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Sample records for acid dna sequence

  1. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  2. Nucleic acid (cDNA) and amino acid sequences of alpha-type gliadins from wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed Central

    Kasarda, D D; Okita, T W; Bernardin, J E; Baecker, P A; Nimmo, C C; Lew, E J; Dietler, M D; Greene, F C

    1984-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence for an alpha-type gliadin protein of wheat (Triticum aestivum Linnaeus) endosperm has been derived from a cloned cDNA sequence. An additional cDNA clone that corresponds to about 75% of a similar alpha-type gliadin has been sequenced and shows some important differences. About 97% of the composite sequence of A-gliadin (an alpha-type gliadin fraction) has also been obtained by direct amino acid sequencing. This sequence shows a high degree of similarity with amino acid sequences derived from both cDNA clones and is virtually identical to one of them. On the basis of sequence information, after loss of the signal sequence, the mature alpha-type gliadins may be divided into five different domains, two of which may have evolved from an ancestral gliadin gene, whereas the remaining three contain repeating sequences that may have developed independently. Images PMID:6589619

  3. Nucleic acid (cDNA) and amino acid sequences of the maize endosperm protein glutelin-2.

    PubMed Central

    Prat, S; Cortadas, J; Puigdomènech, P; Palau, J

    1985-01-01

    The cDNA coding for a glutelin-2 protein from maize endosperm has been cloned and the complete amino acid sequence of the protein derived for the first time. An immature maize endosperm cDNA bank was screened for the expression of a beta-lactamase:glutelin-2 (G2) fusion polypeptide by using antibodies against the purified 28 kd G2 protein. A clone corresponding to the 28 kd G2 protein was sequenced and the primary structure of this protein was derived. Five regions can be defined in the protein sequence: an 11 residue N-terminal part, a repeated region formed by eight units of the sequence Pro-Pro-Pro-Val-His-Leu, an alternating Pro-X stretch 21 residues long, a Cys rich domain and a C-terminal part rich in Gln. The protein sequence is preceded by 19 residues which have the characteristics of the signal peptide found in secreted proteins. Unlike zeins, the main maize storage proteins, 28 kd glutelin-2 has several homologous sequences in common with other cereal storage proteins. Images PMID:3839076

  4. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  5. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  6. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  7. Amino acid sequence of band-3 protein from rainbow trout erythrocytes derived from cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, S; Michel, F; Rudloff, V; Appelhans, H

    1992-01-01

    In this report we present the first complete band-3 cDNA sequence of a poikilothermic lower vertebrate. The primary structure of the anion-exchange protein band 3 (AE1) from rainbow trout erythrocytes was determined by nucleotide sequencing of cDNA clones. The overlapping clones have a total length of 3827 bp with a 5'-terminal untranslated region of 150 bp, a 2754 bp open reading frame and a 3'-untranslated region of 924 bp. Band-3 protein from trout erythrocytes consists of 918 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 101 827 Da. Comparison of its amino acid sequence revealed a 60-65% identity within the transmembrane spanning sequence of band-3 proteins published so far. An additional insertion of 24 amino acid residues within the membrane-associated domain of trout band-3 protein was identified, which until now was thought to be a general feature only of mammalian band-3-related proteins. PMID:1637296

  8. In silico comparative analysis of DNA and amino acid sequences for prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Lee, J; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability might contribute to species specificity of prion diseases in various organisms. In this study, structures of the prion protein gene (PRNP) and its amino acids were compared among species of which sequence data were available. Comparisons of PRNP DNA sequences among 12 species including human, chimpanzee, monkey, bovine, ovine, dog, mouse, rat, wallaby, opossum, chicken and zebrafish allowed us to identify candidate regulatory regions in intron 1 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in addition to the coding region. Highly conserved putative binding sites for transcription factors, such as heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) and myocite enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), were discovered in the intron 1. In 3'-UTR, the functional sequence (ATTAAA) for nucleus-specific polyadenylation was found in all the analysed species. The functional sequence (TTTTTAT) for maturation-specific polyadenylation was identically observed only in ovine, and one or two nucleotide mismatches in the other species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences in 53 species revealed a large sequence identity. Especially the octapeptide repeat region was observed in all the species but frog and zebrafish. Functional changes and susceptibility to prion diseases with various isoforms of prion protein could be caused by numeric variability and conformational changes discovered in the repeat sequences.

  9. Sequence-specific nucleic acid mobility using a reversible block copolymer gel matrix and DNA amphiphiles (lipid-DNA) in capillary and microfluidic electrophoretic separations.

    PubMed

    Wagler, Patrick; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S; Tangen, Uwe; de Vries, Jan Willem; Prusty, Deepak; Kwak, Minseok; Herrmann, Andreas; McCaskill, John S

    2015-10-01

    Reversible noncovalent but sequence-dependent attachment of DNA to gels is shown to allow programmable mobility processing of DNA populations. The covalent attachment of DNA oligomers to polyacrylamide gels using acrydite-modified oligonucleotides has enabled sequence-specific mobility assays for DNA in gel electrophoresis: sequences binding to the immobilized DNA are delayed in their migration. Such a system has been used for example to construct complex DNA filters facilitating DNA computations. However, these gels are formed irreversibly and the choice of immobilized sequences is made once off during fabrication. In this work, we demonstrate the reversible self-assembly of gels combined with amphiphilic DNA molecules, which exhibit hydrophobic hydrocarbon chains attached to the nucleobase. This amphiphilic DNA, which we term lipid-DNA, is synthesized in advance and is blended into a block copolymer gel to induce sequence-dependent DNA retention during electrophoresis. Furthermore, we demonstrate and characterize the programmable mobility shift of matching DNA in such reversible gels both in thin films and microchannels using microelectrode arrays. Such sequence selective separation may be employed to select nucleic acid sequences of similar length from a mixture via local electronics, a basic functionality that can be employed in novel electronic chemical cell designs and other DNA information-processing systems.

  10. In the TTF-1 homeodomain the contribution of several amino acids to DNA recognition depends on the bound sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Fabbro, D; Tell, G; Leonardi, A; Pellizzari, L; Pucillo, C; Lonigro, R; Formisano, S; Damante, G

    1996-01-01

    The thyroid transcription factor-1 homeodomain (TTF-1HD) shows a peculiar DNA binding specificity, preferentially recognizing sequences containing the 5'-CAAG-3' core motif. Most other homeodomains instead recognize sites containing the 5'-TAAT-3' core motif. Here, we show that TTF-1HD efficiently recognizes another sequence, called D1, devoid of the 5'-CAAG-3' core motif. Different experimental approaches indicate that TTF-1HD contacts the D1 sequence in a manner which is different to that used to interact with sequences containing the 5'-CAAG-3' core motif. The binding activities that mutants of TTF-1HD display with the D1 sequence or with the sequence containing the 5'-CAAG-3' core motif indicate that the role of several DNA-contacting amino acids is different. In particular, during recognition of the D1 sequence, backbone-interacting amino acids not relevant in binding to sequences containing the 5'-CAAG-3' core motif play an important role. In the TTF-1HD, therefore, the contribution of several amino acids to DNA recognition depends on the bound sequence. These data indicate that although a common bonding network exists in all of the HD/DNA complexes, peculiarities important for DNA recognition may occur in single cases. PMID:8811078

  11. Analysis of cloned cDNA and genomic sequences for phytochrome: complete amino acid sequences for two gene products expressed in etiolated Avena.

    PubMed Central

    Hershey, H P; Barker, R F; Idler, K B; Lissemore, J L; Quail, P H

    1985-01-01

    Cloned cDNA and genomic sequences have been analyzed to deduce the amino acid sequence of phytochrome from etiolated Avena. Restriction endonuclease site polymorphism between clones indicates that at least four phytochrome genes are expressed in this tissue. Sequence analysis of two complete and one partial coding region shows approximately 98% homology at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels, with the majority of amino acid changes being conservative. High sequence homology is also found in the 5'-untranslated region but significant divergence occurs in the 3'-untranslated region. The phytochrome polypeptides are 1128 amino acid residues long corresponding to a molecular mass of 125 kdaltons. The known protein sequence at the chromophore attachment site occurs only once in the polypeptide, establishing that phytochrome has a single chromophore per monomer covalently linked to Cys-321. Computer analyses of the amino acid sequences have provided predictions regarding a number of structural features of the phytochrome molecule. PMID:3001642

  12. Nucleotide sequences of the Pseudomonas savastanoi indoleacetic acid genes show homology with Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tetsuji; Palm, Curtis J.; Brooks, Bob; Kosuge, Tsune

    1985-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequences of iaaM and iaaH, the genetic determinants for, respectively, tryptophan 2-monooxygenase and indoleacetamide hydrolase, the enzymes that catalyze the conversion of L-tryptophan to indoleacetic acid in the tumor-forming bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. savastanoi. The sequence analysis indicates that the iaaM locus contains an open reading frame encoding 557 amino acids that would comprise a protein with a molecular weight of 61,783; the iaaH locus contains an open reading frame of 455 amino acids that would comprise a protein with a molecular weight of 48,515. Significant amino acid sequence homology was found between the predicted sequence of the tryptophan monooxygenase of P. savastanoi and the deduced product of the T-DNA tms-1 gene of the octopine-type plasmid pTiA6NC from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Strong homology was found in the 25 amino acid sequence in the putative FAD-binding region of tryptophan monooxygenase. Homology was also found in the amino acid sequences representing the central regions of the putative products of iaaH and tms-2 T-DNA. The results suggest a strong similarity in the pathways for indoleacetic acid synthesis encoded by genes in P. savastanoi and in A. tumefaciens T-DNA. Images PMID:16593610

  13. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  14. Size and distribution of polyadenylic acid sequences in Drosophila polytene DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Alonso, C; Pages, M; García, M L

    1977-12-02

    [3H]Poly(U) hybridizes very rapidly to polytene DNA from Drosophila hydei. When hybridization is performed at 30 degrees C in 2 X SSC to a large excess of DNA, 95% of the poly(U) becomes ribonuclease resistant. Also, complementary RNA transcribed in vitro from polytene DNA hybridizes to poly(U). 023--0.25% of the DNA is composed of (dA)-rich sequences and 0.23--0.31% of cRNA hybridizes to [3H]poly(U). The length of the (dA)-rich sequences on the DNA and cRNA is 40 nucleotides. The Tm values of these hybrids formed between DNA or cRNA-poly(U) is 45 degrees C. The poly(A) fragments from cytoplasmic RNA ranged from 80 to 170 nucleotides in lenght, and migrated in polyacrilamide gels as a broad peak. The average sizes of the poly(A) fragments from the poly(A)-containing RNA transcribed by nuclei isolated from salivary glands in vivo or in vitro were 40, 70, 170 and 70 nucleotides, respectively. Hybridization in situ of [3H]-poly(U) to chromosome squashes indicated that the (dA)-rich sequences are randomly distributed over the whole genome.

  15. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  16. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA.

    PubMed

    Heather, James M; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way.

  17. Highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection of specific DNA sequences with molecular beacons and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhai, Kun; Xiang, Wenjun; Wang, Lianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescence method of quantitative detection for specific DNA sequence is developed based on molecular beacon (MB) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I by synchronous fluorescence analysis. It is demonstrated by an oligonucleotide sequence of wild-type HBV (target DNA) as a model system. In this strategy, the fluorophore of MB is designed to be 6-carboxyfluorescein group (FAM), and the maximum excitation wavelength and maximum emission wavelength are both very close to that of SYBR Green I. In the presence of targets DNA, the MBs hybridize with the targets DNA and form double-strand DNA (dsDNA), the fluorophore FAM is separated from the quencher BHQ-1, thus the fluorophore emit fluorescence. At the same time, SYBR Green I binds to dsDNA, the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I is significantly enhanced. When targets DNA are detected by synchronous fluorescence analysis, the fluorescence peaks of FAM and SYBR Green I overlap completely, so the fluorescence signal of system will be significantly enhanced. Thus, highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection for DNA can be realized. Under the optimum conditions, the total fluorescence intensity of FAM and SYBR Green I exhibits good linear dependence on concentration of targets DNA in the range from 2×10(-11) to 2.5×10(-9)M. The detection limit of target DNA is estimated to be 9×10(-12)M (3σ). Compared with previously reported methods of detection DNA with MB, the proposed method can significantly enhance the detection sensitivity.

  18. DNA Sequencing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    An automated DNA sequencing apparatus having a reactor for providing at least two series of DNA products formed from a single primer and a DNA strand, each DNA product of a series differing in molecular weight and having a chain terminating agent at one end; separating means for separating the DNA products to form a series bands, the intensity of substantially all nearby bands in a different series being different, band reading means for determining the position an This invention was made with government support including a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, contract number AI-06045. The U.S. government has certain rights in the invention.

  19. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the thioesterase domain of the rat fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed

    Naggert, J; Witkowski, A; Mikkelsen, J; Smith, S

    1988-01-25

    A cloned cDNA containing the entire coding sequence for the long-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolase (thioesterase I) component as well as the 3'-noncoding region of the fatty acid synthetase has been isolated using an expression vector and domain-specific antibodies. The coding region was assigned to the thioesterase I domain by identification of sequences coding for characterized peptide fragments, amino-terminal analysis of the isolated thioesterase I domain and the presence of the serine esterase active-site sequence motif. The thioesterase I domain is 306 amino acids long with a calculated molecular mass of 33,476 daltons; its DNA is flanked at the 5'-end by a region coding for the acyl carrier protein domain and at the 3'-end by a 1,537-base pairs-long noncoding sequence with a poly(A) tail. The thioesterase I domain exhibits a low, albeit discernible, homology with the discrete medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolases (thioesterase II) from rat mammary gland and duck uropygial gland, suggesting a distant but common evolutionary ancestry for these proteins.

  20. Amino acid sequence of rabbit kidney neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) deduced from a complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Devault, A; Lazure, C; Nault, C; Le Moual, H; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M; Kahn, P; Powell, J; Mallet, J; Beaumont, A

    1987-01-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) is a major constituent of kidney brush border membranes. It is also present in the brain where it has been shown to be involved in the inactivation of opioid peptides, methionine- and leucine-enkephalins. For this reason this enzyme is often called 'enkephalinase'. In order to characterize the primary structure of the enzyme, oligonucleotide probes were designed from partial amino acid sequences and used to isolate clones from kidney cDNA libraries. Sequencing of the cDNA inserts revealed the complete primary structure of the enzyme. Neutral endopeptidase consists of 750 amino acids. It contains a short N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (27 amino acids), a single membrane-spanning segment (23 amino acids) and an extracellular domain that comprises most of the protein mass. The comparison of the primary structure of neutral endopeptidase with that of thermolysin, a bacterial Zn-metallopeptidase, indicates that most of the amino acid residues involved in Zn coordination and catalytic activity in thermolysin are found within highly honmologous sequences in neutral endopeptidase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2440677

  1. Analys. DNA: a computer program for nucleic acid sequence data processing.

    PubMed

    Amthauer, R; Araya, A

    1984-09-01

    A computer program written in BASIC language is described. The program allows processing and analysis of DNA data and has been designed to be used by persons with little or no computer experience. The operator using different options can search for direct homologies with varying degrees of matching, generate complementary strands, find restriction sites, invert the polarity of the sequence and edit a print-out.

  2. Image analysis for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Kannappan; Huang, Thomas S.

    1991-07-01

    There is a great deal of interest in automating the process of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) sequencing to support the analysis of genomic DNA such as the Human and Mouse Genome projects. In one class of gel-based sequencing protocols autoradiograph images are generated in the final step and usually require manual interpretation to reconstruct the DNA sequence represented by the image. The need to handle a large volume of sequence information necessitates automation of the manual autoradiograph reading step through image analysis in order to reduce the length of time required to obtain sequence data and reduce transcription errors. Various adaptive image enhancement, segmentation and alignment methods were applied to autoradiograph images. The methods are adaptive to the local characteristics of the image such as noise, background signal, or presence of edges. Once the two-dimensional data is converted to a set of aligned one-dimensional profiles waveform analysis is used to determine the location of each band which represents one nucleotide in the sequence. Different classification strategies including a rule-based approach are investigated to map the profile signals, augmented with the original two-dimensional image data as necessary, to textual DNA sequence information.

  3. Biotools: Patenting DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonsky, M.D.; Hone, W.J.

    1995-07-01

    The decision, known as In re Deuel{sup 2}, rejects the PTO`s interpretation of a previous decision of the Federal Circuit and makes it more possible that a {open_quotes}nucleic acid of a particular sequence{close_quotes} - commonly known as a gene sequence - may be patentable. 15 refs.

  4. Transposon facilitated DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.; Berg, C.M.; Huang, H.V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop methods that exploit the power of bacterial transposable elements for large scale DNA sequencing: Our premise is that the use of transposons to put primer binding sites randomly in target DNAs should provide access to all portions of large DNA fragments, without the inefficiencies of methods involving random subcloning and attendant repetitive sequencing, or of sequential synthesis of many oligonucleotide primers that are used to match systematically along a DNA molecule. Two unrelated bacterial transposons, Tn5 and {gamma}{delta}, are being used because they have both proven useful for molecular analyses, and because they differ sufficiently in mechanism and specificity of transposition to merit parallel development.

  5. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  6. DNA Sequence and Expression Variation of Hop (Humulus lupulus) Valerophenone Synthase (VPS), a Key Gene in Bitter Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Consuelo B.; Whittock, Lucy D.; Whittock, Simon P.; Leggett, Grey; Koutoulis, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Background The hop plant (Humulus lupulus) is a source of many secondary metabolites, with bitter acids essential in the beer brewing industry and others having potential applications for human health. This study investigated variation in DNA sequence and gene expression of valerophenone synthase (VPS), a key gene in the bitter acid biosynthesis pathway of hop. Methods Sequence variation was studied in 12 varieties, and expression was analysed in four of the 12 varieties in a series across the development of the hop cone. Results Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in VPS, seven of which were synonymous. The two non-synonymous polymorphisms did not appear to be related to typical bitter acid profiles of the varieties studied. However, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of VPS expression during hop cone development showed a clear link with the bitter acid content. The highest levels of VPS expression were observed in two triploid varieties, ‘Symphony’ and ‘Ember’, which typically have high bitter acid levels. Conclusions In all hop varieties studied, VPS expression was lowest in the leaves and an increase in expression was consistently observed during the early stages of cone development. PMID:18519445

  7. Gastropod arginine kinases from Cellana grata and Aplysia kurodai. Isolation and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Inoue, N; Higashi, T; Mizobuchi, R; Sugimura, N; Yokouchi, K; Furukohri, T

    2000-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) was isolated from the radular muscle of the gastropod molluscs Cellana grata (subclass Prosobranchia) and Aplysia kurodai (subclass Opisthobranchia), respectively, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and DEAE-ion exchange chromatography. The denatured relative molecular mass values were estimated to be 40 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated enzyme from Aplysia gave a Km value of 0.6 mM for arginine and a Vmax value of 13 micromole Pi min(-1) mg protein(-1) for the forward reaction. These values are comparable to other molluscan AKs. The cDNAs encoding Cellana and Aplysia AKs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the nucleotide sequences of 1,608 and 1,239 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Cellana AK is 1044 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 347 amino acid residues, and that for A. kurodai is 1077 nucleotides and 354 residues. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were validated by chemical sequencing of internal lysyl endopeptidase peptides. The amino acid sequences of Cellana and Aplysia AKs showed the highest percent identity (66-73%) with those of the abalone Nordotis and turbanshell Battilus belonging to the same class Gastropoda. These AK sequences still have a strong homology (63-71%) with that of the chiton Liolophura (class Polyplacophora), which is believed to be one of the most primitive molluscs. On the other hand, these AK sequences are less homologous (55-57%) with that of the clam Pseudocardium (class Bivalvia), suggesting that the biological position of the class Polyplacophora should be reconsidered.

  8. Complete nucleotide and derived amino acid sequence of cDNA encoding the mitochondrial uncoupling protein of rat brown adipose tissue: lack of a mitochondrial targeting presequence.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, R G; Patel, H V; Gerber, G E; Morton, R C; Freeman, K B

    1986-01-01

    A cDNA clone spanning the entire amino acid sequence of the nuclear-encoded uncoupling protein of rat brown adipose tissue mitochondria has been isolated and sequenced. With the exception of the N-terminal methionine the deduced N-terminus of the newly synthesized uncoupling protein is identical to the N-terminal 30 amino acids of the native uncoupling protein as determined by protein sequencing. This proves that the protein contains no N-terminal mitochondrial targeting prepiece and that a targeting region must reside within the amino acid sequence of the mature protein. Images PMID:3012461

  9. DNA sequences encoding osteoinductive products

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.A.; Wozney, J.M.; Rosen, V.

