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Sample records for acid dna molecule

  1. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  2. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  3. DNA curtains: novel tools for imaging protein-nucleic acid interactions at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Collins, Bridget E; Ye, Ling F; Duzdevich, Daniel; Greene, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids are at the molecular foundations of most key biological processes, including DNA replication, genome maintenance, the regulation of gene expression, and chromosome segregation. A complete understanding of these types of biological processes requires tackling questions with a range of different techniques, such as genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and structural biology. Here, we describe a novel experimental approach called "DNA curtains" that can be used to complement and extend these more traditional techniques by providing real-time information about protein-nucleic acid interactions at the level of single molecules. We describe general features of the DNA curtain technology and its application to the study of protein-nucleic acid interactions in vitro. We also discuss some future developments that will help address crucial challenges to the field of single-molecule biology.

  4. Electrochemical detection of nucleic acids, proteins, small molecules and cells using a DNA-nanostructure-based universal biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meihua; Song, Ping; Zhou, Guobao; Zuo, Xiaolei; Aldalbahi, Ali; Lou, Xiaoding; Shi, Jiye; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and prognosis of many complex diseases, such as cancers, is associated with the variation of various molecules, including DNA at the genetic level, RNA at the regulatory level, proteins at the functional level and small molecules at the metabolic level (defined collectively as multilevel molecules). Thus it is highly desirable to develop a single platform for detecting multilevel biomarkers for early-stage diagnosis. Here we report a protocol on DNA-nanostructure-based programmable engineering of the biomolecular recognition interface, which provides a universal electrochemical biosensing platform for the ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids (DNA/RNA), proteins, small molecules and whole cells. The protocol starts with the synthesis of a series of differentially sized, self-assembled tetrahedral DNA nanostructures (TDNs) with site-specifically modified thiol groups that can be readily anchored on the surface of a gold electrode with high reproducibility. By exploiting the rigid structure, nanoscale addressability and versatile functionality of TDNs, one can tailor the type of biomolecular probes appended on individual TDNs for the detection of specific molecules of interest. Target binding occurring on the gold surface patterned with TDNs is quantitatively translated into electrochemical signals via a coupled enzyme-based catalytic process. This uses a sandwich assay strategy in which biotinylated reporter probes recognize TDN-bound target biomolecules, which then allow binding of horseradish-peroxidase-conjugated avidin (avidin-HRP). Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is then reduced by avidin-HRP in the presence of TMB (3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine) to generate a quantitative electrochemical signal. The time range for the entire protocol is ∼1 d, whereas the detection process takes ∼30 min to 3 h. PMID:27310264

  5. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L.; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π–π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes. PMID:26337293

  6. Single Qdot-labeled glycosylase molecules use a wedge amino acid to probe for lesions while scanning along DNA.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Andrew R; Kad, Neil M; Nelson, Shane R; Warshaw, David M; Wallace, Susan S

    2011-09-01

    Within the base excision repair (BER) pathway, the DNA N-glycosylases are responsible for locating and removing the majority of oxidative base damages. Endonuclease III (Nth), formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (Nei) are members of two glycosylase families: the helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) superfamily and the Fpg/Nei family. The search mechanisms employed by these two families of glycosylases were examined using a single molecule assay to image quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled glycosylases interacting with YOYO-1 stained λ-DNA molecules suspended between 5 µm silica beads. The HhH and Fpg/Nei families were found to have a similar diffusive search mechanism described as a continuum of motion, in keeping with rotational diffusion along the DNA molecule ranging from slow, sub-diffusive to faster, unrestricted diffusion. The search mechanism for an Fpg variant, F111A, lacking a phenylalanine wedge residue no longer displayed slow, sub-diffusive motion compared to wild type, suggesting that Fpg base interrogation may be accomplished by Phe(111) insertion.

  7. Single Qdot-labeled glycosylase molecules use a wedge amino acid to probe for lesions while scanning along DNA.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Andrew R; Kad, Neil M; Nelson, Shane R; Warshaw, David M; Wallace, Susan S

    2011-09-01

    Within the base excision repair (BER) pathway, the DNA N-glycosylases are responsible for locating and removing the majority of oxidative base damages. Endonuclease III (Nth), formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (Nei) are members of two glycosylase families: the helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) superfamily and the Fpg/Nei family. The search mechanisms employed by these two families of glycosylases were examined using a single molecule assay to image quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled glycosylases interacting with YOYO-1 stained λ-DNA molecules suspended between 5 µm silica beads. The HhH and Fpg/Nei families were found to have a similar diffusive search mechanism described as a continuum of motion, in keeping with rotational diffusion along the DNA molecule ranging from slow, sub-diffusive to faster, unrestricted diffusion. The search mechanism for an Fpg variant, F111A, lacking a phenylalanine wedge residue no longer displayed slow, sub-diffusive motion compared to wild type, suggesting that Fpg base interrogation may be accomplished by Phe(111) insertion. PMID:21666255

  8. Nanoelectronics of a DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.; Lyra, M. L.; Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the nanoelectronic properties of a double-strand quasiperiodic DNA molecule, modeled by a tight-binding effective Hamiltonian, which includes contributions from the nucleobasis system as well as the sugar-phosphate backbone. Our theoretical approach makes use of Dyson's equation together with a transfer-matrix treatment, to investigate the electronic density of states, the electronic transmissivity, and the current-voltage characteristic curves of sequences of a DNA finite segment.We compared the electronic transport found for the quasiperiodic structure to those using a sequence of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22.

  9. A split G-quadruplex-based DNA nano-tweezers structure as a signal-transducing molecule for the homogeneous detection of specific nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Keisuke; Shigeto, Hajime; Kuroda, Akio; Funabashi, Hisakage

    2015-12-15

    A portable method of specific nucleic acid detection would be very useful for monitoring public health in a variety of settings for point-of-care and point-of-need testing. However, conventional methods for the detection of nucleic acids are not ideal for use in the field, as they require skilled operators and complex equipment. Here, we constructed a method for specific nucleic acid detection using a split G-quadruplex (Gq) structure that can recognize target nucleic acids without competitive reactions in a bimolecular reaction and directly produce a detectable signal based on peroxidase activity. We developed a single signal-transducing molecule with a split Gq-based DNA-nano tweezers (NT) structure that self-assembles from three single-stranded DNAs through simple mixing, and detects its target without requiring any washing steps. A model target, a partial norovirus mRNA (NV-RNA), was specifically recognized by the split Gq-based DNA-NT, causing it to undergo a structural change that restored its peroxidase activity. The peroxidase activity was measured by following the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), which gave a greenish colorimetric response, and was proportional to the NV-RNA concentration. The lower detection limit was 4 nM. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting specific nucleic acids with a split Gq-based DNA-NT structure as a nucleic acid signal-transducing molecule in a homogenous assay format. Also the target recognition sites of split Gq-based DNA-NT can easily be designed without delicate optimization of tweezers structure. Thus a split Gq-based DNA-NT technique is readily applicable to a basic platform for the development of a portable device.

  10. Ultra-high-density 3D DNA arrays within nanoporous biocompatible membranes for single-molecule-level detection and purification of circulating nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Aramesh, M; Shimoni, O; Fox, K; Karle, T J; Lohrmann, A; Ostrikov, K; Prawer, S; Cervenka, J

    2015-04-14

    Extracellular nucleic acids freely circulating in blood and other physiologic fluids are important biomarkers for non-invasive diagnostics and early detection of cancer and other diseases, yet difficult to detect because they exist in very low concentrations and large volumes. Here we demonstrate a new broad-range sensor platform for ultrasensitive and selective detection of circulating DNA down to the single-molecule level. The biosensor is based on a chemically functionalized nanoporous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated alumina membrane. The few nanometer-thick, yet perfect and continuous DLC-coating confers the chemical stability and biocompatibility of the sensor, allowing its direct application in biological conditions. The selective detection is based on complementary hybridization of a fluorescently-tagged circulating cancer oncomarker (a 21-mer nucleic acid) with covalently immobilized DNA on the surface of the membrane. The captured DNAs are detected in the nanoporous structure of the sensor using confocal scanning laser microscopy. The flow-through membrane sensor demonstrates broad-range sensitivity, spanning from 10(15) molecules per cm(2) down to single molecules, which is several orders of magnitude improvement compared to the flat DNA microarrays. Our study suggests that these flow-through type nanoporous sensors represent a new powerful platform for large volume sampling and ultrasensitive detection of different chemical biomarkers. PMID:25744416

  11. Visualization of large elongated DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Yongkyun; Lee, Seonghyun; Jo, Kyubong

    2015-09-01

    Long and linear DNA molecules are the mainstream single-molecule analytes for a variety of biochemical analysis within microfluidic devices, including functionalized surfaces and nanostructures. However, for biochemical analysis, large DNA molecules have to be unraveled, elongated, and visualized to obtain biochemical and genomic information. To date, elongated DNA molecules have been exploited in the development of a number of genome analysis systems as well as for the study of polymer physics due to the advantage of direct visualization of single DNA molecule. Moreover, each single DNA molecule provides individual information, which makes it useful for stochastic event analysis. Therefore, numerous studies of enzymatic random motions have been performed on a large elongated DNA molecule. In this review, we introduce mechanisms to elongate DNA molecules using microfluidics and nanostructures in the beginning. Secondly, we discuss how elongated DNA molecules have been utilized to obtain biochemical and genomic information by direct visualization of DNA molecules. Finally, we reviewed the approaches used to study the interaction of proteins and large DNA molecules. Although DNA-protein interactions have been investigated for many decades, it is noticeable that there have been significant achievements for the last five years. Therefore, we focus mainly on recent developments for monitoring enzymatic activity on large elongated DNA molecules.

  12. Deformation of DNA molecules by hydrodynamic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Pak Kin; Lee, Yi-Kuen; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2003-12-01

    The motion of a DNA molecule in a solvent flow reflects the deformation of a nano/microscale flexible mass spring structure by the forces exerted by the fluid molecules. The dynamics of individual molecules can reveal both fundamental properties of the DNA and basic understanding of the complex rheological properties of long-chain molecules. In this study, we report the dynamics of isolated DNA molecules under homogeneous extensional flow. Hydrodynamic focusing generates homogeneous extensional flow with uniform velocity in the transverse direction. The deformation of individual DNA molecules in the flow was visualized with video fluorescence microscopy. A coil stretch transition was observed when the Deborah number (De) is larger than 0.8. With a sudden stopping of the flow, the DNA molecule relaxes and recoils. The longest relaxation time of T2 DNA was determined to be 0.63 s when scaling viscosity to 0.9 cP.

  13. Ultra-high-density 3D DNA arrays within nanoporous biocompatible membranes for single-molecule-level detection and purification of circulating nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Fox, K.; Karle, T. J.; Lohrmann, A.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Extracellular nucleic acids freely circulating in blood and other physiologic fluids are important biomarkers for non-invasive diagnostics and early detection of cancer and other diseases, yet difficult to detect because they exist in very low concentrations and large volumes. Here we demonstrate a new broad-range sensor platform for ultrasensitive and selective detection of circulating DNA down to the single-molecule level. The biosensor is based on a chemically functionalized nanoporous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated alumina membrane. The few nanometer-thick, yet perfect and continuous DLC-coating confers the chemical stability and biocompatibility of the sensor, allowing its direct application in biological conditions. The selective detection is based on complementary hybridization of a fluorescently-tagged circulating cancer oncomarker (a 21-mer nucleic acid) with covalently immobilized DNA on the surface of the membrane. The captured DNAs are detected in the nanoporous structure of the sensor using confocal scanning laser microscopy. The flow-through membrane sensor demonstrates broad-range sensitivity, spanning from 1015 molecules per cm2 down to single molecules, which is several orders of magnitude improvement compared to the flat DNA microarrays. Our study suggests that these flow-through type nanoporous sensors represent a new powerful platform for large volume sampling and ultrasensitive detection of different chemical biomarkers.Extracellular nucleic acids freely circulating in blood and other physiologic fluids are important biomarkers for non-invasive diagnostics and early detection of cancer and other diseases, yet difficult to detect because they exist in very low concentrations and large volumes. Here we demonstrate a new broad-range sensor platform for ultrasensitive and selective detection of circulating DNA down to the single-molecule level. The biosensor is based on a chemically functionalized nanoporous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated

  14. Circular DNA Molecules in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini, E. C.; Schultz, J.

    1972-01-01

    The satellite DNA's from the embryos of five species of Drosophila (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. nasuta, D. virilis and D. hydei) have been analyzed for the presence of closed circular duplex DNA molecules, as determined by CsCl-EBr gradients. Circular DNA molecules were found in every species but D. melanogaster. Analyses of cell fractions from adult Drosophila and organ fractions from Drosophila larvae show that fractions containing mitochondria are highly enriched in these molecules. PMID:4643820

  15. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  16. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  17. Electrical Transport Properties of Au-Doped Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jong Seung; Hong, Su Heon; Kim, Hyung Kwon; Kwon, Young Whan; Jin, Jung Il; Hwang, Sung Woo; Ahn, Doyeol

    2005-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules were doped with Au atoms and their electrical transport properties were measured. The Au doping was carried out by incubating a mixture of HAuCl4\\cdot3H2O and DNA solutions. The binding of Au atoms to DNA bases was identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The Au-doped DNA molecules were deposited on nanoelectrodes and the presence of the molecules between the electrodes was determined by both scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Measurement of the current-voltage characteristics showed that the Au-doped DNA molecules exhibited a higher conductivity than undoped DNA molecules. Detailed analysis of the chemical composition shows that there is a strong possibility of reliably controlling the conductivity of DNA molecules using this method.

  18. Macronuclear DNA molecules of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Conover, R K; Brunk, C F

    1986-01-01

    The physical organization of the DNA in the macronuclei of Tetrahymena thermophila was investigated by using alternating-orthogonal-field gel electrophoresis. The genome consisted of a spectrum of molecules with lengths ranging from less than 100 to in excess of 1,500 kilobase pairs. There were about 270 different macronuclear DNA molecules, with an average size of about 800 kilobase pairs. Specific genes were mapped and were generally found on macronuclear DNA molecules of the same size in different strains of T. thermophila. This indicates that the molecular mechanisms giving rise to the macronuclear DNA molecules were precise. The fragmentation process that gave rise to macronuclear DNA molecules occurred between 11 and 19 h after the initiation of conjugation. Images PMID:3773895

  19. DNA heterogeneity and phosphorylation unveiled by single-molecule electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Dunning, James E.; Huang, Albert P.-H.; Nyamwanda, Jacqueline A.; Branton, Daniel

    2004-09-01

    Broad-spectrum analysis of DNA and RNA samples is of increasing importance in the growing field of biotechnology. We show that nanopore measurements may be used to assess the purity, phosphorylation state, and chemical integrity of nucleic acid preparations. In contrast with gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, an unprecedented dynamic range of DNA sizes and concentrations can be evaluated in a single data acquisition process that spans minutes. Because the molecule information is quantized and digitally recorded with single-molecule resolution, the sensitivity of the system can be adjusted in real time to detect trace amounts of a particular DNA species.

  20. Folic acid deficiency increases delayed neuronal death, DNA damage, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 immunoreactivity, and gliosis in the hippocampus after transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Koo; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Suh, Hong-Won; Kim, Young Sup; Kwon, Dae Young; Kwon, Young-Guen; Yoo, Jun-Hyun; Won, Moo-Ho

    2008-07-01

    Folic acid deficiency increases stroke risk. In the present study, we examined whether folic acid deficiency enhances neuronal damage and gliosis via oxidative stress in the gerbil hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia. Animals were exposed to a folic acid-deficient diet (FAD) for 3 months and then subjected to occlusion of both common carotid arteries for 5 min. Exposure to an FAD increased plasma homocysteine levels by five- to eightfold compared with those of animals fed with a control diet (CD). In CD-treated animals, most neurons were dead in the hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after ischemia/reperfusion, whereas, in FAD-treated animals, this occurred 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion. Immunostaining for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was performed to examine DNA damage in CA1 neurons in both groups after ischemia, and it was found that 8-OHdG immunoreactivity in both FAD and CD groups peaked at 12 hr after reperfusion, although the immunoreactivity in the FAD group was much greater than that in the CD group. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1; a final mediator of neutrophil transendothelial migration) immunoreactivity in both groups increased with time after ischemia/reperfusion: Its immunoreactivity in the FAD group was much higher than that in the CD group 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, reactive gliosis in the ischemic CA1 region increased with time after ischemia in both groups, but astrocytosis and microgliosis in the FAD group were more severe than in the CD group at all times after ischemia. Our results suggest that folic acid deficiency enhances neuronal damage induced by ischemia.

  1. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  2. DNA, the central molecule of aging.

    PubMed

    Lenart, Peter; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism of aging could have enormous medical implications. Despite a century of research, however, there is no universally accepted theory regarding the molecular basis of aging. On the other hand, there is plentiful evidence suggesting that DNA constitutes the central molecule in this process. Here, we review the roles of chromatin structure, DNA damage, and shortening of telomeres in aging and propose a hypothesis for how their interplay leads to aging phenotypes.

  3. Visualizing Protein Movement on DNA at the Single-molecule Level using DNA Curtains

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Timothy D.; Gibb, Bryan; Greene, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental feature of many nucleic-acid binding proteins is their ability to move along DNA either by diffusion-based mechanisms or by ATP-hydrolysis driven translocation. For example, most site-specific DNA-binding proteins must diffuse to some extent along DNA to either find their target sites, or to otherwise fulfill their biological roles. Similarly, nucleic-acid translocases such as helicases and polymerases must move along DNA to fulfill their functions. In both instances, the proteins must also be capable of moving in crowded environments while navigating through DNA-bound obstacles. These types of behaviors can be challenging to analyze by bulk biochemical methods because of the transient nature of the interactions, and/or heterogeneity of the reaction intermediates. The advent of single-molecule methodologies has overcome some of these problems, and has led to many new insights into the mechanisms that contribute to protein motion along DNA. We have developed DNA curtains as a tool to facilitate single molecule observations of protein-nucleic acid interactions, and we have applied these new research tools to systems involving both diffusive-based motion as well as ATP directed translocation. Here we highlight these studies by first discussing how diffusion contributes to target searches by proteins involved in post-replicative mismatch repair. We then discuss DNA curtain assays of two different DNA translocases, RecBCD and FtsK, which participate in homologous DNA recombination and site-specific DNA recombination, respectively. PMID:24598576

  4. Single molecule detection of direct, homologous, DNA/DNA pairing

    PubMed Central

    Danilowicz, C.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, K.; Hatch, K.; Coljee, V. W.; Kleckner, N.; Prentiss, M.

    2009-01-01

    Using a parallel single molecule magnetic tweezers assay we demonstrate homologous pairing of two double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules in the absence of proteins, divalent metal ions, crowding agents, or free DNA ends. Pairing is accurate and rapid under physiological conditions of temperature and monovalent salt, even at DNA molecule concentrations orders of magnitude below those found in vivo, and in the presence of a large excess of nonspecific competitor DNA. Crowding agents further increase the reaction rate. Pairing is readily detected between regions of homology of 5 kb or more. Detected pairs are stable against thermal forces and shear forces up to 10 pN. These results strongly suggest that direct recognition of homology between chemically intact B-DNA molecules should be possible in vivo. The robustness of the observed signal raises the possibility that pairing might even be the “default” option, limited to desired situations by specific features. Protein-independent homologous pairing of intact dsDNA has been predicted theoretically, but further studies are needed to determine whether existing theories fit sequence length, temperature, and salt dependencies described here. PMID:19903884

  5. Electrophoresis of Large DNA Molecules in Microcontractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Patrick; Randall, Greg; Kim, Ju Min

    2006-03-01

    The ability to controllably position and stretch large DNA molecules in a microfluidic format is important for gene mapping technologies such as Direct Linear Analysis (DLA). Current technologies developed for DLA use controlled hydrodynamic flows created in a microfluidic device. The downside to this approach is that the imposition of the no-slip condition at the channel walls generates vorticity which can lead to DNA chain tumbling and incomplete stretching. We have recently shown that electric field gradients can be readily generated in a microfluidic device and the resulting field is purely elongational. We present here single molecule studies of DNA molecules driven by an electric field through a microfabricated contraction. Analogous to the hydrodynamic deformation of DNA, we can define an electrophoretic Deborah number (De) for our problem. We will discuss the effectiveness of the device to fully stretch DNA as a function of De and compare to stretching achieved in hydrodynamic flows. A detailed analysis of molecular stretching and the role of a non-homogeneous electric field will be discussed.

  6. Fluorescently labeled circular DNA molecules for DNA topology and topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Maxwell; Berrido, Andrea; Gonzalez, Walter G.; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Chambers, Jeremy W.; Leng, Fenfei

    2016-01-01

    DNA topology plays essential roles in several fundamental biological processes, such as DNA replication, recombination, and transcription. Typically agarose gel electrophoresis is employed to study DNA topology. Since gel electrophoresis is time-consuming and labor intensive, it is desirable to develop other methods, such as fluorescence-based methods, for such studies. In this paper we report the synthesis of a type of unique fluorescence-labeled DNA molecules that can be used to study DNA topology and topoisomerases by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Specifically, we inserted an 82 nt. synthetic DNA oligomer FL905 carrying a 42 nt. AT sequence with fluorescein and dabcyl labels into a gapped DNA molecule to generate relaxed and supercoiled pAB1_FL905. Since the fluorescence intensity of pAB1_FL905 is dependent on its supercoiling status, pAB1_FL905 is a powerful tool to study DNA topology and topoisomerases by FRET. pAB1_FL905 can also be developed into rapid and efficient high-throughput screening assays to identify inhibitors that target various DNA topoisomerases. PMID:27796331

  7. Polymer physics experiments with single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Douglas E.

    1999-11-01

    Bacteriophage DNA molecules were taken as a model flexible polymer chain for the experimental study of polymer dynamics at the single molecule level. Video fluorescence microscopy was used to directly observe the conformational dynamics of fluorescently labeled molecules, optical tweezers were used to manipulate individual molecules, and micro-fabricated flow cells were used to apply controlled hydrodynamic strain to molecules. These techniques constitute a powerful new experimental approach in the study of basic polymer physics questions. I have used these techniques to study the diffusion and relaxation of isolated and entangled polymer molecules and the hydrodynamic deformation of polymers in elongational and shear flows. These studies revealed a rich, and previously unobserved, ``molecular individualism'' in the dynamical behavior of single molecules. Individual measurements on ensembles of identical molecules allowed the average conformation to be determined as well as the underlying probability distributions for molecular conformation. Scaling laws, that predict the dependence of properties on chain length and concentration, were also tested. The basic assumptions of the reptation model were directly confirmed by visualizing the dynamics of entangled chains.

  8. Quantitative detection of single DNA molecules on DNA tetrahedron decorated substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenguang; Xue, Qingwang; Tian, Wenzhi; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    A single DNA molecule detection method on DNA tetrahedron decorated substrates has been developed. DNA tetrahedra were introduced onto substrates for both preventing nonspecific adsorption and sensitive recognition of single DNA molecules.

  9. Reprogramming the assembly of unmodified DNA with a small molecule.

    PubMed

    Avakyan, Nicole; Greschner, Andrea A; Aldaye, Faisal; Serpell, Christopher J; Toader, Violeta; Petitjean, Anne; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2016-04-01

    The ability of DNA to store and encode information arises from base pairing of the four-letter nucleobase code to form a double helix. Expanding this DNA 'alphabet' by synthetic incorporation of new bases can introduce new functionalities and enable the formation of novel nucleic acid structures. However, reprogramming the self-assembly of existing nucleobases presents an alternative route to expand the structural space and functionality of nucleic acids. Here we report the discovery that a small molecule, cyanuric acid, with three thymine-like faces, reprogrammes the assembly of unmodified poly(adenine) (poly(A)) into stable, long and abundant fibres with a unique internal structure. Poly(A) DNA, RNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) all form these assemblies. Our studies are consistent with the association of adenine and cyanuric acid units into a hexameric rosette, which brings together poly(A) triplexes with a subsequent cooperative polymerization. Fundamentally, this study shows that small hydrogen-bonding molecules can be used to induce the assembly of nucleic acids in water, which leads to new structures from inexpensive and readily available materials. PMID:27001733

  10. Reprogramming the assembly of unmodified DNA with a small molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, Nicole; Greschner, Andrea A.; Aldaye, Faisal; Serpell, Christopher J.; Toader, Violeta; Petitjean, Anne; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2016-04-01

    The ability of DNA to store and encode information arises from base pairing of the four-letter nucleobase code to form a double helix. Expanding this DNA ‘alphabet’ by synthetic incorporation of new bases can introduce new functionalities and enable the formation of novel nucleic acid structures. However, reprogramming the self-assembly of existing nucleobases presents an alternative route to expand the structural space and functionality of nucleic acids. Here we report the discovery that a small molecule, cyanuric acid, with three thymine-like faces, reprogrammes the assembly of unmodified poly(adenine) (poly(A)) into stable, long and abundant fibres with a unique internal structure. Poly(A) DNA, RNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) all form these assemblies. Our studies are consistent with the association of adenine and cyanuric acid units into a hexameric rosette, which brings together poly(A) triplexes with a subsequent cooperative polymerization. Fundamentally, this study shows that small hydrogen-bonding molecules can be used to induce the assembly of nucleic acids in water, which leads to new structures from inexpensive and readily available materials.

  11. Methods And Devices For Characterizing Duplex Nucleic Acid Molecules

    DOEpatents

    Akeson, Mark; Vercoutere, Wenonah; Haussler, David; Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2005-08-30

    Methods and devices are provided for characterizing a duplex nucleic acid, e.g., a duplex DNA molecule. In the subject methods, a fluid conducting medium that includes a duplex nucleic acid molecule is contacted with a nanopore under the influence of an applied electric field and the resulting changes in current through the nanopore caused by the duplex nucleic acid molecule are monitored. The observed changes in current through the nanopore are then employed as a set of data values to characterize the duplex nucleic acid, where the set of data values may be employed in raw form or manipulated, e.g., into a current blockade profile. Also provided are nanopore devices for practicing the subject methods, where the subject nanopore devices are characterized by the presence of an algorithm which directs a processing means to employ monitored changes in current through a nanopore to characterize a duplex nucleic acid molecule responsible for the current changes. The subject methods and devices find use in a variety of applications, including, among other applications, the identification of an analyte duplex DNA molecule in a sample, the specific base sequence at a single nulceotide polymorphism (SNP), and the sequencing of duplex DNA molecules.

  12. Construction of DNA Hemicatenanes from Two Small Circular DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Claire; Strauss, François

    2015-01-01

    DNA hemicatenanes, one of the simplest possible junctions between two double stranded DNA molecules, have frequently been mentioned in the literature for their possible function in DNA replication, recombination, repair, and organization in chromosomes. They have been little studied experimentally, however, due to the lack of an appropriate method for their preparation. Here we have designed a method to build hemicatenanes from two small circular DNA molecules. The method involves, first, the assembly of two linear single strands and their circularization to form a catenane of two single stranded circles, and, second, the addition and base-pairing of the two single stranded circles complementary to the first ones, followed by their annealing using DNA topoisomerase I. The product was purified by gel electrophoresis and characterized. The arrangement of strands was as expected for a hemicatenane and clearly distinct from a full catenane. In addition, each circle was unwound by an average of half a double helical turn, also in excellent agreement with the structure of a hemicatenane. It was also observed that hemicatenanes are quickly destabilized by a single cut on either of the two strands passing inside the junction, strongly suggesting that DNA strands are able to slide easily inside the hemicatenane. This method should make it possible to study the biochemical properties of hemicatenanes and to test some of the hypotheses that have been proposed about their function, including a possible role for this structure in the organization of complex genomes in loops and chromosomal domains. PMID:25799010

  13. Fluorescence Detection of Single DNA Molecules.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weidong; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhimin

    2015-09-01

    Single-molecule detection (SMD) and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) were conducted using Cy3- and Cy5-labeled single-strand DNAs (ssDNAs) either immobilized on substrates or encapsulated in microdroplets. High-quality fluorescent images were obtained using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM). In the substrate system, deposition of a low concentration of fluorescence molecules on substrates through electrostatic adsorption showed that most of the fluorescence spots were single molecules, and the mean value of signal to noise ratio (S/N) reached 6.9 ± 0.34. smFRET analysis was conducted through immobilization of donor- and acceptor-labeled oligonucleotides on substrates. In the droplet system, fluorophor-labeled oligonucleotides were injected into T-type microfluidics. Single and double fluorophor-labeled DNA molecules encapsulated in droplets were detected, the FRET efficiency and inter-dye distance of a single donor-acceptor pair were measured accurately. smFRET was conducted detailedly in the tortuous channel for the first time.

  14. Single Molecule Dynamics of Branched DNA Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Danielle; Sing, Charles; Schroeder, Charles

    This work focuses on extending the field of single polymer dynamics to topologically complex polymers. Here, we report the direct observation of DNA-based branched polymers. Recently, we recently demonstrated a two-step synthesis method to generate star, H-shaped, and comb polymers for single molecule visualization. Following synthesis, we use single-color or dual-color single molecule fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize branched polymer dynamics in flow, in particular tracking side branches and backbones independently. In this way, our imaging method allows for characterization of molecular properties, including quantification of polymer contour length and branch distributions. Moving beyond characterization, we use molecular rheology and single molecule techniques to study the dynamics of single branched polymers in flow. Here, we utilize precision microfluidics to directly observe branched DNA polymer conformations during transient stretching, steady-state extension, and relaxation from high stretch. We specifically measure backbone end-to-end distance as a function of time. Experiments and Brownian dynamics simulations show that branched polymer relaxation is a strong function of the number of branches and position of branch points along the main chain backbone.

  15. Mapping Transcription Factors on Extended DNA: A Single Molecule Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenstein, Yuval; Gassman, Natalie; Weiss, Shimon

    The ability to determine the precise loci and distribution of nucleic acid binding proteins is instrumental to our detailed understanding of cellular processes such as transcription, replication, and chromatin reorganization. Traditional molecular biology approaches and above all Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) based methods have provided a wealth of information regarding protein-DNA interactions. Nevertheless, existing techniques can only provide average properties of these interactions, since they are based on the accumulation of data from numerous protein-DNA complexes analyzed at the ensemble level. We propose a single molecule approach for direct visualization of DNA binding proteins bound specifically to their recognition sites along a long stretch of DNA such as genomic DNA. Fluorescent Quantum dots are used to tag proteins bound to DNA, and the complex is deposited on a glass substrate by extending the DNA to a linear form. The sample is then imaged optically to determine the precise location of the protein binding site. The method is demonstrated by detecting individual, Quantum dot tagged T7-RNA polymerase enzymes on the bacteriophage T7 genomic DNA and assessing the relative occupancy of the different promoters.

  16. Programmable DNA-binding Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Meghan S.; Melander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant gene expression is responsible for a myriad of human diseases from infectious diseases to cancer. Precise regulation of these genes via specific interactions with the DNA double helix could pave the way for novel therapeutics. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamides are small molecules capable of binding to pre-determined DNA sequences up to 16 base pairs with affinity and specificity comparable to natural transcription factors. In the three decades since their development, great strides have been made relating to synthetic accessibility and improved sequence specificity and binding affinity. This perspective presents a brief history of early seminal developments in the field and highlights recent reports of the utility of polyamides as both genetic modulators and molecular probes. PMID:23665141

  17. Stepwise oscillatory circuits of a DNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kunming

    2009-08-01

    A DNA molecule is characterized by a stepwise oscillatory circuit where every base pair is a capacitor, every phosphate bridge is an inductance, and every deoxyribose is a charge router. The circuitry accounts for DNA conductivity through both short and long distances in good agreement with experimental evidence that has led to the identification of the so-called super-exchange and multiple-step hopping mechanisms. However, in contrast to the haphazard hopping and super-exchanging events, the circuitry is a well-defined charge transport mechanism reflecting the great reliability of the genetic substance in delivering electrons. Stepwise oscillatory charge transport through a nucleotide sequence that directly modulates the oscillation frequency may have significant biological implications.

  18. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    circular optical path, similar to an acoustic wave guided along the wall of St. Paul's Cathedral. These so called whispering gallery modes (WGM) propagate with little loss, so that even a whisper can be heard on the other side of the gallery. In the optical case, the light beam can travel many thousand times around the inside of the microsphere before being scattered or absorbed, thereby making numerous interactions with an analyte molecule, bound to microsphere from surrounding sample solution. The most part of the light intensity, however, remains inside the microsphere, just below the reflecting glass surface, resulting in a relatively weak interaction between the light and the bound molecule. To enhance this interaction further, we attach tiny 42 nm x 12 nm gold nanorods to the glass surface. When passing a nanorod, the lightwave induces oscillations of conduction electrons, resulting in so called plasmon resonance. These nanorod plasmons greatly enhance the light intensity on the nanorod, so that the interaction of the light with a molecule attached to the nanorod is also enhanced[4-6]. This enhanced interaction results in an increase in sensitivity by more than a factor of one thousand, putting our experiments of single DNA molecule detection within reach. For the specific detection of nucleic acids, we attach single-stranded DNA to the nanorod and immerse our device in a liquid solution. When a matching, i.e. complementary DNA fragment binds from solution to the "bait" on the nanorod, the enhanced interaction with the light results in an observable shift of the WGM wavelength. Since light propagates in a WGM only for a very precise resonance wavelength or frequency, this shift can be detected with great accuracy[3]. On our current biosensor platform, we detect wavelength shifts with an accuracy of less than one femtometer, resulting in an extremely high sensitivity for biosensing, which we leverage for the specific detection of single 8 mer oligonucleotides as well

  19. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  20. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  1. Detection, purification, and characterization of two species of covalently closed circular proviral DNA molecules of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kashmiri, S V; Mehdi, R; Ferrer, J F

    1983-01-01

    Cocultivation of uninfected and bovine leukemia virus-producing bat cells yielded, in addition to the unintegrated linear DNA duplex, DNA molecules that migrated as 4.4- and 4.8-kilobase-pair DNA fragments in gel electrophoresis. These DNA molecules were purified by acid-phenol extraction and cleaved with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, and HindIII, which have one recognition site each on the bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA. Such cleavage generated DNA molecules of approximately 10.0 and 9.4 kilobase pairs, thus indicating the existence of two species of covalently closed circular molecules of bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA. Images PMID:6300454

  2. Structure of Replicating Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules 1

    PubMed Central

    Sebring, E. D.; Kelly, T. J.; Thoren, M. M.; Salzman, N. P.

    1971-01-01

    Properties of replicating simian virus 40 (SV40) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) have been examined by sedimentation analysis and by direct observation during a lytic cycle of infection of African green monkey kidney cells. Two types of replicating DNA molecules were observed in the electron microscope. One was an open structure containing two branch points, three branches, and no free ends whose length measurements were consistent with those expected for replicating SV40 DNA molecules. A second species had the same features as the open structure, but in addition it contained a superhelix in the unreplicated portion of the molecule. Eighty to ninety per cent of the replicative intermediates (RI) were in this latter configuration, and length measurements of these molecules also were consistent with replicating SV40 DNA. Replicating DNA molecules with this configuration have not been described previously. RI, when examined in ethidium bromide-cesium chloride (EB-CsCl) isopycnic gradients, banded in a heterogeneous manner. A fraction of the RI banded at the same density as circular SV40 DNA containing one or more single-strand nicks (component II). The remaining radioactive RI banded at densities higher than that of component II, and material was present at all densities between that of supercoiled double-stranded DNA (component I) and component II. When RI that banded at different densities in EB-CsCl were examined in alkaline gradients, cosedimentation of parental DNA and newly replicated DNA did not occur. All newly replicated DNA sedimented more slowly than did intact single-stranded SV40 DNA, a finding that is inconsistent with the rolling circle model of DNA replication. An inverse correlation exists between the extent of replication of the SV40 DNA and the banding density in EB-CsCl. Under alkaline conditions, the parental DNA strands that were contained in the RI sedimented as covalently closed structures. The sedimentation rates in alkali of the covalently closed

  3. Analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Maglia, Giovanni; Heron, Andrew J.; Stoddart, David; Japrung, Deanpen; Bayley, Hagan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the methods used in our laboratory for the analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores. The technical section is preceded by a review of the variety of experiments that can be done with protein nanopores. The end goal of much of this work is single-molecule DNA sequencing, although sequencing is not discussed explicitly here. The technical section covers the equipment required for nucleic acid analysis, the preparation and storage of the necessary materials, and aspects of signal processing and data analysis. PMID:20627172

  4. Single-molecule Measurements of DNA Topology and Topoisomerases*

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.

    2010-01-01

    Topological properties of DNA influence its mechanical and biochemical interactions. Genomic DNA is maintained in a state of topological homeostasis by topoisomerases and is subjected to mechanical stress arising from replication and segregation. Despite their fundamental roles, the effects of topology and force have been difficult to ascertain. Developments in single-molecule manipulation techniques have enabled precise control and measurement of the topology of individual DNA molecules under tension. This minireview provides an overview of these single-molecule techniques and illustrates their unique capabilities through a number of specific examples of single-molecule measurements of DNA topology and topoisomerase activity. PMID:20382732

  5. Electrical conduction measurement of thiol modified DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. S.; Hwang, S. W.; Ahn, D.

    2003-09-01

    We present a novel transport measurement of 60 base pairs of poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA molecules. Thiol-terminated DNA molecules are chemically anchored at the surface of a Au nanoparticle and this DNA attached Au nanoparticle is self-trapped in between Au nanoelectrodes to make an electrical conduction channel. It provides an automatic electrical conduction channel consisting of electrode-DNA-nanoparticle-DNA-electrode. Due to robust bonding of thiol and Au, this transport channel is stable and reliable. The current-voltage characteristics measured from our device show a nonlinear behavior with voltage gaps comparable to previous experiment using the same molecules.

  6. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  7. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    circular optical path, similar to an acoustic wave guided along the wall of St. Paul's Cathedral. These so called whispering gallery modes (WGM) propagate with little loss, so that even a whisper can be heard on the other side of the gallery. In the optical case, the light beam can travel many thousand times around the inside of the microsphere before being scattered or absorbed, thereby making numerous interactions with an analyte molecule, bound to microsphere from surrounding sample solution. The most part of the light intensity, however, remains inside the microsphere, just below the reflecting glass surface, resulting in a relatively weak interaction between the light and the bound molecule. To enhance this interaction further, we attach tiny 42 nm x 12 nm gold nanorods to the glass surface. When passing a nanorod, the lightwave induces oscillations of conduction electrons, resulting in so called plasmon resonance. These nanorod plasmons greatly enhance the light intensity on the nanorod, so that the interaction of the light with a molecule attached to the nanorod is also enhanced[4-6]. This enhanced interaction results in an increase in sensitivity by more than a factor of one thousand, putting our experiments of single DNA molecule detection within reach. For the specific detection of nucleic acids, we attach single-stranded DNA to the nanorod and immerse our device in a liquid solution. When a matching, i.e. complementary DNA fragment binds from solution to the "bait" on the nanorod, the enhanced interaction with the light results in an observable shift of the WGM wavelength. Since light propagates in a WGM only for a very precise resonance wavelength or frequency, this shift can be detected with great accuracy[3]. On our current biosensor platform, we detect wavelength shifts with an accuracy of less than one femtometer, resulting in an extremely high sensitivity for biosensing, which we leverage for the specific detection of single 8 mer oligonucleotides as well

  8. Plasmonic imaging and detection of single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Shan, Xiaonan; Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Hongyuan; Tao, Nongjian

    2014-04-22

    The capability of imaging and detecting single DNA molecules is critical in the study, analysis, and applications of DNA. Fluorescence imaging is a widely used method, but it suffers from blinking and photobleaching, and fluorescence tags may block or affect binding sites on DNA. We report on label-free imaging of single DNA molecules with a differential plasmonic imaging technique. The technique produces high contrast images due to the scattering of surface plasmonic waves by the molecules and the removal of background noises and interference patterns, allowing for quantitative analysis of individual DNA molecules. Simulation of the images based on a scattering model shows good agreement with the experiment. We further demonstrate optical mapping of single DNA molecules.

  9. Sugar amino acids in designing new molecules.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tushar Kanti; Srinivasu, Pothukanuri; Tapadar, Subhasish; Mohan, Bajjuri Krishna

    2005-03-01

    Emulating the basic principles followed by nature to build its vast repertoire of biomolecules, organic chemists are developing many novel multifunctional building blocks and using them to create 'nature-like' and yet unnatural organic molecules. Sugar amino acids constitute an important class of such polyfunctional scaffolds where the carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl termini provide an excellent opportunity to organic chemists to create structural diversities akin to Nature's molecular arsenal. This article describes some of our works on various sugar amino acids and many other related building blocks, like furan amino acids, pyrrole amino acids etc. used in wide-ranging peptidomimetic studies. PMID:16133829

  10. Real-time DNA sequencing from single polymerase molecules.

    PubMed

    Korlach, Jonas; Bjornson, Keith P; Chaudhuri, Bidhan P; Cicero, Ronald L; Flusberg, Benjamin A; Gray, Jeremy J; Holden, David; Saxena, Ravi; Wegener, Jeffrey; Turner, Stephen W

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Biosciences has developed a method for real-time sequencing of single DNA molecules (Eid et al., 2009), with intrinsic sequencing rates of several bases per second and read lengths into the kilobase range. Conceptually, this sequencing approach is based on eavesdropping on the activity of DNA polymerase carrying out template-directed DNA polymerization. Performed in a highly parallel operational mode, sequential base additions catalyzed by each polymerase are detected with terminal phosphate-linked, fluorescence-labeled nucleotides. This chapter will first outline the principle of this single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) DNA sequencing method, followed by descriptions of its underlying components and typical sequencing run conditions. Two examples are provided which illustrate that, in addition to the DNA sequence, the dynamics of DNA polymerization from each enzyme molecules is directly accessible: the determination of base-specific kinetic parameters from single-molecule sequencing reads, and the characterization of DNA synthesis rate heterogeneities. PMID:20580975

  11. Using Synthetic Nanopores for Single-Molecule Analyses: Detecting SNPs, Trapping DNA Molecules, and the Prospects for Sequencing DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitrov, Valentin V.

    2009-01-01

    This work focuses on studying properties of DNA molecules and DNA-protein interactions using synthetic nanopores, and it examines the prospects of sequencing DNA using synthetic nanopores. We have developed a method for discriminating between alleles that uses a synthetic nanopore to measure the binding of a restriction enzyme to DNA. There exists…

  12. Structural changes of linear DNA molecules induced by cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiguo; Liu, Ruisi; Zhou, Zhen; Zu, Yuangang; Xu, Fengjie

    2015-02-20

    Interaction between long DNA molecules and activated cisplatin is believed to be crucial to anticancer activity. However, the exact structural changes of long DNA molecules induced by cisplatin are still not very clear. In this study, structural changes of long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) induced by activated cisplatin have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that long DNA molecules gradually formed network structures, beads-on-string structures and their large aggregates. Electrostatic and coordination interactions were considered as the main driving forces producing these novel structures. An interesting finding in this study is the beads-on-string structures. Moreover, it is worth noting that the beads-on-string structures were linked into the networks, which can be ascribed to the strong DNA–DNA interactions. This study expands our knowledge of the interactions between DNA molecules and cisplatin. - Highlights: • We investigate structural changes of dsDNA and ssDNA induced by cisplatin. • AFM results indicated long dsDNA formed network, beads-on-string and aggregates. • ssDNA can form very similar structures as those of long linear dsDNA. • A possible formation process of theses novel structure is proposed.

  13. Nanopore detection of DNA molecules in magnesium chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Liu, Lei; Sha, Jingjie; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Chen, Yunfei

    2013-01-01

    High translocation speed of a DNA strand through a nanopore is a major bottleneck for nanopore detection of DNA molecules. Here, we choose MgCl2 electrolyte as salt solution to control DNA mobility. Experimental results demonstrate that the duration time for straight state translocation events in 1 M MgCl2 solution is about 1.3 ms which is about three times longer than that for the same DNA in 1 M KCl solution. This is because Mg(2+) ions can effectively reduce the surface charge density of the negative DNA strands and then lead to the decrease of the DNA electrophoretic speed. It is also found that the Mg(2+) ions can induce the DNA molecules binding together and reduce the probability of straight DNA translocation events. The nanopore with small diameter can break off the bound DNA strands and increase the occurrence probability of straight DNA translocation events.

  14. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  15. Nanopore Unzipping of Individual DNA Hairpin Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Mathé, Jérôme; Visram, Hasina; Viasnoff, Virgile; Rabin, Yitzhak; Meller, Amit

    2004-01-01

    We have used the nanometer scale α-Hemolysin pore to study the unzipping kinetics of individual DNA hairpins under constant force or constant loading rate. Using a dynamic voltage control method, the entry rate of polynucleotides into the pore and the voltage pattern applied to induce hairpin unzipping are independently set. Thus, hundreds of unzipping events can be tested in a short period of time (few minutes), independently of the unzipping voltage amplitude. Because our method does not entail the physical coupling of the molecules under test to a force transducer, very high throughput can be achieved. We used our method to study DNA unzipping kinetics at small forces, which have not been accessed before. We find that in this regime the static unzipping times decrease exponentially with voltage with a characteristic slope that is independent of the duplex region sequence, and that the intercept depends strongly on the duplex region energy. We also present the first nanopore dynamic force measurements (time varying force). Our results are in agreement with the ∼log(\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\dot {V}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) dependence at high \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\dot {V}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}(where \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\dot {V}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} is the loading rate) observed by other methods

  16. Imaging of single uncoated DNA molecules by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, D.; Bustamante, C.; Keller, R.W. )

    1989-07-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope images of DNA molecules adsorbed onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite have been obtained. Three methods of deposition and sample preparation have been utilized. In the first method, a highly concentrated solution of DNA is sonicated, and a drop is deposited on freshly cleaved graphite. Under these conditions, the molecules tend to align in a parallel fashion, forming liquid-crystalline phases. In the second method, a solution of DNA is deposited directly on the graphite surface without sonication. In this case, ammonium acetate, a volatile salt, is used to decrease the amount of the residual salt crystals left after drying. In the third method, a solution containing lysed phage particles and DNA is adsorbed onto a graphite surface. The molecules are seen either isolated or in small bundles. The values of height, periodicity, and thickness observed and the handedness of the molecules are consistent with those expected for DNA. In all cases, the molecules were identified by their characteristic periodic structure and because, at higher magnification, no graphite-like structure was detectable on the surface of the molecules. Often the DNA molecules appear to adsorb in areas of the graphite that have many steps and defects. A mechanism that explains the magnitude of the tunneling currents measured in DNA is proposed. This mechanism, in turn, suggests a general method by which large insulating molecules can be rendered conductive.

  17. Recent developments in single-molecule DNA mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Zev; Oberstrass, Florian C.; Basu, Aakash

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, measurements on individual stretched and twisted DNA molecules have helped define the basic elastic properties of the double helix and enabled real-time functional assays of DNA-associated molecular machines. Recently, new magnetic tweezers approaches for simultaneously measuring freely fluctuating twist and extension have begun to shed light on the structural dynamics of large nucleoprotein complexes. Related technical advances have facilitated direct measurements of DNA torque, contributing to a better understanding of abrupt structural transitions in mechanically stressed DNA. The new measurements have also been exploited in studies that hint at a developing synergistic relationship between single-molecule manipulation and structural DNA nanotechnology. PMID:22658779

  18. Did the Pre-RNA World Rest Upon DNA Molecules?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, Antonio; Dworkin, Jason P.; Miller, Stanley L.

    2004-01-01

    The isolation of a DNA sequence that catalyzes the ligation of oligodeoxynucleotides via the formation of 3' - 5' phosphodiester linkage significance in selection experiments has been reported. Ball recently used this to discuss the possibility that natural DNA molecules may have formed in the primitive Earth leading to the origin of life. As noted by Ferris and Usher, if metabolic pathways evolved backwards, it could be argued that the biosynthesis of 2-deoxyribose from ribose suggests that RNA came from DNA. As summarized elsewhere, there are several properties of deoxyribose which could be interpreted to support the possibility that DNA-like molecules arose prior to the RNA world. For example, 2-deoxyribose is slightly more soluble than ribose (which may have been an advantage in a drying pool scenario), may have been more reactive under possible prebiotic conditions (it forms a nucleoside approx. 150 times faster than ribose with the alternative base urazole at 25 C), while it decomposes in solution (approximately 2.6 times more slowly than ribose at 100 C). Other advantages of DNA over RNA are that it has one fewer chiral center, has a greater stability at the 8.2 pH value of the current oceans, and does not has the 2'5' and 3'5' ambiguity in polymerizations. Yet, there is strong molecular biological and biochemical evidence that RNA was featured in the biology well before the last common ancestor. The presence of sugar acids, including both ribo- and deoxysugar acids, in the 4.6 Ga old Murchison meteorite suggest that both may have been available in the primitive Earth, derived from the accretion of extraterrestrial sources and/or from endogenous processes involving formaldehyde and its derivatives. However, the abiotic synthesis of deoxyribose, ribose, and other sugars from glyceraldehyde and acetaldehyde under alkaline conditions is inefficient and unespecific. Although sugars are labile compounds, the role of cyanamide or borate minerals in the

  19. DNA micelles as nanoreactors: efficient DNA functionalization with hydrophobic organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Tuan; Chidchob, Pongphak; Bazzi, Hassan S; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2016-09-18

    We report a micelle-templated method to enhance the reactivity of DNA with highly hydrophobic molecules. Lipids, chromophores and polymers can be conjugated to DNA in high yield and under mild conditions. This method expands the range of DNA-templated reactions for DNA-encoded libraries, oligonucleotide and drug delivery, nanopore mimetics and DNA nanotechnology.

  20. Progress towards DNA sequencing at the single molecule level

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.M.; Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.

    1995-12-01

    We describe progress towards sequencing DNA at the single molecule level. Our technique involves incorporation of fluorescently tagged nucleotides into a targeted sequence, anchoring the labeled DNA strand in a flowing stream, sequential exonuclease digestion of the DNA strand, and efficient detection and identification of single tagged nucleotides. Experiments demonstrating strand specific exonuclease digestion of fluorescently labeled DNA anchored in flow as well as the detection of single cleaved fluorescently tagged nucleotides from a small number of anchored DNA fragments axe described. We find that the turnover rate of Esherichia coli exonuclease III on fluorescently labeled DNA in flow at 36{degree}C is {approximately}7 nucleotides per DNA strand per second, which is approximately the same as that measured for this enzyme on native DNA under static, saturated (excess enzyme) conditions. Experiments demonstrating the efficient detection of single fluorescent molecules delivered electrokinetically to a {approximately}3 pL probe volume are also described.

  1. Visualization of DNA molecules in time during electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubega, Seth

    1991-01-01

    For several years individual DNA molecules have been observed and photographed during agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA molecule is clearly the largest molecule known. Nevertheless, the largest molecule is still too small to be seen using a microscope. A technique developed by Morikawa and Yanagida has made it possible to visualize individual DNA molecules. When these long molecules are labeled with appropriate fluorescence dyes and observed under a fluorescence microscope, although it is not possible to directly visualize the local ultrastructure of the molecules, yet because they are long light emitting chains, their microscopic dynamical behavior can be observed. This visualization works in the same principle that enables one to observe a star through a telescope because it emits light against a dark background. The dynamics of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose matrix during electrophoresis have been described by Smith et al. (1989), Schwartz and Koval (1989), and Bustamante et al. (1990). DNA molecules during agarose gel electrophoresis advance lengthwise thorough the gel in an extended configuration. They display an extension-contraction motion and tend to bunch up in their leading ends as the 'heads' find new pores through the gel. From time to time they get hooked on obstacles in the gel to form U-shaped configurations before they resume their linear configuration.

  2. Structural Transitions of a Twisted and Stretched DNA Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léger, J. F.; Romano, G.; Sarkar, A.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    1999-08-01

    We report results of a micromanipulation study of single double-helical DNA molecules at forces up to 150 pN. Depending on whether the DNA winding is allowed to relax, or held fixed, qualitatively different structural transitions are observed. By studying the transitions as a function of winding the different DNA structures underlying them are characterized; this allows us to report the first estimate of S-DNA helicity. A model is introduced to describe these transitions; in addition to B-DNA, we find that four DNA states are needed to describe the experiments.

  3. Fractionation of Long DNA Molecules in Microfabricated Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakajin, Olgica; Duke, T. A. J.; Chou, C. F.; Tegenfeldt, J.; Chan, S. S.; Austin, R. H.; Cox, E. C.

    2000-03-01

    Novel microfabricated devices promise to accomplish fractionation of megabase DNA quickly, accurately, at low cost, and by using small sample amounts. At the entrance to the device the DNA is concentrated in a thin band either at a barrier via entropic forces, or on a platinum wire via dielectric forces. The DNA is then electrophoretically driven into an array of posts arranged in a hexagonal lattice. The dependence of mobility on the length of the DNA molecule is induced by a periodically changing electric field. Under the field whose direction changes by 120 degrees, the DNA molecules move in a regular fashion: the longer DNA molecules backtrack more and move forward at lower speeds than the shorter ones. This technique allows electric fields as large as 1000 V/cm and, thus reduces separation times of long molecules compared to the presently used technique of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. While in a gel it takes up to 48 hours of pulsing to resolve T4 (167 kbp) and lambda (48.5 kbp) molecules, in our device it takes less than 10 seconds. In 10 minutes we can separate these molecules by many millimeters. For video clips of DNA in hexagonal arrays go to http://suiling.princeton.edu

  4. Trapping and immobilization of DNA molecules between nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Kuzyk, Anton; Toppari, J Jussi; Törmä, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    DNA is one of the most promising molecules for nanoscale bottom-up fabrication. For both scientific studies and fabrication of devices, it is desirable to be able to manipulate DNA molecules, or self--assembled DNA constructions, at the single unit level. Efficient methods are needed for precisely attaching the single unit to the external measurement setup or the device structure. So far, this has often been too cumbersome to achieve, and consequently most of the scientific studies are based on a statistical analysis or measurements done for a sample containing numerous molecules in liquid or in a dry state. Here, we explain a method for trapping and attaching nanoscale double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules between nanoelectrodes. The method is based on dielectrophoresis and gives a high yield of trapping only single or a few molecules, which enables, for example, transport measurements at the single -molecule level. The method has been used to trap different dsDNA fragments, sizes varying from 27 to 8,416 bp, and also DNA origami constructions. We also explain how confocal microscopy can be used to determine and optimize the trapping parameters.

  5. Single Molecule Visualization of DNA in Pure Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Connie; Duggal, Rajat; Pasquali, Matteo

    2003-03-01

    Polymers are ever-present in society from plastic bottles to DNA. The study of single molecule dynamics will provide the opportunity for advances in fields from synthetic polymer coatings to gene therapy. Many applications involve flow of dilute polymer solutions in viscous solvents. These long, flexible polymer chains (DNA) are coiled at rest in solution. The configuration of the molecules is altered by the applied flow which, in turn, affects the dynamics of the flow. Control of flow allows for manipulation of the DNA molecules. Our apparatus consists of a rectangular channel that has been plasma etched into a silicon wafer with pressure driven flow (pulse-free syringe pump). The dynamics of the DNA molecules in flow are monitored using fluorescence microscopy and digital imaging. The flow channel was designed to allow for visualization of the molecules in the plane defined by velocity and velocity gradient instead of the plane identified by the velocity and the vorticity (previously studied by Smith et al (1999) and LeDuc et al (1999)). Moreover, we can visualize the DNA in a flow where the velocity gradient is not uniform. The individual and average conformations (size and orientation) of the flowing DNA molecules are being studied as a function of the Weissenberg number (product of strain rate and DNA relaxation time) and distance from the channel walls.

  6. Small-molecule discovery from DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, Ralph E; Dumelin, Christoph E; Liu, David R

    2011-12-01

    Researchers seeking to improve the efficiency and cost effectiveness of the bioactive small-molecule discovery process have recently embraced selection-based approaches, which in principle offer much higher throughput and simpler infrastructure requirements compared with traditional small-molecule screening methods. Since selection methods benefit greatly from an information-encoding molecule that can be readily amplified and decoded, several academic and industrial groups have turned to DNA as the basis for library encoding and, in some cases, library synthesis. The resulting DNA-encoded synthetic small-molecule libraries, integrated with the high sensitivity of PCR and the recent development of ultra high-throughput DNA sequencing technology, can be evaluated very rapidly for binding or bond formation with a target of interest while consuming minimal quantities of material and requiring only modest investments of time and equipment. In this tutorial review we describe the development of two classes of approaches for encoding chemical structures and reactivity with DNA: DNA-recorded library synthesis, in which encoding and library synthesis take place separately, and DNA-directed library synthesis, in which DNA both encodes and templates library synthesis. We also describe in vitro selection methods used to evaluate DNA-encoded libraries and summarize successful applications of these approaches to the discovery of bioactive small molecules and novel chemical reactivity.

  7. Partial sequencing of a single DNA molecule with a scanning tunnelling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Tomoji

    2009-08-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope is capable of the real-space imaging and spectroscopy of molecules on an atomic scale. Numerous attempts have been made to use the scanning tunnelling microscope to sequence single DNA molecules, but difficulties in preparing samples of long-chain DNA molecules on surfaces, and problems in reproducing results have limited these experiments. Here, we report single-molecule DNA sequencing with a scanning tunnelling microscope by using an oblique pulse-injection method to deposit the molecules onto a copper surface. First, we show that guanine bases have a distinct electronic state that allows them to be distinguished from the other nucleic acid bases. Then, by comparing data on M13mp18, a single-stranded phage DNA, with a known base sequence, the `electronic fingerprint' of guanine bases in the DNA molecule is identified. These results show that it is possible to sequence individual guanine bases in real long-chain DNA molecules with high-resolution scanning tunnelling microscope imaging and spectroscopy.

  8. Single-molecule mechanochemical sensing using DNA origami nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Deepak; Shrestha, Prakash; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Mandal, Shankar; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Mao, Hanbin

    2014-07-28

    While single-molecule sensing offers the ultimate detection limit, its throughput is often restricted as sensing events are carried out one at a time in most cases. 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures are used as expanded single-molecule platforms in a new mechanochemical sensing strategy. As a proof of concept, six sensing probes are incorporated in a 7-tile DNA origami nanoassembly, wherein binding of a target molecule to any of these probes leads to mechanochemical rearrangement of the origami nanostructure, which is monitored in real time by optical tweezers. Using these platforms, 10 pM platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are detected within 10 minutes, while demonstrating multiplex sensing of the PDGF and a target DNA in the same solution. By tapping into the rapid development of versatile DNA origami nanostructures, this mechanochemical platform is anticipated to offer a long sought solution for single-molecule sensing with improved throughput.

