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Sample records for acid dna base

  1. End invasion of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) with mixed-base composition into linear DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Smolina, Irina V; Demidov, Vadim V; Soldatenkov, Viatcheslav A; Chasovskikh, Sergey G; Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D

    2005-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a synthetic DNA mimic with valuable properties and a rapidly growing scope of applications. With the exception of recently introduced pseudocomplementary PNAs, binding of common PNA oligomers to target sites located inside linear double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs) is essentially restricted to homopurine-homopyrimidine sequence motifs, which significantly hampers some of the PNA applications. Here, we suggest an approach to bypass this limitation of common PNAs. We demonstrate that PNA with mixed composition of ordinary nucleobases is capable of sequence-specific targeting of complementary dsDNA sites if they are located at the very termini of DNA duplex. We then show that such targeting makes it possible to perform capturing of designated dsDNA fragments via the DNA-bound biotinylated PNA as well as to signal the presence of a specific dsDNA sequence, in the case a PNA beacon is employed. We also examine the PNA-DNA conjugate and prove that it can initiate the primer-extension reaction starting from the duplex DNA termini when a DNA polymerase with the strand-displacement ability is used. We thus conclude that recognition of duplex DNA by mixed-base PNAs via the end invasion has a promising potential for site-specific and sequence-unrestricted DNA manipulation and detection.

  2. A Concentrated Hydrochloric Acid-based Method for Complete Recovery of DNA from Bone.

    PubMed

    Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M

    2015-11-01

    The successful extraction of DNA from historical or ancient animal bone is important for the analysis of discriminating genetic markers. Methods used currently rely on the digestion of bone with EDTA and proteinase K, followed by purification with phenol/chloroform and silica bed binding. We have developed a simple concentrated hydrochloric acid-based method that precludes the use of phenol/chloroform purification and can lead to a several-fold increase in DNA yield when compared to other commonly used methods. Concentrated hydrochloric acid was shown to dissolve most of the undigested bone and allowed the efficient recovery of DNA fragments <100 bases in length. This method should prove useful for the recovery of DNAs from highly degraded animal bone, such as that found in historical or ancient samples.

  3. Optoelectronic studies on heterocyclic bases of deoxyribonucleic acid for DNA photonics.

    PubMed

    El-Diasty, Fouad; Abdel-Wahab, Fathy

    2015-10-01

    The optoelectronics study of large molecules, particularly π-stacking molecules, such as DNA is really an extremely difficult task. We perform first electronic structure calculations on the heterocyclic bases of 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid based on Lorentz-Fresnel dispersion theory. In the UV-VIS range of spectrum, many of the optoelectronic parameters for DNA four bases namely adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine are calculated and discussed. The results demonstrate that adenine has the highest hyperpolarizability, whereas thymine has the lowest hyperpolarizability. Cytosine has the lower average oscillator energy and the higher lattice energy. Thymine infers the most stable nucleic base with the lower phonon energy. Thymine also has the highest average oscillator energy and the lower lattice energy. Moreover, the four nucleic acid bases have large band gap energies less than 5 eV with a semiconducting behavior. Guanine shows the smallest band gap and the highest Fermi level energy, whereas adenine elucidates the highest band gap energy.

  4. DNA binding mode of novel tetradentate amino acid based 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.; Selvaganapathy, M.; Mahalakshmi, R.

    2012-10-01

    Few transition metal complexes of tetradentate N2O2 donor Schiff base ligands containing 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine and amino acids (alanine/valine) abbreviated to KHL1/KHL2 have been synthesized. All the metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic data. The Schiff bases KHL1/KHL2 are found to act as tetradentate ligands using N2O2 donor set of atoms leading to a square-planar geometry for the complexes around the metal ions. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA have been investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The DNA binding constants reveal that all these complexes interact with DNA through minor groove binding mode. The studies on mechanism of photocleavage reveal that singlet oxygen (1O2) and superoxide anion radical (O2rad -) may play an important role in the photocleavage. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger, Fusarium solani, Culvularia lunata, Rhizoctonia bataicola and Candida albicans by MIC method.

  5. DNA binding mode of novel tetradentate amino acid based 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine complexes.

    PubMed

    Raman, N; Sobha, S; Selvaganapathy, M; Mahalakshmi, R

    2012-10-01

    Few transition metal complexes of tetradentate N(2)O(2) donor Schiff base ligands containing 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine and amino acids (alanine/valine) abbreviated to KHL(1)/KHL(2) have been synthesized. All the metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic data. The Schiff bases KHL(1)/KHL(2) are found to act as tetradentate ligands using N(2)O(2) donor set of atoms leading to a square-planar geometry for the complexes around the metal ions. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA have been investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The DNA binding constants reveal that all these complexes interact with DNA through minor groove binding mode. The studies on mechanism of photocleavage reveal that singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) and superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)) may play an important role in the photocleavage. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger, Fusarium solani, Culvularia lunata, Rhizoctonia bataicola and Candida albicans by MIC method. PMID:22885083

  6. Theoretical study of the adsorption of DNA bases on the acidic external surface of montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Mignon, Pierre; Sodupe, Mariona

    2012-01-14

    In the present study, DFT periodic plane wave calculations, at the PBE-D level of theory, were carried out to investigate the interaction of DNA nucleobases with acidic montmorillonite. The surface model was considered in its octahedral (Osub) and tetrahedral (Tsub) substituted forms, known to have different acidic properties. The adsorption of adenine, guanine and cytosine was considered in both orthogonal and coplanar orientations with the surface, interacting with the proton via a given heteroatom. In almost all considered cases, adsorption involved the spontaneous proton transfer to the nucleobase, with a more pronounced character in the Osub structures. The binding energy is about 10 kcal mol(-1) larger for Osub than for Tsub complexes mainly due to the larger acidity in Osub surfaces and due to the better stabilization by H-bond contacts between the negatively charged surface and the protonated base. The binding energy of coplanar orientations of the base is observed to be as large as the orthogonal ones due to a balance between electrostatic and dispersion contributions. Finally the binding of guanine and adenine on the acidic surface amounts to 50 kcal mol(-1) while that of cytosine rises to 44 kcal mol(-1).

  7. [Classification of amino acids based on a comparative analysis of contacts in DNA-protein complexes and specific DNA-protein interactions].

    PubMed

    Anashkina, A A; Kuznetsov, E N; Batianovskiĭ, A V; Gnuchev, N V; Tumanian, V G; Esipova, N G

    2013-01-01

    The classification of amino acid residues based on the events of contact formation between distinct amino acid and selected nucleotides was constructed. Thus, the most integral properties, that characterize interactions in organization of DNA-protein complexes, were used. We applied the Voronoi-Delaunay tessellation to draw statistics of contacts and area of contacts for the set included 1937 DNA-protein complexes. Similarities of amino acid residues have been searched for based on the comparison of corresponded rows and matrixes of contacts and areas of contacts. Nine measures of distance were used for estimation of rows similarity degree. The procedure of clustering amino acids in groups included three hierarchical and two nonhierarchical methods. A total tree was built using nine techniques of estimating distance with three hierarchical clustering methods. It was shown that clustering centers in the main groups are always constant while other relationships between objects vary. Clustering of binary associations was found for the most amino acids. Major classes of up to six amino acids correspond to the certain local structures of the polypeptide chain in the context of amino acid composition. These data should be taken into account when designing DNA-protein ligands. PMID:25486755

  8. [Classification of amino acids based on a comparative analysis of contacts in DNA-protein complexes and specific DNA-protein interactions].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The classification of amino acid residues based on the events of contact formation between distinct amino acid and selected nucleotides was constructed. Thus, the most integral properties, that characterize interactions in organization of DNA-protein complexes, were used. We applied the Voronoi-Delaunay tessellation to draw statistics of contacts and area of contacts for the set included 1937 DNA-protein complexes. Similarities of amino acid residues have been searched for based on the comparison of corresponded rows and matrixes of contacts and areas of contacts. Nine measures of distance were used for estimation of rows similarity degree. The procedure of clustering amino acids in groups included three hierarchical and two nonhierarchical methods. A total tree was built using nine techniques of estimating distance with three hierarchical clustering methods. It was shown that clustering centers in the main groups are always constant while other relationships between objects vary. Clustering of binary associations was found for the most amino acids. Major classes of up to six amino acids correspond to the certain local structures of the polypeptide chain in the context of amino acid composition. These data should be taken into account when designing DNA-protein ligands. PMID:25508886

  9. "Nano-oddities": unusual nucleic acid assemblies for DNA-based nanostructures and nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Mendoza, Oscar; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA is an attractive polymer building material for nanodevices and nanostructures due to its ability for self-recognition and self-assembly. Assembly relies on the formation of base-specific interactions that allow strands to adopt structures in a controllable fashion. Most DNA-based higher order structures such as DNA cages, 2D and 3D DNA crystals, or origamis are based on DNA double helices stabilized by Watson-Crick complementarity. A number of nonclassical pairing patterns are possible between or among DNA strands; these interactions result in formation of unusual structures that include, but are not limited to, G-quadruplexes, i-motifs, triplexes, and parallel-stranded duplexes. These structures create greater diversity of DNA-based building blocks for nanomaterials and have certain advantages over conventional duplex DNA, such as enhanced thermal stability and sensitivity to chemical stimuli. In this Account, we briefly introduce these alternative DNA structures and describe in detail their utilization in a variety of nanomaterials and nanomachines. The field of DNA "nano-oddities" emerged in the late 1990s when for the first time a DNA nanomachine was designed based on equilibrium between B-DNA and noncanonical, left-handed Z-DNA. Soon after, "proof-of-principle" DNA nanomachines based on several DNA "oddities" were reported. These machines were set in motion by the addition of complementary strands (a principle used by many B-DNA-based nanodevices), by the addition of selected cations, small molecules, or proteins, or by a change in pH or temperature. Today, we have fair understanding of the mechanism of action of these devices, excellent control over their performance, and knowledge of basic principles of their design. pH sensors and pH-controlled devices occupy a central niche in the field. They are usually based on i-motifs or triplex DNA, are amazingly simple, robust, and reversible, and create no waste apart from salt and water. G

  10. Multilayered Polyelectrolyte Assemblies as Platforms for the Delivery of DNA and Other Nucleic Acid-Based Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Christopher M.; Lynn, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Materials that provide spatial and temporal control over the delivery of DNA and other nucleic acid-based agents from surfaces play important roles in the development of localized gene-based therapies. This review focuses on a relatively new approach to the immobilization and release of DNA from surfaces: methods based on the layer-by-layer assembly of thin multilayered films (or polyelectrolyte multilayers, PEMs). Layer-by-layer methods provide convenient, nanometer-scale control over the incorporation of DNA, RNA, and oligonucleotide constructs into thin polyelectrolyte films. Provided that these assemblies can be designed in ways that permit controlled film disassembly under physiological conditions, this approach can contribute new methods for spatial and/or temporal control over the delivery of nucleic acid-based therapeutics in vitro and in vivo. We describe applications of layer-by-layer assembly to the fabrication of DNA-containing films that can be used to provide control over the release of plasmid DNA from the surfaces of macroscopic objects and promote surface-mediated cell transfection. We also highlight the application of these methods to the coating of colloidal substrates and the fabrication of hollow micrometer-scale capsules that can be used to encapsulate and control the release or delivery of DNA and oligonucleotides. Current challenges, gaps in knowledge, and new opportunities for the development of these methods in the general area of gene delivery are discussed. PMID:18395291

  11. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  12. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications. PMID:24647836

  13. Influence of amino acids Shiff bases on irradiated DNA stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Karapetyan, N H; Malakyan, M H; Bajinyan, S A; Torosyan, A L; Grigoryan, I E; Haroutiunian, S G

    2013-01-01

    To reveal protective role of the new Mn(II) complexes with Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate and Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate Schiff Bases against ionizing radiation. The DNA of the rats liver was isolated on 7, 14, and 30 days after X-ray irradiation. The differences between the DNA of irradiated rats and rats pre-treated with Mn(II) complexes were studied using the melting, microcalorimetry, and electrophoresis methods. The melting parameters and the melting enthalpy of rats livers DNA were changed after the X-ray irradiation: melting temperature and melting enthalpy were decreased and melting interval was increased. These results can be explained by destruction of DNA molecules. It was shown that pre-treatment of rats with Mn(II) complexes approximates the melting parameters to norm. Agarose gel electrophoresis data confirmed the results of melting studies. The separate DNA fragments were revealed in DNA samples isolated from irradiated animals. The DNA isolated from animals pre-treated with the Mn(II) chelates had better electrophoretic characteristics, which correspond to healthy DNA. Pre-treatment of the irradiated rats with Mn(II)(Nicotinil-L-Tyrosinate) and Mn(II)(Nicotinil-L-Tryptophanate)2 improves the DNA characteristics.

  14. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: a comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Raman, N; Sakthivel, A; Pravin, N

    2014-05-01

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 10(2) to 10(5) indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical.

  15. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: A comparative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sakthivel, A.; Pravin, N.

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 102 to 105 indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical.

  16. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: a comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Raman, N; Sakthivel, A; Pravin, N

    2014-05-01

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 10(2) to 10(5) indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical. PMID:24566120

  17. Evaluation of a facile method of template DNA preparation for PCR-based detection and typing of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atul Kumar; Ramesh, Aiyagari

    2009-08-01

    The objective of our investigation was to develop a convenient and reliable method of generating template DNA for routine PCR-based detection and typing of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Template DNA extracted from Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Pediococcus and Leuconostoc using a combination of urea, SDS and NaOH yielded amplicons of expected size in PCR with genus-specific primers. Apart from LAB, the proposed method could also be adopted to generate PCR-compatible template DNA from a number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. DNA template prepared by the proposed method from various standard strains of Lactobacillus sp. also generated discriminating fingerprints with BOXA1R primer in rep-PCR. A significant finding of the investigation was that a comparable banding profile of LAB strains was obtained in rep-PCR using template DNA prepared by urea-SDS-NaOH method and a commercially available DNA isolation kit. This was further evidenced by high dice coefficient values obtained in the range of 81.8-96.7 when cluster analysis was performed by UPGAMA method. The application potential of this DNA extraction method for PCR-based direct detection of LAB in fermented food samples such as dahi, idli batter and salt-fermented cucumber was validated by detecting specific amplicons of LAB genera in the fermented samples. The applicability of the proposed template DNA extraction method was further substantiated when 29 bacteriocinogenic LAB strains (Bac+) previously detected in salt-fermented cucumber by PCR [Singh, A.K., Ramesh, A., 2008. Succession of dominant and antagonistic lactic acid bacteria in fermented cucumber: Insights from a PCR-based approach. Food. Microbiol. 25, 278-287] generated differentiating fingerprints in BOX element based rep-PCR and formed clusters with reference LAB strains. PMID:19465247

  18. DNA nanotechnology for nucleic acid analysis: DX motif-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Khan, Mohammad S

    2011-11-25

    A light on the tiles: A sensor that fluoresces in the presence of specific nucleic acids was designed and characterized. The sensor uses a molecular beacon probe and three adaptor strands to form a five-stranded assembly, a DX-tile, with a specific analyte. This sensor is a highly selective and affordable tool for the real-time analysis of DNA and RNA.

  19. DNA interaction with octahedral and square planar Ni(II) complexes of aspartic-acid Schiff-bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, S. A.; Orabi, A. S.; Abbas, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Ni(II) complexes of (S,E)-2-(2-OHbenzilydene)aspartic acid; (S,E)-2-(2,3-diOHbenzilydene)aspartic acid-; (S,E)-2-(2,4-diOH-benzilydene)aspartic acid; (S,E)-2-(2,5-diOHbenzilydene)aspartic acid and (S,E)-2-((2-OHnaphthalene-1-yl)methylene)aspartic acid Schiff-bases have been synthesized by template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and 1H nmr spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG, DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate or tetradentate donors and the complexes have square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in two or three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  20. Self-assembling DNA hydrogel-based delivery of immunoinhibitory nucleic acids to immune cells.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yu; Ohtsuki, Shozo; Araie, Yuki; Umeki, Yuka; Endo, Masayuki; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Nishikawa, Makiya

    2016-01-01

    Immunoinhibitory oligodeoxynucleotides (INH-ODNs) are promising inhibitors of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) activation. To efficiently deliver INH-ODNs to TLR9-positive cells, we designed a Takumi-shaped DNA (Takumi) consisting of two partially complementary ODNs as the main component of a DNA hydrogel. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that Takumi-containing INH-ODNs (iTakumi) and iTakumi-based DNA hydrogel (iTakumiGel) were successfully generated. Their activity was examined in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and DC2.4 dendritic cells by measuring tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release after the addition of a TLR9 ligand (CpG ODN). Cytokine release was efficiently inhibited by the iTakumiGel. Flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy showed that cellular uptake of INH-ODN was greatly increased by the iTakumiGel. These results indicate that a Takumi-based DNA hydrogel is useful for the delivery of INH-ODNs to immune cells to inhibit TLR9-mediated hyperinduction of proinflammatory cytokines. From the Clinical Editor: Toll-like receptor 9 activation has been reported to be associated with many autoimmune diseases. DNA inhibition using oligodeoxynucleotides is one of the potential treatments. In this article, the authors described hydrogel-based platform for the delivery of the inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotides for enhanced efficacy. The positive findings could indicate a way for the future.

  1. Synthesis, physicochemical studies, embryos toxicity and DNA interaction of some new Iron(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.

    2013-05-01

    New Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, and conductance measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. The investigated Schiff bases exhibited tridentate coordination mode with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O for all amino acids except L-histidine. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their toxicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. The interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA cleavage activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. The thermodynamic Profile of the binding of nphali complex and CT-DNA was constructed by analyzing the experimental data of absorption titration and UV melting studies with the McGhee equation, van't Hoff's equation, and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

  2. Histidine-Based Lipopeptides Enhance Cleavage of Nucleic Acids: Interactions with DNA and Hydrolytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Bélières, M; Déjugnat, C; Chouini-Lalanne, N

    2015-12-16

    Interaction studies and cleavage activity experiments were carried out between plasmid DNA and a series of histidine-based lipopeptides. Specific fluorescent probes (ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342, and pyrene) were used to monitor intercalation, minor groove binding, and self-assembly of lipopeptides, respectively. Association between DNA and lipopeptides was thus evidenced, highlighting the importance of both histidine and hydrophobic tail in the interaction process. DNA cleavage in the presence of lipopeptides was then detected by gel electrophoresis and quantified, showing the importance of histidine and the involvement of its side-chain imidazole in the hydrolysis mechanism. These systems could then be developed as synthetic nucleases while raising concern of introducing histidine in the design of lipopeptide-based transfection vectors.

  3. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  4. A beta-D-allopyranoside-grafted Ru(II) complex: synthesis and acid-base and DNA-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Zi; Yin, Hong-Ju; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2009-08-01

    A new ruthenium(II) complex grafted with beta-d-allopyranoside, Ru(bpy)(2)(Happip)(ClO(4))(2) (where bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; Happip = 2-(4-(beta-d-allopyranoside)phenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline), has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The acid-base properties of the complex have been studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, and ground- and excited-state ionization constants have been derived. The Ru(II) complex functions as a DNA intercalator as revealed by UV-visible and emission titrations, salt effects, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)(6)](4-), DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, DNA melting experiment, and viscosity measurements.

  5. DNA Methylation Profiling at Single-Base Resolution Reveals Gestational Folic Acid Supplementation Influences the Epigenome of Mouse Offspring Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Brown, W. Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly more evident that lifestyle, environmental factors, and maternal nutrition during gestation can influence the epigenome of the developing fetus and thus modulate the physiological outcome. Variations in the intake of maternal nutrients affecting one-carbon metabolism may influence brain development and exert long-term effects on the health of the progeny. In this study, we investigated whether supplementation with high maternal folic acid during gestation alters DNA methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of mouse offspring. We used reduced representation bisulfite sequencing to analyze the DNA methylation profile at the single-base resolution level. The genome-wide DNA methylation analysis revealed that supplementation with higher maternal folic acid resulted in distinct methylation patterns (P < 0.05) of CpG and non-CpG sites in the cerebellum of offspring. Such variations of methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring were highly sex-specific, including several genes of the neuronal pathways. These findings demonstrate that alterations in the level of maternal folic acid during gestation can influence methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring. Such changes in the offspring epigenome may alter neurodevelopment and influence the functional outcome of neurologic and psychiatric diseases. PMID:27199632

  6. DNA Methylation Profiling at Single-Base Resolution Reveals Gestational Folic Acid Supplementation Influences the Epigenome of Mouse Offspring Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Brown, W Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly more evident that lifestyle, environmental factors, and maternal nutrition during gestation can influence the epigenome of the developing fetus and thus modulate the physiological outcome. Variations in the intake of maternal nutrients affecting one-carbon metabolism may influence brain development and exert long-term effects on the health of the progeny. In this study, we investigated whether supplementation with high maternal folic acid during gestation alters DNA methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of mouse offspring. We used reduced representation bisulfite sequencing to analyze the DNA methylation profile at the single-base resolution level. The genome-wide DNA methylation analysis revealed that supplementation with higher maternal folic acid resulted in distinct methylation patterns (P < 0.05) of CpG and non-CpG sites in the cerebellum of offspring. Such variations of methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring were highly sex-specific, including several genes of the neuronal pathways. These findings demonstrate that alterations in the level of maternal folic acid during gestation can influence methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring. Such changes in the offspring epigenome may alter neurodevelopment and influence the functional outcome of neurologic and psychiatric diseases. PMID:27199632

  7. Investigation of irradiated rats DNA in the presence of Cu(II) chelates of amino acids Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Karapetyan, N H; Torosyan, A L; Malakyan, M; Bajinyan, S A; Haroutiunian, S G

    2016-01-01

    The new synthesized Cu(II) chelates of amino acids Schiff bases were studied as a potential radioprotectors. Male albino rats of Wistar strain were exposed to X-ray whole-body irradiation at 4.8 Gy. This dose caused 30% mortality of the animals (LD30). The survival of animals exposed to radiation after preliminary administration of 10 mg/kg Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate)2 or Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate)2 prior to irradiation was registered about 80 and 100% correspondingly. Using spectrophotometric melting and agarose gel electrophoresis methods, the differences between the DNA isolated from irradiated rats and rats pretreated with Cu(II) chelates were studied. The fragments of DNA with different breaks were revealed in DNA samples isolated from irradiated animals. While, the repair of the DNA structure was observed for animals pretreated with the Cu(II) chelates. The results suggested that pretreatment of the irradiated rats with Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate)2 and Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate)2 compounds improves the liver DNA characteristics.

  8. Label-free DNA biosensor based on a peptide nucleic acid-functionalized microstructured optical fiber-Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candiani, Alessandro; Bertucci, Alessandro; Giannetti, Sara; Konstantaki, Maria; Manicardi, Alex; Pissadakis, Stavros; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Corradini, Roberto; Selleri, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    We describe a novel sensing approach based on a functionalized microstructured optical fiber-Bragg grating for specific DNA target sequences detection. The inner surface of a microstructured fiber, where a Bragg grating was previously inscribed, has been functionalized by covalent linking of a peptide nucleic acid probe targeting a DNA sequence bearing a single point mutation implicated in cystic fibrosis (CF) disease. A solution of an oligonucleotide (ON) corresponding to a tract of the CF gene containing the mutated DNA has been infiltrated inside the fiber capillaries and allowed to hybridize to the fiber surface according to the Watson-Crick pairing. In order to achieve signal amplification, ON-functionalized gold nanoparticles were then infiltrated and used in a sandwich-like assay. Experimental measurements show a clear shift of the reflected high order mode of a Bragg grating for a 100 nM DNA solution, and fluorescence measurements have confirmed the successful hybridization. Several experiments have been carried out on the same fiber using the identical concentration, showing the same modulation trend, suggesting the possibility of the reuse of the sensor. Measurements have also been made using a 100 nM mismatched DNA solution, containing a single nucleotide mutation and corresponding to the wild-type gene, and the results demonstrate the high selectivity of the sensor.

  9. Signal amplification architecture for electrochemical aptasensor based on network-like thiocyanuric acid/gold nanoparticle/ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengbo; Li, Lidong; Tian, Yu; Mu, Xiaojiao; Guo, Lin

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we described signal amplification architecture for electronic aptamer-based sensor (E-AB), which is applicable to a wide range of aptamers. Herein, we only take lysozyme as the representative sensing target. The amplification method was based on the network of thiocyanuric acid (TCA)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified with ssDNA. The binding event can be detected by a decrease in the integrated charge of the surface-bound [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) which electrostatically absorbed onto the negatively charged phosphate backbones of DNA. In the presence of target molecules, a large amount of TCA/AuNP/ssDNA network associated with [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) would be removed from the electrode surface, leading to a significant decrease of redox current. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) signals of [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) provides quantitative measures of the concentrations of lysozyme, with a linear calibration ranging from 5 pM to 1 nM and a detection limit is 0.1 pM. The detection limit of the proposed sensor is one order of magnitude and three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the detection limits in the absence of TCA (5 pM) and in the absence of TCA/AuNP/ssDNA network (0.5 nM). This amplification method is promising for broad potential application in clinic assay and various protein analysis.

  10. A Spherical Nucleic Acids Platform Based on Self-Assembled DNA Biopolymer for High Performance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jing; Zhu, Guizhi; Li, Yinhui; Li, Chunmei; You, Mingxu; Chen, Tao; Song, Erqun

    2013-01-01

    Based on their enhanced cellular uptake, stability, biocompatibility, and versatile surface functionalization, spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) have become a potentially useful platform in biological application. It still remains important to expand the SNAs “toolbox”, especially given the current interest in multimodal or theranostic nanomaterials, that is, composites capable of multiple simultaneous applications such as imaging, sensing, and drug delivery. In this paper, we have engineered a nanoparticle-conjugated initiator that triggers a cascade of hybridization reaction resulting in the formation of a long DNA polymer as the nanoparticle shell. By employing different DNA fragments, self-assembled multifunctional SNAs can be constructed. Therefore, using one capped ligand, these SNAs can combine imaging fluorescent tags, target recognition element, and targeted delivery molecules together. Since these SNAs possess high drug loading capacity and high specificity by the incorporation of an aptamer, our approach might find potential applications in new drug development, existing drug improvement, and drug delivery for cancer therapy. PMID:23841478

  11. DNA-templated native chemical ligation of functionalized peptide nucleic acids: a versatile tool for single base-specific detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Roloff, Alexander; Ficht, Simon; Dose, Christian; Seitz, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Single base-specific detection of DNA/RNA sequences is of importance in the diagnosis of disease-associated genetic disorders or early stage cancer. This chapter introduces DNA-templated native chemical PNA ligation as a potentially useful tool for the sequence specific detection of nucleic acids. The template-induced alignment of PNA-thioesters and 1,2-aminothiol-PNAs in close proximity leads to an increase in their effective molarities. This facilitates PNA ligation to proceed at concentrations where no reaction would be possible in absence of the template. Moreover, hybridization of the rather short PNA conjugates with non-complementary DNA/RNA is disfavored, which prevents PNA ligation to occur on single base-mismatched templates. Different readout strategies of the ligation reaction such as HPLC, MALDI-TOF-MS and fluorecence monitoring are discussed, and examples for the detection of a point mutation within single stranded and PCR-amplified double stranded DNA are provided.

  12. Plant flavone apigenin binds to nucleic acid bases and reduces oxidative DNA damage in prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Haripaul; Kanwal, Rajnee; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Gupta, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked to prostate carcinogenesis as human prostate tissue is vulnerable to oxidative DNA damage. Apigenin, a dietary plant flavone, possesses anti-proliferative and anticancer effects; however, its antioxidant properties have not been fully elucidated. We investigated sub-cellular distribution of apigenin, it's binding to DNA and protective effects against H2O2-induced DNA damage using transformed human prostate epithelial RWPE-1 cells and prostate cancer LNCaP, PC-3 and DU145 cells. Exposure of cells to apigenin exhibited higher accumulation in RWPE-1 and LNCaP cells, compared to PC-3 and DU145 cells. The kinetics of apigenin uptake in LNCaP cells was estimated with a Km value of 5 µmole/L and Vmax of 190 pmoles/million cells/h. Sub-cellular fractionation demonstrated that nuclear matrix retains the highest concentration of apigenin (45.3%), followed by cytosol (23.9%), nuclear membranes (17.9%) and microsomes (12.9%), respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of apigenin with calf-thymus DNA exhibited intercalation as the dominant binding mode to DNA duplex. Apigenin exposure resulted in significant genoprotective effects in H2O2-stressed RWPE-1 cells by reduction in reactive oxygen species levels. In addition, apigenin exposure suppressed the formation of 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine and protected exposed cells from apoptosis. Our studies demonstrate that apigenin is readily taken up by normal prostatic epithelial cells and prostate cancer cells, and is incorporated into their nuclei, where its intercalation with nucleic acid bases may account for its antioxidant and chemopreventive activities. PMID:24614817

  13. Genomic DNA Methylation Changes in Response to Folic Acid Supplementation in a Population-Based Intervention Study among Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Robert J.; Hao, Ling; Li, Zhu; Maneval, David; Yang, Thomas P.; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Yang, Quanhe; Zhu, Jiang-Hui; Hu, Dale J.; Bailey, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Folate is a source of one-carbons necessary for DNA methylation, a critical epigenetic modification necessary for genomic structure and function. The use of supplemental folic acid is widespread however; the potential influence on DNA methylation is unclear. We measured global DNA methylation using DNA extracted from samples from a population-based, double-blind randomized trial of folic acid supplementation (100, 400, 4000 µg per day) taken for 6 months; including a 3 month post-supplementation sample. We observed no changes in global DNA methylation in response to up to 4,000 µg/day for 6 months supplementation in DNA extracted from uncoagulated blood (approximates circulating blood). However, when DNA methylation was determined in coagulated samples from the same individuals at the same time, significant time, dose, and MTHFR genotype-dependent changes were observed. The baseline level of DNA methylation was the same for uncoagulated and coagulated samples; marked differences between sample types were observed only after intervention. In DNA from coagulated blood, DNA methylation decreased (−14%; P<0.001) after 1 month of supplementation and 3 months after supplement withdrawal, methylation decreased an additional 23% (P<0.001) with significant variation among individuals (max+17%; min-94%). Decreases in methylation of ≥25% (vs. <25%) after discontinuation of supplementation were strongly associated with genotype: MTHFR CC vs. TT (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 12.9, 95%CI 6.4, 26.0). The unexpected difference in DNA methylation between DNA extracted from coagulated and uncoagulated samples in response to folic acid supplementation is an important finding for evaluating use of folic acid and investigating the potential effects of folic acid supplementation on coagulation. PMID:22163281

  14. Electrochemical detection of nucleic acids, proteins, small molecules and cells using a DNA-nanostructure-based universal biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meihua; Song, Ping; Zhou, Guobao; Zuo, Xiaolei; Aldalbahi, Ali; Lou, Xiaoding; Shi, Jiye; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and prognosis of many complex diseases, such as cancers, is associated with the variation of various molecules, including DNA at the genetic level, RNA at the regulatory level, proteins at the functional level and small molecules at the metabolic level (defined collectively as multilevel molecules). Thus it is highly desirable to develop a single platform for detecting multilevel biomarkers for early-stage diagnosis. Here we report a protocol on DNA-nanostructure-based programmable engineering of the biomolecular recognition interface, which provides a universal electrochemical biosensing platform for the ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids (DNA/RNA), proteins, small molecules and whole cells. The protocol starts with the synthesis of a series of differentially sized, self-assembled tetrahedral DNA nanostructures (TDNs) with site-specifically modified thiol groups that can be readily anchored on the surface of a gold electrode with high reproducibility. By exploiting the rigid structure, nanoscale addressability and versatile functionality of TDNs, one can tailor the type of biomolecular probes appended on individual TDNs for the detection of specific molecules of interest. Target binding occurring on the gold surface patterned with TDNs is quantitatively translated into electrochemical signals via a coupled enzyme-based catalytic process. This uses a sandwich assay strategy in which biotinylated reporter probes recognize TDN-bound target biomolecules, which then allow binding of horseradish-peroxidase-conjugated avidin (avidin-HRP). Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is then reduced by avidin-HRP in the presence of TMB (3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine) to generate a quantitative electrochemical signal. The time range for the entire protocol is ∼1 d, whereas the detection process takes ∼30 min to 3 h. PMID:27310264

  15. Ternary copper(II) complexes with amino acid chains and heterocyclic bases: DNA binding, cytotoxic and cell apoptosis induction properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tieliang; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Hao; Yang, Yong; Liu, Yang; Ding, Weiliang; Zhu, Wenjiao; Chen, Ruhua; Ge, Zhijun; Tan, Yongfei; Jia, Lei; Zhu, Taofeng

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, chemotherapy is a common means of oncology. However, it is difficult to find excellent chemotherapy drugs. Here we reported three new ternary copper(II) complexes which have potential chemotherapy characteristics with reduced Schiff base ligand and heterocyclic bases (TBHP), [Cu(phen)(TBHP)]H2O (1), [Cu(dpz)(TBHP)]H2O (2) and [Cu(dppz)(TBHP)]H2O (3) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline, dpz=dipyrido [3,2:2',3'-f]quinoxaline, dppz=dipyrido [3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, H2TBHP=2-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylamino)-2-benzyl-acetic acid). The DNA-binding properties of the complexes were investigated by spectrometric titrations, ethidium bromide displacement experiments and viscosity measurements. The results indicated that the three complexes, especially the complex 13, can strongly bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA). The intrinsic binding constants Kb of the ternary copper(II) complexes with CT-DNA were 1.37×10(5), 1.81×10(5) and 3.21×10(5) for 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Comparative cytotoxic activities of the copper(II) complexes were also determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that the ternary copper(II) complexes had significant cytotoxic activity against the human lung cancer (A549), human esophageal cancer (Eca109) and human gastric cancer (SGC7901) cell lines. Cell apoptosis were detected by AnnexinV/PI flow cytometry and by Western blotting with the protein expression of p53, Bax and Bcl-2. All the three copper complexes can effectively induce apoptosis of the three human tumor cells. PMID:25555321

  16. Ternary copper(II) complexes with amino acid chains and heterocyclic bases: DNA binding, cytotoxic and cell apoptosis induction properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tieliang; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Hao; Yang, Yong; Liu, Yang; Ding, Weiliang; Zhu, Wenjiao; Chen, Ruhua; Ge, Zhijun; Tan, Yongfei; Jia, Lei; Zhu, Taofeng

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, chemotherapy is a common means of oncology. However, it is difficult to find excellent chemotherapy drugs. Here we reported three new ternary copper(II) complexes which have potential chemotherapy characteristics with reduced Schiff base ligand and heterocyclic bases (TBHP), [Cu(phen)(TBHP)]H2O (1), [Cu(dpz)(TBHP)]H2O (2) and [Cu(dppz)(TBHP)]H2O (3) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline, dpz=dipyrido [3,2:2',3'-f]quinoxaline, dppz=dipyrido [3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, H2TBHP=2-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylamino)-2-benzyl-acetic acid). The DNA-binding properties of the complexes were investigated by spectrometric titrations, ethidium bromide displacement experiments and viscosity measurements. The results indicated that the three complexes, especially the complex 13, can strongly bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA). The intrinsic binding constants Kb of the ternary copper(II) complexes with CT-DNA were 1.37×10(5), 1.81×10(5) and 3.21×10(5) for 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Comparative cytotoxic activities of the copper(II) complexes were also determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that the ternary copper(II) complexes had significant cytotoxic activity against the human lung cancer (A549), human esophageal cancer (Eca109) and human gastric cancer (SGC7901) cell lines. Cell apoptosis were detected by AnnexinV/PI flow cytometry and by Western blotting with the protein expression of p53, Bax and Bcl-2. All the three copper complexes can effectively induce apoptosis of the three human tumor cells.

  17. Analysis of several methods for the extraction of high quality DNA from acetic acid bacteria in wine and vinegar for characterization by PCR-based methods.

    PubMed

    Jara, C; Mateo, E; Guillamón, J M; Torija, M J; Mas, A

    2008-12-10

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are fastidious microorganisms with poor recovery in culture. Culture-independent methods are currently under examination. Good DNA extraction is a strict requirement of these methods. We compared five methods for extracting the DNA of AAB directly from wine and vinegar samples. Four matrices (white wine, red wine, superficial vinegar and submerged vinegar) contaminated with two AAB strains belonging to Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconacetobacter hansenii were assayed. To improve the yield and quality of the extracted DNA, a sample treatment (washing with polyvinyl pyrrolidone or NaCl) was also tested. DNA quality was measured by amplification of the 16S rRNA gene with conventional PCR. DNA recovery rate was assessed by real-time PCR. DNA amplification was always successful with the Wizard method though DNA recovery was poor. A CTAB-based method and NucleoSpin protocol extracted the highest DNA recoveries from wine and vinegar samples. Both of these methods require treatment to recover suitable DNA for amplification with maximum recovery. Both may therefore be good solutions for DNA extraction in wine and vinegar samples. DNA extraction of Ga hansenii was more effective than that of A. pasteurianus. The fastest and cheapest method we evaluated (the Thermal shock protocol) produced the worst results both for DNA amplification and DNA recovery.

  18. Design of nucleic acid sequences for DNA computing based on a thermodynamic approach.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fumiaki; Kameda, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masahito; Ohuchi, Azuma

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm for designing multiple sequences of nucleic acids that have a uniform melting temperature between the sequence and its complement and that do not hybridize non-specifically with each other based on the minimum free energy (DeltaG (min)). Sequences that satisfy these constraints can be utilized in computations, various engineering applications such as microarrays, and nano-fabrications. Our algorithm is a random generate-and-test algorithm: it generates a candidate sequence randomly and tests whether the sequence satisfies the constraints. The novelty of our algorithm is that the filtering method uses a greedy search to calculate DeltaG (min). This effectively excludes inappropriate sequences before DeltaG (min) is calculated, thereby reducing computation time drastically when compared with an algorithm without the filtering. Experimental results in silico showed the superiority of the greedy search over the traditional approach based on the hamming distance. In addition, experimental results in vitro demonstrated that the experimental free energy (DeltaG (exp)) of 126 sequences correlated well with DeltaG (min) (|R| = 0.90) than with the hamming distance (|R| = 0.80). These results validate the rationality of a thermodynamic approach. We implemented our algorithm in a graphic user interface-based program written in Java.

  19. Chemical repair of base lesions, AP-sites, and strand breaks on plasmid DNA in dilute aqueous solution by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We report a novel mechanism of radiation protection of DNA by chemical activity of ascorbic acid. •The “chemical repair” of DNA damage was revealed using biochemical assay and chemical kinetics analysis. •We found that ascorbic acid significantly repairs precursors of nucleobase lesions and abasic sites. •However, ascorbic acid seldom repairs precursors of DNA-strand breaks. -- Abstract: We quantified the damage yields produced in plasmid DNA by γ-irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–100 μM) of ascorbic acid, which is a major antioxidant in living systems, to clarify whether it chemically repairs radiation damage in DNA. The yield of DNA single strand breaks induced by irradiation was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis as conformational changes in closed circular plasmids. Base lesions and abasic sites were also observed as additional conformational changes by treating irradiated samples with glycosylase proteins. By comparing the suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, in addition to scavenging of the OH radicals derived from water radiolysis, it was found that ascorbic acid promotes the chemical repair of precursors of AP-sites and base lesions more effectively than those of single strand breaks. We estimated the efficiency of the chemical repair of each lesion using a kinetic model. Approximately 50–60% of base lesions and AP-sites were repaired by 10 μM ascorbic acid, although strand breaks were largely unrepaired by ascorbic acid at low concentrations. The methods in this study will provide a route to understanding the mechanistic aspects of antioxidant activity in living systems.

  20. Development of PCR-Based DNA markers flanking three low phytic acid mutant loci in barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytic acid (PA) is the most abundant form of phosphorus (P) in cereal grains. PA chelates mineral cations to form an indigestible salt, and is thus regarded as an antinutritional agent and a contributor to water pollution. Grain with low phytic acid (lpa) genotypes could aid in mitigating this prob...

  1. A split G-quadruplex-based DNA nano-tweezers structure as a signal-transducing molecule for the homogeneous detection of specific nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Keisuke; Shigeto, Hajime; Kuroda, Akio; Funabashi, Hisakage

    2015-12-15

    A portable method of specific nucleic acid detection would be very useful for monitoring public health in a variety of settings for point-of-care and point-of-need testing. However, conventional methods for the detection of nucleic acids are not ideal for use in the field, as they require skilled operators and complex equipment. Here, we constructed a method for specific nucleic acid detection using a split G-quadruplex (Gq) structure that can recognize target nucleic acids without competitive reactions in a bimolecular reaction and directly produce a detectable signal based on peroxidase activity. We developed a single signal-transducing molecule with a split Gq-based DNA-nano tweezers (NT) structure that self-assembles from three single-stranded DNAs through simple mixing, and detects its target without requiring any washing steps. A model target, a partial norovirus mRNA (NV-RNA), was specifically recognized by the split Gq-based DNA-NT, causing it to undergo a structural change that restored its peroxidase activity. The peroxidase activity was measured by following the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), which gave a greenish colorimetric response, and was proportional to the NV-RNA concentration. The lower detection limit was 4 nM. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting specific nucleic acids with a split Gq-based DNA-NT structure as a nucleic acid signal-transducing molecule in a homogenous assay format. Also the target recognition sites of split Gq-based DNA-NT can easily be designed without delicate optimization of tweezers structure. Thus a split Gq-based DNA-NT technique is readily applicable to a basic platform for the development of a portable device.

  2. A Magnetic Nanoparticle Based Nucleic Acid Isolation and Purification Instrument for DNA Extraction of Escherichia Coli O157: H7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yahui; Lin, Jianhan; Jiang, Qin; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Shengjun; Li, Li

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a nucleic acid isolation and purification instrument using Escherichia coli O157:H7 as the model. The instrument was developed with magnetic nanoparticles for efficiently capturing nucleic acids and an intelligent mechanical unit for automatically performing the whole nucleic acid extraction process. A commercial DNA extraction kit from Huier Nano Company was used as reference. Nucleic acids in 1 ml of E. coli O157: H7 at a concentration of 5 x 10(8) CFU/mL were extracted by using this instrument and the kit in parallel and then detected by an ultraviolet spectrophotometer to obtain A260 values and A260/A280 values for the determination of the extracted DNA's quantity and purity, respectively. The A260 values for the instrument and the kit were 0.78 and 0.61, respectively, and the A260/A280 values were 1.98 and 1.93. The coefficient of variations of these parallel tests ranged from 10.5% to 16.7%. The results indicated that this nucleic acid isolation and purification instrument could extract a comparable level of nucleic acid within 50 min compared to the commercial DNA extraction kit.

  3. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully. PMID:26572843

  4. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully.

  5. Crosslink Mapping at Amino Acid-Base Resolution Reveals the Path of Scrunched DNA in Initial Transcribing Complexes.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, Jared T; Winkelman, Bradford T; Boyce, Julian; Maloney, Michael F; Chen, Albert Y; Ross, Wilma; Gourse, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    RNA polymerase binds tightly to DNA to recognize promoters with high specificity but then releases these contacts during the initial stage of transcription. We report a site-specific crosslinking approach to map the DNA path in bacterial transcription intermediates at amino acid and nucleotide resolution. After validating the approach by showing that the DNA path in open complexes (RPO) is the same as in high-resolution X-ray structures, we define the path following substrate addition in "scrunched" complexes (RPITC). The DNA bulges that form within the transcription bubble in RPITC are positioned differently on the two strands. Our data suggest that the non-template strand bulge is extruded into solvent in complexes containing a 5-mer RNA, whereas the template strand bulge remains within the template strand tunnel, exerting stress on interactions between the β flap, β' clamp, and σ3.2. We propose that this stress contributes to σ3.2 displacement from the RNA exit channel, facilitating promoter escape. PMID:26257284

  6. Quantitative detection of hepatitis B virus DNA by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with molecular beacon detection.

    PubMed

    Yates, S; Penning, M; Goudsmit, J; Frantzen, I; van de Weijer, B; van Strijp, D; van Gemen, B

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA detection and quantification system based on amplification with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) technology and real-time detection with molecular beacon technology. NASBA is normally applied to amplify single-stranded target RNA, producing RNA amplicons. In this work we show that with modifications like primer design, sample extraction method, and template denaturation, the NASBA technique can be made suitable for DNA target amplification resulting in RNA amplicons. A major advantage of our assay is the one-tube, isothermal nature of the method, which allows high-throughput applications for nucleic acid detection. The homogeneous real-time detection allows a closed-tube format of the assay, avoiding any postamplification handling of amplified material and therefore minimizing the risk of contamination of subsequent reactions. The assay has a detection range of 10(3) to 10(9) HBV DNA copies/ml of plasma or serum (6 logs), with good reproducibility and precision. Compared with other HBV DNA assays, our assay provides good sensitivity, a wide dynamic range, and high-throughput applicability, making it a viable alternative to those based on other amplification or detection methods.

  7. Metal based pharmacologically active agents: Synthesis, structural characterization, molecular modeling, CT-DNA binding studies and in vitro antimicrobial screening of iron(II) bromosalicylidene amino acid chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Ismael, Mohamed; Seleem, Amin Abdou

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been focused on Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes as cytotoxic and antitumor drugs. Thus a series of new iron(II) complexes based on Schiff bases amino acids ligands have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (bs) and α-amino acids (L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (phala), L-aspartic acid (aspa), L-histidine (his) and L-arginine (arg)). The structure of the investigated iron(II) complexes was elucidated using elemental analyses, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Moreover, the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the prepared complexes have been determined spectrophotometrically. The results suggest that 5-bromosalicylaldehyde amino acid Schiff bases (bs:aa) behave as dibasic tridentate ONO ligands and coordinate to Fe(II) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Fe(bs:aa)2]ṡnH2O. The conductivity values between 37 and 64 ohm-1 mol-1 cm2 in ethanol imply the presence of nonelectrolyte species. The structure of the complexes was validated using quantum mechanics calculations based on accurate DFT methods. Geometry optimization of the Fe-Schiff base amino acid complexes showed that all complexes had octahedral coordination. In addition, the interaction of these complexes with (CT-DNA) was investigated at pH = 7.2, by using UV-vis absorption, viscosity and agarose gel electrophoresis measurements. Results indicated that the investigated complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via intercalative mode and showed a different DNA binding according to the sequence: bsari > bshi > bsali > bsasi > bsphali. Moreover, the prepared compounds are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus

  8. Metal based pharmacologically active agents: synthesis, structural characterization, molecular modeling, CT-DNA binding studies and in vitro antimicrobial screening of iron(II) bromosalicylidene amino acid chelates.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H; El-Khatib, Rafat M; Nassr, Lobna A E; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M; Ismael, Mohamed; Seleem, Amin Abdou

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been focused on Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes as cytotoxic and antitumor drugs. Thus a series of new iron(II) complexes based on Schiff bases amino acids ligands have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (bs) and α-amino acids (L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (phala), L-aspartic acid (aspa), L-histidine (his) and L-arginine (arg)). The structure of the investigated iron(II) complexes was elucidated using elemental analyses, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Moreover, the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the prepared complexes have been determined spectrophotometrically. The results suggest that 5-bromosalicylaldehyde amino acid Schiff bases (bs:aa) behave as dibasic tridentate ONO ligands and coordinate to Fe(II) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Fe(bs:aa)2]·nH2O. The conductivity values between 37 and 64 ohm(-1) mol(-1) cm(2) in ethanol imply the presence of nonelectrolyte species. The structure of the complexes was validated using quantum mechanics calculations based on accurate DFT methods. Geometry optimization of the Fe-Schiff base amino acid complexes showed that all complexes had octahedral coordination. In addition, the interaction of these complexes with (CT-DNA) was investigated at pH=7.2, by using UV-vis absorption, viscosity and agarose gel electrophoresis measurements. Results indicated that the investigated complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via intercalative mode and showed a different DNA binding according to the sequence: bsari>bshi>bsali>bsasi>bsphali. Moreover, the prepared compounds are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus flavus

  9. Nucleic Acid Engineering: RNA Following the Trail of DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejin; Park, Yongkuk; Kim, Jieun; Jeong, Jaepil; Han, Sangwoo; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-02-01

    The self-assembly feature of the naturally occurring biopolymer, DNA, has fascinated researchers in the fields of materials science and bioengineering. With the improved understanding of the chemical and structural nature of DNA, DNA-based constructs have been designed and fabricated from two-dimensional arbitrary shapes to reconfigurable three-dimensional nanodevices. Although DNA has been used successfully as a building block in a finely organized and controlled manner, its applications need to be explored. Hence, with the myriad of biological functions, RNA has recently attracted considerable attention to further the application of nucleic acid-based structures. This Review categorizes different approaches of engineering nucleic acid-based structures and introduces the concepts, principles, and applications of each technique, focusing on how DNA engineering is applied as a guide to RNA engineering.

  10. The effects of linear assembly of two carbazole groups on acid-base and DNA-binding properties of a ruthenium(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xue, Long-Xin; Ju, Chun-Chuan; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    A novel Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hbcpip)](ClO4)2 {where bpy=2,2-bipyridine, Hbcpip=2-(4-(9H-3,9'-bicarbazol-9-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} is synthesized and characterized. Calf-thymus DNA-binding properties of the complex were studied by UV-vis absorption and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6](4-), DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and DNA viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the complex partially intercalated into the DNA with a binding constant of (5.5±1.4)×10(5) M(-1) in buffered 50 mM NaCl. The acid-base properties of the complex were also studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, and ground- and excited-state acidity ionization constant values were derived.

  11. The effects of linear assembly of two carbazole groups on acid-base and DNA-binding properties of a ruthenium(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Xue, Long-Xin; Ju, Chun-Chuan; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    A novel Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hbcpip)](ClO4)2 {where bpy = 2,2-bipyridine, Hbcpip = 2-(4-(9H-3,9'-bicarbazol-9-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} is synthesized and characterized. Calf-thymus DNA-binding properties of the complex were studied by UV-vis absorption and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6]4-, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and DNA viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the complex partially intercalated into the DNA with a binding constant of (5.5 ± 1.4) × 105 M-1 in buffered 50 mM NaCl. The acid-base properties of the complex were also studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, and ground- and excited-state acidity ionization constant values were derived.

  12. Synthesis, spectral characterization and DNA binding of Schiff-base metal complexes derived from 2-amino-3-hydroxyprobanoic acid and acetylacetone.

    PubMed

    Hosny, Nasser Mohammed; Hussien, Mostafa A; Radwan, Fatima M; Nawar, Nagwa

    2014-11-11

    Four new metal complexes derived from the reaction of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) acetates with the Schiff-base ligand (H3L) resulted from the condensation of the amino acid 2-amino-3-hydroxyprobanoic acid (serine) and acetylacetone have been synthesized and characterized by, elemental analyses, ES-MS, IR, UV-Vis., 1H NMR, 13C NMR, ESR, thermal analyses (TGA and DTG) and magnetic measurements. The results showed that the Schiff-base ligand acts as bi-negative tridentate through the azomethine nitrogen, the deprotonated carboxylate oxygen and the enolic carbonyl oxygen. The optical band gaps measurements indicated the semi-conducting nature of these complexes. Molecular docking was used to predict the binding between the Schiff base ligand with the receptor of prostate cancer mutant H874Y. The interactions between the Cu(II) complex and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been studied by UV spectra. The results confirm that the Cu(II) complex binds to CT-DNA in an intercalative mode.

  13. Synthesis, spectral characterization and DNA binding of Schiff-base metal complexes derived from 2-amino-3-hydroxyprobanoic acid and acetylacetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosny, Nasser Mohammed; Hussien, Mostafa A.; Radwan, Fatima M.; Nawar, Nagwa

    2014-11-01

    Four new metal complexes derived from the reaction of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) acetates with the Schiff-base ligand (H3L) resulted from the condensation of the amino acid 2-amino-3-hydroxyprobanoic acid (serine) and acetylacetone have been synthesized and characterized by, elemental analyses, ES-MS, IR, UV-Vis., 1H NMR, 13C NMR, ESR, thermal analyses (TGA and DTG) and magnetic measurements. The results showed that the Schiff-base ligand acts as bi-negative tridentate through the azomethine nitrogen, the deprotonated carboxylate oxygen and the enolic carbonyl oxygen. The optical band gaps measurements indicated the semi-conducting nature of these complexes. Molecular docking was used to predict the binding between the Schiff base ligand with the receptor of prostate cancer mutant H874Y. The interactions between the Cu(II) complex and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been studied by UV spectra. The results confirm that the Cu(II) complex binds to CT-DNA in an intercalative mode.

  14. Electrochemical DNA sensor-based strategy for sensitive detection of DNA demethylation and DNA demethylase activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingming; Fan, Mengxing; Yang, Yin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-08-31

    DNA demethylation and demethylase activity play important roles in DNA self-repair, and their detection is key to early diagnosis of fatal diseases. Herein, a facile electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor was developed for the sensitive detection of DNA demethylation and demethylase activity based on an enzyme cleavage strategy. The thiol modified hemi-methylated hairpin probe DNA (pDNA) was self-assembled on a Au electrode surface through the formation of AuS bonds. The hemi-methylated pDNA served as the substrate of DNA demethylase (using methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) as an example). Following demethylation, the hairpin stem was then recognized and cleaved by BstUI endonuclease. The ferrocene carboxylic acid (FcA)-tagged pDNA strands were released into the buffer solution from the electrode surface, resulting in a significant decrease of electrochemical signal and providing a means to observe DNA demethylation. The activity of DNA demethylase was analyzed in the concentration ranging from 0.5 to 500 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection as low as 0.17 ng mL(-1). With high specificity and sensitivity, rapid response, and low cost, this simple E-DNA sensor provides a unique platform for the sensitive detection of DNA demethylation, DNA demethylase activity, and related molecular diagnostics and drug screening. PMID:27506345

  15. Design, characterization, teratogenicity testing, antibacterial, antifungal and DNA interaction of few high spin Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Lashin, Fakhr El-Din

    2013-07-01

    In this study, new Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid chelates derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized via elemental, thermogravimetric analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic, mass spectra and magnetic moment measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. Correlation of all spectroscopic data suggested that Schiff bases ligands exhibited tridentate with ONO sites coordinating to the metal ions via protonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N and carboxylate-O with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate via deprotonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N, carboxylate-O and N-imidazole ring ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their teratogenicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. Moreover, the interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometric and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. Furthermore, the free ligands and their complexes are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus flavus and Trichotheium rosium in order to assess their antimicrobial potential. The results show that the metal complexes are more reactive with respect to their corresponding Schiff base amino acid ligands.

  16. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen.

  17. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen. PMID:27239860

  18. The effects of grafting of 2-pyridyl to [Ru(bpy)(2)(Hpip)](2+) on acid-base and DNA-binding properties: experimental and DFT studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, An-Guo; Yang, Huai-Xia; Yang, Ke-Zhi

    2011-06-01

    A new Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)(2)(Hpip)](2+) {bpy = 2,2'bipyridine; Hppip = 2-(4-(pyridin-2-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} has been synthesized by grafting of 2-pyridyl to parent complex [Ru(bpy)(2)(Hpip)](2+) {Hppip = 2-(4-phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline}. The acid-base properties of [Ru(bpy)(2)(Hpip)](2+) studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, revealed off-on-off luminescence switching of [Ru(bpy)(2)(Hpip)](2+) that was driven by the protonation/deprotonation of the imidazolyl and the pyridyl moieties. The complex was demonstrated to be a DNA intercalator with an intrinsic DNA binding constant of (5.56 ± 0.2) x 10(5) M-1 in buffered 50 mM NaCl, as evidenced by UV-visible and luminescence titrations, reverse salt effect, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6]4-, DNA melting experiments and viscosity measurements. The density functional theory method was also used to calculate geometric/electronic structures of the complex in an effort to understand the DNA binding properties. All the studies indicated that the introduction of 2-pyridyl onto Hpip ligand is more favorable for extension of conjugate plane of the main ligand than that of phenyl, and for greatly enhanced ct-DNA binding affinity accordingly.

  19. A pH-sensitive gene delivery system based on folic acid-PEG-chitosan - PAMAM-plasmid DNA complexes for cancer cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyue; Hu, Haiyang; Sun, Yuqi; Qiu, Lipeng; Zhang, Jie; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Cheng, Liang; Cheng, Lifang; Chen, Dawei

    2013-12-01

    In this study, pH-sensitive biomaterials coated polymer/DNA nanocomplexes containing a high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) were developed as an efficient non-viral gene delivery system. HMGB1 is a family of endogenous molecules that contains nuclear locating sequences (NSL). Polyethylene glycol tethered carboxylated chitosan modified with folic acid (FA-PEG-CCTS) was synthesized and its buffering capacity was determined by acid-base titration. A pH-sensitive core-shell system FA-PEG-CCTS/PAMAM/HMGB1/pDNA nanocomplexes (FPCPHDs), was prepared and characterized. Electrophoresis showed that FPCPHDs were resistant to heparin replacement and DNase I digestion. FPCPHDs exhibited only minor toxic effects on HepG2 and KB cells. The results of both luciferase activity assay and RFP fluorescence intensity analysis showed that FPCPHDs enhanced gene transfection and expression in KB cells. Moreover, gene transfection and expression in KB cells were inhibited by free folic acid. Intracellular trafficking of FPCPHDs in KB cells showed that FPCPHDs could rapidly escape from endo-lysosomes and become exclusively located in the nucleus at 3 h post transfection. In addition, FPCPHDs exhibited increased red fluorescence protein (RFP) expression at the tumor site of S180 xenograft nude mice. All results suggest that FPCPHDs is an efficient approach to improve the transfection and expression efficiency in most FR-positive cancer cells.