    1991-05-07

    This patent describes an isolated DNA sequence encoding an osteoinductive protein the DNA sequence comprising a coding sequence. It comprises: nucleotide No.1 through nucleotide No.387, nucleotide No.356 through nucleotide No.1543, nucleotide $402 through nucleotide No.1626, naturally occurring allelic sequences and equivalent degenerative codon sequences and sequences which hybridize to any of sequences under stringent hybridization conditions; and encode a protein characterized by the ability to induce the formation of bone and/or cartilage.

  10. An amphipathic trans-acting phosphorothioate DNA element delivers uncharged PNA and PMO nucleic acid sequences in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Harsh V.; Beaucage, Serge L.

    2016-01-01

    An innovative approach to the delivery of uncharged peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO) oligomers in mammalian cells is described and consists of extending the sequence of those oligomers with a short PNA-polyA or PMO-polyA tail. Recognition of the polyA-tailed PNA or PMO oligomers by an amphipathic trans-acting polythymidylic thiophosphate triester element (dTtaPS) results in efficient internalization of those oligomers in several cell lines. Our findings indicate that cellular uptake of the oligomers occurs through an energy-dependent mechanism and macropinocytosis appears to be the predo-minant endocytic pathway used for internalization. The functionality of the internalized oligomers is demonstrated by alternate splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding luciferase in HeLa pLuc 705 cells. Amphipathic phosphorothioate DNA elements may represent a unique class of cellular transporters for robust delivery of uncharged nucleic acid sequences in live mammalian cells. PMID:27516815

  11. Purification to homogeneity and partial amino acid sequence of a fragment which includes the methyl acceptor site of the human DNA repair protein for O6-methylguanine.

    PubMed

    Major, G N; Gardner, E J; Carne, A F; Lawley, P D

    1990-03-25

    DNA repair by O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (O6-MT) is accomplished by removal by the enzyme of the methyl group from premutagenic O6-methylguanine-DNA, thereby restoring native guanine in DNA. The methyl group is transferred to an acceptor site cysteine thiol group in the enzyme, which causes the irreversible inactivation of O6-MT. We detected a variety of different forms of the methylated, inactivated enzyme in crude extracts of human spleen of molecular weights higher and lower than the usually observed 21-24kDa for the human O6-MT. Several apparent fragments of the methylated form of the protein were purified to homogeneity following reaction of partially-purified extract enzyme with O6-[3H-CH3]methylguanine-DNA substrate. One of these fragments yielded amino acid sequence information spanning fifteen residues, which was identified as probably belonging to human methyltransferase by virtue of both its significant sequence homology to three procaryote forms of O6-MT encoded by the ada, ogt (both from E. coli) and dat (B. subtilis) genes, and sequence position of the radiolabelled methyl group which matched the position of the conserved procaryote methyl acceptor site cysteine residue. Statistical prediction of secondary structure indicated good homologies between the human fragment and corresponding regions of the constitutive form of O6-MT in procaryotes (ogt and dat gene products), but not with the inducible ada protein, indicating the possibility that we had obtained partial amino acid sequence for a non-inducible form of the human enzyme. The identity of the fragment sequence as belonging to human methyltransferase was more recently confirmed by comparison with cDNA-derived amino acid sequence from the cloned human O6-MT gene from HeLa cells (1). The two sequences compared well, with only three out of fifteen amino acids being different (and two of them by only one nucleotide in each codon).

  12. Data structures for DNA sequence manipulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, C B

    1986-01-01

    Two data structures designated Fragment and Construct are described. The Fragment data structure defines a continuous nucleic acid sequence from a unique genetic origin. The Construct defines a continuous sequence composed of sequences from multiple genetic origins. These data structures are manipulated by a set of software tools to simulate the construction of mosaic recombinant DNA molecules. They are also used as an interface between sequence data banks and analytical programs. PMID:3753765

  13. The Dynamics of DNA Sequencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morvillo, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes a paper-and-pencil activity that helps students understand DNA sequencing and expands student understanding of DNA structure, replication, and gel electrophoresis. Appropriate for advanced biology students who are familiar with the Sanger method. (DDR)

  14. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  15. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerema, Stephanie J.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with nanopores. Owing to its unique structure and properties, graphene provides interesting opportunities for the development of a new sequencing technology. In recent years, a wide range of creative ideas for graphene sequencers have been theoretically proposed and the first experimental demonstrations have begun to appear. Here, we review the different approaches to using graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing, which involve DNA passing through graphene nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons, and the physisorption of DNA on graphene nanostructures. We discuss the advantages and problems of each of these key techniques, and provide a perspective on the use of graphene in future DNA sequencing technology.

  16. EGNAS: an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The molecular recognition based on the complementary base pairing of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the fundamental principle in the fields of genetics, DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing. We present an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm that allows to generate sets containing a maximum number of sequences with defined properties. EGNAS (Exhaustive Generation of Nucleic Acid Sequences) offers the possibility of controlling both interstrand and intrastrand properties. The guanine-cytosine content can be adjusted. Sequences can be forced to start and end with guanine or cytosine. This option reduces the risk of “fraying” of DNA strands. It is possible to limit cross hybridizations of a defined length, and to adjust the uniqueness of sequences. Self-complementarity and hairpin structures of certain length can be avoided. Sequences and subsequences can optionally be forbidden. Furthermore, sequences can be designed to have minimum interactions with predefined strands and neighboring sequences. Results The algorithm is realized in a C++ program. TAG sequences can be generated and combined with primers for single-base extension reactions, which were described for multiplexed genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Thereby, possible foldback through intrastrand interaction of TAG-primer pairs can be limited. The design of sequences for specific attachment of molecular constructs to DNA origami is presented. Conclusions We developed a new software tool called EGNAS for the design of unique nucleic acid sequences. The presented exhaustive algorithm allows to generate greater sets of sequences than with previous software and equal constraints. EGNAS is freely available for noncommercial use at http://www.chm.tu-dresden.de/pc6/EGNAS. PMID:22716030

  17. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, Stefan K.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei.

  18. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, S.K.

    1998-03-24

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example, the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei. 25 figs.

  19. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  20. Nuclear hormone receptors involved in neoplasia: erb A exhibits a novel DNA sequence specificity determined by amino acids outside of the zinc-finger domain.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H; Smit-McBride, Z; Lewis, S; Sharif, M; Privalsky, M L

    1993-01-01

    The erb A oncogene is a dominant negative allele of a thyroid hormone receptor gene and acts in the cancer cell by encoding a transcriptional repressor. We demonstrate here that the DNA sequence recognition properties of the oncogenic form of the erb A protein are significantly altered from those of the normal thyroid hormone receptors and more closely resemble those of the retinoic acid receptors; this alteration appears to play an important role in defining the targets of erb A action in neoplasia. Unexpectedly, the novel DNA recognition properties of erb A are encoded by an N-terminal region not previously implicated as playing this function in current models of receptor-DNA interaction. Two N-terminal erb A amino acids in particular, histidine 12 and cysteine 32, contribute to this phenomenon, acting in conjunction with amino acids in the zinc finger domain. The effects of the N-terminal domain can be observed at the level of both DNA binding and transcriptional modulation. Our results indicate that unanticipated determinants within the nuclear hormone receptors participate in DNA sequence recognition and may contribute to the differential target gene specificity displayed by different receptor forms. Images PMID:8096060

  1. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  2. DNA Sequencing Sensors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Cardenas, Jose Antonio; Garcia-Maroto, Federico; Alvarez-Bermejo, Jose Antonio; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The first sequencing of a complete genome was published forty years ago by the double Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Frederick Sanger. That corresponded to the small sized genome of a bacteriophage, but since then there have been many complex organisms whose DNA have been sequenced. This was possible thanks to continuous advances in the fields of biochemistry and molecular genetics, but also in other areas such as nanotechnology and computing. Nowadays, sequencing sensors based on genetic material have little to do with those used by Sanger. The emergence of mass sequencing sensors, or new generation sequencing (NGS) meant a quantitative leap both in the volume of genetic material that was able to be sequenced in each trial, as well as in the time per run and its cost. One can envisage that incoming technologies, already known as fourth generation sequencing, will continue to cheapen the trials by increasing DNA reading lengths in each run. All of this would be impossible without sensors and detection systems becoming smaller and more precise. This article provides a comprehensive overview on sensors for DNA sequencing developed within the last 40 years. PMID:28335417

  3. Statistical properties of DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We review evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genes containing non-coding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range--indeed, nucleotides thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene. We resolve the problem of the "non-stationarity" feature of the sequence of base pairs by applying a new algorithm called detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). We address the claim of Voss that there is no difference in the statistical properties of coding and non-coding regions of DNA by systematically applying the DFA algorithm, as well as standard FFT analysis, to every DNA sequence (33301 coding and 29453 non-coding) in the entire GenBank database. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work showing that the non-coding sequences have certain statistical features in common with natural and artificial languages. Specifically, we adapt to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts. These statistical properties of non-coding sequences support the possibility that non-coding regions of DNA may carry biological information.

  4. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  5. Import of desired nucleic acid sequences using addressing motif of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA for fluorescent in vivo hybridization of mitochondrial DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Jaroslav; Alán, Lukáš; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2014-04-01

    Based on the matrix-addressing sequence of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA (termed MAM), which is naturally imported into mitochondria, we have constructed an import system for in vivo targeting of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or mt-mRNA, in order to provide fluorescence hybridization of the desired sequences. Thus DNA oligonucleotides were constructed, containing the 5'-flanked T7 RNA polymerase promoter. After in vitro transcription and fluorescent labeling with Alexa Fluor(®) 488 or 647 dye, we obtained the fluorescent "L-ND5 probe" containing MAM and exemplar cargo, i.e., annealing sequence to a short portion of ND5 mRNA and to the light-strand mtDNA complementary to the heavy strand nd5 mt gene (5'-end 21 base pair sequence). For mitochondrial in vivo fluorescent hybridization, HepG2 cells were treated with dequalinium micelles, containing the fluorescent probes, bringing the probes proximally to the mitochondrial outer membrane and to the natural import system. A verification of import into the mitochondrial matrix of cultured HepG2 cells was provided by confocal microscopy colocalizations. Transfections using lipofectamine or probes without 5S-rRNA addressing MAM sequence or with MAM only were ineffective. Alternatively, the same DNA oligonucleotides with 5'-CACC overhang (substituting T7 promoter) were transcribed from the tetracycline-inducible pENTRH1/TO vector in human embryonic kidney T-REx®-293 cells, while mitochondrial matrix localization after import of the resulting unlabeled RNA was detected by PCR. The MAM-containing probe was then enriched by three-order of magnitude over the natural ND5 mRNA in the mitochondrial matrix. In conclusion, we present a proof-of-principle for mitochondrial in vivo hybridization and mitochondrial nucleic acid import.

  6. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen.

  7. Structural Complexity of DNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Huai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results. PMID:23662161

  8. Evolution of phosphagen kinase V. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of two molluscan arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ban, T; Furukohri, T

    1997-06-20

    The cDNAs of arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica (Polyplacophora) and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus (Gastropoda) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the complete nucleotide sequences of 1669 and 1624 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Liolophura arginine kinase is 1050 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 349 amino acid residues, and that for Battilus is 1077 nucleotides and 358 residues. The validity of the cDNA-derived amino acid sequence was supported by chemical sequencing of internal tryptic peptides. The molecular masses were calculated to be 39,057 and 39,795 Da, respectively. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura arginine kinase showed 65-68% identity with those of Battilus and Nordotis (abalone) arginine kinases, and the homology between Battilus and Nordotis was 79%. Molluscan arginine kinases also show lower, but significant homology (38-43%) with rabbit creatine kinase. The sequences of arginine kinases could be used as a molecular clock to elucidate the phylogeny of Mollusca, one of the most diverse animal phyla.

  9. Positively charged polymer brush-functionalized filter paper for DNA sequence determination following Dot blot hybridization employing a pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Laopa, Praethong S; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Hoven, Voravee P

    2013-01-07

    As inspired by the Dot blot analysis, a well known technique in molecular biology and genetics for detecting biomolecules, a new paper-based platform for colorimetric detection of specific DNA sequences employing peptide nucleic acid (PNA) as a probe has been developed. In this particular study, a pyrrolidinyl PNA bearing a conformationally rigid d-prolyl-2-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid backbone (acpcPNA) was used as a probe. The filter paper was modified to be positively charged with grafted polymer brushes of quaternized poly(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (QPDMAEMA) prepared by surface-initiated polymerization of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate from the filter paper via ARGET ATRP followed by quaternization with methyl iodide. Following the Dot blot format, a DNA target was first immobilized via electrostatic interactions between the positive charges of the QPDMAEMA brushes and negative charges of the phosphate backbone of DNA. Upon hybridization with the biotinylated pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (b-PNA) probe, the immobilized DNA can be detected by naked eye observation of the yellow product generated by the enzymatic reaction employing HRP-labeled streptavidin. It has been demonstrated that this newly developed assay was capable of discriminating between complementary and single base mismatch targets at a detection limit of at least 10 fmol. In addition, the QPDMAEMA-grafted filter paper exhibited a superior performance to the commercial membranes, namely Nylon 66 and nitrocellulose.

  10. Characterization of nucleic acids by tandem mass spectrometry - The second decade (2004-2013): From DNA to RNA and modified sequences.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Nucleic acids play key roles in the storage and processing of genetic information, as well as in the regulation of cellular processes. Consequently, they represent attractive targets for drugs against gene-related diseases. On the other hand, synthetic oligonucleotide analogues have found application as chemotherapeutic agents targeting cellular DNA and RNA. The development of effective nucleic acid-based chemotherapeutic strategies requires adequate analytical techniques capable of providing detailed information about the nucleotide sequences, the presence of structural modifications, the formation of higher-order structures, as well as the interaction of nucleic acids with other cellular components and chemotherapeutic agents. Due to the impressive technical and methodological developments of the past years, tandem mass spectrometry has evolved to one of the most powerful tools supporting research related to nucleic acids. This review covers the literature of the past decade devoted to the tandem mass spectrometric investigation of nucleic acids, with the main focus on the fundamental mechanistic aspects governing the gas-phase dissociation of DNA, RNA, modified oligonucleotide analogues, and their adducts with metal ions. Additionally, recent findings on the elucidation of nucleic acid higher-order structures by tandem mass spectrometry are reviewed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 35:483-523, 2016.

  11. Apparatus for improved DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1996-01-01

    This invention is a means for the rapid sequencing of DNA samples. More specifically, it consists of a new design direct blotting electrophoresis unit. The DNA sequence is deposited on a membrane attached to a rotating drum. Initial data compaction is facilitated by the use of a machined multi-channeled plate called a ribbon channel plate. Each channel is an isolated mini gel system much like a gel filled capillary. The system as a whole, however, is in a slab gel like format with the advantages of uniformity and easy reusability. The system can be used in different embodiments. The drum system is unique in that after deposition the drum rotates the deposited DNA into a large non-buffer open space where processing and detection can occur. The drum can also be removed in toto to special workstations for downstream processing, multiplexing and detection.

  12. Apparatus for improved DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1996-05-07

    This invention is a means for the rapid sequencing of DNA samples. More specifically, it consists of a new design direct blotting electrophoresis unit. The DNA sequence is deposited on a membrane attached to a rotating drum. Initial data compaction is facilitated by the use of a machined multi-channeled plate called a ribbon channel plate. Each channel is an isolated mini gel system much like a gel filled capillary. The system as a whole, however, is in a slab gel like format with the advantages of uniformity and easy reusability. The system can be used in different embodiments. The drum system is unique in that after deposition the drum rotates the deposited DNA into a large non-buffer open space where processing and detection can occur. The drum can also be removed in toto to special workstations for downstream processing, multiplexing and detection. 18 figs.

  13. Sequence of a cDNA clone encoding the polysialic acid-rich and cytoplasmic domains of the neural cell adhesion molecule N-CAM.

    PubMed Central

    Hemperly, J J; Murray, B A; Edelman, G M; Cunningham, B A

    1986-01-01

    Purified fractions of the neural cell-adhesion molecule N-CAM from embryonic chicken brain contain two similar polypeptides (Mr, 160,000 and 130,000), each containing an amino-terminal external binding region, a carbohydrate-rich central region, and a carboxyl-terminal region that is associated with the cell. Previous studies indicate that the two polypeptides arise by alternative splicing of mRNAs transcribed from a single gene. We report here the 3556-nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone (pEC208) that encodes 964 amino acids from the carbohydrate and cell-associated domains of the larger N-CAM polypeptide followed by 664 nucleotides of 3' untranslated sequence. The predicted protein sequence contains attachment sites for polysialic acid-containing oligosaccharides, four tandem homologous regions of polypeptide resembling those seen in the immunoglobulin superfamily, and a single hydrophobic sequence that appears to be the membrane-spanning segment. The cytoplasmic domain carboxyl terminal to this segment includes a block of approximately equal to 250 amino acids present in the larger but not in the smaller N-CAM polypeptide. We designate these the ld (large domain) polypeptide and the sd (small domain) polypeptide. The intracellular domains of the ld and sd polypeptides are likely to be critical for cell-surface modulation of N-CAM by interacting in a differential fashion with other intrinsic proteins or with the cytoskeleton. PMID:3458261

  14. cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of ethanol-inducible rabbit liver cytochrome P-450 isozyme 3a (P-450ALC).

    PubMed Central

    Khani, S C; Zaphiropoulos, P G; Fujita, V S; Porter, T D; Koop, D R; Coon, M J

    1987-01-01

    Administration of ethanol to rabbits is known to induce a unique liver microsomal cytochrome P-450, termed isozyme 3a or P-450ALC, which is responsible for the increased oxidation of ethanol and other alcohols and the activation of toxic or carcinogenic compounds such as acetaminophen and N-nitrosodimethylamine. To further characterize this cytochrome P-450 we have identified cDNA clones to isozyme 3a by immunoscreening, DNA hybridization, and hybridization-selection. The cDNA sequence determined from two overlapping clones contains an open reading frame of 1416 nucleotides, and the first 25 amino acids of this reading frame correspond to residues 21-45 of cytochrome P-450 3a. The complete polypeptide, including residues 1 to 20, contains 492 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 56,820. Cytochrome P-450 3a is approximately 55% identical in sequence to P-450 isozymes 1 and 3b and 48% identical to isozyme 2. Hybridization of clone p3a-2 to electrophoretically fractionated rabbit liver poly(A)+ RNA revealed multiple bands, but, with a probe derived from the 3' nontranslated portion of this cDNA, only a 1.9-kilobase band was observed. Treatment of rabbits with imidazole, which increases the content of isozyme 3a, resulted in a transient increase in form 3a mRNA, but this was judged to be insufficient to account for the known 4.5-fold increase in form 3a protein. Genomic DNA analysis indicated that the cytochrome P-450 3a gene does not belong to a large subfamily. Images PMID:3027695

  15. Solid-Phase Purification of Synthetic DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Grajkowski, Andrzej; Cieslak, Jacek; Beaucage, Serge L

    2016-08-05

    Although high-throughput methods for solid-phase synthesis of DNA sequences are currently available for synthetic biology applications and technologies for large-scale production of nucleic acid-based drugs have been exploited for various therapeutic indications, little has been done to develop high-throughput procedures for the purification of synthetic nucleic acid sequences. An efficient process for purification of phosphorothioate and native DNA sequences is described herein. This process consists of functionalizing commercial aminopropylated silica gel with aminooxyalkyl functions to enable capture of DNA sequences carrying a 5'-siloxyl ether linker with a "keto" function through an oximation reaction. Deoxyribonucleoside phosphoramidites functionalized with the 5'-siloxyl ether linker were prepared in yields of 75-83% and incorporated last into the solid-phase assembly of DNA sequences. Capture of nucleobase- and phosphate-deprotected DNA sequences released from the synthesis support is demonstrated to proceed near quantitatively. After shorter than full-length DNA sequences were washed from the capture support, the purified DNA sequences were released from this support upon treatment with tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride in dry DMSO. The purity of released DNA sequences exceeds 98%. The scalability and high-throughput features of the purification process are demonstrated without sacrificing purity of the DNA sequences.