  9. Presentation of large DNA molecules for analysis as nanoconfined dumbbells

    PubMed Central

    Kounovsky-Shafer, Kristy L.; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Jo, Kyubong; Odijk, Theo; de Pablo, Juan J.; Schwartz, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of very large DNA molecules intrinsically supports long-range, phased sequence information, but requires new approaches for their effective presentation as part of any genome analysis platform. Using a multi-pronged approach that marshaled molecular confinement, ionic environment, and DNA elastic properties–but tressed by molecular simulations–we have developed an efficient and scalable approach for presentation of large DNA molecules within nanoscale slits. Our approach relies on the formation of DNA dumbbells, where large segments of the molecules remain outside the nanoslits used to confine them. The low ionic environment, synergizing other features of our approach, enables DNA molecules to adopt a fully stretched conformation, comparable to the contour length, thereby facilitating analysis by optical microscopy. Accordingly, a molecular model is proposed to describe the conformation and dynamics of the DNA molecules within the nanoslits; a Langevin description of the polymer dynamics is adopted in which hydrodynamic effects are included through a Green’s function formalism. Our simulations reveal that a delicate balance between electrostatic and hydrodynamic interactions is responsible for the observed molecular conformations. We demonstrate and further confirm that the “Odijk regime” does indeed start when the confinement dimensions size are of the same order of magnitude as the persistence length of the molecule. We also summarize current theories concerning dumbbell dynamics. PMID:24683272

  10. Mechanisms of small molecule-DNA interactions probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almaqwashi, Ali A; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C

    2016-05-19

    There is a wide range of applications for non-covalent DNA binding ligands, and optimization of such interactions requires detailed understanding of the binding mechanisms. One important class of these ligands is that of intercalators, which bind DNA by inserting aromatic moieties between adjacent DNA base pairs. Characterizing the dynamic and equilibrium aspects of DNA-intercalator complex assembly may allow optimization of DNA binding for specific functions. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies have recently revealed new details about the molecular mechanisms governing DNA intercalation. These studies can provide the binding kinetics and affinity as well as determining the magnitude of the double helix structural deformations during the dynamic assembly of DNA-ligand complexes. These results may in turn guide the rational design of intercalators synthesized for DNA-targeted drugs, optical probes, or integrated biological self-assembly processes. Herein, we survey the progress in experimental methods as well as the corresponding analysis framework for understanding single molecule DNA binding mechanisms. We discuss briefly minor and major groove binding ligands, and then focus on intercalators, which have been probed extensively with these methods. Conventional mono-intercalators and bis-intercalators are discussed, followed by unconventional DNA intercalation. We then consider the prospects for using these methods in optimizing conventional and unconventional DNA-intercalating small molecules. PMID:27085806

  11. Single-molecule studies of DNA dynamics and intermolecular forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Rae Marie

    DNA molecules were used as a model system to investigate fundamental problems in polymer physics; namely, how molecular length, topology and concentration influence the dynamical properties of polymers. A set of DNA molecules suitable for polymer studies was prepared using molecular biology techniques. Video fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking were used to determine self-diffusion coefficients of DNA molecules. Optical tweezers were used to measure the intermolecular forces confining entangled DNA molecules. Scaling of diffusion with molecular length was in agreement with the Zimm model for dilute solutions of linear and circular DNA, indicating that excluded volume effects are appreciable for both topologies. Scaling of diffusion with concentration was also determined for the four possible topological combinations of linear and circular molecules: linear DNA diffusing in a solution of linear DNA, linear DNA in circular DNA, circular in circular, and circular in linear. For lower concentrations molecular topology had little effect and scaling was in agreement with that of the Rouse model. As concentration was increased topology played a much larger role and scaling crossed over to that of the reptation model, predicted to describe the dynamics of entangled polymers. The notable exception was the strongly hindered diffusion observed for a circular molecule diffusing in an entangled linear solution, suggesting the importance of constraint release. Using a new experimental approach with optical tweezers, a tube-like field confining a single entangled molecule was measured, in accord with the key assumption of the reptation model. A time-dependent harmonic potential opposed displacement transverse to the molecular contour, and the force relaxations following displacement were composed of three distinct modes. A characteristic tube radius of the entangled solution was also determined, close to the classically predicted value. The dependence of the above

  12. Nanoconstructions Based on Spatially Ordered Nucleic Acid Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    Different strategies for the design of nanoconstructions whose building blocks are both linear molecules of double-stranded nucleic acids and nucleic acid molecules fixed in the spatial structure of particles of liquid-crystalline dispersions are described.

  13. Placing molecules with Bohr radius resolution using DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Funke, Jonas J; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with nucleic acids can be used to fabricate discrete objects with defined sizes and arbitrary shapes. It relies on building blocks that are commensurate to those of biological macromolecular machines and should therefore be capable of delivering the atomic-scale placement accuracy known today only from natural and designed proteins. However, research in the field has predominantly focused on producing increasingly large and complex, but more coarsely defined, objects and placing them in an orderly manner on solid substrates. So far, few objects afford a design accuracy better than 5 nm, and the subnanometre scale has been reached only within the unit cells of designed DNA crystals. Here, we report a molecular positioning device made from a hinged DNA origami object in which the angle between the two structural units can be controlled with adjuster helices. To test the positioning capabilities of the device, we used photophysical and crosslinking assays that report the coordinate of interest directly with atomic resolution. Using this combination of placement and analysis, we rationally adjusted the average distance between fluorescent molecules and reactive groups from 1.5 to 9 nm in 123 discrete displacement steps. The smallest displacement step possible was 0.04 nm, which is slightly less than the Bohr radius. The fluctuation amplitudes in the distance coordinate were also small (±0.5 nm), and within a factor of two to three of the amplitudes found in protein structures. PMID:26479026

  14. Placing molecules with Bohr radius resolution using DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, Jonas J.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with nucleic acids can be used to fabricate discrete objects with defined sizes and arbitrary shapes. It relies on building blocks that are commensurate to those of biological macromolecular machines and should therefore be capable of delivering the atomic-scale placement accuracy known today only from natural and designed proteins. However, research in the field has predominantly focused on producing increasingly large and complex, but more coarsely defined, objects and placing them in an orderly manner on solid substrates. So far, few objects afford a design accuracy better than 5 nm, and the subnanometre scale has been reached only within the unit cells of designed DNA crystals. Here, we report a molecular positioning device made from a hinged DNA origami object in which the angle between the two structural units can be controlled with adjuster helices. To test the positioning capabilities of the device, we used photophysical and crosslinking assays that report the coordinate of interest directly with atomic resolution. Using this combination of placement and analysis, we rationally adjusted the average distance between fluorescent molecules and reactive groups from 1.5 to 9 nm in 123 discrete displacement steps. The smallest displacement step possible was 0.04 nm, which is slightly less than the Bohr radius. The fluctuation amplitudes in the distance coordinate were also small (±0.5 nm), and within a factor of two to three of the amplitudes found in protein structures.

  15. Placing molecules with Bohr radius resolution using DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Funke, Jonas J; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with nucleic acids can be used to fabricate discrete objects with defined sizes and arbitrary shapes. It relies on building blocks that are commensurate to those of biological macromolecular machines and should therefore be capable of delivering the atomic-scale placement accuracy known today only from natural and designed proteins. However, research in the field has predominantly focused on producing increasingly large and complex, but more coarsely defined, objects and placing them in an orderly manner on solid substrates. So far, few objects afford a design accuracy better than 5 nm, and the subnanometre scale has been reached only within the unit cells of designed DNA crystals. Here, we report a molecular positioning device made from a hinged DNA origami object in which the angle between the two structural units can be controlled with adjuster helices. To test the positioning capabilities of the device, we used photophysical and crosslinking assays that report the coordinate of interest directly with atomic resolution. Using this combination of placement and analysis, we rationally adjusted the average distance between fluorescent molecules and reactive groups from 1.5 to 9 nm in 123 discrete displacement steps. The smallest displacement step possible was 0.04 nm, which is slightly less than the Bohr radius. The fluctuation amplitudes in the distance coordinate were also small (±0.5 nm), and within a factor of two to three of the amplitudes found in protein structures.

  16. Selective dielectrophoretic manipulation of surface-immobilized DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André Germishuizen, W.; Wälti, Christoph; Wirtz, René; Johnston, Michael B.; Pepper, Michael; Davies, A. Giles; Middelberg, Anton P. J.

    2003-08-01

    The fabrication of nanoscale molecular devices is becoming increasingly important and research into their fabrication has intensified over the last few years. In particular, the attachment of molecular objects onto various surfaces has attracted considerable attention. Here, we report a multistep surface immobilization procedure, which allows the specific and controlled attachment of very long DNA molecules onto gold electrodes. Further, we report the effect of dielectrophoresis on these surface-bound DNA molecules with respect to amplitude and frequency, and we show that selected surface-immobilized DNA molecules can be manipulated by dielectrophoresis. Finally, we investigated the use of dielectrophoresis in conjunction with the multistep surface immobilization of fluorescently labelled, surface-bound lambda-DNA in a basic data-storage device.

  17. Watching Individual Proteins Acting on Single Molecules of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Amitani, Ichiro; Liu, Bian; Dombrowski, Christopher C.; Baskin, Ronald J.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    In traditional biochemical experiments, the behavior of individual proteins is obscured by ensemble averaging. To better understand the behavior of proteins that bind to and/or translocate on DNA, we have developed instrumentation that uses optical trapping, microfluidic solution delivery, and fluorescent microscopy to visualize either individual proteins or assemblies of proteins acting on single molecules of DNA. The general experimental design involves attaching a single DNA molecule to a polystyrene microsphere that is then used as a microscopic handle to manipulate individual DNA molecules with a laser trap. Visualization is achieved by fluorescently labeling either the DNA or the protein of interest, followed by direct imaging using high-sensitivity fluorescence microscopy. We describe the sample preparation and instrumentation used to visualize the interaction of individual proteins with single molecules of DNA. As examples, we describe the application of these methods to the study of proteins involved in recombination-mediated DNA repair, a process essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity. PMID:20580968

  18. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  19. Developing DNA nanotechnology using single-molecule fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Nir, Eyal

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: An important effort in the DNA nanotechnology field is focused on the rational design and manufacture of molecular structures and dynamic devices made of DNA. As is the case for other technologies that deal with manipulation of matter, rational development requires high quality and informative feedback on the building blocks and final products. For DNA nanotechnology such feedback is typically provided by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These analytical tools provide excellent structural information; however, usually they do not provide high-resolution dynamic information. For the development of DNA-made dynamic devices such as machines, motors, robots, and computers this constitutes a major problem. Bulk-fluorescence techniques are capable of providing dynamic information, but because only ensemble averaged information is obtained, the technique may not adequately describe the dynamics in the context of complex DNA devices. The single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) technique offers a unique combination of capabilities that make it an excellent tool for guiding the development of DNA-made devices. The technique has been increasingly used in DNA nanotechnology, especially for the analysis of structure, dynamics, integrity, and operation of DNA-made devices; however, its capabilities are not yet sufficiently familiar to the community. The purpose of this Account is to demonstrate how different SMF tools can be utilized for the development of DNA devices and for structural dynamic investigation of biomolecules in general and DNA molecules in particular. Single-molecule diffusion-based Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation (sm-FRET/ALEX) and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques are briefly described and demonstrated. To illustrate the many applications of SMF to DNA nanotechnology, examples of SMF studies of DNA hairpins and

  20. Single molecule study of DNA conductivity in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Legrand, O; Côte, D; Bockelmann, U

    2006-03-01

    The dc electrical conductivity of double stranded DNA is investigated experimentally. Single DNA molecules are manipulated with subpiconewton force and deposited on gold nanoelectrodes by optical traps. The DNA is modified at its ends for specific bead attachments and along the chain to favor charge transfer between the DNA base pair stack and the electrodes. For an electrode separation of 70 nm we find, in aqueous environment, electrical resistances above 100 G Omega indicating that even for weak stretching the double helix is almost insulating at this length scale.

  1. Single molecule study of DNA conductivity in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, O.; Côte, D.; Bockelmann, U.

    2006-03-01

    The dc electrical conductivity of double stranded DNA is investigated experimentally. Single DNA molecules are manipulated with subpiconewton force and deposited on gold nanoelectrodes by optical traps. The DNA is modified at its ends for specific bead attachments and along the chain to favor charge transfer between the DNA base pair stack and the electrodes. For an electrode separation of 70nm we find, in aqueous environment, electrical resistances above 100GΩ indicating that even for weak stretching the double helix is almost insulating at this length scale.

  2. Mechanical stability of low-humidity single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Hormeño, Silvia; Ibarra, Borja; Valpuesta, José M; Carrascosa, José L; Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo

    2012-04-01

    DNA electrostatic character is mostly determined by both water and counterions activities in the phosphate backbone, which together with base sequence, further confer its higher order structure. The authors overstretch individual double-stranded DNA molecules in water-ethanol solutions to investigate the modulation of its mechanical stability by hydration and polycations. The authors found that DNA denatures as ethanol concentration is increased and spermine concentration decreased. This is manifested by an increase in melting hysteresis between the stretch and release curves, with sharp transition at 10% ethanol and reentrant behavior at 60%, by a loss of cooperativity in the overstretching transition and by a dramatic decrease of both the persistence length and the flexural rigidity. Changes in base-stacking stability which are characteristic of the B-A transition between 70 and 80% ethanol concentration do not manifest in the mechanical properties of the double-helical molecule at low or high force or in the behavior of the overstretching and melting transitions within this ethanol concentration range. This is consistent with a mechanism in which A-type base-stacking is unstable in the presence of tension. Binding of motor proteins to DNA locally reduces the number of water molecules and therefore, our results may shed light on analogous reduced-water activity of DNA conditions caused by other molecules, which interact with DNA in vivo. PMID:22020764

  3. Symmetry of electrostatic interaction between pyrophosphate DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Golo, V L; Kats, E I; Kuznetsova, S A; Volkov, Yu S

    2010-01-01

    We study chiral electrostatic interaction between artificial ideal homopolymer DNA-like molecules in which a number of phosphate groups of the sugar-phosphate backbone are exchanged for the pyrophosphate ones. We employ a model in which the DNA is considered as a one-dimensional lattice of dipoles and charges corresponding to base pairs and (pyro)phosphate groups, respectively. The interaction between molecules of the DNA is described by a pair potential U of electrostatic forces between the two sets of dipoles and charges belonging to respective lattices describing the molecules. Minima of the potential U indicate orientational ordering of the molecules and thus liquid crystalline phases of the DNA. We use numerical methods for finding the set of minima in conjunction with symmetries verified by the potential U . The symmetries form a non-commutative group of 8th order, S . Using the group S we suggest a classification of liquid crystalline phases of the DNA, which allows several cholesteric phases, that is polymorphism. Pyrophosphate forms of the DNA could clarify the role played by charges in their liquid crystalline phases, and open experimental research, important for nano-technological and bio-medical applications.

  4. Electrophoretic mobility of supercoiled, catenated and knotted DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cebrián, Jorge; Kadomatsu-Hermosa, Maridian J.; Castán, Alicia; Martínez, Víctor; Parra, Cristina; Fernández-Nestosa, María José; Schaerer, Christian; Martínez-Robles, María-Luisa; Hernández, Pablo; Krimer, Dora B.; Stasiak, Andrzej; Schvartzman, Jorge B.

    2015-01-01

    We systematically varied conditions of two-dimensional (2D) agarose gel electrophoresis to optimize separation of DNA topoisomers that differ either by the extent of knotting, the extent of catenation or the extent of supercoiling. To this aim we compared electrophoretic behavior of three different families of DNA topoisomers: (i) supercoiled DNA molecules, where supercoiling covered the range extending from covalently closed relaxed up to naturally supercoiled DNA molecules; (ii) postreplicative catenanes with catenation number increasing from 1 to ∼15, where both catenated rings were nicked; (iii) knotted but nicked DNA molecules with a naturally arising spectrum of knots. For better comparison, we studied topoisomer families where each member had the same total molecular mass. For knotted and supercoiled molecules, we analyzed dimeric plasmids whereas catenanes were composed of monomeric forms of the same plasmid. We observed that catenated, knotted and supercoiled families of topoisomers showed different reactions to changes of agarose concentration and voltage during electrophoresis. These differences permitted us to optimize conditions for their separation and shed light on physical characteristics of these different types of DNA topoisomers during electrophoresis. PMID:25414338

  5. Carrier molecules and extraction of circulating tumor DNA for next generation sequencing in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Beránek, Martin; Sirák, Igor; Vošmik, Milan; Petera, Jiří; Drastíková, Monika; Palička, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the study were: i) to compare circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) yields obtained by different manual extraction procedures, ii) to evaluate the addition of various carrier molecules into the plasma to improve ctDNA extraction recovery, and iii) to use next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to analyze KRAS, BRAF, and NRAS somatic mutations in ctDNA from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Venous blood was obtained from patients who suffered from metastatic colorectal carcinoma. For plasma ctDNA extraction, the following carriers were tested: carrier RNA, polyadenylic acid, glycogen, linear acrylamide, yeast tRNA, salmon sperm DNA, and herring sperm DNA. Each extract was characterized by quantitative real-time PCR and next generation sequencing. The addition of polyadenylic acid had a significant positive effect on the amount of ctDNA eluted. The sequencing data revealed five cases of ctDNA mutated in KRAS and one patient with a BRAF mutation. An agreement of 86% was found between tumor tissues and ctDNA. Testing somatic mutations in ctDNA seems to be a promising tool to monitor dynamically changing genotypes of tumor cells circulating in the body. The optimized process of ctDNA extraction should help to obtain more reliable sequencing data in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27526306

  6. Electrostatic Interaction of Long DNA Molecules with Solid State Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bingquan; Samuilov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Jonathan; Rafailovich, Miriam; Chu, Ben

    2004-03-01

    At low buffer concentration the electric charge of DNA molecules creates a strong electrostatic interaction and, as a result, a number of phenomena, such as the electro-hydrodynamic instability, partial adsorption at the buffer-semiconductor interface and stretching of DNA with the electric field. Long DNA molecules at the silicon substrate?buffer solution interface are very interesting objects for the electrical transport [1,2] and the mechanical properties, like entropic elasticity, studies. The system (DNA-substrate-electric field in the buffer solution) is very complicated. Due to the strong electrostatic interaction of DNA with the substrate, the image charge is generated, and the physical adsorption takes place. We have studied the S. Pombe genomic DNA of the order of 5 Mbp. Within a surface DNA is entropically partially recoiled due to electrostatic adsorption at a few points. While varying the direction of the low electric field the direction of the electroosmotic flow is changing and stretching the parts of DNA between the adsorption points. If the electric field is high enough, DNA is de-trapped and forms a compact coil. This behavior could be considered as an inverse mechanism of entropy trapping due to confined constrictions. In the case of the surface, DNA is recoiled and trapped in the stretched configuration in the deep energetic barrier by Si surface due to the strong electrostatic interaction. If the energy of the field is enough to overcome the barrier, DNA is detached. The Si surface could be considered as an analog of the entropic recoiling nanostructure. [1]. N. Pernodet, V. Samuilov, K. Shin, J. Sokolov, M.H. Rafailovich, D. Gersappe, B. Chu. DNA Electrophoresis on a Flat Surface, Physical Review Letters, 85 (2000) 5651-5654. [2] Y.-S. Seo, V.A. Samuilov, J. Sokolov, M. Rafailovich, B. Tinland, J. Kim, B. Chu. DNA separation at a liquid-solid interface, Electrophoresis, 23 (2002) 2618-2625.

  7. Automation of a single-DNA molecule stretching device.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Lopacinska, Joanna M; Tommerup, Niels; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Kristensen, Anders; Marie, Rodolphe

    2015-06-01

    We automate the manipulation of genomic-length DNA in a nanofluidic device based on real-time analysis of fluorescence images. In our protocol, individual molecules are picked from a microchannel and stretched with pN forces using pressure driven flows. The millimeter-long DNA fragments free flowing in micro- and nanofluidics emit low fluorescence and change shape, thus challenging the image analysis for machine vision. We demonstrate a set of image processing steps that increase the intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio associated with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, we demonstrate how to estimate the length of molecules by continuous real-time image stitching and how to increase the effective resolution of a pressure controller by pulse width modulation. The sequence of image-processing steps addresses the challenges of genomic-length DNA visualization; however, they should also be general to other applications of fluorescence-based microfluidics.

  8. Automation of a single-DNA molecule stretching device.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Lopacinska, Joanna M; Tommerup, Niels; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Kristensen, Anders; Marie, Rodolphe

    2015-06-01

    We automate the manipulation of genomic-length DNA in a nanofluidic device based on real-time analysis of fluorescence images. In our protocol, individual molecules are picked from a microchannel and stretched with pN forces using pressure driven flows. The millimeter-long DNA fragments free flowing in micro- and nanofluidics emit low fluorescence and change shape, thus challenging the image analysis for machine vision. We demonstrate a set of image processing steps that increase the intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio associated with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, we demonstrate how to estimate the length of molecules by continuous real-time image stitching and how to increase the effective resolution of a pressure controller by pulse width modulation. The sequence of image-processing steps addresses the challenges of genomic-length DNA visualization; however, they should also be general to other applications of fluorescence-based microfluidics. PMID:26133839

  9. Structure and dynamics of single DNA molecules manipulated by magnetic tweezers and or flow

    PubMed Central

    Leuba, Sanford H.; Wheeler, Travis B.; Cheng, Chao-Min; LeDuc, Philip R.; Fernández-Sierra, Mónica; Quiñones, Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Here we describe experiments which employ magnetic tweezers and or microfluidics to manipulate single DNA molecules. We describe the use of magnetic tweezers coupled to an inverted microscope as well as the use of a magnetic tweezers setup with an upright microscope. Using a chamber prepared via soft lithography, we also describe a microfluidic device for the manipulation of individual DNA molecules. Finally, we present some past successful examples of using these approaches to elucidate unique information about protein-nucleic acid interactions. PMID:19015032

  10. Single-molecule mechanics of protein-labelled DNA handles.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Vivek S; Brüggemann, Dorothea; Wruck, Florian; Hegner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA handles are often used as spacers and linkers in single-molecule experiments to isolate and tether RNAs, proteins, enzymes and ribozymes, amongst other biomolecules, between surface-modified beads for nanomechanical investigations. Custom DNA handles with varying lengths and chemical end-modifications are readily and reliably synthesized en masse, enabling force spectroscopic measurements with well-defined and long-lasting mechanical characteristics under physiological conditions over a large range of applied forces. Although these chemically tagged DNA handles are widely used, their further individual modification with protein receptors is less common and would allow for additional flexibility in grabbing biomolecules for mechanical measurements. In-depth information on reliable protocols for the synthesis of these DNA-protein hybrids and on their mechanical characteristics under varying physiological conditions are lacking in literature. Here, optical tweezers are used to investigate different protein-labelled DNA handles in a microfluidic environment under different physiological conditions. Digoxigenin (DIG)-dsDNA-biotin handles of varying sizes (1000, 3034 and 4056 bp) were conjugated with streptavidin or neutravidin proteins. The DIG-modified ends of these hybrids were bound to surface-modified polystyrene (anti-DIG) beads. Using different physiological buffers, optical force measurements showed consistent mechanical characteristics with long dissociation times. These protein-modified DNA hybrids were also interconnected in situ with other tethered biotinylated DNA molecules. Electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) imaging control experiments revealed that quantum dot-streptavidin conjugates at the end of DNA handles remain freely accessible. The experiments presented here demonstrate that handles produced with our protein-DNA labelling procedure are excellent candidates for grasping single molecules exposing tags suitable for molecular recognition in time

  11. Distance measurement along DNA molecules using fluorecent quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strey, Helmut

    2005-03-01

    To create and design better micro- and nanofluidic devices, we need to understand how macromolecules behave when squeezed by lateral barriers to create pseudo-two-dimensional confinement. We present experiments in which we visualize DNA molecules of varying sizes (2 kbp - 50 kbp) trapped in 10 micrometer wide slits, the slit height varying from the radius of gyration of the unconfined molecule (micrometer) down to 25 nm (half the persistence length of DNA). We present data on the diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility (no electroosmotic flow) of SYBR-gold labeled DNA molecules as a function of slit height. Simultaneously, we have assessed the DNA conformation by examining molecules that are end-labeled with differently colored fluorescent quantum dots. By determining the distance between labels, we measure directly the end-to-end distance - a conformational measure much discussed but rarely measured. Using the same approach but turning the problem around, we determined if contour length can be estimated from visualization experiments. The answer to this question becomes important when the distance between specific binding sites on the DNA backbone must be measured. One such application, for example, is the determination of haplotypes (genetic variability due to blocks of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)) in diploid individuals.

  12. De novo DNA synthesis using single molecule PCR

    PubMed Central

    Yehezkel, Tuval Ben; Linshiz, Gregory; Buaron, Hen; Kaplan, Shai; Shabi, Uri; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-01-01

    The throughput of DNA reading (sequencing) has dramatically increased recently due to the incorporation of in vitro clonal amplification. The throughput of DNA writing (synthesis) is trailing behind, with cloning and sequencing constituting the main bottleneck. To overcome this bottleneck, an in vitro alternative for in vivo DNA cloning must be integrated into DNA synthesis methods. Here we show how a new single molecule PCR (smPCR)-based procedure can be employed as a general substitute to in vivo cloning thereby allowing for the first time in vitro DNA synthesis. We integrated this rapid and high fidelity in vitro procedure into our earlier recursive DNA synthesis and error correction procedure and used it to efficiently construct and error-correct a 1.8-kb DNA molecule from synthetic unpurified oligos completely in vitro. Although we demonstrate incorporating smPCR in a particular method, the approach is general and can be used in principle in conjunction with other DNA synthesis methods as well. PMID:18667587

  13. Mechanics and Single-Molecule Interrogation of DNA Recombination.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason C; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    The repair of DNA by homologous recombination is an essential, efficient, and high-fidelity process that mends DNA lesions formed during cellular metabolism; these lesions include double-stranded DNA breaks, daughter-strand gaps, and DNA cross-links. Genetic defects in the homologous recombination pathway undermine genomic integrity and cause the accumulation of gross chromosomal abnormalities-including rearrangements, deletions, and aneuploidy-that contribute to cancer formation. Recombination proceeds through the formation of joint DNA molecules-homologously paired but metastable DNA intermediates that are processed by several alternative subpathways-making recombination a versatile and robust mechanism to repair damaged chromosomes. Modern biophysical methods make it possible to visualize, probe, and manipulate the individual molecules participating in the intermediate steps of recombination, revealing new details about the mechanics of genetic recombination. We review and discuss the individual stages of homologous recombination, focusing on common pathways in bacteria, yeast, and humans, and place particular emphasis on the molecular mechanisms illuminated by single-molecule methods.

  14. High-Throughput Single-Molecule Studies of Protein-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Aaron D.; Finkelstein, Ilya J.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence and force-based single-molecule studies of protein-nucleic acid interactions continue to shed critical insights into many aspects of DNA and RNA processing. As single-molecule assays are inherently low-throughput, obtaining statistically relevant datasets remains a major challenge. Additionally, most fluorescence-based single-molecule particle-tracking assays are limited to observing fluorescent proteins that are in the low-nanomolar range, as spurious background signals predominate at higher fluorophore concentrations. These technical limitations have traditionally limited the types of questions that could be addressed via single-molecule methods. In this review, we describe new approaches for high-throughput and high-concentration single-molecule biochemical studies. We conclude with a discussion of outstanding challenges for the single-molecule biologist and how these challenges can be tackled to further approach the biochemical complexity of the cell. PMID:24859086

  15. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  16. DNA binding fluorescent proteins for the direct visualization of large DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonghyun; Oh, Yeeun; Lee, Jungyoon; Choe, Sojeong; Lim, Sangyong; Lee, Hyun Soo; Jo, Kyubong; Schwartz, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that also bind DNA molecules are useful reagents for a broad range of biological applications because they can be optically localized and tracked within cells, or provide versatile labels for in vitro experiments. We report a novel design for a fluorescent, DNA-binding protein (FP-DBP) that completely ‘paints’ entire DNA molecules, whereby sequence-independent DNA binding is accomplished by linking a fluorescent protein to two small peptides (KWKWKKA) using lysine for binding to the DNA phosphates, and tryptophan for intercalating between DNA bases. Importantly, this ubiquitous binding motif enables fluorescent proteins (Kd = 14.7 μM) to confluently stain DNA molecules and such binding is reversible via pH shifts. These proteins offer useful robust advantages for single DNA molecule studies: lack of fluorophore mediated photocleavage and staining that does not perturb polymer contour lengths. Accordingly, we demonstrate confluent staining of naked DNA molecules presented within microfluidic devices, or localized within live bacterial cells. PMID:26264666

  17. Single-molecule mechanics of protein-labelled DNA handles

    PubMed Central

    Wruck, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Summary DNA handles are often used as spacers and linkers in single-molecule experiments to isolate and tether RNAs, proteins, enzymes and ribozymes, amongst other biomolecules, between surface-modified beads for nanomechanical investigations. Custom DNA handles with varying lengths and chemical end-modifications are readily and reliably synthesized en masse, enabling force spectroscopic measurements with well-defined and long-lasting mechanical characteristics under physiological conditions over a large range of applied forces. Although these chemically tagged DNA handles are widely used, their further individual modification with protein receptors is less common and would allow for additional flexibility in grabbing biomolecules for mechanical measurements. In-depth information on reliable protocols for the synthesis of these DNA–protein hybrids and on their mechanical characteristics under varying physiological conditions are lacking in literature. Here, optical tweezers are used to investigate different protein-labelled DNA handles in a microfluidic environment under different physiological conditions. Digoxigenin (DIG)-dsDNA-biotin handles of varying sizes (1000, 3034 and 4056 bp) were conjugated with streptavidin or neutravidin proteins. The DIG-modified ends of these hybrids were bound to surface-modified polystyrene (anti-DIG) beads. Using different physiological buffers, optical force measurements showed consistent mechanical characteristics with long dissociation times. These protein-modified DNA hybrids were also interconnected in situ with other tethered biotinylated DNA molecules. Electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) imaging control experiments revealed that quantum dot–streptavidin conjugates at the end of DNA handles remain freely accessible. The experiments presented here demonstrate that handles produced with our protein–DNA labelling procedure are excellent candidates for grasping single molecules exposing tags suitable for molecular recognition

  18. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji-Young

    2006-01-01

    The potential of single molecule detection as an analysis tool in biological and medical fields is well recognized today. This fast evolving technique will provide fundamental sensitivity to pick up individual pathogen molecules, and therefore contribute to a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for a complete cure. Many studies are being carried out to successfully apply this technique in real screening fields. In this dissertation, several attempts are shown that have been made to test and refine the application of the single molecule technique as a clinical screening method. A basic applicability was tested with a 100% target content sample, using electrophoretic mobility and multiple colors as identification tools. Both electrophoretic and spectral information of individual molecule were collected within a second, while the molecule travels along the flow in a capillary. Insertion of a transmission grating made the recording of the whole spectrum of a dye-stained molecule possible without adding complicated instrumental components. Collecting two kinds of information simultaneously and combining them allowed more thorough identification, up to 98.8% accuracy. Probing mRNA molecules with fluorescently labeled cDNA via hybridization was also carried out. The spectral differences among target, probe, and hybrid were interpreted in terms of dispersion distances after transmission grating, and used for the identification of each molecule. The probes were designed to have the least background when they are free, but have strong fluorescence after hybridization via fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The mRNA-cDNA hybrids were further imaged in whole blood, plasma, and saliva, to test how far a crude preparation can be tolerated. Imaging was possible with up to 50% of clear bio-matrix contents, suggesting a simple lysis and dilution would be sufficient for imaging for some cells. Real pathogen DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-I6 in human genomic DNA

  19. Molecular forces for the binding and condensation of DNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xian-E; Yang, Jie

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to investigate the binding between a double-stranded DNA and bilayers of cationic lipids and zwitterionic lipids in low ionic-strength solutions. The binding of a DNA molecule to freshly cleaved mica surface in solution has also been measured. The binding of DNA molecules to cationic lipid bilayers has a minimal strength of approximately 45 pN. On zwitterionic lipid bilayers and mica surface, the minimal binding strength is approximately twice that value. The binding also has a dynamic nature, with only a certain percentage of recorded force curves containing the binding characteristics. Divalent Mg(2+) ions enhance the binding by increasing that percentage without any effect on the binding strength. We have also observed a long-range attraction between DNA molecules and cationic lipid bilayers with a strength much larger than the minimum force and a range well over 50 nm, possibly related to the driving force responsible for the two-dimensional condensation of DNA. PMID:11751322

  20. Torsional stress in DNA limits collaboration among reverse gyrase molecules.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Taisaku; Sutoh, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Reverse gyrase is an enzyme that can overwind (introduce positive supercoils into) DNA using the energy obtained from ATP hydrolysis. The enzyme is found in hyperthermophiles, and the overwinding reaction generally requires a temperature above 70 °C. In a previous study using microscopy, we have shown that 30 consecutive mismatched base pairs (a bubble) in DNA serve as a well-defined substrate site for reverse gyrase, warranting the processive overwinding activity down to 50 °C. Here, we inquire how multiple reverse gyrase molecules may collaborate with each other in overwinding one DNA molecule. We introduced one, two, or four bubbles in a linear DNA that tethered a magnetic bead to a coverslip surface. At 40-71 °C in the presence of reverse gyrase, the bead rotated clockwise as viewed from above, to relax the DNA twisted by reverse gyrase. Dependence on the enzyme concentration indicated that each bubble binds reverse gyrase tightly (dissociation constant < 0.1 nm) and that bound enzyme continuously overwinds DNA for > 5 min. Rotation with two bubbles was significantly faster compared with one bubble, indicating that overwinding actions are basically additive, but four bubbles did not show further acceleration except at 40 °C where the activity was very low. The apparent saturation is due to the hydrodynamic friction against the rotating bead, as confirmed by increasing the medium viscosity. When torsional stress in the DNA, determined by the friction, approaches ~ 7 pN·nm (at 71 °C), the overwinding activity of reverse gyrase drops sharply. Multiple molecules of reverse gyrase collaborate additively within this limit.

  1. Modular stitching to image single-molecule DNA transport.

    PubMed

    Guan, Juan; Wang, Bo; Bae, Sung Chul; Granick, Steve

    2013-04-24

    For study of time-dependent conformation, all previous single-molecule imaging studies of polymer transport involve fluorescence labeling uniformly along the chain, which suffers from limited resolution due to the diffraction limit. Here we demonstrate the concept of submolecular single-molecule imaging with DNA chains assembled from DNA fragments such that a chain is labeled at designated spots with covalently attached fluorescent dyes and the chain backbone with dyes of different color. High density of dyes ensures good signal-to-noise ratio to localize the designated spots in real time with nanometer precision and prevents significant photobleaching for long-time tracking purposes. To demonstrate usefulness of this approach, we image electrophoretic transport of λ-DNA through agarose gels. The unexpected pattern is observed that one end of each molecule tends to stretch out in the electric field while the other end remains quiescent for some time before it snaps forward and the stretch-recoil cycle repeats. These features are neither predicted by prevailing theories of electrophoresis mechanism nor detectable by conventional whole-chain labeling methods, which demonstrate pragmatically the usefulness of modular stitching to reveal internal chain dynamics of single molecules.

  2. Small Molecules, Inhibitors of DNA-PK, Targeting DNA Repair, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, David; Amrein, Lilian; Panasci, Lawrence; Aloyz, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining a major mechanism for the repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA-PK. Computer based drug

  3. Recent Advances in Developing Small Molecules Targeting Nucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maolin; Yu, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chao; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids participate in a large number of biological processes. However, current approaches for small molecules targeting protein are incompatible with nucleic acids. On the other hand, the lack of crystallization of nucleic acid is the limiting factor for nucleic acid drug design. Because of the improvements in crystallization in recent years, a great many structures of nucleic acids have been reported, providing basic information for nucleic acid drug discovery. This review focuses on the discovery and development of small molecules targeting nucleic acids. PMID:27248995

  4. Mitochondrial genome of the moon jelly Aurelia aurita (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa): A linear DNA molecule encoding a putative DNA-dependent DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhiyong; Graf, Shannon; Chaga, Oleg Y; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2006-10-15

    The 16,937-nuceotide sequence of the linear mitochondrial DNA (mt-DNA) molecule of the moon jelly Aurelia aurita (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) - the first mtDNA sequence from the class Scypozoa and the first sequence of a linear mtDNA from Metazoa - has been determined. This sequence contains genes for 13 energy pathway proteins, small and large subunit rRNAs, and methionine and tryptophan tRNAs. In addition, two open reading frames of 324 and 969 base pairs in length have been found. The deduced amino-acid sequence of one of them, ORF969, displays extensive sequence similarity with the polymerase [but not the exonuclease] domain of family B DNA polymerases, and this ORF has been tentatively identified as dnab. This is the first report of dnab in animal mtDNA. The genes in A. aurita mtDNA are arranged in two clusters with opposite transcriptional polarities; transcription proceeding toward the ends of the molecule. The determined sequences at the ends of the molecule are nearly identical but inverted and lack any obvious potential secondary structures or telomere-like repeat elements. The acquisition of mitochondrial genomic data for the second class of Cnidaria allows us to reconstruct characteristic features of mitochondrial evolution in this animal phylum.

  5. Detection of pathogenic DNA at the single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiatène, Idir; Klamp, Tobias; Schüttpelz, Mark; Sauer, Markus

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate ultrasensitive detection of pathogenic DNA in a homogeneous assay at the single-molecule level applying two-color coincidence analysis. The target molecule we quantify is a 100 nucleotide long synthetic single-stranded oligonucleotide adapted from Streptococcus pneumoniae, a bacterium causing lower respiratory tract infections. Using spontaneous hybridization of two differently fluorescing Molecular Beacons we demonstrate a detection sensitivity of 100 fM (10-13M) in 30 seconds applying a simple microfluidic device with a 100 μm channel and confocal two-color fluorescence microscopy.

  6. Growth of immobilized DNA by polymerase: bridging nanoelectrodes with individual dsDNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Linko, Veikko; Leppiniemi, Jenni; Shen, Boxuan; Niskanen, Einari; Hytönen, Vesa P; Toppari, J Jussi

    2011-09-01

    We present a method for controlled connection of gold electrodes with dsDNA molecules (locally on a chip) by utilizing polymerase to elongate single-stranded DNA primers attached to the electrodes. Thiol-modified oligonucleotides are directed and immobilized to nanoscale electrodes by means of dielectrophoretic trapping, and extended in a procedure mimicking PCR, finally forming a complete dsDNA molecule bridging the gap between the electrodes. The technique opens up opportunities for building from the bottom-up, for detection and sensing applications, and also for molecular electronics.

  7. Growth of immobilized DNA by polymerase: bridging nanoelectrodes with individual dsDNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linko, Veikko; Leppiniemi, Jenni; Shen, Boxuan; Niskanen, Einari; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Toppari, J. Jussi

    2011-09-01

    We present a method for controlled connection of gold electrodes with dsDNA molecules (locally on a chip) by utilizing polymerase to elongate single-stranded DNA primers attached to the electrodes. Thiol-modified oligonucleotides are directed and immobilized to nanoscale electrodes by means of dielectrophoretic trapping, and extended in a procedure mimicking PCR, finally forming a complete dsDNA molecule bridging the gap between the electrodes. The technique opens up opportunities for building from the bottom-up, for detection and sensing applications, and also for molecular electronics.

  8. Simple horizontal magnetic tweezers for micromanipulation of single DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Christopher P; Tyson, Christopher; Zischkau, Joseph; Mehl, Patrick; Tuma, Pamela L; Pegg, Ian L; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a simple-to-implement magnetic force transducer that can apply a wide range of piconewton (pN) scale forces on single DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes in the horizontal plane. The resulting low-noise force-extension data enable very high-resolution detection of changes in the DNA tether's extension: ~0.05 pN in force and <10 nm change in extension. We have also verified that we can manipulate DNA in near equilibrium conditions through the wide range of forces by ramping the force from low to high and back again, and observing minimal hysteresis in the molecule's force response. Using a calibration technique based on Stokes' drag law, we have confirmed our force measurements from DNA force-extension experiments obtained using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem applied to transverse fluctuations of the magnetic microsphere. We present data on the force-distance characteristics of a DNA molecule complexed with histones. The results illustrate how the tweezers can be used to study DNA binding proteins at the single molecule level.

  9. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  10. Genome-wide Mapping of Nucleosome Positioning and DNA Methylation Within Individual DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaping; Lay, Fides D.; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Jones, Peter A.; Kelly, Terry

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning work together to generate chromatin structures that regulate gene expression. Nucleosomes are typically mapped using nuclease digestion requiring significant amounts of material and varying enzyme concentrations. We have developed a method that uses a GpC methyltransferase (M.CviPI) and next generation sequencing to footprint nucleosome positioning genome-wide using less than 1 million cells, which does not suffer from sequence based biases associated with MNase digestion and retains endogenous DNA methylation information. Using a novel bioinformatics pipeline we identify chromatin configurations associated with a variety of functional genomic loci including distinct promoter types, enhancers, insulators, X-inactivated and imprinted genes. Importantly, DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning information are obtained from the same DNA molecule, giving the first genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning correlation at the single molecule level that can be used to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  11. Single-molecule observation of prokaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Hylkje J; Duderstadt, Karl E; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2015-01-01

    Replication of DNA requires the coordinated activity of a number of proteins within a multiprotein complex, the replisome. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques have enabled the observation of dynamic behavior of individual replisome components and of the replisome as a whole, aspects that previously often have been obscured by ensemble averaging in more classical solution-phase biochemical experiments. To improve robustness and reproducibility of single-molecule assays of replication and allow objective analysis and comparison of results obtained from such assays, common practices should be established. Here, we describe the technical details of two assays to study replisome activity. In one, the kinetics of replication are observed as length changes in DNA molecules mechanically stretched by a laminar flow applied to attached beads. In the other, fluorescence imaging is used to determine both the kinetics and stoichiometry of individual replisome components. These in vitro single-molecule methods allow for elucidation of the dynamic behavior of individual replication proteins of prokaryotic replication systems.

  12. Single-Molecule Electronic Monitoring of DNA Polymerase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marushchak, Denys O.; Pugliese, Kaitlin M.; Turvey, Mackenzie W.; Choi, Yongki; Gul, O. Tolga; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Rajapakse, Arith J.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    Single-molecule techniques can reveal new spatial and kinetic details of the conformational changes occurring during enzymatic catalysis. Here, we investigate the activity of DNA polymerases using an electronic single-molecule technique based on carbon nanotube transistors. Single molecules of the Klenow fragment (KF) of polymerase I were conjugated to the transistors and then monitored via fluctuations in electrical conductance. Continuous, long-term monitoring recorded single KF molecules incorporating up to 10,000 new bases into single-stranded DNA templates. The duration of individual incorporation events was invariant across all analog and native nucleotides, indicating that the precise structure of different base pairs has no impact on the timing of incorporation. Despite similar timings, however, the signal magnitudes generated by certain analogs reveal alternate conformational states that do not occur with native nucleotides. The differences induced by these analogs suggest that the electronic technique is sensing KF's O-helix as it tests the stability of nascent base pairs.

  13. Analysis of alcohol-induced DNA damage in Escherichia coli by visualizing single genomic DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yujin; Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Jisoo; Oh, Yeeun; Kim, Dogeun; Lee, Jungyun; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-07-21

    Consumption of alcohol injures DNA, and such damage is considered to be a primary cause for the development of cancer and many other diseases essentially due to reactive oxygen species generated from alcohol. To sensitively detect alcohol-induced DNA lesions in a biological system, we introduced a novel analytical platform for visualization of single genomic DNA molecules using E. coli. By fluorescently labelling the DNA lesions, our approach demonstrated, with the highest sensitivity, that we could count the number of DNA lesions induced by alcohol metabolism in a single bacterial cell. Moreover, our results showed a linear relationship between ethanol concentration and the number of DNA lesions: 0.88 lesions per 1% ethanol. Using this approach, we quantitatively analysed the DNA damage induced by exposure to alcoholic beverages such as beer (5% ethanol), rice wine (13%), soju (20%), and whisky (40%). PMID:27186604

  14. Rapid sequencing of DNA based on single-molecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, Steven A.; Davis, Lloyd M.; Fairfield, Frederick R.; Hammond, Mark L.; Harger, Carol A.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Martin, John C.; Nutter, Harvey L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Simpson, Daniel J.

    1991-07-01

    Sequencing the human genome is a major undertaking considering the large number of nucleotides present in the genome and the slow methods currently available to perform the task. The authors have recently reported on a scheme to sequence DNA rapidly using a non-gel based technique. The concept is based upon the incorporation of fluorescently labeled nucleotides into a strand of DNA, isolation and manipulation of a labeled DNA fragment and the detection of single nucleotides using ultra-sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection following their cleavage from the fragment. Detection of individual fluorophores in the liquid phase was accomplished with time-gated detection following pulsed-laser excitation. The photon bursts from individual rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules travelling through a laser beam have been observed, as have bursts from single fluorescently modified nucleotides. Using two different biotinylated nucleotides as a model system for fluorescently labeled nucleotides, the authors have observed synthesis of the complementary copy of M13 bacteriophage. Work with fluorescently labeled nucleotides is underway. Individual molecules of DNA attached to a microbead have been observed and manipulated with an epifluorescence microscope.

  15. Rapid sequencing of DNA based on single molecule detection

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, S.A.; Davis, L.M.; Fairfield, F.R.; Hammond, M.L.; Harger, C.A.; Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Marrone, B.L.; Martin, J.C.; Nutter, H.L.; Shera, E.B.; Simpson, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Sequencing the human genome is a major undertaking considering the large number of nucleotides present in the genome and the slow methods currently available to perform the task. We have recently reported on a scheme to sequence DNA rapidly using a non-gel based technique. The concept is based upon the incorporation of fluorescently labeled nucleotides into a strand of DNA, isolation and manipulation of a labeled DNA fragment and the detection of single nucleotides using ultra-sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection following their cleavage from the fragment. Detection of individual fluorophores in the liquid phase was accomplished with time-gated detection following pulsed-laser excitation. The photon bursts from individual rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules travelling through a laser beam have been observed as have bursts from single fluorescently modified nucleotides. Using two different biotinylated nucleotides as a model system for fluorescently labeled nucleotides, we have observed synthesis of the complementary copy of M13 bacteriophage. Work with fluorescently labeled nucleotides is underway. We have observed and manipulated individual molecules of DNA attached to a microbead with an epifluorescence microscope. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic DNA molecule in MARTINI salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadlav, J.; Podgornik, R.; Melo, M. N.; Marrink, S. J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present a dual-resolution model of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule in a bathing solution, where we concurrently couple atomistic bundled water and ions with the coarse-grained MARTINI model of the solvent. We use our fine-grained salt solution model as a solvent in the inner shell surrounding the DNA molecule, whereas the solvent in the outer shell is modeled by the coarse-grained model. The solvent entities can exchange between the two domains and adapt their resolution accordingly. We critically asses the performance of our multiscale model in adaptive resolution simulations of an infinitely long DNA molecule, focusing on the structural characteristics of the solvent around DNA. Our analysis shows that the adaptive resolution scheme does not produce any noticeable artifacts in comparison to a reference system simulated in full detail. The effect of using a bundled-SPC model, required for multiscaling, compared to the standard free SPC model is also evaluated. Our multiscale approach opens the way for large scale applications of DNA and other biomolecules which require a large solvent reservoir to avoid boundary effects.

  17. Single molecule studies of DNA packaging by bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Derek Nathan

    The DNA packaging dynamics of bacteriophages φ29, gamma, and T4 were studied at the single molecule level using a dual trap optical tweezers. Also, a method for producing long DNA molecules by PCR for optical tweezers studies of protein DNA interactions is presented and thoroughly characterized. This DNA preparation technique provided DNA samples for the φ29 and T4 studies. In the studies of φ29, the role of charge was investigated by varying the ionic conditions of the packaging buffer. Ionic conditions in which the DNA charge was highly screened due to divalent and trivalent cations showed the lowest resistance to packaging of the DNA to high density. This confirmed the importance of counterions in shielding the DNA interstrand repulsion when packaged to high density. While the ionic nature of the packaging buffer had a strong effect on packaging velocities, there was no clear trend between the counterion-screened charge of the DNA and the maximum packaging velocity. The packaging studies of lambda and T4 served as systems for comparative studies with φ29. Each system showed similarities to the φ29 system and unique differences. Both the lambda and T4 packaging motors were capable of generating forces in excess of 50 pN and showed remarkably high processivity, similar to φ29. However, dynamic structural transitions were observed with lambda that are not observed with φ29. The packaging of the lambda genome showed capsid expansion at approximately 30 percent of the genome packaged and capsid rupture at 90 percent of the genome packaged in the absence of capsid stabilizing protein gpD. Unique to the T4 packaging motor, packaging dynamics showed a remarkable amount of variability in velocities. This variability was seen both within individual packaging phages and from one phage to the next. This is possibly due to different conformational states of the packaging machinery. Additionally, lambda and T4 had average packaging velocities under minimal load of 600

  18. Interaction of HIV-1 Gag protein components with single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruceanu, Margareta; Gorelick, Robert J.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-03-01

    The Gag protein of the HIV-1 retrovirus is cleaved into three major proteins as part of viral maturation: nucleocapsid (NC), capsid, and matrix. NC is the first of these proteins to be cleaved, and it is cleaved in three stages into NCp15, followed by NCp9, and finally NCp7. In this study, we use optical tweezers to investigate the capability of these NC proteins to alter the helix-coil transition of single DNA molecules. We have previously shown that the capability to alter the DNA helix-coil transition is an excellent probe of the nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC proteins, in which the secondary structure of nucleic acids is rearranged to facilitate reverse transcription. By examining the capability of NCp15, NCp9, and NCp7 to alter DNA stretching, the current studies will test the role of proteolytic cleavage of Gag in regulating the nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC. Whereas binding studies suggest that NCp9 and NCp15 bind more strongly to DNA than NCp7, our DNA stretching results indicate that these proteins all have similar effects on DNA stretching.

  19. An integrated optics microfluidic device for detecting single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Krogmeier, Jeffrey R; Schaefer, Ian; Seward, George; Yantz, Gregory R; Larson, Jonathan W

    2007-12-01

    A fluorescence-based integrated optics microfluidic device is presented, capable of detecting single DNA molecules in a high throughput and reproducible manner. The device integrates microfluidics for DNA stretching with two optical elements for single molecule detection (SMD): a plano-aspheric refractive lens for fluorescence excitation (illuminator) and a solid parabolic reflective mirror for fluorescence collection (collector). Although miniaturized in size, both optical components were produced and assembled onto the microfluidic device by readily manufacturable fabrication techniques. The optical resolution of the device is determined by the small and relatively low numerical aperture (NA) illuminator lens (0.10 effective NA, 4.0 mm diameter) that delivers excitation light to a diffraction limited 2.0 microm diameter spot at full width half maximum within the microfluidic channel. The collector (0.82 annular NA, 15 mm diameter) reflects the fluorescence over a large collection angle, representing 71% of a hemisphere, toward a single photon counting module in an infinity-corrected scheme. As a proof-of-principle experiment for this simple integrated device, individual intercalated lambda-phage DNA molecules (48.5 kb) were stretched in a mixed elongational-shear microflow, detected, and sized with a fluorescence signal to noise ratio of 9.9 +/-1.0. We have demonstrated that SMD does not require traditional high numerical aperture objective lenses and sub-micron positioning systems conventionally used in many applications. Rather, standard manufacturing processes can be combined in a novel way that promises greater accessibility and affordability for microfluidic-based single molecule applications.

  20. Molecular beacons: a novel DNA probe for nucleic acid and protein studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, W; Fang, X; Li, J; Liu, X

    2000-04-01

    A new concept has been introduced for molecular beacon DNA molecules. Molecular beacons are a new class of oligonucleotides that can report the presence of specific nucleic acids in both homogeneous solutions and at the liquid-solid interface. They emit an intense fluorescent signal only when hybridized to their target DNA or RNA molecules. Biotinylated molecular beacons have been designed and used for the development of ultrasensitive DNA sensors and for DNA molecular interaction studies at a solid-liquid interface. Molecular beacons have also been used to study protein-DNA interactions. They have provided a variety of exciting opportunities in DNA/RNA/protein studies.

  1. Trading polymeric microspheres: exchanging DNA molecules via microsphere interaction.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Muramatsu, Kanna; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    A new class of artificial molecular transport system is constructed by polymeric microspheres. The microspheres are prepared by self-assembly of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(3-dimethyl(methacryloyloxyethyl)ammonium propane sulfonate), PEG-b-PDMAPS, by intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction of sulfobetaine side chains in water. Below the upper critical solution temperature (UCST) of PEG-b-PDMAPS, the microspheres (∼1μm) interact with other microspheres by partial and transit fusion. In order to apply the interaction between microspheres, a 3'-TAMRA-labeled single-stranded DNA oligomer (ssDNA) is encapsulated into a PEG-b-PDMAPS microsphere by thermal treatment. The exchange of ssDNA between microspheres is confirmed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) quenching derived from double-stranded formation with complementary 5'-BHQ-2-labeled ssDNA encapsulated in PEG-b-PDMAPS microspheres. The exchange rate of ssDNA is controllable by tuning the composition of the polymer. The contact-dependent transport of molecules can be applied in the areas of microreactors, sensor devices, etc. PMID:25731098

  2. Single-molecule dissection of stacking forces in DNA.

    PubMed

    Kilchherr, Fabian; Wachauf, Christian; Pelz, Benjamin; Rief, Matthias; Zacharias, Martin; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    We directly measured at the single-molecule level the forces and lifetimes of DNA base-pair stacking interactions for all stack sequence combinations. Our experimental approach combined dual-beam optical tweezers with DNA origami components to allow positioning of blunt-end DNA helices so that the weak stacking force could be isolated. Base-pair stack arrays that lacked a covalent backbone connection spontaneously dissociated at average rates ranging from 0.02 to 500 per second, depending on the sequence combination and stack array size. Forces in the range from 2 to 8 piconewtons that act along the helical direction only mildly accelerated the stochastic unstacking process. The free-energy increments per stack that we estimate from the measured forward and backward kinetic rates ranged from -0.8 to -3.4 kilocalories per mole, depending on the sequence combination. Our data contributes to understanding the mechanics of DNA processing in biology, and it is helpful for designing the kinetics of DNA-based nanoscale devices according to user specifications.

  3. Trading polymeric microspheres: exchanging DNA molecules via microsphere interaction.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Muramatsu, Kanna; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    A new class of artificial molecular transport system is constructed by polymeric microspheres. The microspheres are prepared by self-assembly of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(3-dimethyl(methacryloyloxyethyl)ammonium propane sulfonate), PEG-b-PDMAPS, by intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction of sulfobetaine side chains in water. Below the upper critical solution temperature (UCST) of PEG-b-PDMAPS, the microspheres (∼1μm) interact with other microspheres by partial and transit fusion. In order to apply the interaction between microspheres, a 3'-TAMRA-labeled single-stranded DNA oligomer (ssDNA) is encapsulated into a PEG-b-PDMAPS microsphere by thermal treatment. The exchange of ssDNA between microspheres is confirmed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) quenching derived from double-stranded formation with complementary 5'-BHQ-2-labeled ssDNA encapsulated in PEG-b-PDMAPS microspheres. The exchange rate of ssDNA is controllable by tuning the composition of the polymer. The contact-dependent transport of molecules can be applied in the areas of microreactors, sensor devices, etc.

  4. Single-molecule dissection of stacking forces in DNA.

    PubMed

    Kilchherr, Fabian; Wachauf, Christian; Pelz, Benjamin; Rief, Matthias; Zacharias, Martin; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    We directly measured at the single-molecule level the forces and lifetimes of DNA base-pair stacking interactions for all stack sequence combinations. Our experimental approach combined dual-beam optical tweezers with DNA origami components to allow positioning of blunt-end DNA helices so that the weak stacking force could be isolated. Base-pair stack arrays that lacked a covalent backbone connection spontaneously dissociated at average rates ranging from 0.02 to 500 per second, depending on the sequence combination and stack array size. Forces in the range from 2 to 8 piconewtons that act along the helical direction only mildly accelerated the stochastic unstacking process. The free-energy increments per stack that we estimate from the measured forward and backward kinetic rates ranged from -0.8 to -3.4 kilocalories per mole, depending on the sequence combination. Our data contributes to understanding the mechanics of DNA processing in biology, and it is helpful for designing the kinetics of DNA-based nanoscale devices according to user specifications. PMID:27609897

  5. Single-Molecule Observation of Prokaryotic DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Nathan A.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in optical imaging and molecular manipulation techniques have made it possible to observe the activity of individual enzymes and study the dynamic properties of processes that are challenging to elucidate using ensemble-averaging techniques. The use of single-molecule approaches has proven to be particularly successful in the study of the dynamic interactions between the components at the replication fork. In this section, we describe the methods necessary for in vitro single-molecule studies of prokaryotic replication systems. Through these experiments, accurate information can be obtained on the rates and processivities of DNA unwinding and polymerization. The ability to monitor in real time the progress of a single replication fork allows for the detection of short-lived, intermediate states that would be difficult to visualize in bulk-phase assays. PMID:19563119

  6. Physical manipulation of single-molecule DNA using microbead and its application to analysis of DNA-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira

    2009-04-01

    We carried out an individual DNA manipulation using an optical trapping for a microbead. This manipulation system is based on a fluorescent microscopy equipped with an IR laser. Both ends of linear DNA molecule were labeled with a biotin and a thiol group, respectively. Then the biotinylated end was attached to a microbead, and the other was immobilized on a thiol-linkable glass surface. We controlled the form of an individual DNA molecule by moving the focal point of IR laser, which trapped the microbead. In addition, we applied single-molecule approach to analyze DNA hydrolysis. We also used microchannel for single-molecule observation of DNA hydrolysis. The shortening of DNA in length caused by enzymatic hydrolysis was observed in real-time. The single-molecule DNA manipulation should contribute to elucidate detailed mechanisms of DNA-protein interactions.

  7. Cell cycle control of DNA joint molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Wild, Philipp; Matos, Joao

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of stable interactions between chromosomes underpins vital cellular processes such as recombinational DNA repair and bipolar chromosome segregation. On the other hand, timely disengagement of persistent connections is necessary to assure efficient partitioning of the replicated genome prior to cell division. Whereas great progress has been made in defining how cohesin-mediated chromosomal interactions are disengaged as cells prepare to undergo chromosome segregation, little is known about the metabolism of DNA joint molecules (JMs), generated during the repair of chromosomal lesions. Recent work on Mus81 and Yen1/GEN1, two conserved structure-selective endonucleases, revealed unforeseen links between JM-processing and cell cycle progression. Cell cycle kinases and phosphatases control Mus81 and Yen1/GEN1 to restrain deleterious JM-processing during S-phase, while safeguarding chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  8. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  9. Dissolving Hydroxyolite: A DNA Molecule into Its Hydroxyapatite Mold.

    PubMed

    Bertran, Oscar; Revilla-López, Guillermo; Casanovas, Jordi; Del Valle, Luis J; Turon, Pau; Puiggalí, Jordi; Alemán, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    In spite of the clinical importance of hydroxyapatite (HAp), the mechanism that controls its dissolution in acidic environments remains unclear. Knowledge of such a process is highly desirable to provide better understanding of different pathologies, as for example osteoporosis, and of the HAp potential as vehicle for gene delivery to replace damaged DNA. In this work, the mechanism of dissolution in acid conditions of HAp nanoparticles encapsulating double-stranded DNA has been investigated at the atomistic level using computer simulations. For this purpose, four consecutive (multi-step) molecular dynamics simulations, involving different temperatures and proton transfer processes, have been carried out. Results are consistent with a polynuclear decalcification mechanism in which proton transfer processes, from the surface to the internal regions of the particle, play a crucial role. In addition, the DNA remains protected by the mineral mold and transferred proton from both temperature and chemicals. These results, which indicate that biomineralization imparts very effective protection to DNA, also have important implications in other biomedical fields, as for example in the design of artificial bones or in the fight against osteoporosis by promoting the fixation of Ca(2+) ions. PMID:27038364

  10. Dissolving Hydroxyolite: A DNA Molecule into Its Hydroxyapatite Mold.

    PubMed

    Bertran, Oscar; Revilla-López, Guillermo; Casanovas, Jordi; Del Valle, Luis J; Turon, Pau; Puiggalí, Jordi; Alemán, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    In spite of the clinical importance of hydroxyapatite (HAp), the mechanism that controls its dissolution in acidic environments remains unclear. Knowledge of such a process is highly desirable to provide better understanding of different pathologies, as for example osteoporosis, and of the HAp potential as vehicle for gene delivery to replace damaged DNA. In this work, the mechanism of dissolution in acid conditions of HAp nanoparticles encapsulating double-stranded DNA has been investigated at the atomistic level using computer simulations. For this purpose, four consecutive (multi-step) molecular dynamics simulations, involving different temperatures and proton transfer processes, have been carried out. Results are consistent with a polynuclear decalcification mechanism in which proton transfer processes, from the surface to the internal regions of the particle, play a crucial role. In addition, the DNA remains protected by the mineral mold and transferred proton from both temperature and chemicals. These results, which indicate that biomineralization imparts very effective protection to DNA, also have important implications in other biomedical fields, as for example in the design of artificial bones or in the fight against osteoporosis by promoting the fixation of Ca(2+) ions.