  20. Gibberellic Acid enhancement of DNA turnover in barley aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Taiz, L; Starks, J E

    1977-08-01

    When imbibed, deembryonated halfseeds from barley (Hordeum vulgare L., var. Himalaya) are incubated in buffer, the DNA content of the aleurone layer increases 25 to 40% over a 24-hour period. In contrast, the DNA of isolated aleurone layers declines by 20% over the same time period. Gibberellic acid (GA) causes a reduction in DNA levels in both halfseed aleurone layers and isolated aleurone layers. GA also increases the specific radioactivity of [(3)H]thymidine-labeled halfseed aleurone layer DNA during the first 12 hours of treatment. Pulse-chase studies demonstrated that the newly synthesized DNA is metabolically labile.The buoyant density on CsCl density gradients of hormone-treated aleurone DNA is identical with that of DNA extracted from whole seedlings. After density-labeling halfseed DNA with 5-bromodeoxyuridine, a bimodal absorption profile is obtained in neutral CsCl. The light band (1.70 g/ml) corresponds to unsubstituted DNA, while the heavy band (1.725-1.74 g/ml) corresponds to a hybrid density-labeled species. GA increases the relative amount of the heavy (hybrid) peak in halfseed aleurone layer DNA, further suggesting that the hormone enhances semiconservative replication in halfseeds.DNA methylation was also demonstrated. Over 60% of the radioactivity from [(3)H-Me]methionine is incorporated into 5-methylcytosine. GA has no effect on the percentage distribution of label among the bases.It was concluded that GA enhances the rate of DNA degradation and DNA synthesis (turnover) in halfseeds, but primarily DNA degradation in isolated aleurone layers. Incorporation by isolated aleurone layers is due to DNA repair. Semiconservative replication apparently plays no physiological role in the hormone response, since both isolated aleurone layers and gamma-irradiated halfseeds respond normally. The hypothesis was advanced that endoreduplication and DNA degradation are means by which the seed stores and mobilizes deoxyribonucleotides for the embryo during

  1. DNA-Based Applications in Nanobiotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Salah, Khalid M.; Ansari, Anees A.; Alrokayan, Salman A.

    2010-01-01

    Biological molecules such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) have shown great potential in fabrication and construction of nanostructures and devices. The very properties that make DNA so effective as genetic material also make it a very suitable molecule for programmed self-assembly. The use of DNA to assemble metals or semiconducting particles has been extended to construct metallic nanowires and functionalized nanotubes. This paper highlights some important aspects of conjugating the unique physical properties of dots or wires with the remarkable recognition capabilities of DNA which could lead to miniaturizing biological electronics and optical devices, including biosensors and probes. Attempts to use DNA-based nanocarriers for gene delivery are discussed. In addition, the ecological advantages and risks of nanotechnology including DNA-based nanobiotechnology are evaluated. PMID:20652049

  2. A facile, sensitive, and highly specific trinitrophenol assay based on target-induced synergetic effects of acid induction and electron transfer towards DNA-templated copper nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyin; Chang, Jiafu; Hou, Ting; Ge, Lei; Li, Feng

    2016-11-01

    Reliable, selective and sensitive approaches for trinitrophenol (TNP) detection are highly desirable with respect to national security and environmental protection. Herein, a simple and novel fluorescent strategy for highly sensitive and specific TNP assay has been successfully developed, which is based on the quenching of the fluorescent poly(thymine)-templated copper nanoclusters (DNA-CuNCs), through the synergetic effects of acid induction and electron transfer. Upon the addition of TNP, donor-acceptor complexes between the electron-deficient nitro-groups in TNP and the electron-donating DNA templates are formed, resulting in the close proximity between TNP and CuNCs. Moreover, the acidity of TNP contributes to the pH decrease of the system. These factors combine to dramatically quench the fluorescence of DNA-CuNCs, providing a "signal-off" strategy for TNP sensing. The as-proposed strategy demonstrates high sensitivity for TNP assay, and a detection limit of 0.03μM is obtained, which is lower than those reported by using organic fluorescent materials. More significantly, this approach shows outstanding selectivity over a number of TNP analogues, such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), 3-nitrophenol (NP), nitrobenzene (NB), phenol (BP), and toluene (BT). Compared with previous studies, this method does not need complex DNA sequence design, fluorescent dye labeling, or sophisticated organic reactions, rendering the strategy with additional advantages of simplicity and cost-effectiveness. In addition, the as-proposed strategy has been adopted for the detection of TNP in natural water samples, indicating its great potential to be applied in the fields of public safety and environmental monitoring. PMID:27591641

  3. Spectral characterization, optical band gap calculations and DNA binding of some binuclear Schiff-base metal complexes derived from 2-amino-ethanoic acid and acetylacetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussien, Mostafa A.; Nawar, Nagwa; Radwan, Fatima M.; Hosny, Nasser Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Bi-nuclear metal complexes derived from the reaction of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) acetates with the Schiff-base ligand (H2L) resulted from the condensation of 2-amino-ethanoic acid (glycine) and acetylacetone have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, Raman spectra, FT-IR, ES-MS, UV-Vis., 1H NMR, ESR, thermal analyses (TG, DTG and DTA) and magnetic measurements. The results showed that, the Schiff base ligand can bind two metal ions in the same time. It coordinates to the first metal ion as mono-negative bi-dentate through azomethine nitrogen and enolic carbonyl after deprotonation. At the same time, it binds to the second metal ion via carboxylate oxygen after deprotonation. The thermodynamic parameters E∗, ΔH∗, ΔG∗ and ΔS∗ have been calculated by Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzger (HM) methods. The optical band gaps of the isolated complexes have been calculated from absorption spectra and the results indicated semi-conducting nature of the investigated complexes. The interactions between the copper (II) complex and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been studied by UV spectra. The results confirm that the Cu(II) complex binds to CT-DNA.

  4. DNA-LCEB: a high-capacity and mutation-resistant DNA data-hiding approach by employing encryption, error correcting codes, and hybrid twofold and fourfold codon-based strategy for synonymous substitution in amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Ibbad; Khan, Asifullah; Qadir, Abdul

    2014-11-01

    Data-hiding in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences can be used to develop an organic memory and to track parent genes in an offspring as well as in genetically modified organism. However, the main concerns regarding data-hiding in DNA sequences are the survival of organism and successful extraction of watermark from DNA. This implies that the organism should live and reproduce without any functional disorder even in the presence of the embedded data. Consequently, performing synonymous substitution in amino acids for watermarking becomes a primary option. In this regard, a hybrid watermark embedding strategy that employs synonymous substitution in both twofold and fourfold codons of amino acids is proposed. This work thus presents a high-capacity and mutation-resistant watermarking technique, DNA-LCEB, for hiding secret information in DNA of living organisms. By employing the different types of synonymous codons of amino acids, the data storage capacity has been significantly increased. It is further observed that the proposed DNA-LCEB employing a combination of synonymous substitution, lossless compression, encryption, and Bose-Chaudary-Hocquenghem coding is secure and performs better in terms of both capacity and robustness compared to existing DNA data-hiding schemes. The proposed DNA-LCEB is tested against different mutations, including silent, miss-sense, and non-sense mutations, and provides substantial improvement in terms of mutation detection/correction rate and bits per nucleotide. A web application for DNA-LCEB is available at http://111.68.99.218/DNA-LCEB.

  5. The effects of structural variations of thiophene-containing Ru(II) complexes on the acid-base and DNA binding properties.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cui-Li; Zhang, An-Guo; Zheng, Ze-Bo; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-03-01

    A phenylthiophenyl-bearing Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hbptip)](PF₆)₂ {bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, Hbptip = 2-(4-phenylthiophen-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ¹H NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The ground- and excited-state acid-base properties of the complex were studied by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations and the negative logarithm values of the ground-state acid ionization constants were derived to be pK(a1) = 1.31 ± 0.09 and pK(a2) = 5.71 ± 0.11 with the pK(a2) associated deprotonation/protonation process occurring over 3 pK(a) units more acidic than thiophenyl-free parent complex of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hpip)]²⁺ {Hpip = 2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline}. The calf thymus DNA-binding properties of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hbptip)]²⁺ in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.1 and 50 mM NaCl) were investigated by DNA viscosities and density functional theoretical calculations as well as UV-visible and emission spectroscopy techniques of UV-visible and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)₆]⁴⁻, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, DNA melting experiments, and reverse salt effects. The complex was evidenced to bind to the DNA intercalatively with binding affinity being greater than those for previously reported analogs of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hip)]²⁺, [Ru(bpy)₂(Htip)]²⁺, and [Ru(bpy)₂(Haptip)]²⁺ {Hip = 1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, Htip = 2-thiophenimidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, Haptip = 2-(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline}.

  6. Investigation of perfluorooctanoic acid induced DNA damage using electrogenerated chemiluminescence associated with charge transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Guo, Linqing; Li, Meng; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Miao, Wujian

    2016-10-01

    An electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL)-DNA sensor was designed and fabricated for the investigation of DNA damage by a potential environmental pollutant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). The ECL-DNA sensor consisted of a Au electrode that had a self-assembled monolayer of 15 base-pair double-stranded (ds) DNA oligonucleotides with covalently attached semiconductor CdSe quantum dots (QDs) at the distal end of the DNA. Characterization of the ECL-DNA sensor was conducted with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ECL, and cyclic voltammetry before and after the exposure of the sensor to PFOA. Consistent data revealed that the dsDNA on Au was severely damaged upon the incubation of the electrode in PFOA, causing significant increase in charge (or electron) transfer (CT) resistance within DNA strands. Consequently, the cathodic coreactant ECL responses of the Au/dsDNA-QDs electrode in the presence of K2S2O8 were markedly decreased. The strong interaction between DNA and PFOA via the hydrophobic interaction, especially the formation of F···H hydrogen bonds by insertion of the difluoro-methylene group of PFOA into the DNA base pairs, was believed to be responsible for the dissociation or loosening of dsDNA structure, which inhibited the CT through DNA. A linear relationship between the ECL signal of the sensor and the logarithmical concentration of PFOA displayed a dynamic range of 1.00 × 10(-14)-1.00 × 10(-4) M, with a limit of detection of 1.00 × 10(-15) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Graphical Abstract Illustration of ECL detection of PFOA on a Au/dsDNA-QDs ECL-DNA sensor.

  7. Investigation of perfluorooctanoic acid induced DNA damage using electrogenerated chemiluminescence associated with charge transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Guo, Linqing; Li, Meng; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Miao, Wujian

    2016-10-01

    An electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL)-DNA sensor was designed and fabricated for the investigation of DNA damage by a potential environmental pollutant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). The ECL-DNA sensor consisted of a Au electrode that had a self-assembled monolayer of 15 base-pair double-stranded (ds) DNA oligonucleotides with covalently attached semiconductor CdSe quantum dots (QDs) at the distal end of the DNA. Characterization of the ECL-DNA sensor was conducted with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ECL, and cyclic voltammetry before and after the exposure of the sensor to PFOA. Consistent data revealed that the dsDNA on Au was severely damaged upon the incubation of the electrode in PFOA, causing significant increase in charge (or electron) transfer (CT) resistance within DNA strands. Consequently, the cathodic coreactant ECL responses of the Au/dsDNA-QDs electrode in the presence of K2S2O8 were markedly decreased. The strong interaction between DNA and PFOA via the hydrophobic interaction, especially the formation of F···H hydrogen bonds by insertion of the difluoro-methylene group of PFOA into the DNA base pairs, was believed to be responsible for the dissociation or loosening of dsDNA structure, which inhibited the CT through DNA. A linear relationship between the ECL signal of the sensor and the logarithmical concentration of PFOA displayed a dynamic range of 1.00 × 10(-14)-1.00 × 10(-4) M, with a limit of detection of 1.00 × 10(-15) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Graphical Abstract Illustration of ECL detection of PFOA on a Au/dsDNA-QDs ECL-DNA sensor. PMID:27108285

  8. Complexing of amino acids to DNA by chromate in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Voitkun, V; Zhitkovich, A; Costa, M

    1994-01-01

    Using o-pthaldialdehyde (OPT) fluorescence, the amino acids associated with DNA were studied following exposure of intact Chinese hamster ovary cells to chromate. Rigorous extraction with EDTA, acid, or base was required to release the amino acids cross-linked to the DNA isolated from control or chromate-treated cells by standard procedures (i.e., proteinase K, phenol, etc.). Amino acids resisting extraction from DNA were not studied since analysis was limited to those that could be released by these procedures. There was a chromate dose-dependent increase in amino acids complexed with the DNA that could be released by EDTA, acid, and base, and these amino acids were separated by HPLC and identified. Substantial increases in cysteine, glutamine, glutamic acid, histidine, threonine, and tyrosine were found as a function of increasing concentrations of chromate. There was also a time-dependent increase in complexing of these amino acids to the DNA by chromate. The amino acids found complexed to DNA in intact cells by chromate were thought to originate from reactions of free amino acids or small peptides with the DNA rather than being proteolytic products derived from larger proteins that were cross-linked to the DNA. This was supported by a number of experiments: a) free amino acids or bovine serum albumin (BSA) were cross-linked by chromium to DNA in vitro and the DNA was isolated by standard procedures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7843108

  9. Establishment of the 1st World Health Organization International Standard for Plasmodium falciparum DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Padley, David J; Heath, Alan B; Sutherland, Colin; Chiodini, Peter L; Baylis, Sally A

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to harmonize results for the detection and quantification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA by nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays, a World Health Organization (WHO) collaborative study was performed, evaluating a series of candidate standard preparations. Methods Fourteen laboratories from 10 different countries participated in the collaborative study. Four candidate preparations based upon blood samples parasitaemic for P. falciparum were evaluated in the study. Sample AA was lyophilized, whilst samples BB, CC and DD were liquid/frozen preparations. The candidate standards were tested by each laboratory at a range of dilutions in four independent assays, using both qualitative and quantitative NAT-based assays. The results were collated and analysed statistically. Results Twenty sets of data were returned from the participating laboratories and used to determine the mean P. falciparum DNA content for each sample. The mean log10 "equivalents"/ml were 8.51 for sample AA, 8.45 for sample BB, 8.35 for sample CC, and 5.51 for sample DD. The freeze-dried preparation AA, was examined by accelerated thermal degradation studies and found to be highly stable. Conclusion On the basis of the collaborative study, the freeze-dried material, AA (NIBSC code No. 04/176) was established as the 1st WHO International Standard for P. falciparum DNA NAT-based assays and has been assigned a potency of 109 International Units (IU) per ml. Each vial contains 5 × 108 IU, equivalent to 0.5 ml of material after reconstitution. PMID:18652656

  10. Cinnamate-based DNA photolithography.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lang; Romulus, Joy; Li, Minfeng; Sha, Ruojie; Royer, John; Wu, Kun-Ta; Xu, Qin; Seeman, Nadrian C; Weck, Marcus; Chaikin, Paul

    2013-08-01

    As demonstrated by means of DNA nanoconstructs, as well as DNA functionalization of nanoparticles and micrometre-scale colloids, complex self-assembly processes require components to associate with particular partners in a programmable fashion. In many cases the reversibility of the interactions between complementary DNA sequences is an advantage. However, permanently bonding some or all of the complementary pairs may allow for flexibility in design and construction. Here, we show that the substitution of a cinnamate group for a pair of complementary bases provides an efficient, addressable, ultraviolet light-based method to bond complementary DNA covalently. To show the potential of this approach, we wrote micrometre-scale patterns on a surface using ultraviolet light and demonstrated the reversible attachment of conjugated DNA and DNA-coated colloids. Our strategy enables both functional DNA photolithography and multistep, specific binding in self-assembly processes.

  11. Cinnamate-based DNA photolithography

    PubMed Central

    Romulus, Joy; Li, Minfeng; Sha, Ruojie; Royer, John; Wu, Kun-Ta; Xu, Qin

    2013-01-01

    As demonstrated by means of DNA nanoconstructs[1], as well as DNA functionalization of nanoparticles[2-4] and micrometre-scale colloids[5-8], complex self-assembly processes require components to associate with particular partners in a programmable fashion. In many cases the reversibility of the interactions between complementary DNA sequences is an advantage[9]. However, permanently bonding some or all of the complementary pairs may allow for flexibility in design and construction[10]. Here, we show that the substitution of a pair of complementary bases by a cinnamate group provides an efficient, addressable, UV light-based method to covalently bond complementary DNA. To show the potential of this approach, we wrote micrometre-scale patterns on a surface via UV light and demonstrate the reversible attachment of conjugated DNA and DNA-coated colloids. Our strategy enables both functional DNA photolithography and multi-step, specific binding in self-assembly processes. PMID:23685865

  12. QPSO-based adaptive DNA computing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Karakose, Mehmet; Cigdem, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) computing that is a new computation model based on DNA molecules for information storage has been increasingly used for optimization and data analysis in recent years. However, DNA computing algorithm has some limitations in terms of convergence speed, adaptability, and effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach for improvement of DNA computing is proposed. This new approach aims to perform DNA computing algorithm with adaptive parameters towards the desired goal using quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO). Some contributions provided by the proposed QPSO based on adaptive DNA computing algorithm are as follows: (1) parameters of population size, crossover rate, maximum number of operations, enzyme and virus mutation rate, and fitness function of DNA computing algorithm are simultaneously tuned for adaptive process, (2) adaptive algorithm is performed using QPSO algorithm for goal-driven progress, faster operation, and flexibility in data, and (3) numerical realization of DNA computing algorithm with proposed approach is implemented in system identification. Two experiments with different systems were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with comparative results. Experimental results obtained with Matlab and FPGA demonstrate ability to provide effective optimization, considerable convergence speed, and high accuracy according to DNA computing algorithm.

  13. Comparison of Five Commercial Nucleic Acid Extraction Kits for the PCR-based Detection of Burkholderia Pseudomallei DNA in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Obersteller, Sonja; Neubauer, Heinrich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Frickmann, Hagen

    2016-01-01

    The extraction and further processing of nucleic acids (NA) from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues for microbiological diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approaches is challenging. Here, we assessed the effects of five different commercially available nucleic acid extraction kits on the results of real-time PCR. FFPE samples from organs of Burkholderia pseudomallei-infected Swiss mice were subjected to processing with five different extraction kits from QIAGEN (FFPE DNA Tissue Kit, EZ1 DNA Tissue Kit, DNA Mini Kit, DNA Blood Mini Kit, and FlexiGene DNA Kit) in combination with three different real-time PCRs targeting B. pseudomallei-specific sequences of varying length after 16 years of storage. The EZ1 DNA Tissue Kit and the DNA Mini Kit scored best regarding the numbers of successful PCR reactions. In case of positive PCR, differences regarding the cycle-threshold (Ct) values were marginal. The impact of the applied extraction kits on the reliability of PCR from FFPE material seems to be low. Interfering factors like the quality of the dewaxing procedure or the sample age appear more important than the selection of specialized FFPE kits. PMID:27766174

  14. DNA-based hybrid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the DNA are key to achieve high enantioselectivities and, often, additional rate accelerations in catalysis. Nowadays, current efforts are focused on improved designs, understanding the origin of the enantioselectivity and DNA-induced rate accelerations, expanding the catalytic scope of the concept and further increasing the practicality of the method for applications in synthesis. Herein, the recent developments will be reviewed and the perspectives for the emerging field of DNA-based hybrid catalysis will be discussed.

  15. DNA Tetrominoes: The Construction of DNA Nanostructures Using Self-Organised Heterogeneous Deoxyribonucleic Acids Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hui San; Rahim, Mohd Syafiq; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan

    2015-01-01

    The unique programmability of nucleic acids offers alternative in constructing excitable and functional nanostructures. This work introduces an autonomous protocol to construct DNA Tetris shapes (L-Shape, B-Shape, T-Shape and I-Shape) using modular DNA blocks. The protocol exploits the rich number of sequence combinations available from the nucleic acid alphabets, thus allowing for diversity to be applied in designing various DNA nanostructures. Instead of a deterministic set of sequences corresponding to a particular design, the protocol promotes a large pool of DNA shapes that can assemble to conform to any desired structures. By utilising evolutionary programming in the design stage, DNA blocks are subjected to processes such as sequence insertion, deletion and base shifting in order to enrich the diversity of the resulting shapes based on a set of cascading filters. The optimisation algorithm allows mutation to be exerted indefinitely on the candidate sequences until these sequences complied with all the four fitness criteria. Generated candidates from the protocol are in agreement with the filter cascades and thermodynamic simulation. Further validation using gel electrophoresis indicated the formation of the designed shapes. Thus, supporting the plausibility of constructing DNA nanostructures in a more hierarchical, modular, and interchangeable manner. PMID:26258940

  16. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  17. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  18. Formation of the base modification 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine and DNA fragmentation following seizures induced by systemic kainic acid in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lan, J; Henshall, D C; Simon, R P; Chen, J

    2000-01-01

    The formation of oxidative DNA damage as a consequence of seizures remains little explored. We therefore investigated the regional and temporal profile of 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation, a hallmark of oxidative DNA damage and DNA fragmentation in rat brain following seizures induced by systemic kainic acid (KA). Formation of 8-OHdG was determined via HPLC with electrochemical detection, and single- and double-stranded DNA breaks were detected using in situ DNA polymerase I-mediated biotin-dATP nick-translation (PANT) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL), respectively. Systemic KA (11 mg/kg) significantly increased levels of 8-OHdG within the thalamus after 2 h, within the amygdala/piriform cortex after 4 h, and within the hippocampus after 8 h. Levels remained elevated up to sevenfold within these areas for 72 h. Smaller increases in 8-OHdG levels were also detected within the parietal cortex and striatum. PANT-positive cells were detected within the thalamus, amygdala/piriform cortex, and hippocampus 24-72 h following KA injection. TUNEL-positive cells appeared within the same brain regions and over a similar time course (24-72 h) but were generally lower in number. The present data suggest oxidative damage to DNA may be an early consequence of epileptic seizures and a possible initiation event in the progression of seizure-induced injury to DNA fragmentation and cell death.

  19. Label-free potentiometry for detecting DNA hybridization using peptide nucleic acid and DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-02-07

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  20. Development of a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on elongated hexagonal-pyramid CdS and poly-isonicotinic acid composite film.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Delun; Wang, Qingxiang; Gao, Feng; Wang, Qinghua; Qiu, Weiwei; Gao, Fei

    2014-10-15

    Three CdS materials with different shapes (i.e., irregular, rod-like, and elongated hexagonal-pyramid) were hydrothermally synthesized through controlling the molar ratio of Cd(2+) to thiourea. Electrochemical experiments showed that the elongated hexagonal-pyramid CdS (eh-CdS) modified on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) had the higher electrical conductivity than the other two forms. Then the eh-CdS modified GCE was further modified with a layer of poly-isonicotinic acid (PIA) through electro-polymerization in IA solution to enhance the stability and functionality of the interface. The layer-by-layer modification process was characterized by atomic force microscopy and electrochemistry. Then 5'-amino functionalized DNA was immobilized on the electrode surface through coupling with the carboxylic groups derived from PIA-eh-CdS composite film. The hybridization performance of the developed biosensor was evaluated using methylene blue as redox indicator, and the results showed that the peak currents of methylene blue varied with target concentrations in a wide linear range from 1.0 × 10(-14)M to 1.0 × 10(-9)M with a low detection limit of 3.9 × 10(-15)M. The biosensor also showed high stability and good discrimination ability to the one-base, three-base mismatched and non-complementary sequence.

  1. Development of a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on elongated hexagonal-pyramid CdS and poly-isonicotinic acid composite film.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Delun; Wang, Qingxiang; Gao, Feng; Wang, Qinghua; Qiu, Weiwei; Gao, Fei

    2014-10-15

    Three CdS materials with different shapes (i.e., irregular, rod-like, and elongated hexagonal-pyramid) were hydrothermally synthesized through controlling the molar ratio of Cd(2+) to thiourea. Electrochemical experiments showed that the elongated hexagonal-pyramid CdS (eh-CdS) modified on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) had the higher electrical conductivity than the other two forms. Then the eh-CdS modified GCE was further modified with a layer of poly-isonicotinic acid (PIA) through electro-polymerization in IA solution to enhance the stability and functionality of the interface. The layer-by-layer modification process was characterized by atomic force microscopy and electrochemistry. Then 5'-amino functionalized DNA was immobilized on the electrode surface through coupling with the carboxylic groups derived from PIA-eh-CdS composite film. The hybridization performance of the developed biosensor was evaluated using methylene blue as redox indicator, and the results showed that the peak currents of methylene blue varied with target concentrations in a wide linear range from 1.0 × 10(-14)M to 1.0 × 10(-9)M with a low detection limit of 3.9 × 10(-15)M. The biosensor also showed high stability and good discrimination ability to the one-base, three-base mismatched and non-complementary sequence. PMID:24800680

  2. Acid-Base Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S

    2015-12-01

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3(-) and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3(-) is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys.

  3. Understanding Acid Base Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Hernando; Kellum, John A

    2015-10-01

    The concentration of hydrogen ions is regulated in biologic solutions. There are currently 3 recognized approaches to assess changes in acid base status. First is the traditional Henderson-Hasselbalch approach, also called the physiologic approach, which uses the relationship between HCO3(-) and Pco2; the second is the standard base excess approach based on the Van Slyke equation. The third approach is the quantitative or Stewart approach, which uses the strong ion difference and the total weak acids. This article explores the origins of the current concepts framing the existing methods to analyze acid base balance.

  4. DNA adsorption to and elution from silica surfaces: influence of amino acid buffers.

    PubMed

    Vandeventer, Peter E; Mejia, Jorge; Nadim, Ali; Johal, Malkiat S; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-09-19

    Solid phase extraction and purification of DNA from complex samples typically requires chaotropic salts that can inhibit downstream polymerase amplification if carried into the elution buffer. Amino acid buffers may serve as a more compatible alternative for modulating the interaction between DNA and silica surfaces. We characterized DNA binding to silica surfaces, facilitated by representative amino acid buffers, and the subsequent elution of DNA from the silica surfaces. Through bulk depletion experiments, we found that more DNA adsorbs to silica particles out of positively compared to negatively charged amino acid buffers. Additionally, the type of the silica surface greatly influences the amount of DNA adsorbed and the final elution yield. Quartz crystal microbalance experiments with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) revealed multiphasic DNA adsorption out of stronger adsorbing conditions such as arginine, glycine, and glutamine, with DNA more rigidly bound during the early stages of the adsorption process. The DNA film adsorbed out of glutamate was more flexible and uniform throughout the adsorption process. QCM-D characterization of DNA elution from the silica surface indicates an uptake in water mass during the initial stage of DNA elution for the stronger adsorbing conditions, which suggests that for these conditions the DNA film is partly dehydrated during the prior adsorption process. Overall, several positively charged and polar neutral amino acid buffers show promise as an alternative to methods based on chaotropic salts for solid phase DNA extraction.

  5. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  6. The interaction of amino acids, peptides, and proteins with DNA.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Andrey Y; Tarnovskaya, Svetlana I; Chernova, Irina A; Shataeva, Larisa K; Skorik, Yury A

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids that carry charges on their side groups can bind to double stranded DNA (dsDNA) and change the strength of the double helix. Measurement of the DNA melting temperature (Tm) confirmed that acidic amino acids (Glu, Asp) weaken the H-bonds between DNA strands, whereas basic amino acids (Arg, Lys) strengthen the interaction between the strands. A rank correlation exists between the amino acid isoelectric points and the observed changes in Tm. A similar dependence of the hyperchromic effect on the isoelectric point of a protein (pepsin, insulin, cortexin, and protamine) was observed for DNA-protein complexes at room temperature. Short peptides (KE, AEDG, and KEDP) containing a mixture of acidic and basic amino acid residues also affect Tm and the stability of the double helix. A model for binding Glu and Lys to dsDNA was explored by a docking simulation. The model shows that Glu, in an untwisted shape, binds to dsDNA in its major groove and disrupts three H-bonds between the strands, thereby destabilizing the double helix. Lys, in an untwisted shape, binds to the external side of the dsDNA and forms two bonds with O atoms of neighboring phosphodiester groups, thereby strengthening the DNA helix.

  7. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  8. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17).

  9. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17). PMID:27192830

  10. DNA based arithmetic function: a half adder based on DNA strand displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Biomolecular programming utilizes the reactions and information stored in biological molecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, for computational purposes. DNA has proven itself an excellent candidate for building logic operating systems due to its highly predictable molecular behavior. In this work we designed and realized an XOR logic gate and an AND logic gate based on DNA strand displacement reactions. These logic gates utilize ssDNA as input and output signals. The XOR gate and the AND gate were used as building blocks for constructing a half adder logic circuit, which is a primary step in constructing a full adder, a basic arithmetic unit in computing. This work provides the field of DNA molecular programming with a potential universal arithmetic tool.Biomolecular programming utilizes the reactions and information stored in biological molecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, for computational purposes. DNA has proven itself an excellent candidate for building logic operating systems due to its highly predictable molecular behavior. In this work we designed and realized an XOR logic gate and an AND logic gate based on DNA strand displacement reactions. These logic gates utilize ssDNA as input and output signals. The XOR gate and the AND gate were used as building blocks for constructing a half adder logic circuit, which is a primary step in constructing a full adder, a basic arithmetic unit in computing. This work provides the field of DNA molecular programming with a potential universal arithmetic tool. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed descriptions of DNA logic gate design, materials and methods, and additional data analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08497k

  11. DNA based computing for understanding complex shapes.

    PubMed

    Ullah, A M M Sharif; D'Addona, Doriana; Arai, Nobuyuki

    2014-03-01

    This study deals with a computing method called DNA based computing (DBC) that takes inspiration from the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology. The proposed DBC uses a set of user-defined rules to create a DNA-like sequence from a given piece of problem-relevant information (e.g., image data) in a dry-media (i.e., in an ordinary computer). It then uses another set of user-defined rules to create an mRNA-like sequence from the DNA. Finally, it uses the genetic code to translate the mRNA (or directly the DNA) to a protein-like sequence (a sequence of amino acids). The informational characteristics of the protein (entropy, absence, presence, abundance of some selected amino acids, and relationships among their likelihoods) can be used to solve problems (e.g., to understand complex shapes from their image data). Two case studies ((1) fractal geometry generated shape of a fern-leaf and (2) machining experiment generated shape of the worn-zones of a cutting tool) are presented elucidating the shape understanding ability of the proposed DBC in the presence of a great deal of variability in the image data of the respective shapes. The implication of the proposed DBC from the context of Internet-aided manufacturing system is also described. Further study can be carried out in solving other complex computational problems by using the proposed DBC and its derivatives. PMID:24447435

  12. Accurate and easy-to-use assessment of contiguous DNA methylation sites based on proportion competitive quantitative-PCR and lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Cheng, Nan; Huang, Kunlun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Chenguang; Xu, Yuancong; Zhu, Longjiao; Du, Dan; Luo, Yunbo

    2016-06-15

    Many types of diagnostic technologies have been reported for DNA methylation, but they require a standard curve for quantification or only show moderate accuracy. Moreover, most technologies have difficulty providing information on the level of methylation at specific contiguous multi-sites, not to mention easy-to-use detection to eliminate labor-intensive procedures. We have addressed these limitations and report here a cascade strategy that combines proportion competitive quantitative PCR (PCQ-PCR) and lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor (LFNAB), resulting in accurate and easy-to-use assessment. The P16 gene with specific multi-methylated sites, a well-studied tumor suppressor gene, was used as the target DNA sequence model. First, PCQ-PCR provided amplification products with an accurate proportion of multi-methylated sites following the principle of proportionality, and double-labeled duplex DNA was synthesized. Then, a LFNAB strategy was further employed for amplified signal detection via immune affinity recognition, and the exact level of site-specific methylation could be determined by the relative intensity of the test line and internal reference line. This combination resulted in all recoveries being greater than 94%, which are pretty satisfactory recoveries in DNA methylation assessment. Moreover, the developed cascades show significantly high usability as a simple, sensitive, and low-cost tool. Therefore, as a universal platform for sensing systems for the detection of contiguous multi-sites of DNA methylation without external standards and expensive instrumentation, this PCQ-PCR-LFNAB cascade method shows great promise for the point-of-care diagnosis of cancer risk and therapeutics.

  13. Morphine Induces Redox-Based Changes in Global DNA Methylation and Retrotransposon Transcription by Inhibition of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter Type 3–Mediated Cysteine Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Malav; Shah, Jayni; Hodgson, Nathaniel; Byun, Hyang-Min

    2014-01-01

    Canonically, opioids influence cells by binding to a G protein–coupled opioid receptor, initiating intracellular signaling cascades, such as protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and extracellular receptor kinase pathways. This results in several downstream effects, including decreased levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) and elevated oxidative stress, as well as epigenetic changes, especially in retrotransposons and heterochromatin, although the mechanism and consequences of these actions are unclear. We characterized the acute and long-term influence of morphine on redox and methylation status (including DNA methylation levels) in cultured neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Acting via μ-opioid receptors, morphine inhibits excitatory amino acid transporter type 3–mediated cysteine uptake via multiple signaling pathways, involving different G proteins and protein kinases in a temporal manner. Decreased cysteine uptake was associated with decreases in both the redox and methylation status of neuronal cells, as defined by the ratios of GSH to oxidized forms of glutathione and S-adenosylmethionine to S-adenosylhomocysteine levels, respectively. Further, morphine induced global DNA methylation changes, including CpG sites in long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1) retrotransposons, resulting in increased LINE-1 mRNA. Together, these findings illuminate the mechanism by which morphine, and potentially other opioids, can influence neuronal-cell redox and methylation status including DNA methylation. Since epigenetic changes are implicated in drug addiction and tolerance phenomenon, this study could potentially extrapolate to elucidate a novel mechanism of action for other drugs of abuse. PMID:24569088

  14. Folic acid binds DNA and RNA at different locations.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-03-01

    We located multiple binding sites for folic acid on DNA and tRNA at physiological conditions, using FTIR, CD, fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling. Structural analysis revealed that folic acid binds DNA and tRNA at multiple sites via hydrophilic, hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of Kfolic acid-DNA=1.1 (±0.3)×10(4) M(-1) and Kfolic acid-tRNA=6.4 (±0.5)×10(3) M(-1). Molecular modeling showed the participation of several nucleobases in folic acid complexes with DNA and tRNA, stabilized by H-bonding network. Two types of complexes were located for folic acid-tRNA adducts, one at the major groove and the other with TΨC loop, while acid binding occurs at major and minor grooves of DNA duplex. Folic acid complexation induced more alterations of DNA structure than tRNA.

  15. The role of molecular structure of sugar-phosphate backbone and nucleic acid bases in the formation of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Poltev, Valeri; Anisimov, Victor M; Danilov, Victor I; Garcia, Dolores; Sanchez, Carolina; Deriabina, Alexandra; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Rivas, Francisco; Polteva, Nina

    2014-06-01

    Our previous DFT computations of deoxydinucleoside monophosphate complexes with Na(+)-ions (dDMPs) have demonstrated that the main characteristics of Watson-Crick (WC) right-handed duplex families are predefined in the local energy minima of dDMPs. In this work, we study the mechanisms of contribution of chemically monotonous sugar-phosphate backbone and the bases into the double helix irregularity. Geometry optimization of sugar-phosphate backbone produces energy minima matching the WC DNA conformations. Studying the conformational variability of dDMPs in response to sequence permutation, we found that simple replacement of bases in the previously fully optimized dDMPs, e.g. by constructing Pyr-Pur from Pur-Pyr, and Pur-Pyr from Pyr-Pur sequences, while retaining the backbone geometry, automatically produces the mutual base position characteristic of the target sequence. Based on that, we infer that the directionality and the preferable regions of the sugar-phosphate torsions, combined with the difference of purines from pyrimidines in ring shape, determines the sequence dependence of the structure of WC DNA. No such sequence dependence exists in dDMPs corresponding to other DNA conformations (e.g., Z-family and Hoogsteen duplexes). Unlike other duplexes, WC helix is unique by its ability to match the local energy minima of the free single strand to the preferable conformations of the duplex.

  16. Norfloxacin Zn(II)-based complexes: acid base ionization constant determination, DNA and albumin binding properties and the biological effect against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Gouvea, Ligiane R; Martins, Darliane A; Batista, Denise da Gama Jean; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C; Louro, Sonia R W; Barbeira, Paulo J S; Teixeira, Letícia R

    2013-10-01

    Zn(II) complexes with norfloxacin (NOR) in the absence or in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) were obtained and characterized. In both complexes, the ligand NOR was coordinated through a keto and a carboxyl oxygen. Tetrahedral and octahedral geometries were proposed for [ZnCl2(NOR)]·H2O (1) and [ZnCl2(NOR)(phen)]·2H2O (2), respectively. Since the biological activity of the chemicals depends on the pH value, pH titrations of the Zn(II) complexes were performed. UV spectroscopic studies of the interaction of the complexes with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) have suggested that they can bind to CT DNA with moderate affinity in an intercalative mode. The interactions between the Zn(II) complexes and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy at pH 7.4. The experimental data showed static quenching of BSA fluorescence, indicating that both complexes bind to BSA. A modified Stern-Volmer plot for the quenching by complex 2 demonstrated preferential binding near one of the two tryptophan residues of BSA. The binding constants obtained (K b ) showed that BSA had a two orders of magnitude higher affinity for complex 2 than for 1. The results also showed that the affinity of both complexes for BSA was much higher than for DNA. This preferential interaction with protein sites could be important to their biological mechanisms of action. The analysis in vitro of the Zn(II) complexes and corresponding ligand were assayed against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease and the data showed that complex 2 was the most active against bloodstream trypomastigotes.

  17. Chimeric RNA-DNA molecular beacons for quantification of nucleic acids, single nucleotide polymophisms, and nucleic acid damage.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2013-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the main cause for variations in the human genome. DNA lesions, such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), [6-4] pyrimidine-pyrimidinones, dewar pyrimidinones, and photohydrates, can subsequently lead to mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and cell death. Much effort has focused on methods for detecting DNA, SNPs, or damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multistep procedures, are limited to specific types of damage, some of these methods require expensive instruments, and some suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel, simple, mix-and-read assay for the detection of nucleic acids that is general for all types of SNPs and nucleic acid damage. This method uses a chimeric RNA-DNA molecular beacon (chMB). The calibration curve of the chMB for detecting single base mismatch and ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage shows good linearity (R(2) = 0.981 and 0.996, respectively) and limits of detection of 10.4 ± 2.2 and 8.64 ± 1.2 nM, respectively. The chimeric RNA-DNA MB proves to be a more sensitive and selective tool for the quantification of nucleic acids, DNA mismatches, and UV-induced DNA damage than DNA MBs.

  18. Femtosecond spectroscopic study of carminic acid DNA interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comanici, Radu; Gabel, Bianca; Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Cornaggia, Christian; Pommeret, Stanislas; Rusu, Catalin; Kryschi, Carola

    2006-06-01

    Photo-excited carminic acid and carminic acid-DNA complexes in a buffer solution at pH 7 have been examined using a variety of spectroscopy techniques, that are in particular, the femtosecond resolved fluorescence upconversion and transient absorption spectroscopy. The observation of dual fluorescence emission, one peaks at 470 nm and the other at 570 nm, indicates to an excited-state (S 1) intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). A detailed analysis of the transient absorption measurements of an aqueous carminic-acid solution at pH 7 yielded four lifetimes for the excited-state (S 1): 8, 15, 33 and 46 ps. On the other hand, only two lifetimes, 34 and 47 ps, were observed by fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy because of the detection limitation to the long wavelength edge of the carminic-acid spectrum. The four S 1 lifetimes were ascribed to the coexistence of respectively two tautomer (normal and tautomer) forms of carminic acid, in the non-dissociated state (CAH) and in the deprotonated state (CA -). The fluorescence upconversion measurements of carminic acid-DNA complexes exhibited a prolongation of the fluorescence lifetimes. This effect was accepted as evidence for the formation of intercalation complexes between the carminic acid and the DNA. The intercalative binding of the carminic acid to DNA was confirmed by the fluorescence titration experiments resulting to a binding constant of 2 × 10 5 M -1 that is typical for anthracycline-DNA complexes.

  19. Antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials of selected phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, Kemal; Tepe, Bektas; Sarikurkcu, Cengiz

    2015-03-01

    In this study, ten different phenolic acids (caffeic, chlorogenic, cinnamic, ferulic, gallic, p-hydroxybenzoic, protocatechuic, rosmarinic, syringic, and vanillic acids) were evaluated for their antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using four different test systems named as β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, reducing power and chelating effect. In all test systems, rosmarinic acid showed the maximum activity potential, while protocatechuic acid was determined as the weakest antioxidant in β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, and chelating effect assays. Phenolic acids were also screened for their protective effects on pBR322 plasmid DNA against the mutagenic and toxic effects of UV and H2O2. Ferulic acid was found as the most active phytochemical among the others. Even at the lowest concentration value (0.002 mg/ml), ferulic acid protected all of the bands in the presence of H2O2 and UV. It is followed by caffeic, rosmarinic, and vanillic acids. On the other hand, cinnamic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), gallic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml), and protocatechuic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml) could not protect plasmid DNA. PMID:25542528

  20. Synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides containing C5-ethynylbenzenesulfonamide-modified nucleotides (EBNA) by polymerases towards the construction of base functionalized nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Goubet, Astrid; Chardon, Antoine; Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Veedu, Rakesh N

    2013-02-01

    C5-Ethynylbenzenesulfonamide-modified nucleotide (EBNA) was investigated as substrate of various DNA polymerases. The experiments revealed that KOD, Phusion and Klenow DNA polymerases successfully accepted EBNA-T nucleotide as a substrate and yielded the fully extended DNA. KOD DNA polymerase was found to be the most efficient enzyme to furnish EBNA-T containing DNA in good yields. Phusion DNA polymerase efficiently amplified the template containing EBNA-T nucleotides by PCR. PMID:23265899

  1. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms. PMID:17535434

  2. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  3. CuII ions and the stilbene-chroman hybrid with a catechol moiety synergistically induced DNA damage, and cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of HepG2 cells: an interesting acid/base-promoted prooxidant reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Yun; Yang, Jie; Dai, Fang; Yan, Wen-Jing; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiu-Zhuang; Ding, De-Jun; Cao, Xiao-Yan; Zhou, Bo

    2012-08-27

    Development of potential cancer treatment strategies by using an exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating agent (prooxidant) or redox intervention, has attracted much interest. One effective ROS generation method is to construct a prooxidant system by polyphenolic compounds and Cu(II) ions. This work demonstrates that Cu(II) and the stilbene-chroman hybrid with a catechol moiety could synergistically induce pBR322 plasmid DNA damage, as well as cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Additionally, an interesting acid/base-promoted prooxidant reaction was found. The detailed chemical mechanisms for the reaction of the hybrid with Cu(II) in acid, neutral and base solutions are proposed based on UV/Vis spectral changes and identification of the related oxidative intermediates and products.

  4. Base Flipping in a GCGC Containing DNA Dodecamer:  A Comparative Study of the Performance of the Nucleic Acid Force Fields, CHARMM, AMBER, and BMS.

    PubMed

    Priyakumar, U Deva; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2006-01-01

    The improving quality of empirical force field parameters along with other methodological improvements and ever increasing computational resources have lead to more reliable computations on biological macromolecules. In the case of oligonucleotides, three force fields, namely CHARMM27, AMBER4.1, and BMS, have been developed and are widely used by the simulation community. Testing of these force fields to date has primarily focused on their treatment of the canonical forms of DNA and RNA. However, many biological functions of oligonucleotides involve significant variation of their structures from the canonical forms. In the present work, the three force fields are evaluated via computation of potentials of mean force (PMF) of the base flipping process in a DNA dodecamer, 5'-GTCAGCGCATGG-3'. Results are compared with available experimental data on the equilibrium between the opened and closed (i.e. Watson-Crick base paired) state of the underlined C and its WC partner G. Quantitative analysis shows CHARMM to be in the best agreement with experiment, closely followed by AMBER with BMS in the poorest agreement. Various components contributing to the change in the free energy such as base pair interactions, stacking interactions, solvation effects, and intrinsic potential energy changes were evaluated and compared. The results indicate that while all three force fields reasonably represent the canonical structures, the balance of forces contributing to their structural and dynamic properties differ significantly. PMID:26626393

  5. DNA glycosylases in the base excision repair of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Krokan, H E; Standal, R; Slupphaug, G

    1997-01-01

    A wide range of cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA bases are removed by different DNA glycosylases, which initiate the base excision repair pathway. DNA glycosylases cleave the N-glycosylic bond between the target base and deoxyribose, thus releasing a free base and leaving an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. In addition, several DNA glycosylases are bifunctional, since they also display a lyase activity that cleaves the phosphodiester backbone 3' to the AP site generated by the glycosylase activity. Structural data and sequence comparisons have identified common features among many of the DNA glycosylases. Their active sites have a structure that can only bind extrahelical target bases, as observed in the crystal structure of human uracil-DNA glycosylase in a complex with double-stranded DNA. Nucleotide flipping is apparently actively facilitated by the enzyme. With bacteriophage T4 endonuclease V, a pyrimidine-dimer glycosylase, the enzyme gains access to the target base by flipping out an adenine opposite to the dimer. A conserved helix-hairpin-helix motif and an invariant Asp residue are found in the active sites of more than 20 monofunctional and bifunctional DNA glycosylases. In bifunctional DNA glycosylases, the conserved Asp is thought to deprotonate a conserved Lys, forming an amine nucleophile. The nucleophile forms a covalent intermediate (Schiff base) with the deoxyribose anomeric carbon and expels the base. Deoxyribose subsequently undergoes several transformations, resulting in strand cleavage and regeneration of the free enzyme. The catalytic mechanism of monofunctional glycosylases does not involve covalent intermediates. Instead the conserved Asp residue may activate a water molecule which acts as the attacking nucleophile. PMID:9224623

  6. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Dawson, John

    1993-01-01

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source.

  7. A universal molecular translator for non-nucleic acid targets that enables dynamic DNA assemblies and logic operations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Hu, Shichao; Wang, Huaming; Zhao, Yan; Li, Na; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-28

    A universal molecular translator based on the target-triggered DNA strand displacement was developed, which was able to convert various kinds of non-nucleic acid targets into a unique output DNA. This translation strategy was successfully applied in directing dynamic DNA assemblies and in realizing three-input logic gate operations. PMID:25295484

  8. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells' molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  9. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  10. NMR analysis of base-pair opening kinetics in DNA.

    PubMed

    Szulik, Marta W; Voehler, Markus; Stone, Michael P

    2014-12-12

    Base pairing in nucleic acids plays a crucial role in their structure and function. Differences in the base-pair opening and closing kinetics of individual double-stranded DNA sequences or between chemically modified base pairs provide insight into the recognition of these base pairs by DNA processing enzymes. This unit describes how to quantify the kinetics for localized base pairs by observing changes in the imino proton signals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The determination of all relevant parameters using state-of-the art techniques and NMR instrumentation, including cryoprobes, is discussed.

  11. Laccaic Acid A Is a Direct, DNA-competitive Inhibitor of DNA Methyltransferase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Rebecca L.; Cryderman, Diane E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Wallrath, Lori L.; Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Methylation of cytosines in CpG dinucleotides is the predominant epigenetic mark on vertebrate DNA. DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional repression. The pattern of DNA methylation changes during development and with disease. Human DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1), a 1616-amino acid multidomain enzyme, is essential for maintenance of DNA methylation in proliferating cells and is considered an important cancer drug target. Using a fluorogenic, endonuclease-coupled DNA methylation assay with an activated form of Dnmt1 engineered to lack the replication foci targeting sequence domain, we discovered that laccaic acid A (LCA), a highly substituted anthraquinone natural product, is a direct inhibitor with a 310 nm Ki. LCA is competitive with the DNA substrate in in vitro methylation assays and alters the expression of methylated genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells synergistically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. LCA represents a novel class of Dnmt-targeted molecular probes, with biochemical properties that allow it to distinguish between non DNA-bound and DNA-bound Dnmt1. PMID:23839987

  12. Oligonucleotide-based systems: DNA, microRNAs, DNA/RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Pawan; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    There are an increasing number of applications that have been developed for oligonucleotide-based biosensing systems in genetics and biomedicine. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors are those where the probe to capture the analyte is a strand of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) or a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring nucleic acids. This review will shed light on various types of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA (particularly microRNAs), their role and their application in biosensing. It will also cover DNA/RNA aptamers, which can be used as bioreceptors for a wide range of targets such as proteins, small molecules, bacteria and even cells. It will also highlight how the invention of synthetic oligonucleotides such as peptide nucleic acid (PNA) or locked nucleic acid (LNA) has pushed the limits of molecular biology and biosensor development to new perspectives. These technologies are very promising albeit still in need of development in order to bridge the gap between the laboratory-based status and the reality of biomedical applications. PMID:27365033

  13. Oligonucleotide-based systems: DNA, microRNAs, DNA/RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Pawan; Estrela, Pedro; Ladomery, Michael

    2016-06-30

    There are an increasing number of applications that have been developed for oligonucleotide-based biosensing systems in genetics and biomedicine. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors are those where the probe to capture the analyte is a strand of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) or a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring nucleic acids. This review will shed light on various types of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA (particularly microRNAs), their role and their application in biosensing. It will also cover DNA/RNA aptamers, which can be used as bioreceptors for a wide range of targets such as proteins, small molecules, bacteria and even cells. It will also highlight how the invention of synthetic oligonucleotides such as peptide nucleic acid (PNA) or locked nucleic acid (LNA) has pushed the limits of molecular biology and biosensor development to new perspectives. These technologies are very promising albeit still in need of development in order to bridge the gap between the laboratory-based status and the reality of biomedical applications. PMID:27365033

  14. Cationic Lipid-Based Nucleic Acid Vectors.

    PubMed

    Jubeli, Emile; Goldring, William P D; Pungente, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of nucleic acids into cells remains an important laboratory cell culture technique and potential clinical therapy, based upon the initial cellular uptake, then translation into protein (in the case of DNA), or gene deletion by RNA interference (RNAi). Although viral delivery vectors are more efficient, the high production costs, limited cargo capacity, and the potential for clinical adverse events make nonviral strategies attractive. Cationic lipids are the most widely applied and studied nonviral vectors; however, much remains to be solved to overcome limitations of these systems. Advances in the field of cationic lipid-based nucleic acid (lipoplex) delivery rely upon the development of robust and reproducible lipoplex formulations, together with the use of cell culture assays. This chapter provides detailed protocols towards the formulation, delivery, and assessment of in vitro cationic lipid-based delivery of DNA. PMID:27436310

  15. Ultrasensitive FRET-based DNA sensor using PNA/DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lan-Hee; Ahn, Dong June; Koo, Eunhae

    2016-12-01

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases, rapid and highly sensitive DNA detection is crucial. Therefore, many strategies for detecting target DNA have been developed, including electrical, optical, and mechanical methods. Herein, a highly sensitive FRET based sensor was developed by using PNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) probe and QD, in which red color QDs are hybridized with capture probes, reporter probes and target DNAs by EDC-NHS coupling. The hybridized probe with target DNA gives off fluorescent signal due to the energy transfer from QD to Cy5 dye in the reporter probe. Compared to the conventional DNA sensor using DNA probes, the DNA sensor using PNA probes shows higher FRET factor and efficiency due to the higher reactivity between PNA and target DNA. In addition, to elicit the effect of the distance between the donor and the acceptor, we have investigated two types of the reporter probes having Cy5 dyes attached at the different positions of the reporter probes. Results show that the shorter the distance between QDs and Cy5s, the stronger the signal intensity. Furthermore, based on the fluorescence microscopy images using microcapillary chips, the FRET signal is enhanced to be up to 276% times stronger than the signal obtained using the cuvette by the fluorescence spectrometer. These results suggest that the PNA probe system conjugated with QDs can be used as ultrasensitive DNA nanosensors.

  16. Ultrasensitive FRET-based DNA sensor using PNA/DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lan-Hee; Ahn, Dong June; Koo, Eunhae

    2016-12-01

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases, rapid and highly sensitive DNA detection is crucial. Therefore, many strategies for detecting target DNA have been developed, including electrical, optical, and mechanical methods. Herein, a highly sensitive FRET based sensor was developed by using PNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) probe and QD, in which red color QDs are hybridized with capture probes, reporter probes and target DNAs by EDC-NHS coupling. The hybridized probe with target DNA gives off fluorescent signal due to the energy transfer from QD to Cy5 dye in the reporter probe. Compared to the conventional DNA sensor using DNA probes, the DNA sensor using PNA probes shows higher FRET factor and efficiency due to the higher reactivity between PNA and target DNA. In addition, to elicit the effect of the distance between the donor and the acceptor, we have investigated two types of the reporter probes having Cy5 dyes attached at the different positions of the reporter probes. Results show that the shorter the distance between QDs and Cy5s, the stronger the signal intensity. Furthermore, based on the fluorescence microscopy images using microcapillary chips, the FRET signal is enhanced to be up to 276% times stronger than the signal obtained using the cuvette by the fluorescence spectrometer. These results suggest that the PNA probe system conjugated with QDs can be used as ultrasensitive DNA nanosensors. PMID:27612755

  17. Amino acid racemization in amber-entombed insects: implications for DNA preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, J. L.; Wang, X. S.; Poinar, H. N.; Paabo, S.; Poinar, G. O.

    1994-01-01

    DNA depurination and amino acid racemization take place at similar rates in aqueous solution at neutral pH. This relationship suggests that amino acid racemization may be useful in accessing the extent of DNA chain breakage in ancient biological remains. To test this suggestion, we have investigated the amino acids in insects entombed in fossilized tree resins ranging in age from <100 years to 130 million years. The amino acids present in 40 to 130 million year old amber-entombed insects resemble those in a modern fly and are probably the most ancient, unaltered amino acids found so far on Earth. In comparison to other geochemical environments on the surface of the Earth, the amino acid racemization rate in amber insect inclusions is retarded by a factor of >10(4). These results suggest that in amber insect inclusions DNA depurination rates would also likely be retarded in comparison to aqueous solution measurements, and thus DNA fragments containing many hundreds of base pairs should be preserved. This conclusion is consistent with the reported successful retrieval of DNA sequences from amber-entombed organisms.

  18. Detection of Damaged DNA Bases by DNA Glycosylase Enzymes†

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joshua I.; Stivers, James T.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental and shared process in all forms of life is the use of DNA glycosylase enzymes to excise rare damaged bases from genomic DNA. Without such enzymes, the highly-ordered primary sequences of genes would rapidly deteriorate. Recent structural and biophysical studies are beginning to reveal a fascinating multistep mechanism for damaged base detection that begins with short-range sliding of the glycosylase along the DNA chain in a distinct conformation we refer to as the search complex (SC). Sliding is frequently punctuated by the formation of a transient “interrogation” complex (IC) where the enzyme extrahelically inspects both normal and damaged bases in an exosite pocket that is distant from the active site. When normal bases are presented in the exosite, the IC rapidly collapses back to the SC, while a damaged base will efficiently partition forward into the active site to form the catalytically competent excision complex (EC). Here we review the unique problems associated with enzymatic detection of rare damaged DNA bases in the genome, and emphasize how each complex must have specific dynamic properties that are tuned to optimize the rate and efficiency of damage site location. PMID:20469926

  19. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    PubMed

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  20. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-01-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection. PMID:26940532

  1. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-01-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection.

  2. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-01-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection. PMID:26940532

  3. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-03-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection.

  4. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal. In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948. Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = −0.88 (−1.62, −0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = −2.68 (−3.42, −1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend

  5. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, A.M.; Dawson, J.

    1993-12-14

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source. 6 figures.

  6. Unraveling Base Stacking Driving Forces in DNA.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H

    2016-07-01

    Base stacking is a key determinant of nucleic acid structures, but the precise origin of the thermodynamic driving force behind the stacking of nucleobases remains open. The rather mild stacking free energy measured experimentally, roughly a kcal/mol depending on the identity of the bases, is physiologically significant because while base stacking confers stability to the genome in its double helix form, the duplex also has to be unwound in order to be replicated or transcribed. A stacking free energy that is either too high or too low will over- or understabilize the genome, impacting the storage of genetic information and also its retrieval. While the molecular origin of stacking driving force has been attributed to many different sources including dispersion, electrostatics, and solvent hydrogen bonding, here we show via a systematic decomposition of the stacking free energy using large-scale computer simulations that the dominant driving force stabilizing base stacking is nonhydrophobic solvent entropy. Counteracting this is the conformational entropic penalty on the sugar-phosphate backbone against stacking, while solvent hydrogen-bonding, charge-charge interactions, and dispersive forces produce only secondary perturbations. Solvent entropic forces and DNA backbone conformational strains therefore work against each other, leading to a very mild composite stacking free energy in agreement with experiments. PMID:27045853

  7. Switchable reconfiguration of nucleic acid nanostructures by stimuli-responsive DNA machines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: The base sequence in DNA dictates structural and reactivity features of the biopolymer. These properties are implemented to use DNA as a unique material for developing the area of DNA nanotechnology. The design of DNA machines represents a rapidly developing research field in the area of DNA nanotechnology. The present Account discusses the switchable reconfiguration of nucleic acid nanostructures by stimuli-responsive DNA machines, and it highlights potential applications and future perspectives of the area. Programmed switchable DNA machines driven by various fuels and antifuels, such as pH, Hg(2+) ions/cysteine, or nucleic acid strands/antistrands, are described. These include the assembly of DNA tweezers, walkers, a rotor, a pendulum, and more. Using a pH-oscillatory system, the oscillatory mechanical operation of a DNA pendulum is presented. Specifically, the synthesis and "mechanical" properties of interlocked DNA rings are described. This is exemplified with the preparation of interlocked DNA catenanes and a DNA rotaxane. The dynamic fuel-driven reconfiguration of the catenane/rotaxane structures is followed by fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of DNA machines as functional scaffolds to reconfigurate Au nanoparticle assemblies and to switch the fluorescence features within fluorophore/Au nanoparticle conjugates between quenching and surface-enhanced fluorescence states are addressed. Specifically, the fluorescence features of the different DNA machines are characterized as a function of the spatial separation between the fluorophore and Au nanoparticles. The experimental results are supported by theoretical calculations. The future development of reconfigurable stimuli-responsive DNA machines involves fundamental challenges, such as the synthesis of molecular devices exhibiting enhanced complexities, the introduction of new fuels and antifuels, and the integration of new payloads being reconfigured by the molecular devices, such as enzymes or

  8. Age dependency of base modification in rabbit liver DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, O.; Fuji, I.; Yoshida, T.; Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Age-related modifications of DNA bases have been observed in the liver of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a lagomorph with a median life span in captivity of 5-7 yr. The ages of the animals studied ranged from 6 wk to 9 yr. After the DNA had been extracted from the liver cell nuclei and hydrolyzed with acid, the bases were analyzed by column chromatography with Cellulofine gels (GC-15-m). Two peaks in the chromatogram, which eluted before the four DNA bases, contained modified bases. Those materials, which were obtained in relatively large amounts from old animals, were highly fluorescent, and were shown to be crosslinked base products by mass spectrometry. The yield of crosslinked products versus rabbit age (greater than 0.5 yr) can be fitted by an exponential function (correlation coefficient: 0.76 +/- 0.09).