  16. The highly conserved amino acid sequence motif Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser in alpha-like DNA polymerases is required by phage phi 29 DNA polymerase for protein-primed initiation and polymerization.

    PubMed Central

    Bernad, A; Lázaro, J M; Salas, M; Blanco, L

    1990-01-01

    The alpha-like DNA polymerases from bacteriophage phi 29 and other viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes contain an amino acid consensus sequence that has been proposed to form part of the dNTP binding site. We have used site-directed mutants to study five of the six highly conserved consecutive amino acids corresponding to the most conserved C-terminal segment (Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser). Our results indicate that in phi 29 DNA polymerase this consensus sequence, although irrelevant for the 3'----5' exonuclease activity, is essential for initiation and elongation. Based on these results and on its homology with known or putative metal-binding amino acid sequences, we propose that in phi 29 DNA polymerase the Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser consensus motif is part of the dNTP binding site, involved in the synthetic activities of the polymerase (i.e., initiation and polymerization), and that it is involved particularly in the metal binding associated with the dNTP site. Images PMID:2191296

  17. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1998-01-01

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface.

  18. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  19. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  20. cDNA cloning and sequencing of tarantula hemocyanin subunits.

    PubMed

    Voit, R; Feldmaier-Fuchs, G

    1990-01-01

    Tarantula heart cDNA libraries were screened with synthetic oligonucleotide probes deduced from the highly conserved amino acid sequences of the two copper-binding sites, copper A and copper B, found in chelicerate hemocyanins. Positive cDNA clones could be obtained and four different cDNA types were characterized.

  1. cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant-associated proteolipid SPL(Phe)

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Fox, J.L.; Whitsett, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    Hydrophobic surfactant-associated protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 was isolated from either/ethanol or chloroform/methanol extracts of mammalian pulmonary surfactant. Automated Edman degradation in a gas-phase sequencer showed the major N-terminus of the human low molecular weight protein to be Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-Try-Cys-Trp-Leu-Cys-Arg-Ala-Leu-. Because of the N-terminal phenylalanine, the surfactant protein was designated SPL(Phe). Antiserum generated against hydrophobic surfactant protein(s) from bovine pulmonary surfactant recognized protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 in immunoblot analysis and was used to screen a lambdagt11 expression library constructed from adult human lung poly(A)/sup +/ RNA. This resulted in identification of a 1.4-kilobase cDNA clone that was shown to encode the N-terminus of the surfactant polypeptide SPL(Phe) (Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-) within an open reading frame for a larger protein. Expression of a fused ..beta..-galactosidase-SPL (Phe) gene in Escherichia coli yielded an immunoreactive M/sub r/ 34,000 fusion peptide. Hybrid-arrested translation with the cDNA and immunoprecipitation of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled in vitro translation products of human poly(A)/sup +/ RNA with a surfactant polyclonal antibody resulted in identification of a M/sub r/ 40,000 precursor protein. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated RNA from human lung detected a 2.0-kilobase RNA that was more abundant in adult lung than in fetal lung. These proteins, and specifically SPL(Phe), may therefore be useful for synthesis of replacement surfactants for treatment of hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants or of other surfactant-deficient states.

  2. Sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Rusling, David A; Fox, Keith R

    2014-05-15

    DNA is the most exploited biopolymer for the programmed self-assembly of objects and devices that exhibit nanoscale-sized features. One of the most useful properties of DNA nanostructures is their ability to be functionalized with additional non-nucleic acid components. The introduction of such a component is often achieved by attaching it to an oligonucleotide that is part of the nanostructure, or hybridizing it to single-stranded overhangs that extend beyond or above the nanostructure surface. However, restrictions in nanostructure design and/or the self-assembly process can limit the suitability of these procedures. An alternative strategy is to couple the component to a DNA recognition agent that is capable of binding to duplex sequences within the nanostructure. This offers the advantage that it requires little, if any, alteration to the nanostructure and can be achieved after structure assembly. In addition, since the molecular recognition of DNA can be controlled by varying pH and ionic conditions, such systems offer tunable properties that are distinct from simple Watson-Crick hybridization. Here, we describe methodology that has been used to exploit and characterize the sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures, with the aim of generating functional assemblies for bionanotechnology and synthetic biology applications.

  3. Particle sizer and DNA sequencer

    DOEpatents

    Olivares, Jose A.; Stark, Peter C.

    2005-09-13

    An electrophoretic device separates and detects particles such as DNA fragments, proteins, and the like. The device has a capillary which is coated with a coating with a low refractive index such as Teflon.RTM. AF. A sample of particles is fluorescently labeled and injected into the capillary. The capillary is filled with an electrolyte buffer solution. An electrical field is applied across the capillary causing the particles to migrate from a first end of the capillary to a second end of the capillary. A detector light beam is then scanned along the length of the capillary to detect the location of the separated particles. The device is amenable to a high throughput system by providing additional capillaries. The device can also be used to determine the actual size of the particles and for DNA sequencing.

  4. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  5. A case study on the genetic origin of the high oleic acid trait through FAD2-1 DNA sequence variation in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.).

    PubMed

    Rapson, Sara; Wu, Man; Okada, Shoko; Das, Alpana; Shrestha, Pushkar; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Wood, Craig; Green, Allan; Singh, Surinder; Liu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is considered a strongly domesticated species with a long history of cultivation. The hybridization of safflower with its wild relatives has played an important role in the evolution of cultivars and is of particular interest with regards to their production of high quality edible oils. Original safflower varieties were all rich in linoleic acid, while varieties rich in oleic acid have risen to prominence in recent decades. The high oleic acid trait is controlled by a partially recessive allele ol at a single locus OL. The ol allele was found to be a defective microsomal oleate desaturase FAD2-1. Here we present DNA sequence data and Southern blot analysis suggesting that there has been an ancient hybridization and introgression of the FAD2-1 gene into C. tinctorius from its wild relative C. palaestinus. It is from this gene that FAD2-1Δ was derived more recently. Identification and characterization of the genetic origin and diversity of FAD2-1 could aid safflower breeders in reducing population size and generations required for the development of new high oleic acid varieties by using perfect molecular marker-assisted selection.

  6. Complete sequence of Euglena gracilis chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hallick, R B; Hong, L; Drager, R G; Favreau, M R; Monfort, A; Orsat, B; Spielmann, A; Stutz, E

    1993-01-01

    We report the complete DNA sequence of the Euglena gracilis, Pringsheim strain Z chloroplast genome. This circular DNA is 143,170 bp, counting only one copy of a 54 bp tandem repeat sequence that is present in variable copy number within a single culture. The overall organization of the genome involves a tandem array of three complete and one partial ribosomal RNA operons, and a large single copy region. There are genes for the 16S, 5S, and 23S rRNAs of the 70S chloroplast ribosomes, 27 different tRNA species, 21 ribosomal proteins plus the gene for elongation factor EF-Tu, three RNA polymerase subunits, and 27 known photosynthesis-related polypeptides. Several putative genes of unknown function have also been identified, including five within large introns, and five with amino acid sequence similarity to genes in other organisms. This genome contains at least 149 introns. There are 72 individual group II introns, 46 individual group III introns, 10 group II introns and 18 group III introns that are components of twintrons (introns-within-introns), and three additional introns suspected to be twintrons composed of multiple group II and/or group III introns, but not yet characterized. At least 54,804 bp, or 38.3% of the total DNA content is represented by introns. PMID:8346031

  7. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  8. Plant DNA sequencing for phylogenetic analyses: from plants to sequences.

    PubMed

    Neves, Susana S; Forrest, Laura L

    2011-01-01

    DNA sequences are important sources of data for phylogenetic analysis. Nowadays, DNA sequencing is a routine technique in molecular biology laboratories. However, there are specific questions associated with project design and sequencing of plant samples for phylogenetic analysis, which may not be familiar to researchers starting in the field. This chapter gives an overview of methods and protocols involved in the sequencing of plant samples, including general recommendations on the selection of species/taxa and DNA regions to be sequenced, and field collection of plant samples. Protocols of plant sample preparation, DNA extraction, PCR and cloning, which are critical to the success of molecular phylogenetic projects, are described in detail. Common problems of sequencing (using the Sanger method) are also addressed. Possible applications of second-generation sequencing techniques in plant phylogenetics are briefly discussed. Finally, orientation on the preparation of sequence data for phylogenetic analyses and submission to public databases is also given.

  9. The Value of DNA Sequencing - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    DNA sequencing: what it tells us about DNA changes in cancer, how looking across many tumors will help to identify meaningful changes and potential drug targets, and how genomics is changing the way we think about cancer.

  10. Los Alamos sequence analysis package for nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I

    1982-01-01

    An interactive system for computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences has been developed for the Los Alamos DNA Sequence Database. It provides a convenient way to search or verify various sequence features, e.g., restriction enzyme sites, protein coding frames, and properties of coded proteins. Further, the comprehensive analysis package on a large-scale database can be used for comparative studies on sequence and structural homologies in order to find unnoted information stored in nucleic acid sequences. PMID:6174934

  11. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Dawson, John

    1993-01-01

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source.

  12. DNA sequence from Cretaceous period bone fragments.

    PubMed

    Woodward, S R; Weyand, N J; Bunnell, M

    1994-11-18

    DNA was extracted from 80-million-year-old bone fragments found in strata of the Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation in the roof of an underground coal mine in eastern Utah. This DNA was used as the template in a polymerase chain reaction that amplified and sequenced a portion of the gene encoding mitochondrial cytochrome b. These sequences differ from all other cytochrome b sequences investigated, including those in the GenBank and European Molecular Biology Laboratory databases. DNA isolated from these bone fragments and the resulting gene sequences demonstrate that small fragments of DNA may survive in bone for millions of years.

  13. "First generation" automated DNA sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Slatko, Barton E; Kieleczawa, Jan; Ju, Jingyue; Gardner, Andrew F; Hendrickson, Cynthia L; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2011-10-01

    Beginning in the 1980s, automation of DNA sequencing has greatly increased throughput, reduced costs, and enabled large projects to be completed more easily. The development of automation technology paralleled the development of other aspects of DNA sequencing: better enzymes and chemistry, separation and imaging technology, sequencing protocols, robotics, and computational advancements (including base-calling algorithms with quality scores, database developments, and sequence analysis programs). Despite the emergence of high-throughput sequencing platforms, automated Sanger sequencing technology remains useful for many applications. This unit provides background and a description of the "First-Generation" automated DNA sequencing technology. It also includes protocols for using the current Applied Biosystems (ABI) automated DNA sequencing machines.

  14. Fibonacci Sequence and Supramolecular Structure of DNA.

    PubMed

    Shabalkin, I P; Grigor'eva, E Yu; Gudkova, M V; Shabalkin, P I

    2016-05-01

    We proposed a new model of supramolecular DNA structure. Similar to the previously developed by us model of primary DNA structure [11-15], 3D structure of DNA molecule is assembled in accordance to a mathematic rule known as Fibonacci sequence. Unlike primary DNA structure, supramolecular 3D structure is assembled from complex moieties including a regular tetrahedron and a regular octahedron consisting of monomers, elements of the primary DNA structure. The moieties of the supramolecular DNA structure forming fragments of regular spatial lattice are bound via linker (joint) sequences of the DNA chain. The lattice perceives and transmits information signals over a considerable distance without acoustic aberrations. Linker sequences expand conformational space between lattice segments allowing their sliding relative to each other under the action of external forces. In this case, sliding is provided by stretching of the stacked linker sequences.

  15. Sequence and Structure Dependent DNA-DNA Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopchick, Benjamin; Qiu, Xiangyun

    Molecular forces between dsDNA strands are largely dominated by electrostatics and have been extensively studied. Quantitative knowledge has been accumulated on how DNA-DNA interactions are modulated by varied biological constituents such as ions, cationic ligands, and proteins. Despite its central role in biology, the sequence of DNA has not received substantial attention and ``random'' DNA sequences are typically used in biophysical studies. However, ~50% of human genome is composed of non-random-sequence DNAs, particularly repetitive sequences. Furthermore, covalent modifications of DNA such as methylation play key roles in gene functions. Such DNAs with specific sequences or modifications often take on structures other than the canonical B-form. Here we present series of quantitative measurements of the DNA-DNA forces with the osmotic stress method on different DNA sequences, from short repeats to the most frequent sequences in genome, and to modifications such as bromination and methylation. We observe peculiar behaviors that appear to be strongly correlated with the incurred structural changes. We speculate the causalities in terms of the differences in hydration shell and DNA surface structures.

  16. Using DNA looping to measure sequence dependent DNA elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandinov, Alan; Raghunathan, Krishnan; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2012-10-01

    We are using tethered particle motion (TPM) microscopy to observe protein-mediated DNA looping in the lactose repressor system in DNA constructs with varying AT / CG content. We use these data to determine the persistence length of the DNA as a function of its sequence content and compare the data to direct micromechanical measurements with constant-force axial optical tweezers. The data from the TPM experiments show a much smaller sequence effect on the persistence length than the optical tweezers experiments.

  17. Multiple tag labeling method for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, R.A.; Huang, X.C.; Quesada, M.A.

    1995-07-25

    A DNA sequencing method is described which uses single lane or channel electrophoresis. Sequencing fragments are separated in the lane and detected using a laser-excited, confocal fluorescence scanner. Each set of DNA sequencing fragments is separated in the same lane and then distinguished using a binary coding scheme employing only two different fluorescent labels. Also described is a method of using radioisotope labels. 5 figs.

  18. Multiple tag labeling method for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Huang, Xiaohua C.; Quesada, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A DNA sequencing method described which uses single lane or channel electrophoresis. Sequencing fragments are separated in said lane and detected using a laser-excited, confocal fluorescence scanner. Each set of DNA sequencing fragments is separated in the same lane and then distinguished using a binary coding scheme employing only two different fluorescent labels. Also described is a method of using radio-isotope labels.

  19. Image Correlation Method for DNA Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were “digitally” obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment. PMID:22761742

  20. Image correlation method for DNA sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were "digitally" obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment.

  1. Fractal analysis of DNA sequence data

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelsen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequence databases are growing at an almost exponential rate. New analysis methods are needed to extract knowledge about the organization of nucleotides from this vast amount of data. Fractal analysis is a new scientific paradigm that has been used successfully in many domains including the biological and physical sciences. Biological growth is a nonlinear dynamic process and some have suggested that to consider fractal geometry as a biological design principle may be most productive. This research is an exploratory study of the application of fractal analysis to DNA sequence data. A simple random fractal, the random walk, is used to represent DNA sequences. The fractal dimension of these walks is then estimated using the [open quote]sandbox method[close quote]. Analysis of 164 human DNA sequences compared to three types of control sequences (random, base-content matched, and dimer-content matched) reveals that long-range correlations are present in DNA that are not explained by base or dimer frequencies. The study also revealed that the fractal dimension of coding sequences was significantly lower than sequences that were primarily noncoding, indicating the presence of longer-range correlations in functional sequences. The multifractal spectrum is used to analyze fractals that are heterogeneous and have a different fractal dimension for subsets with different scalings. The multifractal spectrum of the random walks of twelve mitochondrial genome sequences was estimated. Eight vertebrate mtDNA sequences had uniformly lower spectra values than did four invertebrate mtDNA sequences. Thus, vertebrate mitochondria show significantly longer-range correlations than to invertebrate mitochondria. The higher multifractal spectra values for invertebrate mitochondria suggest a more random organization of the sequences. This research also includes considerable theoretical work on the effects of finite size, embedding dimension, and scaling ranges.

  2. Alignment method for spectrograms of DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Anca; van Leeuwen, Jasper; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Mittal, Chetan

    2010-01-01

    DNA spectrograms express the periodicities of each of the four nucleotides A, T, C, and G in one or several genomic sequences to be analyzed. DNA spectral analysis can be applied to systematically investigate DNA patterns, which may correspond to relevant biological features. As opposed to looking at nucleotide sequences, spectrogram analysis may detect structural characteristics in very long sequences that are not identifiable by sequence alignment. Alignment of DNA spectrograms can be used to facilitate analysis of very long sequences or entire genomes at different resolutions. Standard clustering algorithms have been used in spectral analysis to find strong patterns in spectra. However, as they use a global distance metric, these algorithms can only detect strong patterns coexisting in several frequencies. In this paper, we propose a new method and several algorithms for aligning spectra suitable for efficient spectral analysis and allowing for the easy detection of strong patterns in both single frequencies and multiple frequencies.

  3. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  4. Indole acetic acid production by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. from the rhizosphere of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. and their variation in extragenic repetitive DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sethia, Bedhya; Mustafa, Mariam; Manohar, Sneha; Patil, Savita V; Jayamohan, Nellickal Subramanian; Kumudini, Belur Satyan

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas (FP) is a heterogenous group of growth promoting rhizobacteria that regulate plant growth by releasing secondary metabolic compounds viz., indole acetic acid (IAA), siderophores, ammonia and hydrogen cyanide. In the present study, IAA producing FPs from the rhizosphere of Plectranthus amboinicus were characterized morphologically, biochemically and at the molecular level. Molecular identification of the isolates were carried out using Pseudomonas specific primers. The effect of varying time (24, 48, 72 and 96 h), Trp concentrations (100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μg x ml(-1)), temperature (10, 26, 37 and 50 ± 2 degrees C) and pH (6, 7 and 8) on IAA production by 10 best isolates were studied. Results showed higher IAA production at 72 h incubation, at 300 μg x ml(-1) Trp concentration, temperature 26 ± 2 degrees C and pH 7. TLC with acidified ethyl acetate extract showed that the IAA produced has a similar Rf value to that of the standard IAA. Results of TLC were confirmed by HPLC analysis. Genetic diversity of the isolates was also studied using 40 RAPD and 4 Rep primers. Genetic diversity parameters such as dominance, Shannon index and Simpson index were calculated. Out of 40 RAPD primers tested, 9 (2 OP-D series and 7 OP-E series) were shortlisted for further analysis. Studies using RAPD, ERIC, BOX, REP and GTG5 primers revealed that isolates exhibit significant diversity in repetitive DNA sequences irrespective of the rhizosphere.

  5. DNA sequencing: bench to bedside and beyond†

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Clyde A.

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen years elapsed between the discovery of the double helix (1953) and the first DNA sequencing (1968). Modern DNA sequencing began in 1977, with development of the chemical method of Maxam and Gilbert and the dideoxy method of Sanger, Nicklen and Coulson, and with the first complete DNA sequence (phage ϕX174), which demonstrated that sequence could give profound insights into genetic organization. Incremental improvements allowed sequencing of molecules >200 kb (human cytomegalovirus) leading to an avalanche of data that demanded computational analysis and spawned the field of bioinformatics. The US Human Genome Project spurred sequencing activity. By 1992 the first ‘sequencing factory’ was established, and others soon followed. The first complete cellular genome sequences, from bacteria, appeared in 1995 and other eubacterial, archaebacterial and eukaryotic genomes were soon sequenced. Competition between the public Human Genome Project and Celera Genomics produced working drafts of the human genome sequence, published in 2001, but refinement and analysis of the human genome sequence will continue for the foreseeable future. New ‘massively parallel’ sequencing methods are greatly increasing sequencing capacity, but further innovations are needed to achieve the ‘thousand dollar genome’ that many feel is prerequisite to personalized genomic medicine. These advances will also allow new approaches to a variety of problems in biology, evolution and the environment. PMID:17855400

  6. Nucleotide capacitance calculation for DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jun-Qiang; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2008-01-01

    Using a first-principles linear response theory, the capacitance of the DNA nucleotides, adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine, are calculated. The difference in the capacitance between the nucleotides is studied with respect to conformational distortion. The result suggests that although an alternate current capacitance measurement of a single-stranded DNA chain threaded through a nano-gap electrodes may not sufficient to be used as a stand alone method for rapid DNA sequencing, the capacitance of the nucleotides should be taken into consideration in any GHz-frequency electric measurements and may also serve as an additional criterion for identifying the DNA sequence.