  11. Single-molecule DNA digestion in various alkanethiol-functionalized gold nanopores.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungah; Kang, Seong Ho

    2013-03-30

    This paper presents the alkanethiol-functionalized environmental effects of individual DNA molecules in nanopores on enzyme digestion at the single-molecule level. A template consisting of gold deposited within a solid-state nanoporous polycarbonate membrane was used to trap individual λ-DNA and enzyme molecules. The gold surfaces were modified with various functional groups (-OH, -COOH, -NH3). The enzyme digestion rates of single DNA molecules increased with decreasing nanopore diameters. Surprisingly, the digestion rates in the l-cysteine chemisorbed nanopores were 2.1-2.6 times faster than in the mercaptoethanol chemisorbed gold nanopores, even though these nanopores had equivalent interspacial areas. In addition, the membrane of chemisorbed cysteamine with ionized functional groups of H3N(+) at pH 8.2 had a greater positive influence on the enzyme digestion rate than the membrane of chemisorbed mercaptoproponic acid with ionized carboxyl groups (COO(-)). These results suggest that the three-dimensional environment effect is strongly correlated with the functional group in confined nanopores and can significantly change the enzyme digestion rates for nanopores with different internal areas. PMID:23598226

  12. Genome-wide mapping of nucleosome positioning and DNA methylation within individual DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Theresa K.; Liu, Yaping; Lay, Fides D.; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Jones, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning work together to generate chromatin structures that regulate gene expression. Nucleosomes are typically mapped using nuclease digestion requiring significant amounts of material and varying enzyme concentrations. We have developed a method (NOMe-seq) that uses a GpC methyltransferase (M.CviPI) and next generation sequencing to generate a high resolution footprint of nucleosome positioning genome-wide using less than 1 million cells while retaining endogenous DNA methylation information from the same DNA strand. Using a novel bioinformatics pipeline, we show a striking anti-correlation between nucleosome occupancy and DNA methylation at CTCF regions that is not present at promoters. We further show that the extent of nucleosome depletion at promoters is directly correlated to expression level and can accommodate multiple nucleosomes and provide genome-wide evidence that expressed non-CpG island promoters are nucleosome-depleted. Importantly, NOMe-seq obtains DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning information from the same DNA molecule, giving the first genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning correlation at the single molecule, and thus, single cell level, that can be used to monitor disease progression and response to therapy. PMID:22960375

  13. Elastic Properties of Nucleic Acids by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Ribezzi-Crivellari, Marco; Ritort, Felix

    2016-07-01

    We review the current knowledge on the use of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to extrapolate the elastic properties of nucleic acids. We emphasize the lesser-known elastic properties of single-stranded DNA. We discuss the importance of accurately determining the elastic response in pulling experiments, and we review the simplest models used to rationalize the experimental data as well as the experimental approaches used to pull single-stranded DNA. Applications used to investigate DNA conformational transitions and secondary structure formation are also highlighted. Finally, we provide an overview of the effects of salt and temperature and briefly discuss the effects of contour length and sequence dependence. PMID:27145878

  14. Elastic Properties of Nucleic Acids by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Ribezzi-Crivellari, Marco; Ritort, Felix

    2016-07-01

    We review the current knowledge on the use of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to extrapolate the elastic properties of nucleic acids. We emphasize the lesser-known elastic properties of single-stranded DNA. We discuss the importance of accurately determining the elastic response in pulling experiments, and we review the simplest models used to rationalize the experimental data as well as the experimental approaches used to pull single-stranded DNA. Applications used to investigate DNA conformational transitions and secondary structure formation are also highlighted. Finally, we provide an overview of the effects of salt and temperature and briefly discuss the effects of contour length and sequence dependence.

  15. Initiation of bacteriophage Φ29 DNA packaging studied by optical tweezers manipulation of single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickgauer, John Peter; Fuller, Derek N.; Hu, Bo; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2006-08-01

    A key step in the life cycle of many viruses, including bacteriophages, adenoviruses, and herpesviruses, is the packaging of replicated viral genomes into pre-assembled proheads by the action of ATP-dependent portal motor complexes. Here we present a method that allows the initiation of packaging by single complexes to be studied using optical tweezers. A procedure is developed for assembling phage Φ29 prohead-motor complexes, which are demonstrated to bind and begin translocation of a target DNA molecule within only a few seconds. We show that the Φ29 DNA terminal protein (gene product 3), which functions to prime DNA replication, also has a dramatic effect on packaging. The DNA tether length measured immediately after binding varied from ~30-100% of the full length, yet shortened monotonically, indicating that packaging does not strictly begin at the terminal end of the DNA. Removal of the terminal protein eliminated this variability, causing packaging to initiate at or very near the end of the DNA. These findings, taken together with electron microscopy data, suggest that rather than simply threading into the portal, the motor captures and dynamically tensions a DNA loop, and that the function of the terminal protein is to load DNA segments on both sides of the loop junction onto separate DNA translocating units.

  16. Single-molecule kinetics and footprinting of DNA bis-intercalation: the paradigmatic case of Thiocoraline

    PubMed Central

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Manosas, Maria; Frutos, Silvia; Tulla-Puche, Judit; Albericio, Fernando; Ritort, Felix

    2015-01-01

    DNA bis-intercalators are widely used in molecular biology with applications ranging from DNA imaging to anticancer pharmacology. Two fundamental aspects of these ligands are the lifetime of the bis-intercalated complexes and their sequence selectivity. Here, we perform single-molecule optical tweezers experiments with the peptide Thiocoraline showing, for the first time, that bis-intercalation is driven by a very slow off-rate that steeply decreases with applied force. This feature reveals the existence of a long-lived (minutes) mono-intercalated intermediate that contributes to the extremely long lifetime of the complex (hours). We further exploit this particularly slow kinetics to determine the thermodynamics of binding and persistence length of bis-intercalated DNA for a given fraction of bound ligand, a measurement inaccessible in previous studies of faster intercalating agents. We also develop a novel single-molecule footprinting technique based on DNA unzipping and determine the preferred binding sites of Thiocoraline with one base-pair resolution. This fast and radiolabelling-free footprinting technique provides direct access to the binding sites of small ligands to nucleic acids without the need of cleavage agents. Overall, our results provide new insights into the binding pathway of bis-intercalators and the reported selectivity might be of relevance for this and other anticancer drugs interfering with DNA replication and transcription in carcinogenic cell lines. PMID:25690887

  17. Single-molecule kinetics and footprinting of DNA bis-intercalation: the paradigmatic case of Thiocoraline.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Manosas, Maria; Frutos, Silvia; Tulla-Puche, Judit; Albericio, Fernando; Ritort, Felix

    2015-03-11

    DNA bis-intercalators are widely used in molecular biology with applications ranging from DNA imaging to anticancer pharmacology. Two fundamental aspects of these ligands are the lifetime of the bis-intercalated complexes and their sequence selectivity. Here, we perform single-molecule optical tweezers experiments with the peptide Thiocoraline showing, for the first time, that bis-intercalation is driven by a very slow off-rate that steeply decreases with applied force. This feature reveals the existence of a long-lived (minutes) mono-intercalated intermediate that contributes to the extremely long lifetime of the complex (hours). We further exploit this particularly slow kinetics to determine the thermodynamics of binding and persistence length of bis-intercalated DNA for a given fraction of bound ligand, a measurement inaccessible in previous studies of faster intercalating agents. We also develop a novel single-molecule footprinting technique based on DNA unzipping and determine the preferred binding sites of Thiocoraline with one base-pair resolution. This fast and radiolabelling-free footprinting technique provides direct access to the binding sites of small ligands to nucleic acids without the need of cleavage agents. Overall, our results provide new insights into the binding pathway of bis-intercalators and the reported selectivity might be of relevance for this and other anticancer drugs interfering with DNA replication and transcription in carcinogenic cell lines. PMID:25690887

  18. Single molecule analysis of Trypanosoma brucei DNA replication dynamics.

    PubMed

    Calderano, Simone Guedes; Drosopoulos, William C; Quaresma, Marina Mônaco; Marques, Catarina A; Kosiyatrakul, Settapong; McCulloch, Richard; Schildkraut, Carl L; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-03-11

    Eukaryotic genome duplication relies on origins of replication, distributed over multiple chromosomes, to initiate DNA replication. A recent genome-wide analysis of Trypanosoma brucei, the etiological agent of sleeping sickness, localized its replication origins to the boundaries of multigenic transcription units. To better understand genomic replication in this organism, we examined replication by single molecule analysis of replicated DNA. We determined the average speed of replication forks of procyclic and bloodstream form cells and we found that T. brucei DNA replication rate is similar to rates seen in other eukaryotes. We also analyzed the replication dynamics of a central region of chromosome 1 in procyclic forms. We present evidence for replication terminating within the central part of the chromosome and thus emanating from both sides, suggesting a previously unmapped origin toward the 5' extremity of chromosome 1. Also, termination is not at a fixed location in chromosome 1, but is rather variable. Importantly, we found a replication origin located near an ORC1/CDC6 binding site that is detected after replicative stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment, suggesting it may be a dormant origin activated in response to replicative stress. Collectively, our findings support the existence of more replication origins in T. brucei than previously appreciated. PMID:25690894

  19. Single molecule analysis of Trypanosoma brucei DNA replication dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Calderano, Simone Guedes; Drosopoulos, William C.; Quaresma, Marina Mônaco; Marques, Catarina A.; Kosiyatrakul, Settapong; McCulloch, Richard; Schildkraut, Carl L.; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genome duplication relies on origins of replication, distributed over multiple chromosomes, to initiate DNA replication. A recent genome-wide analysis of Trypanosoma brucei, the etiological agent of sleeping sickness, localized its replication origins to the boundaries of multigenic transcription units. To better understand genomic replication in this organism, we examined replication by single molecule analysis of replicated DNA. We determined the average speed of replication forks of procyclic and bloodstream form cells and we found that T. brucei DNA replication rate is similar to rates seen in other eukaryotes. We also analyzed the replication dynamics of a central region of chromosome 1 in procyclic forms. We present evidence for replication terminating within the central part of the chromosome and thus emanating from both sides, suggesting a previously unmapped origin toward the 5′ extremity of chromosome 1. Also, termination is not at a fixed location in chromosome 1, but is rather variable. Importantly, we found a replication origin located near an ORC1/CDC6 binding site that is detected after replicative stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment, suggesting it may be a dormant origin activated in response to replicative stress. Collectively, our findings support the existence of more replication origins in T. brucei than previously appreciated. PMID:25690894

  20. 2-hydroxyoleic acid: a new hypotensive molecule.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Regina; Terés, Silvia; Baamonde, Carmela; Benet, Mikhail; Vögler, Oliver; Escribá, Pablo V

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that diets rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) from olive oil, a natural source of oleic acid, have beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients. With this in mind, we investigated whether a synthetic derivative of the MUFA oleic acid, 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2-OHOA), was capable of regulating the BP of Sprague-Dawley rats. Intraperitoneal and oral administration of 2-OHOA to rats induced significant and sustained decreases in BP in a time-dependent manner. Without affecting heart rate, treatments for 7 days provoked reductions in systolic BP of 20 to 26 mm Hg. At the molecular level, the density of Galpha(s), but not Galpha(i2) or Galpha(o), increased in membranes from the hearts and aortas of 2-OHOA-treated rats, whereas in heart membranes, the density of Galpha(q)/11 and protein kinase Calpha proteins was also augmented. These molecular alterations were reflected in the increase in cAMP levels after Galpha(s) protein and beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation. On the contrary, inhibitory hormones reduced adenylyl cyclase activity to the same extent in 2-OHOA-treated rats as in vehicle-treated ones. Our results indicate that cardiovascular tissues from 2-OHOA-treated rats exhibited increased cAMP production in response to Galpha(s) activation, which might be attributed to enhanced expression of Galpha(s) proteins. As a result of this change, a significant reduction in systolic BP was observed. Therefore, BP can be lowered by administration of 2-OHOA, which might represent the first member of a new family of antihypertensive drugs.

  1. Small circular DNA molecules act as rigid motifs to build DNA nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongning; Xiao, Minyu; Yan, Qin; Ma, Yinzhou; Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2014-07-23

    Small circular DNA molecules with designed lengths, for example 64 and 96 nucleotides (nt), after hybridization with a few 32-nt staple strands respectively, can act as rigid motifs for the construction of DNA nanotubes with excellent uniformity in ring diameter. Unlike most native DNA nanotubes, which consist of longitudinal double helices, nanotubes assembled from circular DNAs are constructed from lateral double helices. Of the five types of DNA nanotubes designed here, four are built by alternating two different rings of the same ring size, while one is composed of all the same 96-nt rings. Nanotubes constructed from the same 96-nt rings are 10-100 times shorter than those constructed from two different 96-nt rings, because there are fewer hinge joints on the rings.

  2. Pulsed IR heating studies of single-molecule DNA duplex dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Dupuis, Nicholas F; Nesbitt, David J

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful technique that makes it possible to observe the conformational dynamics associated with biomolecular processes. The addition of precise temperature control to these experiments can yield valuable thermodynamic information about equilibrium and kinetic rate constants. To accomplish this, we have developed a microscopy technique based on infrared laser overtone/combination band absorption to heat small (≈10(-11) liter) volumes of water. Detailed experimental characterization of this technique reveals three major advantages over conventional stage heating methods: 1), a larger range of steady-state temperatures (20-100°C); 2), substantially superior spatial (≤20 μm) control; and 3), substantially superior temporal (≈1 ms) control. The flexibility and breadth of this spatial and temporally resolved laser-heating approach is demonstrated in single-molecule fluorescence assays designed to probe the dissociation of a 21 bp DNA duplex. These studies are used to support a kinetic model based on nucleic acid end fraying that describes dissociation for both short (<10 bp) and long (>10 bp) DNA duplexes. These measurements have been extended to explore temperature-dependent kinetics for the 21 bp construct, which permit determination of single-molecule activation enthalpies and entropies for DNA duplex dissociation.

  3. Pulsed IR Heating Studies of Single-Molecule DNA Duplex Dissociation Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful technique that makes it possible to observe the conformational dynamics associated with biomolecular processes. The addition of precise temperature control to these experiments can yield valuable thermodynamic information about equilibrium and kinetic rate constants. To accomplish this, we have developed a microscopy technique based on infrared laser overtone/combination band absorption to heat small (≈10−11 liter) volumes of water. Detailed experimental characterization of this technique reveals three major advantages over conventional stage heating methods: 1), a larger range of steady-state temperatures (20–100°C); 2), substantially superior spatial (≤20 μm) control; and 3), substantially superior temporal (≈1 ms) control. The flexibility and breadth of this spatial and temporally resolved laser-heating approach is demonstrated in single-molecule fluorescence assays designed to probe the dissociation of a 21 bp DNA duplex. These studies are used to support a kinetic model based on nucleic acid end fraying that describes dissociation for both short (<10 bp) and long (>10 bp) DNA duplexes. These measurements have been extended to explore temperature-dependent kinetics for the 21 bp construct, which permit determination of single-molecule activation enthalpies and entropies for DNA duplex dissociation. PMID:24411254

  4. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  5. Direct Observation of Enzymes Replicating DNA Using a Single-molecule DNA Stretching Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W.; Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Richardson, Charles C.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for observing real time replication of individual DNA molecules mediated by proteins of the bacteriophage replication system. Linearized λ DNA is modified to have a biotin on the end of one strand, and a digoxigenin moiety on the other end of the same strand. The biotinylated end is attached to a functionalized glass coverslip and the digoxigeninated end to a small bead. The assembly of these DNA-bead tethers on the surface of a flow cell allows a laminar flow to be applied to exert a drag force on the bead. As a result, the DNA is stretched close to and parallel to the surface of the coverslip at a force that is determined by the flow rate (Figure 1). The length of the DNA is measured by monitoring the position of the bead. Length differences between single- and double-stranded DNA are utilized to obtain real-time information on the activity of the replication proteins at the fork. Measuring the position of the bead allows precise determination of the rates and processivities of DNA unwinding and polymerization (Figure 2). PMID:20332766

  6. Single-molecule analysis of DNA cross-links using nanopore technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolna, Anna H.

    The alpha-hemolysin (alpha-HL) protein ion channel is a potential next-generation sequencing platform that has been extensively used to study nucleic acids at a single-molecule level. After applying a potential across a lipid bilayer, the imbedded alpha-HL allows monitoring of the duration and current levels of DNA translocation and immobilization. Because this method does not require DNA amplification prior to sequencing, all the DNA damage present in the cell at any given time will be present during the sequencing experiment. The goal of this research is to determine if these damage sites give distinguishable current levels beyond those observed for the canonical nucleobases. Because DNA cross-links are one of the most prevalent types of DNA damage occurring in vivo, the blockage current levels were determined for thymine-dimers, guanine(C8)-thymine(N3) cross-links and platinum adducts. All of these cross-links give a different blockage current level compared to the undamaged strands when immobilized in the ion channel, and they all can easily translocate across the alpha-HL channel. Additionally, the alpha-HL nanopore technique presents a unique opportunity to study the effects of DNA cross-links, such as thymine-dimers, on the secondary structure of DNA G-quadruplexes folded from the human telomere sequence. Using this single-molecule nanopore technique we can detect subtle structural differences that cannot be easily addressed using conventional methods. The human telomere plays crucial roles in maintaining genome stability. In the presence of suitable cations, the repetitive 5'-TTAGGG human telomere sequence can fold into G-quadruplexes that adopt the hybrid fold in vivo. The telomere sequence is hypersensitive to UV-induced thymine-dimer (T=T) formation, and yet the presence of thymine dimers does not cause telomere shortening. The potential structural disruption and thermodynamic stability of the T=T-containing natural telomere sequences were studied to

  7. Physisorption of DNA molecules on chemically modified single-walled carbon nanotubes with and without sonication.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Kazuo; Ishibashi, Yu; Oura, Shusuke

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the physisorption phenomenon of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules onto two types of commercially available chemically functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and agarose gel electrophoresis. We found that DNA molecules can adsorb on the water-soluble SWNT surfaces without sonication, although sonication treatment has been used for hybridization of DNA and SWNTs in many previous studies. Using our method, damage of DNA molecules by sonication can be avoided. On the other hand, the amount of DNA molecules adsorbed on SWNT surfaces increased when the samples were sonicated. This fact suggests that the sonication is effective not only at debundling of SWNTs, but also at assisting DNA adsorption. Furthermore, DNA adsorption was affected by the types of functionalized SWNTs. In the case of SWNTs functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SWNT), physisorption of ssDNA molecules was confirmed only by agarose-gel electrophoresis. In contrast, amino-terminated SWNTs (NH2-SWNTs) showed a change in the height distribution profile based on AFM observations. These results suggest that DNA molecules tended to adsorb to NH2-SWNT surfaces, although DNA molecules can also adsorb on PEG-SWNT surfaces. Our results revealed fundamental information for developing nanobiodevices using hybrids of DNA and SWNTs.

  8. Oxidized fatty acids as inter-kingdom signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Carolina H; Kock, Johan L F

    2014-01-20

    Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to "listen" and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  9. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2.

    PubMed

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E; Bartlett, Edward J; Brissett, Nigel C; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M; Ogilvie, Donald J; Ward, Simon E; Atack, John R; Pearl, Laurence H; Caldecott, Keith W; Oliver, Antony W

    2016-07-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5'-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a 'humanized' form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2.

  10. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2

    PubMed Central

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E.; Bartlett, Edward J.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M.; Ogilvie, Donald J.; Ward, Simon E.; Atack, John R.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Caldecott, Keith W.; Oliver, Antony W.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5′-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a ‘humanized’ form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2. PMID:27099339

  11. Crystal structure of a complex of a type IA DNA topoisomerase with a single-stranded DNA molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Changela, A.; Digate, R.J.; Mondragon, A.

    2010-03-05

    A variety of cellular processes, including DNA replication, transcription, and chromosome condensation, require enzymes that can regulate the ensuing topological changes occurring in DNA. Such enzymes - DNA topoisomerases - alter DNA topology by catalysing the cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), the passage of DNA through the resulting break, and the rejoining of the broken phosphodiester backbone. DNA topoisomerase III from Escherichia coli belongs to the type IA family of DNA topoisomerases, which transiently cleave ssDNA via formation of a covalent 5' phosphotyrosine intermediate. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.05 {angstrom} resolution, of an inactive mutant of E. coli DNA topoisomerase III in a non-covalent complex with an 8-base ssDNA molecule. The enzyme undergoes a conformational change that allows the oligonucleotide to bind within a groove leading to the active site. We note that the ssDNA molecule adopts a conformation like that of B-DNA while bound to the enzyme. The position of the DNA within the realigned active site provides insight into the role of several highly conserved residues during catalysis. These findings confirm various aspects of the type IA topoisomerase mechanism while suggesting functional implications for other topoisomerases and proteins that perform DNA rearrangements.

  12. Direct observation of λ-DNA molecule reversal movement within microfluidic channels under electric field with single molecule imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengyun, Yang; Kaige, Wang; Dan, Sun; Wei, Zhao; Hai-qing, Wang; Xin, He; Gui-ren, Wang; Jin-tao, Bai

    2016-07-01

    The electrodynamic characteristics of single DNA molecules moving within micro-/nano-fluidic channels are important in the design of biomedical chips and bimolecular sensors. In this study, the dynamic properties of λ-DNA molecules transferring along the microchannels driven by the external electrickinetic force were systemically investigated with the single molecule fluorescence imaging technique. The experimental results indicated that the velocity of DNA molecules was strictly dependent on the value of the applied electric field and the diameter of the channel. The larger the external electric field, the larger the velocity, and the more significant deformation of DNA molecules. More meaningfully, it was found that the moving directions of DNA molecules had two completely different directions: (i) along the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was smaller than a certain threshold value; (ii) opposite to the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was greater than the threshold electric field intensity. The reversal movement of DNA molecules was mainly determined by the competition between the electrophoresis force and the influence of electro-osmosis flow. These new findings will theoretically guide the practical application of fluidic channel sensors and lab-on-chips for precisely manipulating single DNA molecules. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378083), the International Cooperation Foundation of the National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2011DFA12220), the Major Research Plan of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91123030), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province of China (Grant Nos. 2010JS110 and 2013SZS03-Z01).

  13. Direct observation of λ-DNA molecule reversal movement within microfluidic channels under electric field with single molecule imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengyun, Yang; Kaige, Wang; Dan, Sun; Wei, Zhao; Hai-qing, Wang; Xin, He; Gui-ren, Wang; Jin-tao, Bai

    2016-07-01

    The electrodynamic characteristics of single DNA molecules moving within micro-/nano-fluidic channels are important in the design of biomedical chips and bimolecular sensors. In this study, the dynamic properties of λ-DNA molecules transferring along the microchannels driven by the external electrickinetic force were systemically investigated with the single molecule fluorescence imaging technique. The experimental results indicated that the velocity of DNA molecules was strictly dependent on the value of the applied electric field and the diameter of the channel. The larger the external electric field, the larger the velocity, and the more significant deformation of DNA molecules. More meaningfully, it was found that the moving directions of DNA molecules had two completely different directions: (i) along the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was smaller than a certain threshold value; (ii) opposite to the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was greater than the threshold electric field intensity. The reversal movement of DNA molecules was mainly determined by the competition between the electrophoresis force and the influence of electro-osmosis flow. These new findings will theoretically guide the practical application of fluidic channel sensors and lab-on-chips for precisely manipulating single DNA molecules. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378083), the International Cooperation Foundation of the National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2011DFA12220), the Major Research Plan of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91123030), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province of China (Grant Nos. 2010JS110 and 2013SZS03-Z01).

  14. The Effect of Low-Energy-Electron Irradiation to DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasimoto, Hideyuki; Mochiji, Kozo

    Secondary electrons with kinetic energies below 20 eV are abundant species generated in living cells by the irradiation with ionizing radiations. It is unclear whether such low-energy electrons are able to induce damage on DNA. In this study, we have directly observed the structural changes of DNA molecules under the irradiation with 4-40 eV electrons which are field-emitted from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. Single- and double-strand breaks of linear DNA moleculesDNA and ΦX DNA) are induced by the electron irradiations. By the electron irradiations of circular DNA molecules (pUC18 DNA) in an entanglement, some parts of the DNA were lost or spread by the dissociation of the molecules. These electron-induced reactions are strongly dependent on the electron energies.

  15. A method to estimate the elastic energy stored in braided DNA molecules using hydrodynamic equations

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sierra, Mónica; Delgado-Martí, Violeta; Colón-García, Jorge E.; Quiñones, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    We present a single-molecule method for measuring the torque exerted by braided DNA molecules undergoing spontaneous unbraiding while attached to a paramagnetic dumbbell in the absence of external manipulation. A magnetic tweezers setup is employed to braid pairs of lambda DNA molecules covalently bound to a surface. Upon removing the magnetic field, the braided DNA molecules undergo spontaneous unbraiding, efficiently transforming the stored elastic energy into enough mechanical energy to rotate the tethered dumbbells for periods as long as 30 minutes. Using hydrodynamic equations we estimate the torque exerted on the dumbbells by the DNA braids, yielding values ranging from 47 to 166 pN nm. PMID:21765578

  16. Conformational dynamics of nucleic acid molecules studied by PELDOR spectroscopy with rigid spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisner, T. F.; Marko, A.; Sigurdsson, S. Th.

    2015-03-01

    Nucleic acid molecules can adopt a variety of structures and exhibit a large degree of conformational flexibility to fulfill their various functions in cells. Here we describe the use of Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance (PELDOR or DEER) to investigate nucleic acid molecules where two cytosine analogs have been incorporated as spin probes. Because these new types of spin labels are rigid and incorporated into double stranded DNA and RNA molecules, there is no additional flexibility of the spin label itself present. Therefore the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between both spin labels encodes for the distance as well as for the mutual orientation between the spin labels. All of this information can be extracted by multi-frequency/multi-field PELDOR experiments, which gives very precise and valuable information about the structure and conformational flexibility of the nucleic acid molecules. We describe in detail our procedure to obtain the conformational ensembles and show the accuracy and limitations with test examples and application to double-stranded DNA.

  17. Fabrication of nickel and gold nanowires by controlled electrodeposition on deoxyribonucleic acid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun; Jin, Helena; Dai, Kun

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic and electrical nanowires are two important materials in the development of futuristic nanoelectronics, data storage media and nanosensors. Ni and Au nanowires with a diameter of a few tens of nanometres have been fabricated using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules as a template through nanoparticle-controlled electroless deposition (ELD). Nanowire precursors, 1-3 nm Pt(0)-DNA and 1.4 nm Au(0)-DNA, were assembled using two different methods. Chemical reduction was used to deposit Pt(0) particles on DNA which catalyzed Ni nanowire growth. Positively charged Au nanoparticles were directly assembled on phosphate groups of DNA which were stretched and anchored between micrometre-spaced electrodes. Electrical measurement has shown that Au nanowires, catalyzed by Au(0)-DNA in a subsequent ELD, are highly conductive and show linear I-V characteristics. The major factors for the resistivity of nanowires were discussed in detail. This work involves important aspects in the field of DNA-based self-assembly, such as DNA and surface interaction, DNA nanoparticle assembly and electrical property of fabricated nanowires.

  18. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  19. DETECTION OF A NEW INTERSTELLAR MOLECULE: THIOCYANIC ACID HSCN

    SciTech Connect

    Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M.; Bruenken, S.; Gottlieb, C. A.; McCarthy, M. C.; Thaddeus, P. E-mail: lziurys@as.arizona.edu E-mail: cgottlieb@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: pthaddeus@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-09-10

    A new interstellar molecule, HSCN (thiocyanic acid), an energetic isomer of the well-known species HNCS, has been detected toward Sgr B2(N) with the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 m telescope. Eight rotational transitions in the K{sub a} = 0 ladder were observed in the 2 mm and 3 mm bands. Five consecutive transitions in the 3 mm band are unblended, but three in the 2 mm band are partially masked by lines of other molecules. The peak intensity of all eight transitions are well described by a rotational temperature that is in very good agreement with that of many other molecules in this source. The line width and radial velocity of HSCN match closely with those of the ground state isomer HNCS (isothiocyanic acid), HNCO (isocyanic acid), and HOCN (cyanic acid); preliminary maps indicate that all four molecules are similarly distributed in Sgr B2. Although HSCN is calculated to lie over 3000 K higher in energy than HNCS, its column density of 1.3 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} in Sgr B2(N) is only three times lower than that of HNCS. The fractional abundances of HSCN and HNCS relative to H{sub 2} are 4.5 x 10{sup -12} and 1.1 x 10{sup -11}. By analogy with the isomeric pair HCN and HNC, these two sulfur-bearing isomers are plausibly formed from a common cation precursor.

  20. Design of stapled DNA-minor-groove-binding molecules with a mutable atom simulated annealing method.

    PubMed

    Walker, W L; Kopka, M L; Dickerson, R E; Goodsell, D S

    1997-11-01

    We report the design of optimal linker geometries for the synthesis of stapled DNA-minor-groove-binding molecules. Netropsin, distamycin, and lexitropsins bind side-by-side to mixed-sequence DNA and offer an opportunity for the design of sequence-reading molecules. Stapled molecules, with two molecules covalently linked side-by-side, provide entropic gains and restrain the position of one molecule relative to its neighbor. Using a free-atom simulated annealing technique combined with a discrete mutable atom definition, optimal lengths and atomic composition for covalent linkages are determined, and a novel hydrogen bond 'zipper' is proposed to phase two molecules accurately side-by-side.

  1. Single molecule fluorescence studies of transition paths in DNA hairpin folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truex, Katherine; Chung, Hoi Sung; Louis, John; Eaton, William

    DNA hairpins are the simplest structures for investigating fundamental aspects of nucleic acid folding mechanisms. For two-state hairpins, all of the mechanistic information on how the hairpin folds is contained in the transition path (TP), the rare event in single molecule trajectories when the free energy barrier between folded and unfolded states is actually crossed. The only previous experimental study of TPs in nucleic acids used optical tweezer measurements and Szabo's analytical theory for diffusive barrier crossing to reconstruct the free energy surface for an indirect determination of average TP times (Neupane et al. PRL 2012). We used confocal single molecule FRET and maximum likelihood analysis of photon trajectories to determine an upper bound of 2.5 μs for the average TP time of a DNA hairpin (Truex et al., PRL 2015), compared to the value of 4 μs predicted by Neupane et al., providing an important test of energy landscape theory. Current experiments are aimed at eventually characterizing structural changes during TPs, which will provide a very demanding test of mechanisms predicted by both theoretical models and simulations.

  2. High-Throughput Universal DNA Curtain Arrays for Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Ignacio F.; Pasupathy, Praveenkumar; Brown, Maxwell; Manhart, Carol M.; Neikirk, Dean P.; Alani, Eric; Finkelstein, Ilya J.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule studies of protein–DNA interactions have shed critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of nearly every aspect of DNA metabolism. The development of DNA curtains—a method for organizing arrays of DNA molecules on a fluid lipid bilayer—has greatly facilitated these studies by increasing the number of reactions that can be observed in a single experiment. However, the utility of DNA curtains is limited by the challenges associated with depositing nanometer-scale lipid diffusion barriers onto quartz microscope slides. Here, we describe a UV lithography-based method for large-scale fabrication of chromium (Cr) features and organization of DNA molecules at these features for high-throughput single-molecule studies. We demonstrate this approach by assembling 792 independent DNA arrays (containing >900 000 DNA molecules) within a single microfluidic flowcell. As a first proof of principle, we track the diffusion of Mlh1-Mlh3—a heterodimeric complex that participates in DNA mismatch repair and meiotic recombination. To further highlight the utility of this approach, we demonstrate a two-lane flowcell that facilitates concurrent experiments on different DNA substrates. Our technique greatly reduces the challenges associated with assembling DNA curtains and paves the way for the rapid acquisition of large statistical data sets from individual single-molecule experiments. PMID:26325477

  3. Stretching and immobilization of DNA for studies of protein-DNA interactions at the single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Dukkipati, Venkat Ram; Pang, Stella W.; Larson, Ronald G.

    2007-04-01

    Single-molecule studies of the interactions of DNA and proteins are important in a variety of biological or biotechnology processes ranging from the protein’s search for its DNA target site, DNA replication, transcription, or repair, and genome sequencing. A critical requirement for single-molecule studies is the stretching and immobilization of otherwise randomly coiled DNA molecules. Several methods for doing so have been developed over the last two decades, including the use of forces derived from light, magnetic and electric fields, and hydrodynamic flow. Here we review the immobilization and stretching mechanisms for several of these techniques along with examples of single-molecule DNA-protein interaction assays that can be performed with each of them.

  4. Single-molecule surface studies of fibrinogen and DNA on semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xianhua

    Understanding of protein adsorption onto non-biological substrates is of fundamental interest in science, but also has great potential technological applications in medical devices and biosensors. This study explores the non-specific interaction, at the single molecule level, of a blood protein and DNA with semiconductor surfaces through the use of a custom built, non rastering electron emission microscope and a scanning probe microscope. The specifics and history of electron emission are described as well as the equipment used in this study. The protein examined in this study is human plasma fibrinogen, which plays an important role in haemostatis and thrombosis, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is also studied. A novel technique for determining the photothreshold of biomolecules on single molecule level is developed and applied to fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on oxidized silicon surfaces, using photo-electron emission microscopy (PEEM). Three theoretical models are employed and compared to analyze the experimental photothreshold data. The non-specific adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen on oxidized p- and n- type silicon (100) surfaces is investigated to characterize both hydrophobic interactions and electrostatic forces. The experimental results indicate that hydrophobic interactions are one of the driving forces for protein adsorption and the electrostatic interactions also play a role in the height of the fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on the surface. PEEM images establish a photo threshold of 5.0 +/- 0.2 eV for fibrinogen on both n-type and p-type Si (100) surfaces. We suggest that the photothreshold results from surface state associated Fermi level (EF) pinning and there exists negative charge transfer from the adsorbed fibrinogen onto the p-type silicon substrates, while on n-type silicon substrates negative charge is transferred in the opposite direction. The adsorption of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) on mica and silicon is studied in liquid and ambient

  5. Single-molecule derivation of salt dependent base-pair free energies in DNA.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Josep M; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Forns, Núria; Smith, Steven B; Bustamante, Carlos; Ritort, Felix

    2010-08-31

    Accurate knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids is crucial to predicting their structure and stability. To date most measurements of base-pair free energies in DNA are obtained in thermal denaturation experiments, which depend on several assumptions. Here we report measurements of the DNA base-pair free energies based on a simplified system, the mechanical unzipping of single DNA molecules. By combining experimental data with a physical model and an optimization algorithm for analysis, we measure the 10 unique nearest-neighbor base-pair free energies with 0.1 kcal mol(-1) precision over two orders of magnitude of monovalent salt concentration. We find an improved set of standard energy values compared with Unified Oligonucleotide energies and a unique set of 10 base-pair-specific salt-correction values. The latter are found to be strongest for AA/TT and weakest for CC/GG. Our unique energy values and salt corrections improve predictions of DNA unzipping forces and are fully compatible with melting temperatures for oligos. The method should make it possible to obtain free energies, enthalpies, and entropies in conditions not accessible by bulk methodologies. PMID:20716688

  6. Molecular Combing of Single DNA Molecules on the 10 Megabase Scale

    PubMed Central

    Kaykov, Atanas; Taillefumier, Thibaud; Bensimon, Aaron; Nurse, Paul

    2016-01-01

    DNA combing allows the investigation of DNA replication on genomic single DNA molecules, but the lengths that can be analysed have been restricted to molecules of 200–500 kb. We have improved the DNA combing procedure so that DNA molecules can be analysed up to the length of entire chromosomes in fission yeast and up to 12 Mb fragments in human cells. Combing multi-Mb-scale DNA molecules revealed previously undetected origin clusters in fission yeast and shows that in human cells replication origins fire stochastically forming clusters of fired origins with an average size of 370 kb. We estimate that a single human cell forms around 3200 clusters at mid S-phase and fires approximately 100,000 origins to complete genome duplication. The procedure presented here will be adaptable to other organisms and experimental conditions. PMID:26781994

  7. Single-molecule imaging of DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) activity by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Zhang, P.; Wang, Q.; Wu, N.; Zhang, F.; Hu, J.; Fan, C. H.; Li, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA.We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06544e

  8. Changes in the structure of DNA molecules and the amount of DNA per plastid during chloroplast development in maize.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Delene J; Bendich, Arnold J

    2004-12-10

    We examined the DNA from chloroplasts obtained from different tissues of juvenile maize seedlings (from eight to 16 days old) and adult plants (50-58 days old). During plastid development, we found a striking progression from complex multigenomic DNA molecules to simple subgenomic molecules. The decrease in molecular size and complexity of the DNA paralleled a progressive decrease in DNA content per plastid. Most surprising, we were unable to detect DNA of any size in most chloroplasts from mature leaves, long before the onset of leaf senescence. Thus, the DNA content per plastid is not constant but varies during development from hundreds of genome copies in the proplastid to undetectable levels in the mature chloroplast. This loss of DNA from isolated, mature chloroplasts was monitored by three independent methods: staining intact chloroplasts with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI); staining at the single-molecule level with ethidium bromide after exhaustive deproteinization of lysed chloroplasts; and blot-hybridization after standard DNA isolation procedures. We propose a mechanism for the production of multigenomic chloroplast chromosomes that begins at paired DNA replication origins on linear molecules to generate a head-to-tail linear concatemer, followed by recombination-dependent replication.

  9. Thermophoretic forces on DNA measured with a single-molecule spring balance.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jonas N; Lüscher, Christopher J; Marie, Rodolphe; Thamdrup, Lasse H; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2014-12-31

    We stretch a single DNA molecule with thermophoretic forces and measure these forces with a spring balance: the DNA molecule itself. It is an entropic spring which we calibrate, using as a benchmark its Brownian motion in the nanochannel that contains and prestretches it. This direct measurement of the thermophoretic force in a static configuration finds forces up to 130 fN. This is eleven times stronger than the force experienced by the same molecule in the same thermal gradient in bulk, where the molecule shields itself. Our stronger forces stretch the middle of the molecule up to 80% of its contour length. We find the Soret coefficient per unit length of DNA at various ionic strengths. It agrees, with novel precision, with results obtained in bulk for DNA too short to shield itself and with the thermodynamic model of thermophoresis.

  10. Thermophoretic forces on DNA measured with a single-molecule spring balance.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jonas N; Lüscher, Christopher J; Marie, Rodolphe; Thamdrup, Lasse H; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2014-12-31

    We stretch a single DNA molecule with thermophoretic forces and measure these forces with a spring balance: the DNA molecule itself. It is an entropic spring which we calibrate, using as a benchmark its Brownian motion in the nanochannel that contains and prestretches it. This direct measurement of the thermophoretic force in a static configuration finds forces up to 130 fN. This is eleven times stronger than the force experienced by the same molecule in the same thermal gradient in bulk, where the molecule shields itself. Our stronger forces stretch the middle of the molecule up to 80% of its contour length. We find the Soret coefficient per unit length of DNA at various ionic strengths. It agrees, with novel precision, with results obtained in bulk for DNA too short to shield itself and with the thermodynamic model of thermophoresis. PMID:25615393

  11. Kinetics of single DNA molecule denaturation by T4 Gene 32 protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Kiran; Karpel, Richard L.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-03-01

    Bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein (32 protein) specifically binds single-stranded DNA, a property essential for its role in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. Although on a thermodynamic basis, single-stranded DNA binding proteins should lower the thermal melting temperature of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), 32 protein does not. Using single molecule force spectroscopy, we show for the first time that 32 protein is capable of slowly destabilizing natural dsDNA. Direct measurements of single DNA molecule denaturation and renaturation kinetics in the presence of 32 protein and its proteolytic fragments reveal three types of kinetic behavior, attributable to specific protein structural domains, which regulate 32 protein's helix-destabilizing capabilities. This regulation is potentially biologically significant because uncontrolled helix-destabilization would be lethal to the cell. We also obtain equilibrium measurements of the DNA helix-coil transition free energy in the presence of these proteins for the first time.

  12. Sugar amino acids and their uses in designing bioactive molecules.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tushar K; Ghosh, Subhash; Jayaprakash, Sarva

    2002-02-01

    In search of new molecular entities for discovering new drugs and materials, organic chemists are looking for innovative approaches that try to imitate nature in assembling quickly large number of distinct and diverse molecular structures from 'nature-like' and yet unnatural designer building blocks using combinatorial approach. The main objective in developing such libraries is to mimic the diversities displayed in structures and properties of natural products. The unnatural building blocks used in these assemblies are carefully designed to manifest the structural diversities of the monomeric units used by nature like amino acids, carbohydrates and nucleosides to build its arsenal. Compounds made of such unnatural building blocks are also expected to be more stable toward proteolytic cleavage in physiological systems than their natural counterparts. Sugar amino acids constitute an important class of such polyfunctional scaffolds where the carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl termini provide an excellent opportunity to organic chemists to create structural diversities akin to nature's molecular arsenal. Recent advances in the area of combinatorial chemistry give an unprecedented technological support for rapid compilations of sugar amino acid-based libraries exploiting the diversities of carbohydrate molecules and well-developed solid-phase peptide synthesis methods. This review describes the development of sugar amino acids as a novel class of peptidomimetic building blocks and their applications in creating large number of structurally diverse peptide-based molecules many of which display interesting three-dimensional structures as well as useful biological properties. PMID:11945118

  13. Single molecule fluorescence burst detection of DNA separated by capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haab, Brian B.; Mathies, Richard A.

    1996-03-01

    A method has been developed for detecting DNA separated by capillary gel electrophoresis using single molecule photon burst counting. A confocal fluorescence microscope was used to observe the fluorescence bursts from single molecules of DNA multiply labeled with a thiazole orange derivative as they passed through the approximately 2 micrometer diameter focused laser beam. Amplified photoelectron pulses from the photomultiplier are grouped into bins of from 360 - 450 microseconds in duration, and the resulting histogram stored in a computer for analysis. Solutions of M13 DNA were first flowed through the capillary at various concentrations, and the resulting data were used to optimize the parameters for digital filtering using a low-pass Fourier filter, selecting a discriminator level for peak detection, and applying a peak-calling algorithm. The optimized single molecule counting method was then used to detect a separation of pBR 322 DNA from pRL 277 DNA. Clusters of discrete fluorescence bursts were observed at the expected appearance time of each DNA band. These separations were easily detected when only 50 to 100 molecules of DNA per band traveled through the detection region. This new detection technology should lead to the routine analysis of DNA in capillary columns with an on-column sensitivity of approximately 100 DNA molecules per band or better.

  14. Single-stranded DNA scanning and deamination with Single molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, David

    2012-04-01

    Over the past decade, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy (smFRET) has become an increasingly popular tool to study the structural dynamics of biopolymers, such as DNA, RNA and proteins. The most attractive aspect of single-molecule experiments is that, unlike ensemble-averaged techniques, they directly reveal the structural dynamics of individual molecules, which would otherwise be hidden in ensemble-averaged experiments. Here, we will present a novel single molecule assay to study, for the first time, scanning of an enzyme (APOBEC3G, involved in the defense against HIV) on single stranded DNA (ssDNA). We have investigated the ssDNA scanning and activity of Apo3G with smFRET. Our data show that Apo3G scans ssDNA randomly and bidirectionally with average excursion lengths of ˜ 10 å and ˜1 s-1 scanning rates. Apo3G quasi-localization is observed on highly reactive motifs located near the one end of the ssDNA. Motif-dependent ssDNA bending is also observed, where the bending is maximal for highly reactive targets located near the DNA end. Interestingly, both the Apo3G scanning and Apo3G-induced ssDNA bending is reduced with lowered ionic strength, indicating that Apo3G motion on ssDNA is facilitated by salt by reducing `electrostatic friction'. Although scanning is random, asymmetric catalytic orientation may be the reason for Apo3G directional activity.

  15. Monitoring molecular beacon DNA probe hybridization at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Fang, Xiaohong; Yokota, Hiroaki; Yanagida, Toshio; Tan, Weihong

    2003-11-21

    We have monitored the reaction dynamics of the DNA hybridization process on a liquid/solid interface at the single-molecule level by using a hairpin-type molecular beacon DNA probe. Fluorescence images of single DNA probes were recorded by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence signal of single DNA probes during the hybridization to individual complementary DNA probes was monitored over time. Among 400 molecular beacon DNA probes that we tracked, 349 molecular beacons (87.5 %) were hybridized quickly and showed an abrupt fluorescence increase, while 51 probes (12.5 %) reacted slowly, resulting in a gradual fluorescence increase. This ratio stayed about the same when varying the concentrations of cDNA in MB hybridization on the liquid/surface interface. Statistical data of the 51 single-molecule hybridization images showed that there was a multistep hybridization process. Our results also showed that photostability for the dye molecules associated with the double-stranded hybrids was better than that for those with the single-stranded molecular beacon DNA probes. Our results demonstrate the ability to obtain a better understanding of DNA hybridization processes using single-molecule techniques, which will improve biosensor and biochip development where surface-immobilized molecular beacon DNA probes provide unique advantages in signal transduction.

  16. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  17. [Polarization selectivity of interaction of DNA molecules by the action of X-ray radiation].

    PubMed

    Semchenko, I V; Kakhomov, S A; Balmakov, A P

    2010-01-01

    The optimum form of a long helical molecule, which DNA is, has been calculated in terms of the classical electromagnetic theory. Three different methods of classical electrodynamics are used: the theory of dipole radiation of electromagnetic waves, the energetic power approach, and a helical model of molecules of chiral medium. In all three cases, an identical result for the optimum geometrical form of a long spiral molecule has been obtained. The lead angle between the tangent to the helix and the plane normal to the axis of the helix should be equal to 24.5 degrees. This condition imposes restrictions on the radius and the pitch of the helical molecule. The experimentally measured geometrical characteristics of the DNA molecule satisfy the theoretically calculated condition precisely enough. Having the optimum geometrical form, the DNA molecule is not influenced by a circularly right-handed polarized electromagnetic wave in the soft X-ray range lambda = 7-8 nm. This wave, for which the right-handed DNA molecule is "transparent", should propagate orthogonally to the helix axis and form a right-handed screw in space. The wave radiated by the right-handed DNA molecule orthogonally to helix axis in the range of lambda = 7-8 nm has, accordingly, the left-handed circular polarization. The polarization selectivity of the DNA molecule by the action of X-ray radiation is exhibited strongly enough in the wavelength range of lambda = 1-35 nm. The results obtained are valid for any distribution of electric currents in DNA, i.e., for any sequence of nitrus bases in DNA.

  18. A single molecule assay for measuring site-specific DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Stefano; Mousley, Briana; Cathcart, Lindsay; Winship, Janelle; Loparo, Joseph J; Price, Allen C

    2016-02-15

    Sequence-specific DNA cleavage is a key step in a number of genomic transactions. Here, we report a single-molecule technique that allows the simultaneous measurement of hundreds of DNAs, thereby collecting significant statistics in a single experiment. Microbeads are tethered with single DNA molecules in a microfluidic channel. After the DNA cleavage reaction is initiated, the time of cleavage of each DNA is recorded using video microscopy. We demonstrate the utility of our method by measuring the cleavage kinetics of NdeI, a type II restriction endonuclease.

  19. Hydration of biological molecules: lipids versus nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Pohle, W; Gauger, D R; Dornberger, U; Birch-Hirschfeld, E; Selle, C; Rupprecht, A; Bohl, M

    2002-01-01

    We used FTIR spectroscopy to comparatively study the hydration of films prepared from nucleic acids (DNA and double-stranded RNA) and lipids (phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines chosen as the most abundant ones) at room temperature by varying the ambient relative humidity in terms of solvent-induced structural changes. The nucleic acids and phospholipids both display examples of polymorphism on the one hand and structural conservatism on the other; even closely related representatives behave differently in this respect. DNA undergoes a hydration-driven A-B conformational transition, but RNA maintains an A-like structure independently of the water activity. Similarly, a main transition between the solid and liquid-crystalline phases can be induced lyotropically in certain phosphatidylcholines, while their phosphatidylethanolamine counterparts do not exhibit chain melting under the same conditions. A principal difference concerning the structural changes that occur in the studied biomolecules is given by the relevant water-substrate stoichiometries. These are rather high in DNA and often low in phospholipids, suggesting different mechanisms of action of the hydration water that appears to induce structural changes on global- and local-mode levels, respectively.

  20. Labeling DNA for single-molecule experiments: methods of labeling internal specific sequences on double-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Hagar; Muller, Susan J.

    2011-08-01

    This review is a practical guide for experimentalists interested in specifically labeling internal sequences on double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules for single-molecule experiments. We describe six labeling approaches demonstrated in a single-molecule context and discuss the merits and drawbacks of each approach with particular attention to the amount of specialized training and reagents required. By evaluating each approach according to criteria relevant to single-molecule experiments, including labeling yield and compatibility with cofactors such as Mg2+, we provide a simple reference for selecting a labeling method for given experimental constraints. Intended for non-specialists seeking accessible solutions to DNA labeling challenges, the approaches outlined emphasize simplicity, robustness, suitability for use by non-biologists, and utility in diverse single-molecule experiments.

  1. Drug-DNA interactions at single molecule level: A view with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Studies of small molecule--DNA interactions are essential for developing new drugs for challenging diseases like cancer and HIV. The main idea behind developing these molecules is to target and inhibit the reproduction of the tumor cells and infected cells. We mechanically manipulate single DNA molecule using optical tweezers to investigate two molecules that have complex and multiple binding modes. Mononuclear ruthenium complexes have been extensively studied as a test for rational drug design. Potential drug candidates should have high affinity to DNA and slow dissociation kinetics. To achieve this, motifs of the ruthenium complexes are altered. Our collaborators designed a dumb-bell shaped binuclear ruthenium complex that can only intercalate DNA by threading through its bases. Studying the binding properties of this complex in bulk studies took hours. By mechanically manipulating a single DNA molecule held with optical tweezers, we lower the barrier to thread and make it fast compared to the bulk experiments. Stretching single DNA molecules with different concentration of drug molecules and holding it at a constant force allows the binding to reach equilibrium. By this we can obtain the equilibrium fractional ligand binding and length of DNA at saturated binding. Fitting these results yields quantitative measurements of the binding thermodynamics and kinetics of this complex process. The second complex discussed in this study is Actinomycin D (ActD), a well studied anti-cancer agent that is used as a prototype for developing new generations of drugs. However, the biophysical basis of its activity is still unclear. Because ActD is known to intercalate double stranded DNA (dsDNA), it was assumed to block replication by stabilizing dsDNA in front of the replication fork. However, recent studies have shown that ActD binds with even higher affinity to imperfect duplexes and some sequences of single stranded DNA (ssDNA). We directly measure the on and off rates by

  2. Anion photoelectron spectroscopy of acid-base systems, solvated molecules and MALDI matrix molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eustis, Soren Newman

    Gas phase, mass-selected, anion photoelectron spectroscopic studies were performed on a variety of molecular systems. These studies can be grouped into three main themes: acid-base interactions, solvation, and ions of analytical interest. Acid-base interactions represent some of the most fundamental processes in chemistry. The study of these processes elucidates elementary principles such as inner and outer sphere complexes, hard and soft ions, and salt formation---to name a few. Apart from their appeal from a pedagogical standpoint, the ubiquity of chemical reactions which involve acids, bases or the resulting salts makes the study of their fundamental interactions both necessary and fruitful. With this in mind, the neutral and anionic series (NH3···HX) (X= F, Cl, Br, I) were examined experimentally and theoretically. The relatively small size of these systems, combined with the advances in computational methods, allowed our experimental results to be compared with very high level ab initio theoretical results. The synergy between theory and experiment yielded an understanding of the nature of the complexes that could not be achieved with either method in isolation. The second theme present in this body or work is molecular solvation. Solvation is a phenomenon which is present in biology, chemistry and physics. Many biological molecules do not become 'active' until they are solvated by water. Thus, the study of biologically relevant species solvated by water is one step in a bottom up approach to studying the biochemical interactions in living organisms. Furthermore, the hydration of acidic molecules in the atmosphere is what drives the formation of 'free' protons or hydronium ions which are the key players in acid driven chemistry. Here are presented two unique solvation studies, Adenine(H2O)-n and C6F6(H2O)-n, these systems are very distinct, but show somewhat similar responses to hydration. The last theme presented in this work is the electronic properties

  3. Counting individual DNA molecules by the stochastic attachment of diverse labels

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Glenn K.; Hu, Jing; Wang, Pei-Hua; Fodor, Stephen P. A.

    2011-01-01

    We implement a unique strategy for single molecule counting termed stochastic labeling, where random attachment of a diverse set of labels converts a population of identical DNA molecules into a population of distinct DNA molecules suitable for threshold detection. The conceptual framework for stochastic labeling is developed and experimentally demonstrated by determining the absolute and relative number of selected genes after stochastically labeling approximately 360,000 different fragments of the human genome. The approach does not require the physical separation of molecules and takes advantage of highly parallel methods such as microarray and sequencing technologies to simultaneously count absolute numbers of multiple targets. Stochastic labeling should be particularly useful for determining the absolute numbers of RNA or DNA molecules in single cells. PMID:21562209

  4. Identification of protein/target molecule interactions using yeast surface-displayed cDNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel expression cloning method based on screening yeast surface-displayed human cDNA libraries by direct affinity interaction to identify cellular proteins binding to a broad spectrum of target molecules. Being a eukaryote, yeast protein expression pathways are similar to those found in mammalian cells, and therefore mammalian protein fragments displayed on the yeast cell wall are more likely to be properly folded and functional than proteins displayed using prokaryotic systems. Yeast surface displayed human cDNA libraries have been successfully used to screen for proteins that bind to post-translationally modified phosphorylated peptides, small signaling molecule phosphatidylinositides, and monoclonal antibodies. In this article we describe protocols for using yeast surface-displayed cDNA libraries, coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), to select protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules including post-translationally modified peptides, small signaling molecules, monoclonal phage antibodies, and monoclonal IgG molecules. PMID:21365493

  5. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  6. Recent advances in small organic molecules as DNA intercalating agents: synthesis, activity, and modeling.

    PubMed

    Rescifina, Antonio; Zagni, Chiara; Varrica, Maria Giulia; Pistarà, Venerando; Corsaro, Antonino

    2014-03-01

    The interaction of small molecules with DNA plays an essential role in many biological processes. As DNA is often the target for majority of anticancer and antibiotic drugs, study about the interaction of drug and DNA has a key role in pharmacology. Moreover, understanding the interactions of small molecules with DNA is of prime significance in the rational design of more powerful and selective anticancer agents. Two of the most important and promising targets in cancer chemotherapy include DNA alkylating agents and DNA intercalators. For these last the DNA recognition is a critical step in their anti-tumor action and the intercalation is not only one kind of the interactions in DNA recognition but also a pivotal step of several clinically used anti-tumor drugs such as anthracyclines, acridines and anthraquinones. To push clinical cancer therapy, the discovery of new DNA intercalators has been considered a practical approach and a number of intercalators have been recently reported. The intercalative binding properties of such molecules can also be harnessed as diagnostic probes for DNA structure in addition to DNA-directed therapeutics. Moreover, the problem of intercalation site formation in the undistorted B-DNA of different length and sequence is matter of tremendous importance in molecular modeling studies and, nowadays, three models of DNA intercalation targets have been proposed that account for the binding features of intercalators. Finally, despite DNA being an important target for several drugs, most of the docking programs are validated only for proteins and their ligands. Therefore, a default protocol to identify DNA binding modes which uses a modified canonical DNA as receptor is needed.

  7. Topological events in single molecules of E. coli DNA confined in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Reifenberger, Jeffrey G; Dorfman, Kevin D; Cao, Han

    2015-07-21

    We present experimental data concerning potential topological events such as folds, internal backfolds, and/or knots within long molecules of double-stranded DNA when they are stretched by confinement in a nanochannel. Genomic DNA from E. coli was labeled near the 'GCTCTTC' sequence with a fluorescently labeled dUTP analog and stained with the DNA intercalator YOYO. Individual long molecules of DNA were then linearized and imaged using methods based on the NanoChannel Array technology (Irys® System) available from BioNano Genomics. Data were collected on 189 153 molecules of length greater than 50 kilobases. A custom code was developed to search for abnormal intensity spikes in the YOYO backbone profile along the length of individual molecules. By correlating the YOYO intensity spikes with the aligned barcode pattern to the reference, we were able to correlate the bright intensity regions of YOYO with abnormal stretching in the molecule, which suggests these events were either a knot or a region of internal backfolding within the DNA. We interpret the results of our experiments involving molecules exceeding 50 kilobases in the context of existing simulation data for relatively short DNA, typically several kilobases. The frequency of these events is lower than the predictions from simulations, while the size of the events is larger than simulation predictions and often exceeds the molecular weight of the simulated molecules. We also identified DNA molecules that exhibit large, single folds as they enter the nanochannels. Overall, topological events occur at a low frequency (∼7% of all molecules) and pose an easily surmountable obstacle for the practice of genome mapping in nanochannels.

  8. Insulating behavior for DNA molecules between nanoelectrodes at the 100 nm length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, A. J.; van Noort, J.; de Vries, S.; Dekker, C.

    2001-12-01

    Electrical transport measurements are reported for double-stranded DNA molecules located between nanofabricated electrodes. We observe the absence of any electrical conduction through these DNA-based devices, both at the single-molecule level as well as for small bundles of DNA. We obtain a lower bound of 10 TΩ for the resistance of a DNA molecule at length scales larger than 40 nm. It is concluded that DNA is insulating. This conclusion is based on an extensive set of experiments in which we varied key parameters such as the base-pair sequence [mixed sequence and homogeneous poly(dG)ṡpoly(dC)], length between contacts (40-500 nm), substrate (SiO2 or mica), electrode material (gold or platinum), and electrostatic doping fields. Discrepancies with other reports in the literature are discussed.

  9. Selective enrichment of damaged DNA molecules for ancient genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Contamination by present-day human and microbial DNA is one of the major hindrances for large-scale genomic studies using ancient biological material. We describe a new molecular method, U selection, which exploits one of the most distinctive features of ancient DNA—the presence of deoxyuracils—for selective enrichment of endogenous DNA against a complex background of contamination during DNA library preparation. By applying the method to Neanderthal DNA extracts that are heavily contaminated with present-day human DNA, we show that the fraction of useful sequence information increases ∼10-fold and that the resulting sequences are more efficiently depleted of human contamination than when using purely computational approaches. Furthermore, we show that U selection can lead to a four- to fivefold increase in the proportion of endogenous DNA sequences relative to those of microbial contaminants in some samples. U selection may thus help to lower the costs for ancient genome sequencing of nonhuman samples also. PMID:25081630

  10. Nanochannel Device with Embedded Nanopore: a New Approach for Single-Molecule DNA Analysis and Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuning; Reisner, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Nanopore and nanochannel based devices are robust methods for biomolecular sensing and single DNA manipulation. Nanopore-based DNA sensing has attractive features that make it a leading candidate as a single-molecule DNA sequencing technology. Nanochannel based extension of DNA, combined with enzymatic or denaturation-based barcoding schemes, is already a powerful approach for genome analysis. We believe that there is revolutionary potential in devices that combine nanochannels with embedded pore detectors. In particular, due to the fast translocation of a DNA molecule through a standard nanopore configuration, there is an unfavorable trade-off between signal and sequence resolution. With a combined nanochannel-nanopore device, based on embedding a pore inside a nanochannel, we can in principle gain independent control over both DNA translocation speed and sensing signal, solving the key draw-back of the standard nanopore configuration. We demonstrate that we can optically detect successful translocation of DNA from the nanochannel out through the nanopore, a possible method to 'select' a given barcode for further analysis. In particular, we show that in equilibrium DNA will not escape through an embedded sub-persistence length nanopore, suggesting that the pore could be used as a nanoscale window through which to interrogate a nanochannel extended DNA molecule. Furthermore, electrical measurements through the nanopore are performed, indicating that DNA sensing is feasible using the nanochannel-nanopore device.

  11. Mechanisms of small molecule–DNA interactions probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Almaqwashi, Ali A.; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide range of applications for non-covalent DNA binding ligands, and optimization of such interactions requires detailed understanding of the binding mechanisms. One important class of these ligands is that of intercalators, which bind DNA by inserting aromatic moieties between adjacent DNA base pairs. Characterizing the dynamic and equilibrium aspects of DNA-intercalator complex assembly may allow optimization of DNA binding for specific functions. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies have recently revealed new details about the molecular mechanisms governing DNA intercalation. These studies can provide the binding kinetics and affinity as well as determining the magnitude of the double helix structural deformations during the dynamic assembly of DNA–ligand complexes. These results may in turn guide the rational design of intercalators synthesized for DNA-targeted drugs, optical probes, or integrated biological self-assembly processes. Herein, we survey the progress in experimental methods as well as the corresponding analysis framework for understanding single molecule DNA binding mechanisms. We discuss briefly minor and major groove binding ligands, and then focus on intercalators, which have been probed extensively with these methods. Conventional mono-intercalators and bis-intercalators are discussed, followed by unconventional DNA intercalation. We then consider the prospects for using these methods in optimizing conventional and unconventional DNA-intercalating small molecules. PMID:27085806

  12. Single molecule detection: Applications to sizing of DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, J.T.; Johnson, M.E.; Affleck, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    Using, ultrasensitive fluorescence detection and flow cytometry, size determination of ds-DNA fragments is performed using the fluorescence intensity from samples stained with a thiazole orange homodimer TOTO-1. The stained fragments pass through a low-power (30 mW) continuous-wave laser beam. Using transit times of 1-5 ms, data were acquired in times ranging from 1 to 15 mins at a rate of 40 fragments/second. As little as 50 fg of DNA was needed for the analysis. The authors have demonstrated sizing of DNA fragments in the size range from 1.5 to 150 kbp. Future applications of this approach to DNA sizing require that the factors contributing to size resolution be understood, and the authors present simulations to address this issue. To aid in the modeling, the authors have measured the saturation intensity and the relative fluorescence quantum yield of the TOTO-1/DNA complex. Applications to physical mapping of the human genome are being investigated.