  9. DNA as a Binary Code: How the Physical Structure of Nucleotide Bases Carries Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallister, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The DNA triplet code also functions as a binary code. Because double-ring compounds cannot bind to double-ring compounds in the DNA code, the sequence of bases classified simply as purines or pyrimidines can encode for smaller groups of possible amino acids. This is an intuitive approach to teaching the DNA code. (Contains 6 figures.)

  10. Thermodynamics of the interactions of m-AMSA and o-AMSA with nucleic acids: influence of ionic strength and DNA base composition.

    PubMed Central

    Wadkins, R M; Graves, D E

    1989-01-01

    The equilibrium binding of the antitumor agent m-AMSA and its biologically inactive analog o-AMSA to native and synthetic DNAs are compared over a wide range of ionic strengths and temperatures. Although o-AMSA binds DNA with a higher affinity than m-AMSA it is not effective as an antitumor agent. Both m-AMSA and o-AMSA bind DNA in an intercalative manner. Indepth investigations into the thermodynamic parameters of these interactions reveal the interaction of m-AMSA with DNA to be an enthalpy driven process. In contrast, the structurally similar but biologically inactive o-AMSA binds DNA through an entropy driven process. The differences in thermodynamic mechanisms of binding between the two isomers reveal that the electronic and/or steric factors resulting from the position of the methoxy substituent group on the anilino ring directs the DNA binding properties of these compounds and ultimately the biological effectiveness as an antitumor agent. PMID:2602146

  11. Properties of the Nucleic-acid Bases in Free and Watson-Crick Hydrogen-bonded States: Computational Insights into the Sequence-dependent Features of Double-helical DNA

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, A. R.; Sauers, Ronald R.; Fenley, Marcia O.; Boschitsch, Alexander H.; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Colasanti, Andrew V.; Olson, Wilma K.

    2010-01-01

    The nucleic-acid bases carry structural and energetic signatures that contribute to the unique features of genetic sequences. Here we review the connection between the chemical structure of the constituent nucleotides and the polymeric properties of DNA. The sequence-dependent accumulation of charge on the major- and minor-groove edges of the Watson-Crick base pairs, obtained from ab initio calculations, presents unique motifs for direct sequence recognition. The optimization of base interactions generates a propellering of base-pair planes of the same handedness as that found in high-resolution double-helical structures. The optimized base pairs also deform along conformational pathways, i.e., normal modes, of the same type induced by the binding of proteins. Empirical energy computations that incorporate the properties of the base pairs account satisfactorily for general features of the next level of double-helical structure, but miss key sequence-dependent differences in dimeric structure and deformability. The latter discrepancies appear to reflect factors other than intrinsic base-pair structure. PMID:21218180

  12. Magnetophoretic-based microfluidic device for DNA Concentration.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sangjo; Shim, Jiwook; Taylor, William R; Kosari, Farhad; Vasmatzis, George; Ahlquist, David A; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-04-01

    Nucleic acids serve as biomarkers of disease and it is highly desirable to develop approaches to extract small number of such genomic extracts from human bodily fluids. Magnetic particles-based nucleic acid extraction is widely used for concentration of small amount of samples and is followed by DNA amplification in specific assays. However, approaches to integrate such magnetic particles based capture with micro and nanofluidic based assays are still lacking. In this report, we demonstrate a magnetophoretic-based approach for target-specific DNA extraction and concentration within a microfluidic device. This device features a large chamber for reducing flow velocity and an array of μ-magnets for enhancing magnetic flux density. With this strategy, the device is able to collect up to 95 % of the magnetic particles from the fluidic flow and to concentrate these magnetic particles in a collection region. Then an enzymatic reaction is used to detach the DNA from the magnetic particles within the microfluidic device, making the DNA available for subsequent analysis. Concentrations of over 1000-fold for 90 bp dsDNA molecules is demonstrated. This strategy can bridge the gap between detection of low concentration analytes from clinical samples and a range of micro and nanofluidic sensors and devices including nanopores, nano-cantilevers, and nanowires.

  13. Flexibility of nucleic acids: From DNA to RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bao; Xi, Zhang; Lei, Jin; Zhi-Jie, Tan

    2016-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB933600), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175132, 11575128, and 11374234), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents, China (Grant No. NCET 08-0408).

  14. Associations between Serum Perfluoroalkyl Acids and LINE-1 DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Deborah J.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Butler, Rondi A.; Bartell, Scott M.; Fletcher, Tony; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are persistent, synthetic compounds that are used in a number of consumer products. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been associated with cardiovascular risk factors, and changes in gene expression and DNA methylation in animals and cellular systems. However, whether PFAA exposure is associated with LINE-1 DNA methylation, a potential marker of cardiovascular risk, in humans remains unknown. We sought to evaluate the cross-sectional associations between serum PFAAs and LINE-1 DNA methylation in a population highly exposed to PFOA. We measured serum PFAAs twice four to five years apart in 685 adult participants (47% male, mean age ± SD=42 ± 11 years). We measured percent LINE-1 DNA methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes at the second time point (follow-up), and estimated absolute differences in LINE-1 methylation associated with an interquartile (IQR) shift in mean PFAA serum levels. IQR increases in mean serum PFOA, PFOS, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) were associated with differences of −0.04 (p=0.16), 0.20 (p=0.001), 0.06 (p=0.19), and 0.02 (p=0.57), respectively, in % LINE-1 methylation at follow-up after adjustment for potential confounders. We observed a monotonic increase in LINE-1 DNA methylation across tertiles of PFOS and PFNA (ptrend=0.02 for both associations), but not across tertiles of PFOA or PFHxS (ptrend=0.71 and 0.44, respectively). In summary, serum PFOS was associated with LINE-1 methylation, while serum PFOA, PFHxS, and PFNA were not. Additional research is needed to more precisely determine whether these compounds are epigenetically active. PMID:24263140

  15. Nonenzymatic synthesis of RNA and DNA oligomers on hexitol nucleic acid templates: the importance of the A structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Politis, P. K.; Van Aerschot, A.; Busson, R.; Herdewijn, P.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Dolan, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Hexitol nucleic acid (HNA) is an analogue of DNA containing the standard nucleoside bases, but with a phosphorylated 1,5-anhydrohexitol backbone. HNA oligomers form duplexes having the nucleic acid A structure with complementary DNA or RNA oligomers. The HNA decacytidylate oligomer is an efficient template for the oligomerization of the 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of guanosine or deoxyguanosine. Comparison of the oligomerization efficiencies on HNA, RNA, and DNA decacytidylate templates under various conditions suggests strongly that only nucleic acid double helices with the A structure support efficient template-directed synthesis when 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of nucleosides are used as substrates.

  16. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V.

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, R J; Pittman, D D; Toole, J J; Kriz, R W; Aldape, R A; Hewick, R M; Kaufman, R J; Mann, K G

    1987-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approximately equal to 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approximately 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approximately 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues. Images PMID:3110773

  17. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  18. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  19. A Ru(II) complex with 2-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5- f][1,10]phenanthroline: Synthesis, characterization, and acid-base and DNA-binding properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Yuan, Cui-Li; Jia, Hai-Shun; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2011-09-01

    A new Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy) 2(Hmspip)]Cl 2 {in which bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, Hmspip = 2-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-1 H-imidazo[4,5- f][1,10]phenanthroline} have been synthesized and characterized. The ground- and excited-state acid-base properties of [Ru(bpy) 2(Hmspip)]Cl 2 and its parent complex of [Ru(bpy) 2(Hpip)]Cl 2 {Hpip = 2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5- f][1,10]phenanthroline} have been studied by UV-visible (UV-vis) and emission spectrophotometric pH titrations. [Ru(bpy) 2(Hmspip)]Cl 2 acts as a calf thymus DNA intercalators with a binding constant of 4.0 × 10 5 M -1 in buffered 50 mM NaCl, as evidenced by UV-vis and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN) 6] 4-, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, reverse salt titrations and viscosity measurements.

  20. A Ru(II) complex with 2-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline: synthesis, characterization, and acid-base and DNA-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Yuan, Cui-Li; Jia, Hai-Shun; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2011-09-01

    A new Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hmspip)]Cl2 {in which bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, Hmspip=2-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} have been synthesized and characterized. The ground- and excited-state acid-base properties of [Ru(bpy)2(Hmspip)]Cl2 and its parent complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hpip)]Cl2 {Hpip=2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} have been studied by UV-visible (UV-vis) and emission spectrophotometric pH titrations. [Ru(bpy)2(Hmspip)]Cl2 acts as a calf thymus DNA intercalators with a binding constant of 4.0×10(5) M(-1) in buffered 50 mM NaCl, as evidenced by UV-vis and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6]4-, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, reverse salt titrations and viscosity measurements.

  1. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  2. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  3. Generation of DNA nanocircles containing mismatched bases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yu; Jung, Caroline; Marx, Andreas D; Winkler, Ines; Wyman, Claire; Lebbink, Joyce H G; Friedhoff, Peter; Cristovao, Michele

    2011-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system recognizes and repairs errors that escaped the proofreading function of DNA polymerases. To study molecular details of the MMR mechanism, in vitro biochemical assays require specific DNA substrates carrying mismatches and strand discrimination signals. Current approaches used to generate MMR substrates are time-consuming and/or not very flexible with respect to sequence context. Here we report an approach to generate small circular DNA containing a mismatch (nanocircles). Our method is based on the nicking of PCR products resulting in single-stranded 3' overhangs, which form DNA circles after annealing and ligation. Depending on the DNA template, one can generate mismatched circles containing a single hemimethylated GATC site (for use with the bacterial system) and/or nicking sites to generate DNA circles nicked in the top or bottom strand (for assays with the bacterial or eukaryotic MMR system). The size of the circles varied (323 to 1100 bp), their sequence was determined by the template DNA, and purification of the circles was achieved by ExoI/ExoIII digestion and/or gel extraction. The quality of the nanocircles was assessed by scanning-force microscopy and their suitability for in vitro repair initiation was examined using recombinant Escherichia coli MMR proteins.

  4. DNA Diagnostics: Nanotechnology-enhanced Electrochemical Detection of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang; Lillehoj, Peter B.; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The detection of mismatched base pairs in DNA plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of genetic-related diseases and conditions, especially for early stage treatment. Among the various biosensors that have been employed for DNA detection, electrochemical sensors show great promise since they are capable of precise DNA recognition and efficient signal transduction. Advancements in micro- and nanotechnologies, specifically fabrication techniques and new nanomaterials, have enabled for the development of highly sensitive, highly specific sensors making them attractive for the detection of small sequence variations. Furthermore, the integration of sensors with sample preparation and fluidic processes enables for rapid, multiplexed DNA detection for point-of-care (POC) clinical diagnostics. PMID:20075759

  5. DNA tetrahedron and star trigon nanostructures for target recycling detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueran; Chen, Xifeng; Wang, Bidou; Liu, Guangxing; Tang, Yuguo; Miao, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus which attacks the human body's immune system and further leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Nucleic acid detection is of great importance in the medical diagnosis of such diseases. Herein, we develop a simple and enzyme-free electrochemical method for the target recycling detection of nuclei acid. DNA tetrahedron and star trigon nanostructures are designed and constructed on the electrode interface for target capture and signal enrichment. This strategy is convenient and sensitive, with a limit of detection as low as 1 fM, and can also successfully distinguish single-base mismatched DNA. Therefore, the proposed method has a promising potential application for HIV DNA detection. PMID:27170090

  6. DNA tetrahedron and star trigon nanostructures for target recycling detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueran; Chen, Xifeng; Wang, Bidou; Liu, Guangxing; Tang, Yuguo; Miao, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus which attacks the human body's immune system and further leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Nucleic acid detection is of great importance in the medical diagnosis of such diseases. Herein, we develop a simple and enzyme-free electrochemical method for the target recycling detection of nuclei acid. DNA tetrahedron and star trigon nanostructures are designed and constructed on the electrode interface for target capture and signal enrichment. This strategy is convenient and sensitive, with a limit of detection as low as 1 fM, and can also successfully distinguish single-base mismatched DNA. Therefore, the proposed method has a promising potential application for HIV DNA detection.

  7. Recent progress on DNA based walkers.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Li, Feiran; Cha, Tae-Gon; Chen, Haorong; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2015-08-01

    DNA based synthetic molecular walkers are reminiscent of biological protein motors. They are powered by hybridization with fuel strands, environment induced conformational transitions, and covalent chemistry of oligonucleotides. Recent developments in experimental techniques enable direct observation of individual walkers with high temporal and spatial resolution. The functionalities of state-of-the-art DNA walker systems can thus be analyzed for various applications. Herein we review recent progress on DNA walker principles and characterization methods, and evaluate various aspects of their functions for future applications.

  8. Development of a DNA Sensor Based on Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayer-Modified Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Loaiza, Óscar A.; Campuzano, Susana; López-Berlanga, María; Pedrero, María; Pingarrón, José M.

    2005-01-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor based on recognition of double or single stranded DNA (ds-DNA/ss-DNA) immobilised on a self-assembled modified gold electrode is presented for denaturalisation and hybridisation detection. DNA is covalently bond on a self assembled 3-mercaptopropionic acid monolayer by using water soluble N-3-(dimethylaminopropyl)-N prime;ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxisulfosuccinimide (NHSS) as linkers. The interaction between the immobilised DNA and methylene blue (MB) is investigated using square wave voltammetry (SWV). The increase or diminution of peak currents of the MB upon the hybridisation or denaturalisation event at the modified electrode surface is studied.

  9. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes’ properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate – for the first time – complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  10. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes' properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate - for the first time - complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules. PMID:25669583

  11. Ultratrace DNA Detection Based on the Condensing-Enrichment Effect of Superwettable Microchips.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ping; Chen, Yanxia; Yang, Gao; Shi, Wanxin; Dai, Bing; Li, Guannan; Cao, Yanhua; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Shutao

    2015-11-18

    A sensitive nucleic acid detection platform based on superhydrophilic microwells spotted on a superhydrophobic substrate is fabricated. Due to the wettability differences, ultratrace DNA molecules are enriched and the fluorescent signals are amplified to allow more sensitive detection. The biosensing interface based on superwettable materials provides a simple and cost-effective way for ultratrace DNA sensing. PMID:26426114

  12. Ultratrace DNA Detection Based on the Condensing-Enrichment Effect of Superwettable Microchips.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ping; Chen, Yanxia; Yang, Gao; Shi, Wanxin; Dai, Bing; Li, Guannan; Cao, Yanhua; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Shutao

    2015-11-18

    A sensitive nucleic acid detection platform based on superhydrophilic microwells spotted on a superhydrophobic substrate is fabricated. Due to the wettability differences, ultratrace DNA molecules are enriched and the fluorescent signals are amplified to allow more sensitive detection. The biosensing interface based on superwettable materials provides a simple and cost-effective way for ultratrace DNA sensing.

  13. Luminescent DNA- and agar-based membranes.

    PubMed

    Leones, R; Fernandes, M; Ferreira, R A S; Cesarino, I; Lima, J F; Carlos, L D; Bermudez, V de Zea; Magon, C J; Donoso, J P; Silva, M M; Pawlicka, A

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent materials containing europium ions are investigated for different optical applications. They can be obtained using bio-macromolecules, which are promising alternatives to synthetic polymers based on the decreasing oil resources. This paper describes studies of the DNA- and Agar-europium triflate luminescent membranes and its potential technological applications are expanded to electroluminescent devices. Polarized optical microscopy demonstrated that the samples are birefringent with submicrometer anisotropy. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominantly amorphous nature of the samples and the atomic force microscopy images showed a roughness of the membranes of 409.0 and 136.1 nm for the samples of DNA10Eu and Agar1.11Eu, respectively. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the DNA(n)Eu membranes with the principal lines at g ≈ 2.0 and g ≈ 4.8 confirmed uniform distribution of rare earth ions in a disordered matrix. Moreover, these strong and narrow resonance lines for the samples of DNA(n)Eu when compared to the Agar(n)Eu suggested a presence of paramagnetic radicals arising from the DNA matrix. The emission spectra suggested that the Eu3+ ions occupy a single local environment in both matrices and the excitation spectra monitored around the Eu emission lines pointed out that the Eu3+ ions in the Agar host were mainly excited via the broad band component rather than by direct intra-4f(6) excitation, whereas the opposite case occurred for the DNA-based sample.

  14. Enzyme-Operated DNA-Based Nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Functional molecular nanodevices and nanomachines have attracted a growing interest for their potential use in life science and nanomedicine. In particular, due to their versatility and modularity DNA-based nanodevices appear extremely promising. However, a limitation of such devices is represented by the limited number of molecular stimuli and cues that can be used to control and regulate their function. Here we demonstrate the possibility to rationally control and regulate DNA-based nanodevices using biocatalytic reactions catalyzed by different enzymes. To demonstrate the versatility of our approach, we have employed three model DNA-based systems and three different enzymes (belonging to several classes, i.e., transferases and hydrolases). The possibility to use enzymes and enzymatic substrates as possible cues to operate DNA-based molecular nanodevices will expand the available toolbox of molecular stimuli to be used in the field of DNA nanotechnology and could open the door to many applications including enzyme-induced drug delivery and enzyme-triggered nanostructures assembly. PMID:26600418

  15. Non-intercalative, deoxyribose binding of boric acid to calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ayse; Gursaclı, Refiye Tekiner; Tekinay, Turgay

    2014-05-01

    The present study characterizes the effects of the boric acid binding on calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) by spectroscopic and calorimetric methods. UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to characterize binding properties. Changes in the secondary structure of ct-DNA were determined by CD spectroscopy. Sizes and morphologies of boric acid-DNA complexes were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The kinetics of boric acid binding to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). ITC results revealed that boric acid exhibits a moderate affinity to ct-DNA with a binding constant (K a) of 9.54 × 10(4) M(-1). FT-IR results revealed that boric acid binds to the deoxyribose sugar of DNA without disrupting the B-conformation at tested concentrations.

  16. Intelligent DNA machine for the ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianguo; Qian, Jun; Li, Hongling; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Weiyu; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-15

    As DNA is employed to serve as a smart building block, an increasing interest has been devoted to the development of different DNA-based machines for the specific purpose, for example, the exploration of inter- or intramolecular interaction. In the current contribution, we developed an intelligent DNA machine and its operation can be designed to execute the ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of target nucleic acids. The DNA machine consists of a hairpin probe (HP) and an assistant template (AT). Using p53 gene as the target model to trigger the molecular machine operation, cyclic nucleic acid strand displacement polymerization (CNDP) was specifically induced, leading to the DNAzyme mediated catalytic reaction for signal readout. Specifically, with the help of polymerase and nickase, one target molecule was able to drive DNA nano-mechanical devices one-by-one through the hybridization/polymerization displacement cycles, and every initiated machine continued to operate, causing the dramatic accumulation of G-quadruplex-contained products. The G-quadruplex structure after binding to hemin could act as a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme and catalyzed the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) by H2O2. As a result, an enhanced color change could be detected because of the generation of oxidation product ABTS•(+). In this way, the DNA machine has no any signal loss and enables the quantitative measurement of p53 DNA with a detection limit of 10fM, indicating great promise for unique application in biomedical research and early clinical diagnosis.

  17. One-stop genomic DNA extraction by salicylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhongwu; Kadam, Ulhas S; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-11-15

    Salicylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles were prepared via a modified one-step synthesis and used for a one-stop extraction of genomic DNA from mammalian cells. The synthesized magnetic particles were used for magnetic separation of cells from the media by nonspecific binding of the particles as well as extraction of genomic DNA from the lysate. The quantity and quality were confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction. The entire process of extraction and isolation can be completed within 30 min. Compared with traditional methods based on centrifugation and filtration, the established method is fast, simple, reliable, and environmentally friendly.

  18. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of hemoglobin II from Lucina pectinata.

    PubMed

    Torres-Mercado, Elineth; Renta, Jessicca Y; Rodríguez, Yolanda; López-Garriga, Juan; Cadilla, Carmen L

    2003-11-01

    Hemoglobin II from the clam Lucina pectinata is an oxygen-reactive protein with a unique structural organization in the heme pocket involving residues Gln65 (E7), Tyr30 (B10), Phe44 (CD1), and Phe69 (E11). We employed the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and methods to synthesize various cDNA(HbII). An initial 300-bp cDNA clone was amplified from total RNA by RT-PCR using degenerate oligonucleotides. Gene-specific primers derived from the HbII-partial cDNA sequence were used to obtain the 5' and 3' ends of the cDNA by RACE. The length of the HbII cDNA, estimated from overlapping clones, was approximately 2114 bases. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA size of HbII agrees with the estimated size using cDNA data. The coding region of the full-length HbII cDNA codes for 151 amino acids. The calculated molecular weight of HbII, including the heme group and acetylated N-terminal residue, is 17,654.07 Da.

  19. Duplex-Selective Ruthenium-based DNA Intercalators

    PubMed Central

    Shade, Chad M.; Kennedy, Robert D.; Rouge, Jessica L.; Rosen, Mari S.; Wang, Mary X.; Seo, Soyoung E.; Clingerman, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and synthesis of small molecules that exhibit enhanced luminescence in the presence of duplex rather than single-stranded DNA. The local environment presented by a well-known [Ru(dipyrido[2,3-a:3',2'-c]phenazine)L2]2+-based DNA intercalator was modified by functionalizing the bipyridine ligands with esters and carboxylic acids. By systematically varying the number and charge of the pendant groups, it was determined that decreasing the electrostatic interaction between the intercalator and the anionic DNA backbone reduced single-strand interactions and translated to better duplex specificity. In studying this class of complexes, a single RuII complex emerged that selectively luminesces in the presence of duplex DNA with little to no background from interacting with single stranded DNA. This complex shows promise as a new dye capable of selectively staining double versus single-stranded DNA in gel electrophoresis, which cannot be done with conventional SYBR dyes. PMID:26119581

  20. NIST physical standards for DNA-based medical testing.

    PubMed

    Barker, Peter E; Watson, Michael S; Ticehurst, John R; Colbert, Jennifer C; O'Connell, Catherine D

    2002-01-01

    As DNA and RNA become major targets for clinical laboratory analysis, benchmark reagents will play an increasingly important role in standardization. Reliable national and international nucleic acid standards promote automation and third-party reimbursement for clinical testing. Furthermore, nucleic acid standards provide materials for quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC), and proficiency testing. Standard methods and training initially evolved from consensus guidelines endorsed by professional societies and governmental agencies. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a nonregulatory agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, develops and certifies physical and chemical standards in support of national commerce, manufacturing, and science. In its role supporting U.S. science and industry, the NIST responds to specific standards needs, most recently for medically and biologically important analytes. Broad-based consensus developed through interdisciplinary NIST workshops initiated development of NIST-certified DNA standards. Such materials serve the diagnostic community and help manufacturers benchmark a variety of DNA diagnostic testing platforms. Here we summarize the NIST experience and programs for development of national standards for DNA-based medical diagnostic testing.

  1. Molten fatty acid based microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Noirjean, Cecile; Testard, Fabienne; Dejugnat, Christophe; Jestin, Jacques; Carriere, David

    2016-06-21

    We show that ternary mixtures of water (polar phase), myristic acid (MA, apolar phase) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB, cationic surfactant) studied above the melting point of myristic acid allow the preparation of microemulsions without adding a salt or a co-surfactant. The combination of SANS, SAXS/WAXS, DSC, and phase diagram determination allows a complete characterization of the structures and interactions between components in the molten fatty acid based microemulsions. For the different structures characterized (microemulsion, lamellar or hexagonal phases), a similar thermal behaviour is observed for all ternary MA/CTAB/water monophasic samples and for binary MA/CTAB mixtures without water: crystalline myristic acid melts at 52 °C, and a thermal transition at 70 °C is assigned to the breaking of hydrogen bounds inside the mixed myristic acid/CTAB complex (being the surfactant film in the ternary system). Water determines the film curvature, hence the structures observed at high temperature, but does not influence the thermal behaviour of the ternary system. Myristic acid is partitioned in two "species" that behave independently: pure myristic acid and myristic acid associated with CTAB to form an equimolar complex that plays the role of the surfactant film. We therefore show that myristic acid plays the role of a solvent (oil) and a co-surfactant allowing the fine tuning of the structure of oil and water mixtures. This solvosurfactant behaviour of long chain fatty acid opens the way for new formulations with a complex structure without the addition of any extra compound. PMID:27241163

  2. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators.

  3. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  4. Determination of DNA adducts by combining acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and chromatographic analysis of the carcinogen-modified nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Leung, Elvis M K; Deng, Kailin; Wong, Tin-Yan; Chan, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The commonly used method of analyzing carcinogen-induced DNA adducts involves the hydrolysis of carcinogen-modified DNA samples by using a mixture of enzymes, followed by (32)P-postlabeling or liquid chromatography (LC)-based analyses of carcinogen-modified mononucleotides/nucleosides. In the present study, we report the development and application of a new approach to DNA adduct analysis by combining the H(+)/heat-catalyzed release of carcinogen-modified nucleobases and the use of LC-based methods to analyze DNA adducts. Results showed that heating the carcinogen-modified DNA samples at 70 °C for an extended period of 4 to 6 h in the presence of 0.05% HCl can efficiently induce DNA depurination, releasing the intact carcinogen-modified nucleobases for LC analyses. After optimizing the hydrolysis conditions, DNA samples with C8- and N (2) -modified 2'-deoxyguanosine, as well as N (6) -modified 2'-deoxyadenosine, were synthesized by reacting DNA with 1-nitropyrene, acetaldehyde, and aristolochic acids, respectively. These samples were then hydrolyzed, and the released nucleobase adducts were analyzed using LC-based analytical methods. Analysis results demonstrated a dose-dependent release of target DNA adducts from carcinogen-modified DNA samples, indicating that the developed H(+)/heat-catalyzed hydrolysis method was quantitative. Comparative studies with enzymatic digestion method on carcinogen-modified DNA samples revealed that the two hydrolysis methods did not yield systematically different results.

  5. A DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification-bridged two-stage exonuclease III-assisted recycling strategy for label-free multi-amplified biosensing of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Lv, Yanqin; Cui, Hui; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng

    2015-01-26

    An autonomous DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification (RCA)-bridged two-stage exonuclease III (Exo III)-induced recycling amplification (Exo III-RCA-Exo III) was developed for label-free and highly sensitive homogeneous multi-amplified detection of DNA combined with sensitive fluorescence detection technique. According to the configuration, the analysis of DNA is accomplished by recognizing the target to a unlabeled molecular beacon (UMB) that integrates target-binding and signal transducer within one multifunctional design, followed by the target-binding of UMB in duplex DNA removed stepwise by Exo III accompanied by the releasing of target DNA for the successive hybridization and cleavage process and autonomous generation of the primer that initiate RCA process with a rational designed padlock DNA. The RCA products containing thousands of repeated catalytic sequences catalytically hybridize with a hairpin reporter probe that includes a "caged" inactive G-quadruplex sequence (HGP) and were then detected by Exo III-assisted recycling amplification, liberating the active G-quadruplex and generating remarkable ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex fluorescence signals with the help of zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX). The proposed strategy showed a wide dynamic range over 7 orders of magnitude with a low limit of detection of 0.51 aM. In addition, this designed protocol can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA, and holds a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  6. Comparison of commercial systems for extraction of nucleic acids from DNA/RNA respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Genyan; Erdman, Dean E; Kodani, Maja; Kools, John; Bowen, Michael D; Fields, Barry S

    2011-01-01

    This study compared six automated nucleic acid extraction systems and one manual kit for their ability to recover nucleic acids from human nasal wash specimens spiked with five respiratory pathogens, representing Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pyogenes), Gram-negative bacteria (Legionella pneumophila), DNA viruses (adenovirus), segmented RNA viruses (human influenza virus A), and non-segmented RNA viruses (respiratory syncytial virus). The robots and kit evaluated represent major commercially available methods that are capable of simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from respiratory specimens, and included platforms based on magnetic-bead technology (KingFisher mL, Biorobot EZ1, easyMAG, KingFisher Flex, and MagNA Pure Compact) or glass fiber filter technology (Biorobot MDX and the manual kit Allprep). All methods yielded extracts free of cross-contamination and RT-PCR inhibition. All automated systems recovered L. pneumophila and adenovirus DNA equivalently. However, the MagNA Pure protocol demonstrated more than 4-fold higher DNA recovery from the S. pyogenes than other methods. The KingFisher mL and easyMAG protocols provided 1- to 3-log wider linearity and extracted 3- to 4-fold more RNA from the human influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus. These findings suggest that systems differed in nucleic acid recovery, reproducibility, and linearity in a pathogen specific manner.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Fragmentation to Monitor Processing Parameters in High Acid, Plant-Derived Foods.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jane M; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys M; Harris, Keith; Hassan, Hosni M; Simunovic, Josip; Sandeep, K P

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragmentation was assessed in acidified foods. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Ct values measured from fresh, fermented, pasteurized, and stored cucumber mtDNA were determined to be significantly different (P > 0.05) based on processing and shelf-life. This indicated that the combination of lower temperature thermal processes (hot-fill at 75 °C for 15 min) and acidified conditions (pH = 3.8) was sufficient to cause mtDNA fragmentation. In studies modeling high acid juices, pasteurization (96 °C, 0 to 24 min) of tomato serum produced Ct values which had high correlation to time-temperature treatment. Primers producing longer amplicons (approximately 1 kb) targeting the same mitochondrial gene gave greater sensitivity in correlating time-temperature treatments to Ct values. Lab-scale pasteurization studies using Ct values derived from the longer amplicon differentiated between heat treatments of tomato serum (95 °C for <2 min). MtDNA fragmentation was shown to be a potential new tool to characterize low temperature (<100 °C) high acid processes (pH < 4.6), nonthermal processes such as vegetable fermentation and holding times of acidified, plant-derived products. PMID:26556214

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Fragmentation to Monitor Processing Parameters in High Acid, Plant-Derived Foods.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jane M; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys M; Harris, Keith; Hassan, Hosni M; Simunovic, Josip; Sandeep, K P

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragmentation was assessed in acidified foods. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Ct values measured from fresh, fermented, pasteurized, and stored cucumber mtDNA were determined to be significantly different (P > 0.05) based on processing and shelf-life. This indicated that the combination of lower temperature thermal processes (hot-fill at 75 °C for 15 min) and acidified conditions (pH = 3.8) was sufficient to cause mtDNA fragmentation. In studies modeling high acid juices, pasteurization (96 °C, 0 to 24 min) of tomato serum produced Ct values which had high correlation to time-temperature treatment. Primers producing longer amplicons (approximately 1 kb) targeting the same mitochondrial gene gave greater sensitivity in correlating time-temperature treatments to Ct values. Lab-scale pasteurization studies using Ct values derived from the longer amplicon differentiated between heat treatments of tomato serum (95 °C for <2 min). MtDNA fragmentation was shown to be a potential new tool to characterize low temperature (<100 °C) high acid processes (pH < 4.6), nonthermal processes such as vegetable fermentation and holding times of acidified, plant-derived products.

  9. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanchen; Yang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Dongsheng

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Most biological processes happen at the nanometer scale, and understanding the energy transformations and material transportation mechanisms within living organisms has proved challenging. To better understand the secrets of life, researchers have investigated artificial molecular motors and devices over the past decade because such systems can mimic certain biological processes. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures is one system that has played an important role in these investigations. In this Account, we summarize recent advances in functional DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures. The i-motif is a DNA quadruplex that occurs as four stretches of cytosine repeat sequences form C·CH(+) base pairs, and their stabilization requires slightly acidic conditions. This unique property has produced the first DNA molecular motor driven by pH changes. The motor is reliable, and studies show that it is capable of millisecond running speeds, comparable to the speed of natural protein motors. With careful design, the output of these types of motors was combined to drive micrometer-sized cantilevers bend. Using established DNA nanostructure assembly and functionalization methods, researchers can easily integrate the motor within other DNA assembled structures and functional units, producing DNA molecular devices with new functions such as suprahydrophobic/suprahydrophilic smart surfaces that switch, intelligent nanopores triggered by pH changes, molecular logic gates, and DNA nanosprings. Recently, researchers have produced motors driven by light and electricity, which have allowed DNA motors to be integrated within silicon-based nanodevices. Moreover, some devices based on i-motif structures have proven useful for investigating processes within living cells. The pH-responsiveness of the i-motif structure also provides a way to control the stepwise assembly of DNA nanostructures. In addition, because of the stability of the i-motif, this

  10. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanchen; Yang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Dongsheng

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Most biological processes happen at the nanometer scale, and understanding the energy transformations and material transportation mechanisms within living organisms has proved challenging. To better understand the secrets of life, researchers have investigated artificial molecular motors and devices over the past decade because such systems can mimic certain biological processes. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures is one system that has played an important role in these investigations. In this Account, we summarize recent advances in functional DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures. The i-motif is a DNA quadruplex that occurs as four stretches of cytosine repeat sequences form C·CH(+) base pairs, and their stabilization requires slightly acidic conditions. This unique property has produced the first DNA molecular motor driven by pH changes. The motor is reliable, and studies show that it is capable of millisecond running speeds, comparable to the speed of natural protein motors. With careful design, the output of these types of motors was combined to drive micrometer-sized cantilevers bend. Using established DNA nanostructure assembly and functionalization methods, researchers can easily integrate the motor within other DNA assembled structures and functional units, producing DNA molecular devices with new functions such as suprahydrophobic/suprahydrophilic smart surfaces that switch, intelligent nanopores triggered by pH changes, molecular logic gates, and DNA nanosprings. Recently, researchers have produced motors driven by light and electricity, which have allowed DNA motors to be integrated within silicon-based nanodevices. Moreover, some devices based on i-motif structures have proven useful for investigating processes within living cells. The pH-responsiveness of the i-motif structure also provides a way to control the stepwise assembly of DNA nanostructures. In addition, because of the stability of the i-motif, this

  11. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  12. Optical detection of PNA/DNA hybridization in resonant porous silicon-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotiroti, Lucia; Arcari, Paolo; Lamberti, Annalisa; Sanges, Carmen; De Tommasi, Edoardo; Rea, Ilaria; Rendina, Ivo; De Stefano, Luca

    2008-04-01

    The development of label-free optical biosensors could have a great impact on life sciences as well as on screening techniques for medical and environmental applications. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a nucleic acid analog in which the sugar phosphate backbone of natural nucleic acid has been replaced by a synthetic peptide backbone, resulting in an achiral and uncharged mimic. Due to the uncharged nature of PNA, PNA-DNA duplexes show a better thermal stability respect the DNA-DNA equivalents. In this work, we used an optical biosensor, based on the porous silicon (PSi) nanotechnology, to detect PNA-DNA interactions. PSi optical sensors are based on changes of reflectivity spectrum when they are exposed to the target analytes. The porous silicon surface was chemically modified to covalently link the PNA which acts as a very specific probe for its ligand (cDNA).

  13. Biosensors based on DNA-Functionalized Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnubhotla, Ramya; Ping, Jinglei; Vrudhula, Amey; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    Since its discovery, graphene has been used for sensing applications due to its outstanding electrical properties and biocompatibility. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of field effect transistors (FETs) based on CVD-grown graphene functionalized with commercially obtained DNA oligomers and aptamers for detection of various biomolecular targets (e.g., complementary DNA and small molecule drug targets). Graphene FETs were created with a scalable photolithography process that produces arrays consisting of 50-100 FETs with a layout suitable for multiplexed detection of four molecular targets. FETs were characterized via AFM to confirm the presence of the aptamer. From the measured electrical characteristics, it was determined that binding of molecular targets by the DNA chemical recognition element led to a reproducible, concentration-dependent shift in the Dirac voltage. This biosensor class is potentially suitable for applications in drug detection. This work is funded by NIH through the Center for AIDS Research at the University of Pennsylvania.

  14. An overhang-based DNA block shuffling method for creating a customized random library

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, Kosuke; Venter, Chris; Wang, Kendrick; Ferreira, Raphael; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    We present an overhang-based DNA block shuffling method to create a customized random DNA library with flexible sequence design and length. Our method enables the efficient and seamless assembly of short DNA blocks with dinucleotide overhangs through a simple ligation process. Next generation sequencing analysis of the assembled DNA library revealed that ligation was accurate, directional and unbiased. This straightforward DNA assembly method should fulfill the versatile needs of both in vivo and in vitro functional screening of random peptides and RNA created with a desired amino acid and nucleotide composition, as well as making highly repetitive gene constructs that are difficult to synthesize de novo. PMID:26010273

  15. DNA-Based Nanostructures: Changes of Mechanical Properties of DNA upon Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, Yury; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Gursky, Georgy; Nechipurenko, Dmitry; Polozov, Robert

    The formation of DNA-based nanostructures involves the binding of different kinds of ligands to DNA as well as the interaction of DNA molecules with each other. Complex formation between ligand and DNA can alter physicochemical properties of the DNA molecule. In the present work, the accessibility of DNA-ligand complexes to cleavage by DNase I are considered, and the exact algorithms for analysis of diagrams of DNase I footprinting for ligand-DNA complexes are obtained. Changes of mechanical properties of the DNA upon ligand binding are also demonstrated by the cleavage patterns generated upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes. Propagation of the mechanical perturbations along DNA in the presence of bound ligands is considered in terms of a string model with a heterogeneity corresponding to the position of a bound ligand on DNA. This model can reproduce qualitatively the cleavage patterns obtained upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes.

  16. Luminescent DNA- and agar-based membranes.

    PubMed

    Leones, R; Fernandes, M; Ferreira, R A S; Cesarino, I; Lima, J F; Carlos, L D; Bermudez, V de Zea; Magon, C J; Donoso, J P; Silva, M M; Pawlicka, A

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent materials containing europium ions are investigated for different optical applications. They can be obtained using bio-macromolecules, which are promising alternatives to synthetic polymers based on the decreasing oil resources. This paper describes studies of the DNA- and Agar-europium triflate luminescent membranes and its potential technological applications are expanded to electroluminescent devices. Polarized optical microscopy demonstrated that the samples are birefringent with submicrometer anisotropy. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominantly amorphous nature of the samples and the atomic force microscopy images showed a roughness of the membranes of 409.0 and 136.1 nm for the samples of DNA10Eu and Agar1.11Eu, respectively. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the DNA(n)Eu membranes with the principal lines at g ≈ 2.0 and g ≈ 4.8 confirmed uniform distribution of rare earth ions in a disordered matrix. Moreover, these strong and narrow resonance lines for the samples of DNA(n)Eu when compared to the Agar(n)Eu suggested a presence of paramagnetic radicals arising from the DNA matrix. The emission spectra suggested that the Eu3+ ions occupy a single local environment in both matrices and the excitation spectra monitored around the Eu emission lines pointed out that the Eu3+ ions in the Agar host were mainly excited via the broad band component rather than by direct intra-4f(6) excitation, whereas the opposite case occurred for the DNA-based sample. PMID:25924317

  17. All-atom polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-06-15

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field (FF) for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages, and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting quantum mechanical (QM) data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude FF yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100-ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduce (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII substates of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive FF, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA. PMID:24752978

  18. Communication: Electron ionization of DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2016-04-01

    No reliable experimental data exist for the partial and total electron ionization cross sections for DNA bases, which are very crucial for modeling radiation damage in genetic material of living cell. We have measured a complete set of absolute partial electron ionization cross sections up to 500 eV for DNA bases for the first time by using the relative flow technique. These partial cross sections are summed to obtain total ion cross sections for all the four bases and are compared with the existing theoretical calculations and the only set of measured absolute cross sections. Our measurements clearly resolve the existing discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results, thereby providing for the first time reliable numbers for partial and total ion cross sections for these molecules. The results on fragmentation analysis of adenine supports the theory of its formation in space.

  19. Communication: Electron ionization of DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M A; Krishnakumar, E

    2016-04-28

    No reliable experimental data exist for the partial and total electron ionization cross sections for DNA bases, which are very crucial for modeling radiation damage in genetic material of living cell. We have measured a complete set of absolute partial electron ionization cross sections up to 500 eV for DNA bases for the first time by using the relative flow technique. These partial cross sections are summed to obtain total ion cross sections for all the four bases and are compared with the existing theoretical calculations and the only set of measured absolute cross sections. Our measurements clearly resolve the existing discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results, thereby providing for the first time reliable numbers for partial and total ion cross sections for these molecules. The results on fragmentation analysis of adenine supports the theory of its formation in space.

  20. Communication: Electron ionization of DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M A; Krishnakumar, E

    2016-04-28

    No reliable experimental data exist for the partial and total electron ionization cross sections for DNA bases, which are very crucial for modeling radiation damage in genetic material of living cell. We have measured a complete set of absolute partial electron ionization cross sections up to 500 eV for DNA bases for the first time by using the relative flow technique. These partial cross sections are summed to obtain total ion cross sections for all the four bases and are compared with the existing theoretical calculations and the only set of measured absolute cross sections. Our measurements clearly resolve the existing discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results, thereby providing for the first time reliable numbers for partial and total ion cross sections for these molecules. The results on fragmentation analysis of adenine supports the theory of its formation in space. PMID:27131520

  1. Conducting Polymer Based Nucleic Acid Sensor for Environment Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Bansi Dhar; Prabhakar, Nirmal; Solanki, Pratima R.

    Nucleic acid sensor based on polyaniline has been fabricated by covalently immobilizing double stranded calf thymus (dsCT) DNA onto perchlorate (ClO-4) doped polyaniline (PANI) film deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass plate using 1-(3-(dimethylamino) propyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxyl succinimide (NHS) chemistry. These dsCT-DNA-PANI/ITO and PANI/ITO electrodes have been characterized using square wave voltammetry, electrochemical impedance, and Fourier-transform-infra-red (FTIR) measurements. This disposable dsCT-DNA-PANI/ITO bioelectrode is stable for about four months, can be used to detect arsenic trioxide (0.1ppm) in 30s.

  2. Thymine, adenine and lipoamino acid based gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Ziora, Zyta M; Coles, Daniel J; Lin, I-Chun; Toth, Istvan

    2010-05-14

    A novel class of thymine, adenine and lipoamino acid based non-viral carriers for gene delivery has been developed. Their ability to bind to DNA by hydrogen bonding was confirmed by NMR diffusion, isothermal titration calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy experiments.

  3. Nucleic acid based logical systems.

    PubMed

    Han, Da; Kang, Huaizhi; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Cuichen; Zhou, Cuisong; You, Mingxu; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2014-05-12

    Researchers increasingly visualize a significant role for artificial biochemical logical systems in biological engineering, much like digital logic circuits in electrical engineering. Those logical systems could be utilized as a type of servomechanism to control nanodevices in vitro, monitor chemical reactions in situ, or regulate gene expression in vivo. Nucleic acids (NA), as carriers of genetic information with well-regulated and predictable structures, are promising materials for the design and engineering of biochemical circuits. A number of logical devices based on nucleic acids (NA) have been designed to handle various processes for technological or biotechnological purposes. This article focuses on the most recent and important developments in NA-based logical devices and their evolution from in vitro, through cellular, even towards in vivo biological applications.

  4. Information transfer from DNA to peptide nucleic acids by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Christensen, L.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are analogs of nucleic acids in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is replaced by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. Oligocytidylates have been shown to act as templates for formation of longer oligomers of G from PNA G2 dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from DNA to PNA. DNA C4T2C4 is an efficient template for synthesis of PNA G4A2G4 using G2 and A2 units as substrates. The corresponding synthesis of PNA G4C2G4 on DNA C4G2C4 is less efficient. Incorporation of PNA T2 into PNA products on DNA C4A2C4 is the least efficient of the three reactions. These results, obtained using PNA dimers as substrates, parallel those obtained using monomeric activated nucleotides.

  5. Radiometric acid-base titrations.

    PubMed

    Erdey, L; Gimesi, O; Szabadváry, F

    1969-03-01

    Acid-base titrations can be performed with radiometric end-point detection by use of labelled metal salts (e.g., ZnCl(2), HgCl(2)). Owing to the formation or dissolution of the corresponding hydroxide after the equivalence point, the activity of the titrated solution linearly increases or decreases as excess of standard solution is added. The end-point of the titration is determined graphically.

  6. Relationship inference based on DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navreet; Bouzga, Mariam M; Dørum, Guro; Egeland, Thore

    2016-03-01

    Today, there exists a number of tools for solving kinship cases. But what happens when information comes from a mixture? DNA mixtures are in general rarely seen in kinship cases, but in a case presented to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, sample DNA was obtained after a rape case that resulted in an unwanted pregnancy and abortion. The only available DNA from the fetus came in form of a mixture with the mother, and it was of interest to find the father of the fetus. The mother (the victim), however, refused to give her reference data and so commonly used methods for paternity testing were no longer applicable. As this case illustrates, kinship cases involving mixtures and missing reference profiles do occur and make the use of existing methods rather inconvenient. We here present statistical methods that may handle general relationship inference based on DNA mixtures. The basic idea is that likelihood calculations for mixtures can be decomposed into a series of kinship problems. This formulation of the problem facilitates the use of kinship software. We present the freely available R package relMix which extends on the R version of Familias. Complicating factors like mutations, silent alleles, and θ-correction are then easily handled for quite general family relationships, and are included in the statistical methods we develop in this paper. The methods and their implementations are exemplified on the data from the rape case.

  7. Kinetics of photoinduced electron transfer between DNA bases and triplet 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid in aqueous solution of different pH's: proton-coupled electron transfer?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Truong X; Kattnig, Daniel; Mansha, Asim; Grampp, Günter; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Lukzen, Nikita

    2012-11-01

    The kinetics of triplet state quenching of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid (BPTC) by DNA bases adenine, adenosine, thymine, and thymidine has been investigated in aqueous solution using time-resolved laser flash photolysis. The observation of the BPTC ketyl radical anion at λ(max) = 630 nm indicates that one electron transfer is involved in the quenching reactions. The pH-dependence of the quenching rate constants is measured in detail. As a result, the chemical reactivity of the reactants is assigned. The bimolecular rate constants of the quenching reactions between triplet BPTC and adenine, adenosine, thymine, and thymidine are k(q) = 2.3 × 10(9) (4.7 < pH < 9.9), k(q) = 4.0 × 10(9) (3.5 < pH < 4.7), k(q) = 1.0 × 10(9) (4.7 < pH < 9.9), and k(q) = 4.0 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) (4.7 < pH < 9.8), respectively. Moreover, it reveals that in strong basic medium (pH = 12.0) a keto-enol tautomerism of thymine inhibits its reaction with triplet BPTC. Such a behavior is not possible for thymidine because of its deoxyribose group. In addition, the pH-dependence of the apparent electrochemical standard potential of thymine in aqueous solution was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The ΔE/ΔpH ≈ -59 mV/pH result is characteristic of proton-coupled electron transfer. This behavior, together with the kinetic analysis, leads to the conclusion that the quenching reactions between triplet BPTC and thymine involve one proton-coupled electron transfer. PMID:23038981

  8. DNA sequencing by synthesis based on elongation delay detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manturov, Alexey O.; Grigoryev, Anton V.

    2015-03-01

    The one of most important problem in modern genetics, biology and medicine is determination of the primary nucleotide sequence of the DNA of living organisms (DNA sequencing). This paper describes the label-free DNA sequencing approach, based on the observation of a discrete dynamics of DNA sequence elongation phase. The proposed DNA sequencing principle are studied by numerical simulation. The numerical model for proposed label-free DNA sequencing approach is based on a cellular automaton, which can simulate the elongation stage (growth of DNA strands) and dynamics of nucleotides incorporation to rising DNA strand. The estimates for number of copied DNA sequences for required probability of nucleotide incorporation event detection and correct DNA sequence determination was obtained. The proposed approach can be applied at all known DNA sequencing devices with "sequencing by synthesis" principle of operation.

  9. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  10. DNA-Based Vaccine Guards Against Zika in Monkey Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161106.html DNA-Based Vaccine Guards Against Zika in Monkey Study ... THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental DNA-based vaccine protected monkeys from infection with the ...

  11. DNA delivery from hyaluronic acid-collagen hydrogels via a substrate-mediated approach

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Tatiana; Chung, Peter H.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2008-01-01

    Efficient and controlled gene delivery from biodegradable materials can be employed to stimulate cellular processes that lead to tissue regeneration. In this report, a substrate-mediated approach was developed to deliver DNA from hyaluronic acid-collagen hydrogels. The hydrogels were formed by crosslinking HA with poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether. Poly(ethylene imine)(PEI)/DNA complexes were immobilized to the substrate using either biotin/neutravidin or non-specific adsorption. Complexes were formed in the presence or absence of salt to regulate complex size, and resulted in complexes with z-average diameters of 1221.7±152.3 and 139.4±1.3 nm, respectively. During 48-h incubation in PBS or hyaluronidase, DNA was released slowly from the hydrogel substrate (<30% of immobilized DNA), which was enhanced by incubation with conditioned media (≈50% of immobilized DNA). Transgene expression mediated by immobilized, large diameter complexes was 3 to 7-fold greater than for small diameter complexes. However, the percentage of cells expressing the transgene was greater for small diameter complexes (48.7%) than for large diameter complexes (22.3%). Spatially controlled gene transfer was achieved by topographically patterning the hydrogel to pattern cell adhesion. Biomaterial-based gene delivery can be applicable to numerous tissue engineering applications, or as a tool to examine tissue formation. PMID:15522759

  12. Target-catalyzed autonomous assembly of dendrimer-like DNA nanostructures for enzyme-free and signal amplified colorimetric nucleic acids detection.

    PubMed

    He, Hongfei; Dai, Jianyuan; Duan, Zhijuan; Meng, Yan; Zhou, Cuisong; Long, Yuyin; Zheng, Baozhan; Du, Juan; Guo, Yong; Xiao, Dan

    2016-12-15

    Self-assembly of DNA nanostructures is of great importance in nanomedicine, nanotechnology and biosensing. Herein, a novel target-catalyzed autonomous assembly pathway for the formation of dendrimer-like DNA nanostructures that only employing target DNA and three hairpin DNA probes was proposed. We use the sticky-ended Y shape DNA (Y-DNA) as the assembly monomer and it was synthesized by the catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) instead of the DNA strand annealing method. The formed Y-DNA was equipped with three ssDNA sticky ends and two of them were predesigned to be complementary to the third one, then the dendrimer-like DNA nanostructures can be obtained via an autonomous assembly among these sticky-ended Y-DNAs. The resulting nanostructure has been successfully applied to develop an enzyme-free and signal amplified gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based colorimetric nucleic acids assay. PMID:27498325

  13. Excess Electron Localization in Solvated DNA Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Maeve; Kohanoff, Jorge

    2011-06-10

    We present a first-principles molecular dynamics study of an excess electron in condensed phase models of solvated DNA bases. Calculations on increasingly large microsolvated clusters taken from liquid phase simulations show that adiabatic electron affinities increase systematically upon solvation, as for optimized gas-phase geometries. Dynamical simulations after vertical attachment indicate that the excess electron, which is initially found delocalized, localizes around the nucleobases within a 15 fs time scale. This transition requires small rearrangements in the geometry of the bases.

  14. Entropy Beacon: A Hairpin-Free DNA Amplification Strategy for Efficient Detection of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yifan; Cui, Liang; Peng, Ruizi; Zhao, Zilong; Qiu, Liping; Chen, Huapei; Jin, Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Here, we propose an efficient strategy for enzyme- and hairpin-free nucleic acid detection called an entropy beacon (abbreviated as Ebeacon). Different from previously reported DNA hybridization/displacement-based strategies, Ebeacon is driven forward by increases in the entropy of the system, instead of free energy released from new base-pair formation. Ebeacon shows high sensitivity, with a detection limit of 5 pM target DNA in buffer and 50 pM in cellular homogenate. Ebeacon also benefits from the hairpin-free amplification strategy and zero-background, excellent thermostability from 20 °C to 50 °C, as well as good resistance to complex environments. In particular, based on the huge difference between the breathing rate of a single base pair and two adjacent base pairs, Ebeacon also shows high selectivity toward base mutations, such as substitution, insertion, and deletion and, therefore, is an efficient nucleic acid detection method, comparable to most reported enzyme-free strategies.

  15. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-24

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  16. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  17. Inhibition of DNA methylation by caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid, two common catechol-containing coffee polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Jun; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2006-02-01

    We studied the modulating effects of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid (two common coffee polyphenols) on the in vitro methylation of synthetic DNA substrates and also on the methylation status of the promoter region of a representative gene in two human cancer cells lines. Under conditions that were suitable for the in vitro enzymatic methylation of DNA and dietary catechols, we found that the presence of caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the DNA methylation catalyzed by prokaryotic M.SssI DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and human DNMT1. The IC50 values of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid were 3.0 and 0.75 microM, respectively, for the inhibition of M.SssI DNMT-mediated DNA methylation, and were 2.3 and 0.9 microM, respectively, for the inhibition of human DNMT1-mediated DNA methylation. The maximal in vitro inhibition of DNA methylation was approximately 80% when the highest concentration (20 microM) of caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid was tested. Kinetic analyses showed that DNA methylation catalyzed by M.SssI DNMT or human DNMT1 followed the Michaelis-Menten curve patterns. The presence of caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid inhibited DNA methylation predominantly through a non-competitive mechanism, and this inhibition was largely due to the increased formation of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH, a potent inhibitor of DNA methylation), resulting from the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated O-methylation of these dietary catechols. Using cultured MCF-7 and MAD-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, we also demonstrated that treatment of these cells with caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid partially inhibited the methylation of the promoter region of the RARbeta gene. The findings of our present study provide a general mechanistic basis for the notion that a variety of dietary catechols can function as inhibitors of DNA methylation through increased formation of SAH during the COMT-mediated O-methylation of these dietary

  18. An Electrochemical DNA Microbiosensor Based on Succinimide-Modified Acrylic Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Ulianas, Alizar; Heng, Lee Yook; Hanifah, Sharina Abu; Ling, Tan Ling

    2012-01-01

    An electrochemical microbiosensor for DNA has been fabricated based on new acrylic microspheres modified with reactive N-acryloxysuccinimide (NAS) functional groups. Hydrophobic poly(n-butylacrylate-N-acryloxysuccinimide) microspheres were synthesized in an emulsion form with a simple one-step photopolymerization technique. Aminated DNA probe was attached to the succinimde functional group of the acrylic microspheres via covalent bonding. The hybridization of the immobilized DNA probe with the complementary DNA was studied by differential pulse voltametry using anthraquninone-2-sulfonic acid monohydrate sodium salt (AQMS) as the electroactive hybridization label. The influences of many factors such as duration of DNA probe immobilization and hybridization, pH, type of ions, buffer concentrations, ionic strength, operational temperature and non-complementary DNA on the biosensor performance were evaluated. Under optimized conditions, the DNA microbiosensor demonstrated a linear response range to target DNA over a wide concentration range of 1.0 × 10−16 and 1.0 × 10−8 M with a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 9.46 × 10−17 M (R2 = 0.97). This DNA microbiosensor showed good reproducibility with 2.84% RSD (relative standard deviation) (n = 3). Application of the NAS-modified acrylic microspheres in the construction of DNA microbiosensor had improved the overall analytical performance of the resultant DNA microbiosensor when compared with other reported DNA biosensors using other nano-materials for membranes and microspheres as DNA immobilization matrices. PMID:22778594

  19. Radiation-induced degradation of DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douki, T.; Delatour, T.; Martini, R.; Cadet, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radio-induced degradation of DNA involves radical processes. A series of lesions among the major bases degradation products has been measured in isolated DNA exposed to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. Degradation can be accounted for by the formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water (indirect effect). The four bases are degraded in high yield. Direct effect has been mimicked by photo-induced electron abstraction from the bases producing their radical cation. Quantification of the modified bases showed that guanine is the preferential target. This can be explained by its lower oxidation potential and charge transfer phenomena. La décomposition radio-induite de l'ADN fait intervenir des processus radicalaires. Une série de lésions choisies parmi les produits majeurs de dégradation des bases a été mesurée dans de l'ADN isolé exposé au rayonnement en solution aqueuse aérée. Les modifications sont alors dues aux radicaux hydroxyles produits par la radiolyse de l'eau (effet indirect) et les quatre bases sont efficacement dégradées. L'arrachement d'électrons aux bases par photosensibilisation pour produire leur radical cation, a été utilisé comme modèle de l'effet direct. La quantification des bases modifiées montre que la guanine est préférentiellement dégradée. Cette observation peut s'expliquer par le plus faible potentiel d'oxydation de cette base ainsi que par les phénomènes de transfert de charge vers les guanines.