  7. Visible periodicity of strong nucleosome DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bilal; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Lowary and Widom assembled nucleosomes on synthetic random sequence DNA molecules, selected the strongest nucleosomes and discovered that the TA dinucleotides in these strong nucleosome sequences often appear at 10-11 bases from one another or at distances which are multiples of this period. We repeated this experiment computationally, on large ensembles of natural genomic sequences, by selecting the strongest nucleosomes--i.e. those with such distances between like-named dinucleotides, multiples of 10.4 bases, the structural and sequence period of nucleosome DNA. The analysis confirmed the periodicity of TA dinucleotides in the strong nucleosomes, and revealed as well other periodic sequence elements, notably classical AA and TT dinucleotides. The matrices of DNA bendability and their simple linear forms--nucleosome positioning motifs--are calculated from the strong nucleosome DNA sequences. The motifs are in full accord with nucleosome positioning sequences derived earlier, thus confirming that the new technique, indeed, detects strong nucleosomes. Species- and isochore-specific variations of the matrices and of the positioning motifs are demonstrated. The strong nucleosome DNA sequences manifest the highest hitherto nucleosome positioning sequence signals, showing the dinucleotide periodicities in directly observable rather than in hidden form.

  8. Counterintuitive DNA Sequence Dependence in Supercoiling-Induced DNA Melting

    PubMed Central

    Vlijm, Rifka; v.d. Torre, Jaco; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of DNA in cells relies on the balance between hybridized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and local de-hybridized regions of ssDNA that provide access to binding proteins. Traditional melting experiments, in which short pieces of dsDNA are heated up until the point of melting into ssDNA, have determined that AT-rich sequences have a lower binding energy than GC-rich sequences. In cells, however, the double-stranded backbone of DNA is destabilized by negative supercoiling, and not by temperature. To investigate what the effect of GC content is on DNA melting induced by negative supercoiling, we studied DNA molecules with a GC content ranging from 38% to 77%, using single-molecule magnetic tweezer measurements in which the length of a single DNA molecule is measured as a function of applied stretching force and supercoiling density. At low force (<0.5pN), supercoiling results into twisting of the dsDNA backbone and loop formation (plectonemes), without inducing any DNA melting. This process was not influenced by the DNA sequence. When negative supercoiling is introduced at increasing force, local melting of DNA is introduced. We measured for the different DNA molecules a characteristic force Fchar, at which negative supercoiling induces local melting of the dsDNA. Surprisingly, GC-rich sequences melt at lower forces than AT-rich sequences: Fchar = 0.56pN for 77% GC but 0.73pN for 38% GC. An explanation for this counterintuitive effect is provided by the realization that supercoiling densities of a few percent only induce melting of a few percent of the base pairs. As a consequence, denaturation bubbles occur in local AT-rich regions and the sequence-dependent effect arises from an increased DNA bending/torsional energy associated with the plectonemes. This new insight indicates that an increased GC-content adjacent to AT-rich DNA regions will enhance local opening of the double-stranded DNA helix. PMID:26513573

  9. Applications of mass spectrometry to DNA fingerprinting and DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Chen, C.H.; Doktycz, M.J.; McLuckey, S.A. ); Arlinghaus, H.F. )

    1993-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting and sequencing rely on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the sizes of the DNA fragments. Innovative altematives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are under investigation for characterization of such fingerprinting and sequencing. One method uses stable isotopes of tin and other elements to label the DNAwhereas other procedures do not require labels. The detectors in each case are mass spectrometers that detect either the stable isotopes or the DNA fragments themselves. If successful, these methods will speed up the rate of DNA analysis by one or two orders of magnitude.

  10. Applications of mass spectrometry to DNA fingerprinting and DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Chen, C.H.; Doktycz, M.J.; McLuckey, S.A.; Arlinghaus, H.F.

    1993-06-01

    DNA fingerprinting and sequencing rely on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the sizes of the DNA fragments. Innovative altematives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are under investigation for characterization of such fingerprinting and sequencing. One method uses stable isotopes of tin and other elements to label the DNAwhereas other procedures do not require labels. The detectors in each case are mass spectrometers that detect either the stable isotopes or the DNA fragments themselves. If successful, these methods will speed up the rate of DNA analysis by one or two orders of magnitude.

  11. Nanopores: A journey towards DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wanunu, Meni

    2013-01-01

    Much more than ever, nucleic acids are recognized as key building blocks in many of life's processes, and the science of studying these molecular wonders at the single-molecule level is thriving. A new method of doing so has been introduced in the mid 1990's. This method is exceedingly simple: a nanoscale pore that spans across an impermeable thin membrane is placed between two chambers that contain an electrolyte, and voltage is applied across the membrane using two electrodes. These conditions lead to a steady stream of ion flow across the pore. Nucleic acid molecules in solution can be driven through the pore, and structural features of the biomolecules are observed as measurable changes in the trans-membrane ion current. In essence, a nanopore is a high-throughput ion microscope and a single-molecule force apparatus. Nanopores are taking center stage as a tool that promises to read a DNA sequence, and this promise has resulted in overwhelming academic, industrial, and national interest. Regardless of the fate of future nanopore applications, in the process of this 16-year-long exploration, many studies have validated the indispensability of nanopores in the toolkit of single-molecule biophysics. This review surveys past and current studies related to nucleic acid biophysics, and will hopefully provoke a discussion of immediate and future prospects for the field. PMID:22658507

  12. DNA sequencing using electrical conductance measurements of a DNA polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Lee, Chia-Hui; Hung, Meng-Yen; Pan, Hsu-An; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Huang, G. Steven

    2013-06-01

    The development of personalized medicine--in which medical treatment is customized to an individual on the basis of genetic information--requires techniques that can sequence DNA quickly and cheaply. Single-molecule sequencing technologies, such as nanopores, can potentially be used to sequence long strands of DNA without labels or amplification, but a viable technique has yet to be established. Here, we show that single DNA molecules can be sequenced by monitoring the electrical conductance of a phi29 DNA polymerase as it incorporates unlabelled nucleotides into a template strand of DNA. The conductance of the polymerase is measured by attaching it to a protein transistor that consists of an antibody molecule (immunoglobulin G) bound to two gold nanoparticles, which are in turn connected to source and drain electrodes. The electrical conductance of the DNA polymerase exhibits well-separated plateaux that are ~3 pA in height. Each plateau corresponds to an individual base and is formed at a rate of ~22 nucleotides per second. Additional spikes appear on top of the plateaux and can be used to discriminate between the four different nucleotides. We also show that the sequencing platform works with a variety of DNA polymerases and can sequence difficult templates such as homopolymers.

  13. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, A.M.; Dawson, J.

    1993-12-14

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source. 6 figures.

  14. Extracting biological knowledge from DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    De La Vega, F.M.; Thieffry, D. |; Collado-Vides, J.

    1996-12-31

    This session describes the elucidation of information from dna sequences and what challenges computational biologists face in their task of summarizing and deciphering the human genome. Techniques discussed include methods from statistics, information theory, artificial intelligence and linguistics. 1 ref.

  15. Nanopore DNA sequencing using kinetic proofreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xinsheng

    We propose a method of DNA sequencing by combining the physical method of nanopore electrical measurements and Southern's sequencing-by-hybridization. The new key ingredient, essential to both lowering the costs and increasing the precision, is an asymmetric nanopore sandwich device capable of measuring the DNA hybridization probe twice separated by a designed waiting time. Those incorrect probes appearing only once in nanopore ionic current traces are discriminated from the correct ones that appear twice. This method of discrimination is similar to the principle of kinetic proofreading proposed by Hopfield and Ninio in gene transcription and translation processes. An error analysis is of this nanopore kinetic proofreading (nKP) technique for DNA sequencing is carried out in comparison with the most precise 3' dideoxy termination method developed by Sanger. Nanopore DNA sequencing using kinetic proofreading.

  16. gargammel: a sequence simulator for ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Gabriel; Hanghøj, Kristian; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2016-10-29

    Ancient DNA has emerged as a remarkable tool to infer the history of extinct species and past populations. However, many of its characteristics, such as extensive fragmentation, damage and contamination, can influence downstream analyses. To help investigators measure how these could impact their analyses in silico, we have developed gargammel, a package that simulates ancient DNA fragments given a set of known reference genomes. Our package simulates the entire molecular process from post-mortem DNA fragmentation and DNA damage to experimental sequencing errors, and reproduces most common bias observed in ancient DNA datasets.

  17. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA and genomic DNA encoding PDM phosphatase of Fusarium moniliforme.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Iizuka, Mari; Narita, Takao; Norioka, Naoko; Norioka, Shigemi

    2006-12-01

    PDM phosphatase was purified approximately 500-fold through six steps from the extract of dried powder of the culture filtrate of Fusarium moniliforme. The purified preparation appeared homogeneous on SDS-PAGE although the protein band was broad. Amino acid sequence information was collected on tryptic peptides from this preparation. cDNA cloning was carried out based on the information. A full-length cDNA was obtained and sequenced. The sequence had an open reading frame of 651 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 69,988 Da. Cloning and sequencing of the genomic DNA corresponding to the cDNA was also conducted. The deduced amino acid sequence could account for many but not all of the tryptic peptides, suggesting presence of contaminant protein(s). SDS-PAGE analysis after chemical deglycosylation showed two proteins with molecular masses of 58 and 68 kDa. This implied that the 58 kDa protein had been copurified with PDM phosphatase. Homology search showed that PDM phosphatase belongs to the purple acid phosphatase family, which is widely distributed in the biosphere. Sequence data of fungal purple acid phosphatases were collected from the database. Processing of the data revealed presence of two types, whose evolutionary relationships were discussed.

  18. DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, Karin D.; Chu, Tun-Jen; Pitt, William G.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through said smino groups contained on the surface thereof. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to said target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membrances may be reprobed numerous times.

  19. DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, K.D.; Chu, T.J.; Pitt, W.G.

    1992-05-12

    A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through amino groups contained on the surface. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to the target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membranes may be reprobed numerous times. No Drawings

  20. Terminal repetitive sequences in herpesvirus saimiri virion DNA.

    PubMed

    Bankier, A T; Dietrich, W; Baer, R; Barrell, B G; Colbère-Garapin, F; Fleckenstein, B; Bodemer, W

    1985-07-01

    The H-DNA repeat unit of Herpesvirus saimiri strain 11 was cloned in plasmid vector pAGO, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by the dideoxy chain termination method. One unit of repetitive DNA has 1,444 base pairs with 70.8% G+C content. The structural features of repeat DNA sequences at the termini of intact virion M-DNA (160 kilobases) and orientation of reiterated DNA were analyzed by radioactive end labeling of M-DNA, followed by cleavage of the end fragments with restriction endonucleases. The termini appeared to be blunt ended with a 5'-phosphate group, probably generated during encapsidation by cleavage in the immediate vicinity of the single ApaI recognition site in the H-DNA repeat unit. The sequence did not reveal sizeable open reading frames, the longest hypothetical peptide from H-DNA being 85 amino acids. There was no evidence for an mRNA promoter or terminator element, and H-DNA-specific transcription could not be found in productively infected cells.

  1. Improved Algorithm for Analysis of DNA Sequences Using Multiresolution Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Inbamalar, T. M.; Sivakumar, R.

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatics and genomic signal processing use computational techniques to solve various biological problems. They aim to study the information allied with genetic materials such as the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the ribonucleic acid (RNA), and the proteins. Fast and precise identification of the protein coding regions in DNA sequence is one of the most important tasks in analysis. Existing digital signal processing (DSP) methods provide less accurate and computationally complex solution with greater background noise. Hence, improvements in accuracy, computational complexity, and reduction in background noise are essential in identification of the protein coding regions in the DNA sequences. In this paper, a new DSP based method is introduced to detect the protein coding regions in DNA sequences. Here, the DNA sequences are converted into numeric sequences using electron ion interaction potential (EIIP) representation. Then discrete wavelet transformation is taken. Absolute value of the energy is found followed by proper threshold. The test is conducted using the data bases available in the National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) site. The comparative analysis is done and it ensures the efficiency of the proposed system. PMID:26000337

  2. Sequencing Intractable DNA to Close Microbial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled intractable resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such difficult regions in the non-contiguous finished Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. These developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  3. Intranuclear Anchoring of Repetitive DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Weipoltshammer, Klara; Schöfer, Christian; Almeder, Marlene; Philimonenko, Vlada V.; Frei, Klemens; Wachtler, Franz; Hozák, Pavel

    1999-01-01

    Centromeres, telomeres, and ribosomal gene clusters consist of repetitive DNA sequences. To assess their contributions to the spatial organization of the interphase genome, their interactions with the nucleoskeleton were examined in quiescent and activated human lymphocytes. The nucleoskeletons were prepared using “physiological” conditions. The resulting structures were probed for specific DNA sequences of centromeres, telomeres, and ribosomal genes by in situ hybridization; the electroeluted DNA fractions were examined by blot hybridization. In both nonstimulated and stimulated lymphocytes, centromeric alpha-satellite repeats were almost exclusively found in the eluted fraction, while telomeric sequences remained attached to the nucleoskeleton. Ribosomal genes showed a transcription-dependent attachment pattern: in unstimulated lymphocytes, transcriptionally inactive ribosomal genes located outside the nucleolus were eluted completely. When comparing transcription unit and intergenic spacer, significantly more of the intergenic spacer was removed. In activated lymphocytes, considerable but similar amounts of both rDNA fragments were eluted. The results demonstrate that: (a) the various repetitive DNA sequences differ significantly in their intranuclear anchoring, (b) telomeric rather than centromeric DNA sequences form stable attachments to the nucleoskeleton, and (c) different attachment mechanisms might be responsible for the interaction of ribosomal genes with the nucleoskeleton. PMID:10613900

  4. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-08-06

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces.

  5. Ancient DNA sequence revealed by error-correcting codes

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Marcelo M.; Spoladore, Larissa; Faria, Luzinete C. B.; Rocha, Andréa S. L.; Silva-Filho, Marcio C.; Palazzo, Reginaldo

    2015-01-01

    A previously described DNA sequence generator algorithm (DNA-SGA) using error-correcting codes has been employed as a computational tool to address the evolutionary pathway of the genetic code. The code-generated sequence alignment demonstrated that a residue mutation revealed by the code can be found in the same position in sequences of distantly related taxa. Furthermore, the code-generated sequences do not promote amino acid changes in the deviant genomes through codon reassignment. A Bayesian evolutionary analysis of both code-generated and homologous sequences of the Arabidopsis thaliana malate dehydrogenase gene indicates an approximately 1 MYA divergence time from the MDH code-generated sequence node to its paralogous sequences. The DNA-SGA helps to determine the plesiomorphic state of DNA sequences because a single nucleotide alteration often occurs in distantly related taxa and can be found in the alternative codon patterns of noncanonical genetic codes. As a consequence, the algorithm may reveal an earlier stage of the evolution of the standard code. PMID:26159228

  6. Osmylated DNA, a novel concept for sequencing DNA using nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    2015-03-01

    Saenger sequencing has led the advances in molecular biology, while faster and cheaper next generation technologies are urgently needed. A newer approach exploits nanopores, natural or solid-state, set in an electrical field, and obtains base sequence information from current variations due to the passage of a ssDNA molecule through the pore. A hurdle in this approach is the fact that the four bases are chemically comparable to each other which leads to small differences in current obstruction. ‘Base calling’ becomes even more challenging because most nanopores sense a short sequence and not individual bases. Perhaps sequencing DNA via nanopores would be more manageable, if only the bases were two, and chemically very different from each other; a sequence of 1s and 0s comes to mind. Osmylated DNA comes close to such a sequence of 1s and 0s. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide bipyridine across the C5-C6 double bond of the pyrimidines. Osmylation adds almost 400% mass to the reactive base, creates a sterically and electronically notably different molecule, labeled 1, compared to the unreactive purines, labeled 0. If osmylated DNA were successfully sequenced, the result would be a sequence of osmylated pyrimidines (1), and purines (0), and not of the actual nucleobases. To solve this problem we studied the osmylation reaction with short oligos and with M13mp18, a long ssDNA, developed a UV-vis assay to measure extent of osmylation, and designed two protocols. Protocol A uses mild conditions and yields osmylated thymidines (1), while leaving the other three bases (0) practically intact. Protocol B uses harsher conditions and effectively osmylates both pyrimidines, but not the purines. Applying these two protocols also to the complementary of the target polynucleotide yields a total of four osmylated strands that collectively could define the actual base sequence of the target DNA.

  7. Bacterial identification and subtyping using DNA microarray and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Al-Khaldi, Sufian F; Mossoba, Magdi M; Allard, Marc M; Lienau, E Kurt; Brown, Eric D

    2012-01-01

    The era of fast and accurate discovery of biological sequence motifs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is here. The co-evolution of direct genome sequencing and DNA microarray strategies not only will identify, isotype, and serotype pathogenic bacteria, but also it will aid in the discovery of new gene functions by detecting gene expressions in different diseases and environmental conditions. Microarray bacterial identification has made great advances in working with pure and mixed bacterial samples. The technological advances have moved beyond bacterial gene expression to include bacterial identification and isotyping. Application of new tools such as mid-infrared chemical imaging improves detection of hybridization in DNA microarrays. The research in this field is promising and future work will reveal the potential of infrared technology in bacterial identification. On the other hand, DNA sequencing by using 454 pyrosequencing is so cost effective that the promise of $1,000 per bacterial genome sequence is becoming a reality. Pyrosequencing technology is a simple to use technique that can produce accurate and quantitative analysis of DNA sequences with a great speed. The deposition of massive amounts of bacterial genomic information in databanks is creating fingerprint phylogenetic analysis that will ultimately replace several technologies such as Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis. In this chapter, we will review (1) the use of DNA microarray using fluorescence and infrared imaging detection for identification of pathogenic bacteria, and (2) use of pyrosequencing in DNA cluster analysis to fingerprint bacterial phylogenetic trees.

  8. Quadruplex DNA: sequence, topology and structure

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Sarah; Parkinson, Gary N.; Hazel, Pascale; Todd, Alan K.; Neidle, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are higher-order DNA and RNA structures formed from G-rich sequences that are built around tetrads of hydrogen-bonded guanine bases. Potential quadruplex sequences have been identified in G-rich eukaryotic telomeres, and more recently in non-telomeric genomic DNA, e.g. in nuclease-hypersensitive promoter regions. The natural role and biological validation of these structures is starting to be explored, and there is particular interest in them as targets for therapeutic intervention. This survey focuses on the folding and structural features on quadruplexes formed from telomeric and non-telomeric DNA sequences, and examines fundamental aspects of topology and the emerging relationships with sequence. Emphasis is placed on information from the high-resolution methods of X-ray crystallography and NMR, and their scope and current limitations are discussed. Such information, together with biological insights, will be important for the discovery of drugs targeting quadruplexes from particular genes. PMID:17012276

  9. Female-specific DNA sequences in geese.

    PubMed

    Huang, M C; Lin, W C; Horng, Y M; Rouvier, R; Huang, C W

    2003-07-01

    1. The OPAE random primers (Operon Technologies, Inc., CA) were used for random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting in Chinese, White Roman and Landaise geese. One of these primers, OPAE-06, produced a 938-bp sex-specific fragment in all females and in no males of Chinese geese only. 2. A novel female-specific DNA sequence in Chinese goose was cloned and sequenced. Two primers, CGSex-F and CGSex-R, were designed in order to amplify a 912-bp sex-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment on genomic DNA from female geese. 3. It was shown that a simple and effective PCR-based sexing technique could be used in the three goose breeds studied. 4. Nucleotide sequencing of the sex-specific fragments in White Roman and Landaise geese was performed and sequence differences were observed among these three breeds.

  10. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-01

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  11. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  12. Synthesis of circular double-stranded DNA having single-stranded recognition sequence as molecular-physical probe for nucleic acid hybridization detection based on atomic force microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Koji; Matsunaga, Hideshi; Murata, Masaharu; Soh, Nobuaki; Imato, Toshihiko

    2009-08-01

    A new class of DNA probes having a mechanically detectable tag is reported. The DNA probe, which consists of a single-stranded recognition sequence and a double-stranded circular DNA entity, was prepared by polymerase reaction. M13mp18 single strand and a 32mer oligodeoxynucleotide whose 5'-end is decorated with the recognition sequence were used in combination as template and primer, respectively. We have successfully demonstrated that the DNA probe is useful for bioanalytical purposes: by deliberately attaching target DNA molecules onto Au(111) substrates and by mechanically reading out the tag-entity using a high-resolution microscopy including atomic force microscopy, visualization/detection of the individual target/probe DNA conjugate was possible simply yet straightforwardly. The present DNA probe can be characterized as a 100%-nucleic acid product material. It is simply available by one-pod synthesis. A surface topology parameter, image roughness, has witnessed its importance as a quantitative analysis index with particular usability in the present visualization/detection method.