  13. Interactions of DNA binding proteins with G-Quadruplex structures at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sujay

    Guanine-rich nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences can form non-canonical secondary structures, known as G-quadruplex (GQ). Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated formation of these structures in telomeric and non-telomeric regions of the genome. Telomeric GQs protect the chromosome ends whereas non-telomeric GQs either act as road blocks or recognition sites for DNA metabolic machinery. These observations suggest the significance of these structures in regulation of different metabolic processes, such as replication and repair. GQs are typically thermodynamically more stable than the corresponding Watson-Crick base pairing formed by G-rich and C-rich strands, making protein activity a crucial factor for their destabilization. Inside the cell, GQs interact with different proteins and their enzymatic activity is the determining factor for their stability. We studied interactions of several proteins with GQs to understand the underlying principles of protein-GQ interactions using single-molecule FRET and other biophysical techniques. Replication Protein-A (RPA), a single stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is known to posses GQ unfolding activity. First, we compared the thermal stability of three potentially GQ-forming DNA sequences (PQS) to their stability against RPA-mediated unfolding. One of these sequences is the human telomeric repeat and the other two, located in the promoter region of tyrosine hydroxylase gene, are highly heterogeneous sequences that better represent PQS in the genome. The thermal stability of these structures do not necessarily correlate with their stability against protein-mediated unfolding. We conclude that thermal stability is not necessarily an adequate criterion for predicting the physiological viability of GQ structures. To determine the critical structural factors that influence protein-GQ interactions we studied two groups of GQ structures that have systematically varying loop lengths and number of G-tetrad layers. We

  14. Theoretical analysis of gyrotropy and absorption of terahertz electromagnetic waves in layer of DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, A.; Vaks, V.

    2016-08-01

    Certain type of low-frequency DNA molecular oscillations was analysed within the self-consistent phonon approximation. There were calculated dispersion relationship, exiting the oscillations by electromagnetic wave and corresponding contribution to the absorption spectrum of ensemble of parallel DNA molecules. The dependence of the DNA spectral characteristics on the length and period of the DNA duplex structure is revealed. The method of experimental check of obtained results is suggested. If the described model is confirmed by experiment, the obtained results available to reconstruct the length and duplex period of the DNA in a sample by its absorption spectrum.

  15. Nucleic acid chemistry in the organic phase: from functionalized oligonucleotides to DNA side chain polymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Zheng, Lifei; Liu, Qing; de Vries, Jan Willem; Gerasimov, Jennifer Y; Herrmann, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    DNA-incorporating hydrophobic moieties can be synthesized by either solid-phase or solution-phase coupling. On a solid support the DNA is protected, and hydrophobic units are usually attached employing phosphoramidite chemistry involving a DNA synthesizer. On the other hand, solution coupling in aqueous medium results in low yields due to the solvent incompatibility of DNA and hydrophobic compounds. Hence, the development of a general coupling method for producing amphiphilic DNA conjugates with high yield in solution remains a major challenge. Here, we report an organic-phase coupling strategy for nucleic acid modification and polymerization by introducing a hydrophobic DNA-surfactant complex as a reactive scaffold. A remarkable range of amphiphile-DNA structures (DNA-pyrene, DNA-triphenylphosphine, DNA-hydrocarbon, and DNA block copolymers) and a series of new brush-type DNA side-chain homopolymers with high DNA grafting density are produced efficiently. We believe that this method is an important breakthrough in developing a generalized approach to synthesizing functional DNA molecules for self-assembly and related technological applications.

  16. Monitoring patterned enzymatic polymerization on DNA origami at single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okholm, A. H.; Aslan, H.; Besenbacher, F.; Dong, M.; Kjems, J.

    2015-06-01

    DNA origami has been used to orchestrate reactions with nano-precision using a variety of biomolecules. Here, the dynamics of albumin-assisted, localized single-molecule DNA polymerization by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase on a 2D DNA origami are monitored using AFM in liquid. Direct visualization of the surface activity revealed the mechanics of growth.DNA origami has been used to orchestrate reactions with nano-precision using a variety of biomolecules. Here, the dynamics of albumin-assisted, localized single-molecule DNA polymerization by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase on a 2D DNA origami are monitored using AFM in liquid. Direct visualization of the surface activity revealed the mechanics of growth. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01945a

  17. Enzymatic Digestion of Single DNA Molecules Anchored on Nanogold-Modified Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Junhong; Ye, Ming; Duan, Na; Li, Bin

    2009-09-01

    To study enzyme-DNA interactions at single molecular level, both the attachment points and the immediate surroundings of surfaces must be carefully considered such that they do not compromise the structural information and biological properties of the sample under investigation. The present work demonstrates the feasibility of enzymatic digestion of single DNA molecules attached to nanoparticle-modified surfaces. With Nanogold linking DNA to the mica surface by electrostatic interactions, advantageous conditions with fewer effects on the length and topography of DNA are obtained, and an appropriate environment for the activities of DNA is created. We demonstrate that by using Dip-Pen Nanolithography, individual DNA molecules attached to modified mica surfaces can be efficiently digested by DNase I.

  18. A 3D-DNA Molecule Made of PlayMais

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caine, Massimo; Horié, Ninon; Zuchuat, Sandrine; Weber, Aurélia; Ducret, Verena; Linder, Patrick; Perron, Karl

    2015-01-01

    More than 60 years have passed since the work of Rosalind Franklin, James Watson, and Francis Crick led to the discovery of the 3D-DNA double-helix structure. Nowadays, due to the simple and elegant architecture of its double helix, the structure of DNA is widely known. The biological role of the DNA molecule (e.g., genetic information), however,…

  19. Effect of internal viscosity on Brownian dynamics of DNA molecules in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; Melnik, Roderick V N

    2007-04-01

    The results of Brownian dynamics simulations of a single DNA molecule in shear flow are presented taking into account the effect of internal viscosity. The dissipative mechanism of internal viscosity is proved necessary in the research of DNA dynamics. A stochastic model is derived on the basis of the balance equation for forces acting on the chain. The Euler method is applied to the solution of the model. The extensions of DNA molecules for different Weissenberg numbers are analyzed. Comparison with the experimental results available in the literature is carried out to estimate the contribution of the effect of internal viscosity.

  20. DNA compaction by the bacteriophage protein Cox studied on the single DNA molecule level using nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, Karolin; Berntsson, Ronnie Per-Arne; Claesson, Magnus; de Battice, Laura; Odegrip, Richard; Stenmark, Pål; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-09-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 forms oligomeric filaments and it has been proposed that DNA can be wound up around these filaments, similar to how histones condense DNA. We here use fluorescence microscopy to study single DNA-Cox complexes in nanofluidic channels and compare how the Cox homologs from phages P2 and WΦ affect DNA. By measuring the extension of nanoconfined DNA in absence and presence of Cox we show that the protein compacts DNA and that the binding is highly cooperative, in agreement with the model of a Cox filament around which DNA is wrapped. Furthermore, comparing microscopy images for the wild-type P2 Cox protein and two mutants allows us to discriminate between compaction due to filament formation and compaction by monomeric Cox. P2 and WΦ Cox have similar effects on the physical properties of DNA and the subtle, but significant, differences in DNA binding are due to differences in binding affinity rather than binding mode. The presented work highlights the use of single DNA molecule studies to confirm structural predictions from X-ray crystallography. It also shows how a small protein by oligomerization can have great impact on the organization of DNA and thereby fulfill multiple regulatory functions.

  1. DNA compaction by the bacteriophage protein Cox studied on the single DNA molecule level using nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, Karolin; Berntsson, Ronnie Per-Arne; Claesson, Magnus; de Battice, Laura; Odegrip, Richard; Stenmark, Pål; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-09-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 forms oligomeric filaments and it has been proposed that DNA can be wound up around these filaments, similar to how histones condense DNA. We here use fluorescence microscopy to study single DNA-Cox complexes in nanofluidic channels and compare how the Cox homologs from phages P2 and WΦ affect DNA. By measuring the extension of nanoconfined DNA in absence and presence of Cox we show that the protein compacts DNA and that the binding is highly cooperative, in agreement with the model of a Cox filament around which DNA is wrapped. Furthermore, comparing microscopy images for the wild-type P2 Cox protein and two mutants allows us to discriminate between compaction due to filament formation and compaction by monomeric Cox. P2 and WΦ Cox have similar effects on the physical properties of DNA and the subtle, but significant, differences in DNA binding are due to differences in binding affinity rather than binding mode. The presented work highlights the use of single DNA molecule studies to confirm structural predictions from X-ray crystallography. It also shows how a small protein by oligomerization can have great impact on the organization of DNA and thereby fulfill multiple regulatory functions. PMID:27131370

  2. Single molecule fluorescence burst detection of DNA fragments separated by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Haab, B.B.; Mathies, R.A.

    1995-09-15

    A method has been developed for detecting DNA separated by capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) using single molecule photon burst counting. A confocal fluorescence microscope was used to observe the fluorescence bursts from single molecules of DNA multiply labeled with the thiazole orange derivative TO6 as they passed through the nearly 2-{mu}m diameter focused laser beam. Amplified photo-electron pulses from the photomultiplier are grouped into bins of 360-450 {mu}s in duration, and the resulting histogram is stored in a computer for analysis. Solutions of M13 DNA were first flowed through the capillary at various concentrations, and the resulting data were used to optimize the parameters for digital filtering using a low-pass Fourier filter, selecting a discriminator level for peak detection, and applying a peak-calling algorithm. The optimized single molecule counting method was then applied to an electrophoretic separation of M13 DNA and to a separation of pBR 322 DNA from pRL 277 DNA. Clusters of discreet fluorescence bursts were observed at the expected appearance time of each DNA band. The auto-correlation function of these data indicated transit times that were consistent with the observed electrophoretic velocity. These separations were easily detected when only 50-100 molecules of DNA per band traveled through the detection region. This new detection technology should lead to the routine analysis of DNA in capillary columns with an on-column sensitivity of nearly 100 DNA molecules/band or better. 45 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Molecular characterization of a new begomovirus infecting Sida cordifolia and its associated satellite DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaojian; Zhou, Xueping

    2006-12-01

    Two virus isolates Hn57 and Hn60 were obtained from Sida cordifolia showing mild upward leaf-curling symptoms in Hainan province of China. Comparison of partial sequences of DNA-A like molecule confirmed the existence of a single type of begomovirus. The complete nucleotide sequence of DNA-A of Hn57 was determined to be 2757 nucleotides, with a genomic organization typical of begomoviruses. Complete sequence comparison with other reported begomoviruses revealed that Hn57 DNA-A has the highest sequence identity (71.0%) with that of Tobacco leaf curl Yunnan virus. Consequently, Hn57 was considered to be a new begomovirus species, for which the name Sida leaf curl virus (SiLCV) is proposed. In addition to DNA-A molecule, two additional circular single-stranded satellite DNA molecules corresponding to DNAbeta and DNA1 were found to be associated with SiLCV isolates. Both DNAbeta and DNA1 were approximately half the size of their cognate genomic DNA. Sequence analysis shows that DNAbeta of Hn57 and Hn60 share 93.8% nucleotide sequence identity, and they have the highest sequence identity (58.5%) with DNAbeta associated with Ageratum leaf curl disease (AJ316027). The nucleotide sequence identity between DNA1 of Hn57 and that of Hn60 was 83.8%, they share 58.2-79.3% nucleotide sequence identities in comparison with other previously reported DNAl.

  4. Nanoelectrode-Gated Detection of Individual Molecules with Potential for Rapid DNA Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, James Weifu

    2007-01-01

    A systematic nanoelectrode-gated electron-tunneling molecular-detection concept with potential for rapid DNA sequencing has recently been invented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A DNA molecule is a polymer that typically contains four different types of nucleotide bases: adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) on its phosphate-deoxyribose chain. According to the nanoelectrode-gated molecular-detection concept, it should be possible to obtain genetic sequence information by probing through a DNA molecule base by base at a nanometer scale, as if looking at a strip of movie film. The nanoscale reading of DNA sequences is envisioned to take place at a nanogap (gate) defined by a pair of nanoelectrode tips as a DNA molecule moves through the gate base by base. The rationale is that sample molecules, such as the four different nucleotide bases, each with a distinct chemical composition and structure, should produce a specific perturbation effect on the tunneling electron beam across the two nanoelectrode tips. A sample molecule could thus be detected when it enters the gate. This nanoscience-based approach could lead to a new DNA sequencing technology that could be thousands of times faster than the current technology (Sanger's 'dideoxy' protocol-based capillary electrophoresis systems). Both computational and experimental studies are underway at ORNL towards demonstrating this nanotechnology concept.

  5. Identification of telomere-associated molecules by engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP)

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Asano, Yoshinori; Ohtsuka, Junko; Takada, Yoko; Saito, Kazunobu; Ohki, Rieko; Fujii, Hodaka

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical analysis of molecular interactions in specific genomic regions requires their isolation while retaining molecular interactions in vivo. Here, we report isolation of telomeres by engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP) using a transcription activator-like (TAL) protein recognizing telomere repeats. Telomeres recognized by the tagged TAL protein were immunoprecipitated with an antibody against the tag and subjected to identification of telomere-binding molecules. enChIP-mass spectrometry (enChIP-MS) targeting telomeres identified known and novel telomere-binding proteins. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000461. In addition, we showed that RNA associated with telomeres could be isolated by enChIP. Identified telomere-binding molecules may play important roles in telomere biology. enChIP using TAL proteins would be a useful tool for biochemical analysis of specific genomic regions of interest. PMID:24201379

  6. Single-Molecule Denaturation Mapping of Genomic DNA in Nanofluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Walter; Larsen, Niels; Kristensen, Anders; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2009-03-01

    We have developed a new DNA barcoding technique based on the partial denaturation of extended fluorescently labeled DNA molecules. We partially melt DNA extended in nanofluidic channels via a combination of local heating and added chemical denaturants. The melted molecules, imaged via a standard fluorescence videomicroscopy setup, exhibit a nonuniform fluorescence profile corresponding to a series of local dips and peaks in the intensity trace along the stretched molecule. We show that this barcode is consistent with the presence of locally melted regions and can be explained by calculations of sequence-dependent melting probability. We believe this melting mapping technology is the first optically based single molecule technique sensitive to genome wide sequence variation that does not require an additional enzymatic labeling or restriction scheme.

  7. Structure of a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of a DNA Polymerase Sliding Clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Georgescu, R.; Yurieva, O; Kim, S; Kuriyan, J; Kong, X; O'Donnell, M

    2008-01-01

    DNA polymerases attach to the DNA sliding clamp through a common overlapping binding site. We identify a small-molecule compound that binds the protein-binding site in the Escherichia coli ?-clamp and differentially affects the activity of DNA polymerases II, III, and IV. To understand the molecular basis of this discrimination, the cocrystal structure of the chemical inhibitor is solved in complex with ? and is compared with the structures of Pol II, Pol III, and Pol IV peptides bound to ?. The analysis reveals that the small molecule localizes in a region of the clamp to which the DNA polymerases attach in different ways. The results suggest that the small molecule may be useful in the future to probe polymerase function with ?, and that the ?-clamp may represent an antibiotic target.

  8. Characterisation of optically driven microstructures for manipulating single DNA molecules under a fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Terao, Kyohei; Masuda, Chihiro; Inukai, Ryo; Gel, Murat; Oana, Hidehiro; Washizu, Masao; Suzuki, Takaaki; Takao, Hidekuni; Shimokawa, Fusao; Oohira, Fumikazu

    2016-06-01

    Optical tweezers are powerful tools for manipulating single DNA molecules using fluorescence microscopy, particularly in nanotechnology-based DNA analysis. We previously proposed a manipulation technique using microstructures driven by optical tweezers that allows the handling of single giant DNA molecules of millimetre length that cannot be manipulated by conventional techniques. To further develop this technique, the authors characterised the microstructures quantitatively from the view point of fabrication and efficiency of DNA manipulation under a fluorescence microscope. The success rate and precision of the fabrications were evaluated. The results indicate that the microstructures are obtained in an aqueous solution with a precision ∼50 nm at concentrations in the order of 10(6) particles/ml. The visibility of these microstructures under a fluorescence microscope was also characterised, along with the elucidation of the fabrication parameters needed to fine tune visibility. Manipulating yeast chromosomal DNA molecules with the microstructures illustrated the relationship between the efficiency of manipulation and the geometrical shape of the microstructure. This report provides the guidelines for designing microstructures used in single DNA molecule analysis based on on-site DNA manipulation, and is expected to broaden the applications of this technique in the future.

  9. Single-molecule characterization and engineering of the surfaces of nucleic acid sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephs, Eric Alan

    The advent of personalized medicine will require biosensors capable of reliably detecting small levels of disease biomarkers. In microarrays and sensors for nucleic acids, hybridization events between surface-tethered DNA probes and the nucleic acids of interest (targets) are transduced into a detectable signal. However, target-binding ultimately occurs as a result of molecular motions and interactions between the probe and target at the nanometer scale, and common characterization methods either lack the resolution to characterize the sensors at this scale or provide only limited information about their interactions with their nanoscale chemical environment. In this dissertation I argue that an impediment to the development of more reliable and practical biosensors is the lack of knowledge and control of the nanometer length-scale structure of biosensor surfaces, which has a profound impact on molecular recognition and reactions for detection. After reviewing the fundamental surface chemistry and structural motifs of biosensors in Chapter 1, in Chapter 2 I use electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) to characterize in situ a common class of model nucleic acid sensors---thiolated DNA attached to a gold electrode which has been passivated by an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer---with single-molecule resolution. This level of detail allows me to observe both the conformations of individual probes and their spatial distribution at the nanoscale, then determine how these are affected by assembly conditions, probe structure, and interactions with co-adsorbates. I also determine how these nanoscale details affect the dynamic response of probes to electric fields, which have been commonly used in sensing schemes, and ultimately the ability of the surface-tethered probes to bind with target nucleic acids. In Chapter 3, I demonstrate and optimize the nanoscale patterning of individual DNA molecules into isolated, chemically well-defined niches on the surface

  10. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  11. DNA molecule provides a computing machine with both data and fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenson, Yaakov; Adar, Rivka; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Livneh, Zvi; Shapiro, Ehud

    2003-03-01

    The unique properties of DNA make it a fundamental building block in the fields of supramolecular chemistry, nanotechnology, nano-circuits, molecular switches, molecular devices, and molecular computing. In our recently introduced autonomous molecular automaton, DNA molecules serve as input, output, and software, and the hardware consists of DNA restriction and ligation enzymes using ATP as fuel. In addition to information, DNA stores energy, available on hybridization of complementary strands or hydrolysis of its phosphodiester backbone. Here we show that a single DNA molecule can provide both the input data and all of the necessary fuel for a molecular automaton. Each computational step of the automaton consists of a reversible software molecule/input molecule hybridization followed by an irreversible software-directed cleavage of the input molecule, which drives the computation forward by increasing entropy and releasing heat. The cleavage uses a hitherto unknown capability of the restriction enzyme FokI, which serves as the hardware, to operate on a noncovalent software/input hybrid. In the previous automaton, software/input ligation consumed one software molecule and two ATP molecules per step. As ligation is not performed in this automaton, a fixed amount of software and hardware molecules can, in principle, process any input molecule of any length without external energy supply. Our experiments demonstrate 3 × 1012 automata per μl performing 6.6 × 1010 transitions per second per μl with transition fidelity of 99.9%, dissipating about 5 × 10-9 W/μl as heat at ambient temperature.

  12. Escape of a knot from a DNA molecule in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Macroscale knots are an everyday occurrence when trying to unravel an unorganized flexible string (e.g. an iPhone cord taken out of your pocket). In nature, knots are found in proteins and viral capsid DNA, and the properties imbued by their topologies are thought to have biological significance. Unlike their macroscale counterparts, thermal fluctuations greatly influence the dynamics of polymer knots. Here, we use Brownian Dynamics simulations to study knot diffusion along a linear polymer chain. The model is parameterized to dsDNA, a model polymer used in previous simulation and experimental studies of knot dynamics. We have used this model to study the process of knot escape and transport along a dsDNA strand extended by an elongational flow. For a range of knot topologies and flow strengths, we show scalings that result in collapse of the data onto a master curve. We show a topologically mediated mode of transport coincides with observed differences in rates of knot transport, and we provide a simple mechanistic explanation for its effect. We anticipate these results will build on the growing body of fundamental studies of knotted polymers and inform future experimental study. This work is supported by the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and National Science Foundation (NSF) grant CBET-0852235.

  13. DNA compaction by the bacteriophage protein Cox studied on the single DNA molecule level using nanofluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Frykholm, Karolin; Berntsson, Ronnie Per-Arne; Claesson, Magnus; de Battice, Laura; Odegrip, Richard; Stenmark, Pål; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 forms oligomeric filaments and it has been proposed that DNA can be wound up around these filaments, similar to how histones condense DNA. We here use fluorescence microscopy to study single DNA–Cox complexes in nanofluidic channels and compare how the Cox homologs from phages P2 and WΦ affect DNA. By measuring the extension of nanoconfined DNA in absence and presence of Cox we show that the protein compacts DNA and that the binding is highly cooperative, in agreement with the model of a Cox filament around which DNA is wrapped. Furthermore, comparing microscopy images for the wild-type P2 Cox protein and two mutants allows us to discriminate between compaction due to filament formation and compaction by monomeric Cox. P2 and WΦ Cox have similar effects on the physical properties of DNA and the subtle, but significant, differences in DNA binding are due to differences in binding affinity rather than binding mode. The presented work highlights the use of single DNA molecule studies to confirm structural predictions from X-ray crystallography. It also shows how a small protein by oligomerization can have great impact on the organization of DNA and thereby fulfill multiple regulatory functions. PMID:27131370

  14. Thermoelectric effect and its dependence on molecular length and sequence in single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueqi; Xiang, Limin; Palma, Julio L; Asai, Yoshihiro; Tao, Nongjian

    2016-01-01

    Studying the thermoelectric effect in DNA is important for unravelling charge transport mechanisms and for developing relevant applications of DNA molecules. Here we report a study of the thermoelectric effect in single DNA molecules. By varying the molecular length and sequence, we tune the charge transport in DNA to either a hopping- or tunnelling-dominated regimes. The thermoelectric effect is small and insensitive to the molecular length in the hopping regime. In contrast, the thermoelectric effect is large and sensitive to the length in the tunnelling regime. These findings indicate that one may control the thermoelectric effect in DNA by varying its sequence and length. We describe the experimental results in terms of hopping and tunnelling charge transport models.

  15. Thermoelectric effect and its dependence on molecular length and sequence in single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yueqi; Xiang, Limin; Palma, Julio L.; Asai, Yoshihiro; Tao, Nongjian

    2016-01-01

    Studying the thermoelectric effect in DNA is important for unravelling charge transport mechanisms and for developing relevant applications of DNA molecules. Here we report a study of the thermoelectric effect in single DNA molecules. By varying the molecular length and sequence, we tune the charge transport in DNA to either a hopping- or tunnelling-dominated regimes. The thermoelectric effect is small and insensitive to the molecular length in the hopping regime. In contrast, the thermoelectric effect is large and sensitive to the length in the tunnelling regime. These findings indicate that one may control the thermoelectric effect in DNA by varying its sequence and length. We describe the experimental results in terms of hopping and tunnelling charge transport models. PMID:27079152

  16. Condensations of single DNA molecules induced by heptaplatin and its chiral isomer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yu-Ru; Li, Wei; Li, Hui; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xie, Ping; Wang, Wei-Chi; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2014-08-15

    Heptaplatin is a third-generation platinum antitumor drug. It has a chiral isomer. We studied the interactions between the two isomers and DNA by using magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the effect of chiralities of the isomers on the interactions. We found that the extension curves and average condensation rates of DNA molecules incubated with heptaplatin were nearly the same as those incubated with its chiral isomer. In addition, the structures of DNA molecules incubated with heptaplatin were also similar to those incubated with its chiral isomer. These results indicate the difference in chirality of the two isomers does not induce different interactions of the isomers with DNA. Our study may facilitate the understanding of interactions of platinum complexes with DNA and the design of new antitumor platinum complexes.

  17. Efficient vaccine against pandemic influenza: combining DNA vaccination and targeted delivery to MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Grødeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-06-01

    There are two major limitations to vaccine preparedness in the event of devastating influenza pandemics: the time needed to generate a vaccine and rapid generation of sufficient amounts. DNA vaccination could represent a solution to these problems, but efficacy needs to be enhanced. In a separate line of research, it has been established that targeting of vaccine molecules to antigen-presenting cells enhances immune responses. We have combined the two principles by constructing DNA vaccines that encode bivalent fusion proteins; these target hemagglutinin to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Such DNA vaccines rapidly induce hemagglutinin-specific antibodies and T cell responses in immunized mice. Responses are long-lasting and protect mice against challenge with influenza virus. In a pandemic situation, targeted DNA vaccines could be produced and tested within a month. The novel DNA vaccines could represent a solution to pandemic preparedness in the advent of novel influenza pandemics.

  18. Thermoelectric effect and its dependence on molecular length and sequence in single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueqi; Xiang, Limin; Palma, Julio L; Asai, Yoshihiro; Tao, Nongjian

    2016-01-01

    Studying the thermoelectric effect in DNA is important for unravelling charge transport mechanisms and for developing relevant applications of DNA molecules. Here we report a study of the thermoelectric effect in single DNA molecules. By varying the molecular length and sequence, we tune the charge transport in DNA to either a hopping- or tunnelling-dominated regimes. The thermoelectric effect is small and insensitive to the molecular length in the hopping regime. In contrast, the thermoelectric effect is large and sensitive to the length in the tunnelling regime. These findings indicate that one may control the thermoelectric effect in DNA by varying its sequence and length. We describe the experimental results in terms of hopping and tunnelling charge transport models. PMID:27079152

  19. Discrimination of Single Base Pair Differences Among Individual DNA Molecules Using a Nanopore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; DeGuzman, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    The protein toxin alpha-hemolysin form nanometer scale channels across lipid membranes. Our lab uses a single channel in an artificial lipid bilayer in a patch clamp device to capture and examine individual DNA molecules. This nanopore detector used with a support vector machine (SVM) can analyze DNA hairpin molecules on the millisecond time scale. We distinguish duplex stem length, base pair mismatches, loop length, and single base pair differences. The residual current fluxes also reveal structural molecular dynamics elements. DNA end-fraying (terminal base pair dissociation) can be observed as near full blockades, or spikes, in current. This technique can be used to investigate other biological processes dependent on DNA end-fraying, such as the processing of HIV DNA by HIV integrase.

  20. The conductive properties of single DNA molecules studied by torsion tunneling atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Niu, D. X.; Jiang, C. R.; Yang, X. J.

    2014-01-01

    The conductive properties of single natural λ-DNA molecules are studied by torsion tunneling atomic force microscopy (TR-TUNA). The currents both parallel to and perpendicular to the DNA chains are investigated, but only weak or even no current signals are detected by TR-TUNA. To improve the conductance of DNA molecules, silver and copper metallized DNAs are fabricated and their conductivities are checked by TR-TUNA. It is found that for both Cu- and Ag-DNAs, the conductivity perpendicular to the DNA chain is enhanced significantly as the metal clusters are attached to the DNA chains. But parallel to the chain the electrical transport is still weak, most probably due to the ‘beads-on-a-string’ constructions of metallized DNAs.

  1. Pulsed-field electrophoresis: application of a computer model to the separation of large DNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Lalande, M; Noolandi, J; Turmel, C; Rousseau, J; Slater, G W

    1987-01-01

    The biased reptation theory has been applied to the pulsed-field electrophoresis of DNA in agarose gels. A computer simulation of the theoretical model that calculates the mobility of large DNA molecules as a function of agarose pore size, DNA chain properties, and electric field conditions has been used to generate mobility curves for DNA molecules in the size range of the larger yeast chromosomes. Pulsed-field electrophoresis experiments resulting in the establishment of an electrophoretic karyotype for yeast, where the mobility of the DNA fragments is a monotonic function of molecular size for the entire size range that is resolved (200-2200 kilobase pairs), has been compared to the theoretical mobility curves generated by the computer model. The various physical mechanisms and experimental conditions responsible for band inversion and improved electrophoretic separation are identified and discussed in the framework of the model. Images PMID:3317398

  2. See me, feel me: methods to concurrently visualize and manipulate single DNA molecules and associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    van Mameren, Joost; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Direct visualization of DNA and proteins allows researchers to investigate DNA–protein interactions with great detail. Much progress has been made in this area as a result of increasingly sensitive single-molecule fluorescence techniques. At the same time, methods that control the conformation of DNA molecules have been improving constantly. The combination of both techniques has appealed to researchers ever since single-molecule measurements have become possible and indeed first implementations of such combined approaches have proven useful in the study of several DNA-binding proteins in real time. Here, we describe the technical state-of-the-art of various integrated manipulation-and-visualization methods. We first discuss methods that allow only little control over the DNA conformation, such as DNA combing. We then describe DNA flow-stretching approaches that allow more control, and end with the full control on position and extension obtained by manipulating DNA with optical tweezers. The advantages and limitations of the various techniques are discussed, as well as several examples of applications to biophysical or biochemical questions. We conclude with an outlook describing potential future technical developments in combining fluorescence microscopy with DNA micromanipulation technology. PMID:18586820

  3. Single DNA molecule jamming and history-dependent dynamics during motor-driven viral packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicholas; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2016-08-01

    In many viruses, molecular motors forcibly pack single DNA molecules to near-crystalline density into ~50-100 nm prohead shells. Unexpectedly, we found that packaging frequently stalls in conditions that induce net attractive DNA-DNA interactions. Here, we present findings suggesting that this stalling occurs because the DNA undergoes a nonequilibrium jamming transition analogous to that observed in many soft-matter systems, such as colloidal and granular systems. Experiments in which conditions are changed during packaging to switch DNA-DNA interactions between purely repulsive and net attractive reveal strongly history-dependent dynamics. An abrupt deceleration is usually observed before stalling, indicating that a transition in DNA conformation causes an abrupt increase in resistance. Our findings suggest that the concept of jamming can be extended to a single polymer molecule. However, compared with macroscopic samples of colloidal particles we find that single DNA molecules jam over a much larger range of densities. We attribute this difference to the nanoscale system size, consistent with theoretical predictions for jamming of attractive athermal particles.

  4. Direct Sequencing from the Minimal Number of DNA Molecules Needed to Fill a 454 Picotiterplate

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Priego, Llúcia; D’Auria, Giussepe; Calafell, Francesc; Moya, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The large amount of DNA needed to prepare a library in next generation sequencing protocols hinders direct sequencing of small DNA samples. This limitation is usually overcome by the enrichment of such samples with whole genome amplification (WGA), mostly by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) based on φ29 polymerase. However, this technique can be biased by the GC content of the sample and is prone to the development of chimeras as well as contamination during enrichment, which contributes to undesired noise during sequence data analysis, and also hampers the proper functional and/or taxonomic assignments. An alternative to MDA is direct DNA sequencing (DS), which represents the theoretical gold standard in genome sequencing. In this work, we explore the possibility of sequencing the genome of Escherichia coli from the minimum number of DNA molecules required for pyrosequencing, according to the notion of one-bead-one-molecule. Using an optimized protocol for DS, we constructed a shotgun library containing the minimum number of DNA molecules needed to fill a selected region of a picotiterplate. We gathered most of the reference genome extension with uniform coverage. We compared the DS method with MDA applied to the same amount of starting DNA. As expected, MDA yielded a sparse and biased read distribution, with a very high amount of unassigned and unspecific DNA amplifications. The optimized DS protocol allows unbiased sequencing to be performed from samples with a very small amount of DNA. PMID:24887077

  5. Single-molecule analysis of DNA uncoiling by a type II topoisomerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strick, Terence R.; Croquette, Vincent; Bensimon, David

    2000-04-01

    Type II DNA topoisomerases are ubiquitous ATP-dependent enzymes capable of transporting a DNA through a transient double-strand break in a second DNA segment. This enables them to untangle DNA and relax the interwound supercoils (plectonemes) that arise in twisted DNA. In vivo, they are responsible for untangling replicated chromosomes and their absence at mitosis or meiosis ultimately causes cell death. Here we describe a micromanipulation experiment in which we follow in real time a single Drosophila melanogaster topoisomerase II acting on a linear DNA molecule which is mechanically stretched and supercoiled. By monitoring the DNA's extension in the presence of ATP, we directly observe the relaxation of two supercoils during a single catalytic turnover. By controlling the force pulling on the molecule, we determine the variation of the reaction rate with the applied stress. Finally, in the absence of ATP, we observe the clamping of a DNA crossover by a single topoisomerase on at least two different timescales (configurations). These results show that single molecule experiments are a powerful new tool for the study of topoisomerases.

  6. DNA combing on low-pressure oxygen plasma modified polysilsesquioxane substrates for single-molecule studies

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, K. K.; Chang, Chun-Ling; Rajesh Kumar, U.; Chou, Chia-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Molecular combing and flow-induced stretching are the most commonly used methods to immobilize and stretch DNA molecules. While both approaches require functionalization steps for the substrate surface and the molecules, conventionally the former does not take advantage of, as the latter, the versatility of microfluidics regarding robustness, buffer exchange capability, and molecule manipulation using external forces for single molecule studies. Here, we demonstrate a simple one-step combing process involving only low-pressure oxygen (O2) plasma modified polysilsesquioxane (PSQ) polymer layer to facilitate both room temperature microfluidic device bonding and immobilization of stretched single DNA molecules without molecular functionalization step. Atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments revealed a significant increase in surface roughness and surface potential on low-pressure O2 plasma treated PSQ, in contrast to that with high-pressure O2 plasma treatment, which are proposed to be responsible for enabling effective DNA immobilization. We further demonstrate the use of our platform to observe DNA-RNA polymerase complexes and cancer drug cisplatin induced DNA condensation using wide-field fluorescence imaging. PMID:25332730

  7. Transforming single DNA molecules into fluorescent magnetic particles for detection and enumeration of genetic variations

    PubMed Central

    Dressman, Devin; Yan, Hai; Traverso, Giovanni; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert

    2003-01-01

    Many areas of biomedical research depend on the analysis of uncommon variations in individual genes or transcripts. Here we describe a method that can quantify such variation at a scale and ease heretofore unattainable. Each DNA molecule in a collection of such molecules is converted into a single magnetic particle to which thousands of copies of DNA identical in sequence to the original are bound. This population of beads then corresponds to a one-to-one representation of the starting DNA molecules. Variation within the original population of DNA molecules can then be simply assessed by counting fluorescently labeled particles via flow cytometry. This approach is called BEAMing on the basis of four of its principal components (beads, emulsion, amplification, and magnetics). Millions of individual DNA molecules can be assessed in this fashion with standard laboratory equipment. Moreover, specific variants can be isolated by flow sorting and used for further experimentation. BEAMing can be used for the identification and quantification of rare mutations as well as to study variations in gene sequences or transcripts in specific populations or tissues. PMID:12857956

  8. The interaction of amino acids, peptides, and proteins with DNA.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Andrey Y; Tarnovskaya, Svetlana I; Chernova, Irina A; Shataeva, Larisa K; Skorik, Yury A

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids that carry charges on their side groups can bind to double stranded DNA (dsDNA) and change the strength of the double helix. Measurement of the DNA melting temperature (Tm) confirmed that acidic amino acids (Glu, Asp) weaken the H-bonds between DNA strands, whereas basic amino acids (Arg, Lys) strengthen the interaction between the strands. A rank correlation exists between the amino acid isoelectric points and the observed changes in Tm. A similar dependence of the hyperchromic effect on the isoelectric point of a protein (pepsin, insulin, cortexin, and protamine) was observed for DNA-protein complexes at room temperature. Short peptides (KE, AEDG, and KEDP) containing a mixture of acidic and basic amino acid residues also affect Tm and the stability of the double helix. A model for binding Glu and Lys to dsDNA was explored by a docking simulation. The model shows that Glu, in an untwisted shape, binds to dsDNA in its major groove and disrupts three H-bonds between the strands, thereby destabilizing the double helix. Lys, in an untwisted shape, binds to the external side of the dsDNA and forms two bonds with O atoms of neighboring phosphodiester groups, thereby strengthening the DNA helix.

  9. On-site manipulation of single whole-genome DNA molecules using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oana, Hidehiro; Kubo, Koji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2004-11-01

    In this letter, we describe a noninvasive methodology for manipulating single Mb-size whole-genome DNA molecules. Cells were subjected to osmotic shock and the genome DNA released from the burst cells was transferred to a region of higher salt concentration using optical tweezers. The transferred genome DNA exhibits a conformational transition from a compact state into an elongated state, accompanied by the change in its environment. The applicability of optical tweezers to the on-site manipulation of giant genome DNA is suggested, i.e., lab-on-a-plate.

  10. Supported Lipid Bilayers and DNA Curtains for High-Throughput Single-Molecule Studies

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Ilya J.; Greene, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule studies of protein–DNA interactions continue to yield new information on numerous DNA processing pathways. For example, optical microscopy-based techniques permit the real-time observation of proteins that interact with DNA substrates, which in turn allows direct insight into reaction mechanisms. However, these experiments remain technically challenging and are limited by the paucity of stable chromophores and the difficulty of acquiring statistically significant observations. In this protocol, we describe a novel, high-throughput, nanofabricated experimental platform enabling real-time imaging of hundreds of individual protein–DNA complexes over hour timescales. PMID:21660710

  11. Cellular strategies for regulating DNA supercoiling: A single-molecule perspective

    PubMed Central

    Koster, Daniel A.; Crut, Aurélien; Shuman, Stewart; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Excess entangling and twisting of cellular DNA (i.e., DNA supercoiling) are problems inherent to the helical structure of double-stranded DNA. Supercoiling affects transcription, DNA replication, and chromosomal segregation. Consequently the cell must fine-tune supercoiling to optimize these key processes. Here, we summarize how supercoiling is generated and review experimental and theoretical insights into supercoil relaxation. We distinguish between the passive dissipation of supercoils by diffusion and the active removal of supercoils by topoisomerase enzymes. We also review single-molecule studies that elucidate the timescales and mechanisms of supercoil removal. PMID:20723754

  12. Rational design of DNA-actuated enzyme nanoreactors guided by single molecule analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Soma; Adendorff, Matthew R.; Liu, Minghui; Yan, Hao; Bathe, Mark; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    The control of enzymatic reactions using nanoscale DNA devices offers a powerful application of DNA nanotechnology uniquely derived from actuation. However, previous characterization of enzymatic reaction rates using bulk biochemical assays reported suboptimal function of DNA devices such as tweezers. To gain mechanistic insight into this deficiency and to identify design rules to improve their function, here we exploit the synergy of single molecule imaging and computational modeling to characterize the three-dimensional structures and catalytic functions of DNA tweezer-actuated nanoreactors. Our analysis revealed two important deficiencies - incomplete closure upon actuation and conformational heterogeneity. Upon rational redesign of the Holliday junctions located at their hinge and arms, we found that the DNA tweezers could be more completely and uniformly closed. A novel single molecule enzyme assay was developed to demonstrate that our design improvements yield significant, independent enhancements in the fraction of active enzyme nanoreactors and their individual substrate turnover frequencies. The sequence-level design strategies explored here may aid more broadly in improving the performance of DNA-based nanodevices including biological and chemical sensors.The control of enzymatic reactions using nanoscale DNA devices offers a powerful application of DNA nanotechnology uniquely derived from actuation. However, previous characterization of enzymatic reaction rates using bulk biochemical assays reported suboptimal function of DNA devices such as tweezers. To gain mechanistic insight into this deficiency and to identify design rules to improve their function, here we exploit the synergy of single molecule imaging and computational modeling to characterize the three-dimensional structures and catalytic functions of DNA tweezer-actuated nanoreactors. Our analysis revealed two important deficiencies - incomplete closure upon actuation and conformational

  13. Directly observing the motion of DNA molecules near solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Ando, Genki; Hyun, Changbae; Li, Jiali; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-27

    We investigate the diffusion and the drift motion of λ DNA molecules near solid-state nanopores prior to their translocation through the nanopores using fluorescence microscopy. The radial dependence of the electric field near a nanopore generated by an applied voltage in ionic solution can be estimated quantitatively in 3D by analyzing the motion of negatively charged DNA molecules. We find that the electric field is approximately spherically symmetric around the nanopore under the conditions investigated. In addition, DNA clogging at the nanopore was directly observed. Surprisingly, the probability of the clogging event increases with increasing external bias voltage. We also find that DNA molecules clogging the nanopore reduce the electric field amplitude at the nanopore membrane surface. To better understand these experimental results, analytical method with Ohm's law and computer simulation with Poisson and Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations are used to calculate the electric field near the nanopore. These results are of great interest in both experimental and theoretical considerations of the motion of DNA molecules near voltage-biased nanopores. These findings will also contribute to the development of solid-state nanopore-based DNA sensing devices.

  14. Antigen Targeting to Human HLA Class II Molecules Increases Efficacy of DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Løset, Geir Åge; Vikse, Elisabeth; Fugger, Lars

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to translate promising results from DNA vaccination in mice to larger animals and humans. Previously, DNA vaccines encoding proteins that target Ag to MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on APCs have been shown to induce rapid, enhanced, and long-lasting Ag-specific Ab titers in mice. In this study, we describe two novel DNA vaccines that as proteins target HLA class II (HLA-II) molecules. These vaccine proteins cross-react with MHC-II molecules in several species of larger mammals. When tested in ferrets and pigs, a single DNA delivery with low doses of the HLA-II–targeted vaccines resulted in rapid and increased Ab responses. Importantly, painless intradermal jet delivery of DNA was as effective as delivery by needle injection followed by electroporation. As an indication that the vaccines could also be useful for human application, HLA-II–targeted vaccine proteins were found to increase human CD4+ T cell responses by a factor of ×103 in vitro. Thus, targeting of Ag to MHC-II molecules may represent an attractive strategy for increasing efficacy of DNA vaccines in larger animals and humans. PMID:27671110

  15. Anatomy of herpes simplex virus DNA. III. Characterization of defective DNA molecules and biological properties of virus populations containing them.

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, N; Jacob, R J; Honess, R W; Hayward, G S; Locker, H; Roizman, B

    1975-01-01

    We have characterized the virus progeny and its DNA from plaque-purified and undiluted passages of herpes simplex virus 1 in HEp-2 cells. Secifically, (i) infectious virus yields declined progressively in passages 1 through 10 and gradually increased at passages 11 through 14. The yields correlated with PFU/particle ratios. (ii) In cells infected with virus from passages 6 through 10, there was an overproduction of an early viral polypeptide (no. 4) and a delay in the synthesis of late viral proteins. In addition, the virus in these passages interfered with the replication of a nondefective marker virus. Cells infected with passage 14 virus produced normal amounts of polypeptide 4 and, moreover, this virus showed minimal interfering capacity. (iii) In addition to DNA of density 1.726 g/cm-3, which was the sole component present in viral progeny of passage 0, passages 6 through 14 contained one additional species (p 1.732) and in some instances (passages 6 and 10) also DNA of an intermediate buoyant density. The ratio of p 1.732 to p 1.726 DNA increased to a maximum of 4 in passages 6 through 9 and gradually decreased to 1 in passages 10 through 14. (iv) p 1.732 DNA cannot be differentiated from p 1.726 DNA with respect to size; however, it has no Hin III restriction enzyme cleavage sites and yields only predominantly two kinds of fragments with molecular weights of 5.1 x 10-6 and 5.4 x 10-6 upon digestion with EcoRI enzyme. (v) Partial denaturation profiles of purified p 1.732 DNA from passage 14 revealed the presence of two types of tandemly repeated units corresponding roughly in size to the EcoRI fragments and situated in different molecules. (vi) In addition to the two kinds of p 1.732 molecules consisting of tandem repaeat units of different sizes, other evidence for the diversity of defective DNA molecules emerged from comparisons of specific infectivity and interfering capacity of the progeny from various passages. The data suggest that some of the particles

  16. Real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing by synthesis using polymer-tagged nucleotides on a nanopore array.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Carl W; Kumar, Shiv; Porel, Mintu; Chien, Minchen; Bibillo, Arek; Stranges, P Benjamin; Dorwart, Michael; Tao, Chuanjuan; Li, Zengmin; Guo, Wenjing; Shi, Shundi; Korenblum, Daniel; Trans, Andrew; Aguirre, Anne; Liu, Edward; Harada, Eric T; Pollard, James; Bhat, Ashwini; Cech, Cynthia; Yang, Alexander; Arnold, Cleoma; Palla, Mirkó; Hovis, Jennifer; Chen, Roger; Morozova, Irina; Kalachikov, Sergey; Russo, James J; Kasianowicz, John J; Davis, Randy; Roever, Stefan; Church, George M; Ju, Jingyue

    2016-05-10

    DNA sequencing by synthesis (SBS) offers a robust platform to decipher nucleic acid sequences. Recently, we reported a single-molecule nanopore-based SBS strategy that accurately distinguishes four bases by electronically detecting and differentiating four different polymer tags attached to the 5'-phosphate of the nucleotides during their incorporation into a growing DNA strand catalyzed by DNA polymerase. Further developing this approach, we report here the use of nucleotides tagged at the terminal phosphate with oligonucleotide-based polymers to perform nanopore SBS on an α-hemolysin nanopore array platform. We designed and synthesized several polymer-tagged nucleotides using tags that produce different electrical current blockade levels and verified they are active substrates for DNA polymerase. A highly processive DNA polymerase was conjugated to the nanopore, and the conjugates were complexed with primer/template DNA and inserted into lipid bilayers over individually addressable electrodes of the nanopore chip. When an incoming complementary-tagged nucleotide forms a tight ternary complex with the primer/template and polymerase, the tag enters the pore, and the current blockade level is measured. The levels displayed by the four nucleotides tagged with four different polymers captured in the nanopore in such ternary complexes were clearly distinguishable and sequence-specific, enabling continuous sequence determination during the polymerase reaction. Thus, real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing data with single-base resolution were obtained. The use of these polymer-tagged nucleotides, combined with polymerase tethering to nanopores and multiplexed nanopore sensors, should lead to new high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:27091962

  17. Real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing by synthesis using polymer-tagged nucleotides on a nanopore array

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Carl W.; Kumar, Shiv; Porel, Mintu; Chien, Minchen; Bibillo, Arek; Stranges, P. Benjamin; Dorwart, Michael; Tao, Chuanjuan; Li, Zengmin; Guo, Wenjing; Shi, Shundi; Korenblum, Daniel; Trans, Andrew; Aguirre, Anne; Liu, Edward; Harada, Eric T.; Pollard, James; Bhat, Ashwini; Cech, Cynthia; Yang, Alexander; Arnold, Cleoma; Palla, Mirkó; Hovis, Jennifer; Chen, Roger; Morozova, Irina; Kalachikov, Sergey; Russo, James J.; Kasianowicz, John J.; Davis, Randy; Roever, Stefan; Church, George M.; Ju, Jingyue

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by synthesis (SBS) offers a robust platform to decipher nucleic acid sequences. Recently, we reported a single-molecule nanopore-based SBS strategy that accurately distinguishes four bases by electronically detecting and differentiating four different polymer tags attached to the 5′-phosphate of the nucleotides during their incorporation into a growing DNA strand catalyzed by DNA polymerase. Further developing this approach, we report here the use of nucleotides tagged at the terminal phosphate with oligonucleotide-based polymers to perform nanopore SBS on an α-hemolysin nanopore array platform. We designed and synthesized several polymer-tagged nucleotides using tags that produce different electrical current blockade levels and verified they are active substrates for DNA polymerase. A highly processive DNA polymerase was conjugated to the nanopore, and the conjugates were complexed with primer/template DNA and inserted into lipid bilayers over individually addressable electrodes of the nanopore chip. When an incoming complementary-tagged nucleotide forms a tight ternary complex with the primer/template and polymerase, the tag enters the pore, and the current blockade level is measured. The levels displayed by the four nucleotides tagged with four different polymers captured in the nanopore in such ternary complexes were clearly distinguishable and sequence-specific, enabling continuous sequence determination during the polymerase reaction. Thus, real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing data with single-base resolution were obtained. The use of these polymer-tagged nucleotides, combined with polymerase tethering to nanopores and multiplexed nanopore sensors, should lead to new high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:27091962

  18. Long-range charge transport in single G-quadruplex DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Livshits, Gideon I; Stern, Avigail; Rotem, Dvir; Borovok, Natalia; Eidelshtein, Gennady; Migliore, Agostino; Penzo, Erika; Wind, Shalom J; Di Felice, Rosa; Skourtis, Spiros S; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Gurevich, Leonid; Kotlyar, Alexander B; Porath, Danny

    2014-12-01

    DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set-ups, and transporting significant current through individual DNA-based molecules remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report reproducible charge transport in guanine-quadruplex (G4) DNA molecules adsorbed on a mica substrate. Currents ranging from tens of picoamperes to more than 100 pA were measured in the G4-DNA over distances ranging from tens of nanometres to more than 100 nm. Our experimental results, combined with theoretical modelling, suggest that transport occurs via a thermally activated long-range hopping between multi-tetrad segments of DNA. These results could re-ignite interest in DNA-based wires and devices, and in the use of such systems in the development of programmable circuits. PMID:25344689

  19. Single-molecule DNA conductance in water solutions: Role of DNA low-frequency dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikov, E. B.; Quintilla, A.; Nganou, C.; Lee, K. H.; Cuniberti, G.; Wenzel, W.

    2009-01-01

    Dependence of charge transmission through several experimentally studied DNA duplexes on their lowest-frequency acoustic modes, combined with the molecular dynamics in picosecond characteristic time range, has been studied. Based on this analysis we were able to identify the specific acoustic modes responsible for the noticeable increase in DNA charge transmission. Other factors influencing electric properties of DNA duplexes are discussed.

  20. Selective inhibition of c-Myc/Max dimerization and DNA binding by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Anke; Sperl, Bianca; Hollis, Angela; Eick, Dirk; Berg, Thorsten

    2006-07-01

    bZip and bHLHZip protein family members comprise a large fraction of eukaryotic transcription factors and need to bind DNA in order to exert most of their fundamental biological roles. Their binding to DNA requires homo- or heterodimerization via alpha-helical domains, which generally do not contain obvious binding sites for small molecules. We have identified two small molecules, dubbed Mycro1 and Mycro2, which inhibit the protein-protein interactions between the bHLHZip proteins c-Myc and Max. Mycros are the first inhibitors of c-Myc/Max dimerization, which have been demonstrated to inhibit DNA binding of c-Myc with preference over other dimeric transcription factors in vitro. Mycros inhibit c-Myc-dependent proliferation, gene transcription, and oncogenic transformation in the low micromolar concentration range. Our data support the idea that dimeric transcription factors can be druggable even in the absence of obvious small-molecule binding pockets.

  1. Single-file electrophoretic transport and counting of individual DNA molecules in surfactant nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tokarz, Michal; Åkerman, Björn; Olofsson, Jessica; Joanny, Jean-Francois; Dommersnes, Paul; Orwar, Owe

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a complete nanotube electrophoresis system (nanotube radii in the range of 50 to 150 nm) based on lipid membranes, comprising DNA injection, single-molecule transport, and single-molecule detection. Using gel-capped electrodes, electrophoretic single-file transport of fluorescently labeled dsDNA molecules is observed inside nanotubes. The strong confinement to a channel of molecular dimensions ensures a detection efficiency close to unity and identification of DNA size from its linear relation to the integrated peak intensity. In addition to constituting a nanotechnological device for identification and quantification of single macromolecules or biopolymers, this system provides a method to study their conformational dynamics, reaction kinetics, and transport in cell-like environments. PMID:15961544

  2. Rapid prototyping of multichannel microfluidic devices for single-molecule DNA curtain imaging.

    PubMed

    Robison, Aaron D; Finkelstein, Ilya J

    2014-05-01

    Single-molecule imaging and manipulation of biochemical reactions continues to reveal numerous biological insights. To facilitate these studies, we have developed and implemented a high-throughput approach to organize and image hundreds of individual DNA molecules at aligned diffusion barriers. Nonetheless, obtaining statistically relevant data sets under a variety of reaction conditions remains challenging. Here, we present a method for integrating high-throughput single-molecule "DNA curtain" imaging with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidics. Our benchtop fabrication method can be accomplished in minutes with common tools found in all molecular biology laboratories. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by simultaneous imaging of two independent biochemical reaction conditions in a laminar flow device. In addition, five different reaction conditions can be observed concurrently in a passive linear gradient generator. Combining rapid microfluidic fabrication with high-throughput DNA curtains greatly expands our capability to interrogate complex biological reactions. PMID:24734940

  3. Construction of logic gates with the fluorene-based small molecule/DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Wang, Ting; Yang, Renqiang

    2012-09-01

    Fluorene-based small molecules (FSMs) have optical properties and can interact with DNA. In this paper, the integrated "INH" and "AND" gates operating in parallel are developed with the fluorene-based small molecule (FSM)/DNA probe. They are activated by taking advantage of the two-step fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process and the sequence-recognition mechanism of DNA. Then, a "NOT" gate is obtained with a molecular beacon-like probe (FSM-MB) by using the FSM as the fluorophore. Moreover, the "NOT" gate based on the FSM-MB probe can be used as a biosensor and has potential applications in label-free detection of target molecules.

  4. A Unified Sensor Architecture for Isothermal Detection of Double-Stranded DNA, Oligonucleotides, and Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Carl W.; Lakin, Matthew R.; Fabry-Wood, Aurora; Horwitz, Eli K.; Baker, Nicholas A.; Stefanovic, Darko; Graves, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen detection is an important problem in many areas of medicine and agriculture, which may involve genomic or transcriptomic signatures, or small molecule metabolites. We report a unified, DNA-based sensor architecture capable of isothermal detection of double-stranded DNA targets, single-stranded oligonucleotides, and small molecules. Each sensor contains independent target detection and reporter modules, enabling rapid design. We detected gene variants on plasmids via a straightforward isothermal denaturation protocol. The sensors were highly specific, even with a randomized DNA background. We achieved a limit of detection of ~15 pM for single-stranded targets and ~5 nM for targets on denatured plasmids. By incorporating a blocked aptamer sequence, we also detected small molecules using the same sensor architecture. This work provides a starting point for multiplexed detection of multi-strain pathogens, and disease states caused by genetic variants (e.g., sickle cell anemia). PMID:25663617

  5. DNA Physical Mapping via the Controlled Translocation of Single Molecules through a 5-10nm Silicon Nitride Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Derek; Reisner, Walter; Jiang, Zhijun; Hagerty, Nick; Wood, Charles; Chan, Jason

    2009-03-01

    The ability to map the binding position of sequence-specific markers, including transcription-factors, protein-nucleic acids (PNAs) or deactivated restriction enzymes, along a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device would be of key importance for the life-sciences. Such markers could give an indication of the active genes at particular stage in a cell's transcriptional cycle, pinpoint the location of mutations or even provide a DNA barcode that could aid in genomics applications. We have developed a setup consisting of a 5-10 nm nanopore in a 20nm thick silicon nitride film coupled to an optical tweezer setup. The translocation of DNA across the nanopore can be detected via blockades in the electrical current through the pore. By anchoring one end of the translocating DNA to an optically trapped microsphere, we hope to stretch out the molecule in the nanopore and control the translocation speed, enabling us to slowly scan across the genome and detect changes in the baseline current due to the presence of bound markers.

  6. Reading Out Single-Molecule Digital RNA and DNA Isothermal Amplification in Nanoliter Volumes with Unmodified Camera Phones.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Karymov, Mikhail A; Begolo, Stefano; Selck, David A; Zhukov, Dmitriy V; Jue, Erik; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-03-22

    Digital single-molecule technologies are expanding diagnostic capabilities, enabling the ultrasensitive quantification of targets, such as viral load in HIV and hepatitis C infections, by directly counting single molecules. Replacing fluorescent readout with a robust visual readout that can be captured by any unmodified cell phone camera will facilitate the global distribution of diagnostic tests, including in limited-resource settings where the need is greatest. This paper describes a methodology for developing a visual readout system for digital single-molecule amplification of RNA and DNA by (i) selecting colorimetric amplification-indicator dyes that are compatible with the spectral sensitivity of standard mobile phones, and (ii) identifying an optimal ratiometric image-process for a selected dye to achieve a readout that is robust to lighting conditions and camera hardware and provides unambiguous quantitative results, even for colorblind users. We also include an analysis of the limitations of this methodology, and provide a microfluidic approach that can be applied to expand dynamic range and improve reaction performance, allowing ultrasensitive, quantitative measurements at volumes as low as 5 nL. We validate this methodology using SlipChip-based digital single-molecule isothermal amplification with λDNA as a model and hepatitis C viral RNA as a clinically relevant target. The innovative combination of isothermal amplification chemistry in the presence of a judiciously chosen indicator dye and ratiometric image processing with SlipChip technology allowed the sequence-specific visual readout of single nucleic acid molecules in nanoliter volumes with an unmodified cell phone camera. When paired with devices that integrate sample preparation and nucleic acid amplification, this hardware-agnostic approach will increase the affordability and the distribution of quantitative diagnostic and environmental tests.