  20. Use of an Acid-Base Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Grover; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Identifies several ways in which an acid-base table can provide students with information about chemical reactions. Cites examples of the chart's use and includes a table which indicates the strengths of some common acids and bases. (ML)

  1. Automated DNA Base Pair Calling Algorithm

    1999-07-07

    The procedure solves the problem of calling the DNA base pair sequence from two channel electropherogram separations in an automated fashion. The core of the program involves a peak picking algorithm based upon first, second, and third derivative spectra for each electropherogram channel, signal levels as a function of time, peak spacing, base pair signal to noise sequence patterns, frequency vs ratio of the two channel histograms, and confidence levels generated during the run. Themore » ratios of the two channels at peak centers can be used to accurately and reproducibly determine the base pair sequence. A further enhancement is a novel Gaussian deconvolution used to determine the peak heights used in generating the ratio.« less

  2. Molecular beacons: a novel DNA probe for nucleic acid and protein studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, W; Fang, X; Li, J; Liu, X

    2000-04-01

    A new concept has been introduced for molecular beacon DNA molecules. Molecular beacons are a new class of oligonucleotides that can report the presence of specific nucleic acids in both homogeneous solutions and at the liquid-solid interface. They emit an intense fluorescent signal only when hybridized to their target DNA or RNA molecules. Biotinylated molecular beacons have been designed and used for the development of ultrasensitive DNA sensors and for DNA molecular interaction studies at a solid-liquid interface. Molecular beacons have also been used to study protein-DNA interactions. They have provided a variety of exciting opportunities in DNA/RNA/protein studies.

  3. DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID BASE COMPOSITION OF PROTEUS AND PROVIDENCE ORGANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Falkow, Stanley; Ryman, I. R.; Washington, O.

    1962-01-01

    Falkow, Stanley (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington D.C.), I. R. Ryman, and O. Washington. Deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of Proteus and Providence organisms. J. Bacteriol. 83:1318–1321. 1962.—Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) from various species of Proteus and of Providence bacteria have been examined for their guanine + cytosine (GC) content. P. vulgaris, P. mirabilis, and P. rettgeri possess essentially identical mean GC contents of 39%, and Providence DNA has a GC content of 41.5%. In marked contrast, P. morganii DNA was found to contain 50% GC. The base composition of P. morganii is only slightly lower than those observed for representatives of the Escherichia, Shigella, and Salmonella groups. Aerobacter and Serratia differ significantly from the other members of the family by their relatively high GC content. Since a minimal requirement for genetic compatibility among different species appears to be similarity of their DNA base composition, it is suggested that P. morganii is distinct genetically from the other species of Proteus as well as Providence strains. The determination of the DNA base composition of microorganisms is important for its predictive information. This information should prove of considerable value in investigating genetic and taxonomic relationships among bacteria. PMID:13891463

  4. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  5. Correlation between Thermal Stability Map and Base Substitution Map of DNA from Related Bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husimi, Yuzuru; Shibata, Keizo

    1984-10-01

    The number density of substituted bases among related bacteriophages (fd, 1 and M13) is heterogeneous along the DNA strand although most base substitutions do not alter the coded amino acids. Local thermal stability of the double helical DNA is also heterogeneous. There is a negative correlation between these two maps. The same conclusion holds between less closely related phages, φX174 and G4.

  6. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  7. Inhibition of non-templated nucleotide addition by DNA polymerases in primer extension using twisted intercalating nucleic acid modified templates.

    PubMed

    Güixens-Gallardo, Pedro; Hocek, Michal; Perlíková, Pavla

    2016-01-15

    A simple and elegant method for inhibition of non-templated nucleotide addition by DNA polymerases and for following DNA 3'-heterogeneity in enzymatic DNA synthesis by primer extension (PEX) is described. When template bearing ortho-twisted intercalating nucleic acid (ortho-TINA) at the 5'-end is used, non-templated nucleotide addition is reduced in both the A- and B-family DNA polymerases (KOD XL, KOD (exo-), Bst 2.0, Therminator, Deep Vent (exo-) and Taq). Formation of a single oligonucleotide product was observed with ortho-TINA modified template and KOD XL, KOD (exo-), Bst 2.0, Deep Vent (exo-) and Taq DNA polymerases. This approach can be applied to the synthesis of both unmodified and base-modified oligonucleotides. PMID:26707394

  8. Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on hemorrhagic fever DNA.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Derzon, Mark Steven; McClain, Jaime; Achyuthan, Komandoor

    2006-11-01

    Columbia University has developed a sensitive highly multiplexed system for genetic identification of nucleic acid targets. The primary obstacle to implementing this technology is the high rate of false positives due to high levels of unbound reporters that remain within the system after hybridization. The ability to distinguish between free reporters and reporters bound to targets limits the use of this technology. We previously demonstrated a new electrokinetic method for binary separation of kb pair long DNA molecules and oligonucleotides. The purpose of this project 99864 is to take these previous demonstrations and further develop the technique and hardware for field use. Specifically, our objective was to implement separation in a heterogeneous sample (containing target DNA and background oligo), to perform the separation in a flow-based device, and to develop all of the components necessary for field testing a breadboard prototype system.

  9. Smart nanomachines based on DNA self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Baoquan

    2013-07-22

    DNA-based nanomachines are self-assembled DNA superstructures that harness chemical free energy to perform mechanical work. The development of DNA machines has benefited greatly from the achievements in both structural and dynamic DNA nanotechnology. In this review, the configurations of DNA machines, fuel systems, and operations are discussed to outline the evolving paths of DNA machines. The focus is on the smart mechanical behavior of DNA machines, from the standpoint of upgrading the complexity of DNA nanostructures, cooperative activation of multimachinary systems, and the establishment of a network of the mechanical states. In the end, the challenges are highlighted and possible solutions are proposed to push forward smart DNA nanomachines, with the goal of creating biomimicking systems. Insights are also provided into the potential applications of the DNA machines with designable intelligence.

  10. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  11. Direct detection of circulating free DNA extracted from serum samples of breast cancer using locked nucleic acid molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Gui, Zhen; Wang, Quanbo; Li, Jinchang; Zhu, Mingchen; Yu, Lili; Xun, Tang; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-07-01

    As an emerging noninvasive blood biomarker, circulating free DNA (cfDNA) can be utilized to assess diagnosis, progression and evaluate prognosis of cancer. However, cfDNAs are not "naked", they can be part of complexes, or are bound to the surface of the cells via proteins, which make the detection more challenging. Here, a simple method for the detection of Ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1) DNA exacted from serum of breast cancer (BC) has been developed using a novel locked nucleic acid molecular beacon (LNA-MB). In order to enhance the stability and detection efficiency of the probe in biofluids, we design a shared-stem molecular beacon containing a 27-mer loop and a 4-mer stem with DNA/LNA alternating bases. The fluorescence is released in the presence of target. The detection procedure is simple and can be completed within 1h. This method shows a sensitive response to UHRF1 DNA with a dynamic range of 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection is 11nM (S/N=3) with excellent selectivity. It can discriminate UHRF1 DNA from three-base mismatched DNA with a high specificity. More importantly, this method can distinguish the expression of serum UHRF1 DNA among 5 breast cancer patients and 5 healthy controls. The mentioned superiority may suggest that this assay can be served as a promising noninvasive detection tool for early BC diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:27154709

  12. Direct detection of circulating free DNA extracted from serum samples of breast cancer using locked nucleic acid molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Gui, Zhen; Wang, Quanbo; Li, Jinchang; Zhu, Mingchen; Yu, Lili; Xun, Tang; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-07-01

    As an emerging noninvasive blood biomarker, circulating free DNA (cfDNA) can be utilized to assess diagnosis, progression and evaluate prognosis of cancer. However, cfDNAs are not "naked", they can be part of complexes, or are bound to the surface of the cells via proteins, which make the detection more challenging. Here, a simple method for the detection of Ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1) DNA exacted from serum of breast cancer (BC) has been developed using a novel locked nucleic acid molecular beacon (LNA-MB). In order to enhance the stability and detection efficiency of the probe in biofluids, we design a shared-stem molecular beacon containing a 27-mer loop and a 4-mer stem with DNA/LNA alternating bases. The fluorescence is released in the presence of target. The detection procedure is simple and can be completed within 1h. This method shows a sensitive response to UHRF1 DNA with a dynamic range of 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection is 11nM (S/N=3) with excellent selectivity. It can discriminate UHRF1 DNA from three-base mismatched DNA with a high specificity. More importantly, this method can distinguish the expression of serum UHRF1 DNA among 5 breast cancer patients and 5 healthy controls. The mentioned superiority may suggest that this assay can be served as a promising noninvasive detection tool for early BC diagnosis and monitoring.

  13. Base pair opening in three DNA-unwinding elements.

    PubMed

    Coman, Daniel; Russu, Irina M

    2005-05-27

    DNA-unwinding elements are specific base sequences that are located in the origin of DNA replication where they provide the start point for strand separation and unwinding of the DNA double helix. In the present work we have obtained the first characterization of the opening of individual base pairs in DNA-unwinding elements. The three DNA molecules investigated reproduce the 13-mer DNA-unwinding elements present in the Escherichia coli chromosome. The base sequences of the three 13-mers are conserved in the origins of replication of enteric bacterial chromosomes. The exchange of imino protons with solvent protons was measured for each DNA as a function of the concentration of exchange catalyst using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The exchange rates provided the rates and the equilibrium constants for opening of individual base pairs in each DNA at 20 degrees C. The results reveal that the kinetics and energetics of the opening reactions for AT/TA base pairs are different in the three DNA-unwinding elements due to long range effects of the base sequence. These differences encompass the AT/TA base pairs that are conserved in various bacterial genomes. Furthermore, a qualitative correlation is observed between the kinetics and energetics of opening of AT/TA base pairs and the location of the corresponding DNA-unwinding element in the origin of DNA replication. PMID:15784615

  14. Nucleic acid chemistry in the organic phase: from functionalized oligonucleotides to DNA side chain polymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Zheng, Lifei; Liu, Qing; de Vries, Jan Willem; Gerasimov, Jennifer Y; Herrmann, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    DNA-incorporating hydrophobic moieties can be synthesized by either solid-phase or solution-phase coupling. On a solid support the DNA is protected, and hydrophobic units are usually attached employing phosphoramidite chemistry involving a DNA synthesizer. On the other hand, solution coupling in aqueous medium results in low yields due to the solvent incompatibility of DNA and hydrophobic compounds. Hence, the development of a general coupling method for producing amphiphilic DNA conjugates with high yield in solution remains a major challenge. Here, we report an organic-phase coupling strategy for nucleic acid modification and polymerization by introducing a hydrophobic DNA-surfactant complex as a reactive scaffold. A remarkable range of amphiphile-DNA structures (DNA-pyrene, DNA-triphenylphosphine, DNA-hydrocarbon, and DNA block copolymers) and a series of new brush-type DNA side-chain homopolymers with high DNA grafting density are produced efficiently. We believe that this method is an important breakthrough in developing a generalized approach to synthesizing functional DNA molecules for self-assembly and related technological applications.

  15. Programmable DNA-Based Finite Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Tamar; Keinan, Ehud

    Computation using DNA has many advantages, including the potential for massive parallelism that allows for large number of operations per second, the direct interface between the computation process and a biological output, and the miniaturization of the computing devices to a molecular scale. In 2001, we reported on the first DNA-based, programmable finite automaton (2-symbol-2-state) capable of computing autonomously with all its hardware, software, input, and output being soluble biomolecules mixed in solution. Later, using similar principles, we developed advanced 3-symbol-3-state automata. We have also shown that real-time detection of the output signal, as well as real-time monitoring of all the computation intermediates, can be achieved by the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. More recently, we have shown that it is possible to achieve a biologically relevant output, such as specific gene expression, by using a reporter-gene as an output-readout. We cloned the input into circular plasmids, and thereby achieved control over gene expression by a programmable sequence of computation events. Further efforts are currently directed to immobilization of the input molecules onto a solid chip to enable parallel computation, where the location of the input on the chip represents specific tagging.

  16. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  17. Site-Selective Binding of Nanoparticles to Double-Stranded DNA via Peptide Nucleic Acid "Invasion"

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, A.L.; van der Lelie, D.; Sun, D.; Maye, M. M.; Gang, O.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for by-design placement of nano-objects along double-stranded (ds) DNA. A molecular intercalator, designed as a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA chimera, is able to invade dsDNA at the PNA-side due to the hybridization specificity between PNA and one of the duplex strands. At the same time, the single-stranded (ss) DNA tail of the chimera, allows for anchoring of nano-objects that have been functionalized with complementary ssDNA. The developed method is applied for interparticle attachment and for the fabrication of particle clusters using a dsDNA template. This method significantly broadens the molecular toolbox for constructing nanoscale systems by including the most conventional not yet utilized DNA motif, double helix DNA.

  18. Highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection of specific DNA sequences with molecular beacons and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhai, Kun; Xiang, Wenjun; Wang, Lianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescence method of quantitative detection for specific DNA sequence is developed based on molecular beacon (MB) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I by synchronous fluorescence analysis. It is demonstrated by an oligonucleotide sequence of wild-type HBV (target DNA) as a model system. In this strategy, the fluorophore of MB is designed to be 6-carboxyfluorescein group (FAM), and the maximum excitation wavelength and maximum emission wavelength are both very close to that of SYBR Green I. In the presence of targets DNA, the MBs hybridize with the targets DNA and form double-strand DNA (dsDNA), the fluorophore FAM is separated from the quencher BHQ-1, thus the fluorophore emit fluorescence. At the same time, SYBR Green I binds to dsDNA, the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I is significantly enhanced. When targets DNA are detected by synchronous fluorescence analysis, the fluorescence peaks of FAM and SYBR Green I overlap completely, so the fluorescence signal of system will be significantly enhanced. Thus, highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection for DNA can be realized. Under the optimum conditions, the total fluorescence intensity of FAM and SYBR Green I exhibits good linear dependence on concentration of targets DNA in the range from 2×10(-11) to 2.5×10(-9)M. The detection limit of target DNA is estimated to be 9×10(-12)M (3σ). Compared with previously reported methods of detection DNA with MB, the proposed method can significantly enhance the detection sensitivity.

  19. QDs-DNA nanosensor for the detection of hepatitis B virus DNA and the single-base mutants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Lou, Xinhui; Wang, Yi; Guo, Qingchuan; Fang, Zheng; Zhong, Xinhua; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Wu, Lei; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2010-04-15

    We report here a quantum dots-DNA (QDs-DNA) nanosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for the detection of the target DNA and single mismatch in hepatitis B virus (HBV) gene. The proposed one-pot DNA detection method is simple, rapid and efficient due to the elimination of the washing and separation steps. In this study, the water-soluble CdSe/ZnS QDs were prepared by replacing the trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) on the surface of QDs with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Subsequently, oligonucleotides were attached to the QDs surface to form functional QDs-DNA conjugates. Along with the addition of DNA targets and Cy5-modified signal DNAs into the QDs-DNA conjugates, sandwiched hybrids were formed. The resulting assembly brings the Cy5 fluorophore, the acceptor, and the QDs, the donor, into proximity, leading to fluorescence emission from the acceptor by means of FRET on illumination of the donor. In order to efficiently detect single-base mutants in HBV gene, oligonucleotide ligation assay was employed. If there existed a single-base mismatch, which could be recognized by the ligase, the detection probe was not ligated and no Cy5 emission was produced due to the lack of FRET. The feasibility of the proposed method was also demonstrated in the detection of synthetic 30-mer oliginucleotide targets derived from the HBV with a sensitivity of 4.0nM by using a multilabel counter. The method enables a simple and efficient detection that could be potentially used for high throughput and multiplex detections of target DNA and the mutants.

  20. Physics of base-pairing dynamics in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, Manoel; Destainville, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    As a key molecule of life, Deoxyribo-Nucleic Acid (DNA) is the focus of numbers of investigations with the help of biological, chemical and physical techniques. From a physical point of view, both experimental and theoretical works have brought quantitative insights into DNA base-pairing dynamics that we review in this Report, putting emphasis on theoretical developments. We discuss the dynamics at the base-pair scale and its pivotal coupling with the polymer one, with a polymerization index running from a few nucleotides to tens of kilo-bases. This includes opening and closure of short hairpins and oligomers as well as zipping and unwinding of long macromolecules. We review how different physical mechanisms are either used by Nature or utilized in biotechnological processes to separate the two intertwined DNA strands, by insisting on quantitative results. They go from thermally-assisted denaturation bubble nucleation to force- or torque-driven mechanisms. We show that the helical character of the molecule, possibly supercoiled, can play a key role in many denaturation and renaturation processes. We categorize the mechanisms according to the relative timescales associated with base-pairing and chain orientational degrees of freedom such as bending and torsional elastic ones. In some specific situations, these chain orientational degrees of freedom can be integrated out, and the quasi-static approximation is valid. The complex dynamics then reduces to the diffusion in a low-dimensional free-energy landscape. In contrast, some important cases of experimental interest necessarily appeal to far-from-equilibrium statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics.

  1. On the role of DNA in DNA-based catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Dijk, Ewold W; Boersma, Arnold J; Feringa, Ben L; Roelfes, Gerard

    2010-09-01

    A kinetic study of DNA-based catalytic enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation and Michael addition reactions showed that DNA affects the rate of these reactions significantly. Whereas in the presence of DNA, a large acceleration was found for the Friedel-Crafts alkylation and a modest acceleration in the Michael addition of dimethyl malonate, a deceleration was observed when using nitromethane as nucleophile. Also, the enantioselectivities proved to be dependent on the DNA sequence. In comparison with the previously reported Diels-Alder reaction, the results presented here suggest that DNA plays a similar role in both cycloaddition and conjugate addition reactions.

  2. Oxidative DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, an amino acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Hiraku, Y; Sugimoto, J; Yamaguchi, T; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    We investigated DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, a metabolite of threonine and glycine. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that aminoacetone caused cellular DNA cleavage. Aminoacetone increased the amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in human cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of 8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA increased due to aminoacetone only in the presence of Cu(II). DNA ladder formation was observed at higher concentrations of aminoacetone than those causing DNA cleavage. Flow cytometry showed that aminoacetone enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured cells. Aminoacetone caused damage to 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments, obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes, at cytosine and thymine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that H2O2 and Cu(I) were involved. Analysis of the products generated from aminoacetone revealed that aminoacetone underwent Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation in two different pathways: the major pathway in which methylglyoxal and NH+4 are generated and the minor pathway in which 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is formed through condensation of two molecules of aminoacetone. These findings suggest that H2O2 generated by the autoxidation of aminoacetone reacts with Cu(I) to form reactive species capable of causing oxidative DNA damage.

  3. Novel materials based on DNA-CTMA and lanthanide (Ce(3+) , Pr(3+) ).

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cosmina Andreea; Kajzar, François; Mihaly, Maria; Rogozea, Adina Elena; Petcu, Adina Roxana; Olteanu, Nicoleta Liliana; Rau, Ileana

    2016-09-01

    New, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) based compounds, functionalized with hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTMA) and lanthanide hydroxide nanoparticles were synthesized. The spectral measurements suggest that between the DNA-CTMA complex and the lanthanide (III) ions a chemical interaction takes place. The obtained materials exhibit an improved fluorescence efficiency, showing a potential interest for application in photonics, and more particularly, in light emitting devices. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 613-617, 2016. PMID:27120012

  4. Analytical Devices Based on Direct Synthesis of DNA on Paper.

    PubMed

    Glavan, Ana C; Niu, Jia; Chen, Zhen; Güder, Firat; Cheng, Chao-Min; Liu, David; Whitesides, George M

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a growing need in clinical diagnostics for parallel, multiplex analysis of biomarkers from small biological samples. It describes a new procedure for assembling arrays of ssDNA and proteins on paper. This method starts with the synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides covalently linked to paper and proceeds to assemble microzones of DNA-conjugated paper into arrays capable of simultaneously capturing DNA, DNA-conjugated protein antigens, and DNA-conjugated antibodies. The synthesis of ssDNA oligonucleotides on paper is convenient and effective with 32% of the oligonucleotides cleaved and eluted from the paper substrate being full-length by HPLC for a 32-mer. These ssDNA arrays can be used to detect fluorophore-linked DNA oligonucleotides in solution, and as the basis for DNA-directed assembly of arrays of DNA-conjugated capture antibodies on paper, detect protein antigens by sandwich ELISAs. Paper-anchored ssDNA arrays with different sequences can be used to assemble paper-based devices capable of detecting DNA and antibodies in the same device and enable simple microfluidic paper-based devices.

  5. The use of carrier RNA to enhance DNA extraction from microfluidic-based silica monoliths.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Thain, Lauren; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-10-12

    DNA extraction was carried out on silica-based monoliths within a microfluidic device. Solid-phase DNA extraction methodology was applied in which the DNA binds to silica in the presence of a chaotropic salt, such as guanidine hydrochloride, and is eluted in a low ionic strength solution, such as water. The addition of poly-A carrier RNA to the chaotropic salt solution resulted in a marked increase in the effective amount of DNA that could be recovered (25ng) compared to the absence of RNA (5ng) using the silica-based monolith. These findings confirm that techniques utilising nucleic acid carrier molecules can enhance DNA extraction methodologies in microfluidic applications.

  6. Synthesis of nucleoside and nucleotide conjugates of bile acids, and polymerase construction of bile acid-functionalized DNA.

    PubMed

    Ikonen, Satu; Macícková-Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Sanda, Miloslav; Hocek, Michal

    2010-03-01

    Aqueous Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions of 5-iodopyrimidine or 7-iodo-7-deazaadenine nucleosides with bile acid-derived terminal acetylenes linked via an ester or amide tether gave the corresponding bile acid-nucleoside conjugates. Analogous reactions of halogenated nucleoside triphosphates gave directly bile acid-modified dNTPs. Enzymatic incorporation of these modified nucleotides to DNA was successfully performed using Phusion polymerase for primer extension. One of the dNTPs (dCTP bearing cholic acid) was also efficient for PCR amplification. PMID:20165813

  7. Substitution of DNA-Contacting Amino Acids with Functional Variants in the Gata-1 Zinc Finger: A Structurally and Phylogenetically Guided Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vonderfecht, Tyson R.; Schroyer, Daniel L.; Schenck, Brandy L.; McDonough, Virginia M.; Pikaart, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    DNA binding functionality among transcription factor proteins is afforded by a number of structural motifs, such as the helix-turn-helix, helix-loop-helix, and zinc finger domains. The common thread among these diverse structures is their sequence-specific binding to essential promoter or other genetic regulatory sequences with high selectivity and affinity. One such motif, present in a wide range of organisms from bacteria to vertebrates, is the Gata-type zinc finger. This family of DNA-binding proteins is characterized by the presence of one or two (Cys)4 metal binding sites which recognize the protein’s eponymous binding site, GATA. Unlike other conserved DNA binding domains, Gata proteins appear to be restricted to binding consensus GATA sequences, or near variations, in DNA. Since the architecture of the Gata finger seems built around recognizing this particular sequence, we set out to define the allowable range of amino acid substitutions along the DNA-binding surface of a Gata finger that could continue to support sequence specific DNA binding activity. Accordingly, we set up a one-hybrid screen in yeast based on the chicken Gata-1 C-terminal zinc finger. Mutant libraries were generated at five amino acids identified in the Gata-DNA structure as likely to mediate sequence-specific contacts between the Gata finger and DNA. These libraries were designed to give as exhaustive amino acid coverage as possible such that almost all alternative amino acids were screened at each of the five probed positions. Screening and characterization of these libraries revealed several functional amino acid substitutions at two leucines which contact the DNA at the 3’ and 5’ flanks of the GATA binding site, but no functional substituents for amino acids near the core of the binding site. This pattern is consistent with amino acid sequences of known DNA-binding Gata fingers. PMID:18328814

  8. First Principles Dynamics of Photoexcited DNA and RNA Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Hudock, Hanneli R.; Levine, Benjamin G.; Thompson, Alexis L.; Martinez, Todd J.

    2007-12-26

    The reaction dynamics of excited electronic states in nucleic acid bases is a key process in DNA photodamage. Recent ultrafast spectroscopy experiments have shown multi-component decays of excited uracil and thymine, tentatively assigned to nonadiabatic transitions involving multiple electronic states. Using both quantum chemistry and first principles quantum molecular dynamics methods we show that a true minimum on the bright S{sub 2} electronic state is responsible for the first step which occurs on a femtosecond timescale. Thus the observed femtosecond decay does not correspond to surface crossing as previously thought. We suggest that subsequent barrier crossing to the minimal energy S{sub 2}/S{sub 1} conical intersection is responsible for the picosecond decay.

  9. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment. PMID:27446026

  10. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment. PMID:27446026

  11. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment.

  12. Carbon-based electrode materials for DNA electroanalysis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Dai; Niwa, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses recent studies of newly developed carbon-based electrode materials and their use for DNA electroanalysis. Recently, new carbon materials including carbon nanotubes (CNT), graphene and diamond-based nanocarbon electrodes have been actively developed as sensing platforms for biomolecules, such as DNA and proteins. Electrochemical techniques using these new material-based electrodes can provide very simple and inexpensive sensing platforms, and so are expected to be used as one of the "post-light" DNA analysis methods, which include coulometric detection, amperometric detection with electroactive tags or intercalators, and potentiometric detection. DNA electroanalysis using these new carbon materials is summarized in view of recent advances on electrodes.

  13. A comprehensive classification of nucleic acid structural families based on strand direction and base pairing.

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, R; Zakrzewska, K; Sun, J S; Harvey, S C

    1992-01-01

    We propose a classification of DNA structures formed from 1 to 4 strands, based only on relative strand directions, base to strand orientation and base pairing geometries. This classification and its associated notation enable all nucleic acids to be grouped into structural families and bring to light possible structures which have not yet been observed experimentally. It also helps in understanding transitions between families and can assist in the design of multistrand structures. PMID:1383936

  14. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  15. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  16. Superior structure stability and selectivity of hairpin nucleic acid probes with an L-DNA stem.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmi; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2007-01-01

    Hairpin nucleic acid probes have been highly useful in many areas, especially for intracellular and in vitro nucleic acid detection. The success of these probes can be attributed to the ease with which their conformational change upon target binding can be coupled to a variety of signal transduction mechanisms. However, false-positive signals arise from the opening of the hairpin due mainly to thermal fluctuations and stem invasions. Stem invasions occur when the stem interacts with its complementary sequence and are especially problematic in complex biological samples. To address the problem of stem invasions in hairpin probes, we have created a modified molecular beacon that incorporates unnatural enantiomeric l-DNA in the stem and natural d-DNA or 2'-O-Me-modified RNA in the loop. l-DNA has the same physical characteristics as d-DNA except that l-DNA cannot form stable duplexes with d-DNA. Here we show that incorporating l-DNA into the stem region of a molecular beacon reduces intra- and intermolecular stem invasions, increases the melting temperature, improves selectivity to its target, and leads to enhanced bio-stability. Our results suggest that l-DNA is useful for designing functional nucleic acid probes especially for biological applications.

  17. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  18. Breaking the dogma: PCB-derived semiquinone free radicals do not form covalent adducts with DNA, GSH, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wangpradit, Orarat; Rahaman, Asif; Mariappan, S V Santhana; Buettner, Garry R; Robertson, Larry W; Luthe, Gregor

    2016-02-01

    Covalent bond formations of free radical metabolites with biomolecules like DNA and proteins are thought to constitute a major mechanism of toxicity and carcinogenesis. Glutathione (GSH) is generally accepted as a radical scavenger protecting the cell. In the present study, we investigated a semiquinone radical (SQ(●-)) metabolite of the semivolatile 4-chlorobiphenyl, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and oxygen consumption. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were also employed to elucidate the radical interaction with DNA, amino acids, and GSH. We found that DNA and oligonucleotides stabilized SQ(●-) by electron delocalization in the π-stacking system, resulting in persistent radical intercalated, rather than forming a covalent bond with SQ(●-). This finding was strongly supported by the semiempirical calculation of the semioccupied molecular orbital and the linear combination of the atomic orbitals, indicating 9.8 kcal mol(-1) energy gain. The insertion of SQ(●-) into the DNA strand may result in DNA strand breaks and interruption of DNA replication process or even activate radical mediated secondary reactions. The presence of amino acids resulted in a decrease of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of SQ(●-) and correlated with their isoelectric points. The pH shifts the equilibrium of the dianions of hydroquinone and influenced indirectly the formation of SQ(●-). Similar findings were observed with GSH and Cys. GSH and Cys functioned as indirect radical scavengers; their activities depend on their chemical equilibria with the corresponding quinones, and their further reaction via Michael addition. The generally accepted role of GSH as radical scavenger in biological systems should be reconsidered based upon these findings, questioning the generally accepted view of radical interaction of semiquinones with biologically active compounds, like DNA, amino acids

  19. Biodegradable DNA-Brush Block Copolymer Spherical Nucleic Acids Enable Transfection Agent-Free Intracellular Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Hao, Liangliang; Calabrese, Colin M; Zhou, Yu; Choi, Chung Hang J; Xing, Hang; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-10-28

    By grafting multiple DNA strands onto one terminus of a polyester chain, a DNA-brush block copolymer that can assemble into micelle structure is constructed. These micelle spherical nucleic acids have a density of nucleic acids that is substantively higher than linear DNA block copolymer structures, which makes them effective cellular transfection and intracellular gene regulation agents.

  20. Students' Alternate Conceptions on Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Hanqing; Henriques, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Knowing what students bring to the classroom can and should influence how we teach them. This study is a review of the literature associated with secondary and postsecondary students' ideas about acids and bases. It was found that there are six types of alternate ideas about acids and bases that students hold. These are: macroscopic properties of…

  1. The Kidney and Acid-Base Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeppen, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the topic of the role of the kidneys in the regulation of acid base balance was last reviewed from a teaching perspective (Koeppen BM. Renal regulation of acid-base balance. Adv Physiol Educ 20: 132-141, 1998), our understanding of the specific membrane transporters involved in H+, HCO , and NH transport, and especially how these…

  2. The Conjugate Acid-Base Chart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties that beginning chemistry students have in understanding acid-base chemistry. Describes the use of conjugate acid-base charts in helping students visualize the conjugate relationship. Addresses chart construction, metal ions, buffers and pH titrations, and the organic functional groups and nonaqueous solvents. (TW)

  3. Fluorescence determination of DNA with 1-pyrenebutyric acid nanoparticles coated with β-cyclodextrin as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lun; Bian, Guirong; Wang, Leyu; Dong, Ling; Chen, Hongqi; Xia, Tingting

    2005-04-01

    A novel ultrasonication method has been successfully developed for the preparation of 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBAC)/β-cyclodextrin(β-CD) complex nanoparticles. The as-prepared nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy. Complex nanoparticles prepared with ultrasonication are smaller and better dispersed than single PBAC nanoparticles. At pH 3.0, the relative fluorescence intensity of complex nanoparticles of PBAC/β-CD can be quenched by the concentration of DNA. Based on this, a novel fluorimetric method has been developed for rapid determination of DNA. In comparison with single organic fluorophores, these nanoparticle probes are better water-solubility, more stable and do not suffer from blinking. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range 0.2-15 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.3-12 μg mL -1 for fish sperm DNA (fs-DNA). The corresponding detection limit is 0.01 μg mL -1 for ct-DNA and 0.02 μg mL -1 for fs-DNA. The relative standard deviation of seven replicate measurements is 1.2% for 2.0 μg mL -1 ct-DNA and 1.4% for 2.0 μg mL -1 fs-DNA, respectively. The method is simple and sensitive. The recovery and relative standard deviation are very satisfactory. A mechanism proposed to explain the process also has been studied.

  4. Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and Cancer: Recent Progress in DNA Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Timothy L.; Rangaswamy, Suganya; Wicker, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by exogenous and environmental genotoxins, but also arise from mitochondria as byproducts of respiration in the body. ROS generate DNA damage of which pathological consequence, including cancer is well established. Research efforts are intense to understand the mechanism of DNA base excision repair, the primary mechanism to protect cells from genotoxicity caused by ROS. Recent Advances: In addition to the notion that oxidative DNA damage causes transformation of cells, recent studies have revealed how the mitochondrial deficiencies and ROS generation alter cell growth during the cancer transformation. Critical Issues: The emphasis of this review is to highlight the importance of the cellular response to oxidative DNA damage during carcinogenesis. Oxidative DNA damage, including 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine, play an important role during the cellular transformation. It is also becoming apparent that the unusual activity and subcellular distribution of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, an essential DNA repair factor/redox sensor, affect cancer malignancy by increasing cellular resistance to oxidative stress and by positively influencing cell proliferation. Future Directions: Technological advancement in cancer cell biology and genetics has enabled us to monitor the detailed DNA repair activities in the microenvironment. Precise understanding of the intracellular activities of DNA repair proteins for oxidative DNA damage should provide help in understanding how mitochondria, ROS, DNA damage, and repair influence cancer transformation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 708–726. PMID:23901781

  5. Sperm DNA fragmentation and base oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Sheena E M

    2014-01-01

    Sperm DNA damage has been shown to be a valuable diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for male infertility and assisted reproductive treatment (ART) outcome. It is linked to every fertility checkpoint from reduced fertilization rates, lower embryo quality and pregnancy rates to higher rates of spontaneous miscarriage and childhood diseases. It is more robust than conventional semen parameters.The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of current laboratory tests and relationships between sperm DNA damage and clinical outcomes. The conclusion is that sperm DNA damage is an important indicator of semen quality, and its routine use in the fertility clinic would improve ART success rates. PMID:23955675

  6. Evaluation of DNA/RNAshells for room temperature nucleic acids storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaopan; Li, Qiyuan; Wang, Xian; Zhou, Xiaolin; He, Xuheng; Liao, Qiuyan; Zhu, Fengqin; Cheng, Le; Zhang, Yong

    2015-02-01

    Traditional nucleic acids preservation methods rely on maintaining samples in cold environments, which are costly to operate and time sensitive. Recent work validated that using room temperature for the storage of nucleic acids is possible if the samples are completely protected from water and oxygen. Here, we conducted accelerated aging and real-time degradation studies to evaluate the new technology DNAshell and RNAshell, which preserves DNA and RNA at room temperature, including the DNA and RNA yield, purity, and integrity. DNA and RNA solutions are dried in the presence of stabilizers in stainless steel minicapsules, then redissolved after different time points of heating and storing at room temperature. Results show that DNAshell and RNAshell ensure the safe storage of nucleic acids at room temperature for long periods of time, and that the quality of these nucleic acids is suitable for common downstream analysis.

  7. Development and application of new nucleic acid-based technologies for microbial community analyses in foods.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Nogva, Hege K; Moen, Birgitte; Nissen, Hilde; Bredholt, Sylvia; Møretrø, Trond; Naterstad, Kristine; Holck, Askild

    2002-09-15

    Several challenges still persist in the analysis of microorganisms in foods, particularly in studies of complex communities. Nucleic acid-based methods are promising tools in addressing new questions concerning microbial communities. We have developed several new methods in the field of nucleic acid-based microbial community analyses. These methods cover both sample preparation and detection approaches. The sample preparation method involves simplified DNA purification using paramagnetic beads. As an extension of this method, the same paramagnetic beads are used for both cell separation and DNA purification. This enables full automation. The separate detection of viable and dead bacteria is a major issue in nucleic acid-based diagnostics. We have applied a living/dead dye that binds covalently to DNA and inhibits the PCR from dead cells. In addition, a DNA array-based detection assay has been developed. The assay combines the specificity obtained by enzymatic labeling of DNA probes with the possibility of detecting several targets simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. In combination with 16S rDNA amplification, this is a promising tool for community analyses. Also, we have developed a novel approach for multiplex quantitative PCR. The multiplex PCR has been combined with our DNA array-based detection method. Finally, we are now in the process of adapting a system for monitoring microbial growth and death in real-time through the tagging of bacteria with green fluorescent protein (GFP) combined with fluorescence detection using a high-resolution confocal laser scanner.

  8. Uracil misincorporation into DNA and folic acid supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Folate deficiency decreases thymidylate synthesis from deoxyuridylate, which results in an imbalance of deoxyribonucleotide that may lead to excessive uracil misincorporation (UrMis) into DNA during replication and repair. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the relation between UrMis in different ...

  9. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  10. Affinity purification of DNA and RNA from environmental samples with peptide nucleic acid clamps.

    PubMed

    Chandler, D P; Stults, J R; Cebula, S; Schuck, B L; Weaver, D W; Anderson, K K; Egholm, M; Brockman, F J

    2000-08-01

    Bispeptide nucleic acids (bis-PNAs; PNA clamps), PNA oligomers, and DNA oligonucleotides were evaluated as affinity purification reagents for subfemtomolar 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and rRNA targets in soil, sediment, and industrial air filter nucleic acid extracts. Under low-salt hybridization conditions (10 mM NaPO(4), 5 mM disodium EDTA, and 0.025% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]) a PNA clamp recovered significantly more target DNA than either PNA or DNA oligomers. The efficacy of PNA clamps and oligomers was generally enhanced in the presence of excess nontarget DNA and in a low-salt extraction-hybridization buffer. Under high-salt conditions (200 mM NaPO(4), 100 mM disodium EDTA, and 0.5% SDS), however, capture efficiencies with the DNA oligomer were significantly greater than with the PNA clamp and PNA oligomer. Recovery and detection efficiencies for target DNA concentrations of > or =100 pg were generally >20% but depended upon the specific probe, solution background, and salt condition. The DNA probe had a lower absolute detection limit of 100 fg of target (830 zM [1 zM = 10(-21) M]) in high-salt buffer. In the absence of exogenous DNA (e.g., soil background), neither the bis-PNA nor the PNA oligomer achieved the same absolute detection limit even under a more favorable low-salt hybridization condition. In the presence of a soil background, however, both PNA probes provided more sensitive absolute purification and detection (830 zM) than the DNA oligomer. In varied environmental samples, the rank order for capture probe performance in high-salt buffer was DNA > PNA > clamp. Recovery of 16S rRNA from environmental samples mirrored quantitative results for DNA target recovery, with the DNA oligomer generating more positive results than either the bis-PNA or PNA oligomer, but PNA probes provided a greater incidence of detection from environmental samples that also contained a higher concentration of nontarget DNA and RNA. Significant interactions between probe

  11. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1990-10-09

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  12. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1987-10-07

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  13. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Moyzis, Robert K.; Ratliff, Robert L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Stewart, Carleton C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed.

  14. Multifunctional DNA-based biomemory device consisting of ssDNA/Cu heterolayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek; El-Said, Waleed Ahmed; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2011-01-15

    In the present study, we developed a novel DNA-based biomemory device that was comprised of ssDNA/Cu heterolayers on Au electrodes. As a conducting material, a thiol-modified single strand DNA (26 bp) was designed and immobilized on the Au electrode without the need for any linker material. Cu(2+) ions, which acted as the active site, were then chemically absorbed on the external structure of ssDNA through electrostatic interactions. The presence of the fabricated ssDNA/Cu heterolayer was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry experiments were carried out to investigate the redox properties of ssDNA/Cu hybrids to obtain the oxidation and reduction potential. Based on measured oxidation and reduction potential, a ROM-type, 3-state type, and WORM type DNA memory functions were demonstrated by chronoamperometry (CA) and open circuit potential amperometry (OCPA). This proposed device acts and operates the memory function very well. In the near future, DNA based biomemory device in this study could provide the alternative to the inorganic electronic device when molecular scaled immobilization control and signal measurement are achieved. PMID:21051218

  15. Tricolour fluorescence detection of sequence-specific DNA with a new molecular beacon and a nucleic acid dye TOTO-3.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhang, Cuiling; Chen, Lu; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2012-12-21

    We have developed a tricolor fluorescence quantitative method for sequence-specific DNA detection using a new molecular beacon (MB) and a nucleic acid dye TOTO-3. This new MB is designed with two fluorophores of FAM and TAMRA instead of one fluorophore and one quencher of traditional MB, and a nucleotide with guanine base is attached directly to FAM as a quencher. In the absence of target DNA, MBs are in the stem-loop state. The fluorescence of FAM is absorbed by TAMRA, and the fluorescence of TAMRA is quenched by guanine base. Meanwhile, the interaction between TOTO-3 and MBs is very weak. In the presence of target DNA, MBs hybridize with target DNA to form a double-stranded structure. TAMRA is separated from FAM and guanine base, and the fluorescence of FAM and TAMRA recovers simultaneously. At the same time TOTO-3 binds to double-stranded DNA, the fluorescence of TOTO-3 significantly enhances. In this strategy, the false-positive signals of MBs caused by non-specific interactions can be distinguished by the change of the ratio of the total fluorescence intensities of FAM and TAMRA to that of TOTO-3 at different concentrations of target DNA. In the simple sample, the detection of target DNA can be achieved with the total fluorescence intensity of three dyes, which results in a significant improvement of the detection sensitivity. In the complex sample, the detection of target DNA can be achieved with the fluorescence intensity of TOTO-3 which can overcome the false-positive signals of MBs and improve the detection accuracy.

  16. Deoxyribonucleic acid base compositions of dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Davison, F D; Mackenzie, D W; Owen, R J

    1980-06-01

    DNA was extracted and purified from 55 dermatophyte isolates representing 34 species of Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton. The base compositions of the chromosomal DNA were determined by CsCl density gradient centrifugation and were found to be in the narrow range of 48.7 to 50.3 mol % G + C. A satellite DNA component assumed to be of mitochondrial origin was present in most strains, with a G + C content ranging from 14.7 to 30.8 mol % G + C. Heterogeneity in microscopic and colonial characteristics was not reflected in differences in the mean G + C content of the chromosomal DNAs. Strains varied in the G + C contents of satelite DNA, but these did not correlate with traditional species concepts.

  17. Alkylation of nucleic acids by DNA-targeted 4-anilinoquinolinium aniline mustards: kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C J; Denny, W A; Fan, J Y

    1991-01-01

    The rate of constant for hydrolysis of a series of 4-substituted aniline mustards Ar-X-pC6H4-N(CH2CH2Cl)2, where Ar is 4-anilinoquinolinium and X = O, CH2, CONH and CO, have been measured in water and 0.02 M imidazole buffer at 37 degrees C and in 50% aqueous acetone at 66 degrees C. The equilibrium binding constants of the compounds and their hydrolysis products to nucleic acids of differing base composition have been determined at varying ionic strengths, and the results are consistent with the compounds binding as expected in the DNA minor groove. The alkylating reactivity of the mustards towards these nucleic acids has been measured in water at 37 degrees C and in 0.01 M HEPES buffer over a range of temperatures from 25 degrees C to 60 degrees C. Evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters for these kinetic and equilibrium studies suggests that the interaction with nucleic acids is via an internal SN2 mechanism involving an aziridinium ion.

  18. Sequential injection redox or acid-base titration for determination of ascorbic acid or acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lenghor, Narong; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Vilen, Michael; Sara, Rolf; Christian, Gary D; Grudpan, Kate

    2002-12-01

    Two sequential injection titration systems with spectrophotometric detection have been developed. The first system for determination of ascorbic acid was based on redox reaction between ascorbic acid and permanganate in an acidic medium and lead to a decrease in color intensity of permanganate, monitored at 525 nm. A linear dependence of peak area obtained with ascorbic acid concentration up to 1200 mg l(-1) was achieved. The relative standard deviation for 11 replicate determinations of 400 mg l(-1) ascorbic acid was 2.9%. The second system, for acetic acid determination, was based on acid-base titration of acetic acid with sodium hydroxide using phenolphthalein as an indicator. The decrease in color intensity of the indicator was proportional to the acid content. A linear calibration graph in the range of 2-8% w v(-1) of acetic acid with a relative standard deviation of 4.8% (5.0% w v(-1) acetic acid, n=11) was obtained. Sample throughputs of 60 h(-1) were achieved for both systems. The systems were successfully applied for the assays of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets and acetic acid content in vinegars, respectively.

  19. DNA fingerprinting of lactic acid bacteria in sauerkraut fermentations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies using traditional biochemical methods to study the ecology of commercial sauerkraut fermentations revealed that four lactic acid bacteria species, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Lactobacillus brevis were the primary microorganisms in...

  20. Characterization of the tunneling conductance across DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Zikic, Radomir; Krstić, Predrag S; Zhang, X-G; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Wells, Jack; Zhao, Xiongce

    2006-07-01

    Characterization of the electrical properties of the DNA bases (adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine), in addition to building the basic knowledge on these fundamental constituents of a DNA, is a crucial step in developing a DNA sequencing technology. We present a first-principles study of the current-voltage characteristics of nucleotidelike molecules of the DNA bases, placed in a 1.5 nm gap formed between gold nanoelectrodes. The quantum transport calculations in the tunneling regime are shown to vary strongly with the electrode-molecule geometry and the choice of the density-functional theory exchange-correlation functionals. Analysis of the results in the zero-bias limit indicates that distinguishable current-voltage characteristics of different DNA bases are dominated by the geometrical conformations of the bases and nanoelectrodes.

  1. Characterization of the tunneling conductance across DNA bases

    SciTech Connect

    Zikic, Radomir; Krstic, Predrag S; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Wells, Jack C; Zhao, Xiongce

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of the electrical properties of the DNA bases, Adenine, Cytosine, Guanine and Thymine, besides building the basic knowledge on these fundamental constituents of a DNA, is a crucial step in developing a DNA sequencing technology. We present a first-principles study of the current-voltage characteristics of nucleotide-like molecules of the DNA bases, placed in a 1.5 nm gap formed between gold nanoelectrodes. The quantum transport calculations in the tunneling regime are shown to vary strongly with the electrode-molecule geometry and the choice of the DFT exchangecorrelation functionals. Analysis of the results in the zero-bias limit indicates that distinguishable current-voltage characteristics of different DNA bases are dominated by the geometrical conformations of the bases and nanoelectrodes.

  2. Characterization of the tunneling conductance across DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikic, Radomir; Krstić, Predrag S.; Zhang, X.-G.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Wells, Jack; Zhao, Xiongce

    2006-07-01

    Characterization of the electrical properties of the DNA bases (adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine), in addition to building the basic knowledge on these fundamental constituents of a DNA, is a crucial step in developing a DNA sequencing technology. We present a first-principles study of the current-voltage characteristics of nucleotidelike molecules of the DNA bases, placed in a 1.5nm gap formed between gold nanoelectrodes. The quantum transport calculations in the tunneling regime are shown to vary strongly with the electrode-molecule geometry and the choice of the density-functional theory exchange-correlation functionals. Analysis of the results in the zero-bias limit indicates that distinguishable current-voltage characteristics of different DNA bases are dominated by the geometrical conformations of the bases and nanoelectrodes.

  3. The nitrosated bile acid DNA lesion O6-carboxymethylguanine is a substrate for the human DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Senthong, Pattama; Millington, Christopher L.; Wilkinson, Oliver J.; Marriott, Andrew S.; Watson, Amanda J.; Reamtong, Onrapak; Eyers, Claire E.; Williams, David M.; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Povey, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of red meat is a risk factor in human colorectal cancer (CRC). One hypothesis is that red meat facilitates the nitrosation of bile acid conjugates and amino acids, which rapidly convert to DNA-damaging carcinogens. Indeed, the toxic and mutagenic DNA adduct O6-carboxymethylguanine (O6-CMG) is frequently present in human DNA, increases in abundance in people with high levels of dietary red meat and may therefore be a causative factor in CRC. Previous reports suggested that O6-CMG is not a substrate for the human version of the DNA damage reversal protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which protects against the genotoxic effects of other O6-alkylguanine lesions by removing alkyl groups from the O6-position. We now show that synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing the known MGMT substrate O6-methylguanine (O6-MeG) or O6-CMG effectively inactivate MGMT in vitro (IC50 0.93 and 1.8 nM, respectively). Inactivation involves the removal of the O6-alkyl group and its transfer to the active-site cysteine residue of MGMT. O6-CMG is therefore an MGMT substrate, and hence MGMT is likely to be a protective factor in CRC under conditions where O6-CMG is a potential causative agent. PMID:23335782

  4. Base excision repair: NMR backbone assignments of Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Wallace, Susan S.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2002-03-01

    Oxidative damage is emerging as one of the most important mechanisms responsible for mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, aging, and various diseases (Farr and Kogma, 1991). One of the potential targets for oxidation is cellular DNA. While exposure to exogenous agents, such as ionizing radiation and chemicals, contributes to damaging DNA, the most important oxidative agents are endogenous, such as the reactive free radicals produced during normal oxidative metabolism (Adelman et., 1988). To mitigate the potentially deleterious effects of oxidative DNA damage virtually all aerobic organisms have developed complex repair mechanisms (Petit and Sancar, 1999). One repair mechanism, base excision repair (BER), appears to be responsible for replacing most oxidative DNA damage (David and Williams, 1998). Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), a 269-residue metalloprotein with a molecular weight of 30.2 kDa, is a key BER enzyme in prokaryotes (Boiteaux et al., 1987). Substrates recognized and released by Fpg include 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), 2,6 diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamido pyrimidine (Fapy-G), the adenine equivalents 8-oxoA and Fapy-A, 5-hydroxycytosine, 5-hydroxyuracil, B ureidoisobutiric acid, and a-R-hydroxy-B-ureidoisobutiric acid (Freidberg et al., 1995). In vitro Fpg bind double-stranded DNA and performs three catalytic activities: (i) DNA glycosylase, (ii) AP lyase, and (iii) deoxyribophosphodiesterase.

  5. Calcium-activated gene transfection from DNA/poly(amic acid-co-imide) complexes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Szu-Yuan; Chang, Li-Ting; Peng, Sydeny; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized a water-soluble poly(amic acid-co-imide) (PA-I) from ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) and 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine) that possesses comparable transfection efficiency to that of polyethylenimine (PEI), when prepared in combination with divalent calcium cations. The polycondensation of monomers afforded poly(amic acid) (PA) precursors, and subsequent thermal imidization resulted in the formation of PA-I. At a polymer/DNA ratio (indicated by the molar ratio of nitrogen in the polymer to phosphate in DNA) of 40, complete retardation of the DNA band was observed by gel electrophoresis, indicating the strong association of DNA with PA-I. A zeta potential of -22 mV was recorded for the PA-I polymer solution, and no apparent cytotoxicity was observed at concentrations up to 500 μg·mL(-1). In the presence of divalent Ca(2+), the transfection efficiency of PA-I was higher than that of PA, due to the formation of a copolymer/Ca(2+)/DNA polyplex and the reduction in negative charge due to thermal cyclization. Interestingly, a synergistic effect of Ca(2+) and the synthesized copolymer on DNA transfection was observed. The use of Ca(2+) or copolymer alone resulted in unsatisfactory delivery, whereas the formation of three-component polyplexes synergistically increased DNA transfection. Our findings demonstrated that a PA-I/Ca(2+)/DNA polyplex could serve as a promising candidate for gene delivery.

  6. DNA-Based Methods in the Immunohematology Reference Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Denomme, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    Although hemagglutination serves the immunohematology reference laboratory well, when used alone, it has limited capability to resolve complex problems. This overview discusses how molecular approaches can be used in the immunohematology reference laboratory. In order to apply molecular approaches to immunohematology, knowledge of genes, DNA-based methods, and the molecular bases of blood groups are required. When applied correctly, DNA-based methods can predict blood groups to resolve ABO/Rh discrepancies, identify variant alleles, and screen donors for antigen-negative units. DNA-based testing in immunohematology is a valuable tool used to resolve blood group incompatibilities and to support patients in their transfusion needs. PMID:21257350

  7. DNA-based methods in the immunohematology reference laboratory.

    PubMed

    Reid, Marion E; Denomme, Gregory A

    2011-02-01

    Although hemagglutination serves the immunohematology reference laboratory well, when used alone, it has limited capability to resolve complex problems. This overview discusses how molecular approaches can be used in the immunohematology reference laboratory. In order to apply molecular approaches to immunohematology, knowledge of genes, DNA-based methods, and the molecular bases of blood groups are required. When applied correctly, DNA-based methods can predict blood groups to resolve ABO/Rh discrepancies, identify variant alleles, and screen donors for antigen-negative units. DNA-based testing in immunohematology is a valuable tool used to resolve blood group incompatibilities and to support patients in their transfusion needs.

  8. Electrochemical nanomaterial-based nucleic acid aptasensors.

    PubMed

    Palchetti, Ilaria; Mascini, Marco

    2012-04-01

    Recent progress in the development of electrochemical nanomaterial-aptamer-based biosensors is summarized. Aptamers are nucleic acid ligands that can be generated against amino acids, drugs, proteins, and other molecules. They are isolated from a large random library of synthetic nucleic acids by an iterative process of binding, separation, and amplification, called systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). In this review, different methods of integrating aptamers with different nanomaterials and nanoparticles for electrochemical biosensing application are described.

  9. Role of amino acid insertions on intermolecular forces between arginine peptide condensed DNA helices: implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm.

    PubMed

    DeRouchey, Jason E; Rau, Donald C

    2011-12-01

    In spermatogenesis, chromatin histones are replaced by arginine-rich protamines to densely compact DNA in sperm heads. Tight packaging is considered necessary to protect the DNA from damage. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing protamine-DNA assemblies and their dependence on amino acid content, the effect of neutral and negatively charged amino acids on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces was studied using model peptides containing six arginines. We have previously observed that the neutral amino acids in salmon protamine decrease the net attraction between protamine-DNA helices compared with the equivalent homo-arginine peptide. Using osmotic stress coupled with x-ray scattering, we have investigated the component attractive and repulsive forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance as a function of the chemistry, position, and number of the amino acid inserted. Neutral amino acids inserted into hexa-arginine increase the short range repulsion while only slightly affecting longer range attraction. The amino acid content alone of salmon protamine is enough to rationalize the forces that package DNA in sperm heads. Inserting a negatively charged amino acid into hexa-arginine dramatically weakens the net attraction. Both of these observations have biological implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm heads.

  10. Novel extraction strategy of ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from cheese for PCR-based investigations.

    PubMed

    Bonaïti, Catherine; Parayre, Sandrine; Irlinger, Françoise

    2006-03-15

    Cheese microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, constitute a complex ecosystem that plays a central role in cheeses ripening. The molecular study of cheese microbial diversity and activity is essential but the extraction of high quality nucleic acid may be problematic: the cheese samples are characterised by a strong buffering capacity which negatively influenced the yield of the extracted rRNA. The objective of this study is to develop an effective method for the direct and simultaneous isolation of yeast and bacterial ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from the same cheese samples. DNA isolation was based on a protocol used for nucleic acids isolation from anaerobic digestor, without preliminary washing step with the combined use of the action of chaotropic agent (acid guanidinium thiocyanate), detergents (SDS, N-lauroylsarcosine), chelating agent (EDTA) and a mechanical method (bead beating system). The DNA purification was carried out by two washing steps of phenol-chloroform. RNA was isolated successfully after the second acid extraction step by recovering it from the phenolic phase of the first acid extraction. The novel method yielded pure preparation of undegraded RNA accessible for reverse transcription-PCR. The extraction protocol of genomic DNA and rRNA was applicable to complex ecosystem of different cheese matrices.

  11. Switchable mechanical DNA ``arms'' operating on nucleic acid scaffolds associated with electrodes or semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelossof, Gilad; Tel-Vered, Ran; Liu, Xiaoqing; Willner, Itamar

    2013-09-01

    Functional footholds linked to DNA scaffolds associated with surfaces provide nano-engineered assemblies acting as switching devices. By the assembly of a β-cyclodextrin receptor on one foothold, and a ferrocene-modified nucleic acid on a second foothold, the switchable and reversible, fuel-driven activation of ``molecular arms'' proceeds, transduced by electrochemical or optical signals.Functional footholds linked to DNA scaffolds associated with surfaces provide nano-engineered assemblies acting as switching devices. By the assembly of a β-cyclodextrin receptor on one foothold, and a ferrocene-modified nucleic acid on a second foothold, the switchable and reversible, fuel-driven activation of ``molecular arms'' proceeds, transduced by electrochemical or optical signals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures, time-dependent deactivation of a DNA ``arm'' using a DNA anti-fuel, and control experiments, excluding β-cyclodextrin from the systems. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02653a

  12. SNP-Based Quantification of Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Patterns by Pyrosequencing®.

    PubMed

    Busato, Florence; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of allele-specific DNA methylation patterns has recently attracted much interest as loci of allele-specific DNA methylation overlap with known risk loci for complex diseases and the analysis might contribute to the fine-mapping and interpretation of non-coding genetic variants associated with complex diseases and improve the understanding between genotype and phenotype. In the presented protocol, we present a method for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns on both alleles separately using heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) as anchor for allele-specific PCR amplification followed by analysis of the allele-specific DNA methylation patterns by Pyrosequencing(®). Pyrosequencing is an easy-to-handle, quantitative real-time sequencing method that is frequently used for genotyping as well as for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns. The protocol consists of three major steps: (1) identification of individuals heterozygous for a SNP in a region of interest using Pyrosequencing; (2) analysis of the DNA methylation patterns surrounding the SNP on bisulfite-treated DNA to identify regions of potential allele-specific DNA methylation; and (3) the analysis of the DNA methylation patterns associated with each of the two alleles, which are individually amplified using allele-specific PCR. The enrichment of the targeted allele is re-enforced by modification of the allele-specific primers at the allele-discriminating base with Locked Nucleic Acids (LNA). For the proof-of-principle of the developed approach, we provide assay details for three imprinted genes (IGF2, IGF2R, and PEG3) within this chapter. The mean of the DNA methylation patterns derived from the individual alleles corresponds well to the overall DNA methylation patterns and the developed approach proved more reliable compared to other protocols for allele-specific DNA methylation analysis.