  13. DNA-binding and transactivation properties of Pax-6: three amino acids in the paired domain are responsible for the different sequence recognition of Pax-6 and BSAP (Pax-5).

    PubMed Central

    Czerny, T; Busslinger, M

    1995-01-01

    Pax-6 is known to be a key regulator of vertebrate eye development. We have now isolated cDNA for an invertebrate Pax-6 protein from sea urchin embryos. Transcripts of this gene first appear during development at the gastrula stage and are later expressed at high levels in the tube foot of the adult sea urchin. The sea urchin Pax-6 protein is highly homologous throughout the whole protein to its vertebrate counterpart with the paired domain and homeodomain being virtually identical. Consequently, we found that the DNA-binding and transactivation properties of the sea urchin and mouse Pax-6 proteins are very similar, if not identical. A potent activation domain capable of stimulating transcription from proximal promoter and distal enhancer positions was localized within the C-terminal sequences of both the sea urchin and mouse Pax-6 proteins. The homeodomain of Pax-6 was shown to cooperatively dimerize on DNA sequences consisting of an inverted repeat of the TAAT motif with a preferred spacing of 3 nucleotides. The consensus recognition sequence of the Pax-6 paired domain deviates primarily only at one position from that of BSAP (Pax-5), and yet the two proteins exhibit largely different binding specificities for individual, naturally occurring sites. By creating Pax-6-BSAP fusion proteins, we were able to identify a short amino acid stretch in the N-terminal part of the paired domain which is responsible for these differences in DNA-binding specificity. Mutation of three Pax-6-specific residues in this region (at positions 42, 44, and 47 of the paired domain) to the corresponding amino acids of BSAP resulted in a complete switch of the DNA-binding specificity from Pax-6 to BSAP. These three amino acids were furthermore shown to discriminate between the Pax-6- and BSAP-specific nucleotide at the divergent position of the two consensus recognition sequences. PMID:7739566

  14. Compressing DNA sequence databases with coil

    PubMed Central

    White, W Timothy J; Hendy, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background Publicly available DNA sequence databases such as GenBank are large, and are growing at an exponential rate. The sheer volume of data being dealt with presents serious storage and data communications problems. Currently, sequence data is usually kept in large "flat files," which are then compressed using standard Lempel-Ziv (gzip) compression – an approach which rarely achieves good compression ratios. While much research has been done on compressing individual DNA sequences, surprisingly little has focused on the compression of entire databases of such sequences. In this study we introduce the sequence database compression software coil. Results We have designed and implemented a portable software package, coil, for compressing and decompressing DNA sequence databases based on the idea of edit-tree coding. coil is geared towards achieving high compression ratios at the expense of execution time and memory usage during compression – the compression time represents a "one-off investment" whose cost is quickly amortised if the resulting compressed file is transmitted many times. Decompression requires little memory and is extremely fast. We demonstrate a 5% improvement in compression ratio over state-of-the-art general-purpose compression tools for a large GenBank database file containing Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data. Finally, coil can efficiently encode incremental additions to a sequence database. Conclusion coil presents a compelling alternative to conventional compression of flat files for the storage and distribution of DNA sequence databases having a narrow distribution of sequence lengths, such as EST data. Increasing compression levels for databases having a wide distribution of sequence lengths is a direction for future work. PMID:18489794

  15. Inferring ethnicity from mitochondrial DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The assignment of DNA samples to coarse population groups can be a useful but difficult task. One such example is the inference of coarse ethnic groupings for forensic applications. Ethnicity plays an important role in forensic investigation and can be inferred with the help of genetic markers. Being maternally inherited, of high copy number, and robust persistence in degraded samples, mitochondrial DNA may be useful for inferring coarse ethnicity. In this study, we compare the performance of methods for inferring ethnicity from the sequence of the hypervariable region of the mitochondrial genome. Results We present the results of comprehensive experiments conducted on datasets extracted from the mtDNA population database, showing that ethnicity inference based on support vector machines (SVM) achieves an overall accuracy of 80-90%, consistently outperforming nearest neighbor and discriminant analysis methods previously proposed in the literature. We also evaluate methods of handling missing data and characterize the most informative segments of the hypervariable region of the mitochondrial genome. Conclusions Support vector machines can be used to infer coarse ethnicity from a small region of mitochondrial DNA sequence with surprisingly high accuracy. In the presence of missing data, utilizing only the regions common to the training sequences and a test sequence proves to be the best strategy. Given these results, SVM algorithms are likely to also be useful in other DNA sequence classification applications. PMID:21554759

  16. Sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    De Bustos, Alfredo; Cuadrado, Angeles; Jouve, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is widespread in eukaryotic genomes, in some cases making up more than 80% of the total. SSRs are a type of repetitive DNA formed by short motifs repeated in tandem arrays. In some species, SSRs may be organized into long stretches, usually associated with the constitutive heterochromatin. Variation in repeats can alter the expression of genes, and changes in the number of repeats have been linked to certain human diseases. Unfortunately, the molecular characterization of these repeats has been hampered by technical limitations related to cloning and sequencing. Indeed, most sequenced genomes contain gaps owing to repetitive DNA-related assembly difficulties. This paper reports an alternative method for sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA based on the combined use of 1) a linear vector to stabilize the cloning process, and 2) the use of exonuclease III for obtaining progressive deletions of SSR-rich fragments. This strategy allowed the sequencing of a fragment containing a stretch of 6.2 kb of continuous SSRs. To demonstrate that this procedure can sequence other kinds of repetitive DNA, it was used to examine a 4.5 kb fragment containing a cluster of 15 repeats of the 5S rRNA gene of barley. PMID:27819354

  17. Correlations in DNA sequences across the three domains of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, Sabyasachi; Hunt, Brian R.; Yorke, James A.; White, Owen R.

    2000-11-01

    We report statistical studies of correlation properties of ∼7500 gene sequences, covering coding (exon) and non-coding (intron) sequences for DNA and primary amino acid sequences for proteins, across all three domains of life, namely Eukaryotes (cells with nuclei), Prokaryotes (bacteria) and Archaea (archaebacteria). Mutual information function, power spectrum and Hölder exponent analyses show exons with somewhat greater correlation content than the introns studied. These results are further confirmed with hypothesis testing. While ∼30% of the Eukaryote coding sequences show distinct correlations above noise threshold, this is true for only ∼10% of the Prokaryote and Archaea coding sequences. For protein sequences, we observe correlation lengths similar to that of “random” sequences.

  18. DNA sequencing by synthesis based on elongation delay detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manturov, Alexey O.; Grigoryev, Anton V.

    2015-03-01

    The one of most important problem in modern genetics, biology and medicine is determination of the primary nucleotide sequence of the DNA of living organisms (DNA sequencing). This paper describes the label-free DNA sequencing approach, based on the observation of a discrete dynamics of DNA sequence elongation phase. The proposed DNA sequencing principle are studied by numerical simulation. The numerical model for proposed label-free DNA sequencing approach is based on a cellular automaton, which can simulate the elongation stage (growth of DNA strands) and dynamics of nucleotides incorporation to rising DNA strand. The estimates for number of copied DNA sequences for required probability of nucleotide incorporation event detection and correct DNA sequence determination was obtained. The proposed approach can be applied at all known DNA sequencing devices with "sequencing by synthesis" principle of operation.

  19. Sequence of figwort mosaic virus DNA (caulimovirus group).

    PubMed

    Richins, R D; Scholthof, H B; Shepherd, R J

    1987-10-26

    The nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of figwort mosaic virus (FMV) was determined using the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. The double-stranded DNA genome (7743 base pairs) contained eight open reading frames (ORFs), seven of which corresponded approximately in size and location to the ORFs found in the genome of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and carnation etched ring virus (CERV). ORFs I and V of FMV demonstrated the highest degrees of nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology with the equivalent coding regions of CaMV and CERV. Regions II, III and IV showed somewhat less homology with the analogous regions of CaMV and CERV, and ORF VI showed homology with the corresponding gene of CaMV and CERV in only a short segment near the middle of the putative gene product. A 16 nucleotide sequence, complementary to the 3' terminus of methionine initiator tRNA (tRNAimet) and presumed to be the primer binding site for initiation of reverse transcription to produce minus strand DNA, was found in the FMV genome near the discontinuity in the minus strand. Sequences near the three interruptions in the plus strand of FMV DNA bear strong resemblance to similarly located sequences of 3 other caulimoviruses and are inferred to be initiation sites for second strand DNA synthesis. Additional conserved sequences in the small and large intergenic regions are pointed out including a highly conserved 35 bp sequence that occurs in the latter region.

  20. Characterization of facultative oligotrophic bacteria from polar seas by analysis of their fatty acids and 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Mergaert, J; Verhelst, A; Cnockaert, M C; Tan, T L; Swings, J

    2001-04-01

    One hundred and seventy three bacterial strains, isolated previously after enrichment under oligotrophic, psychrophylic conditions from Arctic (98 strains) and Antarctic seawater (75 strains), were characterized by gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of their fatty acid compositions. By numerical analysis, 8 clusters, containing 2 to 59 strains, could be delineated, and 8 strains formed separate branches. Five clusters contained strains from both poles, two minor clusters were confined to Arctic isolates, and one cluster consisted of Antarctic isolates only. The 16S rRNA genes from 23 strains, representing the different fatty acid profile clusters and including the unclustered strains, were sequenced. The sequences grouped with the alpha and gamma Proteobacteria, the high percent G+C gram positives, and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides branch. The sequences of strains from 4 clusters and of 7 unclustered strains were closely related (sequence similarities above 97%) to reference sequences of Sulfitobacter mediterraneus, Halomonas variabilis, Alteromonas macleodii, Pseudoalteromonas species, Shewanella frigidimarina, and Rhodococcus fascians. Strains from the other four clusters and an unclustered strain showed sequence similarities below 97% with nearest named neighbours, including Rhizobium, Glaciecola, Pseudomonas, Alteromonas macleodii and Cytophaga marinoflava, indicating that the clusters which they represent form as yet unnamed taxa.

  1. Human somatostatin I: sequence of the cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, L P; Pictet, R L; Rutter, W J

    1982-01-01

    RNA has been isolated from a human pancreatic somatostatinoma and used to prepare a cDNA library. After prescreening, clones containing somatostatin I sequences were identified by hybridization with an anglerfish somatostatin I-cloned cDNA probe. From the nucleotide sequence of two of these clones, we have deduced an essentially full-length mRNA sequence, including the preprosomatostatin coding region, 105 nucleotides from the 5' untranslated region and the complete 150-nucleotide 3' untranslated region. The coding region predicts a 116-amino acid precursor protein (Mr, 12.727) that contains somatostatin-14 and -28 at its COOH terminus. The predicted amino acid sequence of human somatostatin-28 is identical to that of somatostatin-28 isolated from the porcine and ovine species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences of human and anglerfish preprosomatostatin I indicated that the COOH-terminal region encoding somatostatin-14 and the adjacent 6 amino acids are highly conserved, whereas the remainder of the molecule, including the signal peptide region, is more divergent. However, many of the amino acid differences found in the pro region of the human and anglerfish proteins are conservative changes. This suggests that the propeptides have a similar secondary structure, which in turn may imply a biological function for this region of the molecule. Images PMID:6126875

  2. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  3. Unzipping of DNA with correlated base sequence.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, A E; Gevorkian, Zh S; Hu, Chin-Kun; Wu, Ming-Chya

    2004-06-01

    We consider force-induced unzipping transition for a heterogeneous DNA model with a correlated base sequence. Both finite-range and long-range correlated situations are considered. It is shown that finite-range correlations increase stability of DNA with respect to the external unzipping force. Due to long-range correlations the number of unzipped base pairs displays two widely different scenarios depending on the details of the base sequence: either there is no unzipping phase transition at all, or the transition is realized via a sequence of jumps with magnitude comparable to the size of the system. Both scenarios are different from the behavior of the average number of unzipped base pairs (non-self-averaging). The results can be relevant for explaining the biological purpose of correlated structures in DNA.

  4. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  5. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  6. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  7. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  8. Statistical and linguistic features of DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havlin, S.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genes containing noncoding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range--indeed, base pairs thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene. We resolve the problem of the "non-stationary" feature of the sequence of base pairs by applying a new algorithm called Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA). We address the claim of Voss that there is no difference in the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions of DNA by systematically applying the DFA algorithm, as well as standard FFT analysis, to all eukaryotic DNA sequences (33 301 coding and 29 453 noncoding) in the entire GenBank database. We describe a simple model to account for the presence of long-range power-law correlations which is based upon a generalization of the classic Levy walk. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work showing that the noncoding sequences have certain statistical features in common with natural languages. Specifically, we adapt to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts, and the Shannon approach to quantifying the "redundancy" of a linguistic text in terms of a measurable entropy function. We suggest that noncoding regions in plants and invertebrates may display a smaller entropy and larger redundancy than coding regions, further supporting the possibility that noncoding regions of DNA may carry biological information.

  9. A Bioluminometric Method of DNA Sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronaghi, Mostafa; Pourmand, Nader; Stolc, Viktor; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pyrosequencing is a bioluminometric single-tube DNA sequencing method that takes advantage of co-operativity between four enzymes to monitor DNA synthesis. In this sequencing-by-synthesis method, a cascade of enzymatic reactions yields detectable light, which is proportional to incorporated nucleotides. Pyrosequencing has the advantages of accuracy, flexibility and parallel processing. It can be easily automated. Furthermore, the technique dispenses with the need for labeled primers, labeled nucleotides and gel-electrophoresis. In this chapter, the use of this technique for different applications is discussed.

  10. Nanopore Technology: A Simple, Inexpensive, Futuristic Technology for DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P D

    2016-10-01

    In health care, importance of DNA sequencing has been fully established. Sanger's Capillary Electrophoresis DNA sequencing methodology is time consuming, cumbersome, hence become more expensive. Lately, because of its versatility DNA sequencing became house hold name, and therefore, there is an urgent need of simple, fast, inexpensive, DNA sequencing technology. In the beginning of this century efforts were made, and Nanopore DNA sequencing technology was developed; still it is infancy, nevertheless, it is the futuristic technology.

  11. A microchannel electrophoresis DNA sequencing system

    SciTech Connect

    Madabhushi, R S; Warth, T; Balch, J W; Bass, M; Brewer, L R; Copeland, A C; Davidson, J C; Fitch, J P; Kegelmeyer, L M; Kimbrough, J R; McCready, P; Nelson, D; Pastrone, R L; Richardson, P M; Swierkowski, S P; Tarte, L A; Vainer, M

    1999-01-01

    In order to increase the DNA sequencing throughput of the Joint Genome Institute, we have developed a microchannel electrophoresis system. The critical new and unique elements of this system include 1) a process for the production of arrays of 96 and 384 microchannels on bonded glass substrates up to 14 x 58 cm and 2) new sieving media for high resolution and high speed separations. With custom fabrication apparatus, microchannels are etched in a borosilicate substrate, and then fusion bonded to a top substrate 1.1 mm thick that has access holes formed in it. SEM examination shows a typical microchannel to be 40 micrometers deep x 180 micrometers wide by 46 cm long. This technology offers significant advantages over discrete capillaries or conventional slab-gel approaches. High throughput DNA sequencing with over 550 base pairs resolution has been achieved in roughly half the time of conventional sequencers. In February 1999, we begin a pre-production evaluation protocol for the microchannel and for three glass capillary electrophoresis systems (two from industry and one developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for the Joint Genome Institute). In order to utilize these instruments for DNA production sequencing, we have been evaluating and implementing software to convert raw electropherograms into called DNA bases with an associated probability of error. Our original intent was to utilize the DNA base calling software known as Plan and Phred developed by the University of Washington. This software has been outstanding for our slab gel electrophoresis systems currently in the production facility. In our tests and evaluations of this software applied to microchannel data, we observed that the electropherograms are of a different statistical and underlying signal structure compared to slab gels. Even with substantial modifications to the software, base calling performance was not satisfactory for the microchannel data. In this paper, we will present o The

  12. Immunological responses of turbot (Psetta maxima) to nodavirus infection or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC) stimulation, using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) analysis and cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung C; Osborne, Jane A; Montes, Ariana; Dios, Sonia; Nerland, Audun H; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio; Brown, Laura L; Johnson, Stewart C

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the immunological responses of turbot to nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation, we constructed cDNA libraries from liver, kidney and gill tissues of nodavirus-infected fish and examined the differential gene expression within turbot kidney in response to nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation using a turbot cDNA microarray. Turbot were experimentally infected with nodavirus and samples of each tissue were collected at selected time points post-infection. Using equal amount of total RNA at each sampling time, we made three tissue-specific cDNA libraries. After sequencing 3230 clones we obtained 3173 (98.2%) high quality sequences from our liver, kidney and gill libraries. Of these 2568 (80.9%) were identified as known genes and 605 (19.1%) as unknown genes. A total of 768 unique genes were identified. The two largest groups resulting from the classification of ESTs according to function were the cell/organism defense genes (71 uni-genes) and apoptosis-related process (23 uni-genes). Using these clones, a 1920 element cDNA microarray was constructed and used to investigate the differential gene expression within turbot in response to experimental nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation. Kidney tissue was collected at selected times post-infection (HPI) or stimulation (HPS), and total RNA was isolated for microarray analysis. Of the 1920 genes studied on the microarray, we identified a total of 121 differentially expressed genes in the kidney: 94 genes from nodavirus-infected animals and 79 genes from those stimulated with pIC. Within the nodavirus-infected fish we observed the highest number of differentially expressed genes at 24 HPI. Our results indicate that certain genes in turbot have important roles in immune responses to nodavirus infection and dsRNA stimulation.

  13. New Stopping Criteria for Segmenting DNA Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wentian

    2001-06-18

    We propose a solution on the stopping criterion in segmenting inhomogeneous DNA sequences with complex statistical patterns. This new stopping criterion is based on Bayesian information criterion in the model selection framework. When this criterion is applied to telomere of S.cerevisiae and the complete sequence of E.coli, borders of biologically meaningful units were identified, and a more reasonable number of domains was obtained. We also introduce a measure called segmentation strength which can be used to control the delineation of large domains. The relationship between the average domain size and the threshold of segmentation strength is determined for several genome sequences.

  14. New Stopping Criteria for Segmenting DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wentian

    2001-06-01

    We propose a solution on the stopping criterion in segmenting inhomogeneous DNA sequences with complex statistical patterns. This new stopping criterion is based on Bayesian information criterion in the model selection framework. When this criterion is applied to telomere of S. cerevisiae and the complete sequence of E. coli, borders of biologically meaningful units were identified, and a more reasonable number of domains was obtained. We also introduce a measure called segmentation strength which can be used to control the delineation of large domains. The relationship between the average domain size and the threshold of segmentation strength is determined for several genome sequences.

  15. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination.

  16. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  17. The first determination of DNA sequence of a specific gene.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Masayori

    2016-05-10

    How and when the first DNA sequence of a gene was determined? In 1977, F. Sanger came up with an innovative technology to sequence DNA by using chain terminators, and determined the entire DNA sequence of the 5375-base genome of bacteriophage φX 174 (Sanger et al., 1977). While this Sanger's achievement has been recognized as the first DNA sequencing of genes, we had determined DNA sequence of a gene, albeit a partial sequence, 11 years before the Sanger's DNA sequence (Okada et al., 1966).