  7. Reading Out Single-Molecule Digital RNA and DNA Isothermal Amplification in Nanoliter Volumes with Unmodified Camera Phones.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Karymov, Mikhail A; Begolo, Stefano; Selck, David A; Zhukov, Dmitriy V; Jue, Erik; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-03-22

    Digital single-molecule technologies are expanding diagnostic capabilities, enabling the ultrasensitive quantification of targets, such as viral load in HIV and hepatitis C infections, by directly counting single molecules. Replacing fluorescent readout with a robust visual readout that can be captured by any unmodified cell phone camera will facilitate the global distribution of diagnostic tests, including in limited-resource settings where the need is greatest. This paper describes a methodology for developing a visual readout system for digital single-molecule amplification of RNA and DNA by (i) selecting colorimetric amplification-indicator dyes that are compatible with the spectral sensitivity of standard mobile phones, and (ii) identifying an optimal ratiometric image-process for a selected dye to achieve a readout that is robust to lighting conditions and camera hardware and provides unambiguous quantitative results, even for colorblind users. We also include an analysis of the limitations of this methodology, and provide a microfluidic approach that can be applied to expand dynamic range and improve reaction performance, allowing ultrasensitive, quantitative measurements at volumes as low as 5 nL. We validate this methodology using SlipChip-based digital single-molecule isothermal amplification with λDNA as a model and hepatitis C viral RNA as a clinically relevant target. The innovative combination of isothermal amplification chemistry in the presence of a judiciously chosen indicator dye and ratiometric image processing with SlipChip technology allowed the sequence-specific visual readout of single nucleic acid molecules in nanoliter volumes with an unmodified cell phone camera. When paired with devices that integrate sample preparation and nucleic acid amplification, this hardware-agnostic approach will increase the affordability and the distribution of quantitative diagnostic and environmental tests. PMID:26900709

  8. Single-molecule imaging reveals a collapsed conformational state for DNA-bound cohesin

    PubMed Central

    Stigler, Johannes; Çamdere, Gamze Ö.; Koshland, Douglas E.; Greene, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Cohesin is essential for the hierarchical organization of the eukaryotic genome and plays key roles in many aspects of chromosome biology. The conformation of cohesin bound to DNA remains poorly defined, leaving crucial gaps in our understanding of how cohesin fulfills its biological functions. Here we use single molecule microscopy to directly observe the dynamic and functional characteristics of cohesin bound to DNA. We show that cohesin can undergo rapid one-dimensional (1D) diffusion along DNA, but individual nucleosomes, nucleosome arrays, and other protein obstacles significantly restrict its mobility. We further demonstrate that DNA motor proteins can readily push cohesin along DNA, but they cannot pass through the interior of the cohesin ring. Together, our results reveal that DNA-bound cohesin has a central pore that is substantially smaller than anticipated. These findings have direct implications for understanding how cohesin and other SMC proteins interact with and distribute along chromatin. PMID:27117417

  9. An unnatural base pair system for efficient PCR amplification and functionalization of DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Michiko; Kawai, Rie; Mitsui, Tsuneo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hirao, Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Toward the expansion of the genetic alphabet, we present an unnatural base pair system for efficient PCR amplification, enabling the site-specific incorporation of extra functional components into DNA. This system can be applied to conventional PCR protocols employing DNA templates containing unnatural bases, natural and unnatural base triphosphates, and a 3′→5′ exonuclease-proficient DNA polymerase. For highly faithful and efficient PCR amplification involving the unnatural base pairing, we identified the natural-base sequences surrounding the unnatural bases in DNA templates by an in vitro selection technique, using a DNA library containing the unnatural base. The system facilitates the site-specific incorporation of a variety of modified unnatural bases, linked with functional groups of interest, into amplified DNA. DNA fragments (0.15 amol) containing the unnatural base pair can be amplified 107-fold by 30 cycles of PCR, with <1% total mutation rate of the unnatural base pair site. Using the system, we demonstrated efficient PCR amplification and functionalization of DNA fragments for the extremely sensitive detection of zeptomol-scale target DNA molecules from mixtures with excess amounts (pmol scale) of foreign DNA species. This unnatural base pair system will be applicable to a wide range of DNA/RNA-based technologies. PMID:19073696

  10. Macromolecular crowding induced elongation and compaction of single DNA molecules confined in a nanochannel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ce; Shao, Pei Ge; van Kan, Jeroen A; van der Maarel, Johan R C

    2009-09-29

    The effect of dextran nanoparticles on the conformation and compaction of single DNA molecules confined in a nanochannel was investigated with fluorescence microscopy. It was observed that the DNA molecules elongate and eventually condense into a compact form with increasing volume fraction of the crowding agent. Under crowded conditions, the channel diameter is effectively reduced, which is interpreted in terms of depletion in DNA segment density in the interfacial region next to the channel wall. Confinement in a nanochannel also facilitates compaction with a neutral crowding agent at low ionic strength. The threshold volume fraction for condensation is proportional to the size of the nanoparticle, due to depletion induced attraction between DNA segments. We found that the effect of crowding is not only related to the colligative properties of the agent and that confinement is also important. It is the interplay between anisotropic confinement and osmotic pressure which gives the elongated conformation and the possibility for condensation at low ionic strength.

  11. Molecular Threading: Mechanical Extraction, Stretching and Placement of DNA Molecules from a Liquid-Air Interface

    PubMed Central

    Kemmish, Kent; Hamalainen, Mark; Bowell, Charlotte; Bleloch, Andrew; Klejwa, Nathan; Lehrach, Wolfgang; Schatz, Ken; Stark, Heather; Marblestone, Adam; Church, George; Own, Christopher S.; Andregg, William

    2013-01-01

    We present “molecular threading”, a surface independent tip-based method for stretching and depositing single and double-stranded DNA molecules. DNA is stretched into air at a liquid-air interface, and can be subsequently deposited onto a dry substrate isolated from solution. The design of an apparatus used for molecular threading is presented, and fluorescence and electron microscopies are used to characterize the angular distribution, straightness, and reproducibility of stretched DNA deposited in arrays onto elastomeric surfaces and thin membranes. Molecular threading demonstrates high straightness and uniformity over length scales from nanometers to micrometers, and represents an alternative to existing DNA deposition and linearization methods. These results point towards scalable and high-throughput precision manipulation of single-molecule polymers. PMID:23935923

  12. Force-dependent persistence length of DNA-intercalator complexes measured in single molecule stretching experiments.

    PubMed

    Bazoni, R F; Lima, C H M; Ramos, E B; Rocha, M S

    2015-06-01

    By using optical tweezers with an adjustable trap stiffness, we have performed systematic single molecule stretching experiments with two types of DNA-intercalator complexes, in order to investigate the effects of the maximum applied forces on the mechanical response of such complexes. We have explicitly shown that even in the low-force entropic regime the persistence length of the DNA-intercalator complexes is strongly force-dependent, although such behavior is not exhibited by bare DNA molecules. We discuss the possible physicochemical effects that can lead to such results. In particular, we propose that the stretching force can promote partial denaturation on the highly distorted double-helix of the DNA-intercalator complexes, which interfere strongly in the measured values of the persistence length. PMID:25913936

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence of a subviral DNA molecule of porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Wen, Han

    2016-07-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is a member of the genus Circovirus in the family Circoviridae. Most subgenomic molecules of PCV2 have been mapped. Here, the first full-length sequence of a subviral molecule of PCV2 (CH-IVT12) containing a reverse complement sequence of the PCV2 genome was determined by sequencing DNA extracted from PK15 cells infected with PCV2. The circular CH-IVT12 DNA consists of 1136 nucleotides and contains one major open reading frame. PMID:27084550

  14. A DNA Crystal Designed to Contain Two Molecules per Asymmetric Unit

    SciTech Connect

    T Wang; R Sha; J Birktoft; J Zheng; C Mao; N Seeman

    2011-12-31

    We describe the self-assembly of a DNA crystal that contains two tensegrity triangle molecules per asymmetric unit. We have used X-ray crystallography to determine its crystal structure. In addition, we have demonstrated control over the colors of the crystals by attaching either Cy3 dye (pink) or Cy5 dye (blue-green) to the components of the crystal, yielding crystals of corresponding colors. Attaching the pair of dyes to the pair of molecules yields a purple crystal.

  15. Single-molecule analysis enables free solution hydrodynamic separation using yoctomole levels of DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kelvin J; Rane, Tushar D; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2011-05-11

    Single-molecule free solution hydrodynamic separation (SML-FSHS) cohesively integrates cylindrical illumination confocal spectroscopy with free solution hydrodynamic separation. This technique enables single-molecule analysis of size separated DNA with 100% mass detection efficiency, high sizing resolution and wide dynamic range, surpassing the performance of single molecule capillary electrophoresis. Furthermore, SML-FSHS required only a bare fused silica microcapillary and simple pressure control rather than complex high voltage power supplies, sieving matrices, and wall coatings. The wide dynamic range and high sizing resolution of SML-FSHS was demonstrated by separating both large DNA (23 vs 27 kbp) and small DNA (100 vs 200 bp) under identical conditions. Separations were successfully performed with near zero sample consumption using as little as 5 pL of sample and 240 yoctomoles (∼150 molecules) of DNA. Quantitative accuracy was predominantly limited by molecular shot noise. Furthermore, the ability of this method to analyze of single molecule nanosensors was investigated. SML-FSHS was used to examine the thermodynamic equilibrium between stochastically open molecular beacon and target-bound molecular beacon in the detection of E. coli 16s rRNA targets.

  16. True single-molecule DNA sequencing of a pleistocene horse bone

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Ludovic; Ginolhac, Aurelien; Raghavan, Maanasa; Vilstrup, Julia; Rasmussen, Morten; Magnussen, Kim; Steinmann, Kathleen E.; Kapranov, Philipp; Thompson, John F.; Zazula, Grant; Froese, Duane; Moltke, Ida; Shapiro, Beth; Hofreiter, Michael; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.S.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-01-01

    Second-generation sequencing platforms have revolutionized the field of ancient DNA, opening access to complete genomes of past individuals and extinct species. However, these platforms are dependent on library construction and amplification steps that may result in sequences that do not reflect the original DNA template composition. This is particularly true for ancient DNA, where templates have undergone extensive damage post-mortem. Here, we report the results of the first “true single molecule sequencing” of ancient DNA. We generated 115.9 Mb and 76.9 Mb of DNA sequences from a permafrost-preserved Pleistocene horse bone using the Helicos HeliScope and Illumina GAIIx platforms, respectively. We find that the percentage of endogenous DNA sequences derived from the horse is higher among the Helicos data than Illumina data. This result indicates that the molecular biology tools used to generate sequencing libraries of ancient DNA molecules, as required for second-generation sequencing, introduce biases into the data that reduce the efficiency of the sequencing process and limit our ability to fully explore the molecular complexity of ancient DNA extracts. We demonstrate that simple modifications to the standard Helicos DNA template preparation protocol further increase the proportion of horse DNA for this sample by threefold. Comparison of Helicos-specific biases and sequence errors in modern DNA with those in ancient DNA also reveals extensive cytosine deamination damage at the 3′ ends of ancient templates, indicating the presence of 3′-sequence overhangs. Our results suggest that paleogenomes could be sequenced in an unprecedented manner by combining current second- and third-generation sequencing approaches. PMID:21803858

  17. Structure-Based DNA-Targeting Strategies with Small Molecule Ligands for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jia; Gan, Jianhua; Huang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids are the molecular targets of many clinical anticancer drugs. However, compared with proteins, nucleic acids have traditionally attracted much less attention as drug targets in structure-based drug design, partially because limited structural information of nucleic acids complexed with potential drugs is available. Over the past several years, enormous progresses in nucleic acid crystallization, heavy-atom derivatization, phasing, and structural biology have been made. Many complicated nucleic acid structures have been determined, providing new insights into the molecular functions and interactions of nucleic acids, especially DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands. Thus, opportunities have been created to further discover nucleic acid-targeting drugs for disease treatments. This review focuses on the structure studies of DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands for discovering lead compounds, drug candidates, and/or therapeutics. PMID:23633219

  18. How topoisomerase IV can efficiently unknot and decatenate negatively supercoiled DNA molecules without causing their torsional relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rawdon, Eric J; Dorier, Julien; Racko, Dusan; Millett, Kenneth C; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Freshly replicated DNA molecules initially form multiply interlinked right-handed catenanes. In bacteria, these catenated molecules become supercoiled by DNA gyrase before they undergo a complete decatenation by topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Topo IV is also involved in the unknotting of supercoiled DNA molecules. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the shapes of supercoiled DNA molecules that are either knotted or catenated. We are especially interested in understanding how Topo IV can unknot right-handed knots and decatenate right-handed catenanes without acting on right-handed plectonemes in negatively supercoiled DNA molecules. To this end, we investigate how the topological consequences of intersegmental passages depend on the geometry of the DNA-DNA juxtapositions at which these passages occur. We observe that there are interesting differences between the geometries of DNA-DNA juxtapositions in the interwound portions and in the knotted or catenated portions of the studied molecules. In particular, in negatively supercoiled, multiply interlinked, right-handed catenanes, we detect specific regions where DNA segments belonging to two freshly replicated sister DNA molecules form left-handed crossings. We propose that, due to its geometrical preference to act on left-handed crossings, Topo IV can specifically unknot supercoiled DNA, as well as decatenate postreplicative catenanes, without causing their torsional relaxation.

  19. How topoisomerase IV can efficiently unknot and decatenate negatively supercoiled DNA molecules without causing their torsional relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Rawdon, Eric J.; Dorier, Julien; Racko, Dusan; Millett, Kenneth C.; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Freshly replicated DNA molecules initially form multiply interlinked right-handed catenanes. In bacteria, these catenated molecules become supercoiled by DNA gyrase before they undergo a complete decatenation by topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Topo IV is also involved in the unknotting of supercoiled DNA molecules. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the shapes of supercoiled DNA molecules that are either knotted or catenated. We are especially interested in understanding how Topo IV can unknot right-handed knots and decatenate right-handed catenanes without acting on right-handed plectonemes in negatively supercoiled DNA molecules. To this end, we investigate how the topological consequences of intersegmental passages depend on the geometry of the DNA-DNA juxtapositions at which these passages occur. We observe that there are interesting differences between the geometries of DNA-DNA juxtapositions in the interwound portions and in the knotted or catenated portions of the studied molecules. In particular, in negatively supercoiled, multiply interlinked, right-handed catenanes, we detect specific regions where DNA segments belonging to two freshly replicated sister DNA molecules form left-handed crossings. We propose that, due to its geometrical preference to act on left-handed crossings, Topo IV can specifically unknot supercoiled DNA, as well as decatenate postreplicative catenanes, without causing their torsional relaxation. PMID:27106058

  20. Measuring p53 Binding to Single DNA Molecules in a Nanofluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelsky, Amber; Gonzalez, Nicholas, Jr.; Gal, Susannah; Levy, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Protein-DNA binding is central to several important cellular processes, for instance, the transfer of genetic information into proteins. The p53 protein plays a central role in regulating several major cell cycle pathways, in part by binding to well-characterized DNA sequences in the promoters of specific genes. Recent studies show that the most common mutation to the protein occurs in the region responsible for its binding to DNA. We have fabricated slit-like nanofluidic devices that allow us to trap and stretch single molecules of DNA containing a known recognition sequence of p53. We use fluorescent microscopy to observe the diffusion of a single p53 protein as it searches for its DNA recognition site. We measure the reaction rates of binding to selected DNA sequences as well as the one-dimensional, non-sequence specific diffusion of p53 along a stretched DNA molecule as a function of salt concentration. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion attempts to explain how proteins seem able to find their DNA target sequences much more quickly than would be expected from three-dimensional diffusion alone. We compare the observed search mechanism used by normal and mutated p53 from cancer cells to predictions based on this theory.

  1. Pharmacology of bile acid receptors: Evolution of bile acids from simple detergents to complex signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Copple, Bryan L; Li, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    For many years, bile acids were thought to only function as detergents which solubilize fats and facilitate the uptake of fat-soluble vitamins in the intestine. Many early observations; however, demonstrated that bile acids regulate more complex processes, such as bile acids synthesis and immune cell function through activation of signal transduction pathways. These studies were the first to suggest that receptors may exist for bile acids. Ultimately, seminal studies by many investigators led to the discovery of several bile acid-activated receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, the vitamin D receptor, the pregnane X receptor, TGR5, α5 β1 integrin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Several of these receptors are expressed outside of the gastrointestinal system, indicating that bile acids may have diverse functions throughout the body. Characterization of the functions of these receptors over the last two decades has identified many important roles for these receptors in regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport, and detoxification; regulation of glucose utilization; regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation; regulation of immune cell function; regulation of energy expenditure; and regulation of neural processes such as gastric motility. Through these many functions, bile acids regulate many aspects of digestion ranging from uptake of essential vitamins to proper utilization of nutrients. Accordingly, within a short time period, bile acids moved beyond simple detergents and into the realm of complex signaling molecules. Because of the important processes that bile acids regulate through activation of receptors, drugs that target these receptors are under development for the treatment of several diseases, including cholestatic liver disease and metabolic syndrome. In this review, we will describe the various bile acid receptors, the signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors, and briefly discuss the physiological processes that

  2. Simple horizontal magnetic tweezers for micromanipulation of single DNA molecules and DNA–protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    McAndrew, Christopher P.; Tyson, Christopher; Zischkau, Joseph; Mehl, Patrick; Tuma, Pamela L.; Pegg, Ian L.; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a simple-to-implement magnetic force transducer that can apply a wide range of piconewton (pN) scale forces on single DNA molecules and DNA–protein complexes in the horizontal plane. The resulting low-noise force-extension data enable very high-resolution detection of changes in the DNA tether’s extension: ~0.05 pN in force and <10 nm change in extension. We have also verified that we can manipulate DNA in near equilibrium conditions through the wide range of forces by ramping the force from low to high and back again, and observing minimal hysteresis in the molecule’s force response. Using a calibration technique based on Stokes’ drag law, we have confirmed our force measurements from DNA force-extension experiments obtained using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem applied to transverse fluctuations of the magnetic microsphere. We present data on the force-distance characteristics of a DNA molecule complexed with histones. The results illustrate how the tweezers can be used to study DNA binding proteins at the single molecule level. PMID:26757808

  3. Dynamics of topological events within single molecules of DNA confined in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifenberger, Jeffrey; Dorfman, Kevin; Cao, Han

    Genome mapping in nanochannels offers the ability to search for large genomic rearrangements within individual molecules of DNA often missed by sequencing techniques. This method labels DNA at specific sequence motifs such as `GCTCTTC' with a cy3-like fluorophore and then stains the backbone of dsDNA with an intercalating dye. DNA is electrophoretically loaded into an array of nanofluidic channels and linearized in physically confined narrow conduits fabricated on the silicon chip. The fluorescently labeled sequence motifs, unique to long genomic regions, are optically imaged and digitized reflecting structural changes that can occur within cancer. However, some molecules of DNA confined within the ~42 nm wide nanochannels contain topological structures: knots, S-folds, and end-folds that could appear as false genomic rearrangements. We present a technique in which thousands of molecules of E. coli DNA are sequentially imaged in the nanochannels during several minutes allowing for topological events like diffusion of knots, unfolding at the ends, and spontaneous formation of S-folds to be measured. This technology will provide insights and a solution in error correction for making more accurate measurements. NIH R01-HG006851.

  4. Control of Biofilms with the Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Cláudia N. H.; Davies, David G.; Sauer, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms in organized structures attached to surfaces. Importantly, biofilms are a major cause of bacterial infections in humans, and remain one of the most significant challenges to modern medical practice. Unfortunately, conventional therapies have shown to be inadequate in the treatment of most chronic biofilm infections based on the extraordinary innate tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics. Antagonists of quorum sensing signaling molecules have been used as means to control biofilms. QS and other cell-cell communication molecules are able to revert biofilm tolerance, prevent biofilm formation and disrupt fully developed biofilms, albeit with restricted effectiveness. Recently however, it has been demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a small messenger molecule cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA) that shows significant promise as an effective adjunctive to antimicrobial treatment of biofilms. This molecule is responsible for induction of the native biofilm dispersion response in a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and in yeast, and has been shown to reverse persistence, increase microbial metabolic activity and significantly enhance the cidal effects of conventional antimicrobial agents. In this manuscript, the use of cis-2-decenoic acid as a novel agent for biofilm control is discussed. Stimulating the biofilm dispersion response as a novel antimicrobial strategy holds significant promise for enhanced treatment of infections and in the prevention of biofilm formation. PMID:26610524

  5. A Selective Small Molecule DNA2 Inhibitor for Sensitization of Human Cancer Cells to Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenpeng; Zhou, Mian; Li, Zhengke; Li, Hongzhi; Polaczek, Piotr; Dai, Huifang; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Changwei; Karanja, Kenneth K; Popuri, Vencat; Shan, Shu-Ou; Schlacher, Katharina; Zheng, Li; Campbell, Judith L; Shen, Binghui

    2016-04-01

    Cancer cells frequently up-regulate DNA replication and repair proteins such as the multifunctional DNA2 nuclease/helicase, counteracting DNA damage due to replication stress and promoting survival. Therefore, we hypothesized that blocking both DNA replication and repair by inhibiting the bifunctional DNA2 could be a potent strategy to sensitize cancer cells to stresses from radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. We show that homozygous deletion of DNA2 sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation and camptothecin (CPT). Using a virtual high throughput screen, we identify 4-hydroxy-8-nitroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (C5) as an effective and selective inhibitor of DNA2. Mutagenesis and biochemical analysis define the C5 binding pocket at a DNA-binding motif that is shared by the nuclease and helicase activities, consistent with structural studies that suggest that DNA binding to the helicase domain is necessary for nuclease activity. C5 targets the known functions of DNA2 in vivo: C5 inhibits resection at stalled forks as well as reducing recombination. C5 is an even more potent inhibitor of restart of stalled DNA replication forks and over-resection of nascent DNA in cells defective in replication fork protection, including BRCA2 and BOD1L. C5 sensitizes cells to CPT and synergizes with PARP inhibitors. PMID:27211550

  6. Analysis of the eukaryotic topoisomerase II DNA gate: a single-molecule FRET and structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Tammy R. L.; Hammes, Gordon G.; Hsieh, Tao-shih

    2009-01-01

    Type II DNA topoisomerases (topos) are essential and ubiquitous enzymes that perform important intracellular roles in chromosome condensation and segregation, and in regulating DNA supercoiling. Eukaryotic topo II, a type II topoisomerase, is a homodimeric enzyme that solves topological entanglement problems by using the energy from ATP hydrolysis to pass one segment of DNA through another by way of a reversible, enzyme-bridged double-stranded break. This DNA break is linked to the protein by a phosphodiester bond between the active site tyrosine of each subunit and backbone phosphate of DNA. The opening and closing of the DNA gate, a critical step for strand passage during the catalytic cycle, is coupled to this enzymatic cleavage/religation of the backbone. This reversible DNA cleavage reaction is the target of a number of anticancer drugs, which can elicit DNA damage by affecting the cleavage/religation equilibrium. Because of its clinical importance, many studies have sought to determine the manner in which topo II interacts with DNA. Here we highlight recent single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer and crystallographic studies that have provided new insight into the dynamics and structure of the topo II DNA gate. PMID:19155278

  7. Structure of Escherichia coli dGTP triphosphohydrolase: a hexameric enzyme with DNA effector molecules.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepa; Gawel, Damian; Itsko, Mark; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro; Krahn, Juno M; London, Robert E; Schaaper, Roel M

    2015-04-17

    The Escherichia coli dgt gene encodes a dGTP triphosphohydrolase whose detailed role still remains to be determined. Deletion of dgt creates a mutator phenotype, indicating that the dGTPase has a fidelity role, possibly by affecting the cellular dNTP pool. In the present study, we have investigated the structure of the Dgt protein at 3.1-Å resolution. One of the obtained structures revealed a protein hexamer that contained two molecules of single-stranded DNA. The presence of DNA caused significant conformational changes in the enzyme, including in the catalytic site of the enzyme. Dgt preparations lacking DNA were able to bind single-stranded DNA with high affinity (Kd ∼ 50 nM). DNA binding positively affected the activity of the enzyme: dGTPase activity displayed sigmoidal (cooperative) behavior without DNA but hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten) kinetics in its presence, consistent with a specific lowering of the apparent Km for dGTP. A mutant Dgt enzyme was also created containing residue changes in the DNA binding cleft. This mutant enzyme, whereas still active, was incapable of DNA binding and could no longer be stimulated by addition of DNA. We also created an E. coli strain containing the mutant dgt gene on the chromosome replacing the wild-type gene. The mutant also displayed a mutator phenotype. Our results provide insight into the allosteric regulation of the enzyme and support a physiologically important role of DNA binding.

  8. Improving the performance of true single molecule sequencing for ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Second-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to recover genetic information from the past, allowing the characterization of the first complete genomes from past individuals and extinct species. Recently, third generation Helicos sequencing platforms, which perform true Single-Molecule DNA Sequencing (tSMS), have shown great potential for sequencing DNA molecules from Pleistocene fossils. Here, we aim at improving even further the performance of tSMS for ancient DNA by testing two novel tSMS template preparation methods for Pleistocene bone fossils, namely oligonucleotide spiking and treatment with DNA phosphatase. Results We found that a significantly larger fraction of the horse genome could be covered following oligonucleotide spiking however not reproducibly and at the cost of extra post-sequencing filtering procedures and skewed %GC content. In contrast, we showed that treating ancient DNA extracts with DNA phosphatase improved the amount of endogenous sequence information recovered per sequencing channel by up to 3.3-fold, while still providing molecular signatures of endogenous ancient DNA damage, including cytosine deamination and fragmentation by depurination. Additionally, we confirmed the existence of molecular preservation niches in large bone crystals from which DNA could be preferentially extracted. Conclusions We propose DNA phosphatase treatment as a mechanism to increase sequence coverage of ancient genomes when using Helicos tSMS as a sequencing platform. Together with mild denaturation temperatures that favor access to endogenous ancient templates over modern DNA contaminants, this simple preparation procedure can improve overall Helicos tSMS performance when damaged DNA templates are targeted. PMID:22574620

  9. Self-assembly of molecule-like nanoparticle clusters directed by DNA nanocages.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulin; Liu, Zhiyu; Yu, Guimei; Jiang, Wen; Mao, Chengde

    2015-04-01

    Analogous to the atom-molecule relationship, nanoparticle (NP) clusters (or NP-molecules) with defined compositions and directional bonds could potentially integrate the properties of the component individual NPs, leading to emergent properties. Despite extensive efforts in this direction, no general approach is available for assembly of such NP-molecules. Here we report a general method for building this type of structures by encapsulating NPs into self-assembled DNA polyhedral wireframe nanocages, which serve as guiding agents for further assembly. As a demonstration, a series of NP-molecules have been assembled and validated. Such NP-molecules will, we believe, pave a way to explore new nanomaterials with emergent functions/properties that are related to, but do not belong to the individual component nanoparticles.

  10. Single-molecule Study of Nucleocapsid Protein Chaperoned DNA Hairpin Structural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yining; Cosa, Gonzalo; Liu, Hsiao-Wei; Landes, Christy; Makarov, Dmitrii; Barbara, Paul; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2006-03-01

    In HIV-1 reverse transcription, the nucleocapsid protein, NC, induces secondary structure fluctuations in the transactivation response (TAR) region of DNA and RNA hairpins. Time resolved single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to study NC chaperoned secondary fluctuations of DNA hairpins. The experiments reveal that the NC induced secondary fluctuations are limited to the terminal stems, and the mechanism for the fluctuations is complex. The dynamic processes occur over a wide time range, i.e. ˜5 to >250 milliseconds and involve long-lived intermediates. The dynamic role of DNA loop regions and NC binding/dissociation events are discussed.

  11. Folic acid binds DNA and RNA at different locations.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-03-01

    We located multiple binding sites for folic acid on DNA and tRNA at physiological conditions, using FTIR, CD, fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling. Structural analysis revealed that folic acid binds DNA and tRNA at multiple sites via hydrophilic, hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of Kfolic acid-DNA=1.1 (±0.3)×10(4) M(-1) and Kfolic acid-tRNA=6.4 (±0.5)×10(3) M(-1). Molecular modeling showed the participation of several nucleobases in folic acid complexes with DNA and tRNA, stabilized by H-bonding network. Two types of complexes were located for folic acid-tRNA adducts, one at the major groove and the other with TΨC loop, while acid binding occurs at major and minor grooves of DNA duplex. Folic acid complexation induced more alterations of DNA structure than tRNA.

  12. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php.

  13. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php PMID:26896846

  14. Lac Repressor Mediated DNA Looping: Monte Carlo Simulation of Constrained DNA Molecules Complemented with Current Experimental Results

    PubMed Central

    Biton, Yoav Y.; Kumar, Sandip; Dunlap, David; Swigon, David

    2014-01-01

    Tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments can be used to detect time-resolved loop formation in a single DNA molecule by measuring changes in the length of a DNA tether. Interpretation of such experiments is greatly aided by computer simulations of DNA looping which allow one to analyze the structure of the looped DNA and estimate DNA-protein binding constants specific for the loop formation process. We here present a new Monte Carlo scheme for accurate simulation of DNA configurations subject to geometric constraints and apply this method to Lac repressor mediated DNA looping, comparing the simulation results with new experimental data obtained by the TPM technique. Our simulations, taking into account the details of attachment of DNA ends and fluctuations of the looped subsegment of the DNA, reveal the origin of the double-peaked distribution of RMS values observed by TPM experiments by showing that the average RMS value for anti-parallel loop types is smaller than that of parallel loop types. The simulations also reveal that the looping probabilities for the anti-parallel loop types are significantly higher than those of the parallel loop types, even for loops of length 600 and 900 base pairs, and that the correct proportion between the heights of the peaks in the distribution can only be attained when loops with flexible Lac repressor conformation are taken into account. Comparison of the in silico and in vitro results yields estimates for the dissociation constants characterizing the binding affinity between O1 and Oid DNA operators and the dimeric arms of the Lac repressor. PMID:24800809

  15. Theory and simulations of toroidal and rod-like structures in single-molecule DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Cortini, Ruggero; Caré, Bertrand R; Victor, Jean-Marc; Barbi, Maria

    2015-03-14

    DNA condensation by multivalent cations plays a crucial role in genome packaging in viruses and sperm heads, and has been extensively studied using single-molecule experimental methods. In those experiments, the values of the critical condensation forces have been used to estimate the amplitude of the attractive DNA-DNA interactions. Here, to describe these experiments, we developed an analytical model and a rigid body Langevin dynamics assay to investigate the behavior of a polymer with self-interactions, in the presence of a traction force applied at its extremities. We model self-interactions using a pairwise attractive potential, thereby treating the counterions implicitly. The analytical model allows to accurately predict the equilibrium structures of toroidal and rod-like condensed structures, and the dependence of the critical condensation force on the DNA length. We find that the critical condensation force depends strongly on the length of the DNA, and finite-size effects are important for molecules of length up to 10(5)μm. Our Langevin dynamics simulations show that the force-extension behavior of the rod-like structures is very different from the toroidal ones, so that their presence in experiments should be easily detectable. In double-stranded DNA condensation experiments, the signature of the presence of rod-like structures was not unambiguously detected, suggesting that the polyamines used to condense DNA may protect it from bending sharply as needed in the rod-like structures.

  16. Computational methods for the construction, editing, and error correction of DNA molecules and their libraries.

    PubMed

    Raz, Ofir; Ben Yehezkel, Tuval

    2015-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology is fueled by steady advances in our ability to produce designer genetic material on demand. This relatively new technological capability stems from advancements in DNA construction biochemistry as well as supporting computational technologies such as tools for specifying large DNA libraries, as well as planning and optimizing their actual physical construction. In particular, the design, planning, and construction of user specified, combinatorial DNA libraries are of increasing interest. Here we present some of the computational tools we have built over the past decade to support the multidisciplinary task of constructing DNA molecules and their libraries. These technologies encompass computational methods for [1] planning and optimizing the construction of DNA molecules and libraries, [2] the utilization of existing natural or synthetic fragments, [3] identification of shared fragments, [4] planning primers and overlaps, [5] minimizing the number of assembly steps required, and (6) correcting erroneous constructs. Other computational technologies that are important in the overall process of DNA construction, such as [1] computational tools for efficient specification and intuitive visualization of large DNA libraries (which aid in debugging library design pre-construction) and [2] automated liquid handling robotic programming [Linshiz et al., Mol Syst Biol 4:191, 2008; Shabi et al., Syst Synth Biol 4:227-236, 2010], which aid in the construction process itself, have been omitted due to length limitations.

  17. Theory and simulations of toroidal and rod-like structures in single-molecule DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortini, Ruggero; Caré, Bertrand R.; Victor, Jean-Marc; Barbi, Maria

    2015-03-01

    DNA condensation by multivalent cations plays a crucial role in genome packaging in viruses and sperm heads, and has been extensively studied using single-molecule experimental methods. In those experiments, the values of the critical condensation forces have been used to estimate the amplitude of the attractive DNA-DNA interactions. Here, to describe these experiments, we developed an analytical model and a rigid body Langevin dynamics assay to investigate the behavior of a polymer with self-interactions, in the presence of a traction force applied at its extremities. We model self-interactions using a pairwise attractive potential, thereby treating the counterions implicitly. The analytical model allows to accurately predict the equilibrium structures of toroidal and rod-like condensed structures, and the dependence of the critical condensation force on the DNA length. We find that the critical condensation force depends strongly on the length of the DNA, and finite-size effects are important for molecules of length up to 105μm. Our Langevin dynamics simulations show that the force-extension behavior of the rod-like structures is very different from the toroidal ones, so that their presence in experiments should be easily detectable. In double-stranded DNA condensation experiments, the signature of the presence of rod-like structures was not unambiguously detected, suggesting that the polyamines used to condense DNA may protect it from bending sharply as needed in the rod-like structures.

  18. Molecular aptamer beacon tuned DNA strand displacement to transform small molecules into DNA logic outputs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinbo; Zhang, Libing; Zhou, Zhixue; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2014-03-28

    A molecular aptamer beacon tuned DNA strand displacement reaction was introduced in this work. This strand displacement mode can be used to transform the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) input into a DNA strand output signal for the downstream gates to process. A simple logic circuit was built on the basis of this mechanism.

  19. Microsphere adsorption method to study interaction of DNA with hydrophobic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Aaron C.; Crockett, Harriet; Krishnan, Rajagopal; Little, Kevin; Nordlund, Thomas M.

    2003-03-01

    Polystyrene microspheres are reproducible in size, material, and surface character, and can have surfaces that adsorb hydrophobic molecules such as the sunscreens octyl methoxycinnamate and octyl salicylate. Inclusion of 220-nm polystyrene microspheres increases the amount of optically-observed octyl salicylate injected and then vortex-mixed in a buffer suspension by 30 times or more compared to the same buffer without microspheres. Addition of a roughly equal amount of DNA to the salicylate/microsphere preparation caused a 40sunscreen fluorescence. The microsphere technique is thus effective both in adsorbing significant amounts of hydrophobic sunscreen and in showing interaction with DNA. The most straightforward interpretation of these results is that 40fluorescence quenching only indicates the energy leaves the sunscreen. The DNA may cause this energy movement, but the final location of the energy, on the DNA or dissipated into solution, is unknown. Addition of DNA appropriately labeled with an energy acceptor will settle the issue.

  20. Topological events in single molecules of long genomic DNA confined in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifenberger, Jeffrey; Dorfman, Kevin; Cao, Han

    2014-03-01

    ct- We present a rapid genome-wide analysis method based on new NanoChannel Array technology (IrysTM System) that confines and linearizes extremely long DNA molecules (100 to 1,000 kilobases) for direct image analysis at tens to hundred of gigabases per run. Genomic DNA is stained with YOYO and labeled specifically at the `GCTCTTC' sequence with fluorescent dyes allowing each molecule to be uniquely patterned and mapped to its corresponding reference. This high-throughput platform automates the imaging of such barcoded patterns on genomic DNA to identify wide spread structural variations in a genome. Here we describe a method to rule out possible topologically altered molecules in linear confinement by identifying possible topological events through a T-test looking for spikes in the fluorescence of the YOYO stained DNA backbone. These events are confirmed through aligning the marked individual molecules to a standard reference and measuring a distance differential between labels surrounding the suspected topological event compared to the reference. Such events could be flagged to distinguish from true structural variations.

  1. Investigation of localization of DNA molecules using triangular metal electrodes with varying separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, D. Nagendra; Ghonge, Sudarshan; Banerjee, Souri

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of separation of triangular metal electrodes with both convex and concave geometries, on the localization of suspended DNA molecules under the combined effect of dielectrophoresis and AC electro-osmosis through simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics. Trapping points are realized within the electrodes which are found to vary with the separation of the electrodes.

  2. Electrochemistry of single metalloprotein and DNA-based molecules at Au(111) electrode surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Princia; Zeng, Dongdong; Karlsen, Kasper K; Chi, Qijin; Wengel, Jesper; Ulstrup, Jens

    2013-07-22

    We have briefly overviewed recent efforts in the electrochemistry of single transition metal complex, redox metalloprotein, and redox-marked oligonucleotide (ON) molecules. We have particularly studied self-assembled molecular monolayers (SAMs) of several 5'-C6-SH single- (ss) and double-strand (ds) ONs immobilized on Au(111) electrode surfaces via Au-S bond formation, using a combination of nucleic acid chemistry, electrochemistry and electrochemically controlled scanning tunnelling microscopy (in situ STM). Ds ONs stabilized by multiply charged cations and locked nucleic acid (LNA) monomers have been primary targets, with a view on stabilizing the ds-ONs and improving voltammetric signals of intercalating electrochemical redox probes. Voltammetric signals of the intercalator anthraquinone monosulfonate (AQMS) at ds-DNA/Au(111) surfaces diluted by mercaptohexanol are significantly sharpened and more robust in the presence than in the absence of [Co(NH3)6](3+). AQMS also displays robust Faradaic voltammetric signals specific to the ds form on binding to similar LNA/Au(111) surfaces, but this signal only evolves after successive voltammetric scanning into negative potential ranges. Triply charged spermidine (Spd) invokes itself a strong voltammetric signal, which is specific to the ds form and fully matched sequences. This signal is of non-Faradaic, capacitive origin but appears in the same potential range as the Faradaic AQMS signal. In situ STM shows that molecular scale structures of the size of Spd-stabilized ds-ONs are densely packed over the Au(111) surface in potential ranges around the capacitive peak potential.

  3. Optoelectronic studies on heterocyclic bases of deoxyribonucleic acid for DNA photonics.

    PubMed

    El-Diasty, Fouad; Abdel-Wahab, Fathy

    2015-10-01

    The optoelectronics study of large molecules, particularly π-stacking molecules, such as DNA is really an extremely difficult task. We perform first electronic structure calculations on the heterocyclic bases of 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid based on Lorentz-Fresnel dispersion theory. In the UV-VIS range of spectrum, many of the optoelectronic parameters for DNA four bases namely adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine are calculated and discussed. The results demonstrate that adenine has the highest hyperpolarizability, whereas thymine has the lowest hyperpolarizability. Cytosine has the lower average oscillator energy and the higher lattice energy. Thymine infers the most stable nucleic base with the lower phonon energy. Thymine also has the highest average oscillator energy and the lower lattice energy. Moreover, the four nucleic acid bases have large band gap energies less than 5 eV with a semiconducting behavior. Guanine shows the smallest band gap and the highest Fermi level energy, whereas adenine elucidates the highest band gap energy.

  4. Direct Measurement of Single-Molecule DNA Hybridization Dynamics with Single-Base Resolution.

    PubMed

    He, Gen; Li, Jie; Ci, Haina; Qi, Chuanmin; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-07-25

    Herein, we report label-free detection of single-molecule DNA hybridization dynamics with single-base resolution. By using an electronic circuit based on point-decorated silicon nanowires as electrical probes, we directly record the folding/unfolding process of individual hairpin DNAs with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio and bandwidth. These measurements reveal two-level current oscillations with strong temperature dependence, enabling us to determine the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hairpin DNA hybridization. More importantly, successive, stepwise increases and decreases in device conductance at low temperature on a microsecond timescale are successfully observed, indicating a base-by-base unfolding/folding process. The process demonstrates a kinetic zipper model for DNA hybridization/dehybridization at the single base-pair level. This measurement capability promises a label-free single-molecule approach to probe biomolecular interactions with fast dynamics.

  5. Nanoscale charge transport in cytochrome c3/DNA network: Comparative studies between redox-active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Harumasa; Che, Dock-Chil; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    The redox-active molecule of a cytochrome c3/DNA network exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a threshold bias voltage at low temperature and zero-bias conductance at room temperature. I-V curves for the cytochrome c3/DNA network are well matched with the Coulomb blockade network model. Comparative studies of the Mn12 cluster, cytochrome c, and cytochrome c3, which have a wide variety of redox potentials, indicate no difference in charge transport, which suggests that the conduction mechanism is not directly related to the redox states. The charge transport mechanism has been discussed in terms of the newly-formed electronic energy states near the Fermi level, induced by the ionic interaction between redox-active molecules with the DNA network.

  6. Superresolution imaging of single DNA molecules using stochastic photoblinking of minor groove and intercalating dyes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Helen; Zhou, Zhaokun; Wollman, Adam J M; Leake, Mark C

    2015-10-15

    As proof-of-principle for generating superresolution structural information from DNA we applied a method of localization microscopy utilizing photoblinking comparing intercalating dye YOYO-1 against minor groove binding dye SYTO-13, using a bespoke multicolor single-molecule fluorescence microscope. We used a full-length ∼49 kbp λ DNA construct possessing oligo inserts at either terminus allowing conjugation of digoxigenin and biotin at opposite ends for tethering to a glass coverslip surface and paramagnetic microsphere respectively. We observed stochastic DNA-bound dye photoactivity consistent with dye photoblinking as opposed to binding/unbinding events, evidenced through both discrete simulations and continuum kinetics analysis. We analyzed dye photoblinking images of immobilized DNA molecules using superresolution reconstruction software from two existing packages, rainSTORM and QuickPALM, and compared the results against our own novel home-written software called ADEMS code. ADEMS code generated lateral localization precision values of 30-40 nm and 60-70 nm for YOYO-1 and SYTO-13 respectively at video-rate sampling, similar to rainSTORM, running more slowly than rainSTORM and QuickPALM algorithms but having a complementary capability over both in generating automated centroid distribution and cluster analyses. Our imaging system allows us to observe dynamic topological changes to single molecules of DNA in real-time, such as rapid molecular snapping events. This will facilitate visualization of fluorescently-labeled DNA molecules conjugated to a magnetic bead in future experiments involving newly developed magneto-optical tweezers combined with superresolution microscopy.

  7. Femtosecond spectroscopic study of carminic acid DNA interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comanici, Radu; Gabel, Bianca; Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Cornaggia, Christian; Pommeret, Stanislas; Rusu, Catalin; Kryschi, Carola

    2006-06-01

    Photo-excited carminic acid and carminic acid-DNA complexes in a buffer solution at pH 7 have been examined using a variety of spectroscopy techniques, that are in particular, the femtosecond resolved fluorescence upconversion and transient absorption spectroscopy. The observation of dual fluorescence emission, one peaks at 470 nm and the other at 570 nm, indicates to an excited-state (S 1) intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). A detailed analysis of the transient absorption measurements of an aqueous carminic-acid solution at pH 7 yielded four lifetimes for the excited-state (S 1): 8, 15, 33 and 46 ps. On the other hand, only two lifetimes, 34 and 47 ps, were observed by fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy because of the detection limitation to the long wavelength edge of the carminic-acid spectrum. The four S 1 lifetimes were ascribed to the coexistence of respectively two tautomer (normal and tautomer) forms of carminic acid, in the non-dissociated state (CAH) and in the deprotonated state (CA -). The fluorescence upconversion measurements of carminic acid-DNA complexes exhibited a prolongation of the fluorescence lifetimes. This effect was accepted as evidence for the formation of intercalation complexes between the carminic acid and the DNA. The intercalative binding of the carminic acid to DNA was confirmed by the fluorescence titration experiments resulting to a binding constant of 2 × 10 5 M -1 that is typical for anthracycline-DNA complexes.

  8. 'Shotgun DNA synthesis' for the high-throughput construction of large DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwangbeom; Han, Hyojun; Ahn, Jinwoo; Lee, Joongoo; Cho, Namjin; Jang, Hoon; Kim, Hyoki; Kwon, Sunghoon; Bang, Duhee

    2012-10-01

    We developed a highly scalable 'shotgun' DNA synthesis technology by utilizing microchip oligonucleotides, shotgun assembly and next-generation sequencing technology. A pool of microchip oligonucleotides targeting a penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster were assembled into numerous random fragments, and tagged with 20 bp degenerate barcode primer pairs. An optimal set of error-free fragments were identified by high-throughput DNA sequencing, selectively amplified using the barcode sequences, and successfully assembled into the target gene cluster.

  9. DNA encoding an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Weinshank, R.L.; Hartig, P.R.

    1991-10-01

    This paper describes an isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a human alpha 2B-adrenergic receptor. This patent also describes an isolated nucleic acid molecule, wherein the isolated nucleic acid molecule is a DNA molecule and a mammalian cell comprising the DNA molecule.

  10. Separation of chromosomal DNA molecules from yeast by orthogonal-field-alternation gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Carle, G F; Olson, M V

    1984-01-01

    A simple agarose-gel apparatus has been developed that allows the separation of DNA molecules in the size range from 50 kb to well over 750 kb, the largest size for which size standards were available. The apparatus is based on the recent discovery that large DNA molecules are readily fractionated on agarose gels if they are alternately subjected to two approximately orthogonal electric fields. The switching time, which was on the order of 20-50 sec in our experiments, can be adjusted to optimize fractionation in a given size range. The resolution of the technique is sufficient to allow the fractionation of a sample of self-ligated lambda DNA into a ladder of approximately 15 bands, spaced at 50 kb intervals. We have applied the technique to the fractionation of yeast DNA into 11 distinct bands, several of which have been shown by DNA-DNA hybridization to hybridize uniquely to different chromosome-specific hybridization probes. In this paper, we describe the design of the apparatus, the electrophoretic protocol, and the sample-handling procedures that we have employed. Images PMID:6379602

  11. Rational design of DNA-actuated enzyme nanoreactors guided by single molecule analysis.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Soma; Adendorff, Matthew R; Liu, Minghui; Yan, Hao; Bathe, Mark; Walter, Nils G

    2016-02-01

    The control of enzymatic reactions using nanoscale DNA devices offers a powerful application of DNA nanotechnology uniquely derived from actuation. However, previous characterization of enzymatic reaction rates using bulk biochemical assays reported suboptimal function of DNA devices such as tweezers. To gain mechanistic insight into this deficiency and to identify design rules to improve their function, here we exploit the synergy of single molecule imaging and computational modeling to characterize the three-dimensional structures and catalytic functions of DNA tweezer-actuated nanoreactors. Our analysis revealed two important deficiencies--incomplete closure upon actuation and conformational heterogeneity. Upon rational redesign of the Holliday junctions located at their hinge and arms, we found that the DNA tweezers could be more completely and uniformly closed. A novel single molecule enzyme assay was developed to demonstrate that our design improvements yield significant, independent enhancements in the fraction of active enzyme nanoreactors and their individual substrate turnover frequencies. The sequence-level design strategies explored here may aid more broadly in improving the performance of DNA-based nanodevices including biological and chemical sensors.

  12. Antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials of selected phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, Kemal; Tepe, Bektas; Sarikurkcu, Cengiz

    2015-03-01

    In this study, ten different phenolic acids (caffeic, chlorogenic, cinnamic, ferulic, gallic, p-hydroxybenzoic, protocatechuic, rosmarinic, syringic, and vanillic acids) were evaluated for their antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using four different test systems named as β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, reducing power and chelating effect. In all test systems, rosmarinic acid showed the maximum activity potential, while protocatechuic acid was determined as the weakest antioxidant in β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, and chelating effect assays. Phenolic acids were also screened for their protective effects on pBR322 plasmid DNA against the mutagenic and toxic effects of UV and H2O2. Ferulic acid was found as the most active phytochemical among the others. Even at the lowest concentration value (0.002 mg/ml), ferulic acid protected all of the bands in the presence of H2O2 and UV. It is followed by caffeic, rosmarinic, and vanillic acids. On the other hand, cinnamic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), gallic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml), and protocatechuic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml) could not protect plasmid DNA. PMID:25542528

  13. Force and twist dependence of RepC nicking activity on torsionally-constrained DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Cesar L.; Carrasco, Carolina; Akhtar, Parvez; Leuba, Sanford H.; Khan, Saleem A.; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial plasmids replicate by an asymmetric rolling-circle mechanism that requires sequence-specific recognition for initiation, nicking of one of the template DNA strands and unwinding of the duplex prior to subsequent leading strand DNA synthesis. Nicking is performed by a replication-initiation protein (Rep) that directly binds to the plasmid double-stranded origin and remains covalently bound to its substrate 5′-end via a phosphotyrosine linkage. It has been proposed that the inverted DNA sequences at the nick site form a cruciform structure that facilitates DNA cleavage. However, the role of Rep proteins in the formation of this cruciform and the implication for its nicking and religation functions is unclear. Here, we have used magnetic tweezers to directly measure the DNA nicking and religation activities of RepC, the replication initiator protein of plasmid pT181, in plasmid sized and torsionally-constrained linear DNA molecules. Nicking by RepC occurred only in negatively supercoiled DNA and was force- and twist-dependent. Comparison with a type IB topoisomerase in similar experiments highlighted a relatively inefficient religation activity of RepC. Based on the structural modeling of RepC and on our experimental evidence, we propose a model where RepC nicking activity is passive and dependent upon the supercoiling degree of the DNA substrate. PMID:27488190

  14. Liposome-based chemical barcodes for single molecule DNA detection using imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Anders; Sjövall, Peter; Höök, Fredrik

    2010-02-10

    We report on a mass-spectrometry (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, TOF-SIMS) based method for multiplexed DNA detection utilizing a random array, where the lipid composition of small unilamellar liposomes act as chemical barcodes to identify unique DNA target sequences down to the single molecule level. In a sandwich format, suspended target-DNA to be detected mediates the binding of capture-DNA modified liposomes to surface-immobilized probe-DNA. With the lipid composition of each liposome encoding a unique target-DNA sequence, TOF-SIMS analysis was used to determine the chemical fingerprint of the bound liposomes. Using high-resolution TOF-SIMS imaging, providing sub-200 nm spatial resolution, single DNA targets could be detected and identified via the chemical fingerprint of individual liposomes. The results also demonstrate the capability of TOF-SIMS to provide multiplexed detection of DNA targets on substrate areas in the micrometer range. Together with a high multiplexing capacity, this makes the concept an interesting alternative to existing barcode concepts based on fluorescence, Raman, or graphical codes for small-scale bioanalysis. PMID:20085369

  15. High-throughput sequencing for the identification of binding molecules from DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Buller, Fabian; Steiner, Martina; Scheuermann, Jörg; Mannocci, Luca; Nissen, Ina; Kohler, Manuel; Beisel, Christian; Neri, Dario

    2010-07-15

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries are large collections of small organic molecules, individually coupled to DNA fragments that serve as amplifiable identification bar codes. The isolation of specific binders requires a quantitative analysis of the distribution of DNA fragments in the library before and after capture on an immobilized target protein of interest. Here, we show how Illumina sequencing can be applied to the analysis of DNA-encoded chemical libraries, yielding over 10 million DNA sequence tags per flow-lane. The technology can be used in a multiplex format, allowing the encoding and subsequent sequencing of multiple selections in the same experiment. The sequence distributions in DNA-encoded chemical library selections were found to be similar to the ones obtained using 454 technology, thus reinforcing the concept that DNA sequencing is an appropriate avenue for the decoding of library selections. The large number of sequences obtained with the Illumina method now enables the study of very large DNA-encoded chemical libraries (>500,000 compounds) and reduces decoding costs.

  16. Determining the electrophoretic mobility and translational diffusion coefficients of DNA molecules in free solution.

    PubMed

    Stellwagen, Earle; Stellwagen, Nancy C

    2002-08-01

    The free solution mobility of DNA molecules of different molecular weights, the sequence dependence of the mobility, and the diffusion coefficients of small single- and double-stranded DNA (ss- and dsDNA) molecules can be measured accurately by capillary zone electrophoresis, using coated capillaries to minimize the electroosmotic flow (EOF) of the solvent. Very small differences in mobility between various analytes can be quantified if a mobility marker is used to correct for small differences in EOF between successive experiments. Using mobility markers, the molecular weight at which the free solution mobility of dsDNA becomes independent of molecular weight is found to be approximately 170 bp in 40 mM Tris-acetate-EDTA buffer. A DNA fragment containing 170 bp has a contour length of approximately 58 nm, close to the persistence length of DNA under these buffer conditions. Hence, the approach of the free solution mobility of DNA to a plateau value may be associated with the transition from a rod-like to a coil-like conformation in solution. Markers have also been used to determine that the free solution mobilities of ss- and dsDNA oligomers are sequence-dependent. Double-stranded 20-bp oligomers containing runs of three or more adenine residues in a row (A-tracts) migrate somewhat more slowly than 20-mers without A-tracts, suggesting that somewhat larger numbers of counterions are condensed in the ion atmospheres of A-tract DNAs, decreasing their net effective charge. Single-stranded 20-mers with symmetric sequences migrate approximately 1% faster than their double-stranded counterparts, and faster than single-stranded 20-mers containing A(5)- or T(5)-tracts. Interestingly, the average mobility of two complementary single-stranded 20-mers is equal to the mobility of the double-stranded oligomer formed upon annealing. Finally, the stopped migration method has been used to measure the diffusion coefficients of single- and double-stranded oligomers. The diffusion

  17. Investigating the Energy Transfer from Dye Molecules to DNA Stabilized Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Arun Singh; Sahoo, Harekrushna; Mohanty, T

    2016-09-01

    Double-stranded DNA stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are synthesized by chemical reduction method and characterized with different spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), & circular-dichroism (CD) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These NPs show absorption maximum at 520 nm and size of most of the particles are of the order of 3.5 ± 1.0 nm. These Au NPs show crystalline nature as confirmed from electron diffraction pattern. The effect of formation of Au NPs on the macromolecule has been studied using infrared and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Formation of NPs causes conformational changes in the DNA molecules. These Au NPs are further used as resonant energy acceptor of fluorescence emission from dye molecules (Rhodamine 6G). The fluorescence intensity of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) is quenched in presence of Au NPs. The effect of DNA molecules on the fluorescence quenching and the rate of energy transfer from R6G molecules to Au NPs have been explored. PMID:27422695

  18. Real-time analysis and selection of methylated DNA by fluorescence-activated single molecule sorting in a nanofluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Cipriany, Benjamin R; Murphy, Patrick J; Hagarman, James A; Cerf, Aline; Latulippe, David; Levy, Stephen L; Benítez, Jaime J; Tan, Christine P; Topolancik, Juraj; Soloway, Paul D; Craighead, Harold G

    2012-05-29

    Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, are responsible for regulatory pathways that affect disease. Current epigenetic analyses use bisulfite conversion to identify DNA methylation and chromatin immunoprecipitation to collect molecules bearing a specific histone modification. In this work, we present a proof-of-principle demonstration for a new method using a nanofluidic device that combines real-time detection and automated sorting of individual molecules based on their epigenetic state. This device evaluates the fluorescence from labeled epigenetic modifications to actuate sorting. This technology has demonstrated up to 98% accuracy in molecule sorting and has achieved postsorting sample recovery on femtogram quantities of genetic material. We have applied it to sort methylated DNA molecules using simultaneous, multicolor fluorescence to identify methyl binding domain protein-1 (MBD1) bound to full-duplex DNA. The functionality enabled by this nanofluidic platform now provides a workflow for color-multiplexed detection, sorting, and recovery of single molecules toward subsequent DNA sequencing.

  19. Local thermodynamics of the water molecules around single- and double-stranded DNA studied by grid inhomogeneous solvation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Miki; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Tanaka, Shigenori; Tama, Florence; Miyashita, Osamu; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties of water molecules around single- and double-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs and dsDNAs) with different sequences were investigated using grid inhomogeneous solvation theory. Free energies of water molecules solvating the minor groove of dsDNAs are lower than those near ssDNAs, while water molecules should be released during the formation of dsDNA. Free energies of water molecules around dsDNA are lower than those around ssDNA even in the second and third hydration shells. Our findings will help to clarify the role of water molecules in the formation of dsDNA from ssDNAs, thus facilitating the designs of drugs or nanomaterials using DNA.

  20. Quantification of DNA-associated proteins inside eukaryotic cells using single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Etheridge, Thomas J; Boulineau, Rémi L; Herbert, Alex; Watson, Adam T; Daigaku, Yasukazu; Tucker, Jem; George, Sophie; Jönsson, Peter; Palayret, Matthieu; Lando, David; Laue, Ernest; Osborne, Mark A; Klenerman, David; Lee, Steven F; Carr, Antony M

    2014-10-29

    Development of single-molecule localization microscopy techniques has allowed nanometre scale localization accuracy inside cells, permitting the resolution of ultra-fine cell structure and the elucidation of crucial molecular mechanisms. Application of these methodologies to understanding processes underlying DNA replication and repair has been limited to defined in vitro biochemical analysis and prokaryotic cells. In order to expand these techniques to eukaryotic systems, we have further developed a photo-activated localization microscopy-based method to directly visualize DNA-associated proteins in unfixed eukaryotic cells. We demonstrate that motion blurring of fluorescence due to protein diffusivity can be used to selectively image the DNA-bound population of proteins. We designed and tested a simple methodology and show that it can be used to detect changes in DNA binding of a replicative helicase subunit, Mcm4, and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, between different stages of the cell cycle and between distinct genetic backgrounds.

  1. Interconvertible lac repressor-DNA loops revealed by single-molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Oi Kwan; Guthold, Martin; Erie, Dorothy A; Gelles, Jeff

    2008-09-30

    At many promoters, transcription is regulated by simultaneous binding of a protein to multiple sites on DNA, but the structures and dynamics of such transcription factor-mediated DNA loops are poorly understood. We directly examined in vitro loop formation mediated by Escherichia coli lactose repressor using single-molecule structural and kinetics methods. Small ( approximately 150 bp) loops form quickly and stably, even with out-of-phase operator spacings. Unexpectedly, repeated spontaneous transitions between two distinct loop structures were observed in individual protein-DNA complexes. The results imply a dynamic equilibrium between a novel loop structure with the repressor in its crystallographic "V" conformation and a second structure with a more extended linear repressor conformation that substantially lessens the DNA bending strain. The ability to switch between different loop structures may help to explain how robust transcription regulation is maintained even though the mechanical work required to form a loop may change substantially with metabolic conditions. PMID:18828671

  2. Microfabricated arrays for fractionation of large DNA molecules via pulsed field electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakajin, Olgica; Duke, Thomas A. J.; Chou, Chia-Fu; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Chan, Shirley S.; Austin, Robert H.; Cox, Edward C.

    1999-10-01

    Novel microfabricated devices promise to accomplish fractionation of chromosomal size DNA more quickly, more accurately, at lower cost, and by using smaller sample amounts. Chromosomes are released by lysing cells directly in the device. The chromosomal DNA is further concentrated on a platinum wire in a 10 μm wide band using the phenomenon of dielectric trapping in AC fields. The DNA is then electrophoretically driven into a microfabricated array of posts arranged in a hexagonal lattice. Under electric fields whose direction periodically changes by 120°, the longer DNA molecules move at lower speeds than the shorter ones, and separation according to size is achieved. This technique allows application of electric fields as large as 1000 V/cm and, thus, promises to reduce considerably separation times compared to the presently used technique of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

  3. Quantification of DNA-associated proteins inside eukaryotic cells using single-molecule localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Etheridge, Thomas J.; Boulineau, Rémi L.; Herbert, Alex; Watson, Adam T.; Daigaku, Yasukazu; Tucker, Jem; George, Sophie; Jönsson, Peter; Palayret, Matthieu; Lando, David; Laue, Ernest; Osborne, Mark A.; Klenerman, David; Lee, Steven F.; Carr, Antony M.

    2014-01-01

    Development of single-molecule localization microscopy techniques has allowed nanometre scale localization accuracy inside cells, permitting the resolution of ultra-fine cell structure and the elucidation of crucial molecular mechanisms. Application of these methodologies to understanding processes underlying DNA replication and repair has been limited to defined in vitro biochemical analysis and prokaryotic cells. In order to expand these techniques to eukaryotic systems, we have further developed a photo-activated localization microscopy-based method to directly visualize DNA-associated proteins in unfixed eukaryotic cells. We demonstrate that motion blurring of fluorescence due to protein diffusivity can be used to selectively image the DNA-bound population of proteins. We designed and tested a simple methodology and show that it can be used to detect changes in DNA binding of a replicative helicase subunit, Mcm4, and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, between different stages of the cell cycle and between distinct genetic backgrounds. PMID:25106872

  4. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2015-09-24

    Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE) proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) (CRISPR/Cas) system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing.

  5. Single-molecule TPM studies on the conversion of human telomeric DNA.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jen-Fei; Chang, Ta-Chau; Li, Hung-Wen

    2010-04-21

    Human telomere contains guanine-rich (G-rich) tandem repeats of single-stranded DNA sequences at its 3' tail. The G-rich sequences can be folded into various secondary structures, termed G-quadruplexes (G4s), by Hoogsteen basepairing in the presence of monovalent cations (such as Na+ and K+). We developed a single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) method to investigate the unfolding process of G4s in the human telomeric sequence AGGG(TTAGGG)3 in real time. The TPM method monitors the DNA tether length change caused by formation of the G4, thus allowing the unfolding process and structural conversion to be monitored at the single-molecule level. In the presence of its antisense sequence, the folded G4 structure can be disrupted and converted to the unfolded conformation, with apparent unfolding time constants of 82 s and 3152 s. We also observed that the stability of the G4 is greatly affected by different monovalent cations. The folding equilibrium constant of G4 is strongly dependent on the salt concentration, ranging from 1.75 at 5 mM Na+ to 3.40 at 15 mM Na+. Earlier spectral studies of Na+- and K+-folded states suggested that the spectral conversion between these two different folded structures may go through a structurally unfolded intermediate state. However, our single-molecule TPM experiments did not detect any totally unfolded intermediate within our experimental resolution when sodium-folded G4 DNA molecules were titrated with high-concentration, excess potassium ions. This observation suggests that a totally unfolding pathway is likely not the major pathway for spectral conversion on the timescale of minutes, and that interconversion among folded states can be achieved by the loop rearrangement. This study also demonstrates that TPM experiments can be used to study conformational changes in single-stranded DNA molecules.