  13. Pyroglutamic acid stimulates DNA synthesis in rat primary hepatocytes through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shinjiro; Okita, Yoichi; de Toledo, Andreia; Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Eiichi; Morinaga, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    We purified pyroglutamic acid from human placental extract and identified it as a potent stimulator of rat primary hepatocyte DNA synthesis. Pyroglutamic acid dose-dependently stimulated DNA synthesis, and this effect was inhibited by PD98059, a dual specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MAP2K1) inhibitor. Therefore, pyroglutamic acid stimulated DNA synthesis in rat primary hepatocytes via MAPK signaling.

  14. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Christopher B.; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, Andre

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  15. Base-acid hybrid water electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-02-21

    A base-acid hybrid electrolytic system with a low onset voltage of 0.78 V for water electrolysis was developed by using a ceramic Li-ion exchange membrane to separate the oxygen-evolving reaction (OER) in a basic electrolyte solution containing the Li-ion and hydrogen-evolving reaction (HER) in an acidic electrolyte solution. PMID:26804323

  16. [Composites of peptide nucleic acids with titanium dioxide nanoparticles. III. Kinetics of PNA dissociation from nanocomposites containing DNA/PNA duplexes].

    PubMed

    Amirkhanov, R N; Zarytova, V F; Amirkhanov, N V

    2014-01-01

    When delivering peptide nucleic acids (PNA) to the cells in the nanocomposites TiO2 · PL · DNA/PNA, containing titanium dioxide nanoparticles coated with polylysine (PL) and immobilized DNA/PNA duplexes, it is important not only to transport them to the cell, but also ability to control the release rate of the PNA-drug from the carrier. PNA desorption from TiO2 · PL · DNA/PNA nanocomposite in time has been shown. Desorption is caused by dissociation of immobilized DNA/PNA duplex while the DNA remains on the carrier and PNA goes away in solution. It has been found that the half-retention times of PNA on TiO2 · PL · DNA/PNA nanocomposites containing DNA/PNA duplexes with overlapping complementary base pairs equal to 10, 12, 14, and 16 are 10, 14, 22 and 70 minutes, respectively. Thus, it has been shown that the release rate of the PNA-drug from nanocomposites can be adjusted by varying the overlap of complementary base pairs in the immobilized DNA/PNA duplex. This method of PNA immobilization may be used for designing of nanocomposites with optimum release time of the PNA-drugs. Created TiO2 · PL · DNA/PNA nanocomposites can be used to efficiently deliver therapeutically significant drug PNA and their selective effect on the pathogenic nucleic acid in the cell.

  17. Ultra-sensitive detection of zinc oxide nanowires using a quartz crystal microbalance and phosphoric acid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Kuewhan; You, Juneseok; Park, Chanhoo; Park, Hyunjun; Choi, Jaeyeong; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Park, Jinsung; Lee, Howon; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-09-01

    Recent advancements of nanomaterials have inspired numerous scientific and industrial applications. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) is one of the most important nanomaterials due to their extraordinary properties. However, studies performed over the past decade have reported toxicity of ZnO NWs. Therefore, there has been increasing demand for effective detection of ZnO NWs. In this study, we propose a method for the detection of ZnO NW using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and DNA probes. The detection method is based on the covalent interaction between ZnO NWs and the phosphoric acid group of single-stranded DNA (i.e., linker DNA), and DNA hybridization between the linker DNA and the probe DNA strand on the QCM electrode. Rapid, high sensitivity, in situ detection of ZnO NWs was demonstrated for the first time. The limit of detection was 10‑4 μg ml‑1 in deionized water, which represents a sensitivity that is 100000 times higher than the toxic ZnO NW concentration level. Moreover, the selectivity of the ZnO NW detection method was demonstrated by comparison with other types of nanowires and the method was able to detect ZnO NWs in tap water sensitively even after stored for 14 d in a refrigerator. The performance of our proposed method was sufficient to achieve detection of ZnO NW in the ‘real-world’ environment.

  18. Ultra-sensitive detection of zinc oxide nanowires using a quartz crystal microbalance and phosphoric acid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Kuewhan; You, Juneseok; Park, Chanhoo; Park, Hyunjun; Choi, Jaeyeong; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Park, Jinsung; Lee, Howon; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-09-01

    Recent advancements of nanomaterials have inspired numerous scientific and industrial applications. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) is one of the most important nanomaterials due to their extraordinary properties. However, studies performed over the past decade have reported toxicity of ZnO NWs. Therefore, there has been increasing demand for effective detection of ZnO NWs. In this study, we propose a method for the detection of ZnO NW using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and DNA probes. The detection method is based on the covalent interaction between ZnO NWs and the phosphoric acid group of single-stranded DNA (i.e., linker DNA), and DNA hybridization between the linker DNA and the probe DNA strand on the QCM electrode. Rapid, high sensitivity, in situ detection of ZnO NWs was demonstrated for the first time. The limit of detection was 10-4 μg ml-1 in deionized water, which represents a sensitivity that is 100000 times higher than the toxic ZnO NW concentration level. Moreover, the selectivity of the ZnO NW detection method was demonstrated by comparison with other types of nanowires and the method was able to detect ZnO NWs in tap water sensitively even after stored for 14 d in a refrigerator. The performance of our proposed method was sufficient to achieve detection of ZnO NW in the ‘real-world’ environment.

  19. Ultra-sensitive detection of zinc oxide nanowires using a quartz crystal microbalance and phosphoric acid DNA.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kuewhan; You, Juneseok; Park, Chanhoo; Park, Hyunjun; Choi, Jaeyeong; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Park, Jinsung; Lee, Howon; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-09-01

    Recent advancements of nanomaterials have inspired numerous scientific and industrial applications. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) is one of the most important nanomaterials due to their extraordinary properties. However, studies performed over the past decade have reported toxicity of ZnO NWs. Therefore, there has been increasing demand for effective detection of ZnO NWs. In this study, we propose a method for the detection of ZnO NW using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and DNA probes. The detection method is based on the covalent interaction between ZnO NWs and the phosphoric acid group of single-stranded DNA (i.e., linker DNA), and DNA hybridization between the linker DNA and the probe DNA strand on the QCM electrode. Rapid, high sensitivity, in situ detection of ZnO NWs was demonstrated for the first time. The limit of detection was 10(-4) μg ml(-1) in deionized water, which represents a sensitivity that is 100000 times higher than the toxic ZnO NW concentration level. Moreover, the selectivity of the ZnO NW detection method was demonstrated by comparison with other types of nanowires and the method was able to detect ZnO NWs in tap water sensitively even after stored for 14 d in a refrigerator. The performance of our proposed method was sufficient to achieve detection of ZnO NW in the 'real-world' environment.

  20. Ultra-sensitive detection of zinc oxide nanowires using a quartz crystal microbalance and phosphoric acid DNA.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kuewhan; You, Juneseok; Park, Chanhoo; Park, Hyunjun; Choi, Jaeyeong; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Park, Jinsung; Lee, Howon; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-09-01

    Recent advancements of nanomaterials have inspired numerous scientific and industrial applications. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) is one of the most important nanomaterials due to their extraordinary properties. However, studies performed over the past decade have reported toxicity of ZnO NWs. Therefore, there has been increasing demand for effective detection of ZnO NWs. In this study, we propose a method for the detection of ZnO NW using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and DNA probes. The detection method is based on the covalent interaction between ZnO NWs and the phosphoric acid group of single-stranded DNA (i.e., linker DNA), and DNA hybridization between the linker DNA and the probe DNA strand on the QCM electrode. Rapid, high sensitivity, in situ detection of ZnO NWs was demonstrated for the first time. The limit of detection was 10(-4) μg ml(-1) in deionized water, which represents a sensitivity that is 100000 times higher than the toxic ZnO NW concentration level. Moreover, the selectivity of the ZnO NW detection method was demonstrated by comparison with other types of nanowires and the method was able to detect ZnO NWs in tap water sensitively even after stored for 14 d in a refrigerator. The performance of our proposed method was sufficient to achieve detection of ZnO NW in the 'real-world' environment. PMID:27479871

  1. Genomewide expression analysis in amino acid-producing bacteria using DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F

    2004-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has become an important research tool for biotechnology and microbiology. It is now possible to characterize genetic diversity and gene expression in a genomewide manner. DNA microarrays have been applied extensively to study the biology of many bacteria including Escherichia coli, but only recently have they been developed for the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum. Both bacteria are widely used for biotechnological amino acid production. In this article, in addition to the design and generation of microarrays as well as their use in hybridization experiments and subsequent data analysis, we describe recent applications of DNA microarray technology regarding amino acid production in C. glutamicum and E. coli. We also discuss the impact of functional genomics studies on fundamental as well as applied aspects of amino acid production with C. glutamicum and E. coli. PMID:15304751

  2. Beyond DNA origami: A look on the bright future of nucleic acid nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Michelotti, Nicole; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Manzo, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acid nanotechnology exploits the programmable molecular recognition properties of natural and synthetic nucleic acids to assemble structures with nanometer-scale precision. In 2006, DNA origami transformed the field by providing a versatile platform for self-assembly of arbitrary shapes from one long DNA strand held in place by hundreds of short, site-specific (spatially addressable) DNA ”staples”. This revolutionary approach has led to the creation of a multitude of 2D and 3D scaffolds that form the basis for functional nanodevices. Not limited to nucleic acids, these nanodevices can incorporate other structural and functional materials, such as proteins and nanoparticles, making them broadly useful for current and future applications in emerging fields such as nanomedicine, nanoelectronics, and alternative energy. PMID:22131292

  3. Thymine and guanine base specificity of human myeloma proteins with anti-DNA activity.

    PubMed Central

    Zouali, M; Stollar, B D

    1986-01-01

    To further our understanding of the molecular basis of DNA-autoantibody interactions, we have characterized the specificities of three IgG human myeloma proteins that bind DNA. We measured their binding to synthetic single- and double-stranded homopolynucleotides, random and alternating copolymers, oligonucleotides, and nucleotides or nucleosides conjugated to non-nucleic acid carriers. All three antibodies bound single-stranded nucleic acids, including both polyribonucleotides and polydeoxyribonucleotides. They varied in relative affinities for polynucleotides of varying base composition. Polymers containing the purines guanine or hypoxanthine and/or the pyrimidine thymine were most reactive with all three proteins. A myeloma protein that reacted with poly(G), poly(I), or poly(dT) also bound to the corresponding nucleosides or nucleotides conjugated to bovine serum albumin. None of the antibodies reacted with base-paired double-helical polynucleotides (double-stranded RNA, RNA-DNA hybrid or double-stranded DNA). The results indicate that base specificity is prominent in their reactions and that the accessible epitopes in single-stranded polynucleotides become masked upon base pairing in double-stranded helices. These findings suggest a model in which positions N1 and O6 of guanine and hypoxanthine and N3 and O4 of thymine interact with amino acids of the antibody-combining site. PMID:3771789

  4. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of ssDNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide using graphene based nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Berghian-Grosan, Camelia; Biris, Alexandru Radu; Coros, Maria; Pogacean, Florina; Pruneanu, Stela

    2015-06-01

    The oxidative damage of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been intensively studied due to its role in the occurrence of some diseases. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the reactive oxygen species (ROS). It can induce oxidation of DNA bases, sugar lesions or DNA strand breaks. The Pt/Gr-Au-3 modified electrode was employed for the analysis of four ssDNA samples: single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), ssDNA pre-treated with hydrogen peroxide (ssDNA-H2O2), ssDNA pre-treated with graphene-gold nanoparticles (ssDNA-Gr-Au) and ssDNA-Gr-Au complex pre-treated with hydrogen peroxide (ssDNA-Gr-Au-H2O2). By monitoring the changes of the purine oxidation peaks currents, we obtained valuable information about the damage induced by the hydrogen peroxide onto the un-treated or graphene pre-treated ssDNA and also about the interaction between ssDNA and graphene-based nanomaterial. The FTIR analysis has been also used to obtain information about the ssDNA damage. These findings allowed us to prove the utility of graphene-based nanomaterials (mainly Gr-Au-3) not only for the investigation of the oxidative damage induced by a non-radical oxidant, but also for the determination of the type of interaction between ssDNA and graphene surface. The stability of the ssDNA-Gr-Au-3 complex against the damage induced by H2O2, in the absence of reduced transition metals, was also established.

  5. N6-methyladenine: the other methylated base of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ratel, David; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2006-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism involved in many biological functions in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Contrary to mammalian DNA, which is thought to contain only 5-methylcytosine (m5C), bacterial DNA contains two additional methylated bases, namely N6-methyladenine (m6A), and a more recently discovered minor base N4-methylcytosine (m4C). These modified bases are involved in the protection of bacterial DNA from the action of specific endonucleases via the host-specific restriction-modification system which is regarded as a defense mechanism against bacteriophage infection. However, if the main function of m5C and m4C in bacteria is the protection against restriction enzymes, the roles of m6A are multiple and include for example the regulation of virulence and the control of many bacterial DNA functions such as the replication, repair, expression and transposition of DNA. Hence, in regard to the multiple roles of m6A in bacteria, and to the well known tendency for m5C to deaminate in thymine, the selection of the mutagenic m5C instead of m6A in mammals as the only methylated base may seem surprising. However, even if adenine methylation is usually considered as a bacterial DNA feature, the presence of m6A is not restricted to prokaryotic DNA since this methylated base has been found in protist and plant DNAs. Furthermore, indirect evidence suggests the presence of m6A in mammal DNA, raising the possibility that this base has remained undetected due to the low sensitivity of the analytical methods used. This points to the importance to consider m6A as the sixth element of DNA. PMID:16479578

  6. DNA nanostructures based biosensor for the determination of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gayathri, S Baby; Kamaraj, P; Arthanareeswari, M; Devikala, S

    2015-10-15

    Graphite electrode was modified using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), chitosan (CS), glutaraldehyde (GTA) and DNA nanostructures (nsDNA). DNA nanostructures of 50 nm in size were produced from single DNA template sequence using a simple two step procedure and were confirmed using TEM and AFM analysis. The modified electrode was applied to the electrochemical detection of aromatic compounds using EIS. The modified electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). For comparison, electrochemical results derived from single stranded (50 bp length) and double stranded (50 bp length) DNA based biosensors were used. The results indicate that the modified electrode prior to nsDNA immobilization provides a viable platform that effectively promotes electron transfer between nsDNA and the electrode. The mode of binding between the nsDNA and aromatic compounds was investigated using EIS, indicating that the dominant interaction is non-covalent. nsDNA based biosensor was observed to act as an efficient biosensor in selective and sensitive identification of aromatic compounds.

  7. Associations between whole peripheral blood fatty acids and DNA methylation in humans.

    PubMed

    de la Rocha, Carmen; Pérez-Mojica, J Eduardo; León, Silvia Zenteno-De; Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Alvarado-Caudillo, Yolanda; Carmona, F Javier; Esteller, Manel; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Zaina, Silvio; Lund, Gertrud

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) modify DNA methylation in vitro, but limited information is available on whether corresponding associations exist in vivo and reflect any short-term effect of the diet. Associations between global DNA methylation and FAs were sought in blood from lactating infants (LI; n = 49) and adult males (AMM; n = 12) equally distributed across the three conventional BMI classes. AMM provided multiple samples at 2-hour intervals during 8 hours after either a single Western diet-representative meal (post-prandial samples) or no meal (fasting samples). Lipid/glucose profile, HDAC4 promoter and PDK4 5'UTR methylation were determined in AMM. Multiple regression analysis revealed that global (in LI) and both global and PDK4-specific DNA methylation (in AMM) were positively associated with eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acid. HDAC4 methylation was inversely associated with arachidonic acid post-prandially in AMM. Global DNA methylation did not show any defined within-day pattern that would suggest a short-term response to the diet. Nonetheless, global DNA methylation was higher in normal weight subjects both post-prandially and in fasting and coincided with higher polyunsaturated relative to monounsaturated and saturated FAs. We show for the first time strong associations of DNA methylation with specific FAs in two human cohorts of distinct age, diet and postnatal development stage. PMID:27181711

  8. Associations between whole peripheral blood fatty acids and DNA methylation in humans

    PubMed Central

    de la Rocha, Carmen; Pérez-Mojica, J. Eduardo; León, Silvia Zenteno-De; Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E.; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Alvarado-Caudillo, Yolanda; Carmona, F. Javier; Esteller, Manel; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Zaina, Silvio; Lund, Gertrud

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) modify DNA methylation in vitro, but limited information is available on whether corresponding associations exist in vivo and reflect any short-term effect of the diet. Associations between global DNA methylation and FAs were sought in blood from lactating infants (LI; n = 49) and adult males (AMM; n = 12) equally distributed across the three conventional BMI classes. AMM provided multiple samples at 2-hour intervals during 8 hours after either a single Western diet-representative meal (post-prandial samples) or no meal (fasting samples). Lipid/glucose profile, HDAC4 promoter and PDK4 5’UTR methylation were determined in AMM. Multiple regression analysis revealed that global (in LI) and both global and PDK4-specific DNA methylation (in AMM) were positively associated with eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acid. HDAC4 methylation was inversely associated with arachidonic acid post-prandially in AMM. Global DNA methylation did not show any defined within-day pattern that would suggest a short-term response to the diet. Nonetheless, global DNA methylation was higher in normal weight subjects both post-prandially and in fasting and coincided with higher polyunsaturated relative to monounsaturated and saturated FAs. We show for the first time strong associations of DNA methylation with specific FAs in two human cohorts of distinct age, diet and postnatal development stage. PMID:27181711

  9. Toward Electronic Conductance Characterization of DNA Nucleotide Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, Predrag S; Wells, Jack C; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Xu, Dong; Lee, James Weifu

    2007-03-01

    We calculate electron-transport properties within equilibrium, linear transport theory through the DNA nucleotide bases spanning two gold nanowires. Our quantum mechanical calculations show that single configurations of DNA bases A, C, T, and G have significantly different charge conductance characteristics. This result is consistent with the notion that it is possible to read the nucleotide base sequence on an individual DNA heteropolymer which is moving through a gap between electrically biased nanoelectrodes by measuring the changes in the electron-transport conductance.

  10. Toward Electronic Conductance Characterization of DNA Nucleotide Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, James Weifu; Krstic, Predrag S; Wells, Jack C; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Xu, Dong

    2007-01-01

    We calculate electron-transport properties within equilibrium, linear transport theory through the DNA nucleotide bases spanning two gold nanowires. Our quantum mechanical calculations show that single configurations of DNA bases A, C, T, and G have significantly different charge conductance characteristics. This result is consistent with the notion that it is possible to read the nucleotide base sequence on an individual DNA heteropolymer which is moving through a gap between electrically biased nanoelectrodes by measuring the changes in the electron-transport conductance.

  11. Functional nucleic acid-based hydrogels for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Mo, Liuting; Lu, Chun-Hua; Fu, Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogels are crosslinked hydrophilic polymers that can absorb a large amount of water. By their hydrophilic, biocompatible and highly tunable nature, hydrogels can be tailored for applications in bioanalysis and biomedicine. Of particular interest are DNA-based hydrogels owing to the unique features of nucleic acids. Since the discovery of the DNA double helical structure, interest in DNA has expanded beyond its genetic role to applications in nanotechnology and materials science. In particular, DNA-based hydrogels present such remarkable features as stability, flexibility, precise programmability, stimuli-responsive DNA conformations, facile synthesis and modification. Moreover, functional nucleic acids (FNAs) have allowed the construction of hydrogels based on aptamers, DNAzymes, i-motif nanostructures, siRNAs and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides to provide additional molecular recognition, catalytic activities and therapeutic potential, making them key players in biological analysis and biomedical applications. To date, a variety of applications have been demonstrated with FNA-based hydrogels, including biosensing, environmental analysis, controlled drug release, cell adhesion and targeted cancer therapy. In this review, we focus on advances in the development of FNA-based hydrogels, which have fully incorporated both the unique features of FNAs and DNA-based hydrogels. We first introduce different strategies for constructing DNA-based hydrogels. Subsequently, various types of FNAs and the most recent developments of FNA-based hydrogels for bioanalytical and biomedical applications are described with some selected examples. Finally, the review provides an insight into the remaining challenges and future perspectives of FNA-based hydrogels.

  12. Osmium-Based Pyrimidine Contrast Tags for Enhanced Nanopore-Based DNA Base Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Robert Y.; Vazquez-Pagan, Ana G.; Johnson, Michael; Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-01-01

    Nanopores are a promising platform in next generation DNA sequencing. In this platform, an individual DNA strand is threaded into nanopore using an electric field, and enzyme-based ratcheting is used to move the strand through the detector. During this process the residual ion current through the pore is measured, which exhibits unique levels for different base combinations inside the pore. While this approach has shown great promise, accuracy is not optimal because the four bases are chemically comparable to one another, leading to small differences in current obstruction. Nucleobase-specific chemical tagging can be a viable approach to enhancing the contrast between different bases in the sequence. Herein we show that covalent modification of one or both of the pyrimidine bases by an osmium bipyridine complex leads to measureable differences in the blockade amplitudes of DNA molecules. We qualitatively determine the degree of osmylation of a DNA strand by passing it through a solid-state nanopore, and are thus able to gauge T and C base content. In addition, we show that osmium bipyridine reacts with dsDNA, leading to substantially different current blockade levels than exhibited for bare dsDNA. This work serves as a proof of principle for nanopore sequencing and mapping via base-specific DNA osmylation. PMID:26657869

  13. Osmium-Based Pyrimidine Contrast Tags for Enhanced Nanopore-Based DNA Base Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Henley, Robert Y; Vazquez-Pagan, Ana G; Johnson, Michael; Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-01-01

    Nanopores are a promising platform in next generation DNA sequencing. In this platform, an individual DNA strand is threaded into nanopore using an electric field, and enzyme-based ratcheting is used to move the strand through the detector. During this process the residual ion current through the pore is measured, which exhibits unique levels for different base combinations inside the pore. While this approach has shown great promise, accuracy is not optimal because the four bases are chemically comparable to one another, leading to small differences in current obstruction. Nucleobase-specific chemical tagging can be a viable approach to enhancing the contrast between different bases in the sequence. Herein we show that covalent modification of one or both of the pyrimidine bases by an osmium bipyridine complex leads to measureable differences in the blockade amplitudes of DNA molecules. We qualitatively determine the degree of osmylation of a DNA strand by passing it through a solid-state nanopore, and are thus able to gauge T and C base content. In addition, we show that osmium bipyridine reacts with dsDNA, leading to substantially different current blockade levels than exhibited for bare dsDNA. This work serves as a proof of principle for nanopore sequencing and mapping via base-specific DNA osmylation.

  14. Osmium-Based Pyrimidine Contrast Tags for Enhanced Nanopore-Based DNA Base Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Henley, Robert Y; Vazquez-Pagan, Ana G; Johnson, Michael; Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-01-01

    Nanopores are a promising platform in next generation DNA sequencing. In this platform, an individual DNA strand is threaded into nanopore using an electric field, and enzyme-based ratcheting is used to move the strand through the detector. During this process the residual ion current through the pore is measured, which exhibits unique levels for different base combinations inside the pore. While this approach has shown great promise, accuracy is not optimal because the four bases are chemically comparable to one another, leading to small differences in current obstruction. Nucleobase-specific chemical tagging can be a viable approach to enhancing the contrast between different bases in the sequence. Herein we show that covalent modification of one or both of the pyrimidine bases by an osmium bipyridine complex leads to measureable differences in the blockade amplitudes of DNA molecules. We qualitatively determine the degree of osmylation of a DNA strand by passing it through a solid-state nanopore, and are thus able to gauge T and C base content. In addition, we show that osmium bipyridine reacts with dsDNA, leading to substantially different current blockade levels than exhibited for bare dsDNA. This work serves as a proof of principle for nanopore sequencing and mapping via base-specific DNA osmylation. PMID:26657869

  15. Binding of retinoic acid receptor heterodimers to DNA. A role for histones NH2 termini.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Formstecher, P

    1998-05-15

    The retinoic acid signaling pathway is controlled essentially through two types of nuclear receptors, RARs and RXRs. Ligand dependent activation or repression of retinoid-regulated genes is dependent on the binding of retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/9-cis-retinoic acid receptor (RXR) heterodimers to retinoic acid response element (RARE). Although unliganded RXR/RAR heterodimers bind constitutively to DNA in vitro, a clear in vivo ligand-dependent occupancy of the RARE present in the RARbeta2 gene promoter has been reported (Dey, A., Minucci, S., and Ozato, K. (1994) Mol. Cell. Biol. 14, 8191-8201). Nucleosomes are viewed as general repressors of the transcriptional machinery, in part by preventing the access of transcription factors to DNA. The ability of hRXRalpha/hRARalpha heterodimers to bind to a nucleosomal template in vitro has therefore been examined. The assembly of a fragment from the RARbeta2 gene promoter, which contains a canonical DR5 RARE, into a nucleosome core prevented hRXRalpha/hRARalpha binding to this DNA, in conditions where a strong interaction is observed with a linear DNA template. However, histone tails removal by limited proteolysis and histone hyperacetylation yielded nucleosomal RAREs able to bind to hRXRalpha/hRARalpha heterodimers. These data establish therefore the role of histones NH2 termini as a major impediment to retinoid receptors access to DNA, and identify histone hyperacetylation as a potential physiological regulator of retinoid-induced transcription.

  16. Nucleic acid-based nanoengineering: novel structures for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanying; LaBean, Thomas H.; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoengineering exploits the interactions of materials at the nanometre scale to create functional nanostructures. It relies on the precise organization of nanomaterials to achieve unique functionality. There are no interactions more elegant than those governing nucleic acids via Watson–Crick base-pairing rules. The infinite combinations of DNA/RNA base pairs and their remarkable molecular recognition capability can give rise to interesting nanostructures that are only limited by our imagination. Over the past years, creative assembly of nucleic acids has fashioned a plethora of two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanostructures with precisely controlled size, shape and spatial functionalization. These nanostructures have been precisely patterned with molecules, proteins and gold nanoparticles for the observation of chemical reactions at the single molecule level, activation of enzymatic cascade and novel modality of photonic detection, respectively. Recently, they have also been engineered to encapsulate and release bioactive agents in a stimulus-responsive manner for therapeutic applications. The future of nucleic acid-based nanoengineering is bright and exciting. In this review, we will discuss the strategies to control the assembly of nucleic acids and highlight the recent efforts to build functional nucleic acid nanodevices for nanomedicine. PMID:23050076

  17. Jammed acid-base reactions at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Davis, Julianne M; Kruk, Jennifer J; Konek, Christopher T; Scheidt, Karl A; Geiger, Franz M

    2008-11-19

    Using nonlinear optics, we show that acid-base chemistry at aqueous/solid interfaces tracks bulk pH changes at low salt concentrations. In the presence of 10 to 100 mM salt concentrations, however, the interfacial acid-base chemistry remains jammed for hours, until it finally occurs within minutes at a rate that follows the kinetic salt effect. For various alkali halide salts, the delay times increase with increasing anion polarizability and extent of cation hydration and lead to massive hysteresis in interfacial acid-base titrations. The resulting implications for pH cycling in these systems are that interfacial systems can spatially and temporally lag bulk acid-base chemistry when the Debye length approaches 1 nm.

  18. Nucleic acid-based tissue biomarkers of urologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Dimo; Meller, Sebastian; Uhl, Barbara; Ralla, Bernhard; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Ellinger, Jörg; Kristiansen, Glen

    2014-08-01

    Molecular biomarkers play an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Biomarkers allow estimation of the risk of developing cancer; help to diagnose a tumor, ideally at an early stage when cure is still possible; and aid in monitoring disease progression. Furthermore, they hold the potential to predict the outcome of the disease (prognostic biomarkers) and the response to therapy (predictive biomarkers). Altogether, biomarkers will help to avoid tumor-related deaths and reduce overtreatment, and will contribute to increased survival and quality of life in cancer patients due to personalized treatments. It is well established that the process of carcinogenesis is a complex interplay between genomic predisposition, acquired somatic mutations, epigenetic changes and genomic aberrations. Within this complex interplay, nucleic acids, i.e. RNA and DNA, play a fundamental role and therefore represent ideal candidates for biomarkers. They are particularly promising candidates because sequence-specific hybridization and amplification technologies allow highly accurate and sensitive assessment of these biomarker levels over a broad dynamic range. This article provides an overview of nucleic acid-based biomarkers in tissues for the management of urologic malignancies, i.e. tumors of the prostate, testis, kidney, penis, urinary bladder, renal pelvis, ureter and other urinary organs. Special emphasis is put on genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic biomarkers (SNPs, mutations [genomic and mitochondrial], microsatellite instabilities, viral and bacterial DNA, DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation, mRNA expression, and non-coding RNAs [lncRNA, miRNA, siRNA, piRNA, snRNA, snoRNA]). Due to the multitude of published biomarker candidates, special focus is given to the general applicability of different molecular classes as biomarkers and some particularly promising nucleic acid biomarkers. Furthermore, specific challenges regarding the development and clinical

  19. DNA Targeting Sequence Improves Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Plasmid DNA Transfection Efficiency in Model Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Matthew M.; Dean, David A.; Dobson, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Efficient non-viral plasmid DNA transfection of most stem cells, progenitor cells and primary cell lines currently presents an obstacle for many applications within gene therapy research. From a standpoint of efficiency and cell viability, magnetic nanoparticle-based DNA transfection is a promising gene vectoring technique because it has demonstrated rapid and improved transfection outcomes when compared to alternative non-viral methods. Recently, our research group introduced oscillating magnet arrays that resulted in further improvements to this novel plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectoring technology. Continued improvements to nanomagnetic transfection techniques have focused primarily on magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) functionalization and transfection parameter optimization: cell confluence, growth media, serum starvation, magnet oscillation parameters, etc. Noting that none of these parameters can assist in the nuclear translocation of delivered pDNA following MNP-pDNA complex dissociation in the cell’s cytoplasm, inclusion of a cassette feature for pDNA nuclear translocation is theoretically justified. In this study incorporation of a DNA targeting sequence (DTS) feature in the transfecting plasmid improved transfection efficiency in model neurons, presumably from increased nuclear translocation. This observation became most apparent when comparing the response of the dividing SH-SY5Y precursor cell to the non-dividing and differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. PMID:26287182

  20. DNA Targeting Sequence Improves Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Plasmid DNA Transfection Efficiency in Model Neurons.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Matthew M; Dean, David A; Dobson, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Efficient non-viral plasmid DNA transfection of most stem cells, progenitor cells and primary cell lines currently presents an obstacle for many applications within gene therapy research. From a standpoint of efficiency and cell viability, magnetic nanoparticle-based DNA transfection is a promising gene vectoring technique because it has demonstrated rapid and improved transfection outcomes when compared to alternative non-viral methods. Recently, our research group introduced oscillating magnet arrays that resulted in further improvements to this novel plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectoring technology. Continued improvements to nanomagnetic transfection techniques have focused primarily on magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) functionalization and transfection parameter optimization: cell confluence, growth media, serum starvation, magnet oscillation parameters, etc. Noting that none of these parameters can assist in the nuclear translocation of delivered pDNA following MNP-pDNA complex dissociation in the cell's cytoplasm, inclusion of a cassette feature for pDNA nuclear translocation is theoretically justified. In this study incorporation of a DNA targeting sequence (DTS) feature in the transfecting plasmid improved transfection efficiency in model neurons, presumably from increased nuclear translocation. This observation became most apparent when comparing the response of the dividing SH-SY5Y precursor cell to the non-dividing and differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. PMID:26287182

  1. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-01

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10-18 mol l-1 for t-DNA has been achieved.

  2. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-01

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10‑18 mol l‑1 for t-DNA has been achieved.

  3. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-19

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10(-18) mol l(-1) for t-DNA has been achieved. PMID:27378514

  4. DNA methylation in Folbp1 knockout mice supplemented with folic acid during gestation.

    PubMed

    Finnell, Richard H; Spiegelstein, Ofer; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; Triplett, Aleata; Pogribny, Igor P; Melnyk, Stepan; James, Jill S

    2002-08-01

    Periconceptional folic acid supplementation has been shown to prevent up to 70% of neural tube and other birth defects in humans; however, the mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we tested whether defective intracellular folate transport, as achieved by inactivation of the murine folate-binding protein 1 (Folbp1), affects global DNA methylation in the liver and brain from gestational day (GD) 15 embryos. Complete Folbp1 inactivation is embryolethal but can be reversed by maternal folinic acid (FA) supplementation, and thus we also tested the effect of FA supplementation on DNA methylation in Folbp1 fetuses. Overall, the extent of global DNA methylation seems to be similar across all genotypes in unsupplemented control Folbp1 mice; however, explicit conclusions regarding Folbp1(-/-) fetuses were not possible because only a single living unsupplemented fetus was viable at GD 15. FA supplementation induced global DNA hypomethylation across all genotypes. FA-induced hypomethylation is most likely due to its ability to inhibit the enzyme glycine hydroxymethyltransferase, thereby inhibiting the homocysteine remethylation cycle necessary to regenerate S-adenosylmethionine, the methyl donor for DNA methyltransferases. Our hypothesis was that due to defective folate transport in Folbp1(-/-) embryos and fetuses, DNA would be hypomethylated, thereby altering the temporal expression of critical genes necessary for normal embryonic development. However, these results suggest that an extended examination of changes in DNA methylation prior to GD 15 is required to unequivocally prove or disprove the hypothesis. PMID:12163711

  5. Is amino acid racemization a useful tool for screening for ancient DNA in bone?

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Matthew J.; Penkman, Kirsty E. H.; Rohland, Nadin; Shapiro, Beth; Dobberstein, Reimer C.; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Hofreiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many rare and valuable ancient specimens now carry the scars of ancient DNA research, as questions of population genetics and phylogeography require larger sample sets. This fuels the demand for reliable techniques to screen for DNA preservation prior to destructive sampling. Only one such technique has been widely adopted: the extent of aspartic acid racemization (AAR). The kinetics of AAR are believed to be similar to the rate of DNA depurination and therefore a good measure of the likelihood of DNA survival. Moreover, AAR analysis is only minimally destructive. We report the first comprehensive test of AAR using 91 bone and teeth samples from temperate and high-latitude sites that were analysed for DNA. While the AAR range of all specimens was low (0.02–0.17), no correlation was found between the extent of AAR and DNA amplification success. Additional heating experiments and surveys of the literature indicated that d/l Asx is low in bones until almost all the collagen is lost. This is because aspartic acid is retained in the bone within the constrained environment of the collagen triple helix, where it cannot racemize for steric reasons. Only if the helix denatures to soluble gelatin can Asx racemize readily, but this soluble gelatine is readily lost in most burial environments. We conclude that Asx d/l is not a useful screening technique for ancient DNA from bone. PMID:19493899

  6. Natural DNA-modified graphene/Pd nanoparticles as highly active catalyst for formic acid electro-oxidation and for the Suzuki reaction.

    PubMed

    Qu, Konggang; Wu, Li; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2012-09-26

    Natural DNA has been considered as a building block for developing novel functional materials. It is abundant, renewable, and biodegradable and has a well-defined structure and conformation with many unique features, which are difficult to find in other polymers. Herein, calf thymus DNA modified graphene/Pd nanoparticle (DNA-G-Pd) hybrid materials are constructed for the first time using DNA as a mediator, and the prepared DNA-G-Pd hybrid shows high catalytic activity for fuel cell formic acid electro-oxidation and for organic Suzuki reaction. The main advantages of using DNA are not only because the aromatic nucleobases in DNA can interact through π-π stacking with graphene basal surface but also because they can chelate Pd via dative bonding in such defined sites along the DNA lattice. Our results indicate that isolated, homogeneous, and ultrafine spherical Pd nanoparticles are densely in situ decorated on DNA-modified graphene surfaces with high stability and dispersibility. The prepared DNA-G-Pd hybrid has much greater activity and durability for formic acid electro-oxidation than the commercial Pd/C catalyst and polyvinylpyrrolidone-mediated graphene/Pd nanoparticle (PVP-G-Pd) hybrid used for direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). Besides, the DNA-G-Pd hybrid can also be an efficient and recyclable catalyst for the organic Suzuki reaction in aqueous solution under aerobic conditions without any preactivation. Since DNA can chelate various transition metal cations, this proof-of-concept protocol provides the possibility for the tailored design of other novel catalytic materials based on graphene with full exploitation of their properties.

  7. Natural DNA-modified graphene/Pd nanoparticles as highly active catalyst for formic acid electro-oxidation and for the Suzuki reaction.

    PubMed

    Qu, Konggang; Wu, Li; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2012-09-26

    Natural DNA has been considered as a building block for developing novel functional materials. It is abundant, renewable, and biodegradable and has a well-defined structure and conformation with many unique features, which are difficult to find in other polymers. Herein, calf thymus DNA modified graphene/Pd nanoparticle (DNA-G-Pd) hybrid materials are constructed for the first time using DNA as a mediator, and the prepared DNA-G-Pd hybrid shows high catalytic activity for fuel cell formic acid electro-oxidation and for organic Suzuki reaction. The main advantages of using DNA are not only because the aromatic nucleobases in DNA can interact through π-π stacking with graphene basal surface but also because they can chelate Pd via dative bonding in such defined sites along the DNA lattice. Our results indicate that isolated, homogeneous, and ultrafine spherical Pd nanoparticles are densely in situ decorated on DNA-modified graphene surfaces with high stability and dispersibility. The prepared DNA-G-Pd hybrid has much greater activity and durability for formic acid electro-oxidation than the commercial Pd/C catalyst and polyvinylpyrrolidone-mediated graphene/Pd nanoparticle (PVP-G-Pd) hybrid used for direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). Besides, the DNA-G-Pd hybrid can also be an efficient and recyclable catalyst for the organic Suzuki reaction in aqueous solution under aerobic conditions without any preactivation. Since DNA can chelate various transition metal cations, this proof-of-concept protocol provides the possibility for the tailored design of other novel catalytic materials based on graphene with full exploitation of their properties. PMID:22973944

  8. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino < alternating-hydrazino < sequential-hydrazino group. Binding studies of ss-polynucleotides suggest intercalation of phenanthridine between polynucleotide bases, whereby affinity and fluorimetric response decrease with the number of α-hydrazino groups in the peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore. PMID:27161341

  9. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino < alternating-hydrazino < sequential-hydrazino group. Binding studies of ss-polynucleotides suggest intercalation of phenanthridine between polynucleotide bases, whereby affinity and fluorimetric response decrease with the number of α-hydrazino groups in the peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system for studying clustered DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Moscariello, M.M.; Sutherland, B.

    2010-08-01

    DNA-damaging agents can induce clustered lesions or multiply damaged sites (MDSs) on the same or opposing DNA strands. In the latter, attempts to repair MDS can generate closely opposed single-strand break intermediates that may convert non-lethal or mutagenic base damage into double-strand breaks (DSBs). We constructed a diploid S. cerevisiae yeast strain with a chromosomal context targeted by integrative DNA fragments carrying different damages to determine whether closely opposed base damages are converted to DSBs following the outcomes of the homologous recombination repair pathway. As a model of MDS, we studied clustered uracil DNA damages with a known location and a defined distance separating the lesions. The system we describe might well be extended to assessing the repair of MDSs with different compositions, and to most of the complex DNA lesions induced by physical and chemical agents.

  11. Enzymatic amplification detection of DNA based on "molecular beacon" biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xun; Jiang, Jianhui; Xu, Xiangmin; Chu, Xia; Luo, Yan; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2008-05-15

    We described a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on molecular beacon (MB) probe and enzymatic amplification protocol. The MB modified with a thiol at its 5' end and a biotin at its 3' end was immobilized on the gold electrode through mixed self-assembly process. Hybridization events between MB and target DNA cause the conformational change of the MB, triggering the attached biotin group on the electrode surface. Following the specific interaction between the conformation-triggered biotin and streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (HRP), subsequent quantification of DNA was realized by electrochemical detection of enzymatic product in the presence of substrate. The detection limit is obtained as low as 0.1nM. The presented DNA biosensor has good selectivity, being able to differentiate between a complementary target DNA sequence and one containing G-G single-base mismatches.

  12. Size-Expanded yDNA bases: An Ab Initio Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Sumpter, Bobby G; Lipkowski, Pawel; Wells, Jack C

    2006-01-01

    xDNA and yDNA are new classes of synthetic nucleic acids characterized by having base-pairs with one of the bases larger than the natural congeners. Here these larger bases are called x- and y-bases. We recently investigated and reported the structural and electronic properties of the x-bases (Fuentes-Cabrera et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2005, 109, 21135-21139). Here we extend this study by investigating the structure and electronic properties of the y-bases. These studies are framed within our interest that xDNA and yDNA could function as nanowires, for they could have smaller HOMO-LUMO gaps than natural DNA. The limited amount of experimental structural data in these synthetic duplexes makes it necessary to first understand smaller models and, subsequently, to use that information to build larger models. In this paper, we report the results on the chemical and electronic structure of the y-bases. In particular, we predict that the y-bases have smaller HOMO-LUMO gaps than their natural congeners, which is an encouraging result for it indicates that yDNA could have a smaller HOMO-LUMO gap than natural DNA. Also, we predict that the y-bases are less planar than the natural ones. Particularly interesting are our results corresponding to yG. Our studies show that yG is unstable because it is less aromatic and has a Coulombic repulsion that involves the amino group, as compared with a more stable tautomer. However, yG has a very small HOMO-LUMO gap, the smallest of all the size-expanded bases we have considered. The results of this study provide useful information that may allow the synthesis of an yG-mimic that is stable and has a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  13. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine.

  14. Sequence-specific DNA damage induced by ultraviolet A-irradiated folic acid via its photolysis product.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2003-02-15

    DNA damage mediated by photosensitizers participates in solar carcinogenesis. Fluorescence measurement and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that photoirradiated folic acid, one of the photosensitizers in cells, generates pterine-6-carboxylic acid (PCA). Experiments using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from a human gene showed that ultraviolet A-irradiated folic acid or PCA caused DNA cleavage specifically at consecutive G residues in double-stranded DNA after Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase or piperidine treatment. The amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2(')-deoxyguanosine formed through this DNA photoreaction in double-stranded DNA exceeded that in single-stranded DNA. Kinetic studies suggested that DNA damage is caused mainly by photoexcited PCA generated from folic acid rather than by folic acid itself. In conclusion, photoirradiated folic acid generates PCA, which induces DNA photooxidation specifically at consecutive G residues through electron transfer. Excess intake of folic acid supplements may increase a risk of skin cancer by solar ultraviolet light. PMID:12573286

  15. NDI and DAN DNA: Nucleic Acid-Directed Assembly of NDI and DAN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two novel DNA base surrogate phosphoramidites 1 and 2, based upon relatively electron-rich 1,5-dialkoxynaphthalene (DAN) and relatively electron-deficient 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide (NDI), respectively, were designed, synthesized, and incorporated into DNA oligonucleotide strands. The DAN and NDI artificial DNA bases were inserted within a three-base-pair region within the interior of a 12-mer oligonucleotide duplex in various sequential arrangements and investigated with CD spectroscopy and UV melting curve analysis. The CD spectra of the modified duplexes indicated B-form DNA topology. Melting curve analyses revealed trends in DNA duplex stability that correlate with the known association of DAN and NDI moieties in aqueous solution as well as the known favorable interactions between NDI and natural DNA base pairs. This demonstrates that DNA duplex stability and specificity can be driven by the electrostatic complementarity between DAN and NDI. In the most favorable case, an NDI–DAN–NDI arrangement in the middle of the DNA duplex was found to be approximately as stabilizing as three A–T base pairs. PMID:24502543

  16. A novel chaotic based image encryption using a hybrid model of deoxyribonucleic acid and cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayatifar, Rasul; Sadaei, Hossein Javedani; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Lee, Malrey; Isnin, Ismail Fauzi

    2015-08-01

    Currently, there are many studies have conducted on developing security of the digital image in order to protect such data while they are sending on the internet. This work aims to propose a new approach based on a hybrid model of the Tinkerbell chaotic map, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and cellular automata (CA). DNA rules, DNA sequence XOR operator and CA rules are used simultaneously to encrypt the plain-image pixels. To determine rule number in DNA sequence and also CA, a 2-dimension Tinkerbell chaotic map is employed. Experimental results and computer simulations, both confirm that the proposed scheme not only demonstrates outstanding encryption, but also resists various typical attacks.

  17. Tracking Fungal Community Responses to Maize Plants by DNA- and RNA-Based Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kuramae, Eiko E.; Verbruggen, Erik; Hillekens, Remy; de Hollander, Mattias; Röling, Wilfred F. M.; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.; Kowalchuk, George A.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed soil fungal diversity and community structure at two sampling times (t1 = 47 days and t2 = 104 days of plant age) in pots associated with four maize cultivars, including two genetically modified (GM) cultivars by high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 18S rRNA gene using DNA and RNA templates. We detected no significant differences in soil fungal diversity and community structure associated with different plant cultivars. However, DNA-based analyses yielded lower fungal OTU richness as compared to RNA-based analyses. Clear differences in fungal community structure were also observed in relation to sampling time and the nucleic acid pool targeted (DNA versus RNA). The most abundant soil fungi, as recovered by DNA-based methods, did not necessary represent the most “active” fungi (as recovered via RNA). Interestingly, RNA-derived community compositions at t1 were highly similar to DNA-derived communities at t2, based on presence/absence measures of OTUs. We recovered large proportions of fungal sequences belonging to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Basidiomycota, especially at the RNA level, suggesting that these important and potentially beneficial fungi are not affected by the plant cultivars nor by GM traits (Bt toxin production). Our results suggest that even though DNA- and RNA-derived soil fungal communities can be very different at a given time, RNA composition may have a predictive power of fungal community development through time. PMID:23875012

  18. DNA-based self-assembly for functional nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Baoquan

    2013-07-26

    The unprecedented development of DNA nanotechnology has caused DNA self-assembly to attract close attention in many disciplines. In this research news article, the employment of DNA self-assembly in the fields of materials science and nanotechnology is described. DNA self-assembly can be used to prepare bulk-scale hydrogels and 3D macroscopic crystals with nanoscale internal structures, to induce the crystallization of nanoparticles, to template the fabrication of organic conductive nanomaterials, and to act as drug delivery vehicles for therapeutic agents. The properties and functions are fully tunable because of the designability and specificity of DNA assembly. Moreover, because of the intrinsic dynamics, DNA self-assembly can act as a program switch and can efficiently control stimuli responsiveness. We highlight the power of DNA self-assembly in the preparation and function regulation of materials, aiming to motivate future multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research. Finally, we describe some of the challenges currently faced by DNA assembly that may affect the functional evolution of such materials, and we provide our insights into the future directions of several DNA self-assembly-based nanomaterials. PMID:24048977

  19. The interaction of poly(ethylenimine) with nucleic acids and its use in determination of nucleic acids based on light scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying-lin; Li, Yuan-zong

    2004-01-01

    For the first time, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) was used to determine nucleic acids with a light scattering technique using a common spectrofluorometer. The interaction of PEI with DNA results in greatly enhanced intensity of light scattering at 300 nm, which is caused by the formation of the big particles between DNA and PEI. Based on this, a new quantitative method for nucleic acid determination in aqueous solutions has been developed. Under the optimum conditions, the enhanced intensity of light scattering is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acid in the range of 0.01-10.0 microg ml(-1) for herring sperm DNA (hsDNA), 0.02-10.0 microg ml(-1) for calf thymus DNA (ctDNA), 0.02-20.0 microg ml(-1) for yeast RNA (yRNA). The detection limits are 5.3, 9.9, and 13.7 ng ml(-1), respectively. Synthetic samples were determined satisfactorily. At the same time, the light scattering technique has been successfully used to obtain the information on the effects of pH and ionic strength on the formation and the stability of the DNA/PEI complex, which is important in some fields such as genetic engineering and gene transfer. Using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescent probe, the binding of PEI with hsDNA was studied. Both the binding constant of EB with DNA and the number of binding sites per nucleotide decrease with increasing concentration of PEI, indicating noncompetitive inhibition of EB binding to DNA in the presence of PEI. And the association constant of PEI to DNA obtained is 1.2 x 10(5) M(-1). IR-spectra show that PEI interacts with DNA through both the phosphate groups and the bases of DNA and the formation of DNA/PEI complex may cause the change of the conformation of the DNA secondary structure, which is also proved by UV-spectra. PMID:14670501

  20. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  1. Quantitation of residual mouse DNA in monoclonal antibody based products.

    PubMed

    Per, S R; Aversa, C R; Sito, A F

    1990-01-01

    The identification and characterization of cell substrates and testing of bulk and final products is an important issue which must be addressed by manufacturers. In view of the fact that hundreds of applications for Investigational New Drugs (IND) have been submitted over the past few years, there is an obvious need for testing of these products. Detection of DNA by molecular hybridization has been used for various applications including the quantitation and characterization of DNA in biological products. We have developed a precise assay based on hybridization for the detection and quantitation of residual genomic DNA. In order to reduce protein interference, a specific pretreatment method for isolation of DNA in monoclonal antibody based products was implemented. We have used the assay to evaluate levels of contaminating DNA in prepared lots of monoclonal antibodies. Validation experiments demonstrated a sensitivity below 10 pg DNA using nick-translated 32P-labelled genomic DNA probes. The assay allows accurate quantitation of residual DNA in biologics.

  2. A dual input DNA-based molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, Irina V; Elsiddieg, Siddieg O; Nesterov, Evgueni E

    2014-11-01

    We have designed and characterized a DNA-based molecular switch which processes two physiologically relevant inputs: pH (i.e. alkalinisation) and enzymatic activity, and generates a chemical output (in situ synthesized oligonucleotide). The design, based on allosteric interactions between i-motif and hairpin stem within the DNA molecule, addresses such critical physiological system parameters as molecular simplicity, tunability, orthogonality of the two input sensing domains, and compatibility with intracellular operation/delivery. PMID:25099914

  3. Detection of methylglyoxal as a degradation product of DNA and nucleic acid components treated with strong acid.

    PubMed

    Chaplen, F W; Fahl, W E; Cameron, D C

    1996-05-01

    The 1,2-diaminobenzene derivation assay for methylglyoxal in biological systems involves the use of perchloric acid, both as a deproteinizing agent and to prevent the spontaneous formation of methylglyoxal from glycolytic pathway intermediates. However, while using a modification of the standard literature assay to measure methylglyoxal in Chinese hamster ovary cells, we found that oxidation of nucleic acids and related compounds by perchloric or trichloroacetic acid results in the formation of methylglyoxal. Compounds containing 2-deoxyribose gave higher levels of methylglyoxal than those containing ribose; purine nucleotides and deoxynucleotides gave more methylglyoxal than did the pyrimidines. Nucleic acids were the most susceptible to degradation, with 12-fold more methylglyoxal being formed from DNA than RNA. Oxidation of nucleic acids increased with higher temperatures and with decreasing nucleic acid fragment size. Another product of nucleic acid oxidation was 2,3-butanedione, the 1,2-diaminobenzene derivative of which is sometimes used as an internal standard during methylglyoxal measurement. Unless accounted for during the assay procedure, the generation of methylglyoxal and 2,3-butanedione due to the oxidation of nucleic acids may lead to substantial errors in the determination of methylglyoxal concentrations in biological systems.

  4. Programmable editing of a target base in genomic DNA without double-stranded DNA cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Komor, Alexis C.; Kim, Yongjoo B.; Packer, Michael S.; Zuris, John A.; Liu, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Current genome-editing technologies introduce double-stranded (ds) DNA breaks at a target locus as the first step to gene correction.1,2 Although most genetic diseases arise from point mutations, current approaches to point mutation correction are inefficient and typically induce an abundance of random insertions and deletions (indels) at the target locus from the cellular response to dsDNA breaks.1,2 Here we report the development of base editing, a new approach to genome editing that enables the direct, irreversible conversion of one target DNA base into another in a programmable manner, without requiring dsDNA backbone cleavage or a donor template. We engineered fusions of CRISPR/Cas9 and a cytidine deaminase enzyme that retain the ability to be programmed with a guide RNA, do not induce dsDNA breaks, and mediate the direct conversion of cytidine to uridine, thereby effecting a C→T (or G→A) substitution. The resulting “base editors” convert cytidines within a window of approximately five nucleotides (nt), and can efficiently correct a variety of point mutations relevant to human disease. In four transformed human and murine cell lines, second- and third-generation base editors that fuse uracil glycosylase inhibitor (UGI), and that use a Cas9 nickase targeting the non-edited strand, manipulate the cellular DNA repair response to favor desired base-editing outcomes, resulting in permanent correction of ∼15-75% of total cellular DNA with minimal (typically ≤ 1%) indel formation. Base editing expands the scope and efficiency of genome editing of point mutations. PMID:27096365

  5. Programmable editing of a target base in genomic DNA without double-stranded DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Komor, Alexis C; Kim, Yongjoo B; Packer, Michael S; Zuris, John A; Liu, David R

    2016-05-19

    Current genome-editing technologies introduce double-stranded (ds) DNA breaks at a target locus as the first step to gene correction. Although most genetic diseases arise from point mutations, current approaches to point mutation correction are inefficient and typically induce an abundance of random insertions and deletions (indels) at the target locus resulting from the cellular response to dsDNA breaks. Here we report the development of 'base editing', a new approach to genome editing that enables the direct, irreversible conversion of one target DNA base into another in a programmable manner, without requiring dsDNA backbone cleavage or a donor template. We engineered fusions of CRISPR/Cas9 and a cytidine deaminase enzyme that retain the ability to be programmed with a guide RNA, do not induce dsDNA breaks, and mediate the direct conversion of cytidine to uridine, thereby effecting a C→T (or G→A) substitution. The resulting 'base editors' convert cytidines within a window of approximately five nucleotides, and can efficiently correct a variety of point mutations relevant to human disease. In four transformed human and murine cell lines, second- and third-generation base editors that fuse uracil glycosylase inhibitor, and that use a Cas9 nickase targeting the non-edited strand, manipulate the cellular DNA repair response to favour desired base-editing outcomes, resulting in permanent correction of ~15-75% of total cellular DNA with minimal (typically ≤1%) indel formation. Base editing expands the scope and efficiency of genome editing of point mutations. PMID:27096365

  6. In depth analysis of the quenching of three fluorene-phenylene-based cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes by DNA and DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Davies, Matthew L; Douglas, Peter; Burrows, Hugh D; Martincigh, Bice; Miguel, Maria da Graça; Scherf, Ullrich; Mallavia, Ricardo; Douglas, Alastair

    2014-01-16

    The interaction of three cationic poly {9,9-bis[N,N-(trimethylammonium)hexyl]fluorene-co-1,4-phenylene} polymers with average chain lengths of ∼6, 12, and 100 repeat units (PFP-NR36(I),12(Br),100(Br)) with both double and single stranded, short and long, DNA and DNA bases have been studied by steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. Fluorescence of PFP-NR3 polymers is quenched with high efficiency by DNA (both double and single stranded) and DNA bases. The resulting quenching plots are sigmoidal and are not accurately described by using a Stern-Volmer quenching mechanism. Here, the quenching mechanism is well modeled in terms of an equilibrium in which a PFP-NR3/DNA aggregate complex is formed which brings polymer chains into close enough proximity to allow interchain excitation energy migration and quenching at aggregate or DNA base traps. Such an analysis gives equilibrium constants of 8.4 × 10(6) (±1.2 × 10(6)) M(-1) for short-dsDNA and 8.6 × 10(6) (±1.7 × 10(6)) M(-1) for short-ssDNA with PFP-NR36(I).

  7. Immobilization-free electrochemical DNA detection with anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Kongpeth, Jutatip; Jampasa, Sakda; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Chailapakul, Orawon; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical detection provides a simple, rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method for DNA detection. In traditional electrochemical DNA biosensors, the probe is immobilized onto the electrode. Hybridization with the DNA target causes a change in electrochemical signal, either from the intrinsic signal of the probe/target or through a label or a redox indicator. The major drawback of this approach is the requirement for probe immobilization in a controlled fashion. In this research, we take the advantage of different electrostatic properties between PNA and DNA to develop an immobilization-free approach for highly sequence-specific electrochemical DNA sensing on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) using a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) technique. Anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (AQ-PNA) was employed as a probe together with an SPCE that was modified with a positively-charged polymer (poly quaternized-(dimethylamino-ethyl)methacrylate, PQDMAEMA). The electrostatic attraction between the negatively-charged PNA-DNA duplex and the positively-charged modified SPCE attributes to the higher signal of PNA-DNA duplex than that of the electrostatically neutral PNA probe, resulting in a signal change. The calibration curve of this proposed method exhibited a linear range between 0.35 and 50 nM of DNA target with a limit of detection of 0.13 nM (3SD(blank)/Slope). The sub-nanomolar detection limit together with a small sample volume required (20 μL) allowed detection of <10 fmol (<1 ng) of DNA. With the high specificity of the pyrrolidinyl PNA probe used, excellent discrimination between complementary and various single-mismatched DNA targets was obtained. An application of this new platform for a sensitive and specific detection of isothermally-amplified shrimp's white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) DNA was successfully demonstrated. PMID:26695270

  8. Immobilization-free electrochemical DNA detection with anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Kongpeth, Jutatip; Jampasa, Sakda; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Chailapakul, Orawon; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical detection provides a simple, rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method for DNA detection. In traditional electrochemical DNA biosensors, the probe is immobilized onto the electrode. Hybridization with the DNA target causes a change in electrochemical signal, either from the intrinsic signal of the probe/target or through a label or a redox indicator. The major drawback of this approach is the requirement for probe immobilization in a controlled fashion. In this research, we take the advantage of different electrostatic properties between PNA and DNA to develop an immobilization-free approach for highly sequence-specific electrochemical DNA sensing on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) using a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) technique. Anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (AQ-PNA) was employed as a probe together with an SPCE that was modified with a positively-charged polymer (poly quaternized-(dimethylamino-ethyl)methacrylate, PQDMAEMA). The electrostatic attraction between the negatively-charged PNA-DNA duplex and the positively-charged modified SPCE attributes to the higher signal of PNA-DNA duplex than that of the electrostatically neutral PNA probe, resulting in a signal change. The calibration curve of this proposed method exhibited a linear range between 0.35 and 50 nM of DNA target with a limit of detection of 0.13 nM (3SD(blank)/Slope). The sub-nanomolar detection limit together with a small sample volume required (20 μL) allowed detection of <10 fmol (<1 ng) of DNA. With the high specificity of the pyrrolidinyl PNA probe used, excellent discrimination between complementary and various single-mismatched DNA targets was obtained. An application of this new platform for a sensitive and specific detection of isothermally-amplified shrimp's white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) DNA was successfully demonstrated.