  18. Imaging of DNA sequences with chemiluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Tizard, R; Cate, R L; Ramachandran, K L; Wysk, M; Voyta, J C; Murphy, O J; Bronstein, I

    1990-01-01

    We have coupled a chemiluminescent detection method that uses an alkaline phosphatase label to the genomic DNA sequencing protocol of Church and Gilbert [Church, G. M. & Gilbert, W. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 1991-1995]. Images of sequence ladders are obtained on x-ray film with exposure times of less than 30 min, as compared to 40 h required for a similar exposure with a 32P-labeled oligomer. Chemically cleaved DNA from a sequencing gel is transferred to a nylon membrane, and specific sequence ladders are selected by hybridization to DNA oligonucleotides labeled with alkaline phosphatase or with biotin, leading directly or indirectly to deposition of enzyme. If a biotinylated probe is used, an incubation with avidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate follows. The membrane is soaked in the chemiluminescent substrate (AMPPD) and is exposed to film. Dephosphorylation of AMPPD leads in a two-step pathway to a highly localized emission of visible light. The demonstrated shorter exposure times may improve the efficiency of a serial reprobing strategy such as the multiplex sequencing approach of Church and Kieffer-Higgins [Church, G. M. & Kieffer-Higgins, S. (1988) Science 240, 185-188]. Images PMID:2191292

  19. A PDDA/poly(2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid)-CNTs composite film DNA electrochemical sensor and its application for the detection of specific sequences related to PAT gene and NOS gene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Wei; Du, Meng; Jiao, Kui

    2008-05-30

    2,6-Pyridinedicarboxylic acid (PDC) was electropolymerized on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface combined with carboxylic group-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by cyclic voltammetry (CV) to form PDC-SWNTs composite film, which was rich in negatively charged carboxylic group. Then, poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) (PDDA), a linear cationic polyelectrolyte, was electrostatically adsorbed on the PDC-SWNTs/GCE surface. DNA probes with negatively charged phosphate group at the 5' end were immobilized on the PDDA/PDC-SWNTs/GCE due to the strong electrostatic attraction between PDDA and phosphate group of DNA. It has been found that modification of the electrode with PDC-SWNTs film has enhanced the effective electrode surface area and electron-transfer ability, in addition to providing negatively charged groups for the electrostatic assembly of cationic polyelectrolyte. PDDA plays a key role in the attachment of DNA probes to the PDC-SWNTs composite film and acts as a bridge to connect DNA with PDC-SWNTs film. The cathodic peak current of methylene blue (MB), an electroactive label, decreased obviously after the hybridization of DNA probe (ssDNA) with the complementary DNA (cDNA). This peak current change was used to monitor the recognition of the specific sequences related to PAT gene in the transgenic corn and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of NOS gene from the sample of transgenic soybean with satisfactory results. Under optimal conditions, the dynamic detection range of the sensor to PAT gene target sequence was from 1.0x10(-11) to 1.0x10(-6) mol/L with the detection limit of 2.6x10(-12) mol/L.

  20. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces. PMID:27509529

  1. Repetitive DNA sequences in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1988-01-01

    Two types of different repetitive DNA sequences called RepMP1 and RepMP2 were identified in the genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The number of these repeated elements, their nucleotide sequence and their localization on a physical map of the M. pneumoniae genome were determined. The results show that RepMP1 appears at least 10 times and RepMP2 at least 8 times in the genome. The repeated elements are dispersed on the chromosome and, in three cases, linked to each other by a homologous DNA sequence of 400 bp. The elements themselves are 300 bp (for RepMP1) and 150 bp (for RepMP2) long showing a high degree of homology. One copy of RepMP2 is a translated part of the gene for the major cytadhesin protein P1 which is responsible for the adsorption of M. pneumoniae to its host cell. Images PMID:3138660

  2. DNA sequencing by nanopores: advances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agah, Shaghayegh; Zheng, Ming; Pasquali, Matteo; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-10-01

    Developing inexpensive and simple DNA sequencing methods capable of detecting entire genomes in short periods of time could revolutionize the world of medicine and technology. It will also lead to major advances in our understanding of fundamental biological processes. It has been shown that nanopores have the ability of single-molecule sensing of various biological molecules rapidly and at a low cost. This has stimulated significant experimental efforts in developing DNA sequencing techniques by utilizing biological and artificial nanopores. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the nanopore sequencing field with a focus on the nature of nanopores and on sensing mechanisms during the translocation. Current challenges and alternative methods are also discussed.

  3. Sequence-Dependent Persistence Lengths of DNA.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan S; Glowacki, Jaroslaw; Grandchamp, Alexandre E; Manning, Robert S; Maddocks, John H

    2017-03-24

    A Monte Carlo code applied to the cgDNA coarse-grain rigid-base model of B-form double-stranded DNA is used to predict a sequence-averaged persistence length of lF = 53.5 nm in the sense of Flory, and of lp = 160 bp or 53.5 nm in the sense of apparent tangent-tangent correlation decay. These estimates are slightly higher than the consensus experimental values of 150 bp or 50 nm, but we believe the agreement to be good given that the cgDNA model is itself parametrized from molecular dynamics simulations of short fragments of length 10-20 bp, with no explicit fit to persistence length. Our Monte Carlo simulations further predict that there can be substantial dependence of persistence lengths on the specific sequence [Formula: see text] of a fragment. We propose, and confirm the numerical accuracy of, a simple factorization that separates the part of the apparent tangent-tangent correlation decay [Formula: see text] attributable to intrinsic shape, from a part [Formula: see text] attributable purely to stiffness, i.e., a sequence-dependent version of what has been called sequence-averaged dynamic persistence length l̅d (=58.8 nm within the cgDNA model). For ensembles of both random and λ-phage fragments, the apparent persistence length [Formula: see text] has a standard deviation of 4 nm over sequence, whereas our dynamic persistence length [Formula: see text] has a standard deviation of only 1 nm. However, there are notable dynamic persistence length outliers, including poly(A) (exceptionally straight and stiff), poly(TA) (tightly coiled and exceptionally soft), and phased A-tract sequence motifs (exceptionally bent and stiff). The results of our numerical simulations agree reasonably well with both molecular dynamics simulation and diverse experimental data including minicircle cyclization rates and stereo cryo-electron microscopy images.

  4. cDNA sequences of two apolipoproteins from lamprey

    SciTech Connect

    Pontes, M.; Xu, X.; Graham, D.; Riley, M.; Doolittle, R.F.

    1987-03-24

    The messages for two small but abundant apolipoproteins found in lamprey blood plasma were cloned with the aid of oligonucleotide probes based on amino-terminal sequences. In both cases, numerous clones were identified in a lamprey liver cDNA library, consistent with the great abundance of these proteins in lamprey blood. One of the cDNAs (LAL1) has a coding region of 105 amino acids that corresponds to a 21-residue signal peptide, a putative 8-residue propeptide, and the 76-residue mature protein found in blood. The other cDNA (LAL2) codes for a total of 191 residues, the first 23 of which constitute a signal peptide. The two proteins, which occur in the high-density lipoprotein fraction of ultracentrifuged plasma, have amino acid compositions similar to those of apolipoproteins found in mammalian blood; computer analysis indicates that the sequences are largely helix-permissive. When the sequences were searched against an amino acid sequence data base, rat apolipoprotein IV was the best matching candidate in both cases. Although a reasonable alignment can be made with that sequence and LAL1, definitive assignment of the two lamprey proteins to typical mammalian classes cannot be made at this point.

  5. Nucleotide sequence of a Pseudomonas denitrificans 5.4-kilobase DNA fragment containing five cob genes and identification of structural genes encoding S-adenosyl-L-methionine: uroporphyrinogen III methyltransferase and cobyrinic acid a,c-diamide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Crouzet, J; Cauchois, L; Blanche, F; Debussche, L; Thibaut, D; Rouyez, M C; Rigault, S; Mayaux, J F; Cameron, B

    1990-01-01

    A 5.4-kilobase DNA fragment carrying Pseudomonas denitrificans cob genes has been sequenced. The nucleotide sequence and genetic analysis revealed that this fragment carries five different cob genes (cobA to cobE). Four of these genes present the characteristics of translationally coupled genes. cobA has been identified as the structural gene of S-adenosyl-L-methionine:uroporphyrinogen III methyltransferase (SUMT) because the encoded protein has the same NH2 terminus and molecular weight as those determined for the purified SUMT. For the same reasons the cobB gene was shown to be the structural gene for cobyrinic acid a,c-diamide synthase. Genetic and biochemical data concerning cobC and cobD mutants suggest that the products of these genes are involved in the conversion of cobyric acid to cobinamide. PMID:2211520

  6. Axolotl hemoglobin: cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of two alpha globins and a beta globin from an adult Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Shishikura, Fumio; Takeuchi, Hiro-aki; Nagai, Takatoshi

    2005-11-01

    Erythrocytes of the adult axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, have multiple hemoglobins. We separated and purified two kinds of hemoglobin, termed major hemoglobin (Hb M) and minor hemoglobin (Hb m), from a five-year-old male by hydrophobic interaction column chromatography on Alkyl Superose. The hemoglobins have two distinct alpha type globin polypeptides (alphaM and alpham) and a common beta globin polypeptide, all of which were purified in FPLC on a reversed-phase column after S-pyridylethylation. The complete amino acid sequences of the three globin chains were determined separately using nucleotide sequencing with the assistance of protein sequencing. The mature globin molecules were composed of 141 amino acid residues for alphaM globin, 143 for alpham globin and 146 for beta globin. Comparing primary structures of the five kinds of axolotl globins, including two previously established alpha type globins from the same species, with other known globins of amphibians and representatives of other vertebrates, we constructed phylogenetic trees for amphibian hemoglobins and tetrapod hemoglobins. The molecular trees indicated that alphaM, alpham, beta and the previously known alpha major globin were adult types of globins and the other known alpha globin was a larval type. The existence of two to four more globins in the axolotl erythrocyte is predicted.

  7. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred

    1989-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli K12 available from the GENBANK and EMBO databases and over a period of several years independently from the literature. We have introduced all available genetic map data and have arranged the sequences accordingly. As far as possible the overlaps are deleted and a total of 940,449 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1989. This corresponds to a total of 19.92% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2% derived from the sequence of lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and the various insertion sequences. This compilation may be available in machine readable form from one of the international databanks in some future. PMID:2654890

  8. Structural gene and complete amino acid sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus collagenase.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, H; Shibano, Y; Morihara, K; Fukushima, J; Inami, S; Keil, B; Gilles, A M; Kawamoto, S; Okuda, K

    1992-01-01

    The DNA encoding the collagenase of Vibrio alginolyticus was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. When the cloned gene was ligated to pUC18, the Escherichia coli expression vector, bacteria carrying the gene exhibited both collagenase antigen and collagenase activity. The open reading frame from the ATG initiation codon was 2442 bp in length for the collagenase structural gene. The amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, revealed that the mature collagenase consists of 739 amino acids with an Mr of 81875. The amino acid sequences of 20 polypeptide fragments were completely identical with the deduced amino acid sequences of the collagenase gene. The amino acid composition predicted from the DNA sequence was similar to the chemically determined composition of purified collagenase reported previously. The analyses of both the DNA and amino acid sequences of the collagenase gene were rigorously performed, but we could not detect any significant sequence similarity to other collagenases. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1311172

  9. [Characterization and modification of phage T7 DNA polymerase for use in DNA sequencing]: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This project focuses on the DNA polymerase and accessory proteins of phage T7 for use in DNA sequence analysis. T7 DNA polymerase (gene 5 protein) interacts with accessory proteins for the acquisition of properties such as processivity that are necessary for DNA replication. One goal is to understand these interactions in order to modify the proteins to increase their usefulness with DNA sequence analysis. Using a genetically modified gene 5 protein lacking 3' to 5' exonuclease activity we have found that in the presence of manganese there is no discrimination against dideoxynucleotides, a property that enables novel approaches to DNA sequencing using automated technology. Pyrophosphorolysis can create problems in DNA sequence determination, a problem that can be eliminated by the addition of pyrophosphatase. Crystals of the gene 5 protein/thioredoxin complex have now been obtained and X-ray diffraction analysis will be undertaken once their quality has been improved. Amino acid changes in gene 5 protein have been identified that alter its interaction with thioredoxin. Characterization of these proteins should help determine how thioredoxin confers processivity on polymerization. We have characterized the 17 DNA binding protein, the gene 2.5 protein, and shown that it interacts with gene 5 protein and gene 4 protein. The gene 2.5 protein mediates homologous base pairing and strand uptake. Gene 5.5 protein interacts with E. coli Hl protein and affects gene expression. Biochemical and genetic studies on the T7 56-kDa gene 4 protein, the helicase, are focused on its physical interaction with T7 DNA polymerase and the mechanism by which the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates fuels its unidirectional translocation on DNA.

  10. [Characterization and modification of phage T7 DNA polymerase for use in DNA sequencing]: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This project focuses on the DNA polymerase and accessory proteins of phage T7 for use in DNA sequence analysis. T7 DNA polymerase (gene 5 protein) interacts with accessory proteins for the acquisition of properties such as processivity that are necessary for DNA replication. One goal is to understand these interactions in order to modify the proteins to increase their usefulness with DNA sequence analysis. Using a genetically modified gene 5 protein lacking 3` to 5` exonuclease activity we have found that in the presence of manganese there is no discrimination against dideoxynucleotides, a property that enables novel approaches to DNA sequencing using automated technology. Pyrophosphorolysis can create problems in DNA sequence determination, a problem that can be eliminated by the addition of pyrophosphatase. Crystals of the gene 5 protein/thioredoxin complex have now been obtained and X-ray diffraction analysis will be undertaken once their quality has been improved. Amino acid changes in gene 5 protein have been identified that alter its interaction with thioredoxin. Characterization of these proteins should help determine how thioredoxin confers processivity on polymerization. We have characterized the 17 DNA binding protein, the gene 2.5 protein, and shown that it interacts with gene 5 protein and gene 4 protein. The gene 2.5 protein mediates homologous base pairing and strand uptake. Gene 5.5 protein interacts with E. coli Hl protein and affects gene expression. Biochemical and genetic studies on the T7 56-kDa gene 4 protein, the helicase, are focused on its physical interaction with T7 DNA polymerase and the mechanism by which the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates fuels its unidirectional translocation on DNA.

  11. DNA SEQUENCING RESEARCH GROUP (DSRG) 2003—A GENERAL SURVEY OF CORE DNA SEQUENCING FACILITIES

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, Glenis J.; Pershad, Rashmi; Escobar, Helaman; Hawes, John W.; Hunter, Timothy; Jackson-Machelski, Emily; Knudtson, Kevin L.; Robertson, Margaret; Thannhauser, Theodore W.

    2003-01-01

    DNA sequencing core facilities serve as centralized resources within both academic and commercial institutions, providing expertise in the area of DNA analysis. The composition and configuration of these facilities continue to evolve in response to new developments in instrumentation and methodology. The goal of the 2003 DNA Sequencing Research Group (DSRG) survey was to identify recent changes in staffing, funding, instrumentation, services, and customer relations. Responses to 58 survey questions from 30 participants are presented to offer a look at the current typical DNA core sequencing facility. The results from this study will serve as a resource for institutions to benchmark their shared core laboratories, and to give facility directors an opportunity to compare and contrast their respective services and experiences.

  12. Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    COVERED (From - To) 6 Jul 08 – 11 Jul 08 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RANDOM CODING BOUNDS FOR DNA CODES BASED ON FIBONACCI ENSEMBLES OF DNA SEQUENCES ... sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci sequences . 15. SUBJECT TERMS DNA Codes, Fibonacci Ensembles, DNA Computing, Code Optimization 16...coding bound on the rate of DNA codes is proved. To obtain the bound, we use some ensembles of DNA sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci

  13. An oligonucleotide hybridization approach to DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Khrapko, K R; Lysov YuP; Khorlyn, A A; Shick, V V; Florentiev, V L; Mirzabekov, A D

    1989-10-09

    We have proposed a DNA sequencing method based on hybridization of a DNA fragment to be sequenced with the complete set of fixed-length oligonucleotides (e.g., 4(8) = 65,536 possible 8-mers) immobilized individually as dots of a 2-D matrix [(1989) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 303, 1508-1511]. It was shown that the list of hybridizing octanucleotides is sufficient for the computer-assisted reconstruction of the structures for 80% of random-sequence fragments up to 200 bases long, based on the analysis of the octanucleotide overlapping. Here a refinement of the method and some experimental data are presented. We have performed hybridizations with oligonucleotides immobilized on a glass plate, and obtained their dissociation curves down to heptanucleotides. Other approaches, e.g., an additional hybridization of short oligonucleotides which continuously extend duplexes formed between the fragment and immobilized oligonucleotides, should considerably increase either the probability of unambiguous reconstruction, or the length of reconstructed sequences, or decrease the size of immobilized oligonucleotides.

  14. Text mining of DNA sequence homology searches.

    PubMed

    McCallum, John; Ganesh, Siva

    2003-01-01

    Primary tasks in analysis and annotation of expressed sequence tag (EST) datasets are to identify similarity among sequences by unsupervised clustering and assign putative function based on BLAST homology searches. We investigated the usefulness of text mining as a simple approach for further higher-level clustering of EST datasets using IBM Intelligent Miner for Text v2.3 tools. Agglomerative and k-means clustering tools were used to cluster BLASTx homology search documents from two onion EST datasets and optimised by pre-processing and pruning. Subjective evaluation confirmed that these tools provided biologically useful and complementary views of the two libraries, provided new insights into their composition and revealed clusters previously identified by human experts. We compared BLASTx textual clusters for two gene families with their DNA sequence-based clusters and confirmed that these shared similar morphology.

  15. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1987-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3575113

  16. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1989-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2654889

  17. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1988-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3368330

  18. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2333227

  19. Aspects of coverage in medical DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wendl, Michael C; Wilson, Richard K

    2008-01-01

    Background DNA sequencing is now emerging as an important component in biomedical studies of diseases like cancer. Short-read, highly parallel sequencing instruments are expected to be used heavily for such projects, but many design specifications have yet to be conclusively established. Perhaps the most fundamental of these is the redundancy required to detect sequence variations, which bears directly upon genomic coverage and the consequent resolving power for discerning somatic mutations. Results We address the medical sequencing coverage problem via an extension of the standard mathematical theory of haploid coverage. The expected diploid multi-fold coverage, as well as its generalization for aneuploidy are derived and these expressions can be readily evaluated for any project. The resulting theory is used as a scaling law to calibrate performance to that of standard BAC sequencing at 8× to 10× redundancy, i.e. for expected coverages that exceed 99% of the unique sequence. A differential strategy is formalized for tumor/normal studies wherein tumor samples are sequenced more deeply than normal ones. In particular, both tumor alleles should be detected at least twice, while both normal alleles are detected at least once. Our theory predicts these requirements can be met for tumor and normal redundancies of approximately 26× and 21×, respectively. We explain why these values do not differ by a factor of 2, as might intuitively be expected. Future technology developments should prompt even deeper sequencing of tumors, but the 21× value for normal samples is essentially a constant. Conclusion Given the assumptions of standard coverage theory, our model gives pragmatic estimates for required redundancy. The differential strategy should be an efficient means of identifying potential somatic mutations for further study. PMID:18485222

  20. Rapid DNA Sequencing by Direct Nanoscale Reading of Nucleotide Bases on Individual DNA Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, James Weifu; Meller, Amit

    2007-01-01

    Since the independent invention of DNA sequencing by Sanger and by Gilbert 30 years ago, it has grown from a small scale technique capable of reading several kilobase-pair of sequence per day into today's multibillion dollar industry. This growth has spurred the development of new sequencing technologies that do not involve either electrophoresis or Sanger sequencing chemistries. Sequencing by Synthesis (SBS) involves multiple parallel micro-sequencing addition events occurring on a surface, where data from each round is detected by imaging. New High Throughput Technologies for DNA Sequencing and Genomics is the second volume in the Perspectives in Bioanalysis series, which looks at the electroanalytical chemistry of nucleic acids and proteins, development of electrochemical sensors and their application in biomedicine and in the new fields of genomics and proteomics. The authors have expertly formatted the information for a wide variety of readers, including new developments that will inspire students and young scientists to create new tools for science and medicine in the 21st century. Reviews of complementary developments in Sanger and SBS sequencing chemistries, capillary electrophoresis and microdevice integration, MS sequencing and applications set the framework for the book.

  1. DNA polymerase-catalyzed elongation of repetitive hexanucleotide sequences: application to creation of repetitive DNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hiroyuki; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the elongation of various hexanucleotide sequences with thermophilic DNA polymerase, under isothermal or thermal cyclic reaction conditions. We prepared 10 types of double repeat hexanucleotide duplexes with various GC compositions containing between 0 and 6 GC nucleotides per repeat and incubated these duplexes with thermophilic Taq DNA polymerase and dNTPs at various temperatures. All of the model repetitive short duplexes were elongated under the isothermal incubation conditions, although there were some differences in the elongation efficiencies derived from the GC composition in the repetitive sequences. It was also found that all of the model repetitive duplexes were extended more effectively by a 3-step thermal cyclic reaction involving denaturation, annealing, and extension. On the basis of this technique, we prepared a glutamate-encoding short repetitive duplex and created long repetitive DNAs under isothermal and thermal cyclic reaction conditions. DNA sequencing analysis of the cloned repetitive DNA revealed that well-ordered long repetitive DNAs of various chain lengths were created by this DNA polymerase-catalyzed ligation method, and these were easily cloned into vectors by the TA-cloning method. This method could be useful for obtaining DNAs encoding arbitrary long repetitive amino acid sequences more effectively than the conventional T4 ligase-catalyzed ligation method.