  6. Localized nanoscopic surface measurements of nickel-modified mica for single-molecule DNA sequence sampling.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Carlin; Chen, Haijian; Gimzewski, James K; Reed, Jason; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M

    2010-11-01

    Cleaved, cation-derivatized Muscovite mica is utilized extensively in atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging because of its flatness over large areas (millimeter cleavage planes with local root-mean-square roughness < 0.3 nm), ease of preparation, and ability to adsorb charged biomolecules such as DNA (work by Hansma and Laney, Guthold et al., and McMaster et al.). In particular, NiCl(2) treatment has become a common method for controlling DNA adsorption on mica substrates while retaining the mica's ultraflat surface (work by Pietrement et al.). While several studies have modeled the mica/metal ion/DNA system using macroscopic colloidal theory (DLVO, etc.; Pietrement et al., Sushko et al., Pastre et al., and Cheng et al.), nickel/mica's physicochemical properties have not been well characterized on the nanoscale. Efforts to manipulate and engineer DNA nanostructures would benefit greatly from a better understanding of the surface chemistry of nickel/mica. Here we present in situ nanometer- and attogram-scale measurements and thermodynamic simulation results that show that the surface chemistry of nickel-treated mica is more complex than generally appreciated by AFM practitioners because of metal-ion speciation effects present at neutral pH. We also show that, under certain preparations, nickel/mica allows in situ nanoscopic nucleotide sequence mapping within individual surface-adsorbed DNA molecules by permitting localized, controlled desorption of the double helix by soluble DNA binding enzymes. These results should aid efforts to precisely control the DNA/mica binding affinity, particularly at the physiological pH ranges required by enzymatic biochemistry (pH 7.0-8.5), and facilitate the development of more complex and useful biochemical manipulations of adsorbed DNA, such as single-molecule sequencing.

  7. Gibberellic Acid enhancement of DNA turnover in barley aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Taiz, L; Starks, J E

    1977-08-01

    When imbibed, deembryonated halfseeds from barley (Hordeum vulgare L., var. Himalaya) are incubated in buffer, the DNA content of the aleurone layer increases 25 to 40% over a 24-hour period. In contrast, the DNA of isolated aleurone layers declines by 20% over the same time period. Gibberellic acid (GA) causes a reduction in DNA levels in both halfseed aleurone layers and isolated aleurone layers. GA also increases the specific radioactivity of [(3)H]thymidine-labeled halfseed aleurone layer DNA during the first 12 hours of treatment. Pulse-chase studies demonstrated that the newly synthesized DNA is metabolically labile.The buoyant density on CsCl density gradients of hormone-treated aleurone DNA is identical with that of DNA extracted from whole seedlings. After density-labeling halfseed DNA with 5-bromodeoxyuridine, a bimodal absorption profile is obtained in neutral CsCl. The light band (1.70 g/ml) corresponds to unsubstituted DNA, while the heavy band (1.725-1.74 g/ml) corresponds to a hybrid density-labeled species. GA increases the relative amount of the heavy (hybrid) peak in halfseed aleurone layer DNA, further suggesting that the hormone enhances semiconservative replication in halfseeds.DNA methylation was also demonstrated. Over 60% of the radioactivity from [(3)H-Me]methionine is incorporated into 5-methylcytosine. GA has no effect on the percentage distribution of label among the bases.It was concluded that GA enhances the rate of DNA degradation and DNA synthesis (turnover) in halfseeds, but primarily DNA degradation in isolated aleurone layers. Incorporation by isolated aleurone layers is due to DNA repair. Semiconservative replication apparently plays no physiological role in the hormone response, since both isolated aleurone layers and gamma-irradiated halfseeds respond normally. The hypothesis was advanced that endoreduplication and DNA degradation are means by which the seed stores and mobilizes deoxyribonucleotides for the embryo during

  8. Probing the charge-transfer dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Matsutani, Eri; Maruyama, Atsushi; Majima, Tetsuro

    2011-10-01

    Photoinduced charge-transfer fluorescence quenching of a fluorescent dye produces the nonemissive charge-separated state, and subsequent charge recombination makes the reaction reversible. While the information available from the photoinduced charge-transfer process provides the basis for monitoring the microenvironment around the fluorescent dyes and such monitoring is particularly important in live-cell imaging and DNA diagnosis, the information obtainable from the charge recombination process is usually overlooked. When looking at fluorescence emitted from each single fluorescent dye, photoinduced charge-transfer, charge-migration, and charge recombination cause a "blinking" of the fluorescence, in which the charge-recombination rate or the lifetime of the charge-separated state (τ) is supposed to be reflected in the duration of the off time during the single-molecule-level fluorescence measurement. Herein, based on our recently developed method for the direct observation of charge migration in DNA, we utilized DNA as a platform for spectroscopic investigations of charge-recombination dynamics for several fluorescent dyes: TAMRA, ATTO 655, and Alexa 532, which are used in single-molecule fluorescence measurements. Charge recombination dynamics were observed by transient absorption measurements, demonstrating that these fluorescent dyes can be used to monitor the charge-separation and charge-recombination events. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of ATTO 655 modified DNA allowed the successful measurement of the charge-recombination dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level. Utilizing the injected charge just like a pulse of sound, such as a "ping" in active sonar systems, information about the DNA sequence surrounding the fluorescent dye was read out by measuring the time it takes for the charge to return.

  9. A DNA crystal designed to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Sha, Ruojie; Birktoft, Jens; Zheng, Jianping; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2010-11-10

    We describe the self-assembly of a DNA crystal that contains two tensegrity triangle molecules per asymmetric unit. We have used X-ray crystallography to determine its crystal structure. In addition, we have demonstrated control over the colors of the crystals by attaching either Cy3 dye (pink) or Cy5 dye (blue-green) to the components of the crystal, yielding crystals of corresponding colors. Attaching the pair of dyes to the pair of molecules yields a purple crystal. PMID:20958065

  10. Electrostatic energy barriers from dielectric membranes upon approach of translocating DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-02-01

    We probe the electrostatic cost associated with the approach phase of DNA translocation events. Within an analytical theory at the Debye-Hückel level, we calculate the electrostatic energy of a rigid DNA molecule interacting with a dielectric membrane. For carbon or silicon based low permittivity neutral membranes, the DNA molecule experiences a repulsive energy barrier between 10 kBT and 100 kBT. In the case of engineered membranes with high dielectric permittivities, the membrane surface attracts the DNA with an energy of the same magnitude. Both the repulsive and attractive interactions result from image-charge effects and their magnitude survive even for the thinnest graphene-based membranes of size d ≈ 6 Å. For weakly charged membranes, the electrostatic energy is always attractive at large separation distances but switches to repulsive close to the membrane surface. We also characterise the polymer length dependence of the interaction energy. For specific values of the membrane charge density, low permittivity membranes repel short polymers but attract long polymers. Our results can be used to control the strong electrostatic energy of DNA-membrane interactions prior to translocation events by chemical engineering of the relevant system parameters.

  11. Single-molecule study of DNA unlinking by eukaryotic and prokaryotic type-II topoisomerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvin, G.; Bensimon, D.; Croquette, V.

    2003-08-01

    Type-II topoisomerases are responsible for untangling DNA during replication by removing supercoiled and interlinked DNA structures. Using a single-molecule micromanipulation setup, we follow the real-time decatenation of two mechanically braided DNA molecules by Drosophila melanogaster topoisomerase (Topo) II and Escherichia coli Topo IV. Although Topo II relaxes left-handed (L) and right-handed (R-) braids similarly at a rate of 2.9 s-1, Topo IV has a marked preference for L-braids, which it relaxes completely and processively at a rate of 2.4 s-1. However, Topo IV can unlink R-braids at about half that rate when they supercoil to form L-plectonemes. These results imply that the preferred substrate for unlinking by Topo IV has the symmetry of an L-crossing and shed new light on the decatenation of daughter strands during DNA replication, which are usually assumed to be linked in an R-braid. DNA replication

  12. Single Molecule Bioelectronics and Their Application to Amplification-Free Measurement of DNA Lengths

    PubMed Central

    Gül, O. Tolga; Pugliese, Kaitlin M.; Choi, Yongki; Sims, Patrick C.; Pan, Deng; Rajapakse, Arith J.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    2016-01-01

    As biosensing devices shrink smaller and smaller, they approach a scale in which single molecule electronic sensing becomes possible. Here, we review the operation of single-enzyme transistors made using single-walled carbon nanotubes. These novel hybrid devices transduce the motions and catalytic activity of a single protein into an electronic signal for real-time monitoring of the protein’s activity. Analysis of these electronic signals reveals new insights into enzyme function and proves the electronic technique to be complementary to other single-molecule methods based on fluorescence. As one example of the nanocircuit technique, we have studied the Klenow Fragment (KF) of DNA polymerase I as it catalytically processes single-stranded DNA templates. The fidelity of DNA polymerases makes them a key component in many DNA sequencing techniques, and here we demonstrate that KF nanocircuits readily resolve DNA polymerization with single-base sensitivity. Consequently, template lengths can be directly counted from electronic recordings of KF’s base-by-base activity. After measuring as few as 20 copies, the template length can be determined with <1 base pair resolution, and different template lengths can be identified and enumerated in solutions containing template mixtures. PMID:27348011

  13. Nucleic Acid Engineering: RNA Following the Trail of DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejin; Park, Yongkuk; Kim, Jieun; Jeong, Jaepil; Han, Sangwoo; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-02-01

    The self-assembly feature of the naturally occurring biopolymer, DNA, has fascinated researchers in the fields of materials science and bioengineering. With the improved understanding of the chemical and structural nature of DNA, DNA-based constructs have been designed and fabricated from two-dimensional arbitrary shapes to reconfigurable three-dimensional nanodevices. Although DNA has been used successfully as a building block in a finely organized and controlled manner, its applications need to be explored. Hence, with the myriad of biological functions, RNA has recently attracted considerable attention to further the application of nucleic acid-based structures. This Review categorizes different approaches of engineering nucleic acid-based structures and introduces the concepts, principles, and applications of each technique, focusing on how DNA engineering is applied as a guide to RNA engineering.

  14. Ultrafast and Wide Range Analysis of DNA Molecules Using Rigid Network Structure of Solid Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahong, Sakon; Yasui, Takao; Yanagida, Takeshi; Nagashima, Kazuki; Kanai, Masaki; Klamchuen, Annop; Meng, Gang; He, Yong; Zhuge, Fuwei; Kaji, Noritada; Kawai, Tomoji; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2014-06-01

    Analyzing sizes of DNA via electrophoresis using a gel has played an important role in the recent, rapid progress of biology and biotechnology. Although analyzing DNA over a wide range of sizes in a short time is desired, no existing electrophoresis methods have been able to fully satisfy these two requirements. Here we propose a novel method using a rigid 3D network structure composed of solid nanowires within a microchannel. This rigid network structure enables analysis of DNA under applied DC electric fields for a large DNA size range (100 bp-166 kbp) within 13 s, which are much wider and faster conditions than those of any existing methods. The network density is readily varied for the targeted DNA size range by tailoring the number of cycles of the nanowire growth only at the desired spatial position within the microchannel. The rigid dense 3D network structure with spatial density control plays an important role in determining the capability for analyzing DNA. Since the present method allows the spatial location and density of the nanostructure within the microchannels to be defined, this unique controllability offers a new strategy to develop an analytical method not only for DNA but also for other biological molecules.

  15. Investigating hexameric helicases: Single-molecule studies of DnaB and T4 gp41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Omar; Ribeck, Noah; Berezney, John

    2011-03-01

    Hexameric, ring-shaped motor proteins serve as replicative helicases in many systems. They function by encircling and translocating along ssDNA, denaturing dsDNA in advance of its motion by sterically occluding the complementary strand to the outside of the ring. We investigate the helicase activity of two such motors using single-molecule measurements with magnetic tweezers. First, we measure the activity of the E. coli helicase DnaB complexed with the tau subunit of the Pol III holoenzyme. Tau is known from bulk measurements to stimulate DnaB activity (Kim et al., Cell, 1996); we investigate the means of this stimulation. Second, we measure helicase activity of the T4 phage helicase gp41 in multiple tethered DNA geometries. Previous work on DnaB showed a dependence of helicase activity on DNA geometry (Ribeck et al., Biophys. J., 2010); here, we test gp41 for similar behavior to see whether it is a common characteristic of hexameric helicases.

  16. Collection of trace amounts of DNA/mRNA molecules using genomagnetic nanocapturers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaojun; Tapec-Dytioco, Rovelyn; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong

    2003-07-15

    The collection and then the separation of rare DNA/mRNA targets with single-base mismatches in a complex matrix is critically important in human disease diagnostics, gene expression studies, and gene profiling. The major result of this work is the development and application of a novel genomagnetic nanocapturer (GMNC) for the collection, separation, and detection of trace amounts of DNA/RNA molecules with one single-base difference. The GMNC is constructed by bioconjugating molecular beacon DNA probes onto magnetic nanoparticle surfaces. We have successfully applied the GMNC in artificial buffer solution samples and in cancer cell samples, both containing different proteins and random DNA sequences. Our method has three distinctly useful features: highly efficient collection of trace amount of DNA/mRNA samples down to femtomolar (10(-15) M) concentrations; excellent ability to differentiate single-base-mismatched DNA/mRNA samples by combining the exceptional specificity of molecular beacons and the separation power of magnetic nanoparticles; and real-time monitoring and confirmation of the collected gene products. The newly developed genomagnetic nanocapturers will be highly useful for the collection of trace amounts of DNA/mRNA targets in a variety of sample sources in forensic, medical, and biotechnological fields.

  17. Using Amino-Labeled Nucleotide Probes for Simultaneous Single Molecule RNA-DNA FISH

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Shao, Fangwei; Zhang, Li-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Using amino-labeled oligonucleotide probes, we established a simple, robust and low-noise method for simultaneous detection of RNA and DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization, a highly useful tool to study the large pool of long non-coding RNAs being identified in the current research. With probes either chemically or biologically synthesized, we demonstrate that the method can be applied to study a wide range of RNA and DNA targets at the single-cell and single-molecule level in cellular contexts. PMID:25226542

  18. Binding-Induced DNA Nanomachines Triggered by Proteins and Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongquan; Lai, Maode; Zuehlke, Albert; Peng, Hanyong; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2015-11-23

    We introduce the concept and operation of a binding-induced DNA nanomachine that can be activated by proteins and nucleic acids. This new type of nanomachine harnesses specific target binding to trigger assembly of separate DNA components that are otherwise unable to spontaneously assemble. Three-dimensional DNA tracks of high density are constructed on gold nanoparticles functionalized with hundreds of single-stranded oligonucleotides and tens of an affinity ligand. A DNA swing arm, free in solution, is linked to a second affinity ligand. Binding of a target molecule to the two ligands brings the swing arm to AuNP and initiates autonomous, stepwise movement of the swing arm around the AuNP surface. The movement of the swing arm, powered by enzymatic cleavage of conjugated oligonucleotides, cleaves hundreds of oligonucleotides in response to a single binding event. We demonstrate three nanomachines that are specifically activated by streptavidin, platelet-derived growth factor, and the Smallpox gene. Substituting the ligands enables the nanomachine to respond to other molecules. The new nanomachines have several unique and advantageous features over DNA nanomachines that rely on DNA self-assembly.

  19. Nanoconstructions based on double-stranded DNA molecules and their applications as optical biosensing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, M. A.; Kazankov, G. M.; Sergeeva, V. S.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    2006-02-01

    We describe the formation and the properties of biosensing units based on the cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions of the double-stranded nucleic acid molecules. The resulting biosensing units are proved to be sensitive to the presence of some relevant chemical or biological compounds in a liquid to be analyzed.

  20. Cloning of cDNA encoding the common alpha subunit precursor molecule of pituitary glycoprotein hormones in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Kubokawa, K; Ishii, S; Joss, J M

    1998-05-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones encoding a putative glycoprotein hormone alpha subunit precursor molecule from a pituitary cDNA library of the Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri) by a two-step plaque hybridization technique initially using cDNA encoding the toad glycoprotein hormone alpha subunit precursor molecule as the hybridization probe. The inserts (799 bp) of two of the isolated cDNA clones contained sequences of 5' and 3' untranslated regions, including a poly(A) stretch, and the entire coding sequence of the alpha subunit precursor molecule. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that its signal peptide consists of 24 residues and its mature protein 97 residues. In the mature protein, there is an insert of one residue (Ala) just after the 9th residue. This insert is unique to the Australian lungfish among vertebrate species studied. The amino acid sequence of the mature protein shares the common, or the same-group, amino acid residues at 9 positions with tetrapod and not actinopterygian vertebrates, while only one residue is common to some teleosts and the lungfish to the exclusion of the tetrapods. The overall sequence of the mature protein of the Australian lungfish also shares more similarity with those of tetrapods (69 to 84%) than it does with teleosts (57 to 74%). These results on the relation of the alpha subunit precursor molecule between the lungfish and other vertebrates are consistent with the recent molecular phylogenetic studies suggesting a closer relationship between lungfish and tetrapods than between lungfish and teleosts. We also found that the primary structure of the lungfish alpha subunit is slightly but significantly more similar to that of homeothermic vertebrates than to that of amphibians. This may be due to specialization of the amphibian alpha subunit molecules.

  1. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by small molecule antagonists of the E1-E2 protein interaction.

    PubMed

    White, Peter W; Titolo, Steve; Brault, Karine; Thauvette, Louise; Pelletier, Alex; Welchner, Ewald; Bourgon, Lise; Doyon, Louise; Ogilvie, William W; Yoakim, Christiane; Cordingley, Michael G; Archambault, Jacques

    2003-07-18

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA replication is initiated by recruitment of the E1 helicase by the E2 protein to the viral origin. Screening of our corporate compound collection with an assay measuring the cooperative binding of E1 and E2 to the origin identified a class of small molecule inhibitors of the protein interaction between E1 and E2. Isothermal titration calorimetry and changes in protein fluorescence showed that the inhibitors bind to the transactivation domain of E2, the region that interacts with E1. These compounds inhibit E2 of the low risk HPV types 6 and 11 but not those of high risk HPV types or of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus. Functional evidence that the transactivation domain is the target of inhibition was obtained by swapping this domain between a sensitive (HPV11) and a resistant (cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) E2 type and by identifying an amino acid substitution, E100A, that increases inhibition by approximately 10-fold. This class of inhibitors was found to antagonize specifically the E1-E2 interaction in vivo and to inhibit HPV DNA replication in transiently transfected cells. These results highlight the potential of the E1-E2 interaction as a small molecule antiviral target.

  2. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA-barcoded proteins.

    PubMed

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M

    2014-11-27

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing, high-throughput protein analyses are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule protein detection using optical methods is limited by the number of spectrally non-overlapping chromophores. Here we introduce a single-molecular-interaction sequencing (SMI-seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging single-molecule advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide thin film to construct a random single-molecule array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies) and analysed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimetre. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured on the basis of the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor and antibody-binding profiling, are demonstrated. SMI-seq enables 'library versus library' screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity.

  3. Single-molecule analysis of RAG-mediated V(D)J DNA cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Lovely, Geoffrey A.; Brewster, Robert C.; Schatz, David G.; Baltimore, David; Phillips, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The recombination-activating gene products, RAG1 and RAG2, initiate V(D)J recombination during lymphocyte development by cleaving DNA adjacent to conserved recombination signal sequences (RSSs). The reaction involves DNA binding, synapsis, and cleavage at two RSSs located on the same DNA molecule and results in the assembly of antigen receptor genes. We have developed single-molecule assays to examine RSS binding by RAG1/2 and their cofactor high-mobility group-box protein 1 (HMGB1) as they proceed through the steps of this reaction. These assays allowed us to observe in real time the individual molecular events of RAG-mediated cleavage. As a result, we are able to measure the binding statistics (dwell times) and binding energies of the initial RAG binding events and characterize synapse formation at the single-molecule level, yielding insights into the distribution of dwell times in the paired complex and the propensity for cleavage on forming the synapse. Interestingly, we find that the synaptic complex has a mean lifetime of roughly 400 s and that its formation is readily reversible, with only ∼40% of observed synapses resulting in cleavage at consensus RSS binding sites. PMID:25831509

  4. DNA aptamer functionalized zinc oxide field effect transistors for liquid state selective sensing of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Joshua A.; Kim, Sang N.; Bayraktaroglu, Burhan; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Naik, Rajesh R.; Stone, Morley O.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, we show the use of single stranded DNA aptamers as selective biorecognition elements in a sensor based on a field effect transistor (FET) platform. Aptamers are chemically attached to the semiconducting material in the FET through the use of linker molecules and confirmed through atomic force microscopy and positive target detection. Highly selective sensing of a small molecule, riboflavin is shown down to the nano-molar level in zinc oxide FET and micro-molar level in a carbon nanotube FET. High selectivity is determined through the use of negative control target molecules with similar molecular structures as the positive control targets with little to no sensor response. The goal of this work is to develop a sensor platform where biorecognition elements can be used to functionalize an array of transistors for simultaneous sensing of multiple targets in biological fluids.

  5. Three-dimensional Nanowire Structures for Ultra-Fast Separation of DNA, Protein and RNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Rahong, Sakon; Yasui, Takao; Yanagida, Takeshi; Nagashima, Kazuki; Kanai, Masaki; Meng, Gang; He, Yong; Zhuge, Fuwei; Kaji, Noritada; Kawai, Tomoji; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Separation and analysis of biomolecules represent crucial processes for biological and biomedical engineering development; however, separation resolution and speed for biomolecules analysis still require improvements. To achieve separation and analysis of biomolecules in a short time, the use of highly-ordered nanostructures fabricated by top-down or bottom-up approaches have been proposed. Here, we reported on the use of three-dimensional (3D) nanowire structures embedded in microchannels fabricated by a bottom-up approach for ultrafast separation of small biomolecules, such as DNA, protein, and RNA molecules. The 3D nanowire structures could analyze a mixture of DNA molecules (50–1000 bp) within 50 s, a mixture of protein molecules (20–340 kDa) within 5 s, and a mixture of RNA molecules (100–1000 bases) within 25 s. And, we could observe the electrophoretic mobility difference of biomolecules as a function of molecular size in the 3D nanowire structures. Since the present methodology allows users to control the pore size of sieving materials by varying the number of cycles for nanowire growth, the 3D nanowire structures have a good potential for use as alternatives for other sieving materials. PMID:26073192

  6. Kinetic characterization of small DNA-binding molecules interacting with a DNA strand on a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Hajime; Funasaki, Mariko; Okahata, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative studies of the binding of various DNA-binding antibiotics with dsDNA are useful for drug design, not only for effective antibiotics, but also for antitumor drugs. We studied the binding kinetics, association and dissociation rate constants, and association constants (kon, koff, and Ka, respectively) of intercalators and groove binders, including various antibiotics, to double-stranded DNA (dA30·dT30 and dG30·dC30) immobilized on a highly sensitive 27 MHz quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) in aqueous solution. Although a simple ethidium bromide intercalator bound to both dA30·dT30 and dG30·dC30, antibiotics that are side-binding intercalators, such as daunomycin, aclacinomycin A, and actinomycin D, with sugar or peptide moieties on the intercalator parts selectively bound to dG30·dC30 with high Ka and small koff values. Nogalamycin, a dumbbell-shaped penetrating intercalator, showed low kon and koff values owing to slow duplex unwinding during the penetration process. Groove binders (Hoechst 33258, distamycin A, and mithramycin) had high Ka values owing to the high kon values. Kinetic parameters depended largely on molecular shapes and DNA-binding molecule binding modes.

  7. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin. PMID:27010485

  8. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin.

  9. Digitally encoded DNA nanostructures for multiplexed, single-molecule protein sensing with nanopores.

    PubMed

    Bell, Nicholas A W; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous detection of a large number of different analytes is important in bionanotechnology research and in diagnostic applications. Nanopore sensing is an attractive method in this regard as the approach can be integrated into small, portable device architectures, and there is significant potential for detecting multiple sub-populations in a sample. Here, we show that highly multiplexed sensing of single molecules can be achieved with solid-state nanopores by using digitally encoded DNA nanostructures. Based on the principles of DNA origami, we designed a library of DNA nanostructures in which each member contains a unique barcode; each bit in the barcode is signalled by the presence or absence of multiple DNA dumbbell hairpins. We show that a 3-bit barcode can be assigned with 94% accuracy by electrophoretically driving the DNA structures through a solid-state nanopore. Select members of the library were then functionalized to detect a single, specific antibody through antigen presentation at designed positions on the DNA. This allows us to simultaneously detect four different antibodies of the same isotype at nanomolar concentration levels.

  10. Real-time assembly and disassembly of human RAD51 filaments on individual DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Thijn; Seidel, Ralf; Modesti, Mauro; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire; Dekker, Cees

    2007-01-01

    The human DNA repair protein RAD51 is the crucial component of helical nucleoprotein filaments that drive homologous recombination. The molecular mechanistic details of how this structure facilitates the requisite DNA strand rearrangements are not known but must involve dynamic interactions between RAD51 and DNA. Here, we report the real-time kinetics of human RAD51 filament assembly and disassembly on individual molecules of both single- and double-stranded DNA, as measured using magnetic tweezers. The relative rates of nucleation and filament extension are such that the observed filament formation consists of multiple nucleation events that are in competition with each other. For varying concentration of RAD51, a Hill coefficient of 4.3 ± 0.5 is obtained for both nucleation and filament extension, indicating binding to dsDNA with a binding unit consisting of multiple (≥4) RAD51 monomers. We report Monte Carlo simulations that fit the (dis)assembly data very well. The results show that, surprisingly, human RAD51 does not form long continuous filaments on DNA. Instead each nucleoprotein filament consists of a string of many small filament patches that are only a few tens of monomers long. The high flexibility and dynamic nature of this arrangement is likely to facilitate strand exchange. PMID:17709342

  11. Digitally encoded DNA nanostructures for multiplexed, single-molecule protein sensing with nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous detection of a large number of different analytes is important in bionanotechnology research and in diagnostic applications. Nanopore sensing is an attractive method in this regard as the approach can be integrated into small, portable device architectures, and there is significant potential for detecting multiple sub-populations in a sample. Here, we show that highly multiplexed sensing of single molecules can be achieved with solid-state nanopores by using digitally encoded DNA nanostructures. Based on the principles of DNA origami, we designed a library of DNA nanostructures in which each member contains a unique barcode; each bit in the barcode is signalled by the presence or absence of multiple DNA dumbbell hairpins. We show that a 3-bit barcode can be assigned with 94% accuracy by electrophoretically driving the DNA structures through a solid-state nanopore. Select members of the library were then functionalized to detect a single, specific antibody through antigen presentation at designed positions on the DNA. This allows us to simultaneously detect four different antibodies of the same isotype at nanomolar concentration levels.

  12. Single-molecule study of DNA unlinking by eukaryotic and prokaryotic type-II topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Charvin, G.; Bensimon, D.; Croquette, V.

    2003-01-01

    Type-II topoisomerases are responsible for untangling DNA during replication by removing supercoiled and interlinked DNA structures. Using a single-molecule micromanipulation setup, we follow the real-time decatenation of two mechanically braided DNA molecules by Drosophila melanogaster topoisomerase (Topo) II and Escherichia coli Topo IV. Although Topo II relaxes left-handed (L) and right-handed (R-) braids similarly at a rate of ≈2.9 s–1, Topo IV has a marked preference for L-braids, which it relaxes completely and processively at a rate of ≈2.4 s–1. However, Topo IV can unlink R-braids at about half that rate when they supercoil to form L-plectonemes. These results imply that the preferred substrate for unlinking by Topo IV has the symmetry of an L-crossing and shed new light on the decatenation of daughter strands during DNA replication, which are usually assumed to be linked in an R-braid. PMID:12902541

  13. Oxidative DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, an amino acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Hiraku, Y; Sugimoto, J; Yamaguchi, T; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    We investigated DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, a metabolite of threonine and glycine. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that aminoacetone caused cellular DNA cleavage. Aminoacetone increased the amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in human cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of 8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA increased due to aminoacetone only in the presence of Cu(II). DNA ladder formation was observed at higher concentrations of aminoacetone than those causing DNA cleavage. Flow cytometry showed that aminoacetone enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured cells. Aminoacetone caused damage to 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments, obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes, at cytosine and thymine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that H2O2 and Cu(I) were involved. Analysis of the products generated from aminoacetone revealed that aminoacetone underwent Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation in two different pathways: the major pathway in which methylglyoxal and NH+4 are generated and the minor pathway in which 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is formed through condensation of two molecules of aminoacetone. These findings suggest that H2O2 generated by the autoxidation of aminoacetone reacts with Cu(I) to form reactive species capable of causing oxidative DNA damage.

  14. Morphology characterization and single-molecule study of DNA-dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide complex.

    PubMed

    Ran, Shi-Yong; Wang, Yan-Wei; Yang, Guang-Can; Zhang, Lin-Xi

    2011-04-28

    DNA compaction induced by dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) is studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic tweezers. The morphology of DNA-DTAB complex is dependent on the DTAB concentration and incubation time. With magnesium ions, the complexes show rod- and network-like structures after approximately 5 min of incubation at low DTAB concentrations. With increasing incubation time, more toroids and globules appeared, resulting in the formation of scattered condensed particles. At high DTAB concentrations, the complexes show swollen globular structures independent of the incubation time. The compaction and unraveling of the DNA-DTAB complex are also analyzed at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. The extension-time curves show a staircase structure with typical sizes of ∼40, 60, 80, and 112 nm, suggesting that the complexes are well organized and more compacted than those induced by multivalent ions. Finally, the high DTAB concentration stabilized the complex and increased the unraveling energy barrier.

  15. Nucleosome assembly depends on the torsion in the DNA molecule: a magnetic tweezers study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja; Zlatanova, Jordanka; Tomschik, Miroslav

    2009-12-16

    We have used magnetic tweezers to study nucleosome assembly on topologically constrained DNA molecules. Assembly was achieved using chicken erythrocyte core histones and histone chaperone protein Nap1 under constant low force. We have observed only partial assembly when the DNA was topologically constrained and much more complete assembly on unconstrained (nicked) DNA tethers. To verify our hypothesis that the lack of full nucleosome assembly on topologically constrained tethers was due to compensatory accumulation of positive supercoiling in the rest of the template, we carried out experiments in which we mechanically relieved the positive supercoiling by rotating the external magnetic field at certain time points of the assembly process. Indeed, such rotation did lead to the same nucleosome saturation level as in the case of nicked tethers. We conclude that levels of positive supercoiling in the range of 0.025-0.051 (most probably in the form of twist) stall the nucleosome assembly process.

  16. Nanofluidic laboratory-on-chip device for mapping of single molecule DNA extracted from single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahshid, Sara; Berard, Daniel; Sladek, Robert; Leslie, Sabrina; Reisner, Walter

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this project is to create a nanofluidic platform to provide comprehensive maps of single-cell genomes at 1 kbp resolution based on the direct analysis of single 1-10 Mbp extended DNA molecules extracted from individual cells on-chip. We have developed a nanodevice in which all biochemical processing of single cells (cell lysis, DNA purification and fragmentation) is performed in situ. The platform has the following three components: (1) a micro-cavity (50 ×20 micron in dimension) for trapping and biochemical processing of single cells; (2) post arrays (1 micron depth) for untangling the released genomic contents and (3) parallel nanochannel arrays (100 nm) for extension of ~ 1-10 Mbp DNA for high-throughput optical mapping. Moreover, we use ``Convex Lense-Induced Nanoconfinement'' (CLIC) technique for trapping of single cell and dragging DNA into nanochannels. The principle is that a convex lens is pushed down to deform a flexible coverslip lid above the aforesaid platform containing nano/micro patterns, creating a locally confined region that pins molecules in the embedded nano/micro features. CLIC is used to lower the device lid over a cell isolated in the microcavity with an adjustable gap for buffer exchange. The released DNA is untangled using 1 micron-deep post arrays and driven into nanochannel array where its genomic content is revealed. In particular, using CLIC we were able to successfully trap 20 micron lymphoblast cells inside microcavity and lyse the trapped cell to drive out DNA.

  17. DNA origami based Au-Ag-core-shell nanoparticle dimers with single-molecule SERS sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, J.; Heck, C.; Ellerik, L.; Merk, V.; Bald, I.

    2016-03-01

    DNA origami nanostructures are a versatile tool to arrange metal nanostructures and other chemical entities with nanometer precision. In this way gold nanoparticle dimers with defined distance can be constructed, which can be exploited as novel substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We have optimized the size, composition and arrangement of Au/Ag nanoparticles to create intense SERS hot spots, with Raman enhancement up to 1010, which is sufficient to detect single molecules by Raman scattering. This is demonstrated using single dye molecules (TAMRA and Cy3) placed into the center of the nanoparticle dimers. In conjunction with the DNA origami nanostructures novel SERS substrates are created, which can in the future be applied to the SERS analysis of more complex biomolecular targets, whose position and conformation within the SERS hot spot can be precisely controlled.DNA origami nanostructures are a versatile tool to arrange metal nanostructures and other chemical entities with nanometer precision. In this way gold nanoparticle dimers with defined distance can be constructed, which can be exploited as novel substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We have optimized the size, composition and arrangement of Au/Ag nanoparticles to create intense SERS hot spots, with Raman enhancement up to 1010, which is sufficient to detect single molecules by Raman scattering. This is demonstrated using single dye molecules (TAMRA and Cy3) placed into the center of the nanoparticle dimers. In conjunction with the DNA origami nanostructures novel SERS substrates are created, which can in the future be applied to the SERS analysis of more complex biomolecular targets, whose position and conformation within the SERS hot spot can be precisely controlled. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information about materials and methods, designs of DNA origami templates, height profiles, additional SERS spectra, assignment of DNA

  18. DNA--a molecule in search of additional functions: recipient of pool wave emissions? A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Walter

    2010-09-01

    Almost the entire nucleotide sequence of human DNA is functionally unaccounted for, although large parts of the human genome are transcribed. The genes, as defined by current molecular biology, comprise about 1.5-2% of the DNA molecule. It is proposed that DNA encodes additional, hitherto unrecognized functions. In this discussion, the total information inside and outside the universe we live in is termed the pool or the sum total, known or unknown, of all laws, matter, energy, concepts and events. In a hypothetical model, a Gedankenexperiment, it is suggested that the total of all information emits pool waves of an unknown physical nature. They could be related to black energy or have completely different qualities. The designation pool waves should not imply any similarity to electromagnetism. Further, DNA is suggested to have the capability of interacting with the pool waves and thus permit humans - to some partly genetically determined and yet very limited extent - to perceive information from the pool. Pool emissions might be one of the forces that have been instrumental in and are still driving evolution from simple oligonucleotides to DNA with ever more complex recipient capacities. It will be a major challenge for researchers in the field to unravel these and less hypothetical undetected coding principles in DNA. It is uncertain whether the current trend to search the available DNA sequences with ever more refined computer technology on the basis of our present understanding of biology will detect unknown coding systems. For molecular medicine, research into the genetics of the most common human diseases could profit from the elucidation of presently still ephemeral codes in human DNA. Young scientists with a proven record of original research deserve support for the pursuit of unconventional ideas. This concept of granting priorities will be of the utmost importance in advancing the field beyond current concepts in molecular biology.

  19. Laccaic Acid A Is a Direct, DNA-competitive Inhibitor of DNA Methyltransferase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Rebecca L.; Cryderman, Diane E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Wallrath, Lori L.; Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Methylation of cytosines in CpG dinucleotides is the predominant epigenetic mark on vertebrate DNA. DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional repression. The pattern of DNA methylation changes during development and with disease. Human DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1), a 1616-amino acid multidomain enzyme, is essential for maintenance of DNA methylation in proliferating cells and is considered an important cancer drug target. Using a fluorogenic, endonuclease-coupled DNA methylation assay with an activated form of Dnmt1 engineered to lack the replication foci targeting sequence domain, we discovered that laccaic acid A (LCA), a highly substituted anthraquinone natural product, is a direct inhibitor with a 310 nm Ki. LCA is competitive with the DNA substrate in in vitro methylation assays and alters the expression of methylated genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells synergistically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. LCA represents a novel class of Dnmt-targeted molecular probes, with biochemical properties that allow it to distinguish between non DNA-bound and DNA-bound Dnmt1. PMID:23839987

  20. Investigation of perfluorooctanoic acid induced DNA damage using electrogenerated chemiluminescence associated with charge transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Guo, Linqing; Li, Meng; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Miao, Wujian

    2016-10-01

    An electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL)-DNA sensor was designed and fabricated for the investigation of DNA damage by a potential environmental pollutant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). The ECL-DNA sensor consisted of a Au electrode that had a self-assembled monolayer of 15 base-pair double-stranded (ds) DNA oligonucleotides with covalently attached semiconductor CdSe quantum dots (QDs) at the distal end of the DNA. Characterization of the ECL-DNA sensor was conducted with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ECL, and cyclic voltammetry before and after the exposure of the sensor to PFOA. Consistent data revealed that the dsDNA on Au was severely damaged upon the incubation of the electrode in PFOA, causing significant increase in charge (or electron) transfer (CT) resistance within DNA strands. Consequently, the cathodic coreactant ECL responses of the Au/dsDNA-QDs electrode in the presence of K2S2O8 were markedly decreased. The strong interaction between DNA and PFOA via the hydrophobic interaction, especially the formation of F···H hydrogen bonds by insertion of the difluoro-methylene group of PFOA into the DNA base pairs, was believed to be responsible for the dissociation or loosening of dsDNA structure, which inhibited the CT through DNA. A linear relationship between the ECL signal of the sensor and the logarithmical concentration of PFOA displayed a dynamic range of 1.00 × 10(-14)-1.00 × 10(-4) M, with a limit of detection of 1.00 × 10(-15) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Graphical Abstract Illustration of ECL detection of PFOA on a Au/dsDNA-QDs ECL-DNA sensor.

  1. Investigation of perfluorooctanoic acid induced DNA damage using electrogenerated chemiluminescence associated with charge transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Guo, Linqing; Li, Meng; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Miao, Wujian

    2016-10-01

    An electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL)-DNA sensor was designed and fabricated for the investigation of DNA damage by a potential environmental pollutant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). The ECL-DNA sensor consisted of a Au electrode that had a self-assembled monolayer of 15 base-pair double-stranded (ds) DNA oligonucleotides with covalently attached semiconductor CdSe quantum dots (QDs) at the distal end of the DNA. Characterization of the ECL-DNA sensor was conducted with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ECL, and cyclic voltammetry before and after the exposure of the sensor to PFOA. Consistent data revealed that the dsDNA on Au was severely damaged upon the incubation of the electrode in PFOA, causing significant increase in charge (or electron) transfer (CT) resistance within DNA strands. Consequently, the cathodic coreactant ECL responses of the Au/dsDNA-QDs electrode in the presence of K2S2O8 were markedly decreased. The strong interaction between DNA and PFOA via the hydrophobic interaction, especially the formation of F···H hydrogen bonds by insertion of the difluoro-methylene group of PFOA into the DNA base pairs, was believed to be responsible for the dissociation or loosening of dsDNA structure, which inhibited the CT through DNA. A linear relationship between the ECL signal of the sensor and the logarithmical concentration of PFOA displayed a dynamic range of 1.00 × 10(-14)-1.00 × 10(-4) M, with a limit of detection of 1.00 × 10(-15) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Graphical Abstract Illustration of ECL detection of PFOA on a Au/dsDNA-QDs ECL-DNA sensor. PMID:27108285

  2. Selection and Characterization of Single Stranded DNA Aptamers for the Hormone Abscisic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Victor M.; Millo, Enrico; Sturla, Laura; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Bagnasco, Luca; Guida, Lucrezia; D'Arrigo, Cristina; De Flora, Antonio; Salis, Annalisa; Martin, Elena M.; Bellotti, Marta; Zocchi, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a small molecule involved in pivotal physiological functions in higher plants. Recently, ABA has been also identified as an endogenous hormone in mammals, regulating different cell functions including inflammatory processes, stem cell expansion, insulin release, and glucose uptake. Aptamers are short, single-stranded (ss) oligonucleotidesable to recognize target molecules with high affinity. The small size of the ABA molecule represented a challenge for aptamer development and the aim of this study was to develop specific anti-ABA DNA aptamers. Biotinylated abscisic acid (bio-ABA) was immobilized on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. DNA aptamers against bio-ABA were selected with 7 iterative rounds of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment method (SELEX), each round comprising incubation of the ABA-binding beads with the ssDNA sequences, DNA elution, electrophoresis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The binding affinity of several clones was determined using bio-ABA immobilized on streptavidin-coated plates. Aptamer 2 and aptamer 9 showed the highest binding affinity, with dissociation constants values of 0.98±0.14 μM and 0.80±0.07 μM, respectively. Aptamers 2 and 9 were also able to bind free, unmodified ABA and to discriminate between different ABA enantiomers and isomers. Our findings indicate that ssDNA aptamers can selectively bind ABA and could be used for the development of ABA quantitation assays. PMID:23971905

  3. Linearisation of λDNA molecules by instantaneous variation of the trapping electrode voltage inside a micro-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Yukimoto, Naoya; Uehara, Satoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Because long DNA molecules usually exist in random coil states due to the entropic effect, linearisation is required for devices equipped with nanopores where electrical sequencing is necessary during single-file translocation. We present a novel technique for linearising DNA molecules in a micro-channel. In our device, electrodes are embedded in the bottom surface of the channel. The application of a voltage induces the trapping of λDNA molecules on the positive electrode. An instantaneous voltage drop is used to put the λDNA molecules in a partly released state and the hydrodynamic force of the solution induces linearisation. Phenomena were directly observed using an optical microscopy system equipped with a high-speed camera and the linearisation principle was explored in detail. Furthermore, we estimate the tensile characteristics produced by the flow of the solution through a numerical model of a tethered polymer subject to a Poiseuille flow. The mean tensile force is in the range of 0.1-1 pN. This is sufficiently smaller than the structural transition point of λDNA but counterbalances the entropic elasticity that causes the random coil shape of λDNA molecules in solution. We show the important role of thermal fluctuation in the manipulation of molecules in solution and clarify the tensile conditions required for DNA linearisation using a combination of solution flow and voltage variation in a microchannel.

  4. Increased Bending Rigidity of Single DNA Molecules by H-NS, a Temperature and Osmolarity Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Roee; Oppenheim, Amos B.; Stavans, Joel

    2003-01-01

    Histonelike nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) is an abundant prokaryotic protein participating in nucleoid structure, gene regulation, and silencing. It plays a key role in cell response to changes in temperature and osmolarity. Force-extension measurements of single, twist-relaxed λ-DNA-H-NS complexes show that these adopt more extended configurations compared to the naked DNA substrates. Crosslinking indicates that H-NS can decorate DNA molecules at one H-NS dimer per 15–20 bp. These results suggest that H-NS polymerizes along DNA, forming a complex of higher bending rigidity. These effects are not observed above 32°C or at high osmolarity, supporting the hypothesis that a direct H-NS-DNA interaction plays a key role in gene silencing. Thus, we propose that H-NS plays a unique structural role, different from that of HU and IHF, and functions as one of the environmental sensors of the cell. PMID:12668454

  5. The new generation drug candidate molecules: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding and anticancer activity properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gölcü, Ayşegül; Muslu, Harun; Kılıçaslan, Derya; Çeşme, Mustafa; Eren, Özge; Ataş, Fatma; Demirtaş, İbrahim

    2016-09-01

    The new generation drug candidate molecules [Cu(5-Fu)2Cl2H2O] (NGDCM1) and [Zn(5-Fu)2(CH3COO)2] (NGDCM2) were obtained from the reaction of copper(II) and zinc(II) salts with the anticancer drug 5-fluoracil (5-Fu). These compounds have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the compounds were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of the compounds have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the 5-Fu and metal derivatives with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. Thermal decomposition of the compounds lead to the formation of CuO and ZnO as final products. The effect of proliferation 5-Fu, NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 were examined on the HeLa cells using real-time cell analyzer with three different concentrations.

  6. DNA-encoded chemical libraries: advancing beyond conventional small-molecule libraries.

    PubMed

    Franzini, Raphael M; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2014-04-15

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries (DECLs) represent a promising tool in drug discovery. DECL technology allows the synthesis and screening of chemical libraries of unprecedented size at moderate costs. In analogy to phage-display technology, where large antibody libraries are displayed on the surface of filamentous phage and are genetically encoded in the phage genome, DECLs feature the display of individual small organic chemical moieties on DNA fragments serving as amplifiable identification barcodes. The DNA-tag facilitates the synthesis and allows the simultaneous screening of very large sets of compounds (up to billions of molecules), because the hit compounds can easily be identified and quantified by PCR-amplification of the DNA-barcode followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing. Several approaches have been used to generate DECLs, differing both in the methods used for library encoding and for the combinatorial assembly of chemical moieties. For example, DECLs can be used for fragment-based drug discovery, displaying a single molecule on DNA or two chemical moieties at the extremities of complementary DNA strands. DECLs can vary substantially in the chemical structures and the library size. While ultralarge libraries containing billions of compounds have been reported containing four or more sets of building blocks, also smaller libraries have been shown to be efficient for ligand discovery. In general, it has been found that the overall library size is a poor predictor for library performance and that the number and diversity of the building blocks are rather important indicators. Smaller libraries consisting of two to three sets of building blocks better fulfill the criteria of drug-likeness and often have higher quality. In this Account, we present advances in the DECL field from proof-of-principle studies to practical applications for drug discovery, both in industry and in academia. DECL technology can yield specific binders to a variety of target

  7. Site-specifically arraying small molecules or proteins on DNA using an expanded genetic alphabet

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Jörg; Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Dhami, Kirandeep; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Sun, Zhelin; Xiang, Jie; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a class of replicable unnatural DNA base pairs formed between d5SICS and either dMMO2, dDMO, or dNaM. To explore the use of these pairs to produce site-specifically labeled DNA, we report the synthesis of a variety of derivatives bearing propynyl groups, an analysis of their polymerase-mediated replication, and subsequent site-specific modification of the amplified DNA via Click chemistry. We find that with the d5SICS scaffold, a propynyl ether linker is accommodated better than its aliphatic analog, but not as well as the protected propargyl amine linker explored previously. We also find that with the dMMO2 and dDMO analogs, the dMMO2 position para to the glycosidic linkage is best suited for linker attachment, and that while aliphatic and ether-based linkers are similarly accommodated, the direct attachment of an ethynyl group to the nucleobase core is most well tolerated. To demonstrate the utility of these analogs, a variety of them are used to site-selectively attach a biotin tag to the amplified DNA. Finally, we use d5SICSCO-dNaM to couple one or two proteins to amplified DNA, with the double labeled product visualized by atomic force microscopy. The ability to encode the spatial relationships of arrayed molecules in PCR amplifiable DNA should have important applications, ranging from SELEX with functionalities not naturally present in DNA to the production, and perhaps “evolution” of nanomaterials. PMID:24026962

  8. Crowding Induces Complex Ergodic Diffusion and Dynamic Elongation of Large DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Cole D.; Gorczyca, Stephanie; Robertson-Anderson, Rae M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of molecular crowding in living cells, the effects of crowding on the dynamics of genome-sized DNA are poorly understood. Here, we track single, fluorescent-labeled large DNA molecules (11, 115 kbp) diffusing in dextran solutions that mimic intracellular crowding conditions (0–40%), and determine the effects of crowding on both DNA mobility and conformation. Both DNAs exhibit ergodic Brownian motion and comparable mobility reduction in all conditions; however, crowder size (10 vs. 500 kDa) plays a critical role in the underlying diffusive mechanisms and dependence on crowder concentration. Surprisingly, in 10-kDa dextran, crowder influence saturates at ∼20% with an ∼5× drop in DNA diffusion, in stark contrast to exponentially retarded mobility, coupled to weak anomalous subdiffusion, with increasing concentration of 500-kDa dextran. Both DNAs elongate into lower-entropy states (compared to random coil conformations) when crowded, with elongation states that are gamma distributed and fluctuate in time. However, the broadness of the distribution of states and the time-dependence and length scale of elongation length fluctuations depend on both DNA and crowder size with concentration having surprisingly little impact. Results collectively show that mobility reduction and coil elongation of large crowded DNAs are due to a complex interplay between entropic effects and crowder mobility. Although elongation and initial mobility retardation are driven by depletion interactions, subdiffusive dynamics, and the drastic exponential slowing of DNA, up to ∼300×, arise from the reduced mobility of larger crowders. Our results elucidate the highly important and widely debated effects of cellular crowding on genome-sized DNA. PMID:25762333

  9. Site-specifically arraying small molecules or proteins on DNA using an expanded genetic alphabet.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengtao; Lavergne, Thomas; Malyshev, Denis A; Zimmermann, Jörg; Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Dhami, Kirandeep; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Sun, Zhelin; Xiang, Jie; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2013-10-11

    A class of replicable unnatural DNA base pairs formed between d5SICS and either dMMO2, dDMO, or dNaM were developed. To explore the use of these pairs to produce site-specifically labeled DNA, the synthesis of a variety of derivatives bearing propynyl groups, an analysis of their polymerase-mediated replication, and subsequent site-specific modification of the amplified DNA by Click chemistry is reported. With the d5SICS scaffold a propynyl ether linker is accommodated better than its aliphatic analogue, but not as well as the protected propargyl amine linker explored previously. It was also found that with the dMMO2 and dDMO analogues, the dMMO2 position para to the glycosidic linkage is best suited for linker attachment and that although aliphatic and ether-based linkers are similarly accommodated, the direct attachment of an ethynyl group to the nucleobase core is most well tolerated. To demonstrate the utility of these analogues, a variety of them were used to site-selectively attach a biotin tag to the amplified DNA. Finally, we use d5SICS(CO) -dNaM to couple one or two proteins to amplified DNA, with the double labeled product visualized by atomic force microscopy. The ability to encode the spatial relationships of arrayed molecules in PCR amplifiable DNA should have important applications, ranging from SELEX with functionalities not naturally present in DNA to the production, and perhaps "evolution" of nanomaterials. PMID:24026962

  10. Site-specifically arraying small molecules or proteins on DNA using an expanded genetic alphabet.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengtao; Lavergne, Thomas; Malyshev, Denis A; Zimmermann, Jörg; Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Dhami, Kirandeep; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Sun, Zhelin; Xiang, Jie; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2013-10-11

    A class of replicable unnatural DNA base pairs formed between d5SICS and either dMMO2, dDMO, or dNaM were developed. To explore the use of these pairs to produce site-specifically labeled DNA, the synthesis of a variety of derivatives bearing propynyl groups, an analysis of their polymerase-mediated replication, and subsequent site-specific modification of the amplified DNA by Click chemistry is reported. With the d5SICS scaffold a propynyl ether linker is accommodated better than its aliphatic analogue, but not as well as the protected propargyl amine linker explored previously. It was also found that with the dMMO2 and dDMO analogues, the dMMO2 position para to the glycosidic linkage is best suited for linker attachment and that although aliphatic and ether-based linkers are similarly accommodated, the direct attachment of an ethynyl group to the nucleobase core is most well tolerated. To demonstrate the utility of these analogues, a variety of them were used to site-selectively attach a biotin tag to the amplified DNA. Finally, we use d5SICS(CO) -dNaM to couple one or two proteins to amplified DNA, with the double labeled product visualized by atomic force microscopy. The ability to encode the spatial relationships of arrayed molecules in PCR amplifiable DNA should have important applications, ranging from SELEX with functionalities not naturally present in DNA to the production, and perhaps "evolution" of nanomaterials.

  11. PEG-Labeled Nucleotides and Nanopore Detection for Single Molecule DNA Sequencing by Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shiv; Tao, Chuanjuan; Chien, Minchen; Hellner, Brittney; Balijepalli, Arvind; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Li, Zengmin; Russo, James J.; Reiner, Joseph E.; Kasianowicz, John J.; Ju, Jingyue

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel single molecule nanopore-based sequencing by synthesis (Nano-SBS) strategy that can accurately distinguish four bases by detecting 4 different sized tags released from 5′-phosphate-modified nucleotides. The basic principle is as follows. As each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing DNA strand during the polymerase reaction, its tag is released and enters a nanopore in release order. This produces a unique ionic current blockade signature due to the tag's distinct chemical structure, thereby determining DNA sequence electronically at single molecule level with single base resolution. As proof of principle, we attached four different length PEG-coumarin tags to the terminal phosphate of 2′-deoxyguanosine-5′-tetraphosphate. We demonstrate efficient, accurate incorporation of the nucleotide analogs during the polymerase reaction, and excellent discrimination among the four tags based on nanopore ionic currents. This approach coupled with polymerase attached to the nanopores in an array format should yield a single-molecule electronic Nano-SBS platform. PMID:23002425

  12. Nanopore arrays in a silicon membrane for parallel single-molecule detection: DNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Schmidt, Torsten; Jemt, Anders; Sahlén, Pelin; Sychugov, Ilya; Lundeberg, Joakim; Linnros, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Optical nanopore sensing offers great potential in single-molecule detection, genotyping, or DNA sequencing for high-throughput applications. However, one of the bottle-necks for fluorophore-based biomolecule sensing is the lack of an optically optimized membrane with a large array of nanopores, which has large pore-to-pore distance, small variation in pore size and low background photoluminescence (PL). Here, we demonstrate parallel detection of single-fluorophore-labeled DNA strands (450 bps) translocating through an array of silicon nanopores that fulfills the above-mentioned requirements for optical sensing. The nanopore array was fabricated using electron beam lithography and anisotropic etching followed by electrochemical etching resulting in pore diameters down to ∼7 nm. The DNA translocation measurements were performed in a conventional wide-field microscope tailored for effective background PL control. The individual nanopore diameter was found to have a substantial effect on the translocation velocity, where smaller openings slow the translocation enough for the event to be clearly detectable in the fluorescence. Our results demonstrate that a uniform silicon nanopore array combined with wide-field optical detection is a promising alternative with which to realize massively-parallel single-molecule detection. PMID:26180050

  13. Real-time detection of cruciform extrusion by single-molecule DNA nanomanipulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramreddy, T.; Sachidanandam, R.; Strick, T. R.

    2011-01-01

    During cruciform extrusion, a DNA inverted repeat unwinds and forms a four-way junction in which two of the branches consist of hairpin structures obtained by self-pairing of the inverted repeats. Here, we use single-molecule DNA nanomanipulation to monitor in real-time cruciform extrusion and rewinding. This allows us to determine the size of the cruciform to nearly base pair accuracy and its kinetics with second-scale time resolution. We present data obtained with two different inverted repeats, one perfect and one imperfect, and extend single-molecule force spectroscopy to measure the torque dependence of cruciform extrusion and rewinding kinetics. Using mutational analysis and a simple two-state model, we find that in the transition state intermediate only the B-DNA located between the inverted repeats (and corresponding to the unpaired apical loop) is unwound, implying that initial stabilization of the four-way (or Holliday) junction is rate-limiting. We thus find that cruciform extrusion is kinetically regulated by features of the hairpin loop, while rewinding is kinetically regulated by features of the stem. These results provide mechanistic insight into cruciform extrusion and help understand the structural features that determine the relative stability of the cruciform and B-form states. PMID:21266478

  14. Nanopore arrays in a silicon membrane for parallel single-molecule detection: DNA translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Miao; Schmidt, Torsten; Jemt, Anders; Sahlén, Pelin; Sychugov, Ilya; Lundeberg, Joakim; Linnros, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Optical nanopore sensing offers great potential in single-molecule detection, genotyping, or DNA sequencing for high-throughput applications. However, one of the bottle-necks for fluorophore-based biomolecule sensing is the lack of an optically optimized membrane with a large array of nanopores, which has large pore-to-pore distance, small variation in pore size and low background photoluminescence (PL). Here, we demonstrate parallel detection of single-fluorophore-labeled DNA strands (450 bps) translocating through an array of silicon nanopores that fulfills the above-mentioned requirements for optical sensing. The nanopore array was fabricated using electron beam lithography and anisotropic etching followed by electrochemical etching resulting in pore diameters down to ∼7 nm. The DNA translocation measurements were performed in a conventional wide-field microscope tailored for effective background PL control. The individual nanopore diameter was found to have a substantial effect on the translocation velocity, where smaller openings slow the translocation enough for the event to be clearly detectable in the fluorescence. Our results demonstrate that a uniform silicon nanopore array combined with wide-field optical detection is a promising alternative with which to realize massively-parallel single-molecule detection.

  15. Model and computer simulations of the motion of DNA molecules during pulse field gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.B.; Bustamante, C. ); Heller, C. )

    1991-05-28

    A model is presented for the motion of individual molecules of DNA undergoing pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The molecule is represented by a chain of charged beads connected by entropic springs, and the gel is represented by a segmented tube surrounding the beads. This model differs from earlier reptation/tube models in that the tube is allowed to leak in certain places and the chain can double over and flow out of the side of the tube in kinks. It is found that these kinks often lead to the formation of U shapes, which are a major source of retardation in PFGE. The results of computer simulations using this model are compared with real DNA experimental results for the following cases: steady field motion as seen in fluorescence microscopy, mobility in steady fields, mobility in transverse field alternation gel electrophoresis (TFAGE), mobility in field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE), and linear dichroism (LD) of DNA in agarose gels during PFGE. Good agreement between the simulations and the experimental results is obtained.

  16. A single-molecule view of conformational switching of DNA tethered to a gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Josephs, Eric A; Ye, Tao

    2012-06-20

    Surfaces that can actively regulate binding affinities or catalytic properties in response to external stimuli are a powerful means to probe and control the dynamic interactions between the cell and its microenvironment. Active surfaces also enable novel functionalities in biosensors and biomolecular separation technologies. Although electrical stimuli are often appealing due to their speed and localization, the operation of these electrically activated surfaces has mostly been characterized with techniques averaging over many molecules. Without a molecular-scale understanding of how biomolecules respond to electric fields, achieving the ultimate detection sensitivity or localized biological perturbation with the ultimate resolution would be difficult. Using electrochemical atomic force microscopy, we are able to follow the conformational changes of individual, short DNA molecules tethered to a gold electrode in response to an applied potential. Our study reveals conformations and dynamics that are difficult to infer from ensemble measurements: defects in the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) significantly perturb conformations and adsorption/desorption kinetics of surface-tethered DNA; on the other hand, the SAM may be actively molded by the DNA at different potentials. These results underscore the importance of characterizing the systems at the relevant length scale in the development of electrically switchable biofunctional surfaces. PMID:22625181

  17. Nucleic acid detection technologies and marker molecules in bacterial diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Ott; Glynn, Barry; Kurg, Ants

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing need for quick and reliable methods for microorganism detection and identification worldwide. Although traditional culture-based technologies are trustworthy and accurate at a relatively low cost, they are also time- and labor-consuming and are limited to culturable bacteria. Those weaknesses have created a necessity for alternative technologies that are capable for faster and more precise bacterial identification from medical, food or environmental samples. The most common current approach is to analyze the nucleic acid component of analyte solution and determine the bacterial composition according to the specific nucleic acid profiles that are present. This review aims to give an up-to-date overview of different nucleic acid target sequences and respective analytical technologies.

  18. Electrochemiluminescence detection of near single DNA molecules by using quantum dots-dendrimer nanocomposites for signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Divsar, Faten; Ju, Huangxian

    2011-09-21

    An ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescent biosensor was developed for detection of near single DNA molecules with a linear range of 7 orders of magnitude by combining the specific recognition of a molecular beacon with signal amplification of quantum dots-dendrimer nanocomposites.

  19. Intelligent DNA machine for the ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianguo; Qian, Jun; Li, Hongling; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Weiyu; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-15

    As DNA is employed to serve as a smart building block, an increasing interest has been devoted to the development of different DNA-based machines for the specific purpose, for example, the exploration of inter- or intramolecular interaction. In the current contribution, we developed an intelligent DNA machine and its operation can be designed to execute the ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of target nucleic acids. The DNA machine consists of a hairpin probe (HP) and an assistant template (AT). Using p53 gene as the target model to trigger the molecular machine operation, cyclic nucleic acid strand displacement polymerization (CNDP) was specifically induced, leading to the DNAzyme mediated catalytic reaction for signal readout. Specifically, with the help of polymerase and nickase, one target molecule was able to drive DNA nano-mechanical devices one-by-one through the hybridization/polymerization displacement cycles, and every initiated machine continued to operate, causing the dramatic accumulation of G-quadruplex-contained products. The G-quadruplex structure after binding to hemin could act as a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme and catalyzed the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) by H2O2. As a result, an enhanced color change could be detected because of the generation of oxidation product ABTS•(+). In this way, the DNA machine has no any signal loss and enables the quantitative measurement of p53 DNA with a detection limit of 10fM, indicating great promise for unique application in biomedical research and early clinical diagnosis.

  20. Single-molecule DNA hybridisation studied by using a modified DNA sequencer: a comparison with surface plasmon resonance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, Jens; Rehrauer, Hubert; Schauer, Stefan; Fischer, David; Patrignani, Andrea; Landgraf, Stephan; Korlach, Jonas; Schlapbach, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    Current methods for the determination of molecular interactions are widely used in the analytical sciences. To identify new methods, we investigated as a model system the hybridisation of a short 7 nt oligonucleotide labelled with, structurally, very similar cyanine dyes CY3 and DY-547, respectively, to a 34 nt oligonucleotide probe immobilised in a zero-mode waveguide (ZMW) nanostructure. Using a modified commercial off-the-shelf DNA sequencer, we established the principles to measure biomolecular interactions at the single-molecule level. Kinetic data were obtained from trains of fluorescence pulses, allowing the calculation of association and dissociation rate constants (k on, k off). For the 7mer labelled with the positively charged CY3 dye, k on and k off are ~3 larger and ~2 times smaller, respectively, compared with the oligonucleotide labelled with negatively charged DY-547 dye. The effect of neighbouring molecules lacking the 7nt binding sequence on single-molecule rate constants is small. The association rate constants is reduced by only 20–35%. Hybrid dissociation is not affected, since as a consequence of the experimental design, rebinding cannot take place. Results of single-molecule experiments were compared with data obtained from surface plasmon resonance (SPR) performed under comparable conditions. A good correlation for the association rate constants within a factor of 1.5 was found. Dissociation rate constants are smaller by a factor of 2–3 which we interpreted as a result of rebinding to neighbouring probes. Results of SPR measurements tend to systematically underestimate dissociation rate constants. The amount of this deviation depends on the association rate constant and the surface probe density. As a consequence, it is recommended to work at low probe densities to keep this effect small.

  1. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-01

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target.

  2. 2-Fatty acrylic acids: new highly derivatizable lipophilic platform molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the incorporation of an alpha-methylene unit into fatty acid skeletons. Since the new olefin is conjugated with the carboxylate, it is susceptible to 1,4- (Michael) additions. We have used multifunctional thiols and amines for additions at the methylene. The resulting products ...

  3. Electric Dipole Moments of Nanosolvated Acid Molecules in Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggemos, Nicholas; Slavíček, Petr; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-01-01

    The electric dipole moments of (H2O)nDCl (n =3 - 9 ) clusters have been measured by the beam-deflection method. Reflecting the (dynamical) charge distribution within the system, the dipole moment contributes information about the microscopic structure of nanoscale solvation. The addition of a DCl molecule to a water cluster results in a strongly enhanced susceptibility. There is evidence for a noticeable rise in the dipole moment occurring at n ≈5 - 6 . This size is consistent with predictions for the onset of ionic dissociation. Additionally, a molecular-dynamics model suggests that even with a nominally bound impurity an enhanced dipole moment can arise due to the thermal and zero-point motion of the proton and the water molecules. The experimental measurements and the calculations draw attention to the importance of fluctuations in defining the polarity of water-based nanoclusters and generally to the essential role played by motional effects in determining the response of fluxional nanoscale systems under realistic conditions.

  4. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, Part I: Gallic acid as model molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) and its derivatives are a group of biomolecules (polyphenols) obtained from plants. They have effects which are potentially beneficial to heath, for example they are antioxidant, anticarcinogenic and antibacterial, as recently investigated in many fields such as medicine, food and plant sciences. The main drawbacks of these molecules are both low stability and bioavailability. In this research work the opportunity to graft GA to bioactive glasses is investigated, in order to deliver the undamaged biological molecule into the body, using the biomaterial surfaces as a localized carrier. GA was considered for functionalization since it is a good model molecule for polyphenols and presents several interesting biological activities, like antibacterial, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. Two different silica based bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2), with different reactivity, were employed as substrates. UV photometry combined with the Folin&Ciocalteu reagent was adopted to test the concentration of GA in uptake solution after functionalization. This test verified how much GA consumption occurred with surface modification and it was also used on solid samples to test the presence of GA on functionalized glasses. XPS and SEM-EDS techniques were employed to characterize the modification of material surface properties and functional group composition before and after functionalization.

  5. Acid properties of solid acid catalysts characterized by solid-state 31P NMR of adsorbed phosphorous probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Huang, Shing-Jong; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2011-09-01

    A brief review is presented on acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts by means of solid-state phosphor-31 magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P MAS NMR) spectroscopy using phosphor-containing molecules as probes. It is emphasized that such a simple approach using (31)P MAS NMR of adsorbed phosphorous probe molecules, namely trimethylphosphine (TMP) and trialkylphosphine oxides (R(3)PO), represents a unique technique in providing detailed qualitative and quantitative features, viz. type, strength, distribution, and concentration of acid sites in solid acid catalysts. In particular, it will be shown that when applied with a proper choice of probe molecules with varied sizes and results obtained from elemental analysis, the amounts and locations (intracrystalline vs. extracrystalline) of different types (Brønsted vs. Lewis) of acid sites may be determined. In addition, by incorporating the NMR results with that obtained from theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations, correlations between the (31)P chemical shifts (δ(31)P) and acidic strengths of Brønsted and Lewis acid sites may also be derived, facilitating a suitable acidity scale for solid acid catalysts.

  6. Feasibility of Single Molecule DNA Sequencing using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, C E; Reboredo, F; Chan, J; Lane, S M

    2006-02-03

    We have used a combined theoretical and experimental approach in order to assess the feasibility of using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for DNA sequencing at the single molecule level. We have developed a numerical tool capable of calculating the E-field and resulting SERS enhancement factors for metallic structures of arbitrary size and shape. Measurements of the additional SERS enhancement by combining SERS with coherent antistokes Raman scattering (CARS) show that only modest increases in the signal are achievable due to thermal damage at higher laser powers. Finally, measurements of the SERS enhancement from nanoparticles coated with an insulating layer show that the SERS enhancement is decreased by as much as two orders of magnitude when the molecule is not in contact with the metal surface.

  7. Design, synthesis and selection of DNA-encoded small-molecule libraries.

    PubMed

    Clark, Matthew A; Acharya, Raksha A; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Benjamin, Dennis R; Carlson, Neil R; Centrella, Paolo A; Chiu, Cynthia H; Creaser, Steffen P; Cuozzo, John W; Davie, Christopher P; Ding, Yun; Franklin, G Joseph; Franzen, Kurt D; Gefter, Malcolm L; Hale, Steven P; Hansen, Nils J V; Israel, David I; Jiang, Jinwei; Kavarana, Malcolm J; Kelley, Michael S; Kollmann, Christopher S; Li, Fan; Lind, Kenneth; Mataruse, Sibongile; Medeiros, Patricia F; Messer, Jeffrey A; Myers, Paul; O'Keefe, Heather; Oliff, Matthew C; Rise, Cecil E; Satz, Alexander L; Skinner, Steven R; Svendsen, Jennifer L; Tang, Lujia; van Vloten, Kurt; Wagner, Richard W; Yao, Gang; Zhao, Baoguang; Morgan, Barry A

    2009-09-01

    Biochemical combinatorial techniques such as phage display, RNA display and oligonucleotide aptamers have proven to be reliable methods for generation of ligands to protein targets. Adapting these techniques to small synthetic molecules has been a long-sought goal. We report the synthesis and interrogation of an 800-million-member DNA-encoded library in which small molecules are covalently attached to an encoding oligonucleotide. The library was assembled by a combination of chemical and enzymatic synthesis, and interrogated by affinity selection. We describe methods for the selection and deconvolution of the chemical display library, and the discovery of inhibitors for two enzymes: Aurora A kinase and p38 MAP kinase. PMID:19648931

  8. Stardust and the Molecules of Life (Why are the Amino Acids Left-Handed?)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2010-04-02

    A mechanism for creating and selecting amino acid chirality is identified, and subsequent chemical replication and galactic mixing that would populate the galaxy with the predominant species will be described. This involves: (1) the spin of the {sup 14}N in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules from which amino acids might be formed, coupling to the chirality of the molecules; (2) the neutrinos emitted from the supernova, together with magnetic field from the nascent neutron star or black hole from the supernova selectively destroying one orientation of the {sup 14}N, thereby selecting the chirality associated with the other {sup 14}N orientation; (3) amplification by chemical evolution, by which the molecules replicate on a relatively short timescale; and (4) galactic mixing on a longer timescale mixing the selected molecules throughout the galaxy.

  9. Visualization of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair at the Single-Molecule Level

    SciTech Connect

    Dynan, William S.; Li, Shuyi; Mernaugh, Raymond; Wragg, Stephanie; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2003-03-27

    Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is universal. The signature injury from ionizing radiation exposure is induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The first line of defense against DSBs is direct ligation of broken DNA ends via the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Because even a relatively high environmental exposure induces only a few DSBs per cell, our current understanding of the response to this exposure is limited by the ability to measure DSB repair events reliably in situ at a single-molecule level. To address this need, we have taken advantage of biological amplification, measuring relocalization of proteins and detection of protein phosphorylation as a surrogate for detection of broken ends themselves. We describe the use of specific antibodies to investigate the kinetics and mechanism of repair of very small numbers of DSBs in human cells by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway.

  10. Single-molecule microscopy reveals new insights into nucleotide selection by DNA polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Radoslaw P.; Vrtis, Kyle B.; Rueda, David; Romano, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism by which DNA polymerases achieve their extraordinary accuracy has been intensely studied because of the linkage between this process and mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Here, we have used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to study the process of nucleotide selection and exonuclease action. Our results show that the binding of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) to a primer-template is stabilized by the presence of the next correct dNTP, even in the presence of a large excess of the other dNTPs and rNTPs. These results are consistent with a model where nucleotide selection occurs in the open complex prior to the formation of a closed ternary complex. Our assay can also distinguish between primer binding to the polymerase or exonuclease domain and, contrary to ensemble-averaged studies, we find that stable exonuclease binding only occurs with a mismatched primer terminus. PMID:22669904

  11. The Effects of Geometry and Stability of Solid-state Nanopores on Detecting Single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Rollings, Ryan; Graef, Edward; Walsh, Nathan; Nandivada, Santoshi; Benamara, Mourad

    2014-01-01

    In this work we use a combination of 3D-TEM tomography, energy filtered TEM, single molecule DNA translocation experiments, and numerical modeling to show a more precise relationship between nanopore shape and ionic conductance and show that changes in geometry while in solution can account for most deviations between predicted and measured conductance. We compare the structural stability of Ion Beam Sculpted (IBS), IBS-annealed, and TEM drilled nanopores. We demonstrate that annealing can significantly improve the stability of IBS made pores. Furthermore, the methods developed in this work can be used to predict pore conductance and current drop amplitudes of DNA translocation events for a wide variety of pore geometries. We discuss that chemical dissolution is one mechanism of the geometry change for SiNx nanopores and show that small modification in fabrication procedure can significantly increase the stability of IBS nanopores. PMID:25556317

  12. Adsorption of monomers on microspherical structures of thermal heterocomplex molecules from amino ACIDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Hajime; Sakurazawa, Shigeru; Dekikimura, H.; Imai, Eiichi; Matsuno, Koichiro

    1995-10-01

    The surface of a microspherical structure formed in the aqueous suspension of thermal heterocomplex molecules made by heating aspartic acid and proline can adsorb basic amino acids such as histidine, lysine and arginine. It can also adsorb adenine, cytosine, adenosine and cytidine. Electrostatic interactions acting between those monomers to be adsorbed and the adsorbing surface are responsible for the adsorption.

  13. Dissociative attachment reactions of electrons with strong acid molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.; Viggiano, A.A.; Paulson, J.F.; Henchman, M.J.

    1986-06-15

    Using the flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, we have determined (at variously 300 and 570 K) the dissociative attachment coefficients ..beta.. for the reactions of electrons with the common acids HNO/sub 3/ (producing NO/sup -//sub 2/) and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (HSO/sup -//sub 4/), the superacids FSO/sub 3/H (FSO/sup -//sub 3/), CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/H (CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/), ClSO/sub 3/H (ClSO/sup -//sub 3/,Cl/sup -/), the acid anhydride (CF/sub 3/SO/sub 2/)/sub 2/O (CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/), and the halogen halides HBr (Br/sup -/) and HI (I/sup -/). The anions formed in the reactions are those given in the parentheses. The reactions with HF and HCl were investigated, but did not occur at a measurable rate since they are very endothermic. Dissociative attachment is rapid for the common acids, the superacids, and the anhydride, the measured ..beta.. being appreciable fractions of the theoretical maximum ..beta.. for such reactions, ..beta../sub max/. The HI reaction is very fast ( ..beta..approx...beta../sub max/) but the HBr reaction occurs much more slowly because it is significantly endothermic. The data indicate that the extreme acidity of the (Bronsted-type) superacids has its equivalence in the very efficient gas-phase dissociative attachment which these species undergo when reacting with free electrons. The anions of the superacids generated in these reactions, notably FSO/sup -//sub 3/ and CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/, are very stable (unreactive) implying exceptionally large electron affinities for the FSO/sub 3/ and CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/ radicals.

  14. Development of a reference material of a single DNA molecule for the quality control of PCR testing.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Hatano, Shuko; Futo, Satoshi; Yoshii, Junji; Nakae, Hiroki; Naito, Shigehiro; Takabatake, Reona; Kitta, Kazumi

    2014-09-01

    We developed a reference material of a single DNA molecule with a specific nucleotide sequence. The double-strand linear DNA which has PCR target sequences at the both ends was prepared as a reference DNA molecule, and we named the PCR targets on each side as confirmation sequence and standard sequence. The highly diluted solution of the reference molecule was dispensed into 96 wells of a plastic PCR plate to make the average number of molecules in a well below one. Subsequently, the presence or absence of the reference molecule in each well was checked by real-time PCR targeting for the confirmation sequence. After an enzymatic treatment of the reaction mixture in the positive wells for the digestion of PCR products, the resultant solution was used as the reference material of a single DNA molecule with the standard sequence. PCR analyses revealed that the prepared samples included only one reference molecule with high probability. The single-molecule reference material developed in this study will be useful for the absolute evaluation of a detection limit of PCR-based testing methods, the quality control of PCR analyses, performance evaluations of PCR reagents and instruments, and the preparation of an accurate calibration curve for real-time PCR quantitation.

  15. Development of a reference material of a single DNA molecule for the quality control of PCR testing.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Hatano, Shuko; Futo, Satoshi; Yoshii, Junji; Nakae, Hiroki; Naito, Shigehiro; Takabatake, Reona; Kitta, Kazumi

    2014-09-01

    We developed a reference material of a single DNA molecule with a specific nucleotide sequence. The double-strand linear DNA which has PCR target sequences at the both ends was prepared as a reference DNA molecule, and we named the PCR targets on each side as confirmation sequence and standard sequence. The highly diluted solution of the reference molecule was dispensed into 96 wells of a plastic PCR plate to make the average number of molecules in a well below one. Subsequently, the presence or absence of the reference molecule in each well was checked by real-time PCR targeting for the confirmation sequence. After an enzymatic treatment of the reaction mixture in the positive wells for the digestion of PCR products, the resultant solution was used as the reference material of a single DNA molecule with the standard sequence. PCR analyses revealed that the prepared samples included only one reference molecule with high probability. The single-molecule reference material developed in this study will be useful for the absolute evaluation of a detection limit of PCR-based testing methods, the quality control of PCR analyses, performance evaluations of PCR reagents and instruments, and the preparation of an accurate calibration curve for real-time PCR quantitation. PMID:25061686

  16. Lateral migration and focusing of colloidal particles and DNA molecules under viscoelastic flow.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Young; Ahn, Sung Won; Lee, Sung Sik; Kim, Ju Min

    2012-08-21

    Much difficulty has been encountered in manipulating small-scale materials, such as submicron colloidal particles and macromolecules (e.g., DNA and proteins), in microfluidic devices since diffusion processes due to thermal (Brownian) motion become more pronounced with decreasing particle size. Here, we present a novel approach for the continuous focusing of such small-scale materials. First, we successfully focused fluorescent submicron polystyrene (PS) beads along equilibrium positions in microchannels through the addition of a small amount water-soluble polymer [500 ppm poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)]. Lateral migration velocity significantly depends upon the viscoelastic effect (Weissenberg number: Wi) and the aspect ratio of particle size to channel height (a/h). Interestingly, focusing using viscoelastic flows was also observed for flexible DNA molecules (λ-DNA and T4-DNA), which have radii of gyration (R(g)) of approximately 0.69 μm and 1.5 μm, respectively. This small-scale material manipulation using medium viscoelasticity will contribute to the design of nanoparticle separation and genomic mapping devices.

  17. Unraveling the complexity of the interactions of DNA nucleotides with gold by single molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bano, Fouzia; Sluysmans, Damien; Wislez, Arnaud; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2015-12-14

    Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct adsorption behavior of the deoxyribonucleotides (i.e., a nitrogenous base, a deoxyribose sugar, and a phosphate group) and on the factors that govern the DNA-gold bond strength. Here, using single molecule force spectroscopy, we investigated the interaction of the four individual nucleotides, adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, with gold. Experiments were performed in three salinity conditions and two surface dwell times to reveal the factors that influence nucleotide-Au bond strength. Force data show that, at physiological ionic strength, adenine-Au interactions are stronger, asymmetrical and independent of surface dwell time as compared to cytosine-Au and guanine-Au interactions. We suggest that in these conditions only adenine is able to chemisorb on gold. A decrease of the ionic strength significantly increases the bond strength for all nucleotides. We show that moderate ionic strength along with longer surface dwell period suggest weak chemisorption also for cytosine and guanine.

  18. Single molecule photobleaching (SMPB) technology for counting of RNA, DNA, protein and other molecules in nanoparticles and biological complexes by TIRF instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Guo, Peixuan

    2014-05-15

    Direct counting of biomolecules within biological complexes or nanomachines is demanding. Single molecule counting using optical microscopy is challenging due to the diffraction limit. The single molecule photobleaching (SMPB) technology for direct counting developed by our team (Shu et al., 2007 [18]; Zhang et al., 2007 [19]) offers a simple and straightforward method to determine the stoichiometry of molecules or subunits within biocomplexes or nanomachines at nanometer scales. Stoichiometry is determined by real-time observation of the number of descending steps resulted from the photobleaching of individual fluorophore. This technology has now been used extensively for single molecule counting of protein, RNA, and other macromolecules in a variety of complexes or nanostructures. Here, we elucidate the SMPB technology, using the counting of RNA molecules within a bacteriophage phi29 DNA-packaging biomotor as an example. The method described here can be applied to the single molecule counting of other molecules in other systems. The construction of a concise, simple and economical single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope combining prism-type and objective-type TIRF is described. The imaging system contains a deep-cooled sensitive EMCCD camera with single fluorophore detection sensitivity, a laser combiner for simultaneous dual-color excitation, and a Dual-View™ imager to split the multiple outcome signals to different detector channels based on their wavelengths. Methodology of the single molecule photobleaching assay used to elucidate the stoichiometry of RNA on phi29 DNA packaging motor and the mechanism of protein/RNA interaction are described. Different methods for single fluorophore labeling of RNA molecules are reviewed. The process of statistical modeling to reveal the true copy number of the biomolecules based on binomial distribution is also described.

  19. Analysis of single nucleic acid molecules in micro- and nano-fluidics.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Sarah M; Zec, Helena C; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2016-03-01

    Nucleic acid analysis has enhanced our understanding of biological processes and disease progression, elucidated the association of genetic variants and disease, and led to the design and implementation of new treatment strategies. These diverse applications require analysis of a variety of characteristics of nucleic acid molecules: size or length, detection or quantification of specific sequences, mapping of the general sequence structure, full sequence identification, analysis of epigenetic modifications, and observation of interactions between nucleic acids and other biomolecules. Strategies that can detect rare or transient species, characterize population distributions, and analyze small sample volumes enable the collection of richer data from biosamples. Platforms that integrate micro- and nano-fluidic operations with high sensitivity single molecule detection facilitate manipulation and detection of individual nucleic acid molecules. In this review, we will highlight important milestones and recent advances in single molecule nucleic acid analysis in micro- and nano-fluidic platforms. We focus on assessment modalities for single nucleic acid molecules and highlight the role of micro- and nano-structures and fluidic manipulation. We will also briefly discuss future directions and the current limitations and obstacles impeding even faster progress toward these goals.

  20. Activation of Carbonyl-Containing Molecules with Solid Lewis Acids in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Leshkov, Yuriy; Davis, Mark E.

    2011-09-28

    Current interest in reacting carbonyl-containing molecules in aqueous media is primarily due to the growing emphasis on conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Recently, solid Lewis acids have been shown to perform catalytic reactions with carbonyl-containing molecules such as sugars in aqueous media. Here, catalysis mediated by Lewis acids is briefly discussed, Lewis acid solids that perform catalysis in aqueous media are then described, and the review is concluded with a few comments on the outlook for the future.

  1. DNA/polyethyleneimine/hyaluronic acid small complex particles and tumor suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The highest barriers for non-viral vectors to an efficient in vivo gene transfection would be (1) non-specific interaction with biological molecules, and (2) large size of the DNA complex particles. Protective coating of the DNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes by hyaluronic acid (HA) effectively diminished the adverse interactions with biological molecules. Here we found HA also protected the DNA/PEI complexes against aggregation and inactivation through lyophilization-and-rehydration procedures. It allows us to prepare the concentrated very small DNA complex particles (<70 nm) suspension by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by lyophilized-and-rehydrated to a small volume. In vivo gene expression efficiency of the small complex was examined with mice subcutaneously inoculated with B16 melanoma cells. These formulations showed high reporter-gene expression level in tumor after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. Small complex was then made of the plasmid encoding GM-CSF gene, and injected into the mice bearing subcutaneous solid B16 tumor. After intravenous injection, it induced apparent tumor growth suppression in 50% of the mice. Notably, significant therapeutic effect was detected in the mice that received intratumoral injection, and 75% of the mice were completely cured with disappearance of tumor. PMID:20047759

  2. Translation of DNA into a Library of 13,000 Synthetic Small-Molecule Macrocycles Suitable for In Vitro Selection

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Brian N.; Snyder, Thomas M.; Shen, Yinghua; Liu, David R.

    2009-01-01

    DNA-templated organic synthesis enables the translation, selection, and amplification of DNA sequences encoding synthetic small-molecule libraries. Previously we described the DNA-templated multistep synthesis and model in vitro selection of a pilot library of 65 macrocycles. In this work we report several key developments that enable the DNA-templated synthesis of much larger (> 10,000-membered) small-molecule libraries. We developed and validated a capping-based approach to DNA-templated library synthesis that increases final product yields, simplifies the structure and preparation of reagents, and reduces the number of required manipulations. To expand the size and structural diversity of the macrocycle library, we augmented the number of building blocks in each DNA-templated step from four to 12, selected eight different starting scaffolds which result in four macrocycle ring sizes and two building-block orientations, and confirmed the ability of the 36 building blocks and eight scaffolds to generate DNA-templated macrocycle products. We computationally generated and experimentally validated an expanded set of codons sufficient to support 1,728 combinations of step 1, step 2, and step 3 building blocks. Finally, we developed new high-resolution LC/MS analysis methods to assess the quality of large DNA-templated small-molecule libraries. Integrating these four developments, we executed the translation of 13,824 DNA templates into their corresponding small-molecule macrocycles. Analysis of the resulting libraries is consistent with excellent (> 90%) representation of desired macrocycle products and a stringent test of sequence specificity suggests a high degree of sequence fidelity during translation. The quality and structural diversity of this expanded DNA-templated library provides a rich starting point for the discovery of functional synthetic small-molecule macrocycles. PMID:18956864

  3. Possibilities of molecule-based spintoronics of DNA wires, sheets, and related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Takashi; Taniguchi, Takeshi; Hamamoto, Tomohiro; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    Our theoretical efforts toward molecule-based magnetic conductors and superconductors on the basis of ab initio Hamiltonians and effective model Hamiltonians are summarized in relation to recently developed DNA-based molecular materials. Guanine and adenine derivatives coupling with organic radicals (R) are investigated as possible π-R components. To elucidate electronic and magnetic properties of these species, effective exchange integrals (Jab) for magnetic clusters are calculated by ab initio hybrid density functional (HDFT) methods. The ab initio Jab values are numerically reproduced by using model Hamiltonians such as the t-J, Kondo, Anderson, and RKKY models. The theoretical possibilities of organic magnetic conductors are elucidated on the basis of these models for self-assembled DNA wires, sheets, and related materials. The use of these materials for nanoscale molecular electronic devices is also elucidated theoretically in relation to an important role of electron-electron repulsion effect for quantum electron transport, together with the electron-exchange interaction in the Kondo effect. The implications of the calculated results are finally discussed to obtain a unified picture of many p-d, π-d, and π-R molecule-based systems with strong electron correlations.

  4. Stepwise growth of surface-grafted DNA nanotubes visualized at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Amani A; Hamblin, Graham D; Gidi, Yasser; Sleiman, Hanadi F; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2015-04-01

    DNA nanotubes offer a high aspect ratio and rigidity, attractive attributes for the controlled assembly of hierarchically complex linear arrays. It is highly desirable to control the positioning of rungs along the backbone of the nanotubes, minimize the polydispersity in their manufacture and reduce the building costs. We report here a solid-phase synthesis methodology in which, through a cyclic scheme starting from a 'foundation rung' specifically bound to the surface, distinct rungs can be incorporated in a predetermined manner. Each rung is orthogonally addressable. Using fluorescently tagged rungs, single-molecule fluorescence studies demonstrated the robustness and structural fidelity of the constructs and confirmed the incorporation of the rungs in quantitative yield (>95%) at each step of the cycle. Prototype structures that consisted of up to 20 repeat units, about 450 nm in contour length, were constructed. Combined, the solid-phase synthesis strategy described and its visualization through single-molecule spectroscopy show good promise for the production of custom-made DNA nanotubes. PMID:25803467

  5. Stepwise growth of surface-grafted DNA nanotubes visualized at the single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Amani A.; Hamblin, Graham D.; Gidi, Yasser; Sleiman, Hanadi F.; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2015-04-01

    DNA nanotubes offer a high aspect ratio and rigidity, attractive attributes for the controlled assembly of hierarchically complex linear arrays. It is highly desirable to control the positioning of rungs along the backbone of the nanotubes, minimize the polydispersity in their manufacture and reduce the building costs. We report here a solid-phase synthesis methodology in which, through a cyclic scheme starting from a ‘foundation rung’ specifically bound to the surface, distinct rungs can be incorporated in a predetermined manner. Each rung is orthogonally addressable. Using fluorescently tagged rungs, single-molecule fluorescence studies demonstrated the robustness and structural fidelity of the constructs and confirmed the incorporation of the rungs in quantitative yield (>95%) at each step of the cycle. Prototype structures that consisted of up to 20 repeat units, about 450 nm in contour length, were constructed. Combined, the solid-phase synthesis strategy described and its visualization through single-molecule spectroscopy show good promise for the production of custom-made DNA nanotubes.

  6. A candidate reference method for quantification of low concentrations of plasmid DNA by exhaustive counting of single DNA molecules in a flow stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hee-Bong; Oh, Donggeun; Song, Jae Yong; Kawaharasaki, Mamoru; Hwang, Jeeseong; Yang, In Chul; Park, Sang-Ryoul

    2014-10-01

    This work demonstrates accurate measurement of the amount of substance concentration of low concentration plasmid DNA by counting individual DNA molecules using a high-sensitivity flow cytometric setup. Plasmid DNA is a widely used form of DNA, and its quantity often needs to be accurately determined. This work establishes a reference analytical method for direct quantification of low concentration plasmid DNA prepared as reference standards for polymerase chain reaction-based DNA quantification. The model plasmid DNA pBR322 (4361 bp) was stained with a fluorescent dye and was detected in a flow stream in a micro-fluidic channel with laser-induced fluorescence detection, for which the DNA flow was electro-hydrodynamically focused at the centre of the channel. 200 to 8000 DNA molecules in a ˜1 µL sample volume were counted within 2 min in an ‘exhaustive counting’ manner, which facilitated quantitation without calibration. The sample volume was measured and validated from the close agreement of the results of two independent measurement methods, gravimetric determination of water filling the capillary and graphical estimation of actual cross sectional area of the capillary tubing with the image of calibrated scanning electron microscopy. Within the given concentration range, an excellent measurement linearity (R2 = 0.999) was achieved with appropriate data processing for the correction of the events of double molecules (detection of double molecules opposed to single molecule detection assumed, which occurs due to their coincidental passing of the detection zone). The validity of the proposed method was confirmed from the close agreement with the results of quantitation of enzymatically released nucleotides using capillary electrophoresis.

  7. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2015-01-01

    Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE) proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) (CRISPR/Cas) system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing. PMID:26404236

  8. Fabrication of a new substrate for atomic force microscopic observation of DNA molecules from an ultrasmooth sapphire plate.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K; Yoshimoto, M; Sasaki, K; Ohnishi, T; Ushiki, T; Hitomi, J; Yamamoto, S; Sigeno, M

    1998-01-01

    A new stable substrate applicable to the observation of DNA molecules by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was fabricated from a ultrasmooth sapphire (alpha-Al2O3 single crystal) plate. The atomically ultrasmooth sapphire as obtained by high-temperature annealing has hydrophobic surfaces and could not be used for the AFM observation of DNA. However, sapphire treated with Na3PO4 aqueous solution exhibited a hydrophilic character while maintaining a smooth surface structure. The surface of the wet-treated sapphire was found by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and AFM to be approximately 0.3 nm. The hydrophilic surface character of the ultrasmooth sapphire plate made it easy for DNA molecules to adhere to the plate. Circular molecules of the plasmid DNA could be imaged by AFM on the hydrophilic ultrasmooth sapphire plate. PMID:9545030

  9. Label-free potentiometry for detecting DNA hybridization using peptide nucleic acid and DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-02-07

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  10. DNA Tetrominoes: The Construction of DNA Nanostructures Using Self-Organised Heterogeneous Deoxyribonucleic Acids Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hui San; Rahim, Mohd Syafiq; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan

    2015-01-01

    The unique programmability of nucleic acids offers alternative in constructing excitable and functional nanostructures. This work introduces an autonomous protocol to construct DNA Tetris shapes (L-Shape, B-Shape, T-Shape and I-Shape) using modular DNA blocks. The protocol exploits the rich number of sequence combinations available from the nucleic acid alphabets, thus allowing for diversity to be applied in designing various DNA nanostructures. Instead of a deterministic set of sequences corresponding to a particular design, the protocol promotes a large pool of DNA shapes that can assemble to conform to any desired structures. By utilising evolutionary programming in the design stage, DNA blocks are subjected to processes such as sequence insertion, deletion and base shifting in order to enrich the diversity of the resulting shapes based on a set of cascading filters. The optimisation algorithm allows mutation to be exerted indefinitely on the candidate sequences until these sequences complied with all the four fitness criteria. Generated candidates from the protocol are in agreement with the filter cascades and thermodynamic simulation. Further validation using gel electrophoresis indicated the formation of the designed shapes. Thus, supporting the plausibility of constructing DNA nanostructures in a more hierarchical, modular, and interchangeable manner. PMID:26258940

  11. Acidity characterization of heterogeneous catalysts by solid-state NMR spectroscopy using probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the surface acidic properties of solid acid catalysts is a key issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Important acid features of solid acids, such as their type (Brønsted vs. Lewis acid), distribution and accessibility (internal vs. external sites), concentration (amount), and strength of acid sites are crucial factors dictating their reactivity and selectivity. This short review provides information on different solid-state NMR techniques used for acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts. In particular, different approaches using probe molecules containing a specific nucleus of interest, such as pyridine-d5, 2-(13)C-acetone, trimethylphosphine, and trimethylphosphine oxide, are compared. Incorporation of valuable information (such as the adsorption structure, deprotonation energy, and NMR parameters) from density functional theory (DFT) calculations can yield explicit correlations between the chemical shift of adsorbed probe molecules and the intrinsic acid strength of solid acids. Methods that combine experimental NMR data with DFT calculations can therefore provide both qualitative and quantitative information on acid sites.

  12. Single-molecule pull-down for investigating protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Fareh, Mohamed; Loeff, Luuk; Szczepaniak, Malwina; Haagsma, Anna C; Yeom, Kyu-Hyeon; Joo, Chirlmin

    2016-08-01

    The genome and transcriptome are constantly modified by proteins in the cell. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques allow for high spatial and temporal observations of these interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. However, due to the difficulty of obtaining functional protein complexes, it remains challenging to study the interactions between macromolecular protein complexes and nucleic acids. Here, we combined single-molecule fluorescence with various protein complex pull-down techniques to determine the function and stoichiometry of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Through the use of three examples of protein complexes from eukaryotic cells (Drosha, Dicer, and TUT4 protein complexes), we provide step-by-step guidance for using novel single-molecule techniques. Our single-molecule methods provide sub-second and nanometer resolution and can be applied to other nucleoprotein complexes that are essential for cellular processes. PMID:27017911

  13. Unraveling the complexity of the interactions of DNA nucleotides with gold by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bano, Fouzia; Sluysmans, Damien; Wislez, Arnaud; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2015-11-01

    Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct adsorption behavior of the deoxyribonucleotides (i.e., a nitrogenous base, a deoxyribose sugar, and a phosphate group) and on the factors that govern the DNA-gold bond strength. Here, using single molecule force spectroscopy, we investigated the interaction of the four individual nucleotides, adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, with gold. Experiments were performed in three salinity conditions and two surface dwell times to reveal the factors that influence nucleotide-Au bond strength. Force data show that, at physiological ionic strength, adenine-Au interactions are stronger, asymmetrical and independent of surface dwell time as compared to cytosine-Au and guanine-Au interactions. We suggest that in these conditions only adenine is able to chemisorb on gold. A decrease of the ionic strength significantly increases the bond strength for all nucleotides. We show that moderate ionic strength along with longer surface dwell period suggest weak chemisorption also for cytosine and guanine.Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct

  14. Reconstructing multiple free energy pathways of DNA stretching from single molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Frey, Eric W; Li, Jingqiang; Wijeratne, Sithara S; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2015-04-23

    Free energy landscapes provide information on the dynamics of proteins and nucleic acid folding. It has been demonstrated that such landscapes can be reconstructed from single molecule force measurement data using Jarzynski's equality, which requires only stretching data. However, when the process is reversible, the Crooks fluctuation theorem combines both stretch and relaxation force data for the analysis and can offer more rapid convergence of free energy estimates of different states. Here we demonstrate that, similar to Jarzynski's equality, the Crooks fluctuation theorem can be used to reconstruct the full free energy landscapes. In addition, when the free energy landscapes exhibit multiple folding pathways, one can use Jarzynski's equality to reconstruct individual free energy pathways if the experimental data show distinct work distributions. We applied the method to reconstruct the overstretching transition of poly(dA) to demonstrate that the nonequilibrium work theorem combined with single molecule force measurements provides a clear picture of the free energy landscapes.

  15. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  16. The Interaction of Photon Beams with the DNA Molecules: Genomic Medical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2009-03-01

    I propose a novel method for the modification of the corrupted human DNAootnotetextJ.D. Watson and F. H. C. Crick, Nature, 171, 737-738 (1953). code that causes particular genetic disease. The method is based on the nonlinear interaction between the DNA molecule and the ``modulation photons'' generated in beat wave driven free electron laser, BW-FEL.ootnotetextV. Alexander Stefan. Beat Wave Driven Free Electron Laser (S-U-Press, 2002, La Jolla, CA)[cf. V. Stefan, et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 32, No. 9, 1713 (1987)] The BW-FEL frequency is given by ν˜γ^2nφe (γ is the free electron beam relativistic factor, n is the harmonic number of the electron Bernstein plasma mode, and φe is the electron cyclotron frequency). The meV ``carrier photons'' are focused on the area of the brain, the source-center of a genetic disease. For the BW-FEL parameters: the free electron beam guiding d.c. magnetic field ˜ 1kG, γ˜10^3, and n=10, the keV ``modulation photons'' are generated, which are easily focused on the nucleotides. By modulating the frequency of the BW-FEL, the parametric resonance with the different DNA (sub-DNA) eigen molecular oscillation-modes are achieved, leading to the ``knock-on'' of the unwanted (corrupted) nucleotides.

  17. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics. PMID:27566686

  18. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-08-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics.

  19. Separation of large DNA molecules by size exclusion chromatography-based microchip with on-chip concentration structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Naoki; Itoh, Shintaro; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Zhang, Hedong

    2016-06-01

    The separation of DNA molecules according to their size represents a fundamental bioanalytical procedure. Here, we report the development of a chip-sized device, consisting of micrometer-sized fence structures fabricated in a microchannel, for the separation of large DNA molecules (over 10 kbp) based on the principle of size exclusion chromatography (SEC). In order to achieve separation, two approaches were utilized: first, the DNA samples were concentrated immediately prior to separation using nanoslit structures, with the aim of improving the resolution. Second, a theoretical model of SEC-based separation was established and applied in order to predict the optimal voltage range for separation. In this study, we achieved separation of λ DNA (48.5 kbp) and T4 DNA (166 kbp) using the present SEC-based microchip.

  20. Flexibility of nucleic acids: From DNA to RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bao; Xi, Zhang; Lei, Jin; Zhi-Jie, Tan

    2016-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB933600), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175132, 11575128, and 11374234), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents, China (Grant No. NCET 08-0408).

  1. Single DNA molecules on freestanding and supported cationic lipid bilayers: diverse conformational dynamics controlled by the local bilayer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Christoph; Schwille, Petra; Petrov, Eugene P.

    2016-02-01

    We present experimental results on the interaction of DNA macromolecules with cationic lipid membranes with different properties, including freestanding membranes in the fluid and gel state, and supported lipid membranes in the fluid state and under conditions of fluid-gel phase coexistence. We observe diverse conformational dynamics of membrane-bound DNA molecules controlled by the local properties of the lipid bilayer. In case of fluid-state freestanding lipid membranes, the behaviour of DNA on the membrane is controlled by the membrane charge density: whereas DNA bound to weakly charged membranes predominantly behaves as a 2D random coil, an increase in the membrane charge density leads to membrane-driven irreversible DNA collapse and formation of subresolution-sized DNA globules. On the other hand, electrostatic binding of DNA macromolecules to gel-state freestanding membranes leads to completely arrested diffusion and conformational dynamics of membrane-adsorbed DNA. A drastically different picture is observed in case of DNA interaction with supported cationic lipid bilayers: When the supported bilayer is in the fluid state, membrane-bound DNA molecules undergo 2D translational Brownian motion and conformational fluctuations, irrespectively of the charge density of the supported bilayer. At the same time, when the supported cationic membrane shows fluid-gel phase coexistence, membrane-bound DNA molecules are strongly attracted to micrometre-sized gel-phase domains enriched with the cationic lipid, which results in 2D compaction of the membrane-bound macromolecules. This DNA compaction, however, is fully reversible, and disappears as soon as the membrane is heated above the fluid-gel coexistence. We also discuss possible biological implications of our experimental findings.

  2. Associations between Serum Perfluoroalkyl Acids and LINE-1 DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Deborah J.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Butler, Rondi A.; Bartell, Scott M.; Fletcher, Tony; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are persistent, synthetic compounds that are used in a number of consumer products. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been associated with cardiovascular risk factors, and changes in gene expression and DNA methylation in animals and cellular systems. However, whether PFAA exposure is associated with LINE-1 DNA methylation, a potential marker of cardiovascular risk, in humans remains unknown. We sought to evaluate the cross-sectional associations between serum PFAAs and LINE-1 DNA methylation in a population highly exposed to PFOA. We measured serum PFAAs twice four to five years apart in 685 adult participants (47% male, mean age ± SD=42 ± 11 years). We measured percent LINE-1 DNA methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes at the second time point (follow-up), and estimated absolute differences in LINE-1 methylation associated with an interquartile (IQR) shift in mean PFAA serum levels. IQR increases in mean serum PFOA, PFOS, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) were associated with differences of −0.04 (p=0.16), 0.20 (p=0.001), 0.06 (p=0.19), and 0.02 (p=0.57), respectively, in % LINE-1 methylation at follow-up after adjustment for potential confounders. We observed a monotonic increase in LINE-1 DNA methylation across tertiles of PFOS and PFNA (ptrend=0.02 for both associations), but not across tertiles of PFOA or PFHxS (ptrend=0.71 and 0.44, respectively). In summary, serum PFOS was associated with LINE-1 methylation, while serum PFOA, PFHxS, and PFNA were not. Additional research is needed to more precisely determine whether these compounds are epigenetically active. PMID:24263140

  3. Real-time analysis and selection of methylated DNA by fluorescence-activated single molecule sorting in a nanofluidic channel

    PubMed Central

    Cipriany, Benjamin R.; Murphy, Patrick J.; Hagarman, James A.; Cerf, Aline; Latulippe, David; Levy, Stephen L.; Benítez, Jaime J.; Tan, Christine P.; Topolancik, Juraj; Soloway, Paul D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, are responsible for regulatory pathways that affect disease. Current epigenetic analyses use bisulfite conversion to identify DNA methylation and chromatin immunoprecipitation to collect molecules bearing a specific histone modification. In this work, we present a proof-of-principle demonstration for a new method using a nanofluidic device that combines real-time detection and automated sorting of individual molecules based on their epigenetic state. This device evaluates the fluorescence from labeled epigenetic modifications to actuate sorting. This technology has demonstrated up to 98% accuracy in molecule sorting and has achieved postsorting sample recovery on femtogram quantities of genetic material. We have applied it to sort methylated DNA molecules using simultaneous, multicolor fluorescence to identify methyl binding domain protein-1 (MBD1) bound to full-duplex DNA. The functionality enabled by this nanofluidic platform now provides a workflow for color-multiplexed detection, sorting, and recovery of single molecules toward subsequent DNA sequencing. PMID:22586076

  4. Focusing and trapping of DNA molecules by head-on ac electrokinetic streaming through join asymmetric polarization

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jung-Rong; Wei, Hsien-Hung

    2010-01-01

    In this work, invoking join asymmetric ac polarization using double half-quadrupole electrodes in a symmetric arrangement, we demonstrate a head-on ac electro-osmotic streaming capable of focusing and trapping DNA molecules efficiently. This is manifested by the observation that picomolar DNA molecules can be trapped into a large crosslike spot with at least an order of magnitude concentration enhancement within just half a minute. We identify that the phenomenon is a combined result of the formation of two prefocused DNA jets flowing toward each other, dipole-induced attraction between focused DNA molecules, and dielectrophoretic trap on the spot. With an additional horizontal pumping, we observe that the trap can transform into a peculiar pitchfork streaming capable of continuous collection and long-distance transport of concentrated DNA molecules. We also show that the same electrode design can be used to direct assembly of submicrometer particles. This newly designed microfluidic platform not only has potentials in enhancing detection sensitivity and facilitating functional assembly for on-chip analysis but also provides an added advantage of transporting target molecules in a focused and continuous manner. PMID:20838480

  5. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  6. A mushroom-derived amino acid, ergothioneine, is a potential inhibitor of inflammation-related DNA halogenation.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Takashi; Wu, Xiaohong; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Hisaka, Shinsuke; Harada, Etsuko; Kanno, Tomomi; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Kato, Yoji; Osawa, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO)-generated halogenating molecules, such as hypochlorous acid and hypobromous acid (HOBr), in inflammatory regions are postulated to contribute to disease progression. In this study, we showed that ergothioneine (EGT), derived from an edible mushroom, inhibited MPO activity as well as the formation of 8-bromo-2'-deoxyguanosine in vitro. The HOBr scavenging effect of EGT is higher than those of ascorbic acid and glutathione. We initially observed that the administration of Coprinus comatus, an edible mushroom containing a high amount of EGT, inhibited the UV-B-induced inflammatory responses and DNA halogenation, suggesting that EGT is a promising anti-inflammatory agent from mushrooms.

  7. Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on hemorrhagic fever DNA.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Derzon, Mark Steven; McClain, Jaime; Achyuthan, Komandoor

    2006-11-01

    Columbia University has developed a sensitive highly multiplexed system for genetic identification of nucleic acid targets. The primary obstacle to implementing this technology is the high rate of false positives due to high levels of unbound reporters that remain within the system after hybridization. The ability to distinguish between free reporters and reporters bound to targets limits the use of this technology. We previously demonstrated a new electrokinetic method for binary separation of kb pair long DNA molecules and oligonucleotides. The purpose of this project 99864 is to take these previous demonstrations and further develop the technique and hardware for field use. Specifically, our objective was to implement separation in a heterogeneous sample (containing target DNA and background oligo), to perform the separation in a flow-based device, and to develop all of the components necessary for field testing a breadboard prototype system.

  8. A polypeptide-DNA hybrid with selective linking capability applied to single molecule nano-mechanical measurements using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Moayed, Fatemeh; Mashaghi, Alireza; Tans, Sander J

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an efficient, rapid and specific manner, based on the recently developed linkage between the protein StrepTactin (STN) and the peptide StrepTag II (ST). We introduce a two-step approach, in which we first construct a hybrid between DNA and a tandem of two STs peptides (tST). In a second step, this hybrid is linked to polystyrene bead surfaces and Maltose Binding Protein (MBP) using STN. Furthermore, we show the STN-tST linkage is more stable against forces applied by optical tweezers than the commonly used biotin-Streptavidin (STV) linkage. It can be used in conjunction with Neutravidin (NTV)-biotin linkages to form DNA tethers that can sustain applied forces above 65 pN for tens of minutes in a quarter of the cases. The method is general and can be applied to construct other surface-DNA and protein-DNA hybrids. The reversibility, high mechanical stability and specificity provided by this linking procedure make it highly suitable for single molecule mechanical studies, as well as biosensing and lab on chip applications.

  9. A Polypeptide-DNA Hybrid with Selective Linking Capability Applied to Single Molecule Nano-Mechanical Measurements Using Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Tans, Sander J.

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an efficient, rapid and specific manner, based on the recently developed linkage between the protein StrepTactin (STN) and the peptide StrepTag II (ST). We introduce a two-step approach, in which we first construct a hybrid between DNA and a tandem of two STs peptides (tST). In a second step, this hybrid is linked to polystyrene bead surfaces and Maltose Binding Protein (MBP) using STN. Furthermore, we show the STN-tST linkage is more stable against forces applied by optical tweezers than the commonly used biotin-Streptavidin (STV) linkage. It can be used in conjunction with Neutravidin (NTV)-biotin linkages to form DNA tethers that can sustain applied forces above 65 pN for tens of minutes in a quarter of the cases. The method is general and can be applied to construct other surface-DNA and protein-DNA hybrids. The reversibility, high mechanical stability and specificity provided by this linking procedure make it highly suitable for single molecule mechanical studies, as well as biosensing and lab on chip applications. PMID:23336001

  10. Single-molecule imaging reveals the mechanism of Exo1 regulation by single-stranded DNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Ignacio F.; Zhou, Yi; Gong, Fade; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wold, Marc S.; Miller, Kyle M.; Paull, Tanya T.

    2016-01-01

    Exonuclease 1 (Exo1) is a 5′→3′ exonuclease and 5′-flap endonuclease that plays a critical role in multiple eukaryotic DNA repair pathways. Exo1 processing at DNA nicks and double-strand breaks creates long stretches of single-stranded DNA, which are rapidly bound by replication protein A (RPA) and other single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs). Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging and quantitative cell biology approaches to reveal the interplay between Exo1 and SSBs. Both human and yeast Exo1 are processive nucleases on their own. RPA rapidly strips Exo1 from DNA, and this activity is dependent on at least three RPA-encoded single-stranded DNA binding domains. Furthermore, we show that ablation of RPA in human cells increases Exo1 recruitment to damage sites. In contrast, the sensor of single-stranded DNA complex 1—a recently identified human SSB that promotes DNA resection during homologous recombination—supports processive resection by Exo1. Although RPA rapidly turns over Exo1, multiple cycles of nuclease rebinding at the same DNA site can still support limited DNA processing. These results reveal the role of single-stranded DNA binding proteins in controlling Exo1-catalyzed resection with implications for how Exo1 is regulated during DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26884156

  11. Robust signatures in the current-voltage characteristics of DNA molecules oriented between two graphene nanoribbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paez, Carlos; Schulz, Peter; Roemer, Rudolf; Wilson, Neil

    2013-03-01

    In this work we numerically calculate the electric current through three kinds of DNA sequences (telomeric, λ-DNA, and p53-DNA) described by different heuristic models. A bias voltage is applied between two zig-zag edged graphene contacts attached to the DNA segments, while a gate terminal modulates the conductance of the molecule. The calculation of current is performed by integrating the transmission function (calculated using the lattice Green's function) over the range of energies allowed by the chemical potentials. We show that a telomeric DNA sequence, when treated as a quantum wire in the fully coherent low-temperature regime, works as an excellent semiconductor. Clear steps are apparent in the current-voltage curves of telomeric sequences and are present independent of lengths and sequence initialisation at the contacts. The current-voltage curves suggest the existence of stepped structures independent of length and sequencing initialisation at the contacts. We also find that the molecule-electrode coupling can drastically influence the magnitude of the current. The difference between telomeric DNA and other DNA, such as λ-DNA and DNA for the tumour suppressor p53, is particularly visible in the length dependence of the current.

  12. Nanofluidic single-molecule sorting of DNA: a new concept in separation and analysis of biomolecules towards ultimate level performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2010-10-01

    Separation and separation-based analysis of biomolecules are fundamentally important techniques in the field of biotechnology. These techniques, however, depend on stochastic processes that intrinsically involve uncertainty, and thus it is not possible to achieve 100% separation accuracy. Theoretically, the ultimate resolution and sensitivity should be realized in a single-molecule system because of the deterministic nature of single-molecule manipulation. Here, we have proposed and experimentally demonstrated the concept of a 'single-molecule sorter' that detects and correctly identifies individual single molecules, realizing the ultimate level of resolution and sensitivity for any separation-based technology. The single-molecule sorter was created using a nanofluidic network consisting of a single inlet channel that branches off into multiple outlet channels. It includes two major functional elements, namely a single-molecule detection and identification element and a flow path switching element to accurately separate single molecules. With this system we have successfully demonstrated the world's first single-molecule sorting using DNA as a sample molecule. In the future, we hope to expand the application of such devices to comprehensive sorting of single-proteins from a single cell. We also believe that in addition to the single-molecule sorting method reported here, other types of single-molecule based processes will emerge and find use in a wide variety of applications.

  13. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Gene Silencing using Small Interferin RNA: DNA Hybrid Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, L

    2006-02-08

    The recent discovery that short hybrid RNA:DNA molecules (siHybrids) induce long-term silencing of gene expression in mammalian cells conflicts with the currently hypothesized mechanisms explaining the action of small, interfering RNA (siRNA). As a first step to elucidating the mechanism for this effect, we set out to quantify the delivery of siHybrids and determine their cellular localization in mammalian cells. We then tracked the segregation of the siHybrids into daughter cells after cell division. Markers for siHybrid delivery were shown to enter cells with and without the use of a transfection agent. Furthermore, delivery without transfection agent only occurred after a delay of 2-4 hours, suggesting a degradation process occurring in the cell culture media. Therefore, we studied the effects of nucleases and backbone modifications on the stability of siHybrids under cell culture conditions.

  14. Accelerated single photon emission from dye molecule-driven nanoantennas assembled on DNA.

    PubMed

    Busson, Mickaël P; Rolly, Brice; Stout, Brian; Bonod, Nicolas; Bidault, Sébastien

    2012-07-17

    A photon interacts efficiently with an atom when its frequency corresponds exactly to the energy between two eigenstates. But at the nanoscale, homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings strongly hinder the ability of solid-state systems to absorb, scatter or emit light. By compensating the impedance mismatch between visible wavelengths and nanometre-sized objects, optical antennas can enhance light-matter interactions over a broad frequency range. Here we use a DNA template to introduce a single dye molecule in gold particle dimers that act as antennas for light with spontaneous emission rates enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude and single photon emission statistics. Quantitative agreement between measured rate enhancements and theoretical calculations indicate a nanometre control over the emitter-particle position while 10 billion copies of the target geometry are synthesized in parallel. Optical antennas can thus tune efficiently the photo-physical properties of nano-objects by precisely engineering their electromagnetic environment.

  15. Effect of genome sequence on the force-induced unzipping of a DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Singh, Y.

    2006-02-01

    We considered a dsDNA polymer in which distribution of bases are random at the base pair level but ordered at a length of 18 base pairs and calculated its force elongation behaviour in the constant extension ensemble. The unzipping force F(y) vs. extension y is found to have a series of maxima and minima. By changing base pairs at selected places in the molecule we calculated the change in F(y) curve and found that the change in the value of force is of the order of few pN and the range of the effect depending on the temperature, can spread over several base pairs. We have also discussed briefly how to calculate in the constant force ensemble a pause or a jump in the extension-time curve from the knowledge of F(y).

  16. In Silico Single-Molecule Manipulation of DNA with Rigid Body Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Carrivain, Pascal; Barbi, Maria; Victor, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    We develop a new powerful method to reproduce in silico single-molecule manipulation experiments. We demonstrate that flexible polymers such as DNA can be simulated using rigid body dynamics thanks to an original implementation of Langevin dynamics in an open source library called Open Dynamics Engine. We moreover implement a global thermostat which accelerates the simulation sampling by two orders of magnitude. We reproduce force-extension as well as rotation-extension curves of reference experimental studies. Finally, we extend the model to simulations where the control parameter is no longer the torsional strain but instead the torque, and predict the expected behavior for this case which is particularly challenging theoretically and experimentally. PMID:24586127

  17. Mechanistic pathway for controlled extraction of guest molecule bound to herring sperm DNA using α-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffer, S. Syed; Ghosh, Prasun; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    2011-05-01

    trans-2-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]benzothiazole (DMASBT) is known to have dual emitting states where the locally excited (LE) state is responsible for fluorescence in less polar environment and in polar milieu fluorescence is from the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state. This compound also undergoes minor groove binding to herring sperm DNA (hsDNA) evidenced by the absorption spectra before and after the binding process and an effect on DMASBT fluorescence by an anionic quencher. The binding occurs efficiently in a 1:1 manner, i.e. one guest molecule binds to one site on the hsDNA. Instead of following the DNA twist, the aromatic part seems to project outward. Thus, the bound molecule can be successfully extracted out from the DNA in a controlled way by the hydrophobic cavity of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD). The extraction starts even with a low concentration of α-CD and increases as the concentration is increased. Absorption, steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic methods have been employed to explore the mechanistic pathway of binding of DMASBT to hsDNA. The mechanistic approach toward controlled extraction of the guest molecules from hsDNA by α-CD is reported and is expected to serve a significant purpose in treatment of drug overdose.

  18. Syntheses of biodiesel precursors: sulfonic acid catalysts for condensation of biomass-derived platform molecules.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R; Bell, Alexis T

    2014-04-01

    Synthesis of transportation fuel from lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive solution to the green alternative-energy problem. The production of biodiesel, in particular, involves the process of upgrading biomass-derived small molecules to diesel precursors containing a specific carbon range (C11 -C23). Herein, a carbon-upgrading process utilizing an acid-catalyzed condensation of furanic platform molecules from biomass is described. Various types of sulfonic acid catalysts have been evaluated for this process, including biphasic and solid supported catalysts. A silica-bound alkyl sulfonic acid catalyst has been developed for promoting carbon-carbon bond formation of biomass-derived carbonyl compounds with 2-methylfuran. This hydrophobic solid acid catalyst exhibits activity and selectivity that are comparable to those of a soluble acid catalyst. The catalyst can be readily recovered and recycled, possesses appreciable hydrolytic stability in the presence of water, and retains its acidity over multiple reaction cycles. Application of this catalyst to biomass-derived platform molecules led to the synthesis of a variety of furanic compounds, which are potential biodiesel precursors.

  19. Quantitative single-molecule detection of protein based on DNA tetrahedron fluorescent nanolabels.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongshun; Liu, Xingti; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    A highly sensitive method for single-molecule quantitative detection of human IgG is presented by the employment of a new fluorescent nanolabel. In this method, fluorescent nanolabels were assembled by inserting SYBR Green I into DNA tetrahedron nanostructure. The bio-nanolabels were attached to the streptavidin-antihuman antibody by a specific reaction between biotin and streptavidin. The antibody was combined with the target antigen, human IgG, which was immobilized on the silanized glass subtrate surface. Finally, epi-fluorescence microscopy (EFM) coupled with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device was employed for fluorescence imaging. The fluorescent spots corresponding to single protein molecule on images were counted and further used for the quantitative detection. It was found that the new nanolabel shows good photostability, biocompatiblity and exhibits no blinking compared to traditional labels like fluorescence dyes and quantum dot (QDs). In addition, the number of fluorescence spots on the images has a linear relationship with the concentration of human IgG in the range of 3.0×10(-14) to 1.0×10(-12)mol L(-1). What is more, this method showed an excellent specificity and a low matrix effect.

  20. Strongly emissive individual DNA-encapsulated Ag nanoclusters as single-molecule fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Vosch, Tom; Antoku, Yasuko; Hsiang, Jung-Cheng; Richards, Chris I; Gonzalez, Jose I; Dickson, Robert M

    2007-07-31

    The water-soluble, near-IR-emitting DNA-encapsulated silver nanocluster presented herein exhibits extremely bright and photostable emission on the single-molecule and bulk levels. The photophysics have been elucidated by intensity-dependent correlation analysis and suggest a heavy atom effect of silver that rapidly depopulates an excited dark level before quenching by oxygen, thereby conferring great photostability, very high single-molecule emission rates, and essentially no blinking on experimentally relevant time scales (0.1 to >1,000 ms). Strong antibunching is observed from these biocompatible species, which emit >10(9) photons before photobleaching. The significant dark-state quantum yield even enables bunching from the emissive state to be observed as a dip in the autocorrelation curve with only a single detector as the dark state precludes emission from the emissive level. These species represent significant improvements over existing dyes, and the nonpower law blinking kinetics suggest that these very small species may be alternatives to much larger and strongly intermittent semiconductor quantum dots. PMID:17519337

  1. Algebraic Statistics of Poincaré Recurrences in a DNA Molecule.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Alexey K; Shepelyansky, D L

    2015-10-30

    The statistics of Poincaré recurrences is studied for the base-pair breathing dynamics of an all-atom DNA molecule in a realistic aqueous environment with thousands of degrees of freedom. It is found that at least over five decades in time the decay of recurrences is described by an algebraic law with the Poincaré exponent close to β=1.2. This value is directly related to the correlation decay exponent ν=β-1, which is close to ν≈0.15 observed in the time resolved Stokes shift experiments. By applying the virial theorem we analyze the chaotic dynamics in polynomial potentials and demonstrate analytically that an exponent β=1.2 is obtained assuming the dominance of dipole-dipole interactions in the relevant DNA dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations also reveal the presence of strong low frequency noise with the exponent η=1.6. We trace parallels with the chaotic dynamics of symplectic maps with a few degrees of freedom characterized by the Poincaré exponent β~1.5.

  2. Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Lena K; Quaderi, Saair; Emilsson, Gustav; Karami, Nahid; Lagerstedt, Erik; Müller, Vilhelm; Noble, Charleston; Hammarberg, Susanna; Nilsson, Adam N; Sjöberg, Fei; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Sandegren, Linus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance - currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO - is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics. PMID:27460437

  3. Algebraic Statistics of Poincaré Recurrences in a DNA Molecule.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Alexey K; Shepelyansky, D L

    2015-10-30

    The statistics of Poincaré recurrences is studied for the base-pair breathing dynamics of an all-atom DNA molecule in a realistic aqueous environment with thousands of degrees of freedom. It is found that at least over five decades in time the decay of recurrences is described by an algebraic law with the Poincaré exponent close to β=1.2. This value is directly related to the correlation decay exponent ν=β-1, which is close to ν≈0.15 observed in the time resolved Stokes shift experiments. By applying the virial theorem we analyze the chaotic dynamics in polynomial potentials and demonstrate analytically that an exponent β=1.2 is obtained assuming the dominance of dipole-dipole interactions in the relevant DNA dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations also reveal the presence of strong low frequency noise with the exponent η=1.6. We trace parallels with the chaotic dynamics of symplectic maps with a few degrees of freedom characterized by the Poincaré exponent β~1.5. PMID:26565502

  4. Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Emilsson, Gustav; Karami, Nahid; Lagerstedt, Erik; Müller, Vilhelm; Noble, Charleston; Hammarberg, Susanna; Nilsson, Adam N.; Sjöberg, Fei; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Sandegren, Linus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance – currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO – is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics. PMID:27460437

  5. Single-molecule studies on the mechanical interplay between DNA supercoiling and H-NS DNA architectural properties

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ci Ji; Kenney, Linda J.; Yan, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The Escherichia coli H-NS protein is a major nucleoid-associated protein that is involved in chromosomal DNA packaging and gene regulatory functions. These biological processes are intimately related to the DNA supercoiling state and thus suggest a direct relationship between H-NS binding and DNA supercoiling. Here, we show that H-NS, which has two distinct DNA-binding modes, is able to differentially regulate DNA supercoiling. H-NS DNA-stiffening mode caused by nucleoprotein filament formation is able to suppress DNA plectoneme formation during DNA supercoiling. In contrast, when H-NS is in its DNA-bridging mode, it is able to promote DNA plectoneme formation during DNA supercoiling. In addition, the DNA-bridging mode is able to block twists diffusion thus trapping DNA in supercoiled domains. Overall, this work reveals the mechanical interplay between H-NS and DNA supercoiling which provides insights to H-NS organization of chromosomal DNA based on its two distinct DNA architectural properties. PMID:24990375

  6. Simulation Assisted Analysis of the Intrinsic Stiffness for Short DNA Molecules Imaged with Scanning Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haowei; Milstein, Joshua N

    2015-01-01

    Studying the mechanical properties of short segments of dsDNA can provide insight into various biophysical phenomena, from DNA looping to the organization of nucleosomes. Scanning atomic force microscopy (AFM) is able to acquire images of single DNA molecules with near-basepair resolution. From many images, one may use equilibrium statistical mechanics to quantify the intrinsic stiffness (or persistence length) of the DNA. However, this approach is highly dependent upon both the correct microscopic polymer model and a correct image analysis of DNA contours. These complications have led to significant debate over the flexibility of dsDNA at short length scales. We first show how to extract accurate measures of DNA contour lengths by calibrating to DNA traces of simulated AFM data. After this calibration, we show that DNA adsorbed on an aminopropyl-mica surface behaves as a worm-like chain (WLC) for contour lengths as small as ~20 nm. We also show that a DNA binding protein can modify the mechanics of the DNA from that of a WLC.

  7. DNA Origami Nanoantennas with over 5000-fold Fluorescence Enhancement and Single-Molecule Detection at 25 μM.

    PubMed

    Puchkova, Anastasiya; Vietz, Carolin; Pibiri, Enrico; Wünsch, Bettina; Sanz Paz, María; Acuna, Guillermo P; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Optical nanoantennas are known to focus freely propagating light and reversely to mediate the emission of a light source located at the nanoantenna hotspot. These effects were previously exploited for fluorescence enhancement and single-molecule detection at elevated concentrations. We present a new generation of self-assembled DNA origami based optical nanoantennas with improved robustness, reduced interparticle distance, and optimized quantum-yield improvement to achieve more than 5000-fold fluorescence enhancement and single-molecule detection at 25 μM background fluorophore concentration. Besides outperforming lithographic optical antennas, DNA origami nanoantennas are additionally capable of incorporating single emitters or biomolecular assays at the antenna hotspot. PMID:26523768

  8. Sucrose gradient analysis: computer simulation and measurement of the parameters involved in the sedimentation of DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Macchiato, M F; Grossi, G F; Gialanella, G C

    1977-01-01

    The Montecarlo method is used to computer simulate a random distribution of molecular lengths generated by inducing T4 DNA fragmentation through the decay of 32P atoms introduced in the molecule. Taking into account the experimental conditions we find that the value of alpha for alkali sucrose gradients is 0.46 +/- 0.02 and does not depend on the running time. Our findings also prove that the computer simulation can be utilized to analyze sedimentation profiles of DNA molecules fragmented in vivo. PMID:143820

  9. DNA Origami Nanoantennas with over 5000-fold Fluorescence Enhancement and Single-Molecule Detection at 25 μM.

    PubMed

    Puchkova, Anastasiya; Vietz, Carolin; Pibiri, Enrico; Wünsch, Bettina; Sanz Paz, María; Acuna, Guillermo P; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Optical nanoantennas are known to focus freely propagating light and reversely to mediate the emission of a light source located at the nanoantenna hotspot. These effects were previously exploited for fluorescence enhancement and single-molecule detection at elevated concentrations. We present a new generation of self-assembled DNA origami based optical nanoantennas with improved robustness, reduced interparticle distance, and optimized quantum-yield improvement to achieve more than 5000-fold fluorescence enhancement and single-molecule detection at 25 μM background fluorophore concentration. Besides outperforming lithographic optical antennas, DNA origami nanoantennas are additionally capable of incorporating single emitters or biomolecular assays at the antenna hotspot.

  10. [Interactions of DNA bases with individual water molecules. Molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics computation results vs. experimental data].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, E; Lino, J; Deriabina, A; Herrera, J N F; Poltev, V I

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate details of the DNA-water interactions we performed the calculations and systemaitic search for minima of interaction energy of the systems consisting of one of DNA bases and one or two water molecules. The results of calculations using two force fields of molecular mechanics (MM) and correlated ab initio method MP2/6-31G(d, p) of quantum mechanics (QM) have been compared with one another and with experimental data. The calculations demonstrated a qualitative agreement between geometry characteristics of the most of local energy minima obtained via different methods. The deepest minima revealed by MM and QM methods correspond to water molecule position between two neighbor hydrophilic centers of the base and to the formation by water molecule of hydrogen bonds with them. Nevertheless, the relative depth of some minima and peculiarities of mutual water-base positions in' these minima depend on the method used. The analysis revealed insignificance of some differences in the results of calculations performed via different methods and the importance of other ones for the description of DNA hydration. The calculations via MM methods enable us to reproduce quantitatively all the experimental data on the enthalpies of complex formation of single water molecule with the set of mono-, di-, and trimethylated bases, as well as on water molecule locations near base hydrophilic atoms in the crystals of DNA duplex fragments, while some of these data cannot be rationalized by QM calculations.

  11. Genome-wide Mapping of Drug-DNA Interactions in Cells with COSMIC (Crosslinking of Small Molecules to Isolate Chromatin).

    PubMed

    Erwin, Graham S; Grieshop, Matthew P; Bhimsaria, Devesh; Eguchi, Asuka; Rodríguez-Martínez, José A; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2016-01-01

    The genome is the target of some of the most effective chemotherapeutics, but most of these drugs lack DNA sequence specificity, which leads to dose-limiting toxicity and many adverse side effects. Targeting the genome with sequence-specific small molecules may enable molecules with increased therapeutic index and fewer off-target effects. N-methylpyrrole/N-methylimidazole polyamides are molecules that can be rationally designed to target specific DNA sequences with exquisite precision. And unlike most natural transcription factors, polyamides can bind to methylated and chromatinized DNA without a loss in affinity. The sequence specificity of polyamides has been extensively studied in vitro with cognate site identification (CSI) and with traditional biochemical and biophysical approaches, but the study of polyamide binding to genomic targets in cells remains elusive. Here we report a method, the crosslinking of small molecules to isolate chromatin (COSMIC), that identifies polyamide binding sites across the genome. COSMIC is similar to chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), but differs in two important ways: (1) a photocrosslinker is employed to enable selective, temporally-controlled capture of polyamide binding events, and (2) the biotin affinity handle is used to purify polyamide-DNA conjugates under semi-denaturing conditions to decrease DNA that is non-covalently bound. COSMIC is a general strategy that can be used to reveal the genome-wide binding events of polyamides and other genome-targeting chemotherapeutic agents.

  12. Differential Interaction Kinetics of a Bipolar Structure-Specific Endonuclease with DNA Flaps Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rezgui, Rachid; Lestini, Roxane; Kühn, Joëlle; Fave, Xenia; McLeod, Lauren; Myllykallio, Hannu; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Bouzigues, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    As DNA repair enzymes are essential for preserving genome integrity, understanding their substrate interaction dynamics and the regulation of their catalytic mechanisms is crucial. Using single-molecule imaging, we investigated the association and dissociation kinetics of the bipolar endonuclease NucS from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) on 5′ and 3′-flap structures under various experimental conditions. We show that association of the PabNucS with ssDNA flaps is largely controlled by diffusion in the NucS-DNA energy landscape and does not require a free 5′ or 3′ extremity. On the other hand, NucS dissociation is independent of the flap length and thus independent of sliding on the single-stranded portion of the flapped DNA substrates. Our kinetic measurements have revealed previously unnoticed asymmetry in dissociation kinetics from these substrates that is markedly modulated by the replication clamp PCNA. We propose that the replication clamp PCNA enhances the cleavage specificity of NucS proteins by accelerating NucS loading at the ssDNA/dsDNA junctions and by minimizing the nuclease interaction time with its DNA substrate. Our data are also consistent with marked reorganization of ssDNA and nuclease domains occurring during NucS catalysis, and indicate that NucS binds its substrate directly at the ssDNA-dsDNA junction and then threads the ssDNA extremity into the catalytic site. The powerful techniques used here for probing the dynamics of DNA-enzyme binding at the single-molecule have provided new insight regarding substrate specificity of NucS nucleases. PMID:25412080

  13. Label-free and dual-amplified detection of protein via small molecule-ligand linked DNA and a cooperative DNA machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jing; Wu, Yushu; Jiang, Wei

    2015-10-15

    Sensitive detection of protein is essential for both molecular diagnostics and biomedical research. Here, taking folate receptor as the model analyte, we developed a label-free and dual-amplified strategy via small molecular-ligand linked DNA and a cooperative DNA machine which could perform primary amplification and mediate secondary amplification simultaneously. Firstly, the specific binding of folate receptor to the small-molecule folate which linked to a trigger DNA could protect the trigger DNA from exonuclease I digestion, translating folate receptor detection into trigger DNA detection. Subsequently, trigger DNA initiated the DNA machine through hybridizing with the hairpin of the DNA machine, resulting in hairpin conformational change and stem open. The open stem further hybridized with a primer which initiated circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction; meanwhile the rolling circle amplification templates which were initially blocked in the DNA machine were liberated to mediate rolling circle amplification. In such a working model, the DNA machine achieved cooperatively controlling circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction and rolling circle amplification, realizing dual-amplification. Finally, the rolling circle amplification process synthesized a long repeated G-quadruplex sequence, which strongly interacted with N-methyl mesoporphyrin IX, bringing label-free fluorescence signal. This strategy could detect folate receptor as low as 0.23 pM. A recovery over 90% was obtained when folate receptor was detected in spiked human serum, demonstrating the feasibility of this detection strategy in biological samples.

  14. Cyanobacteria produce N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine, a backbone for peptide nucleic acids which may have been the first genetic molecules for life on Earth.

    PubMed

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Metcalf, James S; Jiang, Liying; Craighead, Derek; Ilag, Leopold L; Cox, Paul Alan

    2012-01-01

    Prior to the evolution of DNA-based organisms on earth over 3.5 billion years ago it is hypothesized that RNA was the primary genetic molecule. Before RNA-based organisms arose, peptide nucleic acids may have been used to transmit genetic information by the earliest forms of life on earth. We discovered that cyanobacteria produce N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG), a backbone for peptide nucleic acids. We detected AEG in axenic strains of cyanobacteria with an average concentration of 1 µg/g. We also detected AEG in environmental samples of cyanobacteria as both a free or weakly bound molecule and a tightly bound form released by acid hydrolysis, at concentrations ranging from not detected to 34 µg/g. The production of AEG by diverse taxa of cyanobacteria suggests that AEG may be a primitive feature which arose early in the evolution of life on earth.

  15. Cyanobacteria Produce N-(2-Aminoethyl)Glycine, a Backbone for Peptide Nucleic Acids Which May Have Been the First Genetic Molecules for Life on Earth

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Metcalf, James S.; Jiang, Liying; Craighead, Derek; Ilag, Leopold L.; Cox, Paul Alan

    2012-01-01

    Prior to the evolution of DNA-based organisms on earth over 3.5 billion years ago it is hypothesized that RNA was the primary genetic molecule. Before RNA-based organisms arose, peptide nucleic acids may have been used to transmit genetic information by the earliest forms of life on earth. We discovered that cyanobacteria produce N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG), a backbone for peptide nucleic acids. We detected AEG in axenic strains of cyanobacteria with an average concentration of 1 µg/g. We also detected AEG in environmental samples of cyanobacteria as both a free or weakly bound molecule and a tightly bound form released by acid hydrolysis, at concentrations ranging from not detected to 34 µg/g. The production of AEG by diverse taxa of cyanobacteria suggests that AEG may be a primitive feature which arose early in the evolution of life on earth. PMID:23145061

  16. Robust signatures in the current-voltage characteristics of DNA molecules oriented between two graphene nanoribbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páez, Carlos J.; Schulz, Peter A.; Wilson, Neil R.; Römer, Rudolf A.

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we numerically calculate the electric current through three kinds of DNA sequences (telomeric, λ-DNA and p53-DNA) described by different heuristic models. A bias voltage is applied between two zigzag edged graphene contacts attached to the DNA segments, while a gate terminal modulates the conductance of the molecule. Calculation of the current is performed by integrating the transmission function (calculated using the lattice Green's function) over the range of energies allowed by the chemical potentials. We show that a telomeric DNA sequence, when treated as a quantum wire in the fully coherent low-temperature regime, works as an excellent semiconductor. Clear steps are apparent in the current-voltage curves of telomeric sequences and are present independent of length and sequence initialization at the contacts. We also find that the molecule-electrode coupling can drastically influence the magnitude of the current. The difference between telomeric DNA and other DNAs, such as λ-DNA and DNA for the tumour suppressor p53, is particularly visible in the length dependence of the current.

  17. Imaging and energetics of single SSB-ssDNA molecules reveal intramolecular condensation and insight into RecOR function.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason C; Liu, Bian; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein (SSB) is the defining bacterial member of ssDNA binding proteins essential for DNA maintenance. SSB binds ssDNA with a variable footprint of ∼30-70 nucleotides, reflecting partial or full wrapping of ssDNA around a tetramer of SSB. We directly imaged single molecules of SSB-coated ssDNA using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and observed intramolecular condensation of nucleoprotein complexes exceeding expectations based on simple wrapping transitions. We further examined this unexpected property by single-molecule force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers. In conditions favoring complete wrapping, SSB engages in long-range reversible intramolecular interactions resulting in condensation of the SSB-ssDNA complex. RecO and RecOR, which interact with SSB, further condensed the complex. Our data support the idea that RecOR--and possibly other SSB-interacting proteins-function(s) in part to alter long-range, macroscopic interactions between or throughout nucleoprotein complexes by microscopically altering wrapping and bridging distant sites. PMID:26381353

  18. Imaging and energetics of single SSB-ssDNA molecules reveal intramolecular condensation and insight into RecOR function

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jason C; Liu, Bian; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein (SSB) is the defining bacterial member of ssDNA binding proteins essential for DNA maintenance. SSB binds ssDNA with a variable footprint of ∼30–70 nucleotides, reflecting partial or full wrapping of ssDNA around a tetramer of SSB. We directly imaged single molecules of SSB-coated ssDNA using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and observed intramolecular condensation of nucleoprotein complexes exceeding expectations based on simple wrapping transitions. We further examined this unexpected property by single-molecule force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers. In conditions favoring complete wrapping, SSB engages in long-range reversible intramolecular interactions resulting in condensation of the SSB-ssDNA complex. RecO and RecOR, which interact with SSB, further condensed the complex. Our data support the idea that RecOR--and possibly other SSB-interacting proteins—function(s) in part to alter long-range, macroscopic interactions between or throughout nucleoprotein complexes by microscopically altering wrapping and bridging distant sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08646.001 PMID:26381353

  19. Sustained Small Molecule Delivery from Injectable Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels through Host-Guest Mediated Retention

    PubMed Central

    Mealy, Joshua E.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled and injectable hydrogels have many beneficial properties for the local delivery of therapeutics; however, challenges still exist in the sustained release of small molecules from these highly hydrated networks. Host-guest chemistry between cyclodextrin and adamantane has been used to create supramolecular hydrogels from modified polymers. Beyond assembly, this chemistry may also provide increased drug retention and sustained release through the formation of inclusion complexes between drugs and cyclodextrin. Here, we engineered a two-component system from adamantane-modified and β-cyclodextrin (CD)-modified hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural component of the extracellular matrix, to produce hydrogels that are both injectable and able to sustain the release of small molecules. The conjugation of cyclodextrin to HA dramatically altered its affinity for hydrophobic small molecules, such as tryptophan. This interaction led to lower molecule diffusivity and the release of small molecules for up to 21 days with release profiles dependent on CD concentration and drug-CD affinity. There was significant attenuation of release from the supramolecular hydrogels (~20% release in 24h) when compared to hydrogels without CD (~90% release in 24h). The loading of small molecules also had no effect on hydrogel mechanics or self-assembly properties. Finally, to illustrate this controlled delivery approach with clinically used small molecule pharmaceuticals, we sustained the release of two widely used drugs (i.e., doxycycline and doxorubicin) from these hydrogels. PMID:26693019

  20. Complexing of amino acids to DNA by chromate in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Voitkun, V; Zhitkovich, A; Costa, M

    1994-01-01

    Using o-pthaldialdehyde (OPT) fluorescence, the amino acids associated with DNA were studied following exposure of intact Chinese hamster ovary cells to chromate. Rigorous extraction with EDTA, acid, or base was required to release the amino acids cross-linked to the DNA isolated from control or chromate-treated cells by standard procedures (i.e., proteinase K, phenol, etc.). Amino acids resisting extraction from DNA were not studied since analysis was limited to those that could be released by these procedures. There was a chromate dose-dependent increase in amino acids complexed with the DNA that could be released by EDTA, acid, and base, and these amino acids were separated by HPLC and identified. Substantial increases in cysteine, glutamine, glutamic acid, histidine, threonine, and tyrosine were found as a function of increasing concentrations of chromate. There was also a time-dependent increase in complexing of these amino acids to the DNA by chromate. The amino acids found complexed to DNA in intact cells by chromate were thought to originate from reactions of free amino acids or small peptides with the DNA rather than being proteolytic products derived from larger proteins that were cross-linked to the DNA. This was supported by a number of experiments: a) free amino acids or bovine serum albumin (BSA) were cross-linked by chromium to DNA in vitro and the DNA was isolated by standard procedures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7843108

  1. Biochemical Method for Inserting New Genetic Information into DNA of Simian Virus 40: Circular SV40 DNA Molecules Containing Lambda Phage Genes and the Galactose Operon of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David A.; Symons, Robert H.; Berg, Paul

    1972-01-01

    We have developed methods for covalently joining duplex DNA molecules to one another and have used these techniques to construct circular dimers of SV40 DNA and to insert a DNA segment containing lambda phage genes and the galactose operon of E. coli into SV40 DNA. The method involves: (a) converting circular SV40 DNA to a linear form, (b) adding single-stranded homodeoxypolymeric extensions of defined composition and length to the 3′ ends of one of the DNA strands with the enzyme terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (c) adding complementary homodeoxypolymeric extensions to the other DNA strand, (d) annealing the two DNA molecules to form a circular duplex structure, and (e) filling the gaps and sealing nicks in this structure with E. coli DNA polymerase and DNA ligase to form a covalently closed-circular DNA molecule. PMID:4342968

  2. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes’ properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate – for the first time – complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  3. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes' properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate - for the first time - complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules. PMID:25669583

  4. Investigation of pyridine carboxylic acids in CM2 carbonaceous chondrites: Potential precursor molecules for ancient coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-07-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  5. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We lso report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  6. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  7. The mitochondrial transcription factor TFAM coordinates the assembly of multiple DNA molecules into nucleoid-like structures.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Brett A; Durisic, Nela; Mativetsky, Jeffrey M; Costantino, Santiago; Hancock, Mark A; Grutter, Peter; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2007-09-01

    Packaging DNA into condensed structures is integral to the transmission of genomes. The mammalian mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is a high copy, maternally inherited genome in which mutations cause a variety of multisystem disorders. In all eukaryotic cells, multiple mtDNAs are packaged with protein into spheroid bodies called nucleoids, which are the fundamental units of mtDNA segregation. The mechanism of nucleoid formation, however, remains unknown. Here, we show that the mitochondrial transcription factor TFAM, an abundant and highly conserved High Mobility Group box protein, binds DNA cooperatively with nanomolar affinity as a homodimer and that it is capable of coordinating and fully compacting several DNA molecules together to form spheroid structures. We use noncontact atomic force microscopy, which achieves near cryo-electron microscope resolution, to reveal the structural details of protein-DNA compaction intermediates. The formation of these complexes involves the bending of the DNA backbone, and DNA loop formation, followed by the filling in of proximal available DNA sites until the DNA is compacted. These results indicate that TFAM alone is sufficient to organize mitochondrial chromatin and provide a mechanism for nucleoid formation.

  8. Single-molecule kinetics reveal microscopic mechanism by which High-Mobility Group B proteins alter DNA flexibility

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Micah J.; Rueter, Emily M.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Maher, L. James; Williams, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic High-Mobility Group B (HMGB) proteins alter DNA elasticity while facilitating transcription, replication and DNA repair. We developed a new single-molecule method to probe non-specific DNA interactions for two HMGB homologs: the human HMGB2 box A domain and yeast Nhp6Ap, along with chimeric mutants replacing neutral N-terminal residues of the HMGB2 protein with cationic sequences from Nhp6Ap. Surprisingly, HMGB proteins constrain DNA winding, and this torsional constraint is released over short timescales. These measurements reveal the microscopic dissociation rates of HMGB from DNA. Separate microscopic and macroscopic (or local and non-local) unbinding rates have been previously proposed, but never independently observed. Microscopic dissociation rates for the chimeric mutants (∼10 s−1) are higher than those observed for wild-type proteins (∼0.1–1.0 s−1), reflecting their reduced ability to bend DNA through short-range interactions, despite their increased DNA-binding affinity. Therefore, transient local HMGB–DNA contacts dominate the DNA-bending mechanism used by these important architectural proteins to increase DNA flexibility. PMID:23143110

  9. L-Ascorbic Acid: A Multifunctional Molecule Supporting Plant Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    L-Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is as essential to plants as it is to animals. Ascorbic acid functions as a major redox buffer and as a cofactor for enzymes involved in regulating photosynthesis, hormone biosynthesis, and regenerating other antioxidants. Ascorbic acid regulates cell division and growth and is involved in signal transduction. In contrast to the single pathway responsible for ascorbic acid biosynthesis in animals, plants use multiple pathways to synthesize ascorbic acid, perhaps reflecting the importance of this molecule to plant health. Given the importance of ascorbic acid to human nutrition, several technologies have been developed to increase the ascorbic acid content of plants through the manipulation of biosynthetic or recycling pathways. This paper provides an overview of these approaches as well as the consequences that changes in ascorbic acid content have on plant growth and function. Discussed is the capacity of plants to tolerate changes in ascorbic acid content. The many functions that ascorbic acid serves in plants, however, will require highly targeted approaches to improve their nutritional quality without compromising their health. PMID:24278786

  10. Small molecule- and amino acid-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Hesham M; Shah, Akash; Konieczny, Michael; Hoffmann, Joan A; Nijdam, A Jasper; Reeves, M E

    2013-06-25

    To understand which organic molecules are capable of binding to gold nanoparticles and/or inducing nanoparticle aggregation, we investigate the interaction of gold nanoparticles with small molecules and amino acids at variable pH. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra were measured on mixtures of colloidal gold with small molecules to track the progression of the aggregation of gold nanoparticles. We introduce the 522 to 435 nm UV-vis absorbance ratio as a sensitive method for the detection of colloidal gold aggregation, whereby we delineate the ability of thiol, amine, and carboxylic acid functional groups to bind to the surfaces of gold nanoparticles and investigate how combinations of these functional groups affect colloidal stability. We present models for mechanisms of aggregation of colloidal gold, including surface charge reduction and bridging linkers. For all molecules whose addition leads to the aggregation of gold nanoparticles, the aggregation kinetics were accelerated at acidic pH values. Colloidal gold is maintained only in the presence of anionic carboxyl groups, which are neutralized by protonation at lower pH. The overall reduced charge on the stabilizing carboxyl groups accounts for the accelerated aggregation at lower pH values. PMID:23718319

  11. Computational investigation of locked nucleic acid (LNA) nucleotides in the active sites of DNA polymerases by molecular docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Madala, Praveen K; Højland, Torben; Veedu, Rakesh N

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers constitute a potential class of therapeutic molecules typically selected from a large pool of oligonucleotides against a specific target. With a scope of developing unique shorter aptamers with very high biostability and affinity, locked nucleic acid (LNA) nucleotides have been investigated as a substrate for various polymerases. Various reports showed that some thermophilic B-family DNA polymerases, particularly KOD and Phusion DNA polymerases, accepted LNA-nucleoside 5'-triphosphates as substrates. In this study, we investigated the docking of LNA nucleotides in the active sites of RB69 and KOD DNA polymerases by molecular docking simulations. The study revealed that the incoming LNA-TTP is bound in the active site of the RB69 and KOD DNA polymerases in a manner similar to that seen in the case of dTTP, and with LNA structure, there is no other option than the locked C3'-endo conformation which in fact helps better orienting within the active site. PMID:25036012

  12. Channel Size Conversion of Phi29 DNA-Packaging Nanomotor for Discrimination of Single- and Double-Stranded Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jia; Wang, Shaoying; Fang, Huaming; Guo, Peixuan

    2013-01-01

    Nanopores have been utilized to detect the conformation and dynamics of polymers, including DNA and RNA. Biological pores are extremely reproducible at the atomic level with uniform channel sizes. The channel of the bacterial virus phi29 DNA packaging motor is a natural conduit for the transportation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), and has the largest diameter among the well-studied biological channels. The larger channel facilitates translocation of dsDNA, and offers more space for further channel modification and conjugation. Interestingly, the relatively large wild type channel, which translocates dsDNA, cannot detect single-stranded nucleic acids (ssDNA or ssRNA) under the current experimental conditions. Herein, we reengineered this motor channel by removing the internal loop segment of the channel. The modification resulted in two classes of channels. One class was the same size as the wild type channel, while the other class had a cross-sectional area about 60% of the wild type. This smaller channel was able to detect the real-time translocation of single stranded nucleic acids at single-molecule level. While the wild type connector exhibited a one-way traffic property with respect to dsDNA translocation, the loop deleted connector was able to translocate ssDNA and ssRNA with equal competencies from both termini. This finding of size alterations in reengineered motor channels expands the potential application of the phi29 DNA packaging motor in nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, and high-throughput single pore DNA sequencing. PMID:23488809

  13. Non-intercalative, deoxyribose binding of boric acid to calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ayse; Gursaclı, Refiye Tekiner; Tekinay, Turgay

    2014-05-01

    The present study characterizes the effects of the boric acid binding on calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) by spectroscopic and calorimetric methods. UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to characterize binding properties. Changes in the secondary structure of ct-DNA were determined by CD spectroscopy. Sizes and morphologies of boric acid-DNA complexes were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The kinetics of boric acid binding to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). ITC results revealed that boric acid exhibits a moderate affinity to ct-DNA with a binding constant (K a) of 9.54 × 10(4) M(-1). FT-IR results revealed that boric acid binds to the deoxyribose sugar of DNA without disrupting the B-conformation at tested concentrations.

  14. Directly interrogating single quantum dot labelled UvrA2 molecules on DNA tightropes using an optically trapped nanoprobe

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Michelle; Pollard, Mark R.; Hughes, Craig D.; Ward, Andrew D.; Van Houten, Bennett; Towrie, Mike; Botchway, Stan W.; Parker, Anthony W.; Kad, Neil M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we describe a new methodology to physically probe individual complexes formed between proteins and DNA. By combining nanoscale, high speed physical force measurement with sensitive fluorescence imaging we investigate the complex formed between the prokaryotic DNA repair protein UvrA2 and DNA. This approach uses a triangular, optically-trapped “nanoprobe” with a nanometer scale tip protruding from one vertex. By scanning this tip along a single DNA strand suspended between surface-bound micron-scale beads, quantum-dot tagged UvrA2 molecules bound to these ‘”DNA tightropes” can be mechanically interrogated. Encounters with UvrA2 led to deflections of the whole nanoprobe structure, which were converted to resistive force. A force histogram from all 144 detected interactions generated a bimodal distribution centered on 2.6 and 8.1 pN, possibly reflecting the asymmetry of UvrA2’s binding to DNA. These observations successfully demonstrate the use of a highly controllable purpose-designed and built synthetic nanoprobe combined with fluorescence imaging to study protein-DNA interactions at the single molecule level. PMID:26691010

  15. Probing radiation damage by alternated current conductivity as a method to characterize electron hopping conduction in DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Paulo J.; Coelho, Margarida; Dionísio, Madalena; António Ribeiro, Paulo; Raposo, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Analysis of AC electrical conductivity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) thin films, irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light, revealed that electrical conduction arises from DNA chain electron hopping between base-pairs and phosphate groups. The hopping distance calculated from correlated barrier hopping model equals the distance between DNA base-pairs, which is consistent with the loss of conductivity with irradiation time arising from a decrease in phosphates groups. In the high frequency regime, at a given frequency, real part of conductivity strongly depends on irradiation time particularly for low dose levels suggesting the use of DNA based films for UV radiation sensors.

  16. Probing radiation damage by alternated current conductivity as a method to characterize electron hopping conduction in DNA molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Paulo J.; Coelho, Margarida; Antonio Ribeiro, Paulo; Raposo, Maria; Dionisio, Madalena

    2012-09-17

    Analysis of AC electrical conductivity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) thin films, irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light, revealed that electrical conduction arises from DNA chain electron hopping between base-pairs and phosphate groups. The hopping distance calculated from correlated barrier hopping model equals the distance between DNA base-pairs, which is consistent with the loss of conductivity with irradiation time arising from a decrease in phosphates groups. In the high frequency regime, at a given frequency, real part of conductivity strongly depends on irradiation time particularly for low dose levels suggesting the use of DNA based films for UV radiation sensors.

  17. DNA Vaccine that Targets Hemagglutinin to MHC Class II Molecules Rapidly Induces Antibody-Mediated Protection against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Mjaaland, Siri; Roux, Kenneth H.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik

    2013-01-01

    New influenza A viruses with pandemic potential periodically emerge due to viral genomic reassortment. In the face of pandemic threats, production of conventional egg-based vaccines is time consuming and of limited capacity. We have developed in this study a novel DNA vaccine in which viral hemagglutinin (HA) is bivalently targeted to MHC class II (MHC II) molecules on APCs. Following DNA vaccination, transfected cells secreted vaccine proteins that bound MHC II on APCs and initiated adaptive immune responses. A single DNA immunization induced within 8 d protective levels of strain-specific Abs and also cross-reactive T cells. During the Mexican flu pandemic, a targeted DNA vaccine (HA from A/California/07/2009) was generated within 3 wk after the HA sequences were published online. These results suggest that MHC II–targeted DNA vaccines could play a role in situations of pandemic threats. The vaccine principle should be extendable to other infectious diseases. PMID:23956431

  18. Recent advances in targeting the telomeric G-quadruplex DNA sequence with small molecules as a strategy for anticancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad K; Jackson, Paul Jm; Rahman, Khondaker M; Thurston, David E

    2016-07-01

    Human telomeric DNA (hTelo), present at the ends of chromosomes to protect their integrity during cell division, comprises tandem repeats of the sequence d(TTAGGG) which is known to form a G-quadruplex secondary structure. This unique structural formation of DNA is distinct from the well-known helical structure that most genomic DNA is thought to adopt, and has recently gained prominence as a molecular target for new types of anticancer agents. In particular, compounds that can stabilize the intramolecular G-quadruplex formed within the human telomeric DNA sequence can inhibit the activity of the enzyme telomerase which is known to be upregulated in tumor cells and is a major contributor to their immortality. This provides the basis for the discovery and development of small molecules with the potential for selective toxicity toward tumor cells. This review summarizes the various families of small molecules reported in the literature that have telomeric quadruplex stabilizing properties, and assesses the potential for compounds of this type to be developed as novel anticancer therapies. A future perspective is also presented, emphasizing the need for researchers to adopt approaches that will allow the discovery of molecules with more drug-like properties in order to improve the chances of lead molecules reaching the clinic in the next decade. PMID:27442231

  19. A New Three-Dimensional Educational Model Kit for Building DNA and RNA Molecules: Development and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beltramini, Leila Maria; Araujo, Ana Paula Ulian; de Oliveira, Tales Henrique Goncalves; dos Santos Abel, Luciano Douglas; da Silva, Aparecido Rodrigues; dos Santos, Neusa Fernandes

    2006-01-01

    International specialized literature focused on research in biology education is sadly scarce, especially regarding biochemical and molecular aspects. In this light, researchers from this Centre for Structural Molecular Biotechnology developed and evaluated a three-dimensional educational model named "Building Life Molecules DNA and RNA." The…

  20. Photoluminescence Enhancement in CdSe/ZnS–DNA linked–Au Nanoparticle Heterodimers Probed by Single Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, M.; Maye, M.M.; Gang, O.

    2010-07-26

    Photoluminescence enhancement of up to 20 fold is demonstrated at the single molecule level for heterodimers composed of a core/shell CdSe/ZnS semiconductive quantum dot and a gold nanoparticle of 60 nm size separated by a 32 nm-long dsDNA linker when employing optical excitation at wavelengths near the surface plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticle.

  1. Direct imaging of RecA nucleation and growth on single molecules of SSB-coated ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason C; Plank, Jody L; Dombrowski, Christopher C; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2012-11-01

    Escherichia coli RecA is the defining member of a ubiquitous class of DNA strand-exchange proteins that are essential for homologous recombination, a pathway that maintains genomic integrity by repairing broken DNA. To function, filaments of RecA must nucleate and grow on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in direct competition with ssDNA-binding protein (SSB), which rapidly binds and continuously sequesters ssDNA, kinetically blocking RecA assembly. This dynamic self-assembly on a DNA lattice, in competition with another protein, is unique for the RecA family compared to other filament-forming proteins such as actin and tubulin. The complexity of this process has hindered our understanding of RecA filament assembly because ensemble measurements cannot reliably distinguish between the nucleation and growth phases, despite extensive and diverse attempts. Previous single-molecule assays have measured the nucleation and growth of RecA--and its eukaryotic homologue RAD51--on naked double-stranded DNA and ssDNA; however, the template for RecA self-assembly in vivo is SSB-coated ssDNA. Using single-molecule microscopy, here we directly visualize RecA filament assembly on single molecules of SSB-coated ssDNA, simultaneously measuring nucleation and growth. We establish that a dimer of RecA is required for nucleation, followed by growth of the filament through monomer addition, consistent with the finding that nucleation, but not growth, is modulated by nucleotide and magnesium ion cofactors. Filament growth is bidirectional, albeit faster in the 5'→3' direction. Both nucleation and growth are repressed at physiological conditions, highlighting the essential role of recombination mediators in potentiating assembly in vivo. We define a two-step kinetic mechanism in which RecA nucleates on transiently exposed ssDNA during SSB sliding and/or partial dissociation (DNA unwrapping) and then the RecA filament grows. We further demonstrate that the recombination mediator protein pair

  2. Extracting physical chemistry from mechanics: a new approach to investigate DNA interactions with drugs and proteins in single molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Rocha, M S

    2015-09-01

    In this review we focus on the idea of establishing connections between the mechanical properties of DNA-ligand complexes and the physical chemistry of DNA-ligand interactions. This type of connection is interesting because it opens the possibility of performing a robust characterization of such interactions by using only one experimental technique: single molecule stretching. Furthermore, it also opens new possibilities in comparing results obtained by very different approaches, in particular when comparing single molecule techniques to ensemble-averaging techniques. We start the manuscript reviewing important concepts of DNA mechanics, from the basic mechanical properties to the Worm-Like Chain model. Next we review the basic concepts of the physical chemistry of DNA-ligand interactions, revisiting the most important models used to analyze the binding data and discussing their binding isotherms. Then, we discuss the basic features of the single molecule techniques most used to stretch DNA-ligand complexes and to obtain "force × extension" data, from which the mechanical properties of the complexes can be determined. We also discuss the characteristics of the main types of interactions that can occur between DNA and ligands, from covalent binding to simple electrostatic driven interactions. Finally, we present a historical survey of the attempts to connect mechanics to physical chemistry for DNA-ligand systems, emphasizing a recently developed fitting approach useful to connect the persistence length of DNA-ligand complexes to the physicochemical properties of the interaction. Such an approach in principle can be used for any type of ligand, from drugs to proteins, even if multiple binding modes are present.

  3. DNA sequencing by a single molecule detection of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a single strand of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Wilkerson, C.W.; Hammond, M.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Jett, J.H.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Keller, R.A. ); Haces, A.; Shih, P.J.; Harding, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    We are developing a laser-based technique for the rapid sequencing of large DNA fragments (several kb in size) at a rate of 100 to 1000 bases per second. Our approach relies on fluorescent labeling of the bases in a single fragment of DNA, attachment of this labeled DNA fragment to a support, movement of the supported DNA into a flowing sample stream, sequential cleavage of the end nucleotide from the DNA fragment with an exonuclease, and detection of the individual fluorescently labeled bases by laser-induced fluorescence.

  4. DNA sequencing by a single molecule detection of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a single strand of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Wilkerson, C.W.; Hammond, M.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Jett, J.H.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Keller, R.A.; Haces, A.; Shih, P.J.; Harding, J.D.

    1993-02-01

    We are developing a laser-based technique for the rapid sequencing of large DNA fragments (several kb in size) at a rate of 100 to 1000 bases per second. Our approach relies on fluorescent labeling of the bases in a single fragment of DNA, attachment of this labeled DNA fragment to a support, movement of the supported DNA into a flowing sample stream, sequential cleavage of the end nucleotide from the DNA fragment with an exonuclease, and detection of the individual fluorescently labeled bases by laser-induced fluorescence.

  5. Statics and Dynamics of Stretched Single DNA Molecules Tug-of-War at Micro-Nanofluidic Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Jiawei; Taloni, Alessandro; Chen, Yeng-Long; Chou, Chia-Fu

    2011-03-01

    Understanding single molecule dynamics at micro-nanoscale interfaces has implications to polymer transport in biological processes, device design for single molecule analysis and biotechnological applications. We report our study on single DNA molecules straddling across a nanoslit, bridging two micro-nanofluidic interfaces, for both its tug-of-war behavior and confinement-induced entropic recoiling at varying length and height (h: 30 ~ 100 nm) of a nanoslit. From a modified worm-like chain model in the tug-of-war scenario and the scaling analysis in the entropic recoiling process, we demonstrate the entropic recoiling force is essentially constant, given the degree of confinement, irrespective of the DNA length inside the nanoslit and the slit length. The scaling exponents for the entropic force will also be discussed.

  6. Effect of Varying Magnetic Fields on Targeted Gene Delivery of Nucleic Acid-Based Molecules.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ozlem; Cıkım, Taha; Zuvin, Merve; Unal, Ozlem; Yagci-Acar, Havva; Gozuacik, Devrim; Koşar, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Several physical methods have been developed to introduce nucleic acid expression vectors into mammalian cells. Magnetic transfection (magnetofection) is one such transfection method, and it involves binding of nucleic acids such as DNA, RNA or siRNA to magnetic nanoparticles followed by subsequent exposure to external magnetic fields. However, the challenge between high efficiency of nucleic acid uptake by cells and toxicity was not totally resolved. Delivery of nucleic acids and their transport to the target cells require carefully designed and controlled systems. In this study, we introduced a novel magnetic system design providing varying magnet turn speeds and magnetic field directions. The system was tested in the magnetofection of human breast (MCF-7), prostate (DU-145, PC-3) and bladder (RT-4) cancer cell lines using green fluorescent protein DNA as a reporter. Polyethylenimine coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were used as nucleic acid carriers. Adsorption of PEI on SPION improved the cytocompatibility dramatically. Application of external magnetic field increased intracellular uptake of nanoparticles and transfection efficiency without any additional cytotoxicity. We introduce our novel magnetism-based method as a promising tool for enhanced nucleic acid delivery into mammalian cells. PMID:25963582

  7. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators.

  8. Local conformational perturbations of the DNA molecule in the SG-model

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnobaeva, L. A.; Shapovalov, A. V.

    2015-11-17

    Within the formalism of the Fokker–Planck equation, the influence of nonstationary external force, random force, and dissipation effects on dynamics local conformational perturbations (kink) propagating along the DNA molecule is investigated. Such waves have an important role in the regulation of important biological processes in living systems at the molecular level. As a dynamic model of DNA was used a modified sine-Gordon equation, simulating the rotational oscillations of bases in one of the chains DNA. The equation of evolution of the kink momentum is obtained in the form of the stochastic differential equation in the Stratonovich sense within the framework of the well-known McLaughlin and Scott energy approach. The corresponding Fokker–Planck equation for the momentum distribution function coincides with the equation describing the Ornstein–Uhlenbek process with a regular nonstationary external force. The influence of the nonlinear stochastic effects on the kink dynamics is considered with the help of the Fokker– Planck nonlinear equation with the shift coefficient dependent on the first moment of the kink momentum distribution function. Expressions are derived for average value and variance of the momentum. Examples are considered which demonstrate the influence of the external regular and random forces on the evolution of the average value and variance of the kink momentum. Within the formalism of the Fokker–Planck equation, the influence of nonstationary external force, random force, and dissipation effects on the kink dynamics is investigated in the sine–Gordon model. The equation of evolution of the kink momentum is obtained in the form of the stochastic differential equation in the Stratonovich sense within the framework of the well-known McLaughlin and Scott energy approach. The corresponding Fokker–Planck equation for the momentum distribution function coincides with the equation describing the Ornstein–Uhlenbek process with a regular

  9. Local conformational perturbations of the DNA molecule in the SG-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnobaeva, L. A.; Shapovalov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Within the formalism of the Fokker-Planck equation, the influence of nonstationary external force, random force, and dissipation effects on dynamics local conformational perturbations (kink) propagating along the DNA molecule is investigated. Such waves have an important role in the regulation of important biological processes in living systems at the molecular level. As a dynamic model of DNA was used a modified sine-Gordon equation, simulating the rotational oscillations of bases in one of the chains DNA. The equation of evolution of the kink momentum is obtained in the form of the stochastic differential equation in the Stratonovich sense within the framework of the well-known McLaughlin and Scott energy approach. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for the momentum distribution function coincides with the equation describing the Ornstein-Uhlenbek process with a regular nonstationary external force. The influence of the nonlinear stochastic effects on the kink dynamics is considered with the help of the Fokker- Planck nonlinear equation with the shift coefficient dependent on the first moment of the kink momentum distribution function. Expressions are derived for average value and variance of the momentum. Examples are considered which demonstrate the influence of the external regular and random forces on the evolution of the average value and variance of the kink momentum. Within the formalism of the Fokker-Planck equation, the influence of nonstationary external force, random force, and dissipation effects on the kink dynamics is investigated in the sine-Gordon model. The equation of evolution of the kink momentum is obtained in the form of the stochastic differential equation in the Stratonovich sense within the framework of the well-known McLaughlin and Scott energy approach. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for the momentum distribution function coincides with the equation describing the Ornstein-Uhlenbek process with a regular nonstationary

  10. On the influence of low-energy ionizing radiation on the amino acid molecule: proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuliene, Jelena; Romanova, Liudmila; Vukstich, Vasyl; Papp, Alexander; Shkurin, Serhiy; Baliulyte, Laura; Snegursky, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    New data on the electron-impact fragmentation of the amino acid proline molecule are presented as being related to the formation of the ionized products due to the influence of low-energy ionizing radiation on the above molecule. An extensive DFT-theory based on the theoretical approach enabled the main pathways of the proline molecules fragmentation to be elucidated. A series of the produced fragments have been identified. The absolute appearance energies for some of them have been both measured experimentally and calculated theoretically. The data of the experimental studies and theoretical calculations are compared and analyzed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic, B. Sivaraman.

  11. Identification of Putative Coffee Rust Mycoparasites via Single-Molecule DNA Sequencing of Infected Pustules

    PubMed Central

    Marino, John A.; Perfecto, Ivette; Vandermeer, John

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of crop pests with their natural enemies is a fundament to their control. Natural enemies of fungal pathogens of crops are poorly known relative to those of insect pests, despite the diversity of fungal pathogens and their economic importance. Currently, many regions across Latin America are experiencing unprecedented epidemics of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix). Identification of natural enemies of coffee rust could aid in developing management strategies or in pinpointing species that could be used for biocontrol. In the present study, we characterized fungal communities associated with coffee rust lesions by single-molecule DNA sequencing of fungal rRNA gene bar codes from leaf discs (≈28 mm2) containing rust lesions and control discs with no rust lesions. The leaf disc communities were hyperdiverse in terms of fungi, with up to 69 operational taxonomic units (putative species) per control disc, and the diversity was only slightly reduced in rust-infected discs, with up to 63 putative species. However, geography had a greater influence on the fungal community than whether the disc was infected by coffee rust. Through comparisons between control and rust-infected leaf discs, as well as taxonomic criteria, we identified 15 putative mycoparasitic fungi. These fungi are concentrated in the fungal family Cordycipitaceae and the order Tremellales. These data emphasize the complexity of diverse fungi of unknown ecological function within a leaf that might influence plant disease epidemics or lead to the development of species for biocontrol of fungal disease. PMID:26567299

  12. Identification of Putative Coffee Rust Mycoparasites via Single-Molecule DNA Sequencing of Infected Pustules.

    PubMed

    James, Timothy Y; Marino, John A; Perfecto, Ivette; Vandermeer, John

    2015-11-13

    The interaction of crop pests with their natural enemies is a fundament to their control. Natural enemies of fungal pathogens of crops are poorly known relative to those of insect pests, despite the diversity of fungal pathogens and their economic importance. Currently, many regions across Latin America are experiencing unprecedented epidemics of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix). Identification of natural enemies of coffee rust could aid in developing management strategies or in pinpointing species that could be used for biocontrol. In the present study, we characterized fungal communities associated with coffee rust lesions by single-molecule DNA sequencing of fungal rRNA gene bar codes from leaf discs (≈28 mm(2)) containing rust lesions and control discs with no rust lesions. The leaf disc communities were hyperdiverse in terms of fungi, with up to 69 operational taxonomic units (putative species) per control disc, and the diversity was only slightly reduced in rust-infected discs, with up to 63 putative species. However, geography had a greater influence on the fungal community than whether the disc was infected by coffee rust. Through comparisons between control and rust-infected leaf discs, as well as taxonomic criteria, we identified 15 putative mycoparasitic fungi. These fungi are concentrated in the fungal family Cordycipitaceae and the order Tremellales. These data emphasize the complexity of diverse fungi of unknown ecological function within a leaf that might influence plant disease epidemics or lead to the development of species for biocontrol of fungal disease.

  13. Polymer relaxation and stretching dynamics in semi-dilute DNA solutions: a single molecule study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Brockman, Christopher; Schroeder, Charles

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we study polymer relaxation and stretching dynamics in semi-dilute DNA solutions using single molecule techniques. Using this approach, we uncover a unique scaling relation for longest polymer relaxation time that falls in the crossover regime described by semi-flexible polymer solutions, which is distinct from truly flexible polymer chains. In addition, we performed a series of step-strain experiments on single polymers in semi-dilute solutions in planar extensional flow using an automated microfluidic trap. In this way, we are able to precisely control the flow strength and the amount of strain applied to single polymer chains, thereby enabling direct observation of the full stretching and relaxation process in semi-dilute solutions during transient start-up and flow cessation. Interestingly, we observe polymer individualism in the conformation of single chains in semi-dilute solutions, which to our knowledge has not yet been observed. In addition, we observe the relaxation data can be explained by a multi-exponential decay process after flow cessation in semi-dilute solutions. Overall, our work reports key advance in non-dilute polymer systems from a molecular perspective via direct observation of dynamics in strong flows. DOW fellowship.

  14. Sequential photochemical and microbial degradation of organic molecules bound to humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, J.A.; Zika, R.G. ); Alexander, M. )

    1989-11-01

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of (2-{sup 14}C)glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of {sup 14}C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A{sub 330}. Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid.

  15. Sequential photochemical and microbial degradation of organic molecules bound to humic Acid.

    PubMed

    Amador, J A; Alexander, M; Zika, R G

    1989-11-01

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of [2-C]glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A(330). Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid.

  16. Difficulties in Laboratory Studies and Astronomical Observations of Organic Molecules: Hydroxyacetone and Lactic Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apponi, A. J.; Brewster, M. A.; Hoy, J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2006-01-01

    For the past 35 years, radio astronomy has revealed a rich organic chemistry in the interstellar gas, which is exceptionally complex towards active star-forming regions. New solar systems condense out of this gas and may influence the evolution of life on newly formed planets. Much of the biologically important functionality is present among the some 130 gas-phase molecules found to date, including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, acids, amines, amides and even the simplest sugar - glycolaldehyde. Still, many unidentified interstellar radio signals remain, and their identification relies on further laboratory study. The molecules hydroxyacetone and lactic acid are relatively small organic molecules, but possess rather complex rotational spectra owing to their high asymmetry. Hydroxyacetone is particularly problematic because it possess a very low barrier to internal rotation, and exhibits strong coupling of the free-rotor states with the overall rotation of the molecule. As in the case of acetamide, a full decomposition method was employed to order the resultant eigenstates onto normal asymmetric top eigenvectors.

  17. Circulating nucleic acids damage DNA of healthy cells by integrating into their genomes.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Indraneel; Khare, Naveen Kumar; Raghuram, Gorantla Venkata; Chaubal, Rohan; Khambatti, Fatema; Gupta, Deepika; Gaikwad, Ashwini; Prasannan, Preeti; Singh, Akshita; Iyer, Aishwarya; Singh, Ankita; Upadhyay, Pawan; Nair, Naveen Kumar; Mishra, Pradyumna Kumar; Dutt, Amit

    2015-03-01

    Whether nucleic acids that circulate in blood have any patho-physiological functions in the host have not been explored.We report here that far from being inert molecules, circulating nucleic acids have significant biological activities of their own that are deleterious to healthy cells of the body. Fragmented DNA and chromatin (DNAfs and Cfs) isolated from blood of cancer patients and healthy volunteers are readily taken up by a variety of cells in culture to be localized in their nuclei within a few minutes. The intra-nuclear DNAfs and Cfs associate themselves with host cell chromosomes to evoke a cellular DNA-damage-repair-response (DDR) followed by their incorporation into the host cell genomes. Whole genome sequencing detected the presence of tens of thousands of human sequence reads in the recipient mouse cells. Genomic incorporation of DNAfs and Cfs leads to dsDNA breaks and activation of apoptotic pathways in the treated cells. When injected intravenously into Balb/C mice, DNAfs and Cfs undergo genomic integration into cells of their vital organs resulting in activation of DDR and apoptotic proteins in the recipient cells. Cfs have significantly greater activity than DNAfs with respect to all parameters examined, while both DNAfs and Cfs isolated from cancer patients are more active than those from normal volunteers. All the above pathological actions of DNAfs and Cfs described above can be abrogated by concurrent treatment with DNase I and/or anti-histone antibody complexed nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that circulating DNAfs and Cfs are physiological, continuously arising, endogenous DNA damaging agents with implications to ageing and a multitude of human pathologies including initiation of cancer.

  18. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  19. Adding explicit solvent molecules to continuum solvent calculations for the calculation of aqueous acid dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Casey P; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2006-02-23

    Aqueous acid dissociation free energies for a diverse set of 57 monoprotic acids have been calculated using a combination of experimental and calculated gas and liquid-phase free energies. For ionic species, aqueous solvation free energies were calculated using the recently developed SM6 continuum solvation model. This model combines a dielectric continuum with atomic surface tensions to account for bulk solvent effects. For some of the acids studied, a combined approach that involves attaching a single explicit water molecule to the conjugate base (anion), and then surrounding the resulting anion-water cluster by a dielectric continuum, significantly improves the agreement between the calculated pK(a) value and experiment. This suggests that for some anions, particularly those concentrating charge on a single exposed heteroatom, augmenting implicit solvent calculations with a single explicit water molecule is required, and adequate, to account for strong short-range hydrogen bonding interactions between the anion and the solvent. We also demonstrate the effect of adding several explicit waters by calculating the pK(a) of bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) using as the conjugate base carbonate (CO(3)(2-)) bound by up to three explicit water molecules.

  20. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Barbara; Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100-6000mgcarbonL(-1). (13)C CPMAS-NMR and GC-MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS (13)CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R(2)=-0.85; p<0.01, n=6). PMID:27100009

  1. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Barbara; Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100-6000mgcarbonL(-1). (13)C CPMAS-NMR and GC-MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS (13)CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R(2)=-0.85; p<0.01, n=6).

  2. Mycosporine-like amino acids are multifunctional molecules in sea hares and their marine community.

    PubMed

    Kicklighter, Cynthia E; Kamio, Michiya; Nguyen, Linh; Germann, Markus W; Derby, Charles D

    2011-07-12

    Molecules of keystone significance are relatively rare, yet mediate a variety of interactions between organisms. They influence the distribution and abundance of species, the transfer of energy across multiple trophic levels, and thus they play significant roles in structuring ecosystems. Despite their potential importance in facilitating our understanding of ecological systems, only three molecules thus far have been proposed as molecules of keystone significance: saxitoxin and dimethyl sulfide in marine communities and tetrodotoxin in riparian communities. In the course of studying the neuroecology of chemical defenses, we identified three mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs)--N-ethanol palythine (= asterina-330), N-isopropanol palythine (= aplysiapalythine A), and N-ethyl palythine (= aplysiapalythine B)--as intraspecific alarm cues for sea hares (Aplysia californica). These alarm cues are released in the ink secretion of sea hares and cause avoidance behaviors in neighboring conspecifics. Further, we show that these three bioactive MAAs, two [aplysiapalythine A (APA) and -B (APB)] being previously unknown molecules, are present in the algal diet of sea hares and are concentrated in their defensive secretion as well as in their skin. MAAs are known to be produced by algae, fungi, and cyanobacteria and are acquired by many aquatic animals through trophic interactions. MAAs are widely used as sunscreens, among other uses, but sea hares modify their function to serve a previously undocumented role, as intraspecific chemical cues. Our findings highlight the multifunctionality of MAAs and their role in ecological connectivity, suggesting that they may function as molecules of keystone significance in marine ecosystems.

  3. The sequence of rat leukosialin (W3/13 antigen) reveals a molecule with O-linked glycosylation of one third of its extracellular amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, N; Barclay, A N; Willis, A C; Williams, A F

    1987-01-01

    Leukosialin is one of the major glycoproteins of thymocytes and T lymphocytes and is notable for a very high content of O-linked carbohydrate structures. The full protein sequence for rat leukosialin as translated from cDNA clones is now reported. The molecule contains 371 amino acids with 224 residues outside the cell, one transmembrane sequence and 124 cytoplasmic residues. Data from the peptide sequence and carbohydrate composition suggest that one in three of the extracellular amino acids may be O-glycosylated with no N-linked glycosylation sites. The cDNA sequence contained a CpG rich region in the 3' coding sequence and a large 3' non-coding region which included tandem repeats of the sequence GGAT. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2965006

  4. Optical mapping of single-molecule human DNA in disposable, mass-produced all-polymer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østergaard, Peter Friis; Lopacinska-Jørgensen, Joanna; Nyvold Pedersen, Jonas; Tommerup, Niels; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Marie, Rodolphe; Taboryski, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate all-polymer injection molded devices for optical mapping of denaturation-renaturation (DR) patterns on long, single DNA-molecules from the human genome. The devices have channels with ultra-low aspect ratio, only 110 nm deep while 20 μm wide, and are superior to the silica devices used previously in the field. With these polymer devices, we demonstrate on-chip recording of DR images of DNA-molecules stretched to more than 95% of their contour length. The stretching is done by opposing flows Marie et al (2013 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 110 4893-8). The performance is validated by mapping 20 out of 24 Mbp-long DNA fragments to the human reference genome. We optimized fabrication of the devices to a yield exceeding 95%. This permits a substantial economies-of-scale driven cost-reduction, leading to device costs as low as 3 USD per device, about a factor 70 lower than the cost of silica devices. This lowers the barrier to a wide use of DR mapping of native, megabase-size DNA molecules, which has a huge potential as a complementary method to next-generation sequencing.

  5. In vitro study of DNA damage induced by acid orange 52 and its biodegradation derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ben Mansour, Hedi; Barillier, Daniel; Corroler, David; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila; Mosrati, Ridha

    2009-03-01

    Mutagenicity of acid orange 52 (AO52) and its degradation products by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 was evaluated with the use of Salmonella Typhimurium TA102 and TA104 with and without the metabolic activation system (S9). No mutagenicity was observed in the absence of S9 and in the presence of S9 for biodegradation under shaking conditions, but it increased significantly in the presence of S9 after biodegradation under static conditions. In addition, the ability of tested compounds to induce DNA damage in vitro was evaluated with the DNA strand scission assay. The toxicity generated by the pure azo dye and the corresponding azoreduction products (4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid and N,N'-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine) were compared. We suggest that the mutagenicity mechanism of these molecules occurs through free radical generation processes. In this study, we demonstrate that P. putida mt-2 incubated under aerobic conditions undergoes catabolism that enables it to degrade AO52 completely and, especially, to detoxify the dye mixtures.

  6. Structure and DNA-binding properties of the Bacillus subtilis SpoIIIE DNA translocase revealed by single-molecule and electron microscopies

    PubMed Central

    Cattoni, Diego I.; Thakur, Shreyasi; Godefroy, Cedric; Le Gall, Antoine; Lai-Kee-Him, Josephine; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bron, Patrick; Nöllmann, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    SpoIIIE/FtsK are a family of ring-shaped, membrane-anchored, ATP-fuelled motors required to segregate DNA across bacterial membranes. This process is directional and requires that SpoIIIE/FtsK recognize highly skewed octameric sequences (SRS/KOPS for SpoIIIE/FtsK) distributed along the chromosome. Two models have been proposed to explain the mechanism by which SpoIIIE/FtsK interact with DNA. The loading model proposes that SpoIIIE/FtsK oligomerize exclusively on SpoIIIE recognition sequence/orienting polar sequences (SRS/KOPS) to accomplish directional DNA translocation, whereas the target search and activation mechanism proposes that pre-assembled SpoIIIE/FtsK hexamers bind to non-specific DNA, reach SRS/KOPS by diffusion/3d hopping and activate at SRS/KOPS. Here, we employ single-molecule total internal reflection imaging, atomic force and electron microscopies and ensemble biochemical methods to test these predictions and obtain further insight into the SpoIIIE–DNA mechanism of interaction. First, we find that SpoIIIE binds DNA as a homo-hexamer with neither ATP binding nor hydrolysis affecting the binding mechanism or affinity. Second, we show that hexameric SpoIIIE directly binds to double-stranded DNA without requiring the presence of SRS or free DNA ends. Finally, we find that SpoIIIE hexamers can show open and closed conformations in solution, with open-ring conformations most likely resembling a state poised to load to non-specific, double-stranded DNA. These results suggest how SpoIIIE and related ring-shaped motors may be split open to bind topologically closed DNA. PMID:24297254

  7. Different combinations of atomic interactions predict protein-small molecule and protein-DNA/RNA affinities with similar accuracy.

    PubMed

    Dias, Raquel; Kolazckowski, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between proteins and other molecules play essential roles in all biological processes. Although it is widely held that a protein's ligand specificity is determined primarily by its three-dimensional structure, the general principles by which structure determines ligand binding remain poorly understood. Here we use statistical analyses of a large number of protein-ligand complexes with associated binding-affinity measurements to quantitatively characterize how combinations of atomic interactions contribute to ligand affinity. We find that there are significant differences in how atomic interactions determine ligand affinity for proteins that bind small chemical ligands, those that bind DNA/RNA and those that interact with other proteins. Although protein-small molecule and protein-DNA/RNA binding affinities can be accurately predicted from structural data, models predicting one type of interaction perform poorly on the others. Additionally, the particular combinations of atomic interactions required to predict binding affinity differed between small-molecule and DNA/RNA data sets, consistent with the conclusion that the structural bases determining ligand affinity differ among interaction types. In contrast to what we obs