  9. DNA adducts of aristolochic acid II: total synthesis and site-specific mutagenesis studies in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Attaluri, Sivaprasad; Bonala, Radha R.; Yang, In-Young; Lukin, Mark A.; Wen, Yujing; Grollman, Arthur P.; Moriya, Masaaki; Iden, Charles R.; Johnson, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Aristolochic acids I and II (AA-I, AA-II) are found in all Aristolochia species. Ingestion of these acids either in the form of herbal remedies or as contaminated wheat flour causes a dose-dependent chronic kidney failure characterized by renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In ∼50% of these cases, the condition is accompanied by an upper urinary tract malignancy. The disease is now termed aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). AA-I is largely responsible for the nephrotoxicity while both AA-I and AA-II are genotoxic. DNA adducts derived from AA-I and AA-II have been isolated from renal tissues of patients suffering from AAN. We describe the total synthesis, de novo, of the dA and dG adducts derived from AA-II, their incorporation site-specifically into DNA oligomers and the splicing of these modified oligomers into a plasmid construct followed by transfection into mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Analysis of the plasmid progeny revealed that both adducts blocked replication but were still partly processed by DNA polymerase(s). Although the majority of coding events involved insertion of correct nucleotides, substantial misincorporation of bases also was noted. The dA adduct is significantly more mutagenic than the dG adduct; both adducts give rise, almost exclusively, to misincorporation of dA, which leads to AL-II-dA→T and AL-II-dG→T transversions. PMID:19854934

  10. DNA bending propensity in the presence of base mismatches: implications for DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Predeus, Alexander V; Mukherjee, Shayantani; Feig, Michael

    2013-05-23

    DNA bending is believed to facilitate the initial recognition of the mismatched base for repair. The repair efficiencies are dependent on both the mismatch type and neighboring nucleotide sequence. We have studied bending of several DNA duplexes containing canonical matches: A:T and G:C; various mismatches: A:A, A:C, G:A, G:G, G:T, C:C, C:T, and T:T; and a bis-abasic site: X:X. Free-energy profiles were generated for DNA bending using umbrella sampling. The highest energetic cost associated with DNA bending is observed for canonical matches while bending free energies are lower in the presence of mismatches, with the lowest value for the abasic site. In all of the sequences, DNA duplexes bend toward the major groove with widening of the minor groove. For homoduplexes, DNA bending is observed to occur via smooth deformations, whereas for heteroduplexes, kinks are observed at the mismatch site during strong bending. In general, pyrimidine:pyrimidine mismatches are the most destabilizing, while purine:purine mismatches lead to intermediate destabilization, and purine:pyrimidine mismatches are the least destabilizing. The ease of bending is partially correlated with the binding affinity of MutS to the mismatch pairs and subsequent repair efficiencies, indicating that intrinsic DNA bending propensities are a key factor of mismatch recognition.

  11. DNA Aptamer Generation by Genetic Alphabet Expansion SELEX (ExSELEX) Using an Unnatural Base Pair System.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Michiko; Matsunaga, Ken-ichiro; Hirao, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Genetic alphabet expansion of DNA using unnatural base pair systems is expected to provide a wide variety of novel tools and methods. Recent rapid progress in this area has enabled the creation of several types of unnatural base pairs that function as a third base pair in polymerase reactions. Presently, a major topic is whether the genetic alphabet expansion system actually increases nucleic acid functionalities. We recently applied our unnatural base pair system to in vitro selection (SELEX), using a DNA library containing four natural bases and an unnatural base, and succeeded in the generation of high-affinity DNA aptamers that specifically bind to target proteins. Only a few hydrophobic unnatural bases greatly augmented the affinity of the aptamers. Here, we describe a new approach (genetic alphabet Expansion SELEX, ExSELEX), using our hydrophobic unnatural base pair system for high affinity DNA aptamer generation. PMID:26552815

  12. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, DNA cleavage and antimicrobial studies of Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Mendu, Padmaja; Kumari, C Gyana; Ragi, Rajesh

    2015-03-01

    A series of Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized from the Schiff base ligand L. The Schiff base ligand 4-chloro-2-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3yl) methylene amino) benzoic acid (L) has been synthesized by the reaction between chromone-3-carbaldehyde and 4-chloro-2-amino benzoic acid. The nature of bonding and geometry of the transition metal complexes as well as ligand L have been deduced from elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, ESR spectral studies, mass, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance measurements. The complexes are found to have ML2 composition and are neutral in DMSO. Based on elemental, conductance and spectral studies, six-coordinated geometry was assigned for these complexes. The ligand L acts as tridentate and coordinates through nitrogen atom of azomethine group, hydroxyl of the carboxyl group and oxygen atom of keto group of γ-pyrone ring. The interaction of Cu(II) complex with CT-DNA was carried out by UV-vis, fluorescence titrations and viscosity measurements. The complex binds to DNA through intercalative binding mode. The nuclease activity of the above metal complexes shows that Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes cleave DNA through redox chemistry. The biological activity of the ligand and its complexes have been studied on four bacteria E. coli, B. subtilis, pseudomonas and Edwardella and two fungi penicillium and trichoderma by well disc and fusion method and found that the metal complexes are more active than the free Schiff base ligand.

  13. DNA immobilization on a polypyrrole nanofiber modified electrode and its interaction with salicylic acid/aspirin.

    PubMed

    Yousef Elahi, M; Bathaie, S Z; Kazemi, S H; Mousavi, M F

    2011-04-15

    A double-stranded calf thymus DNA (dsDNA) was physisorbed onto a polypyrrole (PPy) nanofiber film that had been electrochemically deposited onto a Pt electrode. The surface morphology of the polymeric film was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical characteristics of the PPy film and the DNA deposited onto the PPy modified electrode were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Then the interaction of DNA with salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), or aspirin, was studied on the electrode surface with DPV. An increase in the DPV current was observed due to the oxidation of guanine, which decreased with the increasing concentrations of the ligands. The interactions of SA and ASA with the DNA follow the saturation isotherm behavior. The binding constants of these interactions were 1.15×10(4)M for SA and 7.46×10(5)M for ASA. The numbers of binding sites of SA and ASA on DNA were approximately 0.8 and 0.6, respectively. The linear dynamic ranges of the sensors were 0.1-2μM (r(2)=0.996) and 0.05-1mM (r(2)=0.996) with limits of detection of 8.62×10(-1) and 5.24×10(-6)μM for SA and ASA, respectively.

  14. The cell as the smallest DNA-based molecular computer.

    PubMed

    Ji, S

    1999-10-01

    The pioneering work of Adleman (1994) demonstrated that DNA molecules in test tubes can be manipulated to perform a certain type of mathematical computation. This has stimulated a theoretical interest in the possibility of constructing DNA-based molecular computers. To gauge the practicality of realizing such microscopic computers, it was thought necessary to learn as much as possible from the biology of the living cell--presently the only known DNA-based molecular computer in existence. Here the recently developed theoretical model of the living cell (the Bhopalator) and its associated theories (e.g. cell language), principles, laws and concepts (e.g. conformons, IDS's) are briefly reviewed and summarized in the form of a set of five laws of 'molecular semiotics' (synonyms include 'microsemiotics', 'cellular semiotics', or 'cytosemiotics') the study of signs mediating measurement, computation, and communication on the cellular and molecular levels. Hopefully, these laws will find practical applications in designing DNA-based computing systems.

  15. Highly sensitive DNA sensor based on polypyrrole nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Anh Tuan; Duc, Thanh Pham; Thi, Xuan Chu; Nguyen, Minh Hieu; Nguyen, Hoang Hai

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a DNA sensor based on polypyrrole nanowire. By using potentiostatic technique, in the presence of gelatin as the soft mold, the polypyrrole nanowires were synthesized on the surface of the micro-sensor. The surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy shows that the Nsbnd H ends of the polypyrrole nanowires orientate upward from the surface facilitating the DNA probe immobilization through the simple linkage with the phosphate groups of the probe DNA. The label-free signal readout was carried out by lock-in amplifier technique. The response time of the DNA sensor is 10 s and the measurement time was 5 min. The lowest detectable concentration of Escherichia coli DNA was 0.1 nM.

  16. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  17. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury. PMID:26345909

  18. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury.

  19. Development of bis-locked nucleic acid (bisLNA) oligonucleotides for efficient invasion of supercoiled duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Geny, Sylvain; Pabon, Y. Vladimir; Bergquist, Helen; Zaghloul, Eman M.; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Oprea, Iulian I.; Bestas, Burcu; Andaloussi, Samir EL; Jørgensen, Per T.; Pedersen, Erik B.; Lundin, Karin E.; Zain, Rula; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the many developments in synthetic oligonucleotide (ON) chemistry and design, invasion into double-stranded DNA (DSI) under physiological salt and pH conditions remains a challenge. In this work, we provide a new ON tool based on locked nucleic acids (LNAs), designed for strand invasion into duplex DNA (DSI). We thus report on the development of a clamp type of LNA ON—bisLNA—with capacity to bind and invade into supercoiled double-stranded DNA. The bisLNA links a triplex-forming, Hoogsteen-binding, targeting arm with a strand-invading Watson–Crick binding arm. Optimization was carried out by varying the number and location of LNA nucleotides and the length of the triplex-forming versus strand-invading arms. Single-strand regions in target duplex DNA were mapped using chemical probing. By combining design and increase in LNA content, it was possible to achieve a 100-fold increase in potency with 30% DSI at 450 nM using a bisLNA to plasmid ratio of only 21:1. Although this first conceptual report does not address the utility of bisLNA for the targeting of DNA in a chromosomal context, it shows bisLNA as a promising candidate for interfering also with cellular genes. PMID:23345620

  20. Monitoring Cooperative Binding Using Electrochemical DNA-Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical DNA-based (E-DNA) sensors are utilized to detect a variety of targets including complementary DNA, small molecules, and proteins. These sensors typically employ surface-bound single-stranded oligonucleotides that are modified with a redox-active molecule on the distal 3′ terminus. Target-induced flexibility changes of the DNA probe alter the efficiency of electron transfer between the redox active methylene blue and the electrode surface, allowing for quantitative detection of target concentration. While numerous studies have utilized the specific and sensitive abilities of E-DNA sensors to quantify target concentration, no studies to date have demonstrated the ability of this class of collision-based sensors to elucidate biochemical-binding mechanisms such as cooperativity. In this study, we demonstrate that E-DNA sensors fabricated with various lengths of surface-bound oligodeoxythymidylate [(dT)n] sensing probes are able to quantitatively distinguish between cooperative and noncooperative binding of a single-stranded DNA-binding protein. Specifically, we demonstrate that oligo(dT) E-DNA sensors are able to quantitatively detect nM levels (50 nM–4 μM) of gene 32 protein (g32p). Furthermore, the sensors exhibit signal that is able to distinguish between the cooperative binding of the full-length g32p and the noncooperative binding of the core domain (*III) fragment to single-stranded DNA. Finally, we demonstrate that this binding is both probe-length- and ionic-strength-dependent. This study illustrates a new quantitative property of this powerful class of biosensor and represents a rapid and simple methodology for understanding protein–DNA binding mechanisms. PMID:25517392

  1. Monitoring cooperative binding using electrochemical DNA-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Macazo, Florika C; Karpel, Richard L; White, Ryan J

    2015-01-20

    Electrochemical DNA-based (E-DNA) sensors are utilized to detect a variety of targets including complementary DNA, small molecules, and proteins. These sensors typically employ surface-bound single-stranded oligonucleotides that are modified with a redox-active molecule on the distal 3' terminus. Target-induced flexibility changes of the DNA probe alter the efficiency of electron transfer between the redox active methylene blue and the electrode surface, allowing for quantitative detection of target concentration. While numerous studies have utilized the specific and sensitive abilities of E-DNA sensors to quantify target concentration, no studies to date have demonstrated the ability of this class of collision-based sensors to elucidate biochemical-binding mechanisms such as cooperativity. In this study, we demonstrate that E-DNA sensors fabricated with various lengths of surface-bound oligodeoxythymidylate [(dT)n] sensing probes are able to quantitatively distinguish between cooperative and noncooperative binding of a single-stranded DNA-binding protein. Specifically, we demonstrate that oligo(dT) E-DNA sensors are able to quantitatively detect nM levels (50 nM-4 μM) of gene 32 protein (g32p). Furthermore, the sensors exhibit signal that is able to distinguish between the cooperative binding of the full-length g32p and the noncooperative binding of the core domain (*III) fragment to single-stranded DNA. Finally, we demonstrate that this binding is both probe-length- and ionic-strength-dependent. This study illustrates a new quantitative property of this powerful class of biosensor and represents a rapid and simple methodology for understanding protein-DNA binding mechanisms.

  2. A magnetic bead-based method for concentrating DNA from human urine for downstream detection.

    PubMed

    Bordelon, Hali; Russ, Patricia K; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R

    2013-01-01

    Due to the presence of PCR inhibitors, PCR cannot be used directly on most clinical samples, including human urine, without pre-treatment. A magnetic bead-based strategy is one potential method to collect biomarkers from urine samples and separate the biomarkers from PCR inhibitors. In this report, a 1 mL urine sample was mixed within the bulb of a transfer pipette containing lyophilized nucleic acid-silica adsorption buffer and silica-coated magnetic beads. After mixing, the sample was transferred from the pipette bulb to a small diameter tube, and captured biomarkers were concentrated using magnetic entrainment of beads through pre-arrayed wash solutions separated by small air gaps. Feasibility was tested using synthetic segments of the 140 bp tuberculosis IS6110 DNA sequence spiked into pooled human urine samples. DNA recovery was evaluated by qPCR. Despite the presence of spiked DNA, no DNA was detectable in unextracted urine samples, presumably due to the presence of PCR inhibitors. However, following extraction with the magnetic bead-based method, we found that ∼50% of spiked TB DNA was recovered from human urine containing roughly 5×10(3) to 5×10(8) copies of IS6110 DNA. In addition, the DNA was concentrated approximately ten-fold into water. The final concentration of DNA in the eluate was 5×10(6), 14×10(6), and 8×10(6) copies/µL for 1, 3, and 5 mL urine samples, respectively. Lyophilized and freshly prepared reagents within the transfer pipette produced similar results, suggesting that long-term storage without refrigeration is possible. DNA recovery increased with the length of the spiked DNA segments from 10±0.9% for a 75 bp DNA sequence to 42±4% for a 100 bp segment and 58±9% for a 140 bp segment. The estimated LOD was 77 copies of DNA/µL of urine. The strategy presented here provides a simple means to achieve high nucleic acid recovery from easily obtained urine samples, which does not contain inhibitors of PCR.

  3. [Determination of body fluid based on analysis of nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Korabečná, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recent methodological approaches of molecular genetics allow isolation of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from negligible forensic samples. Analysis of these molecules may be used not only for individual identification based on DNA profiling but also for the detection of origin of the body fluid which (alone or in mixture with other body fluids) forms the examined biological trace. Such an examination can contribute to the evaluation of procedural, technical and tactical value of the trace. Molecular genetic approaches discussed in the review offer new possibilities in comparison with traditional spectrum of chemical, immunological and spectroscopic tests especially with regard to the interpretation of mixtures of biological fluids and to the confirmatory character of the tests. Approaches based on reverse transcription of tissue specific mRNA and their subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fragmentation analysis are applicable on samples containing minimal amounts of biological material. Methods for body fluid discrimination based on examination of microRNA in samples provided so far confusing results therefore further development in this field is needed. The examination of tissue specific methylation of nucleotides in selected gene sequences seems to represent a promising enrichment of the methodological spectrum. The detection of DNA sequences of tissue related bacteria has been established and it provides satisfactory results mainly in combination with above mentioned methodological approaches. PMID:26419517

  4. DNA Enzyme-Decorated DNA Nanoladders as Enhancer for Peptide Cleavage-Based Electrochemical Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kou, Bei-Bei; Zhang, Li; Xie, Hua; Wang, Ding; Yuan, Ya-Li; Chai, Ya-Qin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we developed a label-free electrochemical biosensor for sensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) based on DNA enzyme-decorated DNA nanoladders as enhancer. A peptide and single-stranded DNA S1-modified platinum nanoparticles (P1-PtNPs-S1), which served as recognition nanoprobes, were first immobilized on electrode. When target MMP-7 specifically recognized and cleaved the peptide, the PtNPs-S1 bioconjugates were successfully released from electrode. The remaining S1 on electrode then hybridized with ssDNA1 (I1) and ssDNA2 (I2), which could synchronously trigger two hybridization chain reactions (HCRs), resulting in the in situ formation of DNA nanoladders. The desired DNA nanoladders not only were employed as ideal nanocarriers for enzyme loading, but also maintained its catalytic activity. With the help of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), manganese porphyrin (MnPP) with peroxidase-like activity accelerated the 4-chloro-1-naphthol (4-CN) oxidation with generation of insoluble precipitation on electrode, causing a very low differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) signal for quantitative determination of MMP-7. Under optimal conditions, the developed biosensor exhibited a wide linear ranging from 0.2 pg/mL to 20 ng/mL, and the detection limit was 0.05 pg/mL. This work successfully realized the combination of DNA signal amplification technique with artificial mimetic enzyme-catalyzed precipitation reaction in peptide cleavage-based protein detection, offering a promising avenue for the detection of other proteases. PMID:27532492

  5. [Kidney, Fluid, and Acid-Base Balance].

    PubMed

    Shioji, Naohiro; Hayashi, Masao; Morimatsu, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Kidneys play an important role to maintain human homeostasis. They contribute to maintain body fluid, electrolytes, and acid-base balance. Especially in fluid control, we, physicians can intervene body fluid balance using fluid resuscitation and diuretics. In recent years, one type of fluid resuscitation, hydroxyl ethyl starch has been extensively studied in the field of intensive care. Although their effects on fluid resuscitation are reasonable, serious complications such as kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy occur frequently. Now we have to pay more attention to this important complication. Another topic of fluid management is tolvaptan, a selective vasopressin-2 receptor antagonist Recent randomized trial suggested that tolvaptan has a similar supportive effect for fluid control and more cost effective compared to carperitide. In recent years, Stewart approach is recognized as one important tool to assess acid-base balance in critically ill patients. This approach has great value, especially to understand metabolic components in acid-base balance. Even for assessing the effects of kidneys on acid-base balance, this approach gives us interesting insight. We should appropriately use this new approach to treat acid-base abnormality in critically ill patients. PMID:27319095

  6. Efficient in vivo gene transfection by stable DNA/PEI complexes coated by hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Iida-Tanaka, Naoko; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2008-05-01

    Plasmid DNA was mixed with polyethyleneimine (PEI) and hyaluronic acid (HA) to afford ternary complexes with negative surface charge regardless of the mixing order. They showed reduced non-specific interactions with blood components. When DNA and PEI were mixed at a high concentration such as that used in in vivo experiments, they soon aggregated, and large particles were formed. On the other hand, pre-addition of HA to DNA prior to PEI effectively diminished the aggregation, and 10% (in volume) of the complexes remained as small particles with a diameter below 80 nm. Those negatively charged small ternary complexes induced a much stronger extra-gene expression in tumor than binary DNA/PEI complex after intratumoral or intravenous injection into the mice bearing B16 cells. PMID:18446606

  7. DNA detection using water-soluble conjugated polymers and peptide nucleic acid probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaylord, Brent S.; Heeger, Alan J.; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2002-08-01

    The light-harvesting properties of cationic conjugated polymers are used to sensitize the emission of a dye on a specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence for the purpose of homogeneous, "real-time" DNA detection. Signal transduction is controlled by hybridization of the neutral PNA probe and the negative DNA target. Electrostatic interactions bring the hybrid complex and cationic polymer within distances required for Förster energy transfer. Conjugated polymer excitation provides fluorescein emission >25 times higher than that obtained by exciting the dye, allowing detection of target DNA at concentrations of 10 pM with a standard fluorometer. A simple and highly sensitive assay with optical amplification that uses the improved hybridization behavior of PNA/DNA complexes is thus demonstrated.

  8. Competitive assembly to increase the performance of the DNA/carbon-nanomaterial-based sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiao; Zhang, Qier; Jiang, Ying; Li, Jishan; Zheng, Jing; Li, Yinhui; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-08-27

    Increasing the rate of target binding on the surface and enhancing the fluorescence signal restoration efficiency are critical to the desirable biomedical application of carbon nanomaterials, for example, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We describe here a strategy to increase the target binding rate and enhance the fluorescence signal restoration efficiency on the DNA-functionalized SWNT surface using a short complementary DNA (scDNA) strand. The scDNA causes up to a 2.5-fold increase in association rate and 4-fold increase in fluorescence signal restoration by its competitive assembly on the nanostructure's surface and inducing a conformational change that extends the DNA away from the surface, making it more available to bind target nucleic acids. The scDNA-induced enhancement of binding kinetics and fluorescence signal restoration efficiency is a general phenomenon that occurred with all sequences and surfaces investigated. Through this competitive assembly strategy of scDNA, performance improvement of the carbon-nanomaterial-based biosensing platform for both in vitro detection and live cell imaging can be reached.

  9. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of myoglobins from nine species of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Kentaro; Mita, Hajime; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Fujise, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Tadasu; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2006-10-01

    We determined the myoglobin (Mb) cDNA sequences of nine cetaceans, of which six are the first reports of Mb sequences: sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis), Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri), Longman's beaked whale (Indopacetus pacificus), and melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), and three confirm the previously determined chemical amino acid sequences: sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), common minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata). We found two types of Mb in the skeletal muscle of pantropical spotted dolphin: Mb I with the same amino acid sequence as that deposited in the protein database, and Mb II, which differs at two amino acid residues compared with Mb I. Using an alignment of the amino acid or cDNA sequences of cetacean Mb, we constructed a phylogenetic tree by the NJ method. Clustering of cetacean Mb amino acid and cDNA sequences essentially follows the classical taxonomy of cetaceans, suggesting that Mb sequence data is valid for classification of cetaceans at least to the family level. PMID:16962803

  10. N6-methyladenine: the other methylated base of DNA.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2006-03-01

    Contrary to mammalian DNA, which is thought to contain only 5-methylcytosine (m5C), bacterial DNA contains two additional methylated bases, namely N6-methyladenine (m6A), and N4-methylcytosine (m4C). However, if the main function of m5C and m4C in bacteria is protection against restriction enzymes, the roles of m6A are multiple and include, for example, the regulation of virulence and the control of many bacterial DNA functions such as the replication, repair, expression and transposition of DNA. Interestingly, even if adenine methylation is usually considered a bacterial DNA feature, the presence of m6A has been found in protist and plant DNAs. Furthermore, indirect evidence suggests the presence of m6A in mammal DNA, raising the possibility that this base has remained undetected due to the low sensitivity of the analytical methods used. This highlights the importance of considering m6A as the sixth element of DNA. PMID:16479578

  11. PCR-based typing of DNA extracted from cigarette butts.

    PubMed

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Jung, J; Borer, U V; Comey, C T; Dirnhofer, R

    1991-01-01

    Limited genetic marker information can be obtained from saliva by typing by conventional serological means. Thus, the application of PCR-based DNA typing methods was investigated as a potential approach for typing genetic markers in saliva. DNA was isolated from 200 cigarettes smoked by 10 different individuals (20 cigarettes per individual) and from 3 cigarette butts recovered from 2 crime scenes (adjudicated cases) using a Chelex 100 extraction procedure. The amount of recovered human DNA was quantified by slot-blot analysis and ranged from approximately less than 2-160 ng DNA per cigarette butt for the 200 samples, and 8 ng, 50 ng, and 100 ng for the cigarette butts from the adjudicated cases. The DNA was successfully amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the HLA-DQ alpha locus (99 out of 100 samples) as well as for the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) locus D1S80 (99 out of 100 samples). Amplification and typing of DNA was successful on all samples recovered from the crime scenes. The results suggest that PCR-based typing of DNA offers a potential method for genetically characterizing traces of saliva on cigarette butts.

  12. Responsive DNA-based hydrogels and their applications

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiangling; Zhou, Cuisong; Wu, Cuichen; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    The term hydrogel describes a type of soft and wet material formed by crosslinked hydrophilic polymers. The distinct feature of hydrogels is their ability to absorb a large amount of water and swell. The properties of a hydrogel are usually determined by the type of polymer and crosslinker, the degree of crosslinking, and the water content. However, a group of hydrogels, called “smart hydrogels”, changes properties in response to environmental changes or external stimuli. Recently, DNA or DNA-inspired responsive hydrogels have attracted considerable attention in construction of smart hydrogels because of the intrinsic advantages of DNA. As a biological polymer, DNA is hydrophilic, biocompatible, and highly programmable by Watson-Crick base pairing. DNA can form a hydrogel by itself under certain conditions, and it can also be incorporated into synthetic polymers to form DNA-hybrid hydrogels. Functional DNAs, such as aptamers and DNAzymes, provide additional molecular recognition capabilities and versatility. In this review, we discuss DNA-based hydrogels in terms of their stimulus response, as well as their applications. PMID:23857726

  13. Calcium-activated gene transfection from DNA/poly(amic acid-co-imide) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Szu-Yuan; Chang, Li-Ting; Peng, Sydeny; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized a water-soluble poly(amic acid-co-imide) (PA-I) from ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) and 2,2′-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine) that possesses comparable transfection efficiency to that of polyethylenimine (PEI), when prepared in combination with divalent calcium cations. The polycondensation of monomers afforded poly(amic acid) (PA) precursors, and subsequent thermal imidization resulted in the formation of PA-I. At a polymer/DNA ratio (indicated by the molar ratio of nitrogen in the polymer to phosphate in DNA) of 40, complete retardation of the DNA band was observed by gel electrophoresis, indicating the strong association of DNA with PA-I. A zeta potential of −22 mV was recorded for the PA-I polymer solution, and no apparent cytotoxicity was observed at concentrations up to 500 μg·mL−1. In the presence of divalent Ca2+, the transfection efficiency of PA-I was higher than that of PA, due to the formation of a copolymer/Ca2+/DNA polyplex and the reduction in negative charge due to thermal cyclization. Interestingly, a synergistic effect of Ca2+ and the synthesized copolymer on DNA transfection was observed. The use of Ca2+ or copolymer alone resulted in unsatisfactory delivery, whereas the formation of three-component polyplexes synergistically increased DNA transfection. Our findings demonstrated that a PA-I/Ca2+/DNA polyplex could serve as a promising candidate for gene delivery. PMID:25767385

  14. Strand displacement and duplex invasion into double-stranded DNA by pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Bohländer, Peggy R; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2015-09-21

    The so-called acpcPNA system bears a peptide backbone consisting of 4'-substituted proline units with (2'R,4'R) configuration in an alternating combination with (2S)-amino-cyclopentane-(1S)-carboxylic acids. acpcPNA forms exceptionally stable hybrids with complementary DNA. We demonstrate herein (i) strand displacements by single-stranded DNA from acpcPNA-DNA hybrids, and by acpcPNA strands from DNA duplexes, and (ii) strand invasions by acpcPNA into double-stranded DNA. These processes were studied in vitro using synthetic oligonucleotides and by means of our concept of wavelength-shifting fluorescent nucleic acid probes, including fluorescence lifetime measurements that allow quantifying energy transfer efficiencies. The strand displacements of preannealed 14mer acpcPNA-7mer DNA hybrids consecutively by 10mer and 14mer DNA strands occur with rather slow kinetics but yield high fluorescence color ratios (blue : yellow or blue : red), fluorescence intensity enhancements, and energy transfer efficiencies. Furthermore, 14mer acpcPNA strands are able to invade into 30mer double-stranded DNA, remarkably with quantitative efficiency in all studied cases. These processes can also be quantified by means of fluorescence. This remarkable behavior corroborates the extraordinary versatile properties of acpcPNA. In contrast to conventional PNA systems which require 3 or more equivalents PNA, only 1.5 equivalents acpcPNA are sufficient to get efficient double duplex invasion. Invasions also take place even in the presence of 250 mM NaCl which represents an ionic strength nearly twice as high as the physiological ion concentration. These remarkable results corroborate the extraordinary properties of acpcPNA, and thus acpcPNA represents an eligible tool for biological analytics and antigene applications.

  15. Direct DNA Analysis with Paper-Based Ion Concentration Polarization.

    PubMed

    Gong, Max M; Nosrati, Reza; San Gabriel, Maria C; Zini, Armand; Sinton, David

    2015-11-01

    DNA analysis is essential for diagnosis and monitoring of many diseases. Conventional DNA testing is generally limited to the laboratory. Increasing access to relevant technologies can improve patient care and outcomes in both developed and developing regions. Here, we demonstrate direct DNA analysis in paper-based devices, uniquely enabled by ion concentration polarization at the interface of patterned nanoporous membranes in paper (paper-based ICP). Hepatitis B virus DNA targets in human serum are simultaneously preconcentrated, separated, and detected in a single 10 min operation. A limit of detection of 150 copies/mL is achieved without prior viral load amplification, sufficient for early diagnosis of hepatitis B. We clinically assess the DNA integrity of sperm cells in raw human semen samples. The percent DNA fragmentation results from the paper-based ICP devices strongly correlate (R(2) = 0.98) with the sperm chromatin structure assay. In all cases, agreement was 100% with respect to the clinical decision. Paper-based ICP can provide inexpensive and accessible advanced molecular diagnostics.

  16. Direct DNA Analysis with Paper-Based Ion Concentration Polarization.

    PubMed

    Gong, Max M; Nosrati, Reza; San Gabriel, Maria C; Zini, Armand; Sinton, David

    2015-11-01

    DNA analysis is essential for diagnosis and monitoring of many diseases. Conventional DNA testing is generally limited to the laboratory. Increasing access to relevant technologies can improve patient care and outcomes in both developed and developing regions. Here, we demonstrate direct DNA analysis in paper-based devices, uniquely enabled by ion concentration polarization at the interface of patterned nanoporous membranes in paper (paper-based ICP). Hepatitis B virus DNA targets in human serum are simultaneously preconcentrated, separated, and detected in a single 10 min operation. A limit of detection of 150 copies/mL is achieved without prior viral load amplification, sufficient for early diagnosis of hepatitis B. We clinically assess the DNA integrity of sperm cells in raw human semen samples. The percent DNA fragmentation results from the paper-based ICP devices strongly correlate (R(2) = 0.98) with the sperm chromatin structure assay. In all cases, agreement was 100% with respect to the clinical decision. Paper-based ICP can provide inexpensive and accessible advanced molecular diagnostics. PMID:26447553

  17. Oxidation of DNA bases, deoxyribonucleosides and homopolymers by peroxyl radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Simandan, T; Sun, J; Dix, T A

    1998-01-01

    DNA base oxidation is considered to be a key event associated with disease initiation and progression in humans. Peroxyl radicals (ROO. ) are important oxidants found in cells whose ability to react with the DNA bases has not been characterized extensively. In this paper, the products resulting from ROO. oxidation of the DNA bases are determined by gas chromatography/MS in comparison with authentic standards. ROO. radicals oxidize adenine and guanine to their 8-hydroxy derivatives, which are considered biomarkers of hydroxyl radical (HO.) oxidations in cells. ROO. radicals also oxidize adenine to its hydroxylamine, a previously unidentified product. ROO. radicals oxidize cytosine and thymine to the monohydroxy and dihydroxy derivatives that are formed by oxidative damage in cells. Identical ROO. oxidation profiles are observed for each base when exposed as deoxyribonucleosides, monohomopolymers and base-paired dihomopolymers. These results have significance for the development, utilization and interpretation of DNA base-derived biomarkers of oxidative damage associated with disease initiation and propagation, and support the idea that the mutagenic potential of N-oxidized bases, when generated in cellular DNA, will require careful evaluation. Adenine hydroxylamine is proposed as a specific molecular probe for the activity of ROO. in cellular systems. PMID:9761719

  18. No difference in high-magnification morphology and hyaluronic acid binding in the selection of euploid spermatozoa with intact DNA

    PubMed Central

    Mongkolchaipak, Suchada; Vutyavanich, Teraporn

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared conventional sperm selection with high-magnification morphology based on the motile sperm organellar morphology examination (MSOME) criteria, and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding for sperm chromosome aneuploidy and DNA fragmentation rates. Semen from 50 severe male factor cases was processed through density gradient centrifugation, and subjected to sperm selection by using the conventional method (control), high magnification at ×6650 or HA binding. Aneuploidy was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y, and DNA fragmentation by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) method. Spermatozoa selected under high-magnification had a lower DNA fragmentation rate (2.6% vs. 1.7% P=0.032), with no significant difference in aneuploidy rate (0.8% vs 0.7% P=0.583), than those selected by the HA binding method. Spermatozoa selected by both methods had much lower aneuploidy and DNA fragmentation rate than the controls (7% aneuploidy and 26.8% DNA fragmentation rates, respectively). In the high-magnification group, the aneuploidy rate was lower when the best spermatozoa were selected than when only the second-best spermatozoa were available for selection, but the DNA fragmentation rate was not different. In conclusion, sperm selection under high magnification was more effective than under HA binding in selecting spermatozoa with low DNA fragmentation rate, but the small difference (0.9%) might not be clinically meaningful. Both methods were better than the conventional method of sperm selection. PMID:23435468

  19. A novel image encryption algorithm based on DNA subsequence operation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Xue, Xianglian; Wei, Xiaopeng

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel image encryption algorithm based on DNA subsequence operation. Different from the traditional DNA encryption methods, our algorithm does not use complex biological operation but just uses the idea of DNA subsequence operations (such as elongation operation, truncation operation, deletion operation, etc.) combining with the logistic chaotic map to scramble the location and the value of pixel points from the image. The experimental results and security analysis show that the proposed algorithm is easy to be implemented, can get good encryption effect, has a wide secret key's space, strong sensitivity to secret key, and has the abilities of resisting exhaustive attack and statistic attack.

  20. An Optimal Seed Based Compression Algorithm for DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Gopakumar; Karunakaran, Muralikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a seed based lossless compression algorithm to compress a DNA sequence which uses a substitution method that is similar to the LempelZiv compression scheme. The proposed method exploits the repetition structures that are inherent in DNA sequences by creating an offline dictionary which contains all such repeats along with the details of mismatches. By ensuring that only promising mismatches are allowed, the method achieves a compression ratio that is at par or better than the existing lossless DNA sequence compression algorithms. PMID:27555868

  1. DNA barcode-based molecular identification system for fish species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungmin; Eo, Hae-Seok; Koo, Hyeyoung; Choi, Jun-Kil; Kim, Won

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we applied DNA barcoding to identify species using short DNA sequence analysis. We examined the utility of DNA barcoding by identifying 53 Korean freshwater fish species, 233 other freshwater fish species, and 1339 saltwater fish species. We successfully developed a web-based molecular identification system for fish (MISF) using a profile hidden Markov model. MISF facilitates efficient and reliable species identification, overcoming the limitations of conventional taxonomic approaches. MISF is freely accessible at http://bioinfosys.snu.ac.kr:8080/MISF/misf.jsp .

  2. A Rewritable, Random-Access DNA-Based Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei Yazdi, S. M. Hossein; Yuan, Yongbo; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Huimin; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2015-09-01

    We describe the first DNA-based storage architecture that enables random access to data blocks and rewriting of information stored at arbitrary locations within the blocks. The newly developed architecture overcomes drawbacks of existing read-only methods that require decoding the whole file in order to read one data fragment. Our system is based on new constrained coding techniques and accompanying DNA editing methods that ensure data reliability, specificity and sensitivity of access, and at the same time provide exceptionally high data storage capacity. As a proof of concept, we encoded parts of the Wikipedia pages of six universities in the USA, and selected and edited parts of the text written in DNA corresponding to three of these schools. The results suggest that DNA is a versatile media suitable for both ultrahigh density archival and rewritable storage applications.

  3. A Rewritable, Random-Access DNA-Based Storage System.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, S M Hossein Tabatabaei; Yuan, Yongbo; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Huimin; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2015-01-01

    We describe the first DNA-based storage architecture that enables random access to data blocks and rewriting of information stored at arbitrary locations within the blocks. The newly developed architecture overcomes drawbacks of existing read-only methods that require decoding the whole file in order to read one data fragment. Our system is based on new constrained coding techniques and accompanying DNA editing methods that ensure data reliability, specificity and sensitivity of access, and at the same time provide exceptionally high data storage capacity. As a proof of concept, we encoded parts of the Wikipedia pages of six universities in the USA, and selected and edited parts of the text written in DNA corresponding to three of these schools. The results suggest that DNA is a versatile media suitable for both ultrahigh density archival and rewritable storage applications. PMID:26382652

  4. Nano-plasmonic-based structures for DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Fotouhi, Bashir; Ahmadi, Vahid; Faramarzi, Vahid

    2016-09-15

    We propose novel nano-plasmonic-based structures for rapid sequencing of DNA molecules. The optical properties of DNA nucleotides have notable differences in the ultraviolet (UV) region of light. Using nanopore, bowtie, and bowtie-nanopore compound structures, probable application of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in DNA sequencing is investigated by employing the discrete dipole approximation method. The effects of different materials like chromium (Cr), aluminum (Al), rhodium (Rh), and graphene (Gr) are studied. We show that for Cr/Al/Gr/Rh, the nucleotide presented shifts the SPR spectra for the nanopore 1/29/5/34 to 14/39/15/67 nm, bowtie 8/2/49/38 to 31/20/79/55 nm, and bowtie-nanopore compound 25/77/5/16 to 80/80/22/39 nm. The Cr-based compound structure shows excellent sensitivity and selectivity which can make it a promising methodology for DNA sequencing. PMID:27628364

  5. A Rewritable, Random-Access DNA-Based Storage System.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, S M Hossein Tabatabaei; Yuan, Yongbo; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Huimin; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2015-09-18

    We describe the first DNA-based storage architecture that enables random access to data blocks and rewriting of information stored at arbitrary locations within the blocks. The newly developed architecture overcomes drawbacks of existing read-only methods that require decoding the whole file in order to read one data fragment. Our system is based on new constrained coding techniques and accompanying DNA editing methods that ensure data reliability, specificity and sensitivity of access, and at the same time provide exceptionally high data storage capacity. As a proof of concept, we encoded parts of the Wikipedia pages of six universities in the USA, and selected and edited parts of the text written in DNA corresponding to three of these schools. The results suggest that DNA is a versatile media suitable for both ultrahigh density archival and rewritable storage applications.

  6. Sensitive sepiolite-carbon nanotubes based disposable electrodes for direct detection of DNA and anticancer drug-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Arzum; Kuralay, Filiz; Çubukçu, H Evren; Congur, Gulsah; Karadeniz, Hakan; Canavar, Ece

    2012-09-01

    A new surface based on the natural clay mineral sepiolite and a single-walled carbon nanotubes-modified graphite electrode was developed for the electrochemical detection of DNA, and also for anticancer drug-DNA interactions.

  7. Heterogeneous base distribution in mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, P; Holtrop, M; Kroon, A

    1977-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa has a heterogeneous intramolecular base distribution. A contiguous piece, representing at least 30% of the total genome, has a G+C content that is 6% lower than the overall G+C content of the DNA. The genes for both ribosomal RNAs are contained in the remaining, relatively G+C rich, part of the genome. PMID:141040

  8. Construction of a fuzzy and Boolean logic gates based on DNA.

    PubMed

    Zadegan, Reza M; Jepsen, Mette D E; Hildebrandt, Lasse L; Birkedal, Victoria; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-04-17

    Logic gates are devices that can perform logical operations by transforming a set of inputs into a predictable single detectable output. The hybridization properties, structure, and function of nucleic acids can be used to make DNA-based logic gates. These devices are important modules in molecular computing and biosensing. The ideal logic gate system should provide a wide selection of logical operations, and be integrable in multiple copies into more complex structures. Here we show the successful construction of a small DNA-based logic gate complex that produces fluorescent outputs corresponding to the operation of the six Boolean logic gates AND, NAND, OR, NOR, XOR, and XNOR. The logic gate complex is shown to work also when implemented in a three-dimensional DNA origami box structure, where it controlled the position of the lid in a closed or open position. Implementation of multiple microRNA sensitive DNA locks on one DNA origami box structure enabled fuzzy logical operation that allows biosensing of complex molecular signals. Integrating logic gates with DNA origami systems opens a vast avenue to applications in the fields of nanomedicine for diagnostics and therapeutics.

  9. Sensitive determination of DNA based on the interaction between prulifloxacin-terbium(III) complex and DNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting; Fang, Biyun; Chang, Lin; Liu, Min; Chen, Fang

    2013-01-01

    A simple spectrofluorimetric method is described for the determination of DNA, based on its enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of prulifloxacin (PUFX)-Tb(3+). The luminescence intensity of the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex increased up to 10-fold after adding DNA. The excitation and emission wavelengths were 345 and 545 nm, respectively. Under optimum conditions, variations in the fluorescence intensity showed a good linear relationship with the concentration of hsDNA in the range of 3.0 × 10(-9) to 1.0 × 10(-6) g/mL, with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.997, and the detection limit was 2.1 × 10(-9) g/mL. The method was successfully applied to the determination of DNA in synthetic samples, and recoveries were in the range 97.3-102.0%. The mechanism of fluorescence enhancement of the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex by DNA is also discussed. The mechanism may involve formation of a ternary complex mainly by intercalation binding together with weak electrostatic interaction, which will increase the energy transition from ligand to Tb(3+), increasing the rigidity of the complex, and decreasing the radiationless energy loss through O-H vibration of the H2O molecule in the PUFX-Tb(3+) complex. Compared with the previous DNA probes, the proposed method is not only more robust and friendly to the environment, but also of relatively higher sensitivity.

  10. Visual detection of single-base mismatches in DNA using hairpin oligonucleotide with double-target DNA binding sequences and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    He, Yuqing; Zhang, Xibao; Zhang, Sanquan; Kris, Mak Ka Long; Man, Fong Chi; Kawde, Abdel-Nasser; Liu, Guodong

    2012-04-15

    We describe a hairpin oligonucleotide (HO) with double-target DNA binding sequences in the loop and 11-base in the stem for visual detection of single-base mismatches (SBM) in DNA with highly specificity. The thiol-modified HO was immobilized on gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) surface through a self-assembling process. The strategy of detecting SBM depends on the unique molecular recognition properties of HO to the perfect-matched DNA and SBM to generate different quantities of duplex DNA on the Au-NP surface, which are captured on the test zone of lateral flow test strip via the DNA hybridization reaction between the duplex DNA and preimmobilized DNA probe. Accumulation of Au-NPs produces the characteristic red bands, enabling visual detection of SBM. It was found that the ability of HO to differentiate perfect-matched DNA and SBM was increased dramatically by incorporating double-target DNA binding sequences in the loop of HO. The signal ratio between perfect-matched DNA and SBM was up to 28, which is much higher than that of conventional HO or molecular beacon. The approach was applied to detect the mutation sites, Arg142Cys and Gly529Ile, of transglutaminase 1 gene in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis. The results presented here show that the new HO is a potential molecular recognition probe for the future development of nucleic acid-based biosensors and bioassays. The approach can be used for point-of-care diagnosis of genetic diseases and detecting infectious agents or warning against bio-warfare agents.

  11. DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Matthew

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  12. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by acetylsalicylic acid in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; García-Medina, Sandra; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely

    2014-08-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory widely used due to its low cost and high effectiveness. This compound has been found in water bodies worldwide and is toxic to aquatic organisms; nevertheless its capacity to induce oxidative stress in bioindicators like Daphnia magna remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate toxicity in D. magna induced by acetylsalicylic acid in water, using oxidative stress and DNA damage biomarkers. An acute toxicity test was conducted in order to determine the median lethal concentration (48-h LC50) and the concentrations to be used in the subsequent subacute toxicity test in which the following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation, oxidized protein content, activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and level of DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation level and oxidized protein content were significantly increased (p<0.05), and antioxidant enzymes significantly altered with respect to controls; while the DNA damage were significantly increased (p<0.05) too. In conclusion, acetylsalicylic acid induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in D. magna.

  13. DNA from uncultured organisms as a source of 2,5-diketo-L-gluconic acid reductases.

    SciTech Connect

    Eschenfeldt, W. H.; Stols, L.; Rosenbaum, H.; Khambatta, Z. S.; Quaite, E. R.; Wu, S.; Kilgore, D. C.; Trent, J. D.; Donnelly, M. I.; Genencor International; Eastman Chemical Company

    2001-09-01

    Total DNA of a population of uncultured organisms was extracted from soil samples, and by using PCR methods, the genes encoding two different 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductases (DKGRs) were recovered. Degenerate PCR primers based on published sequence information gave internal gene fragments homologous to known DKGRs. Nested primers specific for the internal fragments were combined with random primers to amplify flanking gene fragments from the environmental DNA, and two hypothetical full-length genes were predicted from the combined sequences. Based on these predictions, specific primers were used to amplify the two complete genes in single PCRs. These genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified gene products catalyzed the reduction of 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid to 2-keto-L-gulonic acid. Compared to previously described DKGRs isolated from Corynebacterium spp., these environmental reductases possessed some valuable properties. Both exhibited greater than 20-fold-higher k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values than those previously determined, primarily as a result of better binding of substrate. The K{sub m} values for the two new reductases were 57 and 67 {mu}M, versus 2 and 13 mM for the Corynebacterium enzymes. Both environmental DKGRs accepted NADH as well as NADPH as a cosubstrate; other DKGRs and most related aldo-keto reductases use only NADPH. In addition, one of the new reductases was more thermostable than known DKGRs.

  14. Gold Nanowire Based Electrical DNA Detection Using Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present an electrical sensor that uses rolling circle amplification (RCA) of DNA to stretch across the gap between two electrodes, interact with metal nanoparticle seeds to generate an electrically conductive nanowire, and produce electrical signals upon detection of specific target DNA sequences. RCA is a highly specific molecular detection mechanism based on DNA probe circularization. With this technique, long single-stranded DNA with simple repetitive sequences are produced. Here we show that stretched RCA products can be metalized using silver or gold solutions to form metal wires. Upon metallization, the resistance drops from TΩ to kΩ for silver and to Ω for gold. Metallization is seeded by gold nanoparticles aligned along the single-stranded DNA product through hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides. We show that combining RCA with electrical DNA detection produces results in readout with very high signal-to-noise ratio, an essential feature for sensitive and specific detection assays. Finally, we demonstrate detection of 10 ng of Escherichia coli genomic DNA using the sensor concept. PMID:24433087

  15. Hydration of nucleic acid fragments: comparison of theory and experiment for high-resolution crystal structures of RNA, DNA, and DNA-drug complexes.

    PubMed

    Hummer, G; García, A E; Soumpasis, D M

    1995-05-01

    A computationally efficient method to describe the organization of water around solvated biomolecules is presented. It is based on a statistical mechanical expression for the water-density distribution in terms of particle correlation functions. The method is applied to analyze the hydration of small nucleic acid molecules in the crystal environment, for which high-resolution x-ray crystal structures have been reported. Results for RNA [r(ApU).r(ApU)] and DNA [d(CpG).d(CpG) in Z form and with parallel strand orientation] and for DNA-drug complexes [d(CpG).d(CpG) with the drug proflavine intercalated] are described. A detailed comparison of theoretical and experimental data shows positional agreement for the experimentally observed water sites. The presented method can be used for refinement of the water structure in x-ray crystallography, hydration analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance structures, and theoretical modeling of biological macromolecules such as molecular docking studies. The speed of the computations allows hydration analyses of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, protein-nucleic acid complexes, etc.) in the crystal environment and in aqueous solution.

  16. Sequence selective double strand DNA cleavage by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeting using nuclease S1.

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, V; Frank-Kamenetskii, M D; Egholm, M; Buchardt, O; Nielsen, P E

    1993-01-01

    A novel method for sequence specific double strand DNA cleavage using PNA (peptide nucleic acid) targeting is described. Nuclease S1 digestion of double stranded DNA gives rise to double strand cleavage at an occupied PNA strand displacement binding site, and under optimized conditions complete cleavage can be obtained. The efficiency of this cleavage is more than 10 fold enhanced when a tandem PNA site is targeted, and additionally enhanced if this site is in trans rather than in cis orientation. Thus in effect, the PNA targeting makes the single strand specific nuclease S1 behave like a pseudo restriction endonuclease. Images PMID:8502550

  17. Immobilization of DNA via oligonucleotides containing an aldehyde or carboxylic acid group at the 5' terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Kremsky, J N; Wooters, J L; Dougherty, J P; Meyers, R E; Collins, M; Brown, E L

    1987-01-01

    A general method for the immobilization of DNA through its 5'-end has been developed. A synthetic oligonucleotide, modified at its 5'-end with an aldehyde or carboxylic acid, was attached to latex microspheres containing hydrazide residues. Using T4 polynucleotide ligase and an oligonucleotide splint, a single stranded 98mer was efficiently joined to the immobilized synthetic fragment. After impregnation of the latex microspheres with the fluorescent dye, Nile Red and attachment of an aldehyde 16mer, 5 X 10(5) bead-DNA conjugates could be detected with a conventional fluorimeter. Images PMID:3562241

  18. Acetylsalicylic acid, aging and coronary artery disease are associated with ABCA1 DNA methylation in men

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that DNA methylation contributes to coronary artery disease (CAD) risk variability. DNA hypermethylation at the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) gene, an important modulator of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and reverse cholesterol transport, has been previously associated with plasma lipid levels, aging and CAD, but the association with CAD has yet to be replicated. Results ABCA1 DNA methylation levels were measured in leucocytes of 88 men using bis-pyrosequencing. We first showed that DNA methylation at the ABCA1 gene promoter locus is associated with aging and CAD occurrence in men (P < 0.05). The latter association is stronger among older men with CAD (≥61 years old; n = 19), who showed at least 4.7% higher ABCA1 DNA methylation levels as compared to younger men with CAD (<61 years old; n = 19) or men without CAD (n = 50; P < 0.001). Higher ABCA1 DNA methylation levels in older men were also associated with higher total cholesterol (r = 0.34, P = 0.03), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.32, P = 0.04) and triglyceride levels (r = 0.26, P = 0.09). Furthermore, we showed that acetylsalicylic acid therapy is associated with 3.6% lower ABCA1 DNA methylation levels (P = 0.006), independent of aging and CAD status of patients. Conclusions This study provides new evidence that the ABCA1 epigenetic profile is associated with CAD and aging, and highlights that epigenetic modifications might be a significant molecular mechanism involved in the pathophysiological processes associated with CAD. Acetylsalicylic acid treatment for CAD prevention might involve epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:25093045

  19. Evolutionary patterns of DNA base composition and correlation to polymorphisms in DNA repair systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianran; Scanlon, Michael J.; Yu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    DNA base composition is a fundamental genome feature. However, the evolutionary pattern of base composition and its potential causes have not been well understood. Here, we report findings from comparative analysis of base composition at the whole-genome level across 2210 species, the polymorphic-site level across eight population comparison sets, and the mutation-site level in 12 mutation-tracking experiments. We first demonstrate that base composition follows the individual-strand base equality rule at the genome, chromosome and polymorphic-site levels. More intriguingly, clear separation of base-composition values calculated across polymorphic sites was consistently observed between basal and derived groups, suggesting common underlying mechanisms. Individuals in the derived groups show an A&T-increase/G&C-decrease pattern compared with the basal groups. Spontaneous and induced mutation experiments indicated these patterns of base composition change can emerge across mutation sites. With base-composition across polymorphic sites as a genome phenotype, genome scans with human 1000 Genomes and HapMap3 data identified a set of significant genomic regions enriched with Gene Ontology terms for DNA repair. For three DNA repair genes (BRIP1, PMS2P3 and TTDN), ENCODE data provided evidence for interaction between genomic regions containing these genes and regions containing the significant SNPs. Our findings provide insights into the mechanisms of genome evolution. PMID:25765652

  20. Development of an electrochemical biosensor methods based on acrylic microsphere for the determination of Arowana DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Heng, Lee Yook; Futra, Dedi; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2015-09-01

    An electrochemical method of Arowana DNA determination based of N-acrylosuccinimide (NAS) modified acrylic microsphere was fabricated. Hydrophobic succinimide functional group containing poly(n-butylacrylate-N-acryloxysuccinimide) microspheres were synthesized with a simple one-step photopolymerization pocedure. Aminated DNA probe was covalently bonded to the succinimde functional group of the acrylic microspheres. The hybridization of the immobilized DNA probe with the complementary DNA was determined by the differential pulse voltametry using anthraquninone-2-sulfonic acid monohydrate sodium salt (AQMS) as the electroactive hybridization label. The influences of many factors such as duration of DNA probe immobilization and hybridization, operational temperature and non-complementary DNA on the biosensor performance were evaluated. Under optimized conditions, the DNA microbiosensor demonstrated a wide linear response range to target DNA is 1.0 × 10-16 and 1.0 × 10-8 M with a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 9.46 × 10-17 M (R2 = 0.99) were calculated. This biosensor had improved the overall analytical performance of the resultant DNA microbiosensor when compared with other reported DNA biosensors using other nano-materials for membranes and microspheres as DNA immobilization matrices.

  1. RNA:DNA Ratio and Other Nucleic Acid Derived Indices in Marine Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Chícharo, Maria Alexandra; Chícharo, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Some of most used indicators in marine ecology are nucleic acid-derived indices. They can be divided by target levels in three groups: 1) at the organism level as ecophysiologic indicators, indicators such as RNA:DNA ratios, DNA:dry weight and RNA:protein, 2) at the population level, indicators such as growth rate, starvation incidence or fisheries impact indicators, and 3) at the community level, indicators such as trophic interactions, exergy indices and prey identification. The nucleic acids derived indices, especially RNA:DNA ratio, have been applied with success as indicators of nutritional condition, well been and growth in marine organisms. They are also useful as indicators of natural or anthropogenic impacts in marine population and communities, such as upwelling or dredge fisheries, respectively. They can help in understanding important issues of marine ecology such as trophic interactions in marine environment, fish and invertebrate recruitment failure and biodiversity changes, without laborious work of counting, measuring and identification of small marine organisms. Besides the objective of integrate nucleic acid derived indices across levels of organization, the paper will also include a general characterization of most used nucleic acid derived indices in marine ecology and also advantages and limitations of them. We can conclude that using indicators, such RNA:DNA ratios and other nucleic acids derived indices concomitantly with organism and ecosystems measures of responses to climate change (distribution, abundance, activity, metabolic rate, survival) will allow for the development of more rigorous and realistic predictions of the effects of anthropogenic climate change on marine systems. PMID:19325815

  2. Monitoring DNA polymerase with nanotube-based nanocircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry; Collins, Philip

    DNA polymerases play an important role in the process of life by accurately and efficiently replicating our genetic information. They use a single-stranded DNA as a template and incorporate nucleotides to create the full, double-stranded DNA. Recent experiments have successfully monitored this process by attaching a Klenow fragment of polymerase I to a carbon nanotube and measuring the current along the tube. Follow-up experiments have shown promise for distinguishing between DNA base pairs when nucleotide analogs are used, thus opening a new avenue for DNA sequencing. In this talk, we present results from computational studies on DNA polymerase I nanocircuits. The enzyme was first equilibrated in molecular dynamics and then density functional theory and Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function methods were used to calculate the ballistic transmission coefficients and currents for different enzymatic states. Our results show significant change in current when the enzyme alternates between open (idle) and closed (synthesizing) states. We can also differentiate between some template bases when modified nucleotides and gate scanning are used.

  3. Application of DNA-based methods in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jeffrey D; Stevens, Jamie R

    2008-01-01

    A forensic entomological investigation can benefit from a variety of widely practiced molecular genotyping methods. The most commonly used is DNA-based specimen identification. Other applications include the identification of insect gut contents and the characterization of the population genetic structure of a forensically important insect species. The proper application of these procedures demands that the analyst be technically expert. However, one must also be aware of the extensive list of standards and expectations that many legal systems have developed for forensic DNA analysis. We summarize the DNA techniques that are currently used in, or have been proposed for, forensic entomology and review established genetic analyses from other scientific fields that address questions similar to those in forensic entomology. We describe how accepted standards for forensic DNA practice and method validation are likely to apply to insect evidence used in a death or other forensic entomological investigation.

  4. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  5. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials.

  6. Binding-Induced DNA Nanomachines Triggered by Proteins and Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongquan; Lai, Maode; Zuehlke, Albert; Peng, Hanyong; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2015-11-23

    We introduce the concept and operation of a binding-induced DNA nanomachine that can be activated by proteins and nucleic acids. This new type of nanomachine harnesses specific target binding to trigger assembly of separate DNA components that are otherwise unable to spontaneously assemble. Three-dimensional DNA tracks of high density are constructed on gold nanoparticles functionalized with hundreds of single-stranded oligonucleotides and tens of an affinity ligand. A DNA swing arm, free in solution, is linked to a second affinity ligand. Binding of a target molecule to the two ligands brings the swing arm to AuNP and initiates autonomous, stepwise movement of the swing arm around the AuNP surface. The movement of the swing arm, powered by enzymatic cleavage of conjugated oligonucleotides, cleaves hundreds of oligonucleotides in response to a single binding event. We demonstrate three nanomachines that are specifically activated by streptavidin, platelet-derived growth factor, and the Smallpox gene. Substituting the ligands enables the nanomachine to respond to other molecules. The new nanomachines have several unique and advantageous features over DNA nanomachines that rely on DNA self-assembly.