  2. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Zhu, Y.F.; Chung, C.N.; Allman, S.L.

    1997-03-01

    Since laser mass spectrometry has the potential for achieving very fast DNA analysis, the authors recently applied it to DNA sequencing, DNA typing for fingerprinting, and DNA screening for disease diagnosis. Two different approaches for sequencing DNA have been successfully demonstrated. One is to sequence DNA with DNA ladders produced from Snager`s enzymatic method. The other is to do direct sequencing without DNA ladders. The need for quick DNA typing for identification purposes is critical for forensic application. The preliminary results indicate laser mass spectrometry can possibly be used for rapid DNA fingerprinting applications at a much lower cost than gel electrophoresis. Population screening for certain genetic disease can be a very efficient step to reducing medical costs through prevention. Since laser mass spectrometry can provide very fast DNA analysis, the authors applied laser mass spectrometry to disease diagnosis. Clinical samples with both base deletion and point mutation have been tested with complete success.

  3. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Zhu, Y. F.; Chung, C. N.; Allman, S. L.

    1997-05-01

    Since laser mass spectrometry has the potential for achieving very fast DNA analysis, we recently applied it to DNA sequencing, DNA typing for fingerprinting, and DNA screening for disease diagnosis. Two different approaches for sequencing DNA have been successfully demonstrated. One is to sequence DNA with DNA ladders produced from Sanger's enzymatic method. The other is to do direct sequencing without DNA ladders. The need for quick DNA typing for identification purposes is critical for forensic application. Our preliminary results indicate laser mass spectrometry can possible be used for rapid DNA fingerprinting applications at a much lower cost than gel electrophoresis. Population screening for certain genetic disease can be a very efficient step to reducing medical costs through prevention. Since laser mass spectrometry can provide very fast DNA analysis, we applied laser mass spectrometry to disease diagnosis. Clinical samples with both base deletion and point mutation have been tested with complete success.

  4. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  5. A frameshift error detection algorithm for DNA sequencing projects.

    PubMed Central

    Fichant, G A; Quentin, Y

    1995-01-01

    During the determination of DNA sequences, frameshift errors are not the most frequent but they are the most bothersome as they corrupt the amino acid sequence over several residues. Detection of such errors by sequence alignment is only possible when related sequences are found in the databases. To avoid this limitation, we have developed a new tool based on the distribution of non-overlapping 3-tuples or 6-tuples in the three frames of an ORF. The method relies upon the result of a correspondence analysis. It has been extensively tested on Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae sequences and has also been examined with human sequences. The results indicate that it can detect frameshift errors affecting as few as 20 bp with a low rate of false positives (no more than 1.0/1000 bp scanned). The proposed algorithm can be used to scan a large collection of data, but it is mainly intended for laboratory practice as a tool for checking the quality of the sequences produced during a sequencing project. PMID:7659513

  6. Color image encryption scheme using CML and DNA sequence operations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Zhang, Hui-Li; Bao, Xue-Mei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an encryption algorithm for color images using chaotic system and DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid) sequence operations is proposed. Three components for the color plain image is employed to construct a matrix, then perform confusion operation on the pixels matrix generated by the spatiotemporal chaos system, i.e., CML (coupled map lattice). DNA encoding rules, and decoding rules are introduced in the permutation phase. The extended Hamming distance is proposed to generate new initial values for CML iteration combining color plain image. Permute the rows and columns of the DNA matrix and then get the color cipher image from this matrix. Theoretical analysis and experimental results prove the cryptosystem secure and practical, and it is suitable for encrypting color images of any size.

  7. The complete amino acid sequence of prochymosin.

    PubMed Central

    Foltmann, B; Pedersen, V B; Jacobsen, H; Kauffman, D; Wybrandt, G

    1977-01-01

    The total sequence of 365 amino acid residues in bovine prochymosin is presented. Alignment with the amino acid sequence of porcine pepsinogen shows that 204 amino acid residues are common to the two zymogens. Further comparison and alignment with the amino acid sequence of penicillopepsin shows that 66 residues are located at identical positions in all three proteases. The three enzymes belong to a large group of proteases with two aspartate residues in the active center. This group forms a family derived from one common ancestor. PMID:329280

  8. Sequence dependent hole evolution in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D

    2004-06-01

    The paper examines thedynamical behavior of a radical cation(G(+*)) generated in adouble stranded DNA for differentoligonucleotide sequences. The resonancehole tunneling through an oligonucleotidesequence is studied by the method ofnumerical integration of self-consistentquantum-mechanical equations. The holemotion is considered quantum mechanicallyand nucleotide base oscillations aretreated classically. The results obtaineddemonstrate a strong dependence of chargetransfer on the type of nucleotidesequence. The rates of the hole transferare calculated for different nucleotidesequences and compared with experimentaldata on the transfer from (G(+*))to a GGG unit.

  9. Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rama Shankar

    2013-06-01

    Successful mapping of the draft human genome in 2001 and more recent mapping of the human microbiome genome in 2012 have relied heavily on the parallel processing of the second generation/Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) DNA machines at a cost of several millions dollars and long computer processing times. These have been mainly biochemical approaches. Here a system analysis approach is used to review these techniques by identifying the requirements, specifications, test methods, error estimates, repeatability, reliability and trends in the cost reduction. The first generation, NGS and the Third Generation Single Molecule Real Time (SMART) detection sequencing methods are reviewed. Based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) data, the achieved cost reduction of 1.5 times per yr. from Sep. 2001 to July 2007; 7 times per yr., from Oct. 2007 to Apr. 2010; and 2.5 times per yr. from July 2010 to Jan 2012 are discussed.

  10. Transverse Electronic Signature of DNA for Electronic Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingsheng; Endres, Robert G.; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    In recent years, the proliferation of large-scale DNA sequencing projects for applications in clinical medicine and health care has driven the search for new methods that could reduce the time and cost. The commonly used Sanger sequencing method relies on the chemistry to read the bases in DNA and is far too slow and expensive for reading personal genetic codes. There were earlier attempts to sequence DNA by directly visualizing the nucleotide composition of the DNA molecules by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However, sequencing DNA based on directly imaging DNA's atomic structure has not yet been successful. In Chap. 9, Xu, Endres, and Arakawa report a potential physical alternative by detecting unique transverse electronic signatures of DNA bases using ultrahigh vacuum STM. Supported by the principles, calculations and statistical analyses, these authors argue that it would be possible to directly sequence DNA by the STM-based technology without any modification of the DNA.

  11. Partition enrichment of nucleotide sequences (PINS)--a generally applicable, sequence based method for enrichment of complex DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Kvist, Thomas; Sondt-Marcussen, Line; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2014-01-01

    The dwindling cost of DNA sequencing is driving transformative changes in various biological disciplines including medicine, thus resulting in an increased need for routine sequencing. Preparation of samples suitable for sequencing is the starting point of any practical application, but enrichment of the target sequence over background DNA is often laborious and of limited sensitivity thereby limiting the usefulness of sequencing. The present paper describes a new method, Probability directed Isolation of Nucleic acid Sequences (PINS), for enrichment of DNA, enabling the sequencing of a large DNA region surrounding a small known sequence. A 275,000 fold enrichment of a target DNA sample containing integrated human papilloma virus is demonstrated. Specifically, a sample containing 0.0028 copies of target sequence per ng of total DNA was enriched to 786 copies per ng. The starting concentration of 0.0028 target copies per ng corresponds to one copy of target in a background of 100,000 complete human genomes. The enriched sample was subsequently amplified using rapid genome walking and the resulting DNA sequence revealed not only the sequence of a the truncated virus, but also 1026 base pairs 5' and 50 base pairs 3' to the integration site in chromosome 8. The demonstrated enrichment method is extremely sensitive and selective and requires only minimal knowledge of the sequence to be enriched and will therefore enable sequencing where the target concentration relative to background is too low to allow the use of other sample preparation methods or where significant parts of the target sequence is unknown.

  12. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  13. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  14. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  15. Determining orientation and direction of DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Edwin H.; Meyne, Julianne

    2000-01-01

    Determining orientation and direction of DNA sequences. A method by which fluorescence in situ hybridization can be made strand specific is described. Cell cultures are grown in a medium containing a halogenated nucleotide. The analog is partially incorporated in one DNA strand of each chromatid. This substitution takes place in opposite strands of the two sister chromatids. After staining with the fluorescent DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33258, cells are exposed to long-wavelength ultraviolet light which results in numerous strand nicks. These nicks enable the substituted strand to be denatured and solubilized by heat, treatment with high or low pH aqueous solutions, or by immersing the strands in 2.times.SSC (0.3M NaCl+0.03M sodium citrate), to name three procedures. It is unnecessary to enzymatically digest the strands using Exo III or another exonuclease in order to excise and solubilize nucleotides starting at the sites of the nicks. The denaturing/solubilizing process removes most of the substituted strand while leaving the prereplication strand largely intact. Hybridization of a single-stranded probe of a tandem repeat arranged in a head-to-tail orientation will result in hybridization only to the chromatid with the complementary strand present.

  16. Large microchannel array fabrication and results for DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrone, R L; Balch, J W; Brewer, L R; Copeland, A C; Davidson , J C; Fitch, J P; Kimbrough, J R; Madabhushi, R S; Richardson, P M; Swierkowski, S P; Tarte, L A; Vainer, M

    1999-01-07

    We have developed a process for the production of microchannel arrays on bonded glass substrates up to I4 x 58 cm, for DNA sequencing. Arrays of 96 and 384 microchannels, each 46 cm long have been built. This technology offers significant advantages over discrete capillaries or conventional slab-gel approaches. High throughput DNA sequencing with over 550 base pairs resolution has been achieved. With custom fabrication apparatus, microchannels are etched in a borosilicate substrate, and then fusion bonded to a top substrate 1.1 mm thick that has access holes formed in it. SEM examination shows a typical microchannel to be 40 x 180 micrometers by 46 cm Iong; the etch is approximately isotropic, leaving a key undercut, for forming a rounded channel. The surface roughness at the bottom of the 40 micrometer deep channel has been profilometer measured to be as low as 20 nm; the roughness at the top surface was 2 nm. Etch uniformity of about 5% has been obtained using a 22% vol. HF / 78% Acetic acid solution. The simple lithography, etching, and bonding of these substrates enables efficient production of these arrays and extremely precise replication From master masks and precision machining with a mandrel. Keywords: microchannels, microchannel plates, DNA sequencing, electrophoresis, borosilicate glass

  17. The nucleotide sequence of the dnaA gene and the first part of the dnaN gene of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Hansen, E B; Hansen, F G; von Meyenburg, K

    1982-11-25

    The nucleotide sequence of the dnaA gene and the first 10% of the dnaN gene was determined. From the nucleotide sequence the amino acid sequence of the dnaA gene product was derived. It is a basic protein of 467 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 52.5 kD. The expression of the dnaA gene is in the counterclockwise direction like the one of the dnaN gene, for which potential startsites were found.

  18. The nucleotide sequence of the dnaA gene and the first part of the dnaN gene of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, E B; Hansen, F G; von Meyenburg, K

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the dnaA gene and the first 10% of the dnaN gene was determined. From the nucleotide sequence the amino acid sequence of the dnaA gene product was derived. It is a basic protein of 467 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 52.5 kD. The expression of the dnaA gene is in the counterclockwise direction like the one of the dnaN gene, for which potential startsites were found. PMID:6296774

  19. Carrier molecules and extraction of circulating tumor DNA for next generation sequencing in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Beránek, Martin; Sirák, Igor; Vošmik, Milan; Petera, Jiří; Drastíková, Monika; Palička, Vladimír

    The aims of the study were: i) to compare circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) yields obtained by different manual extraction procedures, ii) to evaluate the addition of various carrier molecules into the plasma to improve ctDNA extraction recovery, and iii) to use next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to analyze KRAS, BRAF, and NRAS somatic mutations in ctDNA from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Venous blood was obtained from patients who suffered from metastatic colorectal carcinoma. For plasma ctDNA extraction, the following carriers were tested: carrier RNA, polyadenylic acid, glycogen, linear acrylamide, yeast tRNA, salmon sperm DNA, and herring sperm DNA. Each extract was characterized by quantitative real-time PCR and next generation sequencing. The addition of polyadenylic acid had a significant positive effect on the amount of ctDNA eluted. The sequencing data revealed five cases of ctDNA mutated in KRAS and one patient with a BRAF mutation. An agreement of 86% was found between tumor tissues and ctDNA. Testing somatic mutations in ctDNA seems to be a promising tool to monitor dynamically changing genotypes of tumor cells circulating in the body. The optimized process of ctDNA extraction should help to obtain more reliable sequencing data in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  20. Non-random DNA fragmentation in next-generation sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poptsova, Maria S.; Il'Icheva, Irina A.; Nechipurenko, Dmitry Yu.; Panchenko, Larisa A.; Khodikov, Mingian V.; Oparina, Nina Y.; Polozov, Robert V.; Nechipurenko, Yury D.; Grokhovsky, Sergei L.

    2014-03-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology is based on cutting DNA into small fragments, and their massive parallel sequencing. The multiple overlapping segments termed ``reads'' are assembled into a contiguous sequence. To reduce sequencing errors, every genome region should be sequenced several dozen times. This sequencing approach is based on the assumption that genomic DNA breaks are random and sequence-independent. However, previously we showed that for the sonicated restriction DNA fragments the rates of double-stranded breaks depend on the nucleotide sequence. In this work we analyzed genomic reads from NGS data and discovered that fragmentation methods based on the action of the hydrodynamic forces on DNA, produce similar bias. Consideration of this non-random DNA fragmentation may allow one to unravel what factors and to what extent influence the non-uniform coverage of various genomic regions.

  1. DNA extraction from vegetative tissue for next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Agnelo

    2014-01-01

    The quality of extracted DNA is crucial for several applications in molecular biology. If the DNA is to be used for next-generation sequencing (NGS), then microgram quantities of good-quality DNA is required. In addition, the DNA must substantially be of high molecular weight so that it can be used for library preparation and NGS sequencing. Contaminating phenol or starch in the isolated DNA can be easily removed by filtration through kit-based cartridges. In this chapter we describe a simple two-reagent DNA extraction protocol which yields a high quality and quantity of DNA which can be used for different applications including NGS.

  2. What Advances Are Being Made in DNA Sequencing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA building blocks (nucleotides) in an individual's genetic code, called DNA sequencing, has advanced the study of ... breakthrough that helped scientists determine the human genetic code, but it is time-consuming and expensive. The ...

  3. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Finocchiaro, G.; Taroni, F.; Martin, A.L.; Colombo, I.; Tarelli, G.T.; DiDonato, S. ); Rocchi, M. )

    1991-01-15

    The authors have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH{sub 2}-terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH{sub 2}-terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hanster somatic cell hybrids.

  4. Sequence dependence of isothermal DNA amplification via EXPAR

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jifeng; Ferguson, Tanya M.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Ramírez-Borrero, Alissa J.; Hintze, Arend; Adami, Christoph; Niemz, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification is becoming increasingly important for molecular diagnostics. Therefore, new computational tools are needed to facilitate assay design. In the isothermal EXPonential Amplification Reaction (EXPAR), template sequences with similar thermodynamic characteristics perform very differently. To understand what causes this variability, we characterized the performance of 384 template sequences, and used this data to develop two computational methods to predict EXPAR template performance based on sequence: a position weight matrix approach with support vector machine classifier, and RELIEF attribute evaluation with Naïve Bayes classification. The methods identified well and poorly performing EXPAR templates with 67–70% sensitivity and 77–80% specificity. We combined these methods into a computational tool that can accelerate new assay design by ruling out likely poor performers. Furthermore, our data suggest that variability in template performance is linked to specific sequence motifs. Cytidine, a pyrimidine base, is over-represented in certain positions of well-performing templates. Guanosine and adenosine, both purine bases, are over-represented in similar regions of poorly performing templates, frequently as GA or AG dimers. Since polymerases have a higher affinity for purine oligonucleotides, polymerase binding to GA-rich regions of a single-stranded DNA template may promote non-specific amplification in EXPAR and other nucleic acid amplification reactions. PMID:22416064

  5. DNA Tetrominoes: The Construction of DNA Nanostructures Using Self-Organised Heterogeneous Deoxyribonucleic Acids Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hui San; Rahim, Mohd Syafiq; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan

    2015-01-01

    The unique programmability of nucleic acids offers alternative in constructing excitable and functional nanostructures. This work introduces an autonomous protocol to construct DNA Tetris shapes (L-Shape, B-Shape, T-Shape and I-Shape) using modular DNA blocks. The protocol exploits the rich number of sequence combinations available from the nucleic acid alphabets, thus allowing for diversity to be applied in designing various DNA nanostructures. Instead of a deterministic set of sequences corresponding to a particular design, the protocol promotes a large pool of DNA shapes that can assemble to conform to any desired structures. By utilising evolutionary programming in the design stage, DNA blocks are subjected to processes such as sequence insertion, deletion and base shifting in order to enrich the diversity of the resulting shapes based on a set of cascading filters. The optimisation algorithm allows mutation to be exerted indefinitely on the candidate sequences until these sequences complied with all the four fitness criteria. Generated candidates from the protocol are in agreement with the filter cascades and thermodynamic simulation. Further validation using gel electrophoresis indicated the formation of the designed shapes. Thus, supporting the plausibility of constructing DNA nanostructures in a more hierarchical, modular, and interchangeable manner. PMID:26258940

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the WHO International Standard for Hepatitis B Virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Adrian; Minhas, Rehan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The World Health Organization (WHO) international standard (IS) for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA for use in nucleic acid amplification assays was characterized by determining the complete genome sequence, which was assigned genotype A. This information will aid the design, development, and evaluation of HBV DNA amplification assays. PMID:28209818

  7. Estimation of DNA sequence context-dependent mutation rates using primate genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Bouffard, Gerard G; Wallace, Susan S; Bond, Jeffrey P

    2007-09-01

    It is understood that DNA and amino acid substitution rates are highly sequence context-dependent, e.g., C --> T substitutions in vertebrates may occur much more frequently at CpG sites and that cysteine substitution rates may depend on support of the context for participation in a disulfide bond. Furthermore, many applications rely on quantitative models of nucleotide or amino acid substitution, including phylogenetic inference and identification of amino acid sequence positions involved in functional specificity. We describe quantification of the context dependence of nucleotide substitution rates using baboon, chimpanzee, and human genomic sequence data generated by the NISC Comparative Sequencing Program. Relative mutation rates are reported for the 96 classes of mutations of the form 5' alphabetagamma 3' --> 5' alphadeltagamma 3', where alpha, beta, gamma, and delta are nucleotides and beta not equal delta, based on maximum likelihood calculations. Our results confirm that C --> T substitutions are enhanced at CpG sites compared with other transitions, relatively independent of the identity of the preceding nucleotide. While, as expected, transitions generally occur more frequently than transversions, we find that the most frequent transversions involve the C at CpG sites (CpG transversions) and that their rate is comparable to the rate of transitions at non-CpG sites. A four-class model of the rates of context-dependent evolution of primate DNA sequences, CpG transitions > non-CpG transitions approximately CpG transversions > non-CpG transversions, captures qualitative features of the mutation spectrum. We find that despite qualitative similarity of mutation rates among different genomic regions, there are statistically significant differences.

  8. Indirect readout of DNA sequence by p22 repressor: roles of DNA and protein functional groups in modulating DNA conformation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lydia-Ann; Watkins, Derrick; Williams, Loren Dean; Koudelka, Gerald B

    2013-01-09

    The repressor of bacteriophage P22 (P22R) discriminates between its various DNA binding sites by sensing the identity of non-contacted base pairs at the center of its binding site. The "indirect readout" of these non-contacted bases is apparently based on DNA's sequence-dependent conformational preferences. The structures of P22R-DNA complexes indicate that the non-contacted base pairs at the center of the binding site are in the B' state. This finding suggests that indirect readout and therefore binding site discrimination depend on P22R's ability to either sense and/or impose the B' state on the non-contacted bases of its binding sites. We show here that the affinity of binding sites for P22R depends on the tendency of the central bases to assume the B'-DNA state. Furthermore, we identify functional groups in the minor groove of the non-contacted bases as the essential modulators of indirect readout by P22R. In P22R-DNA complexes, the negatively charged E44 and E48 residues are provocatively positioned near the negatively charged DNA phosphates of the non-contacted nucleotides. The close proximity of the negatively charged groups on protein and DNA suggests that electrostatics may play a key role in the indirect readout process. Changing either of two negatively charged residues to uncharged residues eliminates the ability of P22R to impose structural changes on DNA and to recognize non-contacted base sequence. These findings suggest that these negatively charged amino acids function to force the P22R-bound DNA into the B' state and therefore play a key role in indirect readout by P22R.

  9. Random-breakage mapping method applied to human DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The random-breakage mapping method [Game et al. (1990) Nucleic Acids Res., 18, 4453-4461] was applied to DNA sequences in human fibroblasts. The methodology involves NotI restriction endonuclease digestion of DNA from irradiated calls, followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting and hybridization with DNA probes recognizing the single copy sequences of interest. The Southern blots show a band for the unbroken restriction fragments and a smear below this band due to radiation induced random breaks. This smear pattern contains two discontinuities in intensity at positions that correspond to the distance of the hybridization site to each end of the restriction fragment. By analyzing the positions of those discontinuities we confirmed the previously mapped position of the probe DXS1327 within a NotI fragment on the X chromosome, thus demonstrating the validity of the technique. We were also able to position the probes D21S1 and D21S15 with respect to the ends of their corresponding NotI fragments on chromosome 21. A third chromosome 21 probe, D21S11, has previously been reported to be close to D21S1, although an uncertainty about a second possible location existed. Since both probes D21S1 and D21S11 hybridized to a single NotI fragment and yielded a similar smear pattern, this uncertainty is removed by the random-breakage mapping method.

  10. Sequence-Dependent Fluorescence of Cy3- and Cy5-Labeled Double-Stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Kretschy, Nicole; Sack, Matej; Somoza, Mark M

    2016-03-16

    The fluorescent intensity of Cy3 and Cy5 dyes is strongly dependent on the nucleobase sequence of the labeled oligonucleotides. Sequence-dependent fluorescence may significantly influence the data obtained from many common experimental methods based on fluorescence detection of nucleic acids, such as sequencing, PCR, FRET, and FISH. To quantify sequence dependent fluorescence, we have measured the fluorescence intensity of Cy3 and Cy5 bound to the 5' end of all 1024 possible double-stranded DNA 5mers. The fluorescence intensity was also determined for these dyes bound to the 5' end of fixed-sequence double-stranded DNA with a variable sequence 3' overhang adjacent to the dye. The labeled DNA oligonucleotides were made using light-directed, in situ microarray synthesis. The results indicate that the fluorescence intensity of both dyes is sensitive to all five bases or base pairs, that the sequence dependence is stronger for double- (vs single-) stranded DNA, and that the dyes are sensitive to both the adjacent dsDNA sequence and the 3'-ssDNA overhang. Purine-rich sequences result in higher fluorescence. The results can be used to estimate measurement error in experiments with fluorescent-labeled DNA, as well as to optimize the fluorescent signal by considering the nucleobase environment of the labeling cyanine dye.

  11. Microfluidic devices for DNA sequencing: sample preparation and electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Paegel, Brian M; Blazej, Robert G; Mathies, Richard A

    2003-02-01

    Modern DNA sequencing 'factories' have revolutionized biology by completing the human genome sequence, but in the race to completion we are left with inefficient, cumbersome, and costly macroscale processes and supporting facilities. During the same period, microfabricated DNA sequencing, sample processing and analysis devices have advanced rapidly toward the goal of a 'sequencing lab-on-a-chip'. Integrated microfluidic processing dramatically reduces analysis time and reagent consumption, and eliminates costly and unreliable macroscale robotics and laboratory apparatus. A microfabricated device for high-throughput DNA sequencing that couples clone isolation, template amplification, Sanger extension, purification, and electrophoretic analysis in a single microfluidic circuit is now attainable.

  12. DNA Sequence Determination by Hybridization: A Strategy for Efficient Large-Scale Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoddy, J.; Funkhouser, W. K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L.; Crkvenjakov, R.

    1993-06-01

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project.

  13. DNA sequence determination by hybridization: A strategy for efficient large-scale sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoody, J.; Crkvenjakov, R. ); Funkhouser, W.K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L. )

    1993-06-11

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Recent patents of nanopore DNA sequencing technology: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Bingqian

    2010-11-01

    DNA sequencing techniques witnessed fast development in the last decades, primarily driven by the Human Genome Project. Among the proposed new techniques, Nanopore was considered as a suitable candidate for the single DNA sequencing with ultrahigh speed and very low cost. Several fabrication and modification techniques have been developed to produce robust and well-defined nanopore devices. Many efforts have also been done to apply nanopore to analyze the properties of DNA molecules. By comparing with traditional sequencing techniques, nanopore has demonstrated its distinctive superiorities in main practical issues, such as sample preparation, sequencing speed, cost-effective and read-length. Although challenges still remain, recent researches in improving the capabilities of nanopore have shed a light to achieve its ultimate goal: Sequence individual DNA strand at single nucleotide level. This patent review briefly highlights recent developments and technological achievements for DNA analysis and sequencing at single molecule level, focusing on nanopore based methods.

  15. Highly conserved repetitive DNA sequences are present at human centromeres.

    PubMed Central

    Grady, D L; Ratliff, R L; Robinson, D L; McCanlies, E C; Meyne, J; Moyzis, R K

    1992-01-01

    Highly conserved repetitive DNA sequence clones, largely consisting of (GGAAT)n repeats, have been isolated from a human recombinant repetitive DNA library by high-stringency hybridization with rodent repetitive DNA. This sequence, the predominant repetitive sequence in human satellites II and III, is similar to the essential core DNA of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae centromere, centromere DNA element (CDE) III. In situ hybridization to human telophase and Drosophila polytene chromosomes shows localization of the (GGAAT)n sequence to centromeric regions. Hyperchromicity studies indicate that the (GGAAT)n sequence exhibits unusual hydrogen bonding properties. The purine-rich strand alone has the same thermal stability as the duplex. Hyperchromicity studies of synthetic DNA variants indicate that all sequences with the composition (AATGN)n exhibit this unusual thermal stability. DNA-mobility-shift assays indicate that specific HeLa-cell nuclear proteins recognize this sequence with a relative affinity greater than 10(5). The extreme evolutionary conservation of this DNA sequence, its centromeric location, its unusual hydrogen bonding properties, its high affinity for specific nuclear proteins, and its similarity to functional centromeres isolated from yeast suggest that this sequence may be a component of the functional human centromere. Images PMID:1542662

  16. Nucleotide sequence of alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase cDNA from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    de Vet, E C; van den Bosch, H

    1998-11-27

    The nucleotide sequence is reported of alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase cDNA from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The open reading frame encodes a protein of 611 amino acids which shows a 33% amino acid identity to the human enzyme. This D. discoideum homolog carries a variant of the peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 at its C-terminus (PKL). Expression of the cDNA in Escherichia coli yielded an enzymatically active protein.

  17. Giant panda ribosomal protein S14: cDNA, genomic sequence cloning, sequence analysis, and overexpression.

    PubMed

    Wu, G-F; Hou, Y-L; Hou, W-R; Song, Y; Zhang, T

    2010-10-13

    RPS14 is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit encoded by the RPS14 gene and is required for its maturation. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS14 were cloned successfully from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology and touchdown-PCR, respectively; they were both sequenced and analyzed. The length of the cloned cDNA fragment was 492 bp; it contained an open-reading frame of 456 bp, encoding 151 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence is 3421 bp; it contains four exons and three introns. Alignment analysis indicates that the nucleotide sequence shares a high degree of homology with those of Homo sapiens, Bos taurus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Gallus gallus, Xenopus laevis, and Danio rerio (93.64, 83.37, 92.54, 91.89, 87.28, 84.21, and 84.87%, respectively). Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the giant panda with those of these other species revealed that the RPS14 of giant panda is highly homologous with those of B. taurus, R. norvegicus and D. rerio (85.99, 99.34 and 99.34%, respectively), and is 100% identical with the others. This degree of conservation of RPS14 suggests evolutionary selection. Topology prediction shows that there are two N-glycosylation sites, three protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, two casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, four N-myristoylation sites, two amidation sites, and one ribosomal protein S11 signature in the RPS14 protein of the giant panda. The RPS14 gene can be readily expressed in Escherichia coli. When it was fused with the N-terminally His-tagged protein, it gave rise to accumulation of an expected 22-kDa polypeptide, in good agreement with the predicted molecular weight. The expression product obtained can be purified for studies of its function.

  18. Recombinant human MDM2 oncoprotein shows sequence composition selectivity for binding to both RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Challen, Christine; Anderson, John J; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; Lunec, John

    2012-03-01

    MDM2 is a 90 kDa nucleo-phosphoprotein that binds p53 and other proteins contributing to its oncogenic properties. Its structure includes an amino proximal p53 binding site, a central acidic domain and a carboxy region which incorporates Zinc and Ring Finger domains suggestive of nucleic acid binding or transcription factor function. It has previously been reported that a bacculovirus expressed MDM2 protein binds RNA in a sequence-specific manner through the Ring Finger domain, however, its ability to bind DNA has yet to be examined. We report here that a bacterially expressed human MDM2 protein binds both DNA as well as the previously defined RNA consensus sequence. DNA binding appears selective and involves the carboxy-terminal domain of the molecule. RNA binding is inhibited by an MDM2 specific antibody, which recognises an epitope within the carboxy region of the protein. Selection cloning and sequence analysis of MDM2 DNA binding sequences, unlike RNA binding sequences, revealed no obvious DNA binding consensus sequence, but preferential binding to oligopurine:pyrimidine-rich stretches. Our results suggest that the observed preferential DNA binding may occur through the Zinc Finger or in a charge-charge interaction through the Ring Finger, thereby implying potentially different mechanisms for DNA and RNA MDM2 binding.

  19. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  20. Advances in high throughput DNA sequence data compression.

    PubMed

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and reduction in cost of sequencing have led to exponential growth in high throughput DNA sequence data. This growth has posed challenges such as storage, retrieval, and transmission of sequencing data. Data compression is used to cope with these challenges. Various methods have been developed to compress genomic and sequencing data. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of compression methods for genome and reads compression. Algorithms are categorized as referential or reference free. Experimental results and comparative analysis of various methods for data compression are presented. Finally, key challenges and research directions in DNA sequence data compression are highlighted.

  1. Preparing DNA libraries for multiplexed paired-end deep sequencing for Illumina GA sequencers.

    PubMed

    Son, Mike S; Taylor, Ronald K

    2011-02-01

    Whole-genome sequencing, also known as deep sequencing, is becoming a more affordable and efficient way to identify SNP mutations, deletions, and insertions in DNA sequences across several different strains. Two major obstacles preventing the widespread use of deep sequencers are the costs involved in services used to prepare DNA libraries for sequencing and the overall accuracy of the sequencing data. This unit describes the preparation of DNA libraries for multiplexed paired-end sequencing using the Illumina GA series sequencer. Self-preparation of DNA libraries can help reduce overall expenses, especially if optimization is required for the different samples, and use of the Illumina GA Sequencer can improve the quality of the data.

  2. Nucleotide sequence of a preferred maize chloroplast genome template for in vitro DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, B; Carrillo, N; Tewari, K K; Bogorad, L

    1987-01-01

    Maize chloroplast DNA sequences representing 94% of the chromosome have been surveyed for their activity as autonomously replicating sequences in yeast and as templates for DNA synthesis in vitro by a partially purified chloroplast DNA polymerase. A maize chloroplast DNA region extending over about 9 kilobase pairs is especially active as a template for the DNA synthesis reaction. Fragments from within this region are much more active than DNA from elsewhere in the chromosome and 50- to 100-fold more active than DNA of the cloning vector pBR322. The smallest of the strongly active subfragments that we have studied, the 1368-base-pair EcoRI fragment x, has been sequenced and found to contain the coding region of chloroplast ribosomal protein L16. EcoRI fragment x shows sequence homology with a portion of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast chromosome that forms a displacement loop [Wang, X.-M., Chang, C.H., Waddell, J. & Wu, M. (1984) Nucleic Acids Res. 12, 3857-3872]. Maize chloroplast DNA fragments that permit autonomous replication of DNA in yeast are not active as templates for DNA synthesis in the in vitro assay. The template active region we have identified may represent one of the origins of replication of maize chloroplast DNA. Images PMID:3025853

  3. Sequence Recognition in the Pairing of DNA Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Leikin, S.

    2001-04-01

    Pairing of DNA fragments with homologous sequences occurs in gene shuffling, DNA repair, and other vital processes. While chemical individuality of base pairs is hidden inside the double helix, x ray and NMR revealed sequence-dependent modulation of the structure of DNA backbone. Here we show that the resulting modulation of the DNA surface charge pattern enables duplexes longer than ~50 base pairs to recognize sequence homology electrostatically at a distance of up to several water layers. This may explain the local recognition observed in pairing of homologous chromosomes and the observed length dependence of homologous recombination.

  4. [Sequence-specific interaction of pyrimidine oligonucleotides with double-stranded DNA at acidic pH complexes of different types].

    PubMed

    Brossalina, E B; Demchenko, E N; Demchenko, Iu N; Vlassov, V V

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of pyrimidine oligonucleotides (OLN(15) and OLN(6)) and their alkylating derivatives bearing 4-(3-amino)-N-methyl and N-2-chloroethyl (RCl) aniline residues at the 5'-phosphate with a fragment of the human gamma-interferon gene was studied. In the presence of 150 mM NaCl at pH 5.4, the yield of dsDNA alkylation was 60% for RCl-OLN(15) and 10% for RCl-OLN(6); at pH 4.0 in the presence of 150 mM NaCl and 10 mM MgCl2, the yield of the dsDNA modification product was 100% for RCl-OLN(6) and 50% for RCl-OLN(15). It was shown by native electrophoresis that OLN(15) could form with the target dsDNA complexes of two types in the presence of magnesium ions at pH 4.0. One of the complexes was stable at pH 5.4 in the presence of magnesium ions, whereas the other was not. We found that only the complex stable in 10 mM Mg(OAc)2, pH 5.4, was effectively alkylated.

  5. Nucleic acid sensing with enzyme-DNA binding protein conjugates cascade and simple DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Gülsen Betül; Skouridou, Vasso; Masip, Lluis

    2017-03-22

    A versatile and universal DNA sensing platform is presented based on enzyme-DNA binding protein tags conjugates and simple DNA nanostructures. Two enzyme conjugates were thus prepared, with horseradish peroxidase linked to the dimeric single-chain bacteriophage Cro repressor protein (HRP-scCro) and glucose oxidase linked to the dimeric headpiece domain of Escherichia coli LacI repressor protein (GOx-dHP), and used in conjunction with a hybrid ssDNA-dsDNA detection probe. This probe served as a simple DNA nanostructure allowing first for target recognition through its target-complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) part and then for signal generation after conjugate binding on the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing the specific binding sites for the dHP and scCro DNA binding proteins. The DNA binding proteins chosen in this work have different sequence specificity, high affinity, and lack of cross-reactivity. The proposed sensing system was validated for the detection of model target ssDNA from high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV16) and the limits of detection of 45, 26, and 21 pM were achieved using the probes with scCro/dHP DNA binding sites ratio of 1:1, 2:1, and 1:2, respectively. The performance of the platform in terms of limit of detection was comparable to direct HRP systems using target-specific oligonucleotide-HRP conjugates. The ratio of the two enzymes can be easily manipulated by changing the number of binding sites on the detection probe, offering further optimization possibilities of the signal generation step. Moreover, since the signal is obtained in the absence of externally added hydrogen peroxide, the described platform is compatible with paper-based assays for molecular diagnostics applications. Finally, just by changing the ssDNA part of the detection probe, this versatile nucleic acid platform can be used for the detection of different ssDNA target sequences or in a multiplex detection configuration without the need to change any of the

  6. The complementary deoxyribonucleic acid sequence of guinea pig endometrial prorelaxin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y A; Bryant-Greenwood, G D; Mandel, M; Greenwood, F C

    1992-03-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the relaxin gene transcript in the endometrium of the late pregnant guinea pig has been determined. The strategy used was a combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers designed from the mRNA sequence of porcine preprorelaxin, rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR, and blunt end cloning in M13 mp18. With heterologous primers, a 226-basepair (bp) segment of the guinea pig relaxin gene sequence was obtained and was used to design a guinea pig-specific primer for use with the rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR method. The latter allowed completion of the sequence of 336 bp, with a 96-bp overlap. The sequence obtained shows greater homology at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels with porcine and human relaxins H1 and H2 than with rat relaxin, supporting the thesis that the guinea pig is not a rodent. The transcription of the guinea pig endometrial relaxin gene during pregnancy was confirmed by Northern analysis of guinea pig endometrial tissues with a species-specific cDNA probe. The endometrial relaxin gene is transcribed during pregnancy, but not in lactation, consistent with the observed immunostaining for relaxin.

  7. Chimeric DNA methyltransferases target DNA methylation to specific DNA sequences and repress expression of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyang; Papworth, Monika; Minczuk, Michal; Rohde, Christian; Zhang, Yingying; Ragozin, Sergei; Jeltsch, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Gene silencing by targeted DNA methylation has potential applications in basic research and therapy. To establish targeted methylation in human cell lines, the catalytic domains (CDs) of mouse Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b DNA methyltransferases (MTases) were fused to different DNA binding domains (DBD) of GAL4 and an engineered Cys2His2 zinc finger domain. We demonstrated that (i) Dense DNA methylation can be targeted to specific regions in gene promoters using chimeric DNA MTases. (ii) Site-specific methylation leads to repression of genes controlled by various cellular or viral promoters. (iii) Mutations affecting any of the DBD, MTase or target DNA sequences reduce targeted methylation and gene silencing. (iv) Targeted DNA methylation is effective in repressing Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in cell culture with the viral titer reduced by at least 18-fold in the presence of an MTase fused to an engineered zinc finger DBD, which binds a single site in the promoter of HSV-1 gene IE175k. In short, we show here that it is possible to direct DNA MTase activity to predetermined sites in DNA, achieve targeted gene silencing in mammalian cell lines and interfere with HSV-1 propagation. PMID:17151075

  8. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry for DNA Sequencing and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Golovlev, V. V.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    1998-03-01

    Rapid DNA sequencing and/or analysis is critically important for biomedical research. In the past, gel electrophoresis has been the primary tool to achieve DNA analysis and sequencing. However, gel electrophoresis is a time-consuming and labor-extensive process. Recently, we have developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) to achieve sequencing of ss-DNA longer than 100 nucleotides. With LDMS, we succeeded in sequencing DNA in seconds instead of hours or days required by gel electrophoresis. In addition to sequencing, we also applied LDMS for the detection of DNA probes for hybridization LDMS was also used to detect short tandem repeats for forensic applications. Clinical applications for disease diagnosis such as cystic fibrosis caused by base deletion and point mutation have also been demonstrated. Experimental details will be presented in the meeting. abstract.

  9. Sequence and neuronal expression of mouse endothelin-1 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Kurama, M; Ishida, N; Matsui, M; Saida, K; Mitsui, Y

    1996-07-17

    We have isolated and sequenced a cDNA that encodes mouse endothelin-1 (ET-1). The putative protein contains 202 amino acids corresponds to the prepro-form of ET-1. Twenty-one amino acids sequence of the putative mature ET-1 was identical with that of rat, porcine, bovine, and human. In situ hybridization histochemistry indicate that ET-1 mRNA was expressed in several hypothalamic nuclei including the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in rodent brain.

  10. Scanning probe and nanopore DNA sequencing: core techniques and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Lund, John; Parviz, Babak A

    2009-01-01

    We provide an overview of the current state of research towards DNA sequencing using nanopore and scanning probe techniques. Additionally, we provide methods for the creation of two key experimental platforms for studies relating to nanopore and scanning probe DNA studies: a synthetic nanopore apparