efficient protein-DNA interaction studies. MB has the signal transduction mechanism built within the molecule, and can thus be used for quick protein assay development and for real-time measurements.

  4. Interaction of silver ion with CG.C+ base triplets in DNA triplex.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Toshihiro; Ishii, Tatsuaki; Jyo, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    When designing ligands for specific sequences in DNA duplexes, triple helix formation is a useful recognition motif, because base triplet formation is based on the simple rule of complementary Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding, CG.C(+) and TA.T. However the triplexes containing CG.C(+) triplets form only in a weak acidic solution, because cytosines in third strand need to be protonated to satisfy its complementarity to CG base-pairs. A simple and easy method to stabilize the DNA triplex using Ag(+) was reported. A silver ion displaces the N3 proton of cytosine in Hoogsteen base-pairing to form a base triplet, CG.CAg(+). By the addition of an equimolar amount of Ag(+), the third strand 15 mer sequence containing five cytosines was stabilized by ca. 30 degrees C in melting temperature at pH 7. The triplex structure was stable even under weak basic conditions.

  5. Proton exchange in acid-base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    We extend previous work on nitric acid-ammonia and nitric acid-alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid-strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are <400 cm-1. This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm-1. Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  6. Thymine DNA Glycosylase Is Essential for Active DNA Demethylation by Linked Deamination-Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cortellino, Salvatore; Xu, Jinfei; Sannai, Mara; Moore, Robert; Caretti, Elena; Cigliano, Antonio; Le Coz, Madeleine; Devarajan, Karthik; Wessels, Andy; Soprano, Dianne; Abramowitz, Lara K.; Bartolomei, Marisa S.; Rambow, Florian; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Bruno, Tiziana; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Renner, Catherine; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Kobi, Dominique; Davidson, Irwin; Alberti, Christophe; Larue, Lionel; Bellacosa, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism for gene silencing. While methyltransferases mediate cytosine methylation, it is less clear how unmethylated regions in mammalian genomes are protected from de novo methylation and whether an active demethylating activity is involved. Here we show that either knockout or catalytic inactivation of the DNA repair enzyme Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) leads to embryonic lethality in mice. TDG is necessary for recruiting p300 to retinoic acid (RA)-regulated promoters, protection of CpG islands from hypermethylation, and active demethylation of tissue-specific, developmentally- and hormonally-regulated promoters and enhancers. TDG interacts with the deaminase AID and the damage-response protein GADD45a. These findings highlight a dual role for TDG in promoting proper epigenetic states during development and suggest a two-step mechanism for DNA demethylation in mammals, whereby 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine are first deaminated by AID to thymine and 5-hydroxymethyluracil, respectively, followed by TDG-mediated thymine and 5-hydroxymethyluracil excision repair. PMID:21722948

  7. Hybridoma anti-DNA autoantibodies from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus demonstrate similar nucleic acid binding characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rauch, J; Massicotte, H; Tannenbaum, H

    1985-01-01

    Hybridoma anti-DNA antibodies have been generated from the fusion of the GM 4672 lymphoblastoid line with peripheral blood lymphocytes from four normal subjects, nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A total of 441 hybridoma clones were obtained, of which 37 secreted anti-DNA autoantibodies. The nucleic acid binding characteristics of the anti-DNA antibodies produced by two hybridomas from normal subjects, nine hybridomas from RA patients, and 18 hybridomas from SLE patients are reported. The hybridoma anti-DNA antibodies from all three groups showed similar antigen-binding characteristics for denatured DNA (dDNA), native DNA (nDNA), poly(I), poly(dT), and cardiolipin, by both direct binding and competitive binding analyses. One difference noted between normal-derived anti-DNA antibodies and autoimmune-derived antibodies was the inability of the former to react with z-DNA. However, this requires further substantiation with larger numbers of normal-derived clones. The broad overlap of reactivity to nucleic acid antigens among individual anti-DNA autoantibodies found in two clinically different autoimmune diseases, namely RA and SLE, suggests that the pathogenicity of anti-DNA autoantibodies may bear no relationship to their nucleic acid antigen-binding characteristics.

  8. DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Matthew [Mill Valley, CA

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  9. Two-base DNA hairpin-loop structures in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Davison, A; Leach, D R

    1994-01-01

    In vitro studies have revealed that DNA hairpin-loops usually contain four unpaired bases. However, a small subset of sequences can form two-base loops. We have previously described an in vivo assay that is sensitive to tight loop formation and have set out to test whether DNA sequences known to form two-base loops in vitro also form tight loops in vivo. It is shown that the sequences 5'dCNNG and 5'dTNNA behave as predicted if they favour two-base loop formation in vivo, a result that is consistent with previously described in vitro studies. The ability of specific DNA sequences to form tight loops in vivo has implications for their potential to form transient structures involved in gene regulation, recombination and mutagenesis. PMID:7971265

  10. Acetylsalicylic acid, aging and coronary artery disease are associated with ABCA1 DNA methylation in men

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that DNA methylation contributes to coronary artery disease (CAD) risk variability. DNA hypermethylation at the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) gene, an important modulator of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and reverse cholesterol transport, has been previously associated with plasma lipid levels, aging and CAD, but the association with CAD has yet to be replicated. Results ABCA1 DNA methylation levels were measured in leucocytes of 88 men using bis-pyrosequencing. We first showed that DNA methylation at the ABCA1 gene promoter locus is associated with aging and CAD occurrence in men (P < 0.05). The latter association is stronger among older men with CAD (≥61 years old; n = 19), who showed at least 4.7% higher ABCA1 DNA methylation levels as compared to younger men with CAD (<61 years old; n = 19) or men without CAD (n = 50; P < 0.001). Higher ABCA1 DNA methylation levels in older men were also associated with higher total cholesterol (r = 0.34, P = 0.03), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.32, P = 0.04) and triglyceride levels (r = 0.26, P = 0.09). Furthermore, we showed that acetylsalicylic acid therapy is associated with 3.6% lower ABCA1 DNA methylation levels (P = 0.006), independent of aging and CAD status of patients. Conclusions This study provides new evidence that the ABCA1 epigenetic profile is associated with CAD and aging, and highlights that epigenetic modifications might be a significant molecular mechanism involved in the pathophysiological processes associated with CAD. Acetylsalicylic acid treatment for CAD prevention might involve epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:25093045

  11. Gold Nanowire Based Electrical DNA Detection Using Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present an electrical sensor that uses rolling circle amplification (RCA) of DNA to stretch across the gap between two electrodes, interact with metal nanoparticle seeds to generate an electrically conductive nanowire, and produce electrical signals upon detection of specific target DNA sequences. RCA is a highly specific molecular detection mechanism based on DNA probe circularization. With this technique, long single-stranded DNA with simple repetitive sequences are produced. Here we show that stretched RCA products can be metalized using silver or gold solutions to form metal wires. Upon metallization, the resistance drops from TΩ to kΩ for silver and to Ω for gold. Metallization is seeded by gold nanoparticles aligned along the single-stranded DNA product through hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides. We show that combining RCA with electrical DNA detection produces results in readout with very high signal-to-noise ratio, an essential feature for sensitive and specific detection assays. Finally, we demonstrate detection of 10 ng of Escherichia coli genomic DNA using the sensor concept. PMID:24433087

  12. Fluorescent properties of DNA base analogue tC upon incorporation into DNA — negligible influence of neighbouring bases on fluorescence quantum yield

    PubMed Central

    Sandin, Peter; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus; Lincoln, Per; Powers, Vicki E. C.; Brown, Tom; Albinsson, Bo

    2005-01-01

    The quantum yield of the fluorescent tricyclic cytosine analogue, 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenothiazine, tC, is high and virtually unaffected by incorporation into both single- and double-stranded DNA irrespective of neighbouring bases (0.17–0.24 and 0.16–0.21, respectively) and the corresponding fluorescence decay curves are all mono-exponential, properties that are unmatched by any base analogue so far. The fluorescence lifetimes increase when going from tC free in solution (3.2 ns) to single- and double-stranded DNA (on average 5.7 and 6.3 ns, respectively). The mono-exponential decays further support previous NMR results where it was found that tC has a well-defined position and geometry within the DNA helix. Furthermore, we find that the oxidation potential of tC is 0.4 V lower than for deoxyguanosine, the natural base with the lowest oxidation potential. This suggests that tC may be of interest in charge transfer studies in DNA as an electron hole acceptor. We also present a novel synthetic route to the phosphoramidite form of tC. The results presented here together with previous work show that tC is a very good C-analogue that induces minimal perturbation to the native structure of DNA. This makes tC unique as a fluorescent base analogue and is thus highly interesting in a range of applications for studying e.g. structure, dynamics and kinetics in nucleic acid systems. PMID:16147985

  13. Development of an electrochemical biosensor methods based on acrylic microsphere for the determination of Arowana DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Heng, Lee Yook; Futra, Dedi; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2015-09-01

    An electrochemical method of Arowana DNA determination based of N-acrylosuccinimide (NAS) modified acrylic microsphere was fabricated. Hydrophobic succinimide functional group containing poly(n-butylacrylate-N-acryloxysuccinimide) microspheres were synthesized with a simple one-step photopolymerization pocedure. Aminated DNA probe was covalently bonded to the succinimde functional group of the acrylic microspheres. The hybridization of the immobilized DNA probe with the complementary DNA was determined by the differential pulse voltametry using anthraquninone-2-sulfonic acid monohydrate sodium salt (AQMS) as the electroactive hybridization label. The influences of many factors such as duration of DNA probe immobilization and hybridization, operational temperature and non-complementary DNA on the biosensor performance were evaluated. Under optimized conditions, the DNA microbiosensor demonstrated a wide linear response range to target DNA is 1.0 × 10-16 and 1.0 × 10-8 M with a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 9.46 × 10-17 M (R2 = 0.99) were calculated. This biosensor had improved the overall analytical performance of the resultant DNA microbiosensor when compared with other reported DNA biosensors using other nano-materials for membranes and microspheres as DNA immobilization matrices.

  14. Jigsaw Cooperative Learning: Acid-Base Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Sesen, Burcin Acar

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on investigating the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning instruction on first-year undergraduates' understanding of acid-base theories. Undergraduates' opinions about jigsaw cooperative learning instruction were also investigated. The participants of this study were 38 first-year undergraduates in chemistry education…

  15. Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Megumi; Mah, Helen M.; Sgarbi, Paulo W. M.; Lall, Manjinder S.; Ly, Tai Wei; Browne, Lois M.

    2003-01-01

    Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 4.75 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher; Chime plug-in, version compatible with your OS and browser (available from MDL); and Flash player, version 5 or higher (available from Macromedia).

  16. Development of an efficient fungal DNA extraction method to be used in random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR analysis to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid mold producers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Mar; Casado, Eva M; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2008-12-01

    A variety of previously established mechanical and chemical treatments to achieve fungal cell lysis combined with a semiautomatic system operated by a vacuum pump were tested to obtain DNA extract to be directly used in randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid-producing and -nonproducing mold strains. A DNA extraction method that includes digestion with proteinase K and lyticase prior to using a mortar and pestle grinding and a semiautomatic vacuum system yielded DNA of high quality in all the fungal strains and species tested, at concentrations ranging from 17 to 89 ng/microl in 150 microl of the final DNA extract. Two microliters of DNA extracted with this method was directly used for RAPD-PCR using primer (GACA)4. Reproducible RAPD fingerprints showing high differences between producer and nonproducer strains were observed. These differences in the RAPD patterns did not differentiate all the strains tested in clusters by cyclopiazonic acid production but may be very useful to distinguish cyclopiazonic acid producer strains from nonproducer strains by a simple RAPD analysis. Thus, the DNA extracts obtained could be used directly without previous purification and quantification for RAPD analysis to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid producer from nonproducer mold strains. This combined analysis could be adaptable to other toxigenic fungal species to enable differentiation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic molds, a procedure of great interest in food safety.

  17. Identification of amino acids essential for DNA binding and dimerization in p67SRF: implications for a novel DNA-binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Sharrocks, A D; Gille, H; Shaw, P E

    1993-01-01

    The serum response factor (p67SRF) binds to a palindromic sequence in the c-fos serum response element (SRE). A second protein, p62TCF binds in conjunction with p67SRF to form a ternary complex, and it is through this complex that growth factor-induced transcriptional activation of c-fos is thought to take place. A 90-amino-acid peptide, coreSRF, is capable for dimerizing, binding DNA, and recruiting p62TCF. By using extensive site-directed mutagenesis we have investigated the role of individual coreSRF amino acids in DNA binding. Mutant phenotypes were defined by gel retardation and cross-linking analyses. Our results have identified residues essential for either DNA binding or dimerization. Three essential basic amino acids whose conservative mutation severely reduced DNA binding were identified. Evidence which is consistent with these residues being on the face of a DNA binding alpha-helix is presented. A phenylalanine residue and a hexameric hydrophobic box are identified as essential for dimerization. The amino acid phasing is consistent with the dimerization interface being presented as a continuous region on a beta-strand. A putative second alpha-helix acts as a linker between these two regions. This study indicates that p67SRF is a member of a protein family which, in common with many DNA binding proteins, utilize an alpha-helix for DNA binding. However, this alpha-helix is contained within a novel domain structure. Images PMID:8417320

  18. Plasmid DNA-based gene transfer with ultrasound and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common option in the real world because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid DNA-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a Phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. Recently, a Phase III clinical trial of hepatocyte growth factor gene therapy in peripheral artery disease (PAD) showed improvement of ischemic ulcers, but it could not salvage limbs from amputation. In addition, a Phase I/II clinical study of fibroblast growth factor gene therapy in PAD extended amputation-free survival, but it seemed to fail in Phase III. In this situation, we and others have developed plasmid DNA-based gene transfer using ultrasound with microbubbles to enhance its efficiency while maintaining safety. Ultrasound-mediated gene transfer has been reported to augment the gene transfer efficiency and select the target organ using cationic microbubble phospholipids which bind negatively charged DNA. Ultrasound with microbubblesis likely to create new therapeutic options inavariety of diseases.

  19. Monitoring DNA polymerase with nanotube-based nanocircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry; Collins, Philip

    DNA polymerases play an important role in the process of life by accurately and efficiently replicating our genetic information. They use a single-stranded DNA as a template and incorporate nucleotides to create the full, double-stranded DNA. Recent experiments have successfully monitored this process by attaching a Klenow fragment of polymerase I to a carbon nanotube and measuring the current along the tube. Follow-up experiments have shown promise for distinguishing between DNA base pairs when nucleotide analogs are used, thus opening a new avenue for DNA sequencing. In this talk, we present results from computational studies on DNA polymerase I nanocircuits. The enzyme was first equilibrated in molecular dynamics and then density functional theory and Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function methods were used to calculate the ballistic transmission coefficients and currents for different enzymatic states. Our results show significant change in current when the enzyme alternates between open (idle) and closed (synthesizing) states. We can also differentiate between some template bases when modified nucleotides and gate scanning are used.

  20. Base composition at mtDNA boundaries suggests a DNA triple helix model for human mitochondrial DNA large-scale rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Christophe; Letellier, Thierry; Copeland, William C; Lestienne, Patrick

    2002-06-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to account for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability based on the presence of short homologous sequences (direct repeats, DR) at the potential boundaries of mtDNA rearrangements. Among them, slippage-mispairing of the replication complex during the asymmetric replication cycle of the mammalian mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to account for the preferential localization of deletions. This mechanism involves a transfer of the replication complex from the first neo-synthesized heavy (H) strand of the DR1, to the DR2, thus bypassing the intervening sequence and producing a deleted molecule. Nevertheless, the nature of the bonds between the DNA strands remains unknown as the forward sequence of DR2, beyond the replication complex, stays double-stranded. Here, we have analyzed the base composition of the DR at the boundaries of mtDNA deletions and duplications and found a skewed pyrimidine content of about 75% in the light-strand DNA template. This suggests the possible building of a DNA triple helix between the G-rich neo-synthesized DR1 and the base-paired homologous G.C-rich DR2. In vitro experiments with the purified human DNA polymerase gamma subunits enabled us to show that the third DNA strand may be used as a primer for DNA replication, using a template with the direct repeat forming a hairpin, with which the primer could initiate DNA replication. These data suggest a novel molecular basis for mitochondrial DNA rearrangements through the distributive nature of the DNA polymerase gamma, at the level of the direct repeats. A general model accounting for large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletion and duplication is proposed. These experiments extend to a DNA polymerase from an eucaryote source the use of a DNA triple helix strand as a primer, like other DNA polymerases from phage and bacterial origins.

  1. Application of DNA-based methods in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jeffrey D; Stevens, Jamie R

    2008-01-01

    A forensic entomological investigation can benefit from a variety of widely practiced molecular genotyping methods. The most commonly used is DNA-based specimen identification. Other applications include the identification of insect gut contents and the characterization of the population genetic structure of a forensically important insect species. The proper application of these procedures demands that the analyst be technically expert. However, one must also be aware of the extensive list of standards and expectations that many legal systems have developed for forensic DNA analysis. We summarize the DNA techniques that are currently used in, or have been proposed for, forensic entomology and review established genetic analyses from other scientific fields that address questions similar to those in forensic entomology. We describe how accepted standards for forensic DNA practice and method validation are likely to apply to insect evidence used in a death or other forensic entomological investigation.

  2. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials.

  3. Ultrasensitive electrochemical cocaine biosensor based on reversible DNA nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qinglin; Liu, Ruixiao; Zhang, Sai; Zheng, Jianbin

    2014-01-15

    We proposed an ultrasensitive electrochemical cocaine biosensor based on the three-dimensional (3D) DNA structure conversion of nanostructure from Triangular Pyramid Frustum (TPFDNA) to Equilateral Triangle (ETDNA). The presence of cocaine triggered the aptamer-composed DNA nanostructure change from "Close" to "Open", leading to obvious faradaic impedance changes. The unique properties with excellent stability and specific rigid structure of the 3D DNA nanostructure made the biosensing functions stable, sensitive, and regenerable. The Faradaic impedance responses were linearly related to cocaine concentration between 1.0 nM and 2.0 μM with a correlation coefficient of 0.993. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.21 nM following IUPAC recommendations (3Sb/b). It is expected that the distinctive features of DNA nanostructure would make it potentially advantageous for a broad range of biosensing, bionanoelectronics, and therapeutic applications.

  4. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  5. Incorporation and/or adduction of formic acid with DNA in vivo studied by HPLC-AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiadan; Cheng, Yan; Sun, Hongfang; Wang, Haifang; Li, Yuankai; Liu, Yuanfang; Ding, Xingfang; Fu, Dongpo; Liu, Kexin; Wang, Deqing; Deng, Xiaoyong

    2010-04-01

    The contribution of incorporation and/or adduction of formic acid with liver DNA in mouse was investigated using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) associated with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Four kinds of 5'-formylated adducts, which were prepared by the reaction of formic acid and deoxyribonucleosides in vitro, were used as references for the HPLC-AMS analysis of in vivo adduction. After the administration of sodium 14C-formate to mice, the liver DNA pellets were isolated and enzymatically digested to deoxyribonucleosides. A precise analysis of the hydrolysate by HPLC-AMS indicates that a majority of formic acid incorporates directly into DNA, whereas less than 1.5% might form instable formylated DNA adducts in vivo. The results greatly support the important perspective that formic acid is not carcinogenic. Moreover, this study demonstrates that a combination of HPLC with AMS is an essential means for the evaluation of DNA adduction.

  6. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody–epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification. PMID:28211541

  7. Persistence of DNA damage following exposure of human bladder cells to chronic monomethylarsonous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, S.M.; Medeiros, M.K.; Eblin, K.E.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2009-12-01

    Malignant transformation was demonstrated in UROtsa cells following 52-weeks of exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}); the result was the malignantly transformed cell line, URO-MSC. URO-MSC cells were used to study the induction of DNA damage and the alteration of DNA repair enzymes in both the presence of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(+)] and after subsequent removal of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(-)] following chronic, low-level exposure. In the presence of MMA{sup III}, URO-MSC(+) cells demonstrated a sustained increase in DNA damage following 12-weeks of exposure; in particular, a significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks at 12-weeks of exposure consistently elevated through 52 weeks. The persistence of DNA damage in URO-MSC cells was assessed after a 2-week removal of MMA{sup III}. URO-MSC(-) cells demonstrated a decrease in DNA damage compared to URO-MSC(+); however, DNA damage in URO-MSC(-) remained significantly elevated when compared to untreated UROtsa and increased in a time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were demonstrated to be a critical component in the generation of DNA damage determined through the incubation of ROS scavengers with URO-MSC cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a key repair enzyme in DNA single-strand break repair. URO-MSC(+) resulted in a slight increase in PARP activity after 36-weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure, suggesting the presence of MMA{sup III} is inhibiting the increase in PARP activity. In support, PARP activity in URO-MSC(-) increased significantly, coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage demonstrated in URO-MSC(-) compared to URO-MSC(+). These data demonstrate that chronic, low-level exposure of UROtsa cells to 50 nM MMA{sup III} results in: the induction of DNA damage that remains elevated upon removal of MMA{sup III}; increased levels of ROS that play a role in MMA{sup III} induced-DNA damage; and decreased PARP activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}.

  8. Ascorbic acid extends replicative life span of human embryonic fibroblast by reducing DNA and mitochondrial damages.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Won-Sang; Park, Seong-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Kang, Hong-Jun; Kim, Min-Ju; Oh, Soo-Jin; Park, Jae-Bong; Kim, Jaebong; Kim, Sung Chan; Lee, Jae-Yong

    2007-01-01

    Ascorbic acid has been reported to extend replicative life span of human embryonic fibroblast (HEF). Since the detailed molecular mechanism of this phenomenon has not been investigated, we attempted to elucidate. Continuous treatment of HEF cells with ascorbic acid (at 200 microM) from 40 population doubling (PD) increased maximum PD numbers by 18% and lowered SA-beta-gal positive staining, an aging marker, by 2.3 folds, indicating that ascorbic acid extends replicative life span of HEF cells. Ascorbic acid treatment lowered DCFH by about 7 folds and Rho123 by about 70%, suggesting that ascorbic acid dramatically decreased ROS formation. Ascorbic acid also increased aconitase activity, a marker of mitochondrial aging, by 41%, indicating that ascorbic acid treatment restores age-related decline of mitochondrial function. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry revealed that ascorbic acid treatment decreased G1 population up to 12%. Further western blot analysis showed that ascorbic acid treatment decreased levels of p53, phospho-p53 at ser 15, and p21, indicating that ascorbic acid relieved senescence-related G1 arrest. Analysis of AP (apurinic/apyrimidinic) sites showed that ascorbic acid treatment decreased AP site formation by 35%. We also tested the effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment, as an additional oxidative stress. Continuous treatment of 20 microM of hydrogen peroxide from PD 40 of HEF cells resulted in premature senescence due to increased ROS level, and increased AP sites. Taken together, the results suggest that ascorbic acid extends replicative life span of HEF cells by reducing mitochondrial and DNA damages through lowering cellular ROS.

  9. Ab initio Study of Naptho-Homologated DNA Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Huertas, Oscar; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Orozco, Modesto; Luque, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Naptho-homologated DNA bases have been recently used to build a new type of size expanded DNA known as yyDNA. We have used theoretical techniques to investigate the structure, tautomeric preferences, base-pairing ability, stacking interactions, and HOMO-LUMO gaps of the naptho-bases. The structure of these bases is found to be similar to that of the benzo-fused predecessors (y-bases) with respect to the planarity of the aromatic rings and amino groups. Tautomeric studies reveal that the canonical-like form of naptho-thymine (yyT) and naptho-adenine (yyA) are the most stable tautomers, leading to hydrogen-bonded dimers with the corresponding natural nucleobases that mimic the Watson-Crick pairing. However, the canonical-like species of naptho-guanine (yyG) and naptho-cytosine (yyC) are not the most stable tautomers, and the most favorable hydrogen-bonded dimers involve wobble-like pairings. The expanded size of the naphto-bases leads to stacking interactions notably larger than those found for the natural bases, and they should presumably play a dominant contribution in modulating the structure of yyDNA duplexes. Finally, the HOMO-LUMO gap of the naptho-bases is smaller than that of their benzo-base counterparts, indicating that size-expansion of DNA bases is an efficient way of reducing their HOMO-LUMO gap. These results are examined in light of the available experimental evidence reported for yyT and yyC.

  10. Effect of nucleic acid binding dyes on DNA extraction, amplification, and STR typing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Kobus, Hilton J; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    We report on the effects of six dyes used in the detection of DNA on the process of DNA extraction, amplification, and detection of STR loci. While dyes can be used to detect the presence of DNA, their use is restricted if they adversely affect subsequent DNA typing processes. Diamond™ Nucleic Acid Dye, GelGreen™, GelRed™, RedSafe™, SYBR(®) Green I, and EvaGreen™ were evaluated in this study. The percentage of dye removed during the extraction process was determined to be: 70.3% for SYBR(®) Green I; 99.6% for RedSafe™; 99.4% for EvaGreen™; 52.7% for Diamond™ Dye; 50.6% for GelRed™, and; could not be determined for GelGreen™. It was then assumed that the amount of dye in the fluorescent quantification assay had no effect on the DNA signal. The presence of all six dyes was then reviewed for their effect on DNA extraction. The t-test showed no significant difference between the dyes and the control. These extracts were then STR profiled and all dyes and control produced full DNA profiles. STR loci in the presence of GelGreen(TM) at 1X concentration showed increased amplification products in comparison to the control samples. Full STR profiles were detected in the presence of EvaGreen™ (1X), although with reduced amplification products. RedSafe™ (1X), Diamond™ Dye (1X), and SYBR(®) Green I (1X) all exhibited varying degrees of locus drop-out with GelRed™ generating no loci at all. We provide recommendations for the best dye to visualize the presence of DNA profile as a biological stain and its subsequent amplification and detection.

  11. Programmable and automated bead-based microfluidics for versatile DNA microarrays under isothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Penchovsky, Robert

    2013-06-21

    Advances in modern genomic research depend heavily on applications of various devices for automated high- or ultra-throughput arrays. Micro- and nanofluidics offer possibilities for miniaturization and integration of many different arrays onto a single device. Therefore, such devices are becoming a platform of choice for developing analytical instruments for modern biotechnology. This paper presents an implementation of a bead-based microfluidic platform for fully automated and programmable DNA microarrays. The devices are designed to work under isothermal conditions as DNA immobilization and hybridization transfer are performed under steady temperature using reversible pH alterations of reaction solutions. This offers the possibility for integration of more selection modules onto a single chip compared to maintaining a temperature gradient. This novel technology allows integration of many modules on a single reusable chip reducing the application cost. The method takes advantage of demonstrated high-speed DNA hybridization kinetics and denaturation on beads under flow conditions, high-fidelity of DNA hybridization, and small sample volumes are needed. The microfluidic devices are applied for a single nucleotide polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing by synthesis without the need for fluorescent removal step. Apart from that, the microfluidic platform presented is applicable to many areas of modern biotechnology, including biosensor devices, DNA hybridization microarrays, molecular computation, on-chip nucleic acid selection, high-throughput screening of chemical libraries for drug discovery.

  12. DNA-probe-target interaction based detection of Brucella melitensis by using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Sikarwar, Bhavna; Singh, Virendra V; Sharma, Pushpendra K; Kumar, Ashu; Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Boopathi, Mannan; Singh, Beer; Jaiswal, Yogesh K

    2017-01-15

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor using 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) modified gold (4-MBA/Au) SPR chip was developed first time for the detection of Brucella melitensis (B. melitensis) based on the screening of its complementary DNA target by using two different newly designed DNA probes of IS711 gene. Herein, interaction between DNA probes and target molecule are also investigated and result revealed that the interaction is spontaneous. The kinetics and thermodynamic results derived from the experimental data showed that the interaction between complementary DNA targets and probe 1 is more effective than that of probe 2. Equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) and maximum binding capacity of analyte (Bmax) values for the interaction of complementary DNA target with the immobilized DNA probes were calculated by using kinetic evaluation software, and found to be 15.3 pM (KD) and 81.02m° (Bmax) with probe 1 and 54.9pM and 55.29m° (Bmax), respectively. Moreover, real serum samples analysis were also carried out using immobilized probe 1 and probe 2 with SPR which showed the applicability of this methodology and provides an alternative way for the detection of B. melitensis in less than 10min. This remarkable sensing response of present methodology offer a real time and label free detection of biological warfare agent and provide an opportunity to make miniaturized sensor, indicating considerable promise for diverse environmental, bio-defence, clinical diagnostics, food safety, water and security applications.

  13. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on the proximity-dependent surface hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin; Li, Jinghong

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a novel electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) biosensor for simple, rapid, and specific detection of nucleic acids based on the proximity-dependent surface hybridization assay. This E-DNA biosensor was constructed by self-assembly of a 3' short thiolated capture probe on the gold electrode. DNA detection was realized by outputting a remarkable redox current of the 5' ferrocene (Fc) tail labeled probe. When the target DNA was introduced into the system, it was complementary to the 5' Fc labeled probe at the one-half-segment and complementary to the 3' short thiolated capture probe at the other half-segment, resulting in forming a stable duplex complex. As a result, the Fc probe was proximate to the electrode surface, and the Faradaic current was observed. This E-DNA biosensor was proved to have a low detection limit (1 fM) and a wide dynamic range (from 1 fM to 1 nM) due to the stable hybridization mode. In addition, the sensing system could discriminate the complementary sequence from mismatch sequences, with high sensitivity, stability, and reusability.

  14. Linear Titration Curves of Acids and Bases.

    PubMed

    Joseph, N R

    1959-05-29

    The Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, by a simple transformation, becomes pH - pK = pA - pB, where pA and pB are the negative logarithms of acid and base concentrations. Sigmoid titration curves then reduce to straight lines; titration curves of polyelectrolytes, to families of straight lines. The method is applied to the titration of the dipeptide glycyl aminotricarballylic acid, with four titrable groups. Results are expressed as Cartesian and d'Ocagne nomograms. The latter is of a general form applicable to polyelectrolytes of any degree of complexity.

  15. Potential use of DNA barcoding for the identification of Salvia based on cpDNA and nrDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhao, Hong-Xia; Wang, Long; Wang, Tao; Yang, Rui-Wu; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Yong-Hong; Ding, Chun-Bang; Zhang, Li

    2013-10-10

    An effective DNA marker for authenticating the genus Salvia was screened using seven DNA regions (rbcL, matK, trnL-F, and psbA-trnH from the chloroplast genome, and ITS, ITS1, and ITS2 from the nuclear genome) and three combinations (rbcL+matK, psbA-trnH+ITS1, and trnL-F+ITS1). The present study collected 232 sequences from 27 Salvia species through DNA sequencing and 77 sequences within the same taxa from the GenBank. The discriminatory capabilities of these regions were evaluated in terms of PCR amplification success, intraspecific and interspecific divergence, DNA barcoding gaps, and identification efficiency via a tree-based method. ITS1 was superior to the other marker for discriminating between species, with an accuracy of 81.48%. The three combinations did not increase species discrimination. Finally, we found that ITS1 is a powerful barcode for identifying Salvia species, especially Salvia miltiorrhiza.

  16. DNA binding, photoactivated DNA cleavage and cytotoxic activity of Cu(II) and Co(II) based Schiff-base azo photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeepa, S. M.; Bhojya Naik, H. S.; Vinay Kumar, B.; Indira Priyadarsini, K.; Barik, Atanu; Prabhakara, M. C.

    2015-04-01

    A new class of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes of azo-containing Schiff base of the type [Cu(L1)2] and [Co(L1)2], where L1 = 4-[(E)-{2-hydroxy-3-[(E)-(4-bromophenyl)diazenyl]benzylidene}amino]benzoic acid have been synthesized and characterized. Extension of conjugation and the presence of free carboxylic acid group of the ligand L1 increased the wavelength of the complexes from visible region to the near IR region (620-850 nm). The Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes interacted with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with the respective Kb value of 3.2 × 104 M-1 and 2.9 × 104 M-1 and acted as proficient photocleavers of SC pUC19 DNA in UV-A light, forming 1O2 as the reactive oxygen species with the quantum yield of 0.38 and 0.36, respectively. Furthermore, the Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes showed photocytotoxicity toward two selected tumor cell lines MCF-7 and A549 by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) method, and the Cu(II) complex exhibits higher photocytotoxicity than Co(II) complex against each of the selected cell lines, this result is identical with their DNA binding ability order.

  17. DNA binding, photoactivated DNA cleavage and cytotoxic activity of Cu(II) and Co(II) based Schiff-base azo photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Pradeepa, S M; Bhojya Naik, H S; Vinay Kumar, B; Indira Priyadarsini, K; Barik, Atanu; Prabhakara, M C

    2015-04-15

    A new class of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes of azo-containing Schiff base of the type [Cu(L1)2] and [Co(L1)2], where L1=4-[(E)-{2-hydroxy-3-[(E)-(4-bromophenyl)diazenyl]benzylidene}amino]benzoic acid have been synthesized and characterized. Extension of conjugation and the presence of free carboxylic acid group of the ligand L1 increased the wavelength of the complexes from visible region to the near IR region (620-850 nm). The Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes interacted with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with the respective Kb value of 3.2×10(4) M(-1) and 2.9×10(4) M(-1) and acted as proficient photocleavers of SC pUC19 DNA in UV-A light, forming (1)O2 as the reactive oxygen species with the quantum yield of 0.38 and 0.36, respectively. Furthermore, the Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes showed photocytotoxicity toward two selected tumor cell lines MCF-7 and A549 by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) method, and the Cu(II) complex exhibits higher photocytotoxicity than Co(II) complex against each of the selected cell lines, this result is identical with their DNA binding ability order.

  18. The epsilon subunit of DNA polymerase III Is involved in the nalidixic acid-induced SOS response in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pohlhaus, Jennifer Reineke; Long, David T; O'Reilly, Erin; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2008-08-01

    Quinolone antibacterial drugs such as nalidixic acid target DNA gyrase in Escherichia coli. These inhibitors bind to and stabilize a normally transient covalent protein-DNA intermediate in the gyrase reaction cycle, referred to as the cleavage complex. Stabilization of the cleavage complex is necessary but not sufficient for cell killing--cytotoxicity apparently results from the conversion of cleavage complexes into overt DNA breaks by an as-yet-unknown mechanism(s). Quinolone treatment induces the bacterial SOS response in a RecBC-dependent manner, arguing that cleavage complexes are somehow converted into double-stranded breaks. However, the only proteins known to be required for SOS induction by nalidixic acid are RecA and RecBC. In hopes of identifying additional proteins involved in the cytotoxic response to nalidixic acid, we screened for E. coli mutants specifically deficient in SOS induction upon nalidixic acid treatment by using a dinD::lacZ reporter construct. From a collection of SOS partially constitutive mutants with disruptions of 47 different genes, we found that dnaQ insertion mutants are specifically deficient in the SOS response to nalidixic acid. dnaQ encodes DNA polymerase III epsilon subunit, the proofreading subunit of the replicative polymerase. The deficient response to nalidixic acid was rescued by the presence of the wild-type dnaQ gene, confirming involvement of the epsilon subunit. To further characterize the SOS deficiency of dnaQ mutants, we analyzed the expression of several additional SOS genes in response to nalidixic acid using real-time PCR. A subset of SOS genes lost their response to nalidixic acid in the dnaQ mutant strain, while two tested SOS genes (recA and recN) continued to exhibit induction. These results argue that the replication complex plays a role in modulating the SOS response to nalidixic acid and that the response is more complex than a simple on/off switch.

  19. Cationic Lipid-Nucleic Acid Complexes for Gene Delivery And Silencing: Pathways And Mechanisms for Plasmid Dna And Sirna

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, K.K.; Zidovska, A.; Ahmad, A.; Bouxsein, N.F.; Evans, H.M.; McAllister, C.S.; Samuel, C.E.; Safinya, C.R.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    Motivated by the promises of gene therapy, there is great interest in developing non-viral lipid-based vectors for therapeutic applications due to their low immunogenicity, low toxicity, ease of production, and the potential of transferring large pieces of DNA into cells. In fact, cationic liposome (CL) based vectors are among the prevalent synthetic carriers of nucleic acids (NAs) currently used in gene therapy clinical trials worldwide. These vectors are studied both for gene delivery with CL-DNA complexes and gene silencing with CL-siRNA (short interfering RNA) complexes. However, their transfection efficiencies and silencing efficiencies remain low compared to those of engineered viral vectors. This reflects the currently poor understanding of transfection-related mechanisms at the molecular and self-assembled levels, including a lack of knowledge about interactions between membranes and double stranded NAs and between CL-NA complexes and cellular components. In this review we describe our recent efforts to improve the mechanistic understanding of transfection by CL-NA complexes, which will help to design optimal lipid-based carriers of DNA and siRNA for therapeutic gene delivery and gene silencing.

  20. High concentrations of stavudine impair fatty acid oxidation without depleting mitochondrial DNA in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Igoudjil, Anissa; Massart, Julie; Begriche, Karima; Descatoire, Véronique; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    The antiretroviral nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) stavudine (d4T) can induce mild to severe liver injuries such as steatosis (i.e. triglyceride accumulation), steatohepatitis and liver failure. NRTI-induced toxicity has been ascribed to the inhibition of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication causing mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain dysfunction. This can secondarily impair the tricarboxylic acid cycle and fatty acid oxidation (FAO), thus leading to lactic acidosis and hepatic steatosis. However, NRTIs could also impair mitochondrial function and induce hepatic steatosis through other mechanisms. In this study, we sought to determine whether d4T could inhibit mitochondrial FAO and induce triglyceride accumulation through a mtDNA-independent mechanism. Since human tumoral and non-tumoral hepatic cell lines were unable to efficiently oxidize palmitic acid, the effects of d4T on mitochondrial FAO were assessed on cultured rat hepatocytes. Our results showed that 750 microM of d4T significantly inhibited palmitic acid oxidation after 48 or 72 h of culture, without inducing cell death. Importantly, high concentrations of zidovudine and zalcitabine (two other NRTIs that can induce hepatic steatosis), or beta-aminoisobutyric acid (a d4T metabolite), did not impair FAO in rat hepatocytes. D4T-induced FAO inhibition was observed without mtDNA depletion and lactate production, and was fully prevented with l-carnitine or clofibrate coincubation. l-carnitine also prevented the accretion of neutral lipids within rat hepatocytes. High concentrations of d4T were unable to inhibit FAO on freshly isolated liver mitochondria. Moreover, a microarray analysis was performed to clarify the mechanism whereby d4T can inhibit mitochondrial FAO and induce triglyceride accumulation in rat hepatocytes. The microarray data, confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, showed that d4T increased the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c

  1. Probing the Influence of Amino Acids on Photoluminescence from Carbon Nanotubes Suspended with DNA.

    PubMed

    Kurnosov, N V; Leontiev, V S; Karachevtsev, V A

    2016-11-01

    The quantitative analysis of amino acid levels in the human organism is required for the early clinical diagnosis of a variety of diseases. In this work the influence of 13 amino acid doping on the photoluminescence (PL) from the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) suspended with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in water has been studied. Amino acid doping leads to the PL enhancement and the strongest increase was found after cysteine doping of the nanotube suspension while addition of other amino acids yielded the significantly smaller effect. The emphasis of cysteine molecules is attributed to presence of the reactive thiol group that turns cysteine into reducing agent that passivates the p-defects on the nanotube sidewall and increases the PL intensity. The reasons of PL enhancement after doping with other amino acids are discussed. The response of nanotube PL to cysteine addition depends on the nanotube aqueous suspension preparation with tip or bath sonication treatment. The enhancement of the emission from different nanotube species after cysteine doping was analyzed too. It was shown that the increase of the carbon nanotube PL at addition of cysteine allows successful monitoring of the cysteine concentration in aqueous solution in the range of 50-1000 μM.

  2. DNA methylation landscape of fat deposits and fatty acid composition in obese and lean pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shunhua; Shen, Linyuan; Xia, Yudong; Yang, Qiong; Li, Xuewei; Tang, Guoqing; Jiang, Yanzhi; Wang, Jinyong; Li, Mingzhou; Zhu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Obese and lean type pig breeds exhibit differences in their fat deposits and fatty acid composition. Here, we compared the effect of genome-wide DNA methylation on fatty acid metabolism between Landrace pigs (LP, leaner) and Rongchang pigs (RP, fatty). We found that LP backfat (LBF) had a higher polyunsaturated fatty acid content but a lower adipocyte volume than RP backfat (RBF). LBF exhibited higher global DNA methylation levels at the genome level than RBF. A total of 483 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were located in promoter regions, mainly affecting olfactory and sensory activity and lipid metabolism. In LBF, the promoters of genes related to ATPase activity had significantly stronger methylation. This fact may suggest lower energy metabolism levels, which may result in less efficient lipid synthesis in LBF. Furthermore, we identified a DMR in the miR-4335 and miR-378 promoters and validated their methylation status by bisulfite sequencing PCR. The hypermethylation of the promoters of miR-4335 and miR-378 in LBF and the resulting silencing of the target genes may result in LBF’s low content in saturated fatty acids and fat deposition capacity. This study provides a solid basis for exploring the epigenetic mechanisms affecting fat deposition and fatty acid composition. PMID:27721392

  3. A MEMS-based miniature DNA analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M.A.; Gonzalez, C.; Hadley, D.

    1995-04-25

    We detail the design and development of a miniature thermal cycling instrument for performing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that uses microfabricated, silicon-based reaction chambers. The MEMS-based, battery-operated instrument shows significant improvements over commercial thermal cycling instrumentation. Several different biological systems have been amplified and verified with the miniature PCR instrument including the Human Immunodeficiency Virus; both cloned and genomic DNA templates of {beta} globin; and the genetic disease, Cystic Fibrosis from human DNA. The miniaturization of a PCR thermal cycler is the initial module of a fully-integrated portable, low-power, rapid, and highly efficient bioanalytical instrument.

  4. A chemiluminescence biosensor based on the adsorption recognition function between Fe3O4@SiO2@GO polymers and DNA for ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanling; Li, Jianbo; Wang, Yanhui; Ding, Chaofan; Lin, Yanna; Sun, Weiyan; Luo, Chuannan

    2017-05-05

    In this work, a chemiluminescence (CL) biosensor was prepared for ultrasensitive determination of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) based on the adsorption recognition function between core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 - graphene oxide (Fe3O4@SiO2@GO) polymers and DNA. The Fe3O4@SiO2@GO polymers were composed by GO and magnetite nanoparticles. And the core-shell polymers were confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Then Fe3O4@SiO2@GO was modified by DNA. Based on the principle of complementary base, Fe3O4@SiO2@GO-DNA was introduced to the CL system and the selectivity, sensitivity of DNA detection was significantly improved. The adsorption properties of Fe3O4@SiO2@GO to DNA were researched through the adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetic and thermodynamics. Under optimized CL conditions, DNA could be assayed with the linear concentration range of 5.0×10(-12)-2.5×10(-11)mol/L. The detection limit was 1.7×10(-12)mol/L (3δ) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.1%. The biosensor was finally used for the determination of DNA in laboratory samples and recoveries ranged from 99% to 103%. The satisfactory results revealed the potential application of Fe3O4@SiO2@GO-DNA-CL biosensor in the diagnosis and the treatment of human genetic diseases.

  5. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Li, Xiao-Bo; Lopa, Nasrin Siraj; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective. PMID:25664436

  6. Fluorogenic DNA ligase and base excision repair enzyme assays using substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Roman, Steven

    2015-05-15

    Continuing our work on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores for nucleic acid modifying enzymes, here we describe the development of such substrates for DNA ligases and some base excision repair enzymes. These substrates are hairpin-type synthetic DNA molecules with a single fluorophore located on a base close to the 3' ends, an arrangement that results in strong fluorescence quenching. When such substrates are subjected to an enzymatic reaction, the position of the dyes relative to that end of the molecules is altered, resulting in significant fluorescence intensity changes. The ligase substrates described here were 5' phosphorylated and either blunt-ended or carrying short, self-complementary single-stranded 5' extensions. The ligation reactions resulted in the covalent joining of the ends of the molecules, decreasing the quenching effect of the terminal bases on the dyes. To generate fluorogenic substrates for the base excision repair enzymes formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG), human 8-oxo-G DNA glycosylase/AP lyase (hOGG1), endonuclease IV (EndoIV), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), we introduced abasic sites or a modified nucleotide, 8-oxo-dG, at such positions that their enzymatic excision would result in the release of a short fluorescent fragment. This was also accompanied by strong fluorescence increases. Overall fluorescence changes ranged from approximately 4-fold (ligase reactions) to more than 20-fold (base excision repair reactions).

  7. Polyanionic Carboxyethyl Peptide Nucleic Acids (ce-PNAs): Synthesis and DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kirillova, Yuliya; Boyarskaya, Nataliya; Dezhenkov, Andrey; Tankevich, Mariya; Prokhorov, Ivan; Varizhuk, Anna; Eremin, Sergei; Esipov, Dmitry; Smirnov, Igor; Pozmogova, Galina

    2015-01-01

    New polyanionic modifications of polyamide nucleic acid mimics were obtained. Thymine decamers were synthesized from respective chiral α- and γ-monomers, and their enantiomeric purity was assessed. Here, we present the decamer synthesis, purification and characterization by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and an investigation of the hybridization properties of the decamers. We show that the modified γ-S-carboxyethyl-T10 PNA forms a stable triplex with polyadenine DNA. PMID:26469337

  8. Boric Acid Reduces the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Accelerates Wound Healing Process.

    PubMed

    Tepedelen, Burcu Erbaykent; Soya, Elif; Korkmaz, Mehmet

    2016-12-01

    Boron is absorbed by the digestive and respiratory system, and it was considered that it is converted to boric acid (BA), which was distributed to all tissues above 90 %. The biochemical essentiality of boron element is caused by boric acid because it affects the activity of several enzymes involved in the metabolism. DNA damage repair mechanisms and oxidative stress regulation is quite important in the transition stage from normal to cancerous cells; thus, this study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of boric acid on DNA damage and wound healing in human epithelial cell line. For this purpose, the amount of DNA damage occurred with irinotecan (CPT-11), etoposide (ETP), doxorubicin (Doxo), and H2O2 was determined by immunofluorescence through phosphorylation of H2AX((Ser139)) and pATM((Ser1981)) in the absence and presence of BA. Moreover, the effect of BA on wound healing has been investigated in epithelial cells treated with these agents. Our results demonstrated that H2AX((Ser139)) foci numbers were significantly decreased in the presence of BA while wound healing was accelerated by BA compared to that in the control and only drug-treated cells. Eventually, the results indicate that BA reduced the formation of DNA double strand breaks caused by agents as well as improving the wound healing process. Therefore, we suggest that boric acid has important therapeutical effectiveness and may be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases where oxidative stress and wound healing process plays an important role.

  9. Sulfate- and sialic acid-containing glycolipids inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Simbulan, C M; Taki, T; Tamiya-Koizumi, K; Suzuki, M; Savoysky, E; Shoji, M; Yoshida, S

    1994-03-16

    The effects of various glycolipids on the activity of immunoaffinity-purified calf thymus DNA polymerase alpha were studied in vitro. Preincubation with sialic acid-containing glycolipids, such as sialosylparagloboside (SPG), GM3, GM1, and GD1a, and sulfatide (cerebroside sulfate ester, CSE) dose-dependently inhibited the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, while other glycolipids, as well as free sphingosine and ceramide did not. About 50% inhibition was achieved by preincubating the enzyme with 2.5 microM of CSE, 50 microM of SPG or GM3, and 80 microM of GM1. Inhibition was noncompetitive with both the DNA template and the substrate dTTP, as well as with the other dNTPs. Since the inhibition was largely reversed by the addition of 0.05% Nonidet P40, these glycolipids may interact with the hydrophobic region of the enzyme protein. Apparently, the sulfate moiety in CSE and the sialic acid moiety in gangliosides were essential for the inhibition since neither neutral glycolipids (i.e., glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, lactosylceramide) nor asialo-gangliosides (GA1 and GA2) showed any inhibitory effect. Furthermore, the ceramide backbone was also found to be necessary for maximal inhibition since the inhibition was largely abolished by substituting the lipid backbone with cholesterol. Increasing the number of sialic acid moieties per molecule further enhanced the inhibition, while elongating the sugar chain diminished it. It was clearly shown that the N-acetyl residue of the sialic acid moiety is particularly essential for inhibition by both SPG and GM3 because the loss of this residue or substitution with a glycolyl residue completely negated their inhibitory effect on DNA polymerase alpha activity.

  10. Inhibition of N-nitrosamine carcinogenesis and aflatoxin DNA damage by ellagic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal-Chaudhuri, S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ellagic acid (EA), on the tumorigenicity of N-nitrosobenzylmethylamine (NBMA) in the rat esophagus was investigated. Groups of 30 male F-344 rats were fed a semipurified diet containing EA for 27 weeks. N-nitrosobenzylmethylamine was administered subcutaneously, once a week for 18 weeks. Ellagic acid produced a significant inhibition in the average number of esophageal tumors at both 20 weeks and 27 weeks. To investigate the mechanism(s) of this inhibition, EA was tested for its effect on the metabolism, DNA-binding and DNA-adduct formation of NBMA in cultured explants of rat esophagus. Explants were incubated in medium containing EA at concentrations of 10, 50, and 100 {mu}M for 16 hours, followed by the addition of 1{mu}M ({sup 3}H)NBMA and EA for 12 hours. Explant DNA was isolated by phenol extraction and hydroxylapatite chromatography, and benzaldehyde formation was determined by h.p.l.c. analysis of the culture medium. Finally, EA was examined for its ability to inhibit DNA damage induced by aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) in cultured explants of rat trachea and esophagus, and human tracheobronchus.

  11. Visual, base-specific detection of nucleic acid hybridization using polymerization-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan R; Johnson, Leah M; Bowman, Christopher N

    2009-03-15

    Polymerization-based signal amplification offers sensitive visualization of biotinylated biomolecules functionalized to glass microarrays in a manner suitable for point-of-care use. Here we report using this method for visual detection of multiplexed nucleic acid hybridizations from complex media and develop an application toward point mutation detection and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing. Primer extension reactions were employed to label selectively and universally all complementary surface DNA hybrids with photoinitiators, permitting simultaneous and dynamic photopolymerization from positive sites to 0.5-nM target concentrations. Dramatic improvements in signal ratios between complementary and mismatched hybrids enabled visual discrimination of single base differences in KRAS codon-12 biomarkers.

  12. DNA-based species detection capabilities using laser transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahon, A R; Barnes, M A; Li, F; Egan, S P; Tanner, C E; Ruggiero, S T; Feder, J L; Lodge, D M

    2013-01-06

    Early detection of invasive species is critical for effective biocontrol to mitigate potential ecological and economic damage. Laser transmission spectroscopy (LTS) is a powerful solution offering real-time, DNA-based species detection in the field. LTS can measure the size, shape and number of nanoparticles in a solution and was used here to detect size shifts resulting from hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction product to nanoparticles functionalized with species-specific oligonucleotide probes or with the species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone. We carried out a series of DNA detection experiments using the invasive freshwater quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) to evaluate the capability of the LTS platform for invasive species detection. Specifically, we tested LTS sensitivity to (i) DNA concentrations of a single target species, (ii) the presence of a target species within a mixed sample of other closely related species, (iii) species-specific functionalized nanoparticles versus species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone, and (iv) amplified DNA fragments versus unamplified genomic DNA. We demonstrate that LTS is a highly sensitive technique for rapid target species detection, with detection limits in the picomolar range, capable of successful identification in multispecies samples containing target and non-target species DNA. These results indicate that the LTS DNA detection platform will be useful for field application of target species. Additionally, we find that LTS detection is effective with species-specific oligonucleotide tags alone or when they are attached to polystyrene nanobeads and with both amplified and unamplified DNA, indicating that the technique may also have versatility for broader applications.

  13. An unnatural hydrophobic base pair system: site-specific incorporation of nucleotide analogs into DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Mitsui, Tsuneo; Fujiwara, Tsuyoshi; Kawai, Rie; Sato, Akira; Harada, Yoko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2006-09-01

    Methods for the site-specific incorporation of extra components into nucleic acids can be powerful tools for creating DNA and RNA molecules with increased functionality. We present an unnatural base pair system in which DNA containing an unnatural base pair can be amplified and function as a template for the site-specific incorporation of base analog substrates into RNA via transcription. The unnatural base pair is formed by specific hydrophobic shape complementation between the bases, but lacks hydrogen bonding interactions. In replication, this unnatural base pair exhibits high selectivity in combination with the usual triphosphates and modified triphosphates, gamma-amidotriphosphates, as substrates of 3' to 5' exonuclease-proficient DNA polymerases, allowing PCR amplification. In transcription, the unnatural base pair complementarity mediates the incorporation of these base substrates and their analogs, such as a biotinylated substrate, into RNA by T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP). With this system, functional components can be site-specifically incorporated into a large RNA molecule.

  14. The first proton sponge-based amino acids: synthesis, acid-base properties and some reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ozeryanskii, Valery A; Gorbacheva, Anastasia Yu; Pozharskii, Alexander F; Vlasenko, Marina P; Tereznikov, Alexander Yu; Chernov'yants, Margarita S

    2015-08-21

    The first hybrid base constructed from 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (proton sponge or DMAN) and glycine, N-methyl-N-(8-dimethylamino-1-naphthyl)aminoacetic acid, was synthesised in high yield and its hydrobromide was structurally characterised and used to determine the acid-base properties via potentiometric titration. It was found that the basic strength of the DMAN-glycine base (pKa = 11.57, H2O) is on the level of amidine amino acids like arginine and creatine and its structure, zwitterionic vs. neutral, based on the spectroscopic (IR, NMR, mass) and theoretical (DFT) approaches has a strong preference to the zwitterionic form. Unlike glycine, the DMAN-glycine zwitterion is N-chiral and is hydrolytically cleaved with the loss of glycolic acid on heating in DMSO. This reaction together with the mild decarboxylative conversion of proton sponge-based amino acids into 2,3-dihydroperimidinium salts under air-oxygen was monitored with the help of the DMAN-alanine amino acid. The newly devised amino acids are unique as they combine fluorescence, strongly basic and redox-active properties.

  15. Flow cytometry-based DNA hybridization and polymorphism analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, H.; Kommander, K.; White, P.S.; Nolan, J.P.

    1998-07-01

    Functional analysis of the humane genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well-suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. The authors are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. The approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advances of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  16. Flow-cytometry-based DNA hybidization and polymorphism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong; Kommander, Kristina; White, P. S.; Nolan, John P.

    1998-05-01

    Functional analysis of the human genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well- suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. We are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. Our approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advantages of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  17. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants ( Kb) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH 2 (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  18. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Raman, N; Sobha, S

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants (K(b)) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH(2) (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  19. Molecular genotyping of Colletotrichum species based on arbitrarily primed PCR, A + T-Rich DNA, and nuclear DNA analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, S.; Pham, M.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular genotyping of Colletotrichum species based on arbitrarily primed PCR, A + T-rich DNA, and nuclear DNA analyses. Experimental Mycology 17, 309-322. Isolates of Colletotrichum were grouped into 10 separate species based on arbitrarily primed PCR (ap-PCR), A + T-rich DNA (AT-DNA) and nuclear DNA banding patterns. In general, the grouping of Colletotrichum isolates by these molecular approaches corresponded to that done by classical taxonomic identification, however, some exceptions were observed. PCR amplification of genomic DNA using four different primers allowed for reliable differentiation between isolates of the 10 species. HaeIII digestion patterns of AT-DNA also distinguished between species of Colletotrichum by generating species-specific band patterns. In addition, hybridization of the repetitive DNA element (GcpR1) to genomic DNA identified a unique set of Pst 1-digested nuclear DNA fragments in each of the 10 species of Colletotrichum tested. Multiple isolates of C. acutatum, C. coccodes, C. fragariae, C. lindemuthianum, C. magna, C. orbiculare, C. graminicola from maize, and C. graminicola from sorghum showed 86-100% intraspecies similarity based on ap-PCR and AT-DNA analyses. Interspecies similarity determined by ap-PCR and AT-DNA analyses varied between 0 and 33%. Three distinct banding patterns were detected in isolates of C. gloeosporioides from strawberry. Similarly, three different banding patterns were observed among isolates of C. musae from diseased banana.

  20. DNA-based random number generation in security circuitry.

    PubMed

    Gearheart, Christy M; Arazi, Benjamin; Rouchka, Eric C

    2010-06-01

    DNA-based circuit design is an area of research in which traditional silicon-based technologies are replaced by naturally occurring phenomena taken from biochemistry and molecular biology. This research focuses on further developing DNA-based methodologies to mimic digital data manipulation. While exhibiting fundamental principles, this work was done in conjunction with the vision that DNA-based circuitry, when the technology matures, will form the basis for a tamper-proof security module, revolutionizing the meaning and concept of tamper-proofing and possibly preventing it altogether based on accurate scientific observations. A paramount part of such a solution would be self-generation of random numbers. A novel prototype schema employs solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides for random construction of DNA sequences; temporary storage and retrieval is achieved through plasmid vectors. A discussion of how to evaluate sequence randomness is included, as well as how these techniques are applied to a simulation of the random number generation circuitry. Simulation results show generated sequences successfully pass three selected NIST random number generation tests specified for security applications.

  1. The photoinduced transformation of fluorescent DNA base analogue tC triggers DNA melting.

    PubMed

    Preus, Søren; Jønck, Søren; Pittelkow, Michael; Dierckx, Anke; Karpkird, Thitinun; Albinsson, Bo; Wilhelmsson, L Marcus

    2013-08-01

    While fluorescent analogues of the canonical nucleobases have proven to be highly valuable in a large number of applications, up until today, fluorescent DNA base analogues remain virtually inapplicable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments which require extremely bright and photostable dyes. Insight into the photodegradation processes of these fluorophores is thus a key step in the continuous development towards dyes with improved performances. Here, we show that the commercially available fluorescent nucleobase analogue tC under intense long-term illumination and in the presence of O2 is degraded to form a single photoreaction product which we suggest to be the sulfoxide form of tC. The photoproduct is characterized by a blue-shifted absorption and a less intense fluorescence compared to that of tC. Interestingly, when tC is positioned inside double-stranded DNA this photodriven conversion of tC to its photoproduct greatly reduces the duplex stability of the overall double helix in which the probe is positioned. Since tC can be excited selectively at 400 nm, well outside the absorption band of the natural DNA bases, this observation points towards the application of tC as a general light-triggered switch of DNA duplex stability.

  2. An unprecedented nucleic acid capture mechanism for excision of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinson, Emily H.; Prakasha Gowda, A.S.; Spratt, Thomas E.; Gold, Barry; Eichmanbrand, Brandt F.

    2010-11-18

    DNA glycosylases that remove alkylated and deaminated purine nucleobases are essential DNA repair enzymes that protect the genome, and at the same time confound cancer alkylation therapy, by excising cytotoxic N3-methyladenine bases formed by DNA-targeting anticancer compounds. The basis for glycosylase specificity towards N3- and N7-alkylpurines is believed to result from intrinsic instability of the modified bases and not from direct enzyme functional group chemistry. Here we present crystal structures of the recently discovered Bacillus cereus AlkD glycosylase in complex with DNAs containing alkylated, mismatched and abasic nucleotides. Unlike other glycosylases, AlkD captures the extrahelical lesion in a solvent-exposed orientation, providing an illustration for how hydrolysis of N3- and N7-alkylated bases may be facilitated by increased lifetime out of the DNA helix. The structures and supporting biochemical analysis of base flipping and catalysis reveal how the HEAT repeats of AlkD distort the DNA backbone to detect non-Watson-Crick base pairs without duplex intercalation.

  3. Proposed binding mechanism of galbanic acid extracted from Ferula assa-foetida to DNA.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, F; Shokoohinia, Y; Javaheri, Sh; Azizian, H

    2017-01-01

    Recently, galbanic acid (GA), a sesquiterpenoid coumarin, has been introduced as an apoptotic and geno/cytotoxicity agent. In the present study, GA has been extracted from Ferula assa-foetida, a native medicinal plant in Iran, and characterized by (1)H NMR, mass spectroscopy. Additionally, spectroscopic studies have been performed in order to investigate its DNA-interaction mode. The electrochemical behavior of GA has been studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in various scan rates. In neutral media (pH=7.3) one irreversible cathodic peak was obtained at -1.46 V, while in higher scan rates an irreversible one was determined at -1.67 V. According to the voltametric data GA can be easily reduced by 2e(-)/2H(+) mechanism at hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The interaction of GA with ct-DNA was evaluated by CV, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), enhancement fluorescence, UV-Vis, FT-IR spectroscopy and molecular docking. The molecular docking study shows that the GA interacts to DNA on partial intercalation mode via DNA groove binding and forms a complex by van der Waals and electroastatic interactions. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters of GA-DNA complex were investigated with ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° values of 15.81KJmol(-1), 133.95Jmol(-1) and -23.10KJmol(-1), respectively. All data revealed that the GA is binding to DNA by van der Waals and electrostatic interactions through the partial intercalations from the DNA's grooves.

  4. Probe mapping to facilitate transposon-based DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Strausbaugh, L.D.; Bourke, M.T.; Sommer, M.T.; Coon, M.E.; Berg, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    A promising strategy for DNA sequencing exploits transposons to provide mobile sites for the binding of sequencing primers. For such a strategy to be maximally efficient, the location and orientation of the transposon must be readily determined and the insertion sites should be randomly distributed. The authors demonstrate an efficient probe-based method for the localization and orientation of transposon-borne primer sites, which is adaptable to large-scale sequencing strategies. This approach requires no prior restriction enzyme mapping or knowledge of the cloned sequence and eliminates the inefficiency inherent in totally random sequencing methods. To test the efficiency of probe mapping, 49 insertions of the transposon {gamma}{delta} (Tn1000) in a cloned fragment of Drosophila melanogaster DNA were mapped and oriented. In addition, oligonucleotide primers specific for unique subterminal {gamma}{delta} segments were used to prime dideoxynucleotide double-stranded sequencing. These data provided an opportunity to rigorously examine {gamma}{delta} insertion sites. The insertions were quire randomly distributed, even though the target DNA fragment had both A+T-rich and G+C-rich regions; in G+C-rich DNA, the insertions were found in A+T-rich valleys. These data demonstrate that {gamma}{delta} is an excellent choice for supplying mobile primer binding sites to cloned DNA and that transposon-based probe mapping permits the sequences of large cloned segments to be determined without any subcloning.

  5. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of DNA Tile-Based Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shuoxing

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has emerged as an attractive building material for creating complex architectures at the nanometer scale that simultaneously affords versatility and modularity. Particularly, the programmability of DNA enables the assembly of basic building units into increasingly complex, arbitrary shapes or patterns. With the expanding complexity and functionality of DNA toolboxes, a quantitative understanding of DNA self-assembly in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics, will provide researchers with more subtle design guidelines that facilitate more precise spatial and temporal control. This dissertation focuses on studying the physicochemical properties of DNA tile-based self-assembly process by recapitulating representative scenarios and intermediate states with unique assembly pathways. First, DNA double-helical tiles with increasing flexibility were designed to investigate the dimerization kinetics. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles result from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. Next, the thermodynamics and kinetics of single tile attachment to preformed "multitile" arrays were investigated to test the fundamental assumptions of tile assembly models. The results offer experimental evidences that double crossover tile attachment is determined by the electrostatic environment and the steric hindrance at the binding site. Finally, the assembly of double crossover tiles within a rhombic DNA origami frame was employed as the model system to investigate the competition between unseeded, facet and seeded nucleation. The results revealed that preference of nucleation types can be tuned by controlling the rate-limiting nucleation step. The works presented in this dissertation will be helpful for refining the DNA tile assembly model for future designs and simulations. Moreover, The works presented here could also be

  6. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Posner, R.G.; Marrone, B.L.; Hammond, M.L.; Simpson, D.J.

    1995-04-11

    A method is described for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand. 4 figures.

  7. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Posner, Richard G.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Hammond, Mark L.; Simpson, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Method for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand.

  8. DNA methylation detection based on difference of base content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shinobu; Ohtsuka, Keiichi; Honda, Satoshi; Sato, Yusuke; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2016-04-01

    Methylation frequently occurs in cytosines of CpG sites to regulate gene expression. The identification of aberrant methylation of certain genes is important for cancer marker analysis. The aim of this study was to determine the methylation frequency in DNA samples of unknown length and/or concentration. Unmethylated cytosine is known to be converted to thymine following bisulfite treatment and subsequent PCR. For this reason, the AT content in DNA increases with an increasing number of methylation sites. In this study, the fluorescein-carrying bis-acridinyl peptide (FKA) molecule was used for the detection of methylation frequency. FKA contains fluorescein and two acridine moieties, which together allow for the determination of the AT content of double-stranded DNA fragments. Methylated and unmethylated human genomes were subjected to bisulfide treatment and subsequent PCR using primers specific for the CFTR, CDH4, DBC1, and NPY genes. The AT content in the resulting PCR products was estimated by FKA, and AT content estimations were found to be in good agreement with those determined by DNA sequencing. This newly developed method may be useful for determining methylation frequencies of many PCR products by measuring the fluorescence in samples excited at two different wavelengths.

  9. Indicator Based and Indicator - Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of genomic material from infectious organisms. Methylene blue (MB) is an aromatic heterocycle that binds strongly to DNA via intercalation. MB...detection of disease- related point mutation in the guanine bases of the cyanobacteria . The resulting biosensors offer great promise for mismatch

  10. Effects of ascorbic acid on sperm motility, viability, acrosome reaction and DNA integrity in teratozoospermic samples

    PubMed Central

    Fanaei, Hamed; Khayat, Samira; Halvaei, Iman; Ramezani, Vahid; Azizi, Yaser; Kasaeian, Amir; Mardaneh, Jalal; Parvizi, Mohammad Reza; Akrami, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress in teratozoospermic semen samples caused poor assisted reproductive techniques (ART) outcomes. Among antioxidants, ascorbic acid is a naturally occurring free radical scavenger and as such its presence assists various other mechanisms in decreasing numerous disruptive free radical processes. Objective: The main goal of this study was to evaluate potential protective effects of ascorbic acid supplementation during in vitro culture of teratozoospermic specimens. Materials and Methods: Teratozoospermic semen samples that collected from 15 volunteers were processed, centrifuged and incubated at 37oC until sperm swimmed-up. Supernatant was divided into four groups and incubated at 37oC for one hour under different experimental conditions: Control, 10 µm A23187, 600µm ascorbic acid and 10 µm A23187+600 µm ascorbic acid. After incubation sperm motility, viability, acrosome reaction, DNA damage and malondialdehyde levels were evaluated. Results: Our results indicated that after one hour incubation, ascorbic acid significantly reduced malondialdehyde level in ascorbic acid group (1.4±0.11 nmol/ml) compared to control group (1.58±0.13 nmol/ml) (p<0.001). At the end of incubation, progressive motility and viability in ascorbic acid group (64.5±8.8% and 80.3±6.4%, respectively) were significantly (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) higher than the control group (54.5±6.8% and 70.9±7.3%, respectively). A23187 significantly (p<0.0001) increased acrosome reaction in A23187 group (37.3±5.6%) compared to control group (8.5±3.2%) and this effect of A23187 attenuated by ascorbic acid in ascorbic acid+A23187 group (17.2±4.4%). DNA fragmentation in ascorbic acid group (20±4.1%) was significantly (p<0.001) lower than controls (28.9±4.6%). Conclusion: In vitro ascorbic acid supplementation during teratozoospermic semen processing for ART could protect teratozoospermic specimens against oxidative stress, and it could improve ART outcome. PMID

  11. Natural versus artificial creation of base pairs in DNA: origin of nucleobases from the perspectives of unnatural base pair studies.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Yamashige, Rie

    2012-12-18

    Since life began on Earth, the four types of bases (A, G, C, and T(U)) that form two sets of base pairs have remained unchanged as the components of nucleic acids that replicate and transfer genetic information. Throughout evolution, except for the U to T modification, the four base structures have not changed. This constancy within the genetic code raises the question of how these complicated nucleotides were generated from the molecules in a primordial soup on the early Earth. At some prebiotic stage, the complementarity of base pairs might have accelerated the generation and accumulation of nucleotides or oligonucleotides. We have no clues whether one pair of nucleobases initially appeared on the early Earth during this process or a set of two base pairs appeared simultaneously. Recently, researchers have developed new artificial pairs of nucleobases (unnatural base pairs) that function alongside the natural base pairs. Some unnatural base pairs in duplex DNA can be efficiently and faithfully amplified in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using thermostable DNA polymerases. The addition of unnatural base pair systems could expand the genetic alphabet of DNA, thus providing a new mechanism for the generation novel biopolymers by the site-specific incorporation of functional components into nucleic acids and proteins. Furthermore, the process of unnatural base pair development might provide clues to the origin of the natural base pairs in a primordial soup on the early Earth. In this Account, we describe the development of three representative types of unnatural base pairs that function as a third pair of nucleobases in PCR and reconsider the origin of the natural nucleic acids. As researchers developing unnatural base pairs, they use repeated "proof of concept" experiments. As researchers design new base pairs, they improve the structures that function in PCR and eliminate those that do not. We expect that this process is similar to the one functioning in the

  12. Nanopore-based fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanxiao; Zhang, Yuechuan; Ying, Cuifeng; Wang, Deqiang; Du, Chunlei

    2015-02-01

    Nanopore-based sequencers, as the fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology, have the potential to quickly and reliably sequence the entire human genome for less than $1000, and possibly for even less than $100. The single-molecule techniques used by this technology allow us to further study the interaction between DNA and protein, as well as between protein and protein. Nanopore analysis opens a new door to molecular biology investigation at the single-molecule scale. In this article, we have reviewed academic achievements in nanopore technology from the past as well as the latest advances, including both biological and solid-state nanopores, and discussed their recent and potential applications.

  13. Detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) targets using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and paper surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Eric P; Yu, Wei W; White, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enables multiplex detection of analytes using simple, portable equipment consisting of a single excitation source and detector. Thus, in theory, SERS is ideally suited to replace fluorescence in assays that screen for numerous deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) targets, but in practice, SERS-based assays have suffered from complexity and elaborate processing steps. Here, we report an assay in which a simple inkjet-fabricated plasmonic paper device enables SERS-based detection of multiple DNA targets within a single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In prior work, we demonstrated the principles of chromatographic separation and SERS-based detection on inkjet-fabricated plasmonic paper. The present work extends that capability for post-PCR gene sequence detection. In this design, hydrolysis DNA probes with 5' Raman labels are utilized; if the target is present, the probe is hydrolyzed during PCR, freeing the reporter. After applying the PCR sample to a paper SERS device, an on-device chromatographic separation and concentration is conducted to discriminate between hydrolyzed and intact probes. SERS is then used to detect the reporter released by the hydrolyzed probes. This simple separation and detection on paper eliminates the need for complex sample processing steps. In this work, we simultaneously detect the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genes mecA and femB to illustrate the concept. We envision that this approach could contribute to the development of multiplex DNA diagnostic tests enabling screening for several target sequences within a single reaction, which is necessary for cases in which sample volume and resources are limited.

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of a human cDNA and gene encoding a novel acid ceramidase-like protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, S B; Li, C M; Rhee, H J; Park, J H; He, X; Levy, B; Yoo, O J; Schuchman, E H

    1999-12-01

    Computer-assisted database analysis of sequences homologous to human acid ceramidase (ASAH) revealed a 1233-bp cDNA (previously designated cPj-LTR) whose 266-amino-acid open reading frame had approximately 36% identity with the ASAH polypeptide. Based on this high degree of homology, we undertook further molecular characterization of cPj-LTR and now report the full-length cDNA sequence, complete gene structure (renamed human ASAHL since it is a human acid ceramidase-like sequence), chromosomal location, primer extension and promoter analysis, and transient expression results. The full-length human ASAHL cDNA was 1825 bp and contained an open-reading frame encoding a 359-amino-acid polypeptide that was 33% identical and 69% similar to the ASAH polypeptide over its entire length. Numerous short regions of complete identity were observed between these two sequences and two sequences obtained from the Caenorhabditis elegans genome database. The 30-kb human ASAHL genomic sequence contained 11 exons, which ranged in size from 26 to 671 bp, and 10 introns, which ranged from 150 bp to 6.4 kb. The gene was localized to the chromosomal region 4q21.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Northern blotting experiments revealed a major 2.0-kb ASAHL transcript that was expressed at high levels in the liver and kidney, but at relatively low levels in other tissues such as the lung, heart, and brain. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the human ASAHL gene revealed a putative promoter region that lacked a TATA box and was GC rich, typical features of a housekeeping gene promoter, as well as several tissue-specific and/or hormone-induced transcription regulatory sites. 5'-Deletion analysis localized the promoter activity to a 1. 1-kb fragment within this region. A major transcription start site also was located 72 bp upstream from the ATG translation initiation site by primer extension analysis. Expression analysis of a green fluorescence protein/ASAHL fusion

  15. DNA-Based Self-Assembly of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Neumann, Andre; Lindlau, Jessica; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schüder, Florian; Huber, Sebastian; Huber, Marinus; Stehr, Florian; Högele, Alexander; Weil, Tanja; Liedl, Tim

    2015-08-12

    As a step toward deterministic and scalable assembly of ordered spin arrays we here demonstrate a bottom-up approach to position fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) with nanometer precision on DNA origami structures. We have realized a reliable and broadly applicable surface modification strategy that results in DNA-functionalized and perfectly dispersed NDs that were then self-assembled in predefined geometries. With optical studies we show that the fluorescence properties of the nitrogen-vacancy color centers in NDs are preserved during surface modification and DNA assembly. As this method allows the nanoscale arrangement of fluorescent NDs together with other optically active components in complex geometries, applications based on self-assembled spin lattices or plasmon-enhanced spin sensors as well as improved fluorescent labeling for bioimaging could be envisioned.

  16. Fluorescence methods to study DNA translocation and unwinding kinetics by nucleic acid motors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christopher J; Tomko, Eric J; Wu, Colin G; Lohman, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    Translocation of nucleic acid motor proteins (translocases) along linear nucleic acids can be studied by monitoring either the time course of the arrival of the motor protein at one end of the nucleic acid or the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis by the motor protein during translocation using pre-steady state ensemble kinetic methods in a stopped-flow instrument. Similarly, the unwinding of double-stranded DNA or RNA by helicases can be studied in ensemble experiments by monitoring either the kinetics of the conversion of the double-stranded nucleic acid into its complementary single strands by the helicase or the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis by the helicase during unwinding. Such experiments monitor translocation of the enzyme along or unwinding of a series of nucleic acids labeled at one position (usually the end) with a fluorophore or a pair of fluorophores that undergo changes in fluorescence intensity or efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We discuss how the pre-steady state kinetic data collected in these ensemble experiments can be analyzed by simultaneous global nonlinear least squares (NLLS) analysis using simple sequential "n-step" mechanisms to obtain estimates of the macroscopic rates and processivities of translocation and/or unwinding, the rate-limiting step(s) in these mechanisms, the average "kinetic step-size," and the stoichiometry of coupling ATP binding and hydrolysis to movement along the nucleic acid.

  17. Base-sequence-dependent sliding of proteins on DNA.

    PubMed

    Barbi, M; Place, C; Popkov, V; Salerno, M

    2004-10-01

    The possibility that the sliding motion of proteins on DNA is influenced by the base sequence through a base pair reading interaction, is considered. Referring to the case of the T7 RNA-polymerase, we show that the protein should follow a noise-influenced sequence-dependent motion which deviate from the standard random walk usually assumed. The general validity and the implications of the results are discussed.

  18. Folding- and Dynamics-Based Electrochemical DNA Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Rebecca Y

    2017-01-01

    A number of electrochemical DNA sensors based on the target-induced change in the conformation and/or flexibility of surface-bound oligonucleotides have been developed in recent years. These sensors, which are often termed E-DNA sensors, are comprised of an oligonucleotide probe modified with a redox label (e.g., methylene blue) at one terminus and attached to a gold electrode via a thiol-gold bond at the other. Binding of the target to the DNA probe changes its structure and dynamics, which, in turn, influences the efficiency of electron transfer to the interrogating electrode. Since electrochemically active contaminants are less common, these sensors are resistant to false-positive signals arising from the nonspecific adsorption of contaminants and perform well even when employed directly in serum, whole blood, and other realistically complex sample matrices. Moreover, because all of the sensor components are chemisorbed to the electrode, the E-DNA sensors are essentially label-free and readily reusable. To date, these sensors have achieved state-of-the-art sensitivity, while offering the unprecedented selectivity, reusability, and the operational convenience of direct electrochemical detection. This chapter reviews the recent advances in the development of both "signal-off" and "signal-on" E-DNA sensors. Critical aspects that dictate the stability and performance of these sensors are also addressed so as to provide a realistic overview of this oligonucleotide detection platform.

  19. A DNA-based assay for toxic chemicals in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Amy L; Phillips, Leo; Kanellis, Vangelis G; Hammoudeh, Daoud; Naumann, Christoph; Wong, Henri; Chisari, Robert; Hibbert, D Brynn; Lee, Garry S H; Patra, Ronald; Julli, Moreno; Chapman, John; Cooke, A Roger; dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2011-08-01

    Chemical toxicants, particularly metal ions, are a major contaminant in global waterways. Live-organism bioassays used to monitor chemical toxicants commonly involve measurements of activity or survival of a freshwater cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia) or light emitted by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri, used in the commercial Microtox® bioassay. Here we describe a novel molecule-based assay system employing DNA as the chemical biosensor. Metals bind to DNA, causing structural changes that expel a bound (intercalated) fluorescent reporter dye. Analyses of test data using 48 wastewater samples potentially contaminated by metal ions show that the DNA-dye assay results correlate with those from C. dubia and Microtox bioassays. All three assays exhibit additive, antagonistic, and synergistic responses that cannot be predicted by knowing individual metal concentrations. Analyses of metals in these samples imply the presence of chemical toxicants other than metal ions. The DNA-dye assay is robust, has a 12-month shelf life, and is only slightly affected by sample pH in the range 4 to 9. The assay is completed in a matter of minutes, and its portability makes it well suited as a screening assay for use in the field. We conclude that the DNA-dye test is a surrogate bioassay suitable for screening chemical toxicity.

  20. Magnetic bead-based nucleic acid purification kit: Clinical application and performance evaluation in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihoon G; Kang, Jin Seok; Hwang, Seung Yong; Song, Jaewoo; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Two different methods - the semi-automated magnetic bead-based kit (SK, Stool DNA/RNA Purification kit®) and the manual membrane column-based kit (QS, QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini kit) - for purifying nucleic acids from clinical stool samples were compared and evaluated. The SK kit was more user-friendly than QS due to the reduced manual processing, partial automation, and short turnaround time with half cost. Furthermore, SK produced high yields in both DNA and RNA extractions but poor purity in RNA extraction. In the assessment of rotavirus and Clostridium difficile infection, both kits had equivalent or more sensitive performance compared with the standard method. Although SK showed some interference and inhibition in nucleic acid extraction, the performance, including the repeatability, linearity, analytical sensitivity, and matrix effect, was sufficient for routine clinical use.

  1. Ligation with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Ong, Carmichael; Tai, Warren; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M; Artenstein, Andrew W; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for detecting nucleic acid targets using a ligation step along with an isothermal, exponential amplification step. We use an engineered ssDNA with two variable regions on the ends, allowing us to design the probe for optimal reaction kinetics and primer binding. This two-part probe is ligated by T4 DNA Ligase only when both parts bind adjacently to the target. The assay demonstrates that the expected 72-nt RNA product appears only when the synthetic target, T4 ligase, and both probe fragments are present during the ligation step. An extraneous 38-nt RNA product also appears due to linear amplification of unligated probe (P3), but its presence does not cause a false-positive result. In addition, 40 mmol/L KCl in the final amplification mix was found to be optimal. It was also found that increasing P5 in excess of P3 helped with ligation and reduced the extraneous 38-nt RNA product. The assay was also tested with a single nucleotide polymorphism target, changing one base at the ligation site. The assay was able to yield a negative signal despite only a single-base change. Finally, using P3 and P5 with longer binding sites results in increased overall sensitivity of the reaction, showing that increasing ligation efficiency can improve the assay overall. We believe that this method can be used effectively for a number of diagnostic assays.

  2. DNA nanosensor based on biocompatible graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhao Sheng; Shan, Xiao Yue; Chai, Lu Jing; Ma, Juan Juan; Chen, Jian Rong; Feng, Hui

    2014-10-15

    An ultrasensitive nanosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between biocompatible graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes for DNA detection was reported. We take advantage of good biocompatibility and strong fluorescence of graphene quantum dots, base pairing specificity of DNA and unique fluorescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes to achieve the analysis of low concentrations of DNA. Graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield up to 0.20 were prepared and served as the fluorophore of DNA probe. FRET process between graphene quantum dots-labeled probe and oxidized carbon nanotubes is easily achieved due to their efficient self-assembly through specific π-π interaction. This nanosensor can distinguish complementary and mismatched nucleic acid sequences with high sensitivity and good reproducibility. The detection method based on this nanosensor possesses a broad linear span of up to 133.0 nM and ultralow detection limit of 0.4 nM. The constructed nanosensor is expected to be highly biocompatible because of all its components with excellent biocompatibility.

  3. DNA Base Pair Resolution Measurements Using Resonance Energy Transfer Efficiency in Lanthanide Doped Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Delplanque, Aleksandra; Wawrzynczyk, Dominika; Jaworski, Pawel; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Buckle, Malcolm; Nyk, Marcin; Nogues, Claude; Samoc, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are of considerable interest for biodetection and bioimaging techniques thanks to their unique chemical and optical properties. As a sensitive luminescence material, they can be used as (bio) probes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) where trivalent lanthanide ions (La3+) act as energy donors. In this paper we present an efficient method to transfer ultrasmall (ca. 8 nm) NaYF4 nanoparticles dispersed in organic solvent to an aqueous solution via oxidation of the oleic acid ligand. Nanoparticles were then functionalized with single strand DNA oligomers (ssDNA) by inducing covalent bonds between surface carboxylic groups and a 5’ amine modified-ssDNA. Hybridization with the 5’ fluorophore (Cy5) modified complementary ssDNA strand demonstrated the specificity of binding and allowed the fine control over the distance between Eu3+ ions doped nanoparticle and the fluorophore by varying the number of the dsDNA base pairs. First, our results confirmed nonradiative resonance energy transfer and demonstrate the dependence of its efficiency on the distance between the donor (Eu3+) and the acceptor (Cy5) with sensitivity at a nanometre scale. PMID:25748446

  4. Investigating Students' Reasoning about Acid-Base Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Kouyoumdjian, Hovig; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry is central to a wide range of reactions. If students are able to understand how and why acid-base reactions occur, it should provide a basis for reasoning about a host of other reactions. Here, we report the development of a method to characterize student reasoning about acid-base reactions based on their description of…

  5. Bioaugmentation of bromoamine acid degradation with Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY and DNA fingerprint analysis of augmented systems.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Song, Zhiyong; Xing, Linlin; Fu, Xiang

    2006-02-01

    One high-effective bromoamine acid (1-amino-4-bromoanthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid, BAA) degrading strain was isolated previously with the ability to use BAA as sole source of carbon and nitrogen. It was identified as Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY by 16S rDNA sequence analysis and physio-biochemical tests. In this study, bioaugmentation of BAA degradation with suspended and immobilized cells of strain QYY was investigated. The optimal degradation conditions were as follows: temperature 30 degrees C, pH 6.0-7.0, 150 rev min(-1) and the immobilized cells maintained degradation activity to BAA after 60 days storage at 4 degrees C. The structure of BAA was evidently changed according to the analysis of total organic carbon removal of BAA (about 50%) and the UV-VIS spectra changes during the biodegradation. Bioaugmented systems exhibited stronger abilities degrading BAA than the non-bioaugmented control ones. And microbial community dynamics of augmented systems was revealed by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), a modern DNA fingerprint technique. The results indicated that the microbial community dynamics was substantially changed throughout the augmentation process. This study suggests that it is feasible and potentially useful to enhance BAA degradation using bioaugmentation with the immobilized cells of BAA-degrading bacterium.

  6. Nanoparticle-Based Discrimination of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in Long DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Sanromán-Iglesias, María; Lawrie, Charles H; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Grzelczak, Marek

    2017-03-01

    Circulating DNA (ctDNA) and specifically the detection cancer-associated mutations in liquid biopsies promises to revolutionize cancer detection. The main difficulty however is that the length of typical ctDNA fragments (∼150 bases) can form secondary structures potentially obscuring the mutated fragment from detection. We show that an assay based on gold nanoparticles (65 nm) stabilized with DNA (Au@DNA) can discriminate single nucleotide polymorphism in clinically relevant ssDNA sequences (70-140 bases). The preincubation step was crucial to this process, allowing sequential bridging of Au@DNA, so that single base mutation can be discriminated, down to 100 pM concentration.

  7. Dual color fluorescence quantitative detection of specific single-stranded DNA with molecular beacons and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dong-Shan; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Luo, Ming; Ji, Xing-Hu; He, Zhi-Ke

    2012-08-21

    We have developed a dual color fluorescence quantitative detection method for specific single-stranded DNA with molecular beacons (MBs) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I by synchronous scanning fluorescence spectrometry. It is demonstrated by a reverse-transcription oligonucleotide sequence (target DNA, 33 bases) of RNA fragment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a model system. In the absence of target DNA, the MBs are in the stem-closed state, the fluorescence of 5-carboxy-X-rhodamine (ROX) is quenched by black hole quencher-2 (BHQ-2), and the interaction between SYBR Green I and the MBs is very weak. At this time the fluorescence signals of ROX and SYBR Green I are all very weak. In the presence of target DNA, MBs hybridize with target DNA and form a double-strand structure, the fluorophore ROX is separated from the quencher BHQ-2, and the fluorescence of ROX recovers. At the same time, SYBR Green I binds to hybridized dsDNA, whose fluorescence intensity is significantly enhanced. Thus, dual color fluorescence quantitative detection for the target DNA can be realized by synchronous scanning fluorescence spectrometry. In this strategy, the fluorescence signal of SYBR Green I is far larger than that of ROX, so the quantitative analysis of target DNA with the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I can significantly improve the detection sensitivity. In addition, the false-positive signals of MBs do not affect the fluorescence signals of nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I. Thereby, in the analysis of complex samples, quantitative analysis of target DNA with SYBR Green I can avoid the false-positive signals of MBs and improve the detection accuracy.

  8. Evaluation of DNA typing as a positive identification method for soft and hard tissues immersed in strong acids.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Pazzi, M; Di Vella, G; Martinelli, D; Mazzola, L; Ricci, U; Testi, R; Vincenti, M

    2015-11-01

    Identification of human remains can be hindered by several factors (e.g., traumatic mutilation, carbonization or decomposition). Moreover, in some criminal cases, offenders may purposely adopt various expedients to thwart the victim's identification, including the dissolution of body tissues by the use of corrosive reagents, as repeatedly reported in the past for Mafia-related murders. By means of an animal model, namely porcine samples, we evaluated standard DNA typing as a method for identifying soft (muscle) and hard (bone and teeth) tissues immersed in strong acids (hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid) or in mixtures of acids (aqua regia). Samples were tested at different time intervals, ranging between 2 and 6h (soft tissues) and 2-28 days (hard tissues). It was shown that, in every type of acid, complete degradation of the DNA extracted from soft tissues preceded tissue dissolution and could be observed within 4h of immersion. Conversely, high molecular weight DNA amenable to STR analysis could be isolated from hard tissues as long as cortical bone fragments were still present (28 days for sulfuric acid, 7 days for nitric acid, 2 days for hydrochloric acid and aqua regia), or the integrity of the dental pulp chamber was preserved (7 days, in sulfuric acid only). The results indicate that DNA profiling of acid-treated body parts (in particular, cortical bone) is still feasible at advanced stages of corrosion, even when the morphological methods used in forensic anthropology and odontology can no longer be applied for identification purposes.

  9. DNA sequence analysis using hierarchical ART-based classification networks

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, C.; Hruska, S.I.; Katholi, C.R.; Unnasch, T.R.

    1994-12-31

    Adaptive resonance theory (ART) describes a class of artificial neural network architectures that act as classification tools which self-organize, work in real-time, and require no retraining to classify novel sequences. We have adapted ART networks to provide support to scientists attempting to categorize tandem repeat DNA fragments from Onchocerca volvulus. In this approach, sequences of DNA fragments are presented to multiple ART-based networks which are linked together into two (or more) tiers; the first provides coarse sequence classification while the sub- sequent tiers refine the classifications as needed. The overall rating of the resulting classification of fragments is measured using statistical techniques based on those introduced to validate results from traditional phylogenetic analysis. Tests of the Hierarchical ART-based Classification Network, or HABclass network, indicate its value as a fast, easy-to-use classification tool which adapts to new data without retraining on previously classified data.

  10. Free radical scavenging, DNA protection, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation mediated by uric acid.

    PubMed

    Stinefelt, Beth; Leonard, Stephen S; Blemings, Kenneth P; Shi, Xianglin; Klandorf, Hillar

    2005-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) has been proposed to be the dominant antioxidant in birds. The objective of this study was to investigate the quenching effect of varying concentrations of UA, including those found in avian plasma, on specific reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to determine the ability of UA to protect DNA and cellular membranes from ROS-mediated damage. Hydroxyl (OH) and superoxide (O2-) radicals were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) and their presence was reduced following addition of UA (p <0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner. UA inhibited hydroxyl-mediated DNA damage, indicated by the presence of more precise, dense bands of lambda Hind III DNA after agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining (p <0.05). Lipid peroxidation of silica-exposed RAW 264.7 cell membranes was diminished (p <0.02) after addition of UA to the cell incubation mixture. These studies demonstrate that UA scavenges hydroxyl and superoxide radicals and protects against DNA damage and lipid peroxidation. These results indicate specific antioxidant protection that UA may afford birds against ROS-mediated damage.

  11. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  12. Estimation of Bacterial Cell Numbers in Humic Acid-Rich Salt Marsh Sediments with Probes Directed to 16S Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Edgcomb, Virginia P.; McDonald, John H.; Devereux, Richard; Smith, David W.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of using probes directed towards ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as a quantitative approach to estimating cell numbers was examined and applied to study the structure of a bacterial community in humic acid-rich salt marsh sediments. Hybridizations were performed with membrane-bound nucleic acids by using seven group-specific DNA oligonucleotide probes complementary to 16S rRNA coding regions. These included a general eubacterial probe and probes encompassing most members of the gram-negative, mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). DNA was extracted from sediment samples, and contaminating materials were removed by a series of steps. Efficiency of DNA extraction was 48% based on the recovery of tritiated plasmid DNA added to samples prior to extraction. Reproducibility of the extraction procedure was demonstrated by hybridizations to replicate samples. Numbers of target cells in samples were estimated by comparing the amount of hybridization to extracted DNA obtained with each probe to that obtained with a standard curve of genomic DNA for reference strains included on the same membrane. In June, numbers of SRB detected with an SRB-specific probe ranged from 6.0 × 107 to 2.5 × 109 (average, 1.1 × 109 ± 5.2 × 108) cells g of sediment−1. In September, numbers of SRB detected ranged from 5.4 × 108 to 7.3 × 109 (average, 2.5 × 109 ± 1.5 × 109) cells g of sediment−1. The capability of using rDNA probes to estimate cell numbers by hybridization to DNA extracted from complex matrices permits initiation of detailed studies on community composition and changes in communities based on cell numbers in formerly intractable environments. PMID:10103245

  13. Nanoinformatics and DNA-based computing: catalyzing nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Maojo, Victor; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Kulikowski, Casimir; Rodriguez-Paton, Alfonso; Fritts, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Five decades of research and practical application of computers in biomedicine has given rise to the discipline of medical informatics, which has made many advances in genomic and translational medicine possible. Developments in nanotechnology are opening up the prospects for nanomedicine and regenerative medicine where informatics and DNA computing can become the catalysts enabling health care applications at sub-molecular or atomic scales. Although nanomedicine promises a new exciting frontier for clinical practice and biomedical research, issues involving cost-effectiveness studies, clinical trials and toxicity assays, drug delivery methods, and the implementation of new personalized therapies still remain challenging. Nanoinformatics can accelerate the introduction of nano-related research and applications into clinical practice, leading to an area that could be called "translational nanoinformatics." At the same time, DNA and RNA computing presents an entirely novel paradigm for computation. Nanoinformatics and DNA-based computing are together likely to completely change the way we model and process information in biomedicine and impact the emerging field of nanomedicine most strongly. In this article, we review work in nanoinformatics and DNA (and RNA)-based computing, including applications in nanopediatrics. We analyze their scientific foundations, current research and projects, envisioned applications and potential problems that might arise from them.

  14. Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) nanoparticles for DNA delivery: waiving preparation complexity and increasing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Gvili, Koby; Benny, Ofra; Danino, Dganit; Machluf, Marcelle

    When designing a nonviral gene delivery system based on polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), it is important to keep in mind obstacles associated with future clinical applications. Simplifying the procedure of NPs production and taking toxicity into account are the most important issues that need to be addressed. Toxicity concerns in clinical trials may be raised when using additives such as cationic polymers/lipids, buffering reagents, and proteins. Therefore, the aim of this study was to simplify the formulation of poly (lactide-co-glycolide) acid NPs by shortening steps such as sonication time and by avoiding the use of additives while preserving its efficiency. NPs (300 nm) were formulated using a modified w/o/w technique with DNA entrapment efficiency of 80%. Once achieving such NPs, formulation parameters such as DNA loading, release kinetics, DNA integrity and bioactivity, uptake by cells, and toxicity were addressed. The NPs were readily taken by several cell lines and were localized mostly in their endo-lysosomal compartments. The NPs did not affect cells viability. Most importantly, transfection studies in COS-7 and Cf2th cells resulted with a 250-fold protein expression levels when compared with the control. These expression levels are higher than ones achieved with more complicated NPs systems, demonstrating the efficiency of our simplified NPs for gene delivery.

  15. Multiplexed detection of pathogen DNA with DNA-based fluorescence nanobarcodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yougen; Cu, Yen Thi Hong; Luo, Dan

    2005-07-01

    Rapid, multiplexed, sensitive and specific molecular detection is of great demand in gene profiling, drug screening, clinical diagnostics and environmental analysis. One of the major challenges in multiplexed analysis is to identify each specific reaction with a distinct label or 'code'. Two encoding strategies are currently used: positional encoding, in which every potential reaction is preassigned a particular position on a solid-phase support such as a DNA microarray, and reaction encoding, where every possible reaction is uniquely tagged with a code that is most often optical or particle based. The micrometer size, polydispersity, complex fabrication process and nonbiocompatibility of current codes limit their usability. Here we demonstrate the synthesis of dendrimer-like DNA-based, fluorescence-intensity-coded nanobarcodes, which contain a built-in code and a probe for molecular recognition. Their application to multiplexed detection of the DNA of several pathogens is first shown using fluorescence microscopy and dot blotting, and further demonstrated using flow cytometry that resulted in detection that was sensitive (attomole) and rapid.

  16. Can DNA-binding proteins of replisome tautomerize nucleotide bases? Ab initio model study.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Yurenko, Yevgen P; Dubey, Igor Ya; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2012-01-01

    Ab initio quantum-chemical study of specific point contacts of replisome proteins with DNA modeled by acetic acid with canonical and mutagenic tautomers of DNA bases methylated at the glycosidic nitrogen atoms was performed in vacuo and continuum with a low dielectric constant (ϵ ∼ 4) corresponding to a hydrophobic interface of protein-nucleic acid interaction. All tautomerized complexes were found to be dynamically unstable, because the electronic energies of their back-reaction barriers do not exceed zero-point vibrational energies associated with the vibrational modes whose harmonic vibrational frequencies become imaginary in the transition states of the tautomerization reaction. Additionally, based on the physicochemical arguments, it was demonstrated that the effects of biomolecular environment cannot ensure dynamic stabilization. This result allows suggesting that hypothetically generated by DNA-binding proteins of replisome rare tautomers will have no impact on the total spontaneous mutation due to the low reverse barrier allowing a quick return to the canonical form.

  17. Amino acid sequence of band-3 protein from rainbow trout erythrocytes derived from cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, S; Michel, F; Rudloff, V; Appelhans, H

    1992-01-01

    In this report we present the first complete band-3 cDNA sequence of a poikilothermic lower vertebrate. The primary structure of the anion-exchange protein band 3 (AE1) from rainbow trout erythrocytes was determined by nucleotide sequencing of cDNA clones. The overlapping clones have a total length of 3827 bp with a 5'-terminal untranslated region of 150 bp, a 2754 bp open reading frame and a 3'-untranslated region of 924 bp. Band-3 protein from trout erythrocytes consists of 918 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 101 827 Da. Comparison of its amino acid sequence revealed a 60-65% identity within the transmembrane spanning sequence of band-3 proteins published so far. An additional insertion of 24 amino acid residues within the membrane-associated domain of trout band-3 protein was identified, which until now was thought to be a general feature only of mammalian band-3-related proteins. PMID:1637296

  18. Amino acid and DNA analyses in a family with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hou, J W; Wang, T R

    1996-02-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) is a hepatic mitochondrial enzyme involved in the detoxification of ammonia by the urea cycle. OTC deficiency is an X-linked genetic disorder, usually causing neonatal or infantile hyperammonemia, coma and death. We attended a male newborn who had poor feeding since 30 hours of age, at which time, he then rapidly progressed to a comatose state. Hyperammonemia and liver dysfunction were noted. Analysis of plasma amino acids showed elevated levels of glutamine and alanine, but a decreased level of arginine and no citrulline. OTC deficiency was diagnosed by family history of early death of newborn males on the maternal side and characteristic biochemical findings. In addition, it was proved by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. Although OTC deficiency has been described as the most common inborn error of ureagenesis in humans, to our knowledge, this is the first report in a Chinese family confirmed by biochemical and DNA analyses.

  19. Chlorogenic acid prevents isoproterenol-induced DNA damage in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingshuai; Li, Jiyang; Liu, Jie; Xu, Mengjiao; Tong, Xiaowen; Wang, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical therapeutic agents have been identified as DNA damaging. The present study revealed that isoproterenol (Iso) resulted in DNA damage in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the levels of intracellular oxygen free radicals. Administration of chlorogenic acid (CGA) inhibited this effect. Pretreatment with CGA abrogated the increase in protein expression levels of γ-H2A histone family member X, phosphorylated ataxia telangiectasia mutated, phosphorylated Rad3-related protein, breast cancer 1 and C-terminal Src homologous kinase induced by Iso. In addition, the increase in levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by Iso was inhibited by CGA pretreatment in a dose-dependent manner. The results of the present study suggest that CGA may inhibit Iso-induced VSMC damage via the suppression of ROS generation. Therefore, CGA may be a novel agent for the treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:27634104

  20. An Introductory Laboratory Exercise for Acids and Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Richard; Silberman, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Discusses an acid-base neutralization exercise requiring groups of students to determine: (1) combinations of solutions giving neutralization; (2) grouping solutions as acids or bases; and (3) ranking groups in order of concentration. (JM)

  1. The Bronsted-Lowery Acid-Base Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.

    1988-01-01

    Gives the background history of the simultaneous discovery of acid-base relationships by Johannes Bronsted and Thomas Lowry. Provides a brief biographical sketch of each. Discusses their concept of acids and bases in some detail. (CW)

  2. A Proximity-Based Programmable DNA Nanoscale Assembly Line

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hongzhou; Chao, Jie; Xiao, Shou-Jun; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2010-01-01

    Our ability to synthesize nanometer-scale particles with desired shapes and compositions offers the exciting prospect of generating new functional materials and devices by combining the particles in a controlled fashion into larger structures. Self-assembly can achieve this task efficiently, but may be subject to thermodynamic and kinetic limitations: Reactants, intermediates and products may collide with each other throughout the assembly timecourse to produce non-target instead of target species. An alternative approach to nanoscale assembly uses information-containing molecules such as DNA1 to control interactions and thereby minimize unwanted crosstalk between different components. In principle, this method should allow the stepwise and programmed construction of target products by fastening individually selected nanoscale components – much as an automobile is built on an assembly line. Here, we demonstrate that a nanoscale assembly line can indeed be realized by the judicious combination of three known DNA-based modules: a DNA origami2 tile that provides a framework and track for the assembly process, cassettes containing three distinct two-state DNA machines that serve as programmable cargo-donating devices3,4 and are attached4,5 in series to the tile, and a DNA walker that can move on the track from device to device and collect cargo. As the walker traverses the pathway prescribed by the origami tile track, it encounters sequentially the three DNA devices that can be independently switched between an ‘ON’ state allowing its cargo to be transferred to the walker, and an ‘OFF’ state where no transfer occurs. We use three different types of gold nanoparticles as cargo and show that the experimental system does indeed allow the controlled fabrication of the eight different products that can be obtained with three two-state devices. PMID:20463734

  3. A proximity-based programmable DNA nanoscale assembly line.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hongzhou; Chao, Jie; Xiao, Shou-Jun; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2010-05-13

    Our ability to synthesize nanometre-scale chemical species, such as nanoparticles with desired shapes and compositions, offers the exciting prospect of generating new functional materials and devices by combining them in a controlled fashion into larger structures. Self-assembly can achieve this task efficiently, but may be subject to thermodynamic and kinetic limitations: reactants, intermediates and products may collide with each other throughout the assembly time course to produce non-target species instead of target species. An alternative approach to nanoscale assembly uses information-containing molecules such as DNA to control interactions and thereby minimize unwanted cross-talk between different components. In principle, this method should allow the stepwise and programmed construction of target products by linking individually selected nanoscale components-much as an automobile is built on an assembly line. Here we demonstrate that a nanoscale assembly line can be realized by the judicious combination of three known DNA-based modules: a DNA origami tile that provides a framework and track for the assembly process, cassettes containing three independently controlled two-state DNA machines that serve as programmable cargo-donating devices and are attached in series to the tile, and a DNA walker that can move on the track from device to device and collect cargo. As the walker traverses the pathway prescribed by the origami tile track, it sequentially encounters the three DNA devices, each of which can be independently switched between an 'ON' state, allowing its cargo to be transferred to the walker, and an 'OFF' state, in which no transfer occurs. We use three different types of gold nanoparticle species as cargo and show that the experimental system does indeed allow the controlled fabrication of the eight different products that can be obtained with three two-state devices.

  4. Rapid DNA Sequencing by Direct Nanoscale Reading of Nucleotide Bases on Individual DNA Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, James Weifu; Meller, Amit

    2007-01-01

    Since the independent invention of DNA sequencing by Sanger and by Gilbert 30 years ago, it has grown from a small scale technique capable of reading several kilobase-pair of sequence per day into today's multibillion dollar industry. This growth has spurred the development of new sequencing technologies that do not involve either electrophoresis or Sanger sequencing chemistries. Sequencing by Synthesis (SBS) involves multiple parallel micro-sequencing addition events occurring on a surface, where data from each round is detected by imaging. New High Throughput Technologies for DNA Sequencing and Genomics is the second volume in the Perspectives in Bioanalysis series, which looks at the electroanalytical chemistry of nucleic acids and proteins, development of electrochemical sensors and their application in biomedicine and in the new fields of genomics and proteomics. The authors have expertly formatted the information for a wide variety of readers, including new developments that will inspire students and young scientists to create new tools for science and medicine in the 21st century. Reviews of complementary developments in Sanger and SBS sequencing chemistries, capillary electrophoresis and microdevice integration, MS sequencing and applications set the framework for the book.

  5. Hairpin DNA probe based surface plasmon resonance biosensor used for the activity assay of E. coli DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Luan, Qingfen; Xue, Ying; Yao, Xin; Lu, Wu

    2010-02-01

    Using hairpin DNA probe self-structure change during DNA ligation process, a sensitive, label-free and simple method of E. coli DNA ligase assay via a home-built high-resolution surface plasmon resonance (SPR) instrument was developed. The DNA ligation process was monitored in real-time and the effects of single-base mutation on the DNA ligation process were investigated. Then an assay of E. coli DNA ligase was completed with a lower detection limit (0.6 nM), wider concentration range and better reproducibility. Moreover, the influence of Quinacrine on the activity of E. coli DNA ligase was also studied, which demonstrated that our method was useful for drug screening.

  6. Measurement and theory of hydrogen bonding contribution to isosteric DNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Khakshoor, Omid; Wheeler, Steven E; Houk, K N; Kool, Eric T

    2012-02-15

    We address the recent debate surrounding the ability of 2,4-difluorotoluene (F), a low-polarity mimic of thymine (T), to form a hydrogen-bonded complex with adenine in DNA. The hydrogen bonding ability of F has been characterized as small to zero in various experimental studies, and moderate to small in computational studies. However, recent X-ray crystallographic studies of difluorotoluene in DNA/RNA have indicated, based on interatomic distances, possible hydrogen bonding interactions between F and natural bases in nucleic acid duplexes and in a DNA polymerase active site. Since F is widely used to measure electrostatic contributions to pairing and replication, it is important to quantify the impact of this isostere on DNA stability. Here, we studied the pairing stability and selectivity of this compound and a closely related variant, dichlorotoluene deoxyriboside (L), in DNA, using both experimental and computational approaches. We measured the thermodynamics of duplex formation in three sequence contexts and with all possible pairing partners by thermal melting studies using the van't Hoff approach, and for selected cases by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Experimental results showed that internal F-A pairing in DNA is destabilizing by 3.8 kcal/mol (van't Hoff, 37 °C) as compared with T-A pairing. At the end of a duplex, base-base interactions are considerably smaller; however, the net F-A interaction remains repulsive while T-A pairing is attractive. As for selectivity, F is found to be slightly selective for adenine over C, G, T by 0.5 kcal mol, as compared with thymine's selectivity of 2.4 kcal/mol. Interestingly, dichlorotoluene in DNA is slightly less destabilizing and slightly more selective than F, despite the lack of strongly electronegative fluorine atoms. Experimental data were complemented by computational results, evaluated at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) and MP2/cc-pVTZ levels of theory. These computations suggest that the pairing energy of F to A

  7. Electrochemical paper-based peptide nucleic acid biosensor for detecting human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Teengam, Prinjaporn; Siangproh, Weena; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Henry, Charles S; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2017-02-01

    A novel paper-based electrochemical biosensor was developed using an anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) probe (AQ-PNA) and graphene-polyaniline (G-PANI) modified electrode to detect human papillomavirus (HPV). An inkjet printing technique was employed to prepare the paper-based G-PANI-modified working electrode. The AQ-PNA probe baring a negatively charged amino acid at the N-terminus was immobilized onto the electrode surface through electrostatic attraction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to verify the AQ-PNA immobilization. The paper-based electrochemical DNA biosensor was used to detect a synthetic 14-base oligonucleotide target with a sequence corresponding to human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA by measuring the electrochemical signal response of the AQ label using square-wave voltammetry before and after hybridization. It was determined that the current signal significantly decreased after the addition of target DNA. This phenomenon is explained by the rigidity of PNA-DNA duplexes, which obstructs the accessibility of electron transfer from the AQ label to the electrode surface. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit of HPV type 16 DNA was found to be 2.3 nM with a linear range of 10-200 nM. The performance of this biosensor on real DNA samples was tested with the detection of PCR-amplified DNA samples from the SiHa cell line. The new method employs an inexpensive and disposable device, which easily incinerated after use and is promising for the screening and monitoring of the amount of HPV-DNA type 16 to identify the primary stages of cervical cancer.

  8. Aristoxazole analogues. Conversion of 8-nitro-1-naphthoic acid to 2-methylnaphtho[1,2-d]oxazole-9-carboxylic acid: comments on the chemical mechanism of formation of DNA adducts by the aristolochic acids.

    PubMed

    Priestap, Horacio A; Barbieri, Manuel A; Johnson, Francis

    2012-07-27

    2-Methylnaphtho[1,2-d]oxazole-9-carboxylic acid was obtained by reduction of 8-nitro-1-naphthoic acid with zinc-acetic acid. This naphthoxazole is a condensation product between an 8-nitro-1-naphthoic acid reduction intermediate and acetic acid and is a lower homologue of aristoxazole, a similar condensation product of aristolochic acid I with acetic acid that was previously reported. Both oxazoles are believed to arise via a common nitrenium/carbocation ion mechanism that is likely related to that which leads to aristolochic acid-DNA-adducts.

  9. Coronavirus phylogeny based on triplets of nucleic acids bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Liu, Yanshu; Li, Renfa; Zhu, Wen

    2006-04-01

    We considered the fully overlapping triplets of nucleotide bases and proposed a 2D graphical representation of protein sequences consisting of 20 amino acids and a stop code. Based on this 2D graphical representation, we outlined a new approach to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of coronaviruses by constructing a covariance matrix. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the two-dimensional curves.

  10. Circulating nucleic acids damage DNA of healthy cells by integrating into their genomes.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Indraneel; Khare, Naveen Kumar; Raghuram, Gorantla Venkata; Chaubal, Rohan; Khambatti, Fatema; Gupta, Deepika; Gaikwad, Ashwini; Prasannan, Preeti; Singh, Akshita; Iyer, Aishwarya; Singh, Ankita; Upadhyay, Pawan; Nair, Naveen Kumar; Mishra, Pradyumna Kumar; Dutt, Amit

    2015-03-01

    Whether nucleic acids that circulate in blood have any patho-physiological functions in the host have not been explored.We report here that far from being inert molecules, circulating nucleic acids have significant biological activities of their own that are deleterious to healthy cells of the body. Fragmented DNA and chromatin (DNAfs and Cfs) isolated from blood of cancer patients and healthy volunteers are readily taken up by a variety of cells in culture to be localized in their nuclei within a few minutes. The intra-nuclear DNAfs and Cfs associate themselves with host cell chromosomes to evoke a cellular DNA-damage-repair-response (DDR) followed by their incorporation into the host cell genomes. Whole genome sequencing detected the presence of tens of thousands of human sequence reads in the recipient mouse cells. Genomic incorporation of DNAfs and Cfs leads to dsDNA breaks and activation of apoptotic pathways in the treated cells. When injected intravenously into Balb/C mice, DNAfs and Cfs undergo genomic integration into cells of their vital organs resulting in activation of DDR and apoptotic proteins in the recipient cells. Cfs have significantly greater activity than DNAfs with respect to all parameters examined, while both DNAfs and Cfs isolated from cancer patients are more active than those from normal volunteers. All the above pathological actions of DNAfs and Cfs described above can be abrogated by concurrent treatment with DNase I and/or anti-histone antibody complexed nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that circulating DNAfs and Cfs are physiological, continuously arising, endogenous DNA damaging agents with implications to ageing and a multitude of human pathologies including initiation of cancer.

  11. Selection and identification of DNA aptamers against okadaic acid for biosensing application.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Shimaa; Ng, Andy; Siaj, Mohamed; Tavares, Ana C; Zourob, Mohammed

    2013-12-17

    This work describes the selection and identification of DNA aptamers that bind with high affinity and specificity to okadaic acid (OA), a lipophilic marine biotoxin that accumulates in shellfish. The aptamers selected using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) exhibited dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. The aptamer with the highest affinity was then used for the fabrication of a label-free electrochemical biosensor for okadaic acid detection. The aptamer was first immobilized on the gold electrode by a self-assembly approach through Au-S interaction. The binding of okadaic acid to the aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface induces an alteration of the aptamer conformation causing a significant decrease in the electron-transfer resistance monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The aptasensor showed a linear range for the concentrations of OA between 100 pg/mL and 60 ng/mL with a detection limit of 70 pg/mL. The dissociation constant of okadaic acid with the aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface showed good agreement with that determined using fluorescence assay in solution. Moreover, the aptasensor did not show cross-reactivity toward toxins with structures similar to okadaic acid such as dinophysis toxin-1 and 2 (DTX-1, DTX-2). Further biosensing applications of the selected aptamers are expected to offer promising alternatives to the traditional analytical and immunological methods for OA detection.

  12. Ultrasensitive DNA detection by cycle isothermal amplification based on nicking endonuclease and its application to logic gates.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuemei; Ding, Tianrong; Sun, Li; Mao, Changming

    2011-12-15

    In recent years, an intense interest has grown in the DNA logic gates having high potential for computation at literally the "nano-size" level. A limitation of traditional DNA logic gates is that each target strand hybridizes with only a single copy of the probe. This 1:1 hybridization radio limits the gain of the approach and thus its sensitivity. The exponential amplification of nucleic acids has become a core technology in medical diagnostics and has been widely used for the construction of DNA sensor, DNA nanomachine and DNA sequencing. It would be of great interest to develop DNA-based logic systems with exponential amplification for the output signal. In the present study, a series of three-input DNA logic gates with the cycle isothermal amplification based on nicking endonuclease (NEase) are designed. Very low concentrations of the analytes were sufficient to initiate an autocatalytic cascade, achieving a significant improvement of the detection limit, 100-fold improvement compared to the non-autocatalytic system. This was achieved by engineering a simple and flexible biological circuit designed to initiate a cascade of events to detect and amplify a specific DNA sequence. This procedure has the potential to greatly simplify the logic operation because amplification can be performed in "one-pot".

  13. The amplification effect of functionalized gold nanoparticles on the binding of anticancer drug dacarbazine to DNA and DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qin; Wang, Xuemei; Fu, Degang

    2008-11-01

    The promising application of functionalized gold nanoparticles to amplify the performance of biosensors and relevant biomolecular recognition processes has been explored in this paper. Our observations illustrate the apparent enhancement effect of the gold nanoparticles on the electrochemical response of the anticancer drug dacarbazine (DTIC) binding to DNA and DNA bases, indicating that these functionalized gold nanoparticles could readily facilitate the specific interactions between DTIC and DNA/DNA bases. This raises the potential valuable applications of these biocompatible nanoparticles in the promising biosensors and biomedical engineering.

  14. Mathematical modeling of acid-base physiology

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F.

    2015-01-01

    pH is one of the most important parameters in life, influencing virtually every biological process at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body level. Thus, for cells, it is critical to regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and, for multicellular organisms, to regulate extracellular pH (pHo). pHi regulation depends on the opposing actions of plasma-membrane transporters that tend to increase pHi, and others that tend to decrease pHi. In addition, passive fluxes of uncharged species (e.g., CO2, NH3) and charged species (e.g., HCO3− , NH4+) perturb pHi. These movements not only influence one another, but also perturb the equilibria of a multitude of intracellular and extracellular buffers. Thus, even at the level of a single cell, perturbations in acid-base reactions, diffusion, and transport are so complex that it is impossible to understand them without a quantitative model. Here we summarize some mathematical models developed to shed light onto the complex interconnected events triggered by acids-base movements. We then describe a mathematical model of a spherical cell–which to our knowledge is the first one capable of handling a multitude of buffer reaction–that our team has recently developed to simulate changes in pHi and pHo caused by movements of acid-base equivalents across the plasma membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Finally, we extend our work to a consideration of the effects of simultaneous CO2 and HCO3− influx into a cell, and envision how future models might extend to other cell types (e.g., erythrocytes) or tissues (e.g., renal proximal-tubule epithelium) important for whole-body pH homeostasis. PMID:25617697

  15. Positively charged polymer brush-functionalized filter paper for DNA sequence determination following Dot blot hybridization employing a pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Laopa, Praethong S; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Hoven, Voravee P

    2013-01-07

    As inspired by the Dot blot analysis, a well known technique in molecular biology and genetics for detecting biomolecules, a new paper-based platform for colorimetric detection of specific DNA sequences employing peptide nucleic acid (PNA) as a probe has been developed. In this particular study, a pyrrolidinyl PNA bearing a conformationally rigid d-prolyl-2-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid backbone (acpcPNA) was used as a probe. The filter paper was modified to be positively charged with grafted polymer brushes of quaternized poly(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (QPDMAEMA) prepared by surface-initiated polymerization of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate from the filter paper via ARGET ATRP followed by quaternization with methyl iodide. Following the Dot blot format, a DNA target was first immobilized via electrostatic interactions between the positive charges of the QPDMAEMA brushes and negative charges of the phosphate backbone of DNA. Upon hybridization with the biotinylated pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (b-PNA) probe, the immobilized DNA can be detected by naked eye observation of the yellow product generated by the enzymatic reaction employing HRP-labeled streptavidin. It has been demonstrated that this newly developed assay was capable of discriminating between complementary and single base mismatch targets at a detection limit of at least 10 fmol. In addition, the QPDMAEMA-grafted filter paper exhibited a superior performance to the commercial membranes, namely Nylon 66 and nitrocellulose.

  16. Bipolar Membranes for Acid Base Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthamatten, Mitchell; Roddecha, Supacharee; Jorne, Jacob; Coughlan, Anna

    2011-03-01

    Rechargeable batteries can provide grid-scale electricity storage to match power generation with consumption and promote renewable energy sources. Flow batteries offer modular and flexible design, low cost per kWh and high efficiencies. A novel flow battery concept will be presented based on acid-base neutralization where protons (H+) and hydroxyl (OH-) ions react electrochemically to produce water. The large free energy of this highly reversible reaction can be stored chemically, and, upon discharge, can be harvested as usable electricity. The acid-base flow battery concept avoids the use of a sluggish oxygen electrode and utilizes the highly reversible hydrogen electrode, thus eliminating the need for expensive noble metal catalysts. The proposed flow battery is a hybrid of a battery and a fuel cell---hydrogen gas storing chemical energy is produced at one electrode and is immediately consumed at the other electrode. The two electrodes are exposed to low and high pH solutions, and these solutions are separated by a hybrid membrane containing a hybrid cation and anion exchange membrane (CEM/AEM). Membrane design will be discussed, along with ion-transport data for synthesized membranes.

  17. Running DNA Mini-Gels in 20 Minutes or Less Using Sodium Boric Acid Buffer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Kristin P.; Bielec, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Providing a biotechnology experience for students can be challenging on several levels, and time is a real constraint for many experiments. Many DNA based methods require a gel electrophoresis step, and although some biotechnology procedures have convenient break points, gel electrophoresis does not. In addition to the time required for loading…

  18. Photocurable bioadhesive based on lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Marques, D S; Santos, J M C; Ferreira, P; Correia, T R; Correia, I J; Gil, M H; Baptista, C M S G

    2016-01-01

    Novel photocurable and low molecular weight oligomers based on l-lactic acid with proven interest to be used as bioadhesive were successfully manufactured. Preparation of lactic acid oligomers with methacrylic end functionalizations was carried out in the absence of catalyst or solvents by self-esterification in two reaction steps: telechelic lactic acid oligomerization with OH end groups and further functionalization with methacrylic anhydride. The final adhesive composition was achieved by the addition of a reported biocompatible photoinitiator (Irgacure® 2959). Preliminary in vitro biodegradability was investigated by hydrolytic degradation in PBS (pH=7.4) at 37 °C. The adhesion performance was evaluated using glued aminated substrates (gelatine pieces) subjected to pull-to-break test. Surface energy measured by contact angles is lower than the reported values of the skin and blood. The absence of cytoxicity was evaluated using human fibroblasts. A notable antimicrobial behaviour was observed using two bacterial models (Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli). The cured material exhibited a strong thrombogenic character when placed in contact with blood, which can be predicted as a haemostatic effect for bleeding control. This novel material was subjected to an extensive characterization showing great potential for bioadhesive or other biomedical applications where biodegradable and biocompatible photocurable materials are required.

  19. Inhibition of recombinase polymerase amplification by background DNA: a lateral flow-based method for enriching target DNA.

    PubMed

    Rohrman, Brittany; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-02-03

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) may be used to detect a variety of pathogens, often after minimal sample preparation. However, previous work has shown that whole blood inhibits RPA. In this paper, we show that the concentrations of background DNA found in whole blood prevent the amplification of target DNA by RPA. First, using an HIV-1 RPA assay with known concentrations of nonspecific background DNA, we show that RPA tolerates more background DNA when higher HIV-1 target concentrations are present. Then, using three additional assays, we demonstrate that the maximum amount of background DNA that may be tolerated in RPA reactions depends on the DNA sequences used in the assay. We also show that changing the RPA reaction conditions, such as incubation time and primer concentration, has little effect on the ability of RPA to function when high concentrations of background DNA are present. Finally, we develop and characterize a lateral flow-based method for enriching the target DNA concentration relative to the background DNA concentration. This sample processing method enables RPA of 10(4) copies of HIV-1 DNA in a background of 0-14 μg of background DNA. Without lateral flow sample enrichment, the maximum amount of background DNA tolerated is 2 μg when 10(6) copies of HIV-1 DNA are present. This method requires no heating or other external equipment, may be integrated with upstream DNA extraction and purification processes, is compatible with the components of lysed blood, and has the potential to detect HIV-1 DNA in infant whole blood with high proviral loads.

  20. Functional nucleic-acid-based sensors for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sett, Arghya; Das, Suradip; Bora, Utpal

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to replace conventional chromatographic methods for environmental monitoring with cheaper and easy to use biosensors for precise detection and estimation of hazardous environmental toxicants, water or air borne pathogens as well as various other chemicals and biologics are gaining momentum. Out of the various types of biosensors classified according to their bio-recognition principle, nucleic-acid-based sensors have shown high potential in terms of cost, sensitivity, and specificity. The discovery of catalytic activities of RNA (ribozymes) and DNA (DNAzymes) which could be triggered by divalent metallic ions paved the way for their extensive use in detection of heavy metal contaminants in environment. This was followed with the invention of small oligonucleotide sequences called aptamers which can fold into specific 3D conformation under suitable conditions after binding to target molecules. Due to their high affinity, specificity, reusability, stability, and non-immunogenicity to vast array of targets like small and macromolecules from organic, inorganic, and biological origin, they can often be exploited as sensors in industrial waste management, pollution control, and environmental toxicology. Further, rational combination of the catalytic activity of DNAzymes and RNAzymes along with the sequence-specific binding ability of aptamers have given rise to the most advanced form of functional nucleic-acid-based sensors called aptazymes. Functional nucleic-acid-based sensors (FNASs) can be conjugated with fluorescent molecules, metallic nanoparticles, or quantum dots to aid in rapid detection of a variety of target molecules by target-induced structure switch (TISS) mode. Although intensive research is being carried out for further improvements of FNAs as sensors, challenges remain in integrating such bio-recognition element with advanced transduction platform to enable its use as a networked analytical system for tailor made analysis of environmental

  1. Nucleic Acid-based Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Using Integrated Microfluidic Platform Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Clarissa; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Batt, Carl A.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of nucleic acid-based pathogen detection methods offers increased sensitivity and specificity over traditional microbiological techniques, driving the development of portable, integrated biosensors. The miniaturization and automation of integrated detection systems presents a significant advantage for rapid, portable field-based testing. In this review, we highlight current developments and directions in nucleic acid-based micro total analysis systems for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Recent progress in the miniaturization of microfluidic processing steps for cell capture, DNA extraction and purification, polymerase chain reaction, and product detection are detailed. Discussions include strategies and challenges for implementation of an integrated portable platform. PMID:22412335

  2. Gelatin-based nanoparticles as DNA delivery systems: Synthesis, physicochemical and biocompatible characterization.

    PubMed

    Morán, M C; Rosell, N; Ruano, G; Busquets, M A; Vinardell, M P

    2015-10-01

    The rapidly rising demand for therapeutic grade DNA molecules requires associated improvements in encapsulation and delivery technologies. One of the challenges for the efficient intracellular delivery of therapeutic biomolecules after their cell internalization by endocytosis is to manipulate the non-productive trafficking from endosomes to lysosomes, where degradation may occur. The combination of the endosomal acidity with the endosomolytic capability of the nanocarrier can increase the intracellular delivery of many drugs, genes and proteins, which, therefore, might enhance their therapeutic efficacy. Among the suitable compounds, the gelification properties of gelatin as well as the strong dependence of gelatin ionization with pH makes this compound an interesting candidate to be used to the effective intracellular delivery of active biomacromolecules. In the present work, gelatin (either high or low gel strength) and protamine sulfate has been selected to form particles by interaction of oppositely charged compounds. Particles in the absence of DNA (binary system) and in the presence of DNA (ternary system) have been prepared. The physicochemical characterization (particle size, polydispersity index and degree of DNA entrapment) have been evaluated. Cytotoxicity experiments have shown that the isolated systems and the resulting gelatin-based nanoparticles are essentially non-toxic. The pH-dependent hemolysis assay and the response of the nanoparticles co-incubated in buffers at defined pHs that mimic extracellular, early endosomal and late endo-lysosomal environments demonstrated that the nanoparticles tend to destabilize and DNA can be successfully released. It was found that, in addition to the imposed compositions, the gel strength of gelatin is a controlling parameter of the final properties of these nanoparticles. The results indicate that these gelatin-based nanoparticles have excellent properties as highly potent and non-toxic intracellular delivery

  3. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities.

    PubMed

    Gines, Guillaume; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier

    2014-02-17

    DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes' activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL(-1) and 50 μg mL(-1) of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair activities.

  4. Hairpin DNA Switch for Ultrasensitive Spectrophotometric Detection of DNA Hybridization Based on Gold Nanoparticles and Enzyme Signal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Maham, Aihui; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-08-01

    A novel DNA detection platform based on a hairpin-DNA switch, nanoparticles, and enzyme signal amplification for ultrasensitive detection of DNA hybridization has been developed in this work. In this DNA assay, a “stem-loop” DNA probe dually labeled with a thiol at its 5’ end and a biotin at its 3’ end, respectively, was used. This probe was immobilized on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) anchored by a protein, globulin, on a 96-well microplate. In the absence of target DNA, the immobilized probe with the stem-loop structure shields the biotin from being approached by a bulky horseradish peroxidase linked-avidin (avidin-HRP) conjugate due to the steric hindrance. However, in the presence of target DNA, the hybridization between the hairpin DNA probe and the target DNA causes significant conformational change of the probe, which forces biotin away from the surface of AuNPs. As a result, the biotin becomes accessible by the avidin-HRP, and the target hybridization event can be sensitively detected via the HRP catalyzed substrate 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine using spectrophometric method. Some experimental parameters governing the performance of the assay have been optimized. At optimal conditions, this DNA assay can detect DNA at the concentration of femtomolar level by means of a signal amplification strategy based on the combination of enzymes and nanoparticles. This approach also has shown excellent specificity to distinguish single-base mismatches of DNA targets because of the intrinsic high selectivity of the hairpin DNA probe.

  5. Teaching Acid/Base Physiology in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Ulla G.; Plovsing, Ronni; Hansen, Klaus; Laursen, Bent G.; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    Acid/base homeostasis is one of the most difficult subdisciplines of physiology for medical students to master. A different approach, where theory and practice are linked, might help students develop a deeper understanding of acid/base homeostasis. We therefore set out to develop a laboratory exercise in acid/base physiology that would provide…

  6. A clinical approach to acid-base conundrums.

    PubMed

    Garrubba, Carl; Truscott, Judy

    2016-04-01

    Acid-base disorders can provide essential clues to underlying patient conditions. This article provides a simple, practical approach to identifying simple acid-base disorders and their compensatory mechanisms. Using this stepwise approach, clinicians can quickly identify and appropriately treat acid-base disorders.

  7. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  8. A dynamic bead-based microarray for parallel DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochol, R. D.; Casavant, B. P.; Dueck, M. E.; Lee, L. P.; Lin, L.

    2011-05-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed and constructed by means of micromachining processes to integrate both microfluidic mixing of mobile microbeads and hydrodynamic microbead arraying capabilities on a single chip to simultaneously detect multiple bio-molecules. The prototype system has four parallel reaction chambers, which include microchannels of 18 × 50 µm2 cross-sectional area and a microfluidic mixing section of 22 cm length. Parallel detection of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences was achieved via molecular beacon probes immobilized on polystyrene microbeads of 16 µm diameter. Experimental results show quantitative detection of three distinct DNA oligonucleotide sequences from the Hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome with single base-pair mismatch specificity. Our dynamic bead-based microarray offers an effective microfluidic platform to increase parallelization of reactions and improve microbead handling for various biological applications, including bio-molecule detection, medical diagnostics and drug screening.

  9. Nanoparticles based DNA conjugates for detection of pathogenic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamdagni, Pragati; Khatri, Poonam; Rana, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases have been on rise in the recent past. Early diagnosis plays a role as important as proper treatment and prophylaxis. The current practices of detection are time consuming which may result in unnecessary delays in treatment. Advances in nanodiagnostic approaches have been in focus lately. The rising interest and better understanding of nanoparticles have led to opening up of new frontiers in the concerned area. Optical properties of nanoparticles are being exploited to design detection systems that can provide fast, one-step and reliable results. Based on conserved DNA sequences unique to the target organism, the results offer accuracy comparable to conventional tests. Further, visual or spectrophotometric analysis omits the need of costly apparatus for result interpretation. The present review aims at putting together the information on nanoparticles based DNA conjugate systems for detection of pathogenic microorganisms.

  10. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases.

  11. Suberoylanilide Hydroxyamic Acid Modification of Chromatin Architecture Affects DNA Break Formation and Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sheetal; Le Hongan; Shih, S.-J.; Ho, Bay; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Chromatin-modifying compounds that inhibit the activity of histone deacetylases have shown potency as radiosensitizers, but the action of these drugs at a molecular level is not clear. Here we investigated the effect of suberoylanilide hydroxyamic acid (SAHA) on DNA breaks and their repair and induction of rearrangements. Methods and Materials: The effect of SAHA on both clonogenic survival and repair was assessed using cell lines SCC-25, MCF7, and TK6. In order to study unique DNA double-strand breaks, anti-CD95 antibody was employed to introduce a DNA double-strand break at a known location within the 11q23 region. The effects of SAHA on DNA cleavage and rearrangements were analyzed by ligation-mediated PCR and inverse PCR, respectively. Results: SAHA acts as radiosensitizer at 1 {mu}M, with dose enhancement factors (DEFs) at 10% survival of: SCC-25 - 1.24 +- 0.05; MCF7 - 1.16 +- 0.09 and TK6 - 1.17 +- 0.05, and it reduced the capacity of SCC-25 cells to repair radiation induced lesions. Additionally, SAHA treatment diffused site-specific fragmentation over at least 1 kbp in TK6 cells. Chromosomal rearrangements produced in TK6 cells exposed to SAHA showed a reduction in microhomology at the breakpoint between 11q23 and partner chromosomes. Conclusions: SAHA shows efficacy as a radiosensitizer at clinically obtainable levels. In its presence, targeted DNA strand breaks occur over an expanded region, indicating increased chromatin access. The rejoining of such breaks is degraded by SAHA when measured as rearrangements at the molecular level and rejoining that contributes to cell survival.

  12. Impact of boric acid exposure at different concentrations on testicular DNA and male rats fertility.

    PubMed

    El-Dakdoky, Mai H; Abd El-Wahab, Hanan M F

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of exposure to three levels of boric acid (BA) on male rats reproduction, fertility and progeny outcome, with emphasis on testicular DNA level and quality. Adult male rats (12 weeks old) were treated orally with 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg bwt/d of BA for 60 d. The results indicated that BA administration at 125 mg/kg bwt had no adverse effects on fertility, sperm characteristics or prenatal development of the impregnated females. However, at dose 250 mg, BA treatment significantly increased serum nitric oxide, testosterone, estradiol levels and testicular boron and calcium levels and also significantly reduced serum arginase activity, sperm quality and testicular DNA content with minor DNA fragmentation. The impact of BA exposure at dose 250 mg on male rats fertility was translated into increases in pre-implantation loss with a resulting decrease in the number of live fetuses/litter. In addition to the significant alteration of biochemical measurements, observed at dose 250 mg, administration of BA at 500 mg caused testicular atrophy, severe damage of spermatogenesis, spermiation failure and significant reduction of Mg and Zn testicular levels. None of the male rats, treated with 500 mg/kg bwt, could impregnate untreated females, suggesting the occurrence of definitive loss of fertility. In conclusion, BA impaired fertility, in a dose-dependant manner, by targeting the highly proliferative cells, the germ cells, through decreasing DNA synthetic rate rather than the induction of DNA damage.

  13. Measurement of oxidative damage at pyrimidine bases in gamma-irradiated DNA.

    PubMed

    Douki, T; Delatour, T; Paganon, F; Cadet, J

    1996-01-01

    Oxidized nucleobases represent one of the main classes of damage induced in DNA by ionizing radiation. Emphasis was placed in this work on the measurement of four oxidized pyrimidine bases, including 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil (5-HMUra), 5-formyluracil (5-ForUra), 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OHCyt), and 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHUra), in isolated DNA upon exposure to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. For this purpose, both high performance liquid chromatography associated with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used. Conditions of hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond were carefully checked in order to achieve a quantitative release of the lesions. We showed that 60% formic acid treatment leads to the decomposition of the four lesions studied. On the other hand, hydrolysis based on the use of either 88% formic acid or 70% hydrogen fluoride in pyridine (HF/Pyr) allowed the quantitative release of the modified bases, with the exception of 5-HMUra when the latter reagent was utilized. A dose course study of the radiation-induced formation of 5-HMUra and 5-ForUra in DNA by using the GC-MS assay showed that the latter lesion was produced in a 2.1-fold higher yield than the former one. HF/Pyr and 88% formic acid hydrolysis provided similar results for 5-ForUra, indicating the reliability of both techniques for the measurement of this lesion. For 5-OHUra and 5-OHCyt, the level of modification determined by GC-MS analysis was higher after 88% formic acid treatment than upon HF/Pyr hydrolysis. When DNA was enzymatically digested and analyzed by HPLC-EC for 5-OHdCyd and 5-OHdUrd, the results were very close to those obtained by GC-MS following HF/Pyr treatment. It was concluded that additional amounts of both 5-OHUra and 5-OHCyt are produced during the 88% formic acid treatment from radiation-induced 5,6-saturated pyrimidine precursors. It is likely that cytosine and uracil diols are involved in this reaction. The

  14. How are base excision DNA repair pathways deployed in vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Upasna; Demple, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the base excision repair (BER) system for DNA more than 40 years ago, new branches of the pathway have been revealed at the biochemical level by in vitro studies. Largely for technical reasons, however, the confirmation of these subpathways in vivo has been elusive. We review methods that have been used to explore BER in mammalian cells, indicate where there are important knowledge gaps to fill, and suggest a way to address them. PMID:28357058

  15. How are base excision DNA repair pathways deployed in vivo?

    PubMed

    Thapar, Upasna; Demple, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the base excision repair (BER) system for DNA more than 40 years ago, new branches of the pathway have been revealed at the biochemical level by in vitro studies. Largely for technical reasons, however, the confirmation of these subpathways in vivo has been elusive. We review methods that have been used to explore BER in mammalian cells, indicate where there are important knowledge gaps to fill, and suggest a way to address them.

  16. Bifacial Base-Pairing Behaviors of 5-Hydroxyuracil DNA Bases through Hydrogen Bonding and Metal Coordination.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Nishiyama, Kotaro; Mashima, Tsukasa; Katahira, Masato; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2015-10-12

    A novel bifacial ligand-bearing nucleobase, 5-hydroxyuracil (U(OH) ), which forms both a hydrogen-bonded base pair (U(OH) -A) and a metal-mediated base pair (U(OH) -M-U(OH) ) has been developed. The U(OH) -M-U(OH) base pairs were quantitatively formed in the presence of lanthanide ions such as Gd(III) when U(OH) -U(OH) pairs were consecutively incorporated into DNA duplexes. This result established metal-assisted duplex stabilization as well as DNA-templated assembly of lanthanide ions. Notably, a duplex possessing U(OH) -A base pairs was destabilized by addition of Gd(III) ions. This observation suggests that the hybridization behaviors of the U(OH) -containing DNA strands are altered by metal complexation. Thus, the U(OH) nucleobase with a bifacial base-pairing property holds great promise as a component for metal-responsive DNA materials.

  17. DNA-based identification of spices: DNA isolation, whole genome amplification, and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Focke, Felix; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus

    2011-01-26

    Usually spices are identified morphologically using simple methods like magnifying glasses or microscopic instruments. On the other hand, molecular biological methods like the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enable an accurate and specific detection also in complex matrices. Generally, the origins of spices are plants with diverse genetic backgrounds and relationships. The processing methods used for the production of spices are complex and individual. Consequently, the development of a reliable DNA-based method for spice analysis is a challenging intention. However, once established, this method will be easily adapted to less difficult food matrices. In the current study, several alternative methods for the isolation of DNA from spices have been developed and evaluated in detail with regard to (i) its purity (photometric), (ii) yield (fluorimetric methods), and (iii) its amplifiability (PCR). Whole genome amplification methods were used to preamplify isolates to improve the ratio between amplifiable DNA and inhibiting substances. Specific primer sets were designed, and the PCR conditions were optimized to detect 18 spices selectively. Assays of self-made spice mixtures were performed to proof the applicability of the developed methods.

  18. CD44-Targeted Hyaluronic Acid-Coated Redox-Responsive Hyperbranched Poly(amido amine)/Plasmid DNA Ternary Nanoassemblies for Efficient Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jijin; Chen, Xinyi; Ren, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xiulei; Fang, Xiaoling; Sha, Xianyi

    2016-07-20

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), which can specifically bind to CD44 receptor, is a specific ligand for targeting to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells. The current study aimed to develop ternary nanoassemblies based on HA-coating for targeted gene delivery to CD44-positive tumors. A novel reducible hyperbranched poly(amido amine) (RHB) was assembled with plasmid DNA (pDNA) to form RHB/pDNA nanoassemblies. HA/RHB/pDNA nanoassemblies were fabricated by coating HA on the surface of the RHB/pDNA nanoassembly core through electrostatic interaction. After optimization, HA/RHB/pDNA nanoassemblies were spherical, core-shell nanoparticles with nanosize (187.6 ± 11.4 nm) and negative charge (-9.1 ± 0.3 mV). The ternary nanoassemblies could efficiently protect the condensed pDNA from enzymatic degradation by DNase I, and HA could significantly improve the stability of nanoassemblies in the sodium heparin solution or serum in vitro. As expected, HA significantly decreased the cytotoxicity of RHB/pDNA nanoassemblies due to the negative surface charges. Moreover, it revealed that HA/RHB/pDNA nanoassemblies showed higher transfection activity than RHB/pDNA nanoassemblies in B16F10 cells, especially in the presence of serum in vitro. Because of the active recognition between HA and CD44 receptor, there was significantly different transfection efficiency between B16F10 (CD44+) and NIH3T3 (CD44-) cells after treatment with HA/RHB/pDNA nanoassemblies. In addition, the cellular targeting and transfection activity of HA/RHB/pDNA nanoassemblies were further evaluated in vivo. The results indicated that the interaction between HA and CD44 receptor dramatically improved the accumulation of HA/RHB/pDNA nanoassemblies in CD44-positive tumor, leading to higher gene expression than RHB/pDNA nanoassemblies. Therefore, HA/RHB/pDNA ternary nanoassemblies may be a potential gene vector for delivery of therapeutic genes to treat CD44-overexpressing tumors in vivo.

  19. Oleic acid-based gemini surfactants with carboxylic acid headgroups.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Umemoto, Naoki; Matsuda, Wataru; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Anionic gemini surfactants with carboxylic acid headgroups have been synthesized from oleic acid. The hydrocarbon chain is covalently bound to the terminal carbonyl group of oleic acid via an ester bond, and the carboxylic acid headgroups are introduced to the cis double bond of oleic acid via disuccinyl units. The surfactants exhibit pH-dependent protonation-deprotonation behavior in aqueous solutions. In alkaline solutions (pH 9 in the presence of 10 mmol dm(-3) NaCl as the background electrolyte), the surfactants can lower the surface tension as well as form molecular assemblies, even in the region of low surfactant concentrations. Under acidic (pH 3) or neutral (pH 6-7) conditions, the surfactants are intrinsically insoluble in aqueous media and form a monolayer at the air/water interface. In this study, we have investigated physicochemical properties such as the function of the hydrocarbon chain length by means of static surface tension, pyrene fluorescence, dynamic light scattering, surface pressure-area isotherms, and infrared external reflection measurements.

  20. The interaction of poly(ethylenimine) with nucleic acids and its use in determination of nucleic acids based on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying-lin; Li, Yuan-zong

    2004-01-01

    For the first time, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) was used to determine nucleic acids with a light scattering technique using a common spectrofluorometer. The interaction of PEI with DNA results in greatly enhanced intensity of light scattering at 300 nm, which is caused by the formation of the big particles between DNA and PEI. Based on this, a new quantitative method for nucleic acid determination in aqueous solutions has been developed. Under the optimum conditions, the enhanced intensity of light scattering is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acid in the range of 0.01-10.0 μg ml -1 for herring sperm DNA (hsDNA), 0.02-10.0 μg ml -1 for calf thymus DNA (ctDNA), 0.02-20.0 μg ml -1 for yeast RNA (yRNA). The detection limits are 5.3, 9.9, and 13.7 ng ml -1, respectively. Synthetic samples were determined satisfactorily. At the same time, the light scattering technique has been successfully used to obtain the information on the effects of pH and ionic strength on the formation and the stability of the DNA/PEI complex, which is important in some fields such as genetic engineering and gene transfer. Using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescent probe, the binding of PEI with hsDNA was studied. Both the binding constant of EB with DNA and the number of binding sites per nucleotide decrease with increasing concentration of PEI, indicating noncompetitive inhibition of EB binding to DNA in the presence of PEI. And the association constant of PEI to DNA obtained is 1.2×10 5 M -1. IR-spectra show that PEI interacts with DNA through both the phosphate groups and the bases of DNA and the formation of DNA/PEI complex may cause the change of the conformation of the DNA secondary structure, which is also proved by UV-spectra.

  1. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  2. Free energy analysis and mechanism of base pair stacking in nicked DNA

    PubMed Central

    Häse, Florian; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium of stacked and unstacked base pairs is of central importance for all nucleic acid structure formation processes. The stacking equilibrium is influenced by intramolecular interactions between nucleosides but also by interactions with the solvent. Realistic simulations on nucleic acid structure formation and flexibility require an accurate description of the stacking geometry and stability and its sequence dependence. Free energy simulations have been conducted on a series of double stranded DNA molecules with a central strand break (nick) in one strand. The change in free energy upon unstacking was calculated for all ten possible base pair steps using umbrella sampling along a center-of-mass separation coordinate and including a comparison of different water models. Comparison to experimental studies indicates qualitative agreement of the stability order but a general overestimation of base pair stacking interactions in the simulations. A significant dependence of calculated nucleobase stacking free energies on the employed water model was observed with the tendency of stacking free energies being more accurately reproduced by more complex water models. The simulation studies also suggest a mechanism of stacking/unstacking that involves significant motions perpendicular to the reaction coordinate and indicate that the equilibrium nicked base pair step may slightly differ from regular B-DNA geometry in a sequence-dependent manner. PMID:27407106

  3. Genome defense against exogenous nucleic acids in eukaryotes by non-coding DNA occurs through CRISPR-like mechanisms in the cytosol and the bodyguard protection in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guo-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this review, the protective function of the abundant non-coding DNA in the eukaryotic genome is discussed from the perspective of genome defense against exogenous nucleic acids. Peripheral non-coding DNA has been proposed to act as a bodyguard that protects the genome and the central protein-coding sequences from ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. In the proposed mechanism of protection, the radicals generated by water radiolysis in the cytosol and IR energy are absorbed, blocked and/or reduced by peripheral heterochromatin; then, the DNA damage sites in the heterochromatin are removed and expelled from the nucleus to the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes, most likely through the formation of extrachromosomal circular DNA. To strengthen this hypothesis, this review summarizes the experimental evidence supporting the protective function of non-coding DNA against exogenous nucleic acids. Based on these data, I hypothesize herein about the presence of an additional line of defense formed by small RNAs in the cytosol in addition to their bodyguard protection mechanism in the nucleus. Therefore, exogenous nucleic acids may be initially inactivated in the cytosol by small RNAs generated from non-coding DNA via mechanisms similar to the prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas system. Exogenous nucleic acids may enter the nucleus, where some are absorbed and/or blocked by heterochromatin and others integrate into chromosomes. The integrated fragments and the sites of DNA damage are removed by repetitive non-coding DNA elements in the heterochromatin and excluded from the nucleus. Therefore, the normal eukaryotic genome and the central protein-coding sequences are triply protected by non-coding DNA against invasion by exogenous nucleic acids. This review provides evidence supporting the protective role of non-coding DNA in genome defense.

  4. Measurement of oxidative DNA damage by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: ethanethiol prevents artifactual generation of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Jenner, A; England, T G; Aruoma, O I; Halliwell, B

    1998-04-15

    Analysis of oxidative damage to DNA bases by GC-MS enables identification of a range of base oxidation products, but requires a derivatization procedure. However, derivatization at high temperature in the presence of air can cause 'artifactual' oxidation of some undamaged bases, leading to an overestimation of their oxidation products, including 8-hydroxyguanine. Therefore derivatization conditions that could minimize this problem were investigated. Decreasing derivatization temperature to 23 degrees C lowered levels of 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine, 5-hydroxycytosine and 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil measured by GC-MS in hydrolysed calf thymus DNA. Addition of the reducing agent ethanethiol (5%, v/v) to DNA samples during trimethylsilylation at 90 degrees C also decreased levels of these four oxidized DNA bases as well as 5-hydroxyuracil. Removal of guanine from hydrolysed DNA samples by treatment with guanase, prior to derivatization, resulted in 8-hydroxyguanine levels (54-59 pmol/mg of DNA) that were significantly lower than samples not pretreated with guanase, independent of the derivatization conditions used. Only hydrolysed DNA samples that were derivatized at 23 degrees C in the presence of ethanethiol produced 8-hydroxyguanine levels (56+/-8 pmol/mg of DNA) that were as low as those of guanase-pretreated samples. Levels of other oxidized bases were similar to samples derivatized at 23 degrees C without ethanethiol, except for 5-hydroxycytosine and 5-hydroxyuracil, which were further decreased by ethanethiol. Levels of 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine and 5-hydroxycytosine measured in hydrolysed calf thymus DNA by the improved procedures described here were comparable with those reported previously by HPLC with electrochemical detection and by GC-MS with prepurification to remove undamaged base. We conclude that artifactual oxidation of DNA bases during derivatization can be prevented by decreasing the temperature to 23 degrees C, removing air from the

  5. Identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2005-02-08

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  6. Anodized aluminum oxide-based capacitance sensors for the direct detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bongkeun; Yeo, Unjin; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2010-03-15

    We fabricated a capacitance sensor based on an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous structure to detect DNA hybridization. We utilized Au film deposited on the surface of the AAO membrane and Au nanowires infiltrating the nanopores as the top and bottom electrodes, respectively. When completely complementary target DNA molecules were added to the sensor-immobilized DNA molecule probes, the capacitance was reduced; with a concentration of 1pM, the capacitance decreased by approximately 10%. We measured the capacitance change for different concentrations of the target DNA solution. A linear relationship was found between the capacitance change and DNA concentration on a semi-logarithmic scale. We also investigated the possibility of detecting DNA molecules with a single-base mismatch to the probe DNA molecule. In contrast to complementary target DNA molecules, the addition of one-base mismatch DNA molecules caused no significant change in capacitance, demonstrating that DNA hybridization was detected with single nucleotide polymorphism sensitivity.

  7. A Graphene-Based Biosensing Platform Based on Regulated Release of an Aptameric DNA Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yu; Chen, Yongli; Li, Song; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-11-09

    A novel biosensing platform was developed by integrating an aptamer-based DNA biosensor with graphene oxide (GO) for rapid and facile detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, as a model target). The DNA biosensor, which is locked by GO, is designed to contain two sensing modules that include recognition site for ATP and self-replication track that yields the nicking domain for Nt.BbvCI. By taking advantage of the different binding affinity of single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and aptamer-target complex toward GO, the DNA biosensor could be efficiently released from GO in the presence of target with the help of a complementary DNA strand (CPDNA) that partially hybridizes to the DNA biosensor. Then, the polymerization/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal amplification could be triggered, leading to the synthesis of massive DNA amplicons, thus achieving an enhanced sensitivity with a wide linear dynamic response range of four orders of magnitude and good selectivity. This biosensing strategy expands the applications of GO-DNA nanobiointerfaces in biological sensing, showing great potential in fundamental research and biomedical diagnosis.

  8. Porous hyaluronic acid hydrogels for localized nonviral DNA delivery in a diabetic wound healing model.

    PubMed

    Tokatlian, Talar; Cam, Cynthia; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-05-01

    The treatment of impaired wounds requires the use of biomaterials that can provide mechanical and biological queues to the surrounding environment to promote angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, and wound closure. Porous hydrogels show promotion of angiogenesis, even in the absence of proangiogenic factors. It is hypothesized that the added delivery of nonviral DNA encoding for proangiogenic growth factors can further enhance this effect. Here, 100 and 60 μm porous and nonporous (n-pore) hyaluronic acid-MMP hydrogels with encapsulated reporter (pGFPluc) or proangiogenic (pVEGF) plasmids are used to investigate scaffold-mediated gene delivery for local gene therapy in a diabetic wound healing mouse model. Porous hydrogels allow for significantly faster wound closure compared with n-pore hydrogels, which do not degrade and essentially provide a mechanical barrier to closure. Interestingly, the delivery of pDNA/PEI polyplexes positively promotes granulation tissue formation even when the DNA does not encode for an angiogenic protein. And although transfected cells are present throughout the granulation tissue surrounding, all hydrogels at 2 weeks, pVEGF delivery does not further enhance the angiogenic response. Despite this, the presence of transfected cells shows promise for the use of polyplex-loaded porous hydrogels for local gene delivery in the treatment of diabetic wounds.

  9. Homodinuclear lanthanide complexes of phenylthiopropionic acid: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, DNA cleavage, and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Shiju, C; Arish, D; Kumaresan, S

    2013-03-15

    Lanthanide complexes of La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), and Ho(III) with phenylthiopropionic acid were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, mass, IR, electronic spectra, molar conductance, TGA, and powder XRD. The results show that the lanthanide complexes are homodinuclear in nature. The two lanthanide ions are bridged by eight oxygen atoms from four carboxylate groups. Thermal decomposition profiles are consistent with the proposed formulations. Powder XRD studies show that all the complexes are amorphous in nature. Antimicrobial studies indicate that these complexes exhibit more activity than the ligand itself. The DNA cleavage activity of the ligand and its complexes were assayed on Escherichia coli DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence of H(2)O(2). The result shows that the Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes have completely cleaved the DNA. The anticancer activities of the complexes have also been studied towards human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and colon cancer cells (HCT116) and it was found that the La(III) and Nd(III) complexes are more active than the corresponding Pr(III), Sm(III), Ho(III) complexes, and the free ligand on both the cancer cells.

  10. A multiplex nanoparticle-based bio-barcoded DNA sensor for the simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deng; Huarng, Michael C; Alocilja, Evangelyn C

    2010-12-15

    A highly amplified, nanoparticle-based, bio-barcoded electrochemical biosensor for the simultaneous multiple detection of the protective antigen A (pagA) gene (accession number, M22589) of Bacillus anthracis and the insertion element (Iel) gene (accession number, Z83734) of Salmonella enteritidis is reported in this paper. The biosensor system is mainly composed of three nanoparticles: gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nanoparticle tracers (NTs, such as PbS and CdS). The AuNPs are coated with the first target-specific DNA probe (1pDNA), which can recognize one end of the target DNA sequence (tDNA), and many NT-terminated bio-barcode ssDNA (bDNA-NT), which act as signal reporter and amplifier. The MNPs are coated with the second target-specific DNA probe (2pDNA) that can recognize the other end of the target gene. After binding the nanoparticles with the target DNA, the following sandwich structure is formed: MNP-2pDNA/tDNA/1pDNA-AuNP-bDNA-NTs. A magnetic field is applied to separate the sandwich structure from the unreacted materials. Because the AuNPs have a large number of nanoparticle tracers per DNA probe binding event, there is substantial amplification. After the nanoparticle tracer is dissolved in 1M nitric acid, the NT(2+) ions are detected by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) on screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) chips. The results show that the detection limit of this multiplex bio-barcoded DNA sensor are 0.5 ng/mL of the insertion element (Iel) gene of S. enteritidis using CdS, and 50 pg/mL of the pagA gene of B. anthracis using PbS NTs. The nanoparticle-based bio-barcoded DNA sensor has potential application in rapid detection of multiple pathogenic agents in the same sample.

  11. Base pair opening kinetics study of the aegPNA:DNA hydrid duplex containing a site-specific GNA-like chiral PNA monomer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lim, Jisoo; Lee, Eun-Hae; Ok, Taedong; Yoon, Juyoung; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2011-09-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are one of the most widely used synthetic DNA mimics where the four bases are attached to a N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (aeg) backbone instead of the negative-charged phosphate backbone in DNA. We have developed a chimeric PNA (chiPNA), in which a chiral GNA-like γ(3)T monomer is incorporated into aegPNA backbone. The base pair opening kinetics of the aegPNA:DNA and chiPNA:DNA hybrid duplexes were studied by NMR hydrogen exchange experiments. This study revealed that the aegPNA:DNA hybrid is much more stable duplex and is less dynamic compared to DNA duplex, meaning that base pairs are opened and reclosed much more slowly. The site-specific incorporation of γ(3)T monomer in the aegPNA:DNA hybrid can destabilize a specific base pair and its neighbors, maintaining the thermal stabilities and dynamic properties of other base pairs. Our hydrogen exchange study firstly revealed the unique kinetic features of base pairs in the aegPNA:DNA and chiPNA:DNA hybrids, which will provide an insight into the development of methodology for specific DNA recognition using PNA fragments.

  12. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induce plasminogen activator activity and DNA damage in rabbit spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kokoli, A N; Lavrentiadou, S N; Zervos, I A; Tsantarliotou, M P; Georgiadis, M P; Nikolaidis, E A; Botsoglou, N; Boscos, C M; Taitzoglou, I A

    2017-02-20

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect(s) of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) on rabbit semen. Adult rabbit bucks were assigned to two groups that were given two diets, a standard diet (control) and a diet supplemented with ω-3 PUFA. Sperm samples were collected from all bucks with the use of an artificial vagina in 20-day intervals, for a total period of 120 days. The enrichment of membranes in ω-3 PUFA was manifested by the elevation of the 22:5 ω-3 (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA]) levels within 40 days. This increase in DPA content did not affect semen characteristics (i.e., concentration, motility and viability). However, it was associated with the induction of lipid peroxidation in spermatozoa, as determined on the basis of the malondialdehyde content. Lipid peroxidation was associated with DNA fragmentation in ω-3 PUFA-enriched spermatozoa and a concomitant increase in plasminogen activator (PA) activity. The effects of ω-3 PUFA on sperm cells were evident within 40 days of ω-3 PUFA dietary intake and exhibited peack values on day 120. Our findings suggest that an ω-3 PUFA-rich diet may not affect semen characteristics; however, it may have a negative impact on the oxidative status and DNA integrity of the spermatozoa, which was associated with an induction of PAs activity.

  13. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  14. Detection of femtomolar level osteosarcoma-related gene via a chronocoulometric DNA biosensor based on nanostructure gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guangxian; Liu, Ailin; Xu, Xiongwei; Sun, Zhouliang; Chen, Jinyuan; Wang, Kun; Liu, Qicai; Lin, Xinhua; Lin, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a sensitive chronocoulometric deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biosensor based on a nanostructure gold electrode was fabricated for detection of the femtomolar level survivin gene which was correlated with osteosarcoma by using hexaamine-ruthenium III complexes, [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+), as the electrochemical indicator. The effect of different frequencies on the real surface area of the nanostructure gold electrode obtained by repetitive square-wave oxidation reduction cycle was investigated. At the optimal frequency of 8000 Hz, the real surface of the developed nanostructure gold electrode was about 42.5 times compared with that of the bare planar gold electrode. The capture probe DNA was immobilized on the nanostructure gold electrode and hybridized with target DNA. Electrochemical signals of hexaamine-ruthenium III bound to the anionic phosphate of DNA strands via electrostatic interactions were measured by chronocoulometry before and after hybridization. The increase of the charges of hexaamine-ruthenium III was observed upon hybridization of the probe with target DNA. Results indicate that this DNA biosensor could detect the femtomole (fM) concentration of the DNA target quantitatively in the range of 50 fM to 250 fM; the detection limit of this DNA biosensor was 5.6 fM (signal to noise = 3). This new biosensor exhibits excellent sensitivity and selectivity and has been used for an assay of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a satisfactory result.

  15. Magnetophoresis of flexible DNA-based dumbbell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić, B.; Ghai, R.; Dimitrov, K.

    2008-02-01

    Controlled movement and manipulation of magnetic micro- and nanostructures using magnetic forces can give rise to important applications in biomedecine, diagnostics, and immunology. We report controlled magnetophoresis and stretching, in aqueous solution, of a DNA-based dumbbell structure containing magnetic and diamagnetic microspheres. The velocity and stretching of the dumbbell were experimentally measured and correlated with a theoretical model based on the forces acting on individual magnetic beads or the entire dumbbell structures. The results show that precise and predictable manipulation of dumbbell structures is achievable and can potentially be applied to immunomagnetic cell separators.

  16. Detection of DNA hybridization by field-effect DNA-based biosensors: mechanisms of signal generation and open questions.

    PubMed

    Cherstvy, A G

    2013-08-15

    We model theoretically the electrostatic effects taking place upon DNA hybridization in dense DNA arrays immobilized on a layer of Au nano-particles deposited on the surface of a field-effect-based DNA capacitive biosensor. We consider the influence of separation of a charged analyte from the sensor surface and the salinity of electrolyte solution, in the framework of both linear and nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theories. The latter predicts a substantially weaker sensor signals due to electrostatic saturation effects that is the main conclusion of this paper. We analyze how different physical parameters of dense DNA brushes affect the magnitude of hybridization signals. The list includes the fraction of DNA charge neutralization, the length and spatial conformations of adsorbed DNA molecules, as well as the discreteness of DNA charges. We also examine the effect of Donnan ionic equilibrium in DNA lattices on the sensor response. The validity of theoretical models is contrasted against recent experimental observations on detection of DNA hybridization via its intrinsic electric charge. The sensitivity of such biochemical sensing devices, their detection limit, and DNA hybridization efficiency are briefly discussed in the end.

  17. Serine-based gemini surfactants with different spacer linkages: from self-assembly to DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sandra G; Oliveira, Isabel S; do Vale, M Luísa C; Marques, Eduardo F

    2014-12-14

    Cationic gemini surfactants have strong potential as compaction agents of nucleic acids for efficient non-viral gene delivery. In this work, we present the aggregation behavior of three novel cationic serine-based gemini surfactants as well as their ability to compact DNA per se and mixed with a helper lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). All the surfactants have a 12-12-12 configuration, i.e. two main 12-carbon alkyl chains linked to the nitrogen atom of the amino acid residue and a 12 methylene spacer, but they differ in the nature of the spacer linkage: for (12Ser)2N12, an amine bond; for (12Ser)2CON12, an amide bond; and for (12Ser)2COO12, an ester bond. Interestingly, while the amine-based gemini aggregates into micelles, the amide and ester ones spontaneously form vesicles, which denotes a strong influence of the type of linkage on the surfactant packing parameter. The size, ζ-potential and stability of the vesicles have been characterized by light microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The interaction of the gemini aggregates with DNA at different charge ratios and in the absence and presence of DOPE has been studied by DLS, fluorescence spectroscopy and cryo-SEM. All the compounds are found to efficiently compact DNA (complexation > 90%), but relevant differences are obtained in terms of the size, ζ-potential and stability of the lipoplexes formed. Results are rationalized in terms of headgroup differences and the type of aggregates present prior to DNA condensation.

  18. Polarity based fractionation of fulvic acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Aimin; Hu, Jundong; Li, Wenhui; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xuejun

    2009-11-01

    Fulvic acids from the soil of Peking University (PF) and a Nordic river (NF) were separated into well defined sub-fractions using sequential elution techniques based on eluent polarity. The chemical properties of the fractions including: PF1 and NF1 (eluted by 0.01 M HCl), PF2 and NF2 (eluted by 0.01 M HCl+20% methanol), PF3 and NF3 (eluted by 0.01 M HCl+40% methanol), and PF4 and NF4 (eluted by 100% methanol), were characterized using UV-Visible spectroscopy, elemental analysis and (13)C NMR. The results showed that the UV absorptions of the elution peaks at 280 nm (A280) increased from PF2 to PF4 and NF2 to NF4. No elution peaks were observed for PF1 and NF1. The carbon contents increased from 43.34% to 51.90% and 43.06% to 53.26% while the oxygen contents decreased from 46.39% to 36.76% and 49.76% to 40.03% for PF1-PF4 and NF1-NF4, respectively. As a polarity indicator, the (O+N)/C ratio for PF1-PF4 and NF1-NF4 decreased from 0.88 to 0.62 and 0.89 to 0.58, respectively. The aromatic carbon content increased from PF1 to PF4 and NF1 to NF4, suggesting an increase of the hydrophobicity of these fractions. The polarity was positively related to the ratio of UV absorption at 250 nm and 365 nm (E2/E3), and negatively related to the aromaticity. A high positive relationship between the aromaticity and E2/E3 of fulvic acid fractions was also obtained. The use of an eluent with a decreasing polarity allowed to providing simpler fractions of soil and aquatic fulvic acids.

  19. Focused upon hybridization: rapid and high sensitivity detection of DNA using isotachophoresis and peptide nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Ostromohov, Nadya; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel assay for rapid and high sensitivity detection of nucleic acids without amplification. Utilizing the neutral backbone of peptide nucleic acids (PNA), our method is based on the design of low electrophoretic mobility PNA probes, which do not focus under isotachophoresis (ITP) unless bound to their target sequence. Thus, background noise associated with free probes is entirely eliminated, significantly improving the signal-to-noise ratio while maintaining a simple single-step assay requiring no amplification steps. We provide a detailed analytical model and experimentally demonstrate the ability to detect targets as short as 17 nucleotides (nt) and a limit of detection of 100 fM with a dynamic range of 5 decades. We also demonstrate that the assay can be successfully implemented for detection of DNA in human serum without loss of signal. The assay requires 15 min to complete, and it could potentially be used in applications where rapid and highly sensitive amplification-free detection of nucleic acids is desired.

  20. Diaminobenzene schiff base, a novel class of DNA minor groove binder.