  7. Development of an efficient fungal DNA extraction method to be used in random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR analysis to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid mold producers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Mar; Casado, Eva M; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2008-12-01

    A variety of previously established mechanical and chemical treatments to achieve fungal cell lysis combined with a semiautomatic system operated by a vacuum pump were tested to obtain DNA extract to be directly used in randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid-producing and -nonproducing mold strains. A DNA extraction method that includes digestion with proteinase K and lyticase prior to using a mortar and pestle grinding and a semiautomatic vacuum system yielded DNA of high quality in all the fungal strains and species tested, at concentrations ranging from 17 to 89 ng/microl in 150 microl of the final DNA extract. Two microliters of DNA extracted with this method was directly used for RAPD-PCR using primer (GACA)4. Reproducible RAPD fingerprints showing high differences between producer and nonproducer strains were observed. These differences in the RAPD patterns did not differentiate all the strains tested in clusters by cyclopiazonic acid production but may be very useful to distinguish cyclopiazonic acid producer strains from nonproducer strains by a simple RAPD analysis. Thus, the DNA extracts obtained could be used directly without previous purification and quantification for RAPD analysis to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid producer from nonproducer mold strains. This combined analysis could be adaptable to other toxigenic fungal species to enable differentiation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic molds, a procedure of great interest in food safety. PMID:19244904

  8. Development of an efficient fungal DNA extraction method to be used in random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR analysis to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid mold producers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Mar; Casado, Eva M; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2008-12-01

    A variety of previously established mechanical and chemical treatments to achieve fungal cell lysis combined with a semiautomatic system operated by a vacuum pump were tested to obtain DNA extract to be directly used in randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid-producing and -nonproducing mold strains. A DNA extraction method that includes digestion with proteinase K and lyticase prior to using a mortar and pestle grinding and a semiautomatic vacuum system yielded DNA of high quality in all the fungal strains and species tested, at concentrations ranging from 17 to 89 ng/microl in 150 microl of the final DNA extract. Two microliters of DNA extracted with this method was directly used for RAPD-PCR using primer (GACA)4. Reproducible RAPD fingerprints showing high differences between producer and nonproducer strains were observed. These differences in the RAPD patterns did not differentiate all the strains tested in clusters by cyclopiazonic acid production but may be very useful to distinguish cyclopiazonic acid producer strains from nonproducer strains by a simple RAPD analysis. Thus, the DNA extracts obtained could be used directly without previous purification and quantification for RAPD analysis to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid producer from nonproducer mold strains. This combined analysis could be adaptable to other toxigenic fungal species to enable differentiation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic molds, a procedure of great interest in food safety.

  9. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Nicholas C.; Corbett, Anita H.; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. PMID:26519467

  10. Partial base flipping is sufficient for strand slippage near DNA duplex termini.

    PubMed

    Banavali, Nilesh K

    2013-06-01

    Strand slippage is a structural mechanism by which insertion-deletion (indel) mutations are introduced during replication by polymerases. Three-dimensional atomic-resolution structural pathways are still not known for the decades-old template slippage description. The dynamic nature of the process and the higher energy intermediates involved increase the difficulty of studying these processes experimentally. In the present study, restrained and unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations, carried out using multiple nucleic acid force fields, are used to demonstrate that partial base-flipping can be sufficient for strand slippage at DNA duplex termini. Such strand slippage can occur in either strand, i.e. near either the 3' or the 5' terminus of a DNA strand, which suggests that similar structural flipping mechanisms can cause both primer and template slippage. In the repetitive mutation hot-spot sequence studied, non-canonical base-pairing with exposed DNA groove atoms of a neighboring G:C base-pair stabilizes a partially flipped state of the cytosine. For its base-pair partner guanine, a similar partially flipped metastable intermediate was not detected, and the propensity for sustained slippage was also found to be lower. This illustrates that a relatively small metastable DNA structural distortion in polymerase active sites could allow single base insertion or deletion mutations to occur, and stringent DNA groove molecular recognition may be required to maintain intrinsic DNA polymerase fidelity. The implications of a close relationship between base-pair dissociation, base unstacking, and strand slippage are discussed in the context of sequence dependence of indel mutations. PMID:23692220

  11. Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Megumi; Mah, Helen M.; Sgarbi, Paulo W. M.; Lall, Manjinder S.; Ly, Tai Wei; Browne, Lois M.

    2003-01-01

    Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 4.75 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher; Chime plug-in, version compatible with your OS and browser (available from MDL); and Flash player, version 5 or higher (available from Macromedia).

  12. Jigsaw Cooperative Learning: Acid-Base Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Sesen, Burcin Acar

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on investigating the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning instruction on first-year undergraduates' understanding of acid-base theories. Undergraduates' opinions about jigsaw cooperative learning instruction were also investigated. The participants of this study were 38 first-year undergraduates in chemistry education…

  13. The Magic Sign: Acids, Bases, and Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Donald B.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an approach that is used to introduce elementary and junior high students to a series of activities that will provide concrete experiences with acids, bases, and indicators. Provides instructions and listings of needed solutions and materials for developing this "magic sign" device. Includes background information and several student…

  14. Student Concept Changes in Acids and Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Renmin; Wells, Raymond R.

    This study focuses on student concept changes in acids and bases. Variables include field dependent level, personal independence level, interest in science or chemistry, teaching strategy, and student gender. This study of Grade 10 students (N=81) provides information relevant to secondary school chemistry learning, teaching, and concept change.…

  15. FRET-based real-time DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e., real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other intensity-affecting impediments. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we take advantage of as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to experimentally validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:22130990

  16. Drug-induced acid-base disorders.

    PubMed

    Kitterer, Daniel; Schwab, Matthias; Alscher, M Dominik; Braun, Niko; Latus, Joerg

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of acid-base disorders (ABDs) is high, especially in hospitalized patients. ABDs are often indicators for severe systemic disorders. In everyday clinical practice, analysis of ABDs must be performed in a standardized manner. Highly sensitive diagnostic tools to distinguish the various ABDs include the anion gap and the serum osmolar gap. Drug-induced ABDs can be classified into five different categories in terms of their pathophysiology: (1) metabolic acidosis caused by acid overload, which may occur through accumulation of acids by endogenous (e.g., lactic acidosis by biguanides, propofol-related syndrome) or exogenous (e.g., glycol-dependant drugs, such as diazepam or salicylates) mechanisms or by decreased renal acid excretion (e.g., distal renal tubular acidosis by amphotericin B, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin D); (2) base loss: proximal renal tubular acidosis by drugs (e.g., ifosfamide, aminoglycosides, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, antiretrovirals, oxaliplatin or cisplatin) in the context of Fanconi syndrome; (3) alkalosis resulting from acid and/or chloride loss by renal (e.g., diuretics, penicillins, aminoglycosides) or extrarenal (e.g., laxative drugs) mechanisms; (4) exogenous bicarbonate loads: milk-alkali syndrome, overshoot alkalosis after bicarbonate therapy or citrate administration; and (5) respiratory acidosis or alkalosis resulting from drug-induced depression of the respiratory center or neuromuscular impairment (e.g., anesthetics, sedatives) or hyperventilation (e.g., salicylates, epinephrine, nicotine).

  17. Base Excision Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    David, Sheila S.; O’Shea, Valerie L.; Kundu, Sucharita

    2010-01-01

    Base excision repair plays an important role in preventing mutations associated with the common product of oxidative damage, 8-oxoguanine. Recent structural studies have shown that 8-oxoguanine glycosylases use an intricate series of steps to efficiently search and locate 8-oxoguanine lesions within the multitude of undamaged bases. The importance of prevention of mutations associated with 8-oxoguanine has also been illustrated by direct connections between defects in the BER glycosylase MUTYH and colorectal cancer. In addition, the properties of other guanine oxidation products and the BER glycosylases that remove them are being uncovered. This work is providing surprising and intriguing new insights into the process of base excision repair. PMID:17581577

  18. Building a Multifunctional Aptamer-Based DNA Nanoassembly for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cuichen; Han, Da; Chen, Tao; Peng, Lu; Zhu, Guizhi; You, Mingxu; Qiu, Liping; Sefah, Kwame; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2014-01-01

    The ability to self-assemble one-dimensional DNA building blocks into two- and three-dimensional nanostructures via DNA/RNA nanotechnology has led to broad applications in bioimaging, basic biological mechanism studies, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. However, the cellular uptake of most nucleic acid nanostructures is dependent on passive delivery or the enhanced permeability and retention effect, which may not be suitable for certain types of cancers, especially for treatment in vivo. To meet this need, we have constructed a multifunctional aptamer-based DNA nanoassembly (AptNA) for targeted cancer therapy. In particular, we first designed various Y-shaped functional DNA domains through predesigned base pair hybridization, including targeting aptamers, intercalated anticancer drugs and therapeutic antisense oligonucleotides. Then these functional DNA domains were linked to an X-shaped DNA core connector, termed a building unit, through the complementary sequences in the arms of functional domains and connector. Finally, hundreds (~100–200) of these basic building units with 5′-modification of acrydite groups were further photocrosslinked into a multifunctional and programmable aptamer-based nanoassembly structure able to take advantage of facile modular design and assembly, high programmability, excellent biostability and biocompatibility, as well as selective recognition and transportation. With these properties, AptNAs were demonstrated to have specific cytotoxic effect against leukemia cells. Moreover, the incorporation of therapeutic antisense oligonucleotides resulted in the inhibition of P-gp expression (a drug efflux pump to increase excretion of anticancer drugs), as well as a decrease in drug resistance. Therefore, these multifunctional and programmable aptamer-based DNA nanoassemblies show promise as candidates for targeted drug delivery and cancer therapy. PMID:24245521

  19. Persistence of DNA damage following exposure of human bladder cells to chronic monomethylarsonous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, S.M.; Medeiros, M.K.; Eblin, K.E.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2009-12-01

    Malignant transformation was demonstrated in UROtsa cells following 52-weeks of exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}); the result was the malignantly transformed cell line, URO-MSC. URO-MSC cells were used to study the induction of DNA damage and the alteration of DNA repair enzymes in both the presence of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(+)] and after subsequent removal of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(-)] following chronic, low-level exposure. In the presence of MMA{sup III}, URO-MSC(+) cells demonstrated a sustained increase in DNA damage following 12-weeks of exposure; in particular, a significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks at 12-weeks of exposure consistently elevated through 52 weeks. The persistence of DNA damage in URO-MSC cells was assessed after a 2-week removal of MMA{sup III}. URO-MSC(-) cells demonstrated a decrease in DNA damage compared to URO-MSC(+); however, DNA damage in URO-MSC(-) remained significantly elevated when compared to untreated UROtsa and increased in a time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were demonstrated to be a critical component in the generation of DNA damage determined through the incubation of ROS scavengers with URO-MSC cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a key repair enzyme in DNA single-strand break repair. URO-MSC(+) resulted in a slight increase in PARP activity after 36-weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure, suggesting the presence of MMA{sup III} is inhibiting the increase in PARP activity. In support, PARP activity in URO-MSC(-) increased significantly, coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage demonstrated in URO-MSC(-) compared to URO-MSC(+). These data demonstrate that chronic, low-level exposure of UROtsa cells to 50 nM MMA{sup III} results in: the induction of DNA damage that remains elevated upon removal of MMA{sup III}; increased levels of ROS that play a role in MMA{sup III} induced-DNA damage; and decreased PARP activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}.

  20. Ab initio Study of Naptho-Homologated DNA Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Huertas, Oscar; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Orozco, Modesto; Luque, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Naptho-homologated DNA bases have been recently used to build a new type of size expanded DNA known as yyDNA. We have used theoretical techniques to investigate the structure, tautomeric preferences, base-pairing ability, stacking interactions, and HOMO-LUMO gaps of the naptho-bases. The structure of these bases is found to be similar to that of the benzo-fused predecessors (y-bases) with respect to the planarity of the aromatic rings and amino groups. Tautomeric studies reveal that the canonical-like form of naptho-thymine (yyT) and naptho-adenine (yyA) are the most stable tautomers, leading to hydrogen-bonded dimers with the corresponding natural nucleobases that mimic the Watson-Crick pairing. However, the canonical-like species of naptho-guanine (yyG) and naptho-cytosine (yyC) are not the most stable tautomers, and the most favorable hydrogen-bonded dimers involve wobble-like pairings. The expanded size of the naphto-bases leads to stacking interactions notably larger than those found for the natural bases, and they should presumably play a dominant contribution in modulating the structure of yyDNA duplexes. Finally, the HOMO-LUMO gap of the naptho-bases is smaller than that of their benzo-base counterparts, indicating that size-expansion of DNA bases is an efficient way of reducing their HOMO-LUMO gap. These results are examined in light of the available experimental evidence reported for yyT and yyC.

  1. Scalable recovery of plasmid DNA based on aqueous two-phase separation.

    PubMed

    Frerix, Andreas; Müller, Markus; Kula, Maria-Regina; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2005-08-01

    Future developments in gene therapy and DNA vaccination depend on cost-effective large-scale production of pharmaceutical-grade pDNA (plasmid DNA). Given the large amount of impurities present in the feedstock, purification processes that have high specificity and capacity at a moderate cost are required. In the present study, we describe a non-chromatographic procedure based on aqueous two-phase extraction allowing a fast and simply scalable capture step. PEG [poly(ethylene glycol)] in combination with potassium citrate or potassium phosphate was tested as phase component for extraction. By increasing either PEG or salt concentration, the partitioning of nucleic acids changed from bottom to top phase. Phase systems with a composition of 15% PEG 800 and 20% potassium phosphate at pH 7.0 showed a strong partitioning of pDNA to the bottom phase, linked to a clear decrease in open circular pDNA, while proteins, genomic DNA and RNA remain at the top or at the interphase. A great advantage of the current process is that the complete procedure of lysis, precipitation, clarification and extraction can be performed in a single vessel. The number of denatured and sheared genomic DNAs in a spiking experiment was found to be depleted by more than 99%. PMID:15612880

  2. Effect of nucleic acid binding dyes on DNA extraction, amplification, and STR typing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Kobus, Hilton J; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    We report on the effects of six dyes used in the detection of DNA on the process of DNA extraction, amplification, and detection of STR loci. While dyes can be used to detect the presence of DNA, their use is restricted if they adversely affect subsequent DNA typing processes. Diamond™ Nucleic Acid Dye, GelGreen™, GelRed™, RedSafe™, SYBR(®) Green I, and EvaGreen™ were evaluated in this study. The percentage of dye removed during the extraction process was determined to be: 70.3% for SYBR(®) Green I; 99.6% for RedSafe™; 99.4% for EvaGreen™; 52.7% for Diamond™ Dye; 50.6% for GelRed™, and; could not be determined for GelGreen™. It was then assumed that the amount of dye in the fluorescent quantification assay had no effect on the DNA signal. The presence of all six dyes was then reviewed for their effect on DNA extraction. The t-test showed no significant difference between the dyes and the control. These extracts were then STR profiled and all dyes and control produced full DNA profiles. STR loci in the presence of GelGreen(TM) at 1X concentration showed increased amplification products in comparison to the control samples. Full STR profiles were detected in the presence of EvaGreen™ (1X), although with reduced amplification products. RedSafe™ (1X), Diamond™ Dye (1X), and SYBR(®) Green I (1X) all exhibited varying degrees of locus drop-out with GelRed™ generating no loci at all. We provide recommendations for the best dye to visualize the presence of DNA profile as a biological stain and its subsequent amplification and detection. PMID:26202628

  3. Amino acid and cDNA sequences of lysozyme from Hyalophora cecropia

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Å.; Xanthopoulos, K. G.; Boman, H. G.; Bennich, H.

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid and cDNA sequences of lysozyme from the giant silk moth Hyalophora cecropia have been determined. This enzyme is one of several immune proteins produced by the diapausing pupae after injection of bacteria. Cecropia lysozyme is composed of 120 amino acids, has a mol. wt. of 13.8 kd and shows great similarity with vertebrate lysozymes of the chicken type. The amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity and for the binding of substrate are essentially conserved. Three allelic variants of the Cecropia enzyme are identified. A comparison of the chicken and the Cecropia lysozymes shows that there is a 40% identity at both the amino acid and the nucleotide level. Some evolutionary aspects of the sequence data are discussed. PMID:16453632

  4. DNA binding, photoactivated DNA cleavage and cytotoxic activity of Cu(II) and Co(II) based Schiff-base azo photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeepa, S. M.; Bhojya Naik, H. S.; Vinay Kumar, B.; Indira Priyadarsini, K.; Barik, Atanu; Prabhakara, M. C.

    2015-04-01

    A new class of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes of azo-containing Schiff base of the type [Cu(L1)2] and [Co(L1)2], where L1 = 4-[(E)-{2-hydroxy-3-[(E)-(4-bromophenyl)diazenyl]benzylidene}amino]benzoic acid have been synthesized and characterized. Extension of conjugation and the presence of free carboxylic acid group of the ligand L1 increased the wavelength of the complexes from visible region to the near IR region (620-850 nm). The Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes interacted with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with the respective Kb value of 3.2 × 104 M-1 and 2.9 × 104 M-1 and acted as proficient photocleavers of SC pUC19 DNA in UV-A light, forming 1O2 as the reactive oxygen species with the quantum yield of 0.38 and 0.36, respectively. Furthermore, the Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes showed photocytotoxicity toward two selected tumor cell lines MCF-7 and A549 by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) method, and the Cu(II) complex exhibits higher photocytotoxicity than Co(II) complex against each of the selected cell lines, this result is identical with their DNA binding ability order.

  5. DNA base damage by reactive oxygen species, oxidizing agents, and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard

    2013-02-01

    Emphasis has been placed in this article dedicated to DNA damage on recent aspects of the formation and measurement of oxidatively generated damage in cellular DNA in order to provide a comprehensive and updated survey. This includes single pyrimidine and purine base lesions, intrastrand cross-links, purine 5',8-cyclonucleosides, DNA-protein adducts and interstrand cross-links formed by the reactions of either the nucleobases or the 2-deoxyribose moiety with the hydroxyl radical, one-electron oxidants, singlet oxygen, and hypochlorous acid. In addition, recent information concerning the mechanisms of formation, individual measurement, and repair-rate assessment of bipyrimidine photoproducts in isolated cells and human skin upon exposure to UVB radiation, UVA photons, or solar simulated light is critically reviewed. PMID:23378590

  6. A MEMS-based miniature DNA analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M.A.; Gonzalez, C.; Hadley, D.

    1995-04-25

    We detail the design and development of a miniature thermal cycling instrument for performing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that uses microfabricated, silicon-based reaction chambers. The MEMS-based, battery-operated instrument shows significant improvements over commercial thermal cycling instrumentation. Several different biological systems have been amplified and verified with the miniature PCR instrument including the Human Immunodeficiency Virus; both cloned and genomic DNA templates of {beta} globin; and the genetic disease, Cystic Fibrosis from human DNA. The miniaturization of a PCR thermal cycler is the initial module of a fully-integrated portable, low-power, rapid, and highly efficient bioanalytical instrument.

  7. Molecular aspects on the interaction of phenosafranine to deoxyribonucleic acid: Model for intercalative drug DNA binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suman; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2008-01-01

    The mode, mechanism and energetics of interaction of phenosafranine, the planar, cationic and rigid phenazium dye to calf thymus DNA was investigated from absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, isothermal titration calorimetry, thermal melting, and viscosity. The study revealed non-cooperative binding of the dye to DNA with an affinity in the range (3.81-4.22) × 10 5 M -1 as observed from diverse techniques and obeying neighbor exclusion principle. The stoichiometry of binding was characterized to be one phenosafranine molecule per two base pairs. The binding was characterized by strong stabilization of DNA against thermal strand separation, large intrinsic circular dichroic changes of DNA by itself and the generation of induced circular dichroism for the optically inactive phenosafranine molecules. Hydrodynamic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed strong evidence that the phenosafranine molecules are intercalated between every alternate base pairs of calf thymus DNA. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies suggested that the binding was exothermic and favoured by both negative enthalpy and positive entropy changes. This study for the first time presents the complete molecular aspects and energetics of phenosafranine complexation to DNA as model for intercalative drug-DNA interaction.

  8. Label-free visual detection of nucleic acids in biological samples with single-base mismatch detection capability.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanling; Zhang, Weiting; An, Yuan; Cui, Liang; Yu, Chundong; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-01-14

    We have combined an allosteric molecular beacon for target recognition and guanine-rich DNAzyme for signal amplification to develop a new platform for visual detection of nucleic acids with single-base mismatch detection capability. The fully DNA-structured platform can undergo color change in response to target DNA/RNA, which enables sensitive and selective visual detection in biological samples.

  9. Gibberellic-acid-induced cell elongation in pea epicotyls: Effect on polyploidy and DNA content.

    PubMed

    Boeken, G; Van Oostveldt, P

    1977-01-01

    In gibberellic-acid(GA3)-treated epicotyls of dwarf peas (Pisum sativum L.) grown in the light, DNA (per cell and per epicotyl) is followed. Histofluorometric DNA determinations show that GA3-promoted cell elongation is not accompanied by increased endomitosis, but chemical estimations show an increased DNA content per epicotyl. This difference must therefore be the result of increased mitotic activity in the GA3-treated tissue. Epicotyls of seedlings grown with or without cotyledons under continuous light with GA3 are tetraploid, as are those of ecotylized embryos grown in darkness. These epicotyls reach no more than half the length of octaploid epicotyls of seedlings grown in darkness. This result provides evidence for a relationship between polyploidy and final possible cell length. PMID:24419898

  10. Hyaluronic acid and fibrin hydrogels with concentrated DNA/PEI polyplexes for local gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuguo; Rahim, Maha; Ng, Quinn; Segura, Tatiana

    2011-08-10

    Local delivery of DNA through a hydrogel scaffold would increase the applicability of gene therapy in tissue regeneration and cancer therapy. However, the delivery of DNA/cationic polymer nanoparticles (polyplexes) using hydrogels is challenging due to the aggregation and inactivation of polyplexes during their incorporation into hydrogel scaffolds. We developed a novel process (termed caged nanoparticle encapsulation or CnE) to load concentrated and unaggregated non-viral gene delivery nanoparticles into various hydrogels. Previously, we showed that PEG hydrogels loaded with DNA/PEI polyplexes through this process were able to deliver genes both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that hyaluronic acid and fibrin hydrogels with concentrated and unaggregated polyplexes loaded through CnE were able to deliver genes in vivo as well, demonstrating the universality of the process.

  11. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Li, Xiao-Bo; Lopa, Nasrin Siraj; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective. PMID:25664436

  12. DNA methylation landscape of fat deposits and fatty acid composition in obese and lean pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shunhua; Shen, Linyuan; Xia, Yudong; Yang, Qiong; Li, Xuewei; Tang, Guoqing; Jiang, Yanzhi; Wang, Jinyong; Li, Mingzhou; Zhu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Obese and lean type pig breeds exhibit differences in their fat deposits and fatty acid composition. Here, we compared the effect of genome-wide DNA methylation on fatty acid metabolism between Landrace pigs (LP, leaner) and Rongchang pigs (RP, fatty). We found that LP backfat (LBF) had a higher polyunsaturated fatty acid content but a lower adipocyte volume than RP backfat (RBF). LBF exhibited higher global DNA methylation levels at the genome level than RBF. A total of 483 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were located in promoter regions, mainly affecting olfactory and sensory activity and lipid metabolism. In LBF, the promoters of genes related to ATPase activity had significantly stronger methylation. This fact may suggest lower energy metabolism levels, which may result in less efficient lipid synthesis in LBF. Furthermore, we identified a DMR in the miR-4335 and miR-378 promoters and validated their methylation status by bisulfite sequencing PCR. The hypermethylation of the promoters of miR-4335 and miR-378 in LBF and the resulting silencing of the target genes may result in LBF’s low content in saturated fatty acids and fat deposition capacity. This study provides a solid basis for exploring the epigenetic mechanisms affecting fat deposition and fatty acid composition. PMID:27721392

  13. Cationic Lipid-Nucleic Acid Complexes for Gene Delivery And Silencing: Pathways And Mechanisms for Plasmid Dna And Sirna

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, K.K.; Zidovska, A.; Ahmad, A.; Bouxsein, N.F.; Evans, H.M.; McAllister, C.S.; Samuel, C.E.; Safinya, C.R.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    Motivated by the promises of gene therapy, there is great interest in developing non-viral lipid-based vectors for therapeutic applications due to their low immunogenicity, low toxicity, ease of production, and the potential of transferring large pieces of DNA into cells. In fact, cationic liposome (CL) based vectors are among the prevalent synthetic carriers of nucleic acids (NAs) currently used in gene therapy clinical trials worldwide. These vectors are studied both for gene delivery with CL-DNA complexes and gene silencing with CL-siRNA (short interfering RNA) complexes. However, their transfection efficiencies and silencing efficiencies remain low compared to those of engineered viral vectors. This reflects the currently poor understanding of transfection-related mechanisms at the molecular and self-assembled levels, including a lack of knowledge about interactions between membranes and double stranded NAs and between CL-NA complexes and cellular components. In this review we describe our recent efforts to improve the mechanistic understanding of transfection by CL-NA complexes, which will help to design optimal lipid-based carriers of DNA and siRNA for therapeutic gene delivery and gene silencing.

  14. Single-molecule derivation of salt dependent base-pair free energies in DNA.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Josep M; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Forns, Núria; Smith, Steven B; Bustamante, Carlos; Ritort, Felix

    2010-08-31

    Accurate knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids is crucial to predicting their structure and stability. To date most measurements of base-pair free energies in DNA are obtained in thermal denaturation experiments, which depend on several assumptions. Here we report measurements of the DNA base-pair free energies based on a simplified system, the mechanical unzipping of single DNA molecules. By combining experimental data with a physical model and an optimization algorithm for analysis, we measure the 10 unique nearest-neighbor base-pair free energies with 0.1 kcal mol(-1) precision over two orders of magnitude of monovalent salt concentration. We find an improved set of standard energy values compared with Unified Oligonucleotide energies and a unique set of 10 base-pair-specific salt-correction values. The latter are found to be strongest for AA/TT and weakest for CC/GG. Our unique energy values and salt corrections improve predictions of DNA unzipping forces and are fully compatible with melting temperatures for oligos. The method should make it possible to obtain free energies, enthalpies, and entropies in conditions not accessible by bulk methodologies. PMID:20716688

  15. Fluorogenic DNA ligase and base excision repair enzyme assays using substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Roman, Steven

    2015-05-15

    Continuing our work on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores for nucleic acid modifying enzymes, here we describe the development of such substrates for DNA ligases and some base excision repair enzymes. These substrates are hairpin-type synthetic DNA molecules with a single fluorophore located on a base close to the 3' ends, an arrangement that results in strong fluorescence quenching. When such substrates are subjected to an enzymatic reaction, the position of the dyes relative to that end of the molecules is altered, resulting in significant fluorescence intensity changes. The ligase substrates described here were 5' phosphorylated and either blunt-ended or carrying short, self-complementary single-stranded 5' extensions. The ligation reactions resulted in the covalent joining of the ends of the molecules, decreasing the quenching effect of the terminal bases on the dyes. To generate fluorogenic substrates for the base excision repair enzymes formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG), human 8-oxo-G DNA glycosylase/AP lyase (hOGG1), endonuclease IV (EndoIV), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), we introduced abasic sites or a modified nucleotide, 8-oxo-dG, at such positions that their enzymatic excision would result in the release of a short fluorescent fragment. This was also accompanied by strong fluorescence increases. Overall fluorescence changes ranged from approximately 4-fold (ligase reactions) to more than 20-fold (base excision repair reactions). PMID:25728944

  16. Microarray-based resonance light scattering assay for detecting DNA methylation and human DNA methyltransferase simultaneously with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lan; Su, Min; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhenxin

    2014-07-21

    A microarray-based resonance light scattering assay, with the combination of methylation-sensitive endonuclease and gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes, has been proposed to sensitively distinguish the DNA methylation level as low as 0.01% (10 pM methylated DNA in 100 nM total DNA) and detect human DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) down to 0.1 U mL(-1).

  17. A fluorescence method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide and restriction endonuclease HpaII.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Chunyan; Xiong, Yanxiang; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in many biological events and is associated with various diseases. Most traditional methods for detection of DNA methylation are based on the complex and expensive bisulfite method. In this paper, we report a novel fluorescence method to detect DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide (GO) and restriction endonuclease HpaII. The skillfully designed probe DNA labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and optimized GO concentration keep the probe/target DNA still adsorbed on the GO. After the cleavage action of HpaII the labeled FAM is released from the GO surface and its fluorescence recovers, which could be used to detect DNA in the linear range of 50 pM-50 nM with a detection limit of 43 pM. DNA methylation induced by transmethylase (Mtase) or other chemical reagents prevents HpaII from recognizing and cleaving the specific site; as a result, fluorescence cannot recover. The fluorescence recovery efficiency is closely related to the DNA methylation level, which can be used to detect DNA methylation by comparing it with the fluorescence in the presence of intact target DNA. The method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation is simple, reliable and accurate.

  18. Three 3D graphical representations of DNA primary sequences based on the classifications of DNA bases and their applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guosen; Mo, Zhongxi

    2011-01-21

    In this article, we introduce three 3D graphical representations of DNA primary sequences, which we call RY-curve, MK-curve and SW-curve, based on three classifications of the DNA bases. The advantages of our representations are that (i) these 3D curves are strictly non-degenerate and there is no loss of information when transferring a DNA sequence to its mathematical representation and (ii) the coordinates of every node on these 3D curves have clear biological implication. Two applications of these 3D curves are presented: (a) a simple formula is derived to calculate the content of the four bases (A, G, C and T) from the coordinates of nodes on the curves; and (b) a 12-component characteristic vector is constructed to compare similarity among DNA sequences from different species based on the geometrical centers of the 3D curves. As examples, we examine similarity among the coding sequences of the first exon of beta-globin gene from eleven species and validate similarity of cDNA sequences of beta-globin gene from eight species.

  19. Polyanionic Carboxyethyl Peptide Nucleic Acids (ce-PNAs): Synthesis and DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kirillova, Yuliya; Boyarskaya, Nataliya; Dezhenkov, Andrey; Tankevich, Mariya; Prokhorov, Ivan; Varizhuk, Anna; Eremin, Sergei; Esipov, Dmitry; Smirnov, Igor; Pozmogova, Galina

    2015-01-01

    New polyanionic modifications of polyamide nucleic acid mimics were obtained. Thymine decamers were synthesized from respective chiral α- and γ-monomers, and their enantiomeric purity was assessed. Here, we present the decamer synthesis, purification and characterization by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and an investigation of the hybridization properties of the decamers. We show that the modified γ-S-carboxyethyl-T10 PNA forms a stable triplex with polyadenine DNA. PMID:26469337

  20. Inhibition of N-nitrosamine carcinogenesis and aflatoxin DNA damage by ellagic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal-Chaudhuri, S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ellagic acid (EA), on the tumorigenicity of N-nitrosobenzylmethylamine (NBMA) in the rat esophagus was investigated. Groups of 30 male F-344 rats were fed a semipurified diet containing EA for 27 weeks. N-nitrosobenzylmethylamine was administered subcutaneously, once a week for 18 weeks. Ellagic acid produced a significant inhibition in the average number of esophageal tumors at both 20 weeks and 27 weeks. To investigate the mechanism(s) of this inhibition, EA was tested for its effect on the metabolism, DNA-binding and DNA-adduct formation of NBMA in cultured explants of rat esophagus. Explants were incubated in medium containing EA at concentrations of 10, 50, and 100 {mu}M for 16 hours, followed by the addition of 1{mu}M ({sup 3}H)NBMA and EA for 12 hours. Explant DNA was isolated by phenol extraction and hydroxylapatite chromatography, and benzaldehyde formation was determined by h.p.l.c. analysis of the culture medium. Finally, EA was examined for its ability to inhibit DNA damage induced by aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) in cultured explants of rat trachea and esophagus, and human tracheobronchus.

  1. Effects of altered maternal folic acid, vitamin B12 and docosahexaenoic acid on placental global DNA methylation patterns in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Asmita; Dangat, Kamini; Kale, Anvita; Sable, Pratiksha; Chavan-Gautam, Preeti; Joshi, Sadhana

    2011-01-01

    Potential adverse effects of excess maternal folic acid supplementation on a vegetarian population deficient in vitamin B(12) are poorly understood. We have previously shown in a rat model that maternal folic acid supplementation at marginal protein levels reduces brain omega-3 fatty acid levels in the adult offspring. We have also reported that reduced docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels may result in diversion of methyl groups towards DNA in the one carbon metabolic pathway ultimately resulting in DNA methylation. This study was designed to examine the effect of normal and excess folic acid in the absence and presence of vitamin B(12) deficiency on global methylation patterns in the placenta. Further, the effect of maternal omega 3 fatty acid supplementation on the above vitamin B(12) deficient diets was also examined. Our results suggest maternal folic acid supplementation in the absence of vitamin B(12) lowers plasma and placental DHA levels (p<0.05) and reduces global DNA methylation levels (p<0.05). When this group was supplemented with omega 3 fatty acids there was an increase in placental DHA levels and subsequently DNA methylation levels revert back to the levels of the control group. Our results suggest for the first time that DHA plays an important role in one carbon metabolism thereby influencing global DNA methylation in the placenta. PMID:21423696

  2. Flow-cytometry-based DNA hybidization and polymorphism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong; Kommander, Kristina; White, P. S.; Nolan, John P.

    1998-05-01

    Functional analysis of the human genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well- suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. We are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. Our approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advantages of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  3. [DNA-based methods for identification of seafood species].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Shu-Cheng; Zhang, Yi-Jun; Han, Yi

    2010-06-01

    With the development of molecular biotechnology, methods for identification of seafood species are developed from protein to DNA. At present, the main DNA-based methods for species identification are FINS, PCR-RFLP, and specific-PCR, which have been used to identify the species of fresh, frozen, and pickled or canned seafood. However, qualitative and quantitative methods for identification of the mixed seafood species remain to be resolved. The gene databases play an important role in identifying species and are valuable information resources for identification of seafood species. In this paper, recent progresses of major DNA-based methods for identification of seafood species are reviewed and the perspectives of this field are discussed. PMID:20566458

  4. Trial watch: Naked and vectored DNA-based anticancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Aranda, Fernando; Castoldi, Francesca; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One type of anticancer vaccine relies on the administration of DNA constructs encoding one or multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). The ultimate objective of these preparations, which can be naked or vectored by non-pathogenic viruses, bacteria or yeast cells, is to drive the synthesis of TAAs in the context of an immunostimulatory milieu, resulting in the (re-)elicitation of a tumor-targeting immune response. In spite of encouraging preclinical results, the clinical efficacy of DNA-based vaccines employed as standalone immunotherapeutic interventions in cancer patients appears to be limited. Thus, efforts are currently being devoted to the development of combinatorial regimens that allow DNA-based anticancer vaccines to elicit clinically relevant immune responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of this therapeutic paradigm. PMID:26155408

  5. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants ( Kb) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH 2 (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  6. DNA-based identification of novel bovine casein gene variants.

    PubMed

    Gallinat, J L; Qanbari, S; Drögemüller, C; Pimentel, E C G; Thaller, G; Tetens, J

    2013-01-01

    In cattle, at least 39 variants of the 4 casein proteins (α(S1)-, β-, α(S2)- and κ-casein) have been described to date. Many of these variants are known to affect milk-production traits, cheese-processing properties, and the nutritive value of milk. They also provide valuable information for phylogenetic studies. So far, the majority of studies exploring the genetic variability of bovine caseins considered European taurine cattle breeds and were carried out at the protein level by electrophoretic techniques. This only allows the identification of variants that, due to amino acid exchanges, differ in their electric charge, molecular weight, or isoelectric point. In this study, the open reading frames of the casein genes CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, and CSN3 of 356 animals belonging to 14 taurine and 3 indicine cattle breeds were sequenced. With this approach, we identified 23 alleles, including 5 new DNA sequence variants, with a predicted effect on the protein sequence. The new variants were only found in indicine breeds and in one local Iranian breed, which has been phenotypically classified as a taurine breed. A multidimensional scaling approach based on available SNP chip data, however, revealed an admixture of taurine and indicine populations in this breed as well as in the local Iranian breed Golpayegani. Specific indicine casein alleles were also identified in a few European taurine breeds, indicating the introgression of indicine breeds into these populations. This study shows the existence of substantial undiscovered genetic variability of bovine casein loci, especially in indicine cattle breeds. The identification of new variants is a valuable tool for phylogenetic studies and investigations into the evolution of the milk protein genes.

  7. The first proton sponge-based amino acids: synthesis, acid-base properties and some reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ozeryanskii, Valery A; Gorbacheva, Anastasia Yu; Pozharskii, Alexander F; Vlasenko, Marina P; Tereznikov, Alexander Yu; Chernov'yants, Margarita S

    2015-08-21

    The first hybrid base constructed from 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (proton sponge or DMAN) and glycine, N-methyl-N-(8-dimethylamino-1-naphthyl)aminoacetic acid, was synthesised in high yield and its hydrobromide was structurally characterised and used to determine the acid-base properties via potentiometric titration. It was found that the basic strength of the DMAN-glycine base (pKa = 11.57, H2O) is on the level of amidine amino acids like arginine and creatine and its structure, zwitterionic vs. neutral, based on the spectroscopic (IR, NMR, mass) and theoretical (DFT) approaches has a strong preference to the zwitterionic form. Unlike glycine, the DMAN-glycine zwitterion is N-chiral and is hydrolytically cleaved with the loss of glycolic acid on heating in DMSO. This reaction together with the mild decarboxylative conversion of proton sponge-based amino acids into 2,3-dihydroperimidinium salts under air-oxygen was monitored with the help of the DMAN-alanine amino acid. The newly devised amino acids are unique as they combine fluorescence, strongly basic and redox-active properties.

  8. The first proton sponge-based amino acids: synthesis, acid-base properties and some reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ozeryanskii, Valery A; Gorbacheva, Anastasia Yu; Pozharskii, Alexander F; Vlasenko, Marina P; Tereznikov, Alexander Yu; Chernov'yants, Margarita S

    2015-08-21

    The first hybrid base constructed from 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (proton sponge or DMAN) and glycine, N-methyl-N-(8-dimethylamino-1-naphthyl)aminoacetic acid, was synthesised in high yield and its hydrobromide was structurally characterised and used to determine the acid-base properties via potentiometric titration. It was found that the basic strength of the DMAN-glycine base (pKa = 11.57, H2O) is on the level of amidine amino acids like arginine and creatine and its structure, zwitterionic vs. neutral, based on the spectroscopic (IR, NMR, mass) and theoretical (DFT) approaches has a strong preference to the zwitterionic form. Unlike glycine, the DMAN-glycine zwitterion is N-chiral and is hydrolytically cleaved with the loss of glycolic acid on heating in DMSO. This reaction together with the mild decarboxylative conversion of proton sponge-based amino acids into 2,3-dihydroperimidinium salts under air-oxygen was monitored with the help of the DMAN-alanine amino acid. The newly devised amino acids are unique as they combine fluorescence, strongly basic and redox-active properties. PMID:26159785

  9. Chemical Morphing of DNA Containing Four Noncanonical Bases.

    PubMed

    Eremeeva, Elena; Abramov, Michail; Margamuljana, Lia; Rozenski, Jef; Pezo, Valerie; Marlière, Philippe; Herdewijn, Piet

    2016-06-20

    The ability of alternative nucleic acids, in which all four nucleobases are substituted, to replicate in vitro and to serve as genetic templates in vivo was evaluated. A nucleotide triphosphate set of 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine, 7-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine, 5-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidine, and 7-deaza-2'deoxyguanosine successfully underwent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using templates of different lengths (57 or 525mer) and Taq or Vent (exo-) DNA polymerases as catalysts. Furthermore, a fully morphed gene encoding a dihydrofolate reductase was generated by PCR using these fully substituted nucleotides and was shown to transform and confer trimethoprim resistance to E. coli. These results demonstrated that fully modified templates were accurately read by the bacterial replication machinery and provide the first example of a long fully modified DNA molecule being functional in vivo. PMID:27159019

  10. Chemical Morphing of DNA Containing Four Noncanonical Bases.

    PubMed

    Eremeeva, Elena; Abramov, Michail; Margamuljana, Lia; Rozenski, Jef; Pezo, Valerie; Marlière, Philippe; Herdewijn, Piet

    2016-06-20

    The ability of alternative nucleic acids, in which all four nucleobases are substituted, to replicate in vitro and to serve as genetic templates in vivo was evaluated. A nucleotide triphosphate set of 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine, 7-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine, 5-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidine, and 7-deaza-2'deoxyguanosine successfully underwent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using templates of different lengths (57 or 525mer) and Taq or Vent (exo-) DNA polymerases as catalysts. Furthermore, a fully morphed gene encoding a dihydrofolate reductase was generated by PCR using these fully substituted nucleotides and was shown to transform and confer trimethoprim resistance to E. coli. These results demonstrated that fully modified templates were accurately read by the bacterial replication machinery and provide the first example of a long fully modified DNA molecule being functional in vivo.

  11. Probe mapping to facilitate transposon-based DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Strausbaugh, L.D.; Bourke, M.T.; Sommer, M.T.; Coon, M.E.; Berg, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    A promising strategy for DNA sequencing exploits transposons to provide mobile sites for the binding of sequencing primers. For such a strategy to be maximally efficient, the location and orientation of the transposon must be readily determined and the insertion sites should be randomly distributed. The authors demonstrate an efficient probe-based method for the localization and orientation of transposon-borne primer sites, which is adaptable to large-scale sequencing strategies. This approach requires no prior restriction enzyme mapping or knowledge of the cloned sequence and eliminates the inefficiency inherent in totally random sequencing methods. To test the efficiency of probe mapping, 49 insertions of the transposon {gamma}{delta} (Tn1000) in a cloned fragment of Drosophila melanogaster DNA were mapped and oriented. In addition, oligonucleotide primers specific for unique subterminal {gamma}{delta} segments were used to prime dideoxynucleotide double-stranded sequencing. These data provided an opportunity to rigorously examine {gamma}{delta} insertion sites. The insertions were quire randomly distributed, even though the target DNA fragment had both A+T-rich and G+C-rich regions; in G+C-rich DNA, the insertions were found in A+T-rich valleys. These data demonstrate that {gamma}{delta} is an excellent choice for supplying mobile primer binding sites to cloned DNA and that transposon-based probe mapping permits the sequences of large cloned segments to be determined without any subcloning.

  12. Filtration Isolation of Nucleic Acids: A Simple and Rapid DNA Extraction Method.

    PubMed

    McFall, Sally M; Neto, Mário F; Reed, Jennifer L; Wagner, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    FINA, filtration isolation of nucleic acids, is a novel extraction method which utilizes vertical filtration via a separation membrane and absorbent pad to extract cellular DNA from whole blood in less than 2 min. The blood specimen is treated with detergent, mixed briefly and applied by pipet to the separation membrane. The lysate wicks into the blotting pad due to capillary action, capturing the genomic DNA on the surface of the separation membrane. The extracted DNA is retained on the membrane during a simple wash step wherein PCR inhibitors are wicked into the absorbent blotting pad. The membrane containing the entrapped DNA is then added to the PCR reaction without further purification. This simple method does not require laboratory equipment and can be easily implemented with inexpensive laboratory supplies. Here we describe a protocol for highly sensitive detection and quantitation of HIV-1 proviral DNA from 100 µl whole blood as a model for early infant diagnosis of HIV that could readily be adapted to other genetic targets. PMID:27583575

  13. Polyvinyl-alcohol-based magnetic beads for rapid and efficient separation of specific or unspecific nucleic acid sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oster, Jürgen; Parker, Jeffrey; à Brassard, Lothar

    2001-01-01

    The versatile application of polyvinyl-alcohol-based magnetic M-PVA beads is demonstrated in the separation of genomic DNA, sequence specific nucleic acid purification, and binding of bacteria for subsequent DNA extraction and detection. It is shown that nucleic acids can be obtained in high yield and purity using M-PVA beads, making sample preparation efficient, fast and highly adaptable for automation processes.

  14. Implementing a two-layer feed-forward catalytic DNA circuit for enzyme-free and colorimetric detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ravan, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, a highly sensitive and specific bio-sensing platform for enzyme-free and colorimetric detection of nucleic acids has been developed. The biosensor is composed of two DNA nanostructures and two fuel strands that construct the foundation of a feed-forward catalytic DNA circuit. Upon binding the target strand to a specific DNA nanostructure, the circuit is run in order that at the end a hemin-binding aptamer, with the ability to convert a colorless substrate into a colored substance is released. Based on this strategy, 4 pM of the target DNA can be easily detected in serum samples by naked eyes after only a two-hour incubation with the circuit; meanwhile, if the incubation time is extended to 3 h, the biosensor can detect 1 pM of the target DNA. Besides the elevated sensitivity, the circuit can truly discriminate a spurious target containing one nucleotide mismatch with high specificity. Overall, the enzyme-free catalytic DNA circuit can be used as a sensitive alternative method to enzyme-based biosensors for the specific and cost-effective detection of nucleic acids.

  15. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of DNA Tile-Based Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shuoxing

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has emerged as an attractive building material for creating complex architectures at the nanometer scale that simultaneously affords versatility and modularity. Particularly, the programmability of DNA enables the assembly of basic building units into increasingly complex, arbitrary shapes or patterns. With the expanding complexity and functionality of DNA toolboxes, a quantitative understanding of DNA self-assembly in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics, will provide researchers with more subtle design guidelines that facilitate more precise spatial and temporal control. This dissertation focuses on studying the physicochemical properties of DNA tile-based self-assembly process by recapitulating representative scenarios and intermediate states with unique assembly pathways. First, DNA double-helical tiles with increasing flexibility were designed to investigate the dimerization kinetics. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles result from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. Next, the thermodynamics and kinetics of single tile attachment to preformed "multitile" arrays were investigated to test the fundamental assumptions of tile assembly models. The results offer experimental evidences that double crossover tile attachment is determined by the electrostatic environment and the steric hindrance at the binding site. Finally, the assembly of double crossover tiles within a rhombic DNA origami frame was employed as the model system to investigate the competition between unseeded, facet and seeded nucleation. The results revealed that preference of nucleation types can be tuned by controlling the rate-limiting nucleation step. The works presented in this dissertation will be helpful for refining the DNA tile assembly model for future designs and simulations. Moreover, The works presented here could also be

  16. DNA methylation detection based on difference of base content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shinobu; Ohtsuka, Keiichi; Honda, Satoshi; Sato, Yusuke; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2016-04-01

    Methylation frequently occurs in cytosines of CpG sites to regulate gene expression. The identification of aberrant methylation of certain genes is important for cancer marker analysis. The aim of this study was to determine the methylation frequency in DNA samples of unknown length and/or concentration. Unmethylated cytosine is known to be converted to thymine following bisulfite treatment and subsequent PCR. For this reason, the AT content in DNA increases with an increasing number of methylation sites. In this study, the fluorescein-carrying bis-acridinyl peptide (FKA) molecule was used for the detection of methylation frequency. FKA contains fluorescein and two acridine moieties, which together allow for the determination of the AT content of double-stranded DNA fragments. Methylated and unmethylated human genomes were subjected to bisulfide treatment and subsequent PCR using primers specific for the CFTR, CDH4, DBC1, and NPY genes. The AT content in the resulting PCR products was estimated by FKA, and AT content estimations were found to be in good agreement with those determined by DNA sequencing. This newly developed method may be useful for determining methylation frequencies of many PCR products by measuring the fluorescence in samples excited at two different wavelengths.

  17. An Unprecedented Nucleic Acid Capture Mechanism for Excision of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Rubinson, Emily H.; Gowda, A.S. Prakasha; Spratt, Thomas E.; Gold, Barry; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2014-01-01

    DNA glycosylases that remove alkylated and deaminated purine nucleobases are essential DNA repair enzymes that protect the genome, and at the same time confound cancer alkylation therapy, by excising cytotoxic N3-methyladenine bases formed by DNA targeting anticancer compounds. The basis for glycosylase specificity toward N3- and N7-alkylpurines is believed to result from intrinsic instability of the modified bases and not from direct enzyme functional group chemistry. Here, we present crystal structures of the recently discovered Bacillus cereus AlkD glycosylase in complex with DNAs containing alkylated, mismatched, and abasic nucleotides. Unlike other glycosylases, AlkD captures the extrahelical lesion in a solvent-exposed orientation, providing the first illustration for how hydrolysis of N3- and N7-alkylated bases may be facilitated by increased lifetime out of the DNA helix. The structures and supporting biochemical analysis of base flipping and catalysis reveal how AlkD’s HEAT-repeats distort the DNA backbone to detect non-Watson-Crick base pairs without duplex intercalation. PMID:20927102

  18. An unprecedented nucleic acid capture mechanism for excision of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinson, Emily H.; Prakasha Gowda, A.S.; Spratt, Thomas E.; Gold, Barry; Eichmanbrand, Brandt F.

    2010-11-18

    DNA glycosylases that remove alkylated and deaminated purine nucleobases are essential DNA repair enzymes that protect the genome, and at the same time confound cancer alkylation therapy, by excising cytotoxic N3-methyladenine bases formed by DNA-targeting anticancer compounds. The basis for glycosylase specificity towards N3- and N7-alkylpurines is believed to result from intrinsic instability of the modified bases and not from direct enzyme functional group chemistry. Here we present crystal structures of the recently discovered Bacillus cereus AlkD glycosylase in complex with DNAs containing alkylated, mismatched and abasic nucleotides. Unlike other glycosylases, AlkD captures the extrahelical lesion in a solvent-exposed orientation, providing an illustration for how hydrolysis of N3- and N7-alkylated bases may be facilitated by increased lifetime out of the DNA helix. The structures and supporting biochemical analysis of base flipping and catalysis reveal how the HEAT repeats of AlkD distort the DNA backbone to detect non-Watson-Crick base pairs without duplex intercalation.

  19. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Posner, Richard G.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Hammond, Mark L.; Simpson, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Method for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand.

  20. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Posner, R.G.; Marrone, B.L.; Hammond, M.L.; Simpson, D.J.

    1995-04-11

    A method is described for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand. 4 figures.

  1. Local alignment of two-base encoded DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Nils; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA sequence comparison is based on optimal local alignment of two sequences using a similarity score. However, some new DNA sequencing technologies do not directly measure the base sequence, but rather an encoded form, such as the two-base encoding considered here. In order to compare such data to a reference sequence, the data must be decoded into sequence. The decoding is deterministic, but the possibility of measurement errors requires searching among all possible error modes and resulting alignments to achieve an optimal balance of fewer errors versus greater sequence similarity. Results We present an extension of the standard dynamic programming method for local alignment, which simultaneously decodes the data and performs the alignment, maximizing a similarity score based on a weighted combination of errors and edits, and allowing an affine gap penalty. We also present simulations that demonstrate the performance characteristics of our two base encoded alignment method and contrast those with standard DNA sequence alignment under the same conditions. Conclusion The new local alignment algorithm for two-base encoded data has substantial power to properly detect and correct measurement errors while identifying underlying sequence variants, and facilitating genome re-sequencing efforts based on this form of sequence data. PMID:19508732

  2. Selection and Characterization of Single Stranded DNA Aptamers for the Hormone Abscisic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Victor M.; Millo, Enrico; Sturla, Laura; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Bagnasco, Luca; Guida, Lucrezia; D'Arrigo, Cristina; De Flora, Antonio; Salis, Annalisa; Martin, Elena M.; Bellotti, Marta; Zocchi, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a small molecule involved in pivotal physiological functions in higher plants. Recently, ABA has been also identified as an endogenous hormone in mammals, regulating different cell functions including inflammatory processes, stem cell expansion, insulin release, and glucose uptake. Aptamers are short, single-stranded (ss) oligonucleotidesable to recognize target molecules with high affinity. The small size of the ABA molecule represented a challenge for aptamer development and the aim of this study was to develop specific anti-ABA DNA aptamers. Biotinylated abscisic acid (bio-ABA) was immobilized on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. DNA aptamers against bio-ABA were selected with 7 iterative rounds of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment method (SELEX), each round comprising incubation of the ABA-binding beads with the ssDNA sequences, DNA elution, electrophoresis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The binding affinity of several clones was determined using bio-ABA immobilized on streptavidin-coated plates. Aptamer 2 and aptamer 9 showed the highest binding affinity, with dissociation constants values of 0.98±0.14 μM and 0.80±0.07 μM, respectively. Aptamers 2 and 9 were also able to bind free, unmodified ABA and to discriminate between different ABA enantiomers and isomers. Our findings indicate that ssDNA aptamers can selectively bind ABA and could be used for the development of ABA quantitation assays. PMID:23971905

  3. Chem I Supplement: Emphasis on Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education Staff

    1977-01-01

    Provides supplementary notes on acids and bases suitable for secondary school chemistry instruction, including acidity in solid and natural waters, acidity balance in body chemistry, acid and basic foods, pH values of common fluids, examples of drugs, and commercial preparation of nitric acid. (SL)

  4. Autonomous DNA computing machine based on photochemical gate transition.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Shinzi; Ami, Takehiro; Fujimoto, Kenzo

    2008-08-01

    We report the construction of a one-pot autonomous DNA computing machine based on photochemical gate transition (photocleavage, hybridization, and photoligation), and we performed binary digit additions using this machine. In our method, both photochemical DNA manipulations previously reported, photoligation via 5-carboxyvinyldeoxyuridene (cvU) containing ODN and photocleavage via carbazole-modified ODN, were employed. The binary digit additions were autonomously carried out by one-time irradiation at 366 nm in the single test tube. The fluorescence readout by the DNA chip was in good agreement with the correct answer of binary digit additions. We believe that this system is easily applicable to correlation analysis between SNPs as well as other binary digit processing, such as subtraction.

  5. Fluorescence of size-expanded DNA bases: reporting on DNA sequence and structure with an unnatural genetic set.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Andrew T; Kool, Eric T

    2008-03-26

    We recently described the synthesis and helix assembly properties of expanded DNA (xDNA), which contains base pairs 2.4 A larger than natural DNA pairs. This designed genetic set is under study with the goals of mimicking the functions of the natural DNA-based genetic system and of developing useful research tools. Here, we study the fluorescence properties of the four expanded bases of xDNA (xA, xC, xG, xT) and evaluate how their emission varies with changes in oligomer length, composition, and hybridization. Experiments were carried out with short oligomers of xDNA nucleosides conjugated to a DNA oligonucleotide, and we investigated the effects of hybridizing these fluorescent oligomers to short complementary DNAs with varied bases opposite the xDNA bases. As monomer nucleosides, the xDNA bases absorb light in two bands: one at approximately 260 nm (similar to DNA) and one at longer wavelength ( approximately 330 nm). All are efficient violet-blue fluorophores with emission maxima at approximately 380-410 nm and quantum yields (Phifl) of 0.30-0.52. Short homo-oligomers of the xDNA bases (length 1-4 monomers) showed moderate self-quenching except xC, which showed enhancement of Phifl with increasing length. Interestingly, multimers of xA emitted at longer wavelengths (520 nm) as an apparent excimer. Hybridization of an oligonucleotide to the DNA adjacent to the xDNA bases (with the xDNA portion overhanging) resulted in no change in fluorescence. However, addition of one, two, or more DNA bases in these duplexes opposite the xDNA portion resulted in a number of significant fluorescence responses, including wavelength shifts, enhancements, or quenching. The strongest responses were the enhancement of (xG)n emission by hybridization of one or more adenines opposite them, and the quenching of (xT)n and (xC)n emission by guanines opposite. The data suggest multiple ways in which the xDNA bases, both alone and in oligomers, may be useful as tools in biophysical analysis

  6. Functional nucleic acid-based hydrogels for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Mo, Liuting; Lu, Chun-Hua; Fu, Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogels are crosslinked hydrophilic polymers that can absorb a large amount of water. By their hydrophilic, biocompatible and highly tunable nature, hydrogels can be tailored for applications in bioanalysis and biomedicine. Of particular interest are DNA-based hydrogels owing to the unique features of nucleic acids. Since the discovery of the DNA double helical structure, interest in DNA has expanded beyond its genetic role to applications in nanotechnology and materials science. In particular, DNA-based hydrogels present such remarkable features as stability, flexibility, precise programmability, stimuli-responsive DNA conformations, facile synthesis and modification. Moreover, functional nucleic acids (FNAs) have allowed the construction of hydrogels based on aptamers, DNAzymes, i-motif nanostructures, siRNAs and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides to provide additional molecular recognition, catalytic activities and therapeutic potential, making them key players in biological analysis and biomedical applications. To date, a variety of applications have been demonstrated with FNA-based hydrogels, including biosensing, environmental analysis, controlled drug release, cell adhesion and targeted cancer therapy. In this review, we focus on advances in the development of FNA-based hydrogels, which have fully incorporated both the unique features of FNAs and DNA-based hydrogels. We first introduce different strategies for constructing DNA-based hydrogels. Subsequently, various types of FNAs and the most recent developments of FNA-based hydrogels for bioanalytical and biomedical applications are described with some selected examples. Finally, the review provides an insight into the remaining challenges and future perspectives of FNA-based hydrogels. PMID:26758955

  7. DNA base composition of Allium genomes with different chromosome numbers.

    PubMed

    Ricroch, A; Brown, S C

    1997-12-31

    The present report examines whether the presence of an additional chromosome can be detected as modifying the nuclear DNA amount and base composition of the cell, determined here by flow cytometry of interphasic nuclei, using four monosomic additions (chromosomes 3C, 4C, 7C and 8C transmitted from Allium cepa to Allium fistulosum L.). A. cepa differs significantly from A. fistulosum in genome size (2C DNA = 33.2 pg in A. cepa and 23.3 pg in A. fistulosum) as well as in GC content (38.7% and 39.8%, respectively). The presence of an extra chromosome of A. cepa obviously increases the nuclear DNA amount above the A. fistulosum value but also alters the apparent mean GC content. By comparing the monosomic additions and the parental background, the DNA amount and base composition of each of the four single chromosomes were calculated to quantify the GC content per chromosome and therefore to deduce their initial contribution to the A. cepa genome. Taken individually, some chromosomes are atypical in terms of GC content: the single chromosome 3C is AT-rich, having only about only 25% GC. However, the three other chromosomes examined are typical of the A. cepa genome in base composition. Indeed, this biological panel gives access to chromosomal features via a cytometric assay of nuclei. It should facilitate quantification of GC-rich repetitive sequences forming heterochromatic domains located mainly at the telomeres in the monocotyledonous A. cepa genome. PMID:9461399

  8. Phylogenetic Diversity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Associated with Paddy Rice Silage as Determined by 16S Ribosomal DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ennahar, Saïd; Cai, Yimin; Fujita, Yasuhito

    2003-01-01

    A total of 161 low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria isolated from whole-crop paddy rice silage were classified and subjected to phenotypic and genetic analyses. Based on morphological and biochemical characters, these presumptive lactic acid bacterium (LAB) isolates were divided into 10 groups that included members of the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, and Weissella. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was used to confirm the presence of the predominant groups indicated by phenotypic analysis and to determine the phylogenetic affiliation of representative strains. The virtually complete 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced. The sequences from the various LAB isolates showed high degrees of similarity to those of the GenBank reference strains (between 98.7 and 99.8%). Phylogenetic trees based on the 16S rDNA sequence displayed high consistency, with nodes supported by high bootstrap values. With the exception of one species, the genetic data was in agreement with the phenotypic identification. The prevalent LAB, predominantly homofermentative (66%), consisted of Lactobacillus plantarum (24%), Lactococcus lactis (22%), Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides (20%), Pediococcus acidilactici (11%), Lactobacillus brevis (11%), Enterococcus faecalis (7%), Weissella kimchii (3%), and Pediococcus pentosaceus (2%). The present study, the first to fully document rice-associated LAB, showed a very diverse community of LAB with a relatively high number of species involved in the fermentation process of paddy rice silage. The comprehensive 16S rDNA-based approach to describing LAB community structure was valuable in revealing the large diversity of bacteria inhabiting paddy rice silage and enabling the future design of appropriate inoculants aimed at improving its fermentation quality. PMID:12514026

  9. Detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) targets using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and paper surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Eric P; Yu, Wei W; White, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enables multiplex detection of analytes using simple, portable equipment consisting of a single excitation source and detector. Thus, in theory, SERS is ideally suited to replace fluorescence in assays that screen for numerous deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) targets, but in practice, SERS-based assays have suffered from complexity and elaborate processing steps. Here, we report an assay in which a simple inkjet-fabricated plasmonic paper device enables SERS-based detection of multiple DNA targets within a single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In prior work, we demonstrated the principles of chromatographic separation and SERS-based detection on inkjet-fabricated plasmonic paper. The present work extends that capability for post-PCR gene sequence detection. In this design, hydrolysis DNA probes with 5' Raman labels are utilized; if the target is present, the probe is hydrolyzed during PCR, freeing the reporter. After applying the PCR sample to a paper SERS device, an on-device chromatographic separation and concentration is conducted to discriminate between hydrolyzed and intact probes. SERS is then used to detect the reporter released by the hydrolyzed probes. This simple separation and detection on paper eliminates the need for complex sample processing steps. In this work, we simultaneously detect the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genes mecA and femB to illustrate the concept. We envision that this approach could contribute to the development of multiplex DNA diagnostic tests enabling screening for several target sequences within a single reaction, which is necessary for cases in which sample volume and resources are limited.

  10. Response of base excision repair enzymes to complex DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, M; Rasouli-Nia, A; Chaudhry, M A; Britten, R A

    2001-11-01

    There is now increasing evidence that ionizing radiation generates complex DNA damage, i.e. two or more lesions--single-strand breaks or modified nucleosides--located within one to two helical turns on the same strand or on opposite strands. Double-strand breaks are the most readily recognizable clustered lesions, but they may constitute a relatively minor fraction of the total. It is anticipated that clustered lesions may play a significant role in cellular response to ionizing radiation since they may present a major challenge to the DNA repair machinery. The degree of lesion complexity increases with increasing LET. This has potential implications for space travel because of exposure to high-LET cosmic radiation. It is therefore critical that we begin to understand the consequences of such damaged sites, including their influence on DNA repair enzymes. This paper presents a short review of our current knowledge of the action of purified DNA repair enzymes belonging to the base excision repair pathway, including DNA glycosylases and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases, on model complex lesions.

  11. Molecular-beacon-based array for sensitive DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Tan, Weihong

    2004-08-15

    Molecular beacon (MB) DNA probes provide a new way for sensitive label-free DNA/protein detection in homogeneous solution and biosensor development. However, a relatively low fluorescence enhancement after the hybridization of the surface-immobilized MB hinders its effective biotechnological applications. We have designed new molecular beacon probes to enable a larger separation between the surface and the surface-bound MBs. Using these MB probes, we have developed a DNA array on avidin-coated cover slips and have improved analytical sensitivity. A home-built wide-field optical setup was used for imaging the array. Our results show that linker length, pH, and ionic strength have obvious effects on the performance of the surface-bound MBs. The fluorescence enhancement of the new MBs after hybridization has been increased from 2 to 5.5. The MB-based DNA array could be used for DNA detection with high sensitivity, enabling simultaneous multiple-target bioanalysis in a variety of biotechnological applications.

  12. Boswellic acid induces epigenetic alterations by modulating DNA methylation in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; Takahashi, Masanobu; Byun, Hyang-Min; Link, Alexander; Sharma, Nupur; Balaguer, Francesc; Leung, Hon-Chiu; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that chemopreventive effects of some dietary polyphenols may in part be mediated by their ability to influence epigenetic mechanisms in cancer cells. Boswellic acids, derived from the plant Boswellia serrata, have long been used for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases due to their potent anti-inflammatory activities. Recent preclinical studies have also suggested that this compound has anti-cancer potential against various malignancies. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-cancer effects remain elusive. Herein, we report that boswellic acids modulate DNA methylation status of several tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. We treated RKO, SW48 and SW480 CRC cell lines with the active principle present in boswellic acids, acetyl-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA). Using genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression microarray analyses, we discovered that AKBA induced a modest genome-wide demethylation that permitted simultaneous re-activation of the corresponding tumor suppressor genes. The quantitative methylation-specific PCR and RT-PCR validated the gene demethylation and re-expression in several putative tumor suppressor genes including SAMD14 and SMPD3. Furthermore, AKBA inhibited DNMT activity in CRC cells. Taken together, these results lend further support to the growing notion that anti-cancer effect of boswellic acids may in part be due to its ability to demethylate and reactivate methylation-silenced tumor suppressor genes. These results suggest that not only boswellic acid might be a promising epigenetic modulator in the chemoprevention and treatment of CRC, but also provide a rationale for future investigations on the usefulness of such botanicals for epigenetic therapy in other human malignancies. PMID:22415137

  13. Technological applications arising from the interactions of DNA bases with metal ions.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2014-08-01

    An intense interest has grown in the unique interactions of nucleic acids with metal ions, which lead to the formation of metal-base pairs and the generation of fluorescent nanomaterials. In this review, different types of metal-base pairs, especially those formed from naturally occurring nucleosides, are described with emphasis also being given to recent advances made in employing these complexes to govern enzymatic reactions. The review also contains a comprehensive description of DNA-templated inorganic nanomaterials such as silver nanoclusters which possess excellent fluorescence properties. Finally, a summary is given about how these materials have led to recent advances in the field of nanobiotechnology.

  14. Technological applications arising from the interactions of DNA bases with metal ions.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2014-08-01

    An intense interest has grown in the unique interactions of nucleic acids with metal ions, which lead to the formation of metal-base pairs and the generation of fluorescent nanomaterials. In this review, different types of metal-base pairs, especially those formed from naturally occurring nucleosides, are described with emphasis also being given to recent advances made in employing these complexes to govern enzymatic reactions. The review also contains a comprehensive description of DNA-templated inorganic nanomaterials such as silver nanoclusters which possess excellent fluorescence properties. Finally, a summary is given about how these materials have led to recent advances in the field of nanobiotechnology. PMID:24832070

  15. DNA nanosensor based on biocompatible graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhao Sheng; Shan, Xiao Yue; Chai, Lu Jing; Ma, Juan Juan; Chen, Jian Rong; Feng, Hui

    2014-10-15

    An ultrasensitive nanosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between biocompatible graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes for DNA detection was reported. We take advantage of good biocompatibility and strong fluorescence of graphene quantum dots, base pairing specificity of DNA and unique fluorescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes to achieve the analysis of low concentrations of DNA. Graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield up to 0.20 were prepared and served as the fluorophore of DNA probe. FRET process between graphene quantum dots-labeled probe and oxidized carbon nanotubes is easily achieved due to their efficient self-assembly through specific π-π interaction. This nanosensor can distinguish complementary and mismatched nucleic acid sequences with high sensitivity and good reproducibility. The detection method based on this nanosensor possesses a broad linear span of up to 133.0 nM and ultralow detection limit of 0.4 nM. The constructed nanosensor is expected to be highly biocompatible because of all its components with excellent biocompatibility.

  16. Sensitive Detection of ssDNA Using an LRET-Based Upconverting Nanohybrid Material.

    PubMed

    Jesu Raj, Joe Gerald; Quintanilla, Marta; Mahmoud, Khaled A; Ng, Andy; Vetrone, Fiorenzo; Zourob, Mohammed

    2015-08-26

    Water-dispersible, optical hybrid nanoparticles are preferred materials for DNA biosensing due to their biocompatibility. Upconverting nanoparticles are highly desirable optical probes in sensors and bioimaging owing to their sharp emission intensity in the visible region. We herein report a highly sensitive ss-DNA detection based on an energy transfer system that uses a nanohybrid material synthesized by doping NaYF4:Tm(3+)/Yb(3+) upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) on silica coated polystyrene-co-acrylic acid (PSA) nanoparticles (PSA/SiO2) as the donor, and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) decorated with Ir(III) complex as the acceptor. UCNPs tagged on PSA/SiO2 and the cyclometalated Ir(III)/AuNP conjugates were then linked through the ss-DNA sequence. Sequential addition of the target DNA to the probe molecular beacon complex resulted in the separation of the optical nanohybrid material and the quencher, leading to a measurable increase in the blue fluorescence emission intensity. Our results have shown a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and target DNA concentration down to the picomolar.

  17. [Principle and application of DNA-based stable isotope probing---a review].

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhongjun

    2011-12-01

    Microbial communities are the engines that drive the global biogeochemical cycle of carbon and nitrogen essential for life on Earth. However, microorganisms have evolved as a result of complex interactions with other organisms and environments. Deciphering the metabolism of microorganisms at the community level in nature will be crucial for a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to the enormous divergence of microbial ecophysiology. Due to the immense number of uncultivated microbial species and the complexity of microbial communities, delineating community metabolism proves a virtually insurmountable hurdle. By tracing the heavy isotope flow of key elements such as carbon and nitrogen, DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) can provide unequivocal evidence for substrate assimilation by microorganisms in complex environments. The essential prerequisite for a successful DNA-SIP is the identification, with confidence, of isotopically enriched 13C-DNA, of which the amount is generally too low to allow the direct measurement of 13C atom percent of nucleic acid. The methodological considerations for obtaining unambiguous DNA highly enriched in heavy isotope are presented with emphasis on next-generation sequencing technology and metagenomics.

  18. Magnetic bead-based nucleic acid purification kit: Clinical application and performance evaluation in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihoon G; Kang, Jin Seok; Hwang, Seung Yong; Song, Jaewoo; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Two different methods - the semi-automated magnetic bead-based kit (SK, Stool DNA/RNA Purification kit®) and the manual membrane column-based kit (QS, QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini kit) - for purifying nucleic acids from clinical stool samples were compared and evaluated. The SK kit was more user-friendly than QS due to the reduced manual processing, partial automation, and short turnaround time with half cost. Furthermore, SK produced high yields in both DNA and RNA extractions but poor purity in RNA extraction. In the assessment of rotavirus and Clostridium difficile infection, both kits had equivalent or more sensitive performance compared with the standard method. Although SK showed some interference and inhibition in nucleic acid extraction, the performance, including the repeatability, linearity, analytical sensitivity, and matrix effect, was sufficient for routine clinical use. PMID:27030641

  19. Ligation with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Ong, Carmichael; Tai, Warren; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M; Artenstein, Andrew W; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for detecting nucleic acid targets using a ligation step along with an isothermal, exponential amplification step. We use an engineered ssDNA with two variable regions on the ends, allowing us to design the probe for optimal reaction kinetics and primer binding. This two-part probe is ligated by T4 DNA Ligase only when both parts bind adjacently to the target. The assay demonstrates that the expected 72-nt RNA product appears only when the synthetic target, T4 ligase, and both probe fragments are present during the ligation step. An extraneous 38-nt RNA product also appears due to linear amplification of unligated probe (P3), but its presence does not cause a false-positive result. In addition, 40 mmol/L KCl in the final amplification mix was found to be optimal. It was also found that increasing P5 in excess of P3 helped with ligation and reduced the extraneous 38-nt RNA product. The assay was also tested with a single nucleotide polymorphism target, changing one base at the ligation site. The assay was able to yield a negative signal despite only a single-base change. Finally, using P3 and P5 with longer binding sites results in increased overall sensitivity of the reaction, showing that increasing ligation efficiency can improve the assay overall. We believe that this method can be used effectively for a number of diagnostic assays. PMID:22449695

  20. Molecular docking study investigating the possible mode of binding of C.I. Acid Red 73 with DNA.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yumei; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu

    2011-07-01

    C.I. Acid Red 73 is a reactive azo dye with a variable potential carcinogenicity. The mechanism mediating interactions that occur between the dye and DNA have not been completely understood thus far. In this study, molecular docking techniques were applied to describe the most probable mode of DNA binding as well as the sequence selectivity of the C.I. Acid Red 73 dye. These docking experiments revealed that the dye is capable of interacting with the minor groove of the DNA on the basis of its curved shape, which fits well with the topology of double-stranded DNA. In addition, the dye can bind selectively to the minor groove of the DNA by applying CGT sequence selectivity. Further, the minor groove can be recognized although DNA targets present intercalation gaps. However, intercalative binding can also occur when the DNA target possesses an appropriate intercalation gap. Compared with the other eight DNA sequences that were studied, the DNA dodecamer d(CGCGATATCGCG)(2) (PDB ID: 1DNE) presents a very favorable target for the binding of C.I. Acid Red 73 to the minor groove, with the lowest binding free energy -9.19 kcal/mol. Results reported from this study are expected to provide useful information for research involving further simulations of molecular dynamics and toxicology investigations of the dye.

  1. The cytotoxicity, DNA crosslinking ability and DNA sequence selectivity of the aniline mustards melphalan, chlorambucil and 4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino] benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Sunters, A; Springer, C J; Bagshawe, K D; Souhami, R L; Hartley, J A

    1992-07-01

    Three aniline derivatives melphalan (L-PAM), chlorambucil (CHL) and 4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino] benzoic acid (BAM) have been compared on the basis of their in vitro cytotoxicities, DNA interstrand crosslinking ability and DNA sequence selectivity. Cytotoxicity was assessed in the human colonic adenocarcinoma LS174T and leukaemic K562 cell lines using the sulpho-rhodamine B and tetrazolium dye reduction assays. The order of cytotoxicities was L-PAM greater than CHL greater than BAM in both cell lines with K562 being less sensitive than LS174T. This was different from the order CHL greater than L-PAM greater than BAM which would be predicted from simple chemical reactivity or rate of hydrolysis, parameters which have been used previously as indicators of biological potency for aromatic nitrogen mustards. DNA interstrand crosslinking in cells as determined by alkaline elution showed a correlation with IC50 values. The ranking order of activity was further predicted by the ability of the agents to produce interstrand crosslinks in isolated DNA. The extent of guanine N-7 alkylation, assessed using a modified DNA sequencing technique, mirrored cytotoxicity and crosslinking ability, but at equivalent levels of alkylation there was no significant difference in DNA sequence selectivity. These data demonstrates that simple chemical reactivity or hydrolysis rate is not a good indicator of DNA reactivity or cytotoxicity for a number of aniline mustards, whereas DNA interstrand crosslinking ability either measured directly in cells or in isolated DNA, gives a good indication of biological activity.

  2. Technical approaches for efficient high-precision nucleic acid analysis using DNA microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkel, Daniel; Hamilton, Gregory; Brown, Nils; Segraves, Richard; Huey, Bing; Snijders, Anoine; Blackwood, Stephanie; Hindle, Kate; Law, Sindy; Gray, Joe W.; Jain, Ajay; Hanson, John; Nordmeyer, Robert; Albertson, Donna

    2002-06-01

    Microarray measurements offer the potential to compare the abundances of numerous nucleic acid sequences in parallel. Using linker-adapter PCR products from mapped BAC clones we have made arrays that permit scanning the human genome for single copy gains and losses of DNA sequence, which requires reliable detection of 50 percent changes. The DNA is printed at high concentration on amino-silane or chromium coated surface using a custom-built capillary pin printing system. Spots are printed on 130 micrometers centers or closer to minimize the size of the arrays. Hybridization occurs in a dextran sulfate/formamide buffer at 37 degrees C, using slow rocking to mix the reaction. The entire array is imaged in a single CCD frame using a custom built system that employs mercury arc illumination. Up to four fluorochromes can be imaged from a single array with adequate spectral separation. Typically we use DAPI to stain the DNA in the array spots to facilitate automatic image segmentation during analysis, and fluorescein, Cy3, and Cy5 or their spectral equivalents, for labeling specimen nucleic acids. Array spots are segmented and quantitative fluorescence intensities and intensity ratios are automatically calculated in < 1 minute per approximately 8000 element array using the custom software UCSF SPOT.

  3. Modern quantitative acid-base chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P A

    1983-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of ionic solutions in terms of physical and chemical principles has been effectively prohibited in the past by the overwhelming amount of calculation it required, but computers have suddenly eliminated that prohibition. The result is an approach to acid-base which revolutionizes our ability to understand, predict, and control what happens to hydrogen ions in living systems. This review outlines that approach and suggests some of its most useful implications. Quantitative understanding requires distinctions between independent variables (in body fluids: pCO2, net strong ion charge, and total weak acid, usually protein), and dependent variables [( HCO-3], [HA], [A-], [CO(2-)3], [OH-], and [H+] (or pH]. Dependent variables are determined by independent variables, and can be calculated from the defining equations for the specific system. Hydrogen ion movements between solutions can not affect hydrogen ion concentration; only changes in independent variables can. Many current models for ion movements through membranes will require modification on the basis of this quantitative analysis. Whole body acid-base balance can be understood quantitatively in terms of the three independent variables and their physiological regulation by the lungs, kidneys, gut, and liver. Quantitative analysis also shows that body fluids interact mainly by strong ion movements through the membranes separating them.

  4. An electrochemical DNA sensor based on polyaniline/graphene: high sensitivity to DNA sequences in a wide range.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing; Wu, Hao; Shen, Zongxu; Gao, Wenyu; Yu, Yu; Ma, Yuehui; Guang, Weijun; Guo, Quangui; Yan, Rui; Wang, Junzhong; Ding, Kejian

    2015-10-01

    A label-free electrochemical DNA sensor was fabricated by deposition of polyaniline and pristine graphene nanosheet (P/G(ratios)) composites in different mass ratios, DNA probe and bovine serum albumin (BSA) layer by layer on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was employed to monitor every step of fabrication of P/G(ratio)-based DNA sensors and to evaluate the detection results in terms of the hybridization of complementary DNA, mutant DNA and non-complementary DNA. The results illustrate that the P/G(ratio)-based DNA sensor could highly efficiently detect complementary DNA from 0.01 pm to 1 μm and discriminate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In the process of detection, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), resulting from hybridization of a DNA probe, escaping from or remaining on the sensor surface, was monitored by changing the ratio of polyaniline (PANI) to graphene, which was decided by the competition between the electrostatic interaction and Brownian motion.

  5. A General Simulator for Acid-Base Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Levie, Robert

    1999-07-01

    General formal expressions are provided to facilitate the automatic computer calculation of acid-base titration curves of arbitrary mixtures of acids, bases, and salts, without and with activity corrections based on the Davies equation. Explicit relations are also given for the buffer strength of mixtures of acids, bases, and salts.

  6. Unsaturated fatty acids bind Myc-Max transcription factor and inhibit Myc-Max-DNA complex formation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sunah; Park, Seyeon; Yang, Chul Hak

    2002-12-15

    Oncoprotein Myc, hetero-dimerized with Max through a b/HLH/Zip region, is a transcription factor that governs important cellular processes such as cell cycle entry, proliferation and differentiation. We found that linoleic acid, isolated from Pollen Typhae, and other unsaturated fatty acids have strong inhibitory effects on the binding of Myc-Max heterodimer to an E-box DNA site (CA(C/T)GTG). The interaction of a fatty acid with a protein dimer, not with DNA, is assumed to block the entire Myc-Max-DNA complex formation. Unsaturated fatty acids also showed cytotoxicity against a SNU16 human stomach cancer cell line and conjugated linoleic acid suppressed mRNA expression of several myc-target genes; ornithine decarboxylase, p53, cdc25a in the SNU16 cells.

  7. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  8. Nanoinformatics and DNA-based computing: catalyzing nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Maojo, Victor; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Kulikowski, Casimir; Rodriguez-Paton, Alfonso; Fritts, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Five decades of research and practical application of computers in biomedicine has given rise to the discipline of medical informatics, which has made many advances in genomic and translational medicine possible. Developments in nanotechnology are opening up the prospects for nanomedicine and regenerative medicine where informatics and DNA computing can become the catalysts enabling health care applications at sub-molecular or atomic scales. Although nanomedicine promises a new exciting frontier for clinical practice and biomedical research, issues involving cost-effectiveness studies, clinical trials and toxicity assays, drug delivery methods, and the implementation of new personalized therapies still remain challenging. Nanoinformatics can accelerate the introduction of nano-related research and applications into clinical practice, leading to an area that could be called "translational nanoinformatics." At the same time, DNA and RNA computing presents an entirely novel paradigm for computation. Nanoinformatics and DNA-based computing are together likely to completely change the way we model and process information in biomedicine and impact the emerging field of nanomedicine most strongly. In this article, we review work in nanoinformatics and DNA (and RNA)-based computing, including applications in nanopediatrics. We analyze their scientific foundations, current research and projects, envisioned applications and potential problems that might arise from them.

  9. Prognostic value of DNA repair based stratification of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhuo; Xu, Shi-Hao; Wang, Hai-Qing; Cai, Yi-Jing; Ying, Li; Song, Mei; Wang, Yu-Qun; Du, Shan-Jie; Shi, Ke-Qing; Zhou, Meng-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of DNA repair is frequently associated with tumor progression and response to therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Bioinformatics analyses of HCC data in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were performed to define DNA repair based molecular classification that could predict the prognosis of patients with HCC. Furthermore, we tested its predictive performance in 120 independent cases. Four molecular subgroups were identified on the basis of coordinate DNA repair cluster (CDRC) comprising 15 genes in TCGA dataset. Increasing expression of CDRC genes were significantly associated with TP53 mutation. High CDRC was significantly correlated with advanced tumor grades, advanced pathological stage and increased vascular invasion rate. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that the molecular subgrouping was an independent prognostic parameter for both overall survival (p = 0.004, hazard ratio (HR): 2.989) and tumor-free survival (p = 0.049, HR: 3.366) in TCGA dataset. Similar results were also obtained by analyzing the independent cohort. These data suggest that distinct dysregulation of DNA repair constituents based molecular classes in HCC would be useful for predicting prognosis and designing clinical trials for targeted therapy. PMID:27174663

  10. Rapid sequencing of DNA based on single-molecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, Steven A.; Davis, Lloyd M.; Fairfield, Frederick R.; Hammond, Mark L.; Harger, Carol A.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Martin, John C.; Nutter, Harvey L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Simpson, Daniel J.

    1991-07-01

    Sequencing the human genome is a major undertaking considering the large number of nucleotides present in the genome and the slow methods currently available to perform the task. The authors have recently reported on a scheme to sequence DNA rapidly using a non-gel based technique. The concept is based upon the incorporation of fluorescently labeled nucleotides into a strand of DNA, isolation and manipulation of a labeled DNA fragment and the detection of single nucleotides using ultra-sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection following their cleavage from the fragment. Detection of individual fluorophores in the liquid phase was accomplished with time-gated detection following pulsed-laser excitation. The photon bursts from individual rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules travelling through a laser beam have been observed, as have bursts from single fluorescently modified nucleotides. Using two different biotinylated nucleotides as a model system for fluorescently labeled nucleotides, the authors have observed synthesis of the complementary copy of M13 bacteriophage. Work with fluorescently labeled nucleotides is underway. Individual molecules of DNA attached to a microbead have been observed and manipulated with an epifluorescence microscope.

  11. Nanoinformatics and DNA-based computing: catalyzing nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Maojo, Victor; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Kulikowski, Casimir; Rodriguez-Paton, Alfonso; Fritts, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Five decades of research and practical application of computers in biomedicine has given rise to the discipline of medical informatics, which has made many advances in genomic and translational medicine possible. Developments in nanotechnology are opening up the prospects for nanomedicine and regenerative medicine where informatics and DNA computing can become the catalysts enabling health care applications at sub-molecular or atomic scales. Although nanomedicine promises a new exciting frontier for clinical practice and biomedical research, issues involving cost-effectiveness studies, clinical trials and toxicity assays, drug delivery methods, and the implementation of new personalized therapies still remain challenging. Nanoinformatics can accelerate the introduction of nano-related research and applications into clinical practice, leading to an area that could be called "translational nanoinformatics." At the same time, DNA and RNA computing presents an entirely novel paradigm for computation. Nanoinformatics and DNA-based computing are together likely to completely change the way we model and process information in biomedicine and impact the emerging field of nanomedicine most strongly. In this article, we review work in nanoinformatics and DNA (and RNA)-based computing, including applications in nanopediatrics. We analyze their scientific foundations, current research and projects, envisioned applications and potential problems that might arise from them. PMID:20118825

  12. Rapid sequencing of DNA based on single molecule detection

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, S.A.; Davis, L.M.; Fairfield, F.R.; Hammond, M.L.; Harger, C.A.; Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Marrone, B.L.; Martin, J.C.; Nutter, H.L.; Shera, E.B.; Simpson, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Sequencing the human genome is a major undertaking considering the large number of nucleotides present in the genome and the slow methods currently available to perform the task. We have recently reported on a scheme to sequence DNA rapidly using a non-gel based technique. The concept is based upon the incorporation of fluorescently labeled nucleotides into a strand of DNA, isolation and manipulation of a labeled DNA fragment and the detection of single nucleotides using ultra-sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection following their cleavage from the fragment. Detection of individual fluorophores in the liquid phase was accomplished with time-gated detection following pulsed-laser excitation. The photon bursts from individual rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules travelling through a laser beam have been observed as have bursts from single fluorescently modified nucleotides. Using two different biotinylated nucleotides as a model system for fluorescently labeled nucleotides, we have observed synthesis of the complementary copy of M13 bacteriophage. Work with fluorescently labeled nucleotides is underway. We have observed and manipulated individual molecules of DNA attached to a microbead with an epifluorescence microscope. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Evaluation of DNA typing as a positive identification method for soft and hard tissues immersed in strong acids.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Pazzi, M; Di Vella, G; Martinelli, D; Mazzola, L; Ricci, U; Testi, R; Vincenti, M

    2015-11-01

    Identification of human remains can be hindered by several factors (e.g., traumatic mutilation, carbonization or decomposition). Moreover, in some criminal cases, offenders may purposely adopt various expedients to thwart the victim's identification, including the dissolution of body tissues by the use of corrosive reagents, as repeatedly reported in the past for Mafia-related murders. By means of an animal model, namely porcine samples, we evaluated standard DNA typing as a method for identifying soft (muscle) and hard (bone and teeth) tissues immersed in strong acids (hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid) or in mixtures of acids (aqua regia). Samples were tested at different time intervals, ranging between 2 and 6h (soft tissues) and 2-28 days (hard tissues). It was shown that, in every type of acid, complete degradation of the DNA extracted from soft tissues preceded tissue dissolution and could be observed within 4h of immersion. Conversely, high molecular weight DNA amenable to STR analysis could be isolated from hard tissues as long as cortical bone fragments were still present (28 days for sulfuric acid, 7 days for nitric acid, 2 days for hydrochloric acid and aqua regia), or the integrity of the dental pulp chamber was preserved (7 days, in sulfuric acid only). The results indicate that DNA profiling of acid-treated body parts (in particular, cortical bone) is still feasible at advanced stages of corrosion, even when the morphological methods used in forensic anthropology and odontology can no longer be applied for identification purposes.

  14. DNA/polyethyleneimine/hyaluronic acid small complex particles and tumor suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The highest barriers for non-viral vectors to an efficient in vivo gene transfection would be (1) non-specific interaction with biological molecules, and (2) large size of the DNA complex particles. Protective coating of the DNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes by hyaluronic acid (HA) effectively diminished the adverse interactions with biological molecules. Here we found HA also protected the DNA/PEI complexes against aggregation and inactivation through lyophilization-and-rehydration procedures. It allows us to prepare the concentrated very small DNA complex particles (<70 nm) suspension by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by lyophilized-and-rehydrated to a small volume. In vivo gene expression efficiency of the small complex was examined with mice subcutaneously inoculated with B16 melanoma cells. These formulations showed high reporter-gene expression level in tumor after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. Small complex was then made of the plasmid encoding GM-CSF gene, and injected into the mice bearing subcutaneous solid B16 tumor. After intravenous injection, it induced apparent tumor growth suppression in 50% of the mice. Notably, significant therapeutic effect was detected in the mice that received intratumoral injection, and 75% of the mice were completely cured with disappearance of tumor. PMID:20047759

  15. Hybrid polymeric hydrogels via peptide nucleic acid (PNA)/DNA complexation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Te-Wei; Feng, Jiayue; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-12-28

    This work presents a new concept in hybrid hydrogel design. Synthetic water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) polymers grafted with multiple peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are crosslinked upon addition of the linker DNA. The self-assembly is mediated by the PNA-DNA complexation, which results in the formation of hydrophilic polymer networks. We show that the hydrogels can be produced through two different types of complexations. Type I hydrogel is formed via the PNA/DNA double-helix hybridization. Type II hydrogel utilizes a unique "P-form" oligonucleotide triple-helix that comprises two PNA sequences and one DNA. Microrheology studies confirm the respective gelation processes and disclose a higher critical gelation concentration for the type I gel when compared to the type II design. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the interconnected microporous structure of both types of hydrogels. Type I double-helix hydrogel exhibits larger pore sizes than type II triple-helix gel. The latter apparently contains denser structure and displays greater elasticity as well. The designed hybrid hydrogels have potential as novel biomaterials for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

  16. Transcutaneous DNA immunization following waxing-based hair depilation

    PubMed Central

    Sloat, Brian R.; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Xiao, Gang; DiGiovanni, John; Maury, Wendy; Cui, Zhengrong

    2011-01-01

    Transcutaneous DNA immunization is an attractive immunization approach. Previously, we reported that transcutaneous immunization by applying plasmid DNA onto a skin area wherein the hair follicles had been induced into growth stage by ‘cold’ waxing-based hair plucking significantly enhanced the resultant immune responses. In the present study, using a plasmid that encodes the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA63) gene fragment, it was shown that the anti-PA63 antibody responses induced by applying the plasmid onto a skin area where the hair was plucked by ‘warm’ waxing were significantly stronger than by ‘cold’ waxing, very likely because the ‘warm’ waxing-based hair depilation significantly i) enhanced the uptake (or retention) of the plasmid in the application area and ii) enhanced the expression of the transfected gene in the follicular and interfollicular epidermis in the skin. The antibody response induced by transcutaneous DNA immunization was hair cycle dependent, because the plasmid needed to be applied within 5 days after the hair plucking to induce a strong antibody response. The antibody responses were not affected by whether the expressed PA63 protein, as an antigen, was secreted or cell surface bound. Finally, this strategy of enhancing the immune responses induced by transcutaneous DNA immunization following ‘warm’ waxing-based hair depilation was not limited to the PA63 as an antigen, because immunization with a plasmid that encodes the HIV-1 env gp160 gene induced a strong anti-gp160 response as well. Transcutaneous DNA immunization by modifying the hair follicle cycle may hold a great promise in inducing strong and functional immune responses. PMID:21907253

  17. Determination of the dissociation constants for recombinant c-Myc, Max, and DNA complexes: The inhibitory effect of linoleic acid on the DNA-binding step

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Kyung Chae; Rhee, Ho Sung; Park, Chi Hoon; Yang, Chul-Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-08-19

    c-Myc, the protein product of protooncogene c-myc, functions in cell proliferation, differentiation, and neoplastic disease. In this study, recombinant c-Myc and Max proteins, encompassing DNA binding (basic region) and dimerization (helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper) domain of human origin, were expressed in bacteria as Myc87 and Max85. Myc87 was purified under denatured conditions and was renatured again. The dissociation constant for the protein dimers and for dimer/DNA complexes were not detectable by isothermal titration calorimetry because of the low degree of solubility of Myc87 and Max85. Therefore, we set up equations which were used to determine the dissociation constants from the proportion of protein-DNA complexes. The dimer dissociation constants in TBS were 5.90({+-}0.54) x 10{sup -7} M for Max85/Max85 homodimer, 6.85({+-}0.25) x 10{sup -3} M for Myc87/Myc87 homodimer, and 2.55({+-}0.29) x 10{sup -8} M for Myc87/Max85 heterodimer, and the DNA-binding dissociation constants in TBS were 1.33({+-}0.21) x 10{sup -9} M for Max85/Max85/DNA, 2.27({+-}0.08) x 10{sup -12} M for Myc87/Myc87/DNA, and 4.43({+-}0.37) x 10{sup -10} M for Myc87/Max85/DNA. In addition, we revealed that linoleic acid which is known as an inhibitor for the formation of Max/Max/DNA complex reduced the affinity of Max homodimer for DNA. This result indicates that linoleic acid may bind to the DNA-binding region of Max homodimer.

  18. UV-Light-Induced Improvement of Fluorescence Quantum Yield of DNA-Templated Gold Nanoclusters: Application to Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensing of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Yu; Wu, Yun-Tse; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-10-28

    The use of DNA as a template has been demonstrated as an effective method for synthesizing different-sized silver nanoclusters. Although DNA-templated silver nanoclusters show outstanding performance as fluorescent probes for chemical sensing and cellular imaging, the synthesis of DNA-stabilized gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with high fluorescence intensity remains a challenge. Here a facile, reproducible, scalable, NaBH4-free, UV-light-assisted method was developed to prepare AuNCs using repeats of 30 adenosine nucleotides (A30). The maximal fluorescence of A30-stabilized AuNCs appeared at 475 nm with moderate quantum yield, two fluorescence lifetimes, and a small amount of Au(+) on the surface of the Au core. Results of size-exclusion chromatography revealed that A30-stabilized AuNCs were more compact than A30. A series of control experiments showed that UV light played a dual role in the reduction of gold-ion precursors and the decomposition of citrate ions. A30 also acted as a stabilizer to prevent the aggregation of AuNCs. In addition, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) consisting of an AuNC-nucleation sequence and a hybridization sequence was utilized to develop a AuNC-based ratiometric fluorescent probe in the presence of the double-strand-chelating dye SYBR Green I (SG). Under conditions of single-wavelength excitation, the combination of AuNC/SG-bearing ssDNA and perfectly matched DNA emitted fluorescence at 475 and 525 nm, respectively. The formed AuNC/SG-bearing ssDNA enabled the sensitive, selective, and ratiometric detection of specific nucleic acid targets. Finally, the AuNC-based ratiometric probes were successfully applied to determine specific nucleic acid targets in human serum.

  19. Methylarsonous acid causes oxidative DNA damage in cells independent of the ability to biomethylate inorganic arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Tokar, Erik J.; Kojima, Chikara; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its toxic methylated metabolite, methylarsonous acid (MMAIII), both have carcinogenic potential. Prior study shows iAs induced malignant transformation in both arsenic methylation-proficient (liver) and methylation-deficient (prostate) cells, but only methylation-proficient cells show oxidative DNA damage (ODD) during this transformation. To further define if arsenic methylation is necessary for transformation or ODD induction, here we chronically exposed these same liver or prostate cell lines to MMAIII (0.25–1.0 μM) and tested for acquired malignant phenotype. Various metrics of oncogenic transformation were periodically assessed along with ODD during chronic MMAIII exposure. Methylation-deficient and methylation-proficient cells both acquired a cancer phenotype with MMAIII exposure at about 20 weeks, based on increased matrix metalloproteinase secretion, colony formation and invasion. In contrast, prior work showed iAs-induced transformation took longer in biomethylation-deficient cells (~30 weeks) than in biomethylation-proficient cells (~18 weeks). In the present study, MMAIII caused similar peak ODD levels at similar concentrations and at similar exposure times (18–22 weeks) in both cell types. At the approximate peak of ODD production both cell types showed similar alterations in arsenic and oxidative stress adaptation factors (i.e. ABCC1, ABCC2, GST-π, SOD-1). Thus, MMAIII causes oncogenic transformation associated with ODD in methylation-deficient cells, indicating further methylation is not required to induce ODD. Together, these results show that, MMAIII and iAs cause an acquired malignant phenotype in methylation-deficient cells, yet iAs does not induce ODD. This indicates iAs likely has both genotoxic and non-genotoxic mechanisms dictated by the target cell’s ability to methylate arsenic. PMID:24091636

  20. Methylarsonous acid causes oxidative DNA damage in cells independent of the ability to biomethylate inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Erik J; Kojima, Chikara; Waalkes, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its toxic methylated metabolite, methylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), both have carcinogenic potential. Prior study shows iAs-induced malignant transformation in both arsenic methylation-proficient (liver) and methylation-deficient (prostate) cells, but only methylation-proficient cells show oxidative DNA damage (ODD) during this transformation. To further define whether arsenic methylation is necessary for transformation or ODD induction, here we chronically exposed these same liver or prostate cell lines to MMA(III) (0.25-1.0 μM) and tested for acquired malignant phenotype. Various metrics of oncogenic transformation were periodically assessed along with ODD during chronic MMA(III) exposure. Methylation-deficient and methylation-proficient cells both acquired a cancer phenotype with MMA(III) exposure at about 20 weeks, based on increased matrix metalloproteinase secretion, colony formation, and invasion. In contrast, prior work showed iAs-induced transformation took longer in biomethylation-deficient cells (~30 weeks) than in biomethylation-proficient cells (~18 weeks). In the present study, MMA(III) caused similar peak ODD levels at similar concentrations and at similar exposure times (18-22 weeks) in both cell types. At the approximate peak of ODD production, both cell types showed similar alterations in arsenic and oxidative stress adaptation factors (i.e., ABCC1, ABCC2, GST-π, SOD-1). Thus, MMA(III) causes oncogenic transformation associated with ODD in methylation-deficient cells, indicating that further methylation is not required to induce ODD. Together, these results show that MMA(III) and iAs cause an acquired malignant phenotype in methylation-deficient cells, yet iAs does not induce ODD. This indicates iAs likely has both genotoxic and non-genotoxic mechanisms dictated by the target cell's ability to methylate arsenic. PMID:24091636

  1. Methylarsonous acid causes oxidative DNA damage in cells independent of the ability to biomethylate inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Erik J; Kojima, Chikara; Waalkes, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its toxic methylated metabolite, methylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), both have carcinogenic potential. Prior study shows iAs-induced malignant transformation in both arsenic methylation-proficient (liver) and methylation-deficient (prostate) cells, but only methylation-proficient cells show oxidative DNA damage (ODD) during this transformation. To further define whether arsenic methylation is necessary for transformation or ODD induction, here we chronically exposed these same liver or prostate cell lines to MMA(III) (0.25-1.0 μM) and tested for acquired malignant phenotype. Various metrics of oncogenic transformation were periodically assessed along with ODD during chronic MMA(III) exposure. Methylation-deficient and methylation-proficient cells both acquired a cancer phenotype with MMA(III) exposure at about 20 weeks, based on increased matrix metalloproteinase secretion, colony formation, and invasion. In contrast, prior work showed iAs-induced transformation took longer in biomethylation-deficient cells (~30 weeks) than in biomethylation-proficient cells (~18 weeks). In the present study, MMA(III) caused similar peak ODD levels at similar concentrations and at similar exposure times (18-22 weeks) in both cell types. At the approximate peak of ODD production, both cell types showed similar alterations in arsenic and oxidative stress adaptation factors (i.e., ABCC1, ABCC2, GST-π, SOD-1). Thus, MMA(III) causes oncogenic transformation associated with ODD in methylation-deficient cells, indicating that further methylation is not required to induce ODD. Together, these results show that MMA(III) and iAs cause an acquired malignant phenotype in methylation-deficient cells, yet iAs does not induce ODD. This indicates iAs likely has both genotoxic and non-genotoxic mechanisms dictated by the target cell's ability to methylate arsenic.

  2. A Proximity-Based Programmable DNA Nanoscale Assembly Line

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hongzhou; Chao, Jie; Xiao, Shou-Jun; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2010-01-01

    Our ability to synthesize nanometer-scale particles with desired shapes and compositions offers the exciting prospect of generating new functional materials and devices by combining the particles in a controlled fashion into larger structures. Self-assembly can achieve this task efficiently, but may be subject to thermodynamic and kinetic limitations: Reactants, intermediates and products may collide with each other throughout the assembly timecourse to produce non-target instead of target species. An alternative approach to nanoscale assembly uses information-containing molecules such as DNA1 to control interactions and thereby minimize unwanted crosstalk between different components. In principle, this method should allow the stepwise and programmed construction of target products by fastening individually selected nanoscale components – much as an automobile is built on an assembly line. Here, we demonstrate that a nanoscale assembly line can indeed be realized by the judicious combination of three known DNA-based modules: a DNA origami2 tile that provides a framework and track for the assembly process, cassettes containing three distinct two-state DNA machines that serve as programmable cargo-donating devices3,4 and are attached4,5 in series to the tile, and a DNA walker that can move on the track from device to device and collect cargo. As the walker traverses the pathway prescribed by the origami tile track, it encounters sequentially the three DNA devices that can be independently switched between an ‘ON’ state allowing its cargo to be transferred to the walker, and an ‘OFF’ state where no transfer occurs. We use three different types of gold nanoparticles as cargo and show that the experimental system does indeed allow the controlled fabrication of the eight different products that can be obtained with three two-state devices. PMID:20463734

  3. DNA-Based Diet Analysis for Any Predator

    PubMed Central

    Dunshea, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Background Prey DNA from diet samples can be used as a dietary marker; yet current methods for prey detection require a priori diet knowledge and/or are designed ad hoc, limiting their scope. I present a general approach to detect diverse prey in the feces or gut contents of predators. Methodology/Principal Findings In the example outlined, I take advantage of the restriction site for the endonuclease Pac I which is present in 16S mtDNA of most Odontoceti mammals, but absent from most other relevant non-mammalian chordates and invertebrates. Thus in DNA extracted from feces of these mammalian predators Pac I will cleave and exclude predator DNA from a small region targeted by novel universal primers, while most prey DNA remain intact allowing prey selective PCR. The method was optimized using scat samples from captive bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) fed a diet of 6–10 prey species from three phlya. Up to five prey from two phyla were detected in a single scat and all but one minor prey item (2% of the overall diet) were detected across all samples. The same method was applied to scat samples from free-ranging bottlenose dolphins; up to seven prey taxa were detected in a single scat and 13 prey taxa from eight teleost families were identified in total. Conclusions/Significance Data and further examples are provided to facilitate rapid transfer of this approach to any predator. This methodology should prove useful to zoologists using DNA-based diet techniques in a wide variety of study systems. PMID:19390570

  4. Adansonian Analysis and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Base Composition of Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, R. R.; Mandel, M.

    1965-01-01

    Colwell, R. R. (Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.), and M. Mandel. Adansonian analysis and deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of Serratia marcescens. J. Bacteriol. 89:454–461. 1965.—A total of 33 strains of Serratia marcescens were subjected to Adansonian analysis for which more than 200 coded features for each of the organisms were included. In addition, the base composition [expressed as moles per cent guanine + cytosine (G + C)] of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) prepared from each of the strains was determined. Except for four strains which were intermediate between Serratia and the Hafnia and Aerobacter group C of Edwards and Ewing, the S. marcescens species group proved to be extremely homogeneous, and the different strains showed high affinities for each other (mean similarity, ¯S = 77%). The G + C ratio of the DNA from the Serratia strains ranged from 56.2 to 58.4% G + C. Many species names have been listed for the genus, but only a single clustering of the strains was obtained at the species level, for which the species name S. marcescens was retained. S. kiliensis, S. indica, S. plymuthica, and S. marinorubra could not be distinguished from S. marcescens; it was concluded, therefore, that there is only a single species in the genus. The variety designation kiliensis does not appear to be valid, since no subspecies clustering of strains with negative Voges-Proskauer reactions could be detected. The characteristics of the species are listed, and a description of S. marcescens is presented. PMID:14255714

  5. Rapid DNA Sequencing by Direct Nanoscale Reading of Nucleotide Bases on Individual DNA Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, James Weifu; Meller, Amit

    2007-01-01

    Since the independent invention of DNA sequencing by Sanger and by Gilbert 30 years ago, it has grown from a small scale technique capable of reading several kilobase-pair of sequence per day into today's multibillion dollar industry. This growth has spurred the development of new sequencing technologies that do not involve either electrophoresis or Sanger sequencing chemistries. Sequencing by Synthesis (SBS) involves multiple parallel micro-sequencing addition events occurring on a surface, where data from each round is detected by imaging. New High Throughput Technologies for DNA Sequencing and Genomics is the second volume in the Perspectives in Bioanalysis series, which looks at the electroanalytical chemistry of nucleic acids and proteins, development of electrochemical sensors and their application in biomedicine and in the new fields of genomics and proteomics. The authors have expertly formatted the information for a wide variety of readers, including new developments that will inspire students and young scientists to create new tools for science and medicine in the 21st century. Reviews of complementary developments in Sanger and SBS sequencing chemistries, capillary electrophoresis and microdevice integration, MS sequencing and applications set the framework for the book.

  6. MicroRNA and DNA methylation alterations mediating retinoic acid induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Raymond L; Foley, Niamh H; Bray, Isabella M; Das, Sudipto; Buckley, Patrick G

    2011-10-01

    Many neuroblastoma cell lines can be induced to differentiate into a mature neuronal cell type with retinoic acid and other compounds, providing an important model system for elucidating signalling pathways involved in this highly complex process. Recently, it has become apparent that miRNAs, which act as regulators of gene expression at a post-transcriptional level, are differentially expressed in differentiating cells and play important roles governing many aspects of this process. This includes the down-regulation of DNA methyltransferases that cause the de-methylation and transcriptional activation of numerous protein coding gene sequences. The purpose of this article is to review involvement of miRNAs and DNA methylation alterations in the process of neuroblastoma cell differentiation. A thorough understanding of miRNA and genetic pathways regulating neuroblastoma cell differentiation potentially could lead to targeted therapies for this disease.

  7. Ultrasensitive DNA detection by cycle isothermal amplification based on nicking endonuclease and its application to logic gates.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuemei; Ding, Tianrong; Sun, Li; Mao, Changming

    2011-12-15

    In recent years, an intense interest has grown in the DNA logic gates having high potential for computation at literally the "nano-size" level. A limitation of traditional DNA logic gates is that each target strand hybridizes with only a single copy of the probe. This 1:1 hybridization radio limits the gain of the approach and thus its sensitivity. The exponential amplification of nucleic acids has become a core technology in medical diagnostics and has been widely used for the construction of DNA sensor, DNA nanomachine and DNA sequencing. It would be of great interest to develop DNA-based logic systems with exponential amplification for the output signal. In the present study, a series of three-input DNA logic gates with the cycle isothermal amplification based on nicking endonuclease (NEase) are designed. Very low concentrations of the analytes were sufficient to initiate an autocatalytic cascade, achieving a significant improvement of the detection limit, 100-fold improvement compared to the non-autocatalytic system. This was achieved by engineering a simple and flexible biological circuit designed to initiate a cascade of events to detect and amplify a specific DNA sequence. This procedure has the potential to greatly simplify the logic operation because amplification can be performed in "one-pot".

  8. Circulating nucleic acids damage DNA of healthy cells by integrating into their genomes.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Indraneel; Khare, Naveen Kumar; Raghuram, Gorantla Venkata; Chaubal, Rohan; Khambatti, Fatema; Gupta, Deepika; Gaikwad, Ashwini; Prasannan, Preeti; Singh, Akshita; Iyer, Aishwarya; Singh, Ankita; Upadhyay, Pawan; Nair, Naveen Kumar; Mishra, Pradyumna Kumar; Dutt, Amit

    2015-03-01

    Whether nucleic acids that circulate in blood have any patho-physiological functions in the host have not been explored.We report here that far from being inert molecules, circulating nucleic acids have significant biological activities of their own that are deleterious to healthy cells of the body. Fragmented DNA and chromatin (DNAfs and Cfs) isolated from blood of cancer patients and healthy volunteers are readily taken up by a variety of cells in culture to be localized in their nuclei within a few minutes. The intra-nuclear DNAfs and Cfs associate themselves with host cell chromosomes to evoke a cellular DNA-damage-repair-response (DDR) followed by their incorporation into the host cell genomes. Whole genome sequencing detected the presence of tens of thousands of human sequence reads in the recipient mouse cells. Genomic incorporation of DNAfs and Cfs leads to dsDNA breaks and activation of apoptotic pathways in the treated cells. When injected intravenously into Balb/C mice, DNAfs and Cfs undergo genomic integration into cells of their vital organs resulting in activation of DDR and apoptotic proteins in the recipient cells. Cfs have significantly greater activity than DNAfs with respect to all parameters examined, while both DNAfs and Cfs isolated from cancer patients are more active than those from normal volunteers. All the above pathological actions of DNAfs and Cfs described above can be abrogated by concurrent treatment with DNase I and/or anti-histone antibody complexed nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that circulating DNAfs and Cfs are physiological, continuously arising, endogenous DNA damaging agents with implications to ageing and a multitude of human pathologies including initiation of cancer.

  9. An Introductory Laboratory Exercise for Acids and Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Richard; Silberman, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Discusses an acid-base neutralization exercise requiring groups of students to determine: (1) combinations of solutions giving neutralization; (2) grouping solutions as acids or bases; and (3) ranking groups in order of concentration. (JM)

  10. The Bronsted-Lowery Acid-Base Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.

    1988-01-01

    Gives the background history of the simultaneous discovery of acid-base relationships by Johannes Bronsted and Thomas Lowry. Provides a brief biographical sketch of each. Discusses their concept of acids and bases in some detail. (CW)

  11. Inhibition of recombinase polymerase amplification by background DNA: a lateral flow-based method for enriching target DNA.

    PubMed

    Rohrman, Brittany; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-02-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) may be used to detect a variety of pathogens, often after minimal sample preparation. However, previous work has shown that whole blood inhibits RPA. In this paper, we show that the concentrations of background DNA found in whole blood prevent the amplification of target DNA by RPA. First, using an HIV-1 RPA assay with known concentrations of nonspecific background DNA, we show that RPA tolerates more background DNA when higher HIV-1 target concentrations are present. Then, using three additional assays, we demonstrate that the maximum amount of background DNA that may be tolerated in RPA reactions depends on the DNA sequences used in the assay. We also show that changing the RPA reaction conditions, such as incubation time and primer concentration, has little effect on the ability of RPA to function when high concentrations of background DNA are present. Finally, we develop and characterize a lateral flow-based method for enriching the target DNA concentration relative to the background DNA concentration. This sample processing method enables RPA of 10(4) copies of HIV-1 DNA in a background of 0-14 μg of background DNA. Without lateral flow sample enrichment, the maximum amount of background DNA tolerated is 2 μg when 10(6) copies of HIV-1 DNA are present. This method requires no heating or other external equipment, may be integrated with upstream DNA extraction and purification processes, is compatible with the components of lysed blood, and has the potential to detect HIV-1 DNA in infant whole blood with high proviral loads.

  12. Coronavirus phylogeny based on triplets of nucleic acids bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Liu, Yanshu; Li, Renfa; Zhu, Wen

    2006-04-01

    We considered the fully overlapping triplets of nucleotide bases and proposed a 2D graphical representation of protein sequences consisting of 20 amino acids and a stop code. Based on this 2D graphical representation, we outlined a new approach to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of coronaviruses by constructing a covariance matrix. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the two-dimensional curves.

  13. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of complementary DNA encoding rat mammary gland medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Safford, R.; de Silva, J.; Lucas, C.; Windust, J.H.C.; Shedden, J.; James, C.M.; Sidebottom, C.M.; Slabas, A.R.; Tombs, M.P.; Hughes, S.G.

    1987-03-10

    Poly(A) + RNA from pregnant rat mammary glands was size-fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and fractions enriched in medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase (MCH) were identified by in vitro translation and immunoprecipitation. A cDNA library was constructed, in pBR322, from enriched poly(A) + RNA and screened with two oligonucleotide probes deduced from rat MCH amino acid sequence data. Cross-hybridizing clones were isolated and found to contain cDNA inserts ranging from approx. 1100 to 1550 base pairs (bp). A 1550-bp cDNA insert, from clone 43H09, was confirmed to encode MCH by hybrid-select translation/immunoprecipitation studies and by comparison of the amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence of the clone to the amino acid sequence of the MCH peptides. Northern blot analysis revealed the size of the MCH mRNA to be 1500 nucleotides, and it is therefore concluded that the 1550-bp insert (including G x C tails) of clone 43H09 represents a full- or near-full-length copy of the MCH gene. The rat MCH sequence is the first reported sequence of a thioesterase from a mammalian source, but comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of MCH and the recently published mallard duck medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioesterase reveals significant homology. In particular, a seven amino acid sequence containing the proposed active serine of the duck thioesterase is found to be perfectly conserved in rat MCH.

  14. Mathematical modeling of acid-base physiology

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F.

    2015-01-01

    pH is one of the most important parameters in life, influencing virtually every biological process at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body level. Thus, for cells, it is critical to regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and, for multicellular organisms, to regulate extracellular pH (pHo). pHi regulation depends on the opposing actions of plasma-membrane transporters that tend to increase pHi, and others that tend to decrease pHi. In addition, passive fluxes of uncharged species (e.g., CO2, NH3) and charged species (e.g., HCO3− , NH4+) perturb pHi. These movements not only influence one another, but also perturb the equilibria of a multitude of intracellular and extracellular buffers. Thus, even at the level of a single cell, perturbations in acid-base reactions, diffusion, and transport are so complex that it is impossible to understand them without a quantitative model. Here we summarize some mathematical models developed to shed light onto the complex interconnected events triggered by acids-base movements. We then describe a mathematical model of a spherical cell–which to our knowledge is the first one capable of handling a multitude of buffer reaction–that our team has recently developed to simulate changes in pHi and pHo caused by movements of acid-base equivalents across the plasma membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Finally, we extend our work to a consideration of the effects of simultaneous CO2 and HCO3− influx into a cell, and envision how future models might extend to other cell types (e.g., erythrocytes) or tissues (e.g., renal proximal-tubule epithelium) important for whole-body pH homeostasis. PMID:25617697

  15. Mathematical modeling of acid-base physiology.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    pH is one of the most important parameters in life, influencing virtually every biological process at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body level. Thus, for cells, it is critical to regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and, for multicellular organisms, to regulate extracellular pH (pHo). pHi regulation depends on the opposing actions of plasma-membrane transporters that tend to increase pHi, and others that tend to decrease pHi. In addition, passive fluxes of uncharged species (e.g., CO2, NH3) and charged species (e.g., HCO3(-), [Formula: see text] ) perturb pHi. These movements not only influence one another, but also perturb the equilibria of a multitude of intracellular and extracellular buffers. Thus, even at the level of a single cell, perturbations in acid-base reactions, diffusion, and transport are so complex that it is impossible to understand them without a quantitative model. Here we summarize some mathematical models developed to shed light onto the complex interconnected events triggered by acids-base movements. We then describe a mathematical model of a spherical cells-which to our knowledge is the first one capable of handling a multitude of buffer reactions-that our team has recently developed to simulate changes in pHi and pHo caused by movements of acid-base equivalents across the plasma membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Finally, we extend our work to a consideration of the effects of simultaneous CO2 and HCO3(-) influx into a cell, and envision how future models might extend to other cell types (e.g., erythrocytes) or tissues (e.g., renal proximal-tubule epithelium) important for whole-body pH homeostasis.

  16. Running DNA Mini-Gels in 20 Minutes or Less Using Sodium Boric Acid Buffer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Kristin P.; Bielec, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Providing a biotechnology experience for students can be challenging on several levels, and time is a real constraint for many experiments. Many DNA based methods require a gel electrophoresis step, and although some biotechnology procedures have convenient break points, gel electrophoresis does not. In addition to the time required for loading…

  17. Bipolar Membranes for Acid Base Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthamatten, Mitchell; Roddecha, Supacharee; Jorne, Jacob; Coughlan, Anna

    2011-03-01

    Rechargeable batteries can provide grid-scale electricity storage to match power generation with consumption and promote renewable energy sources. Flow batteries offer modular and flexible design, low cost per kWh and high efficiencies. A novel flow battery concept will be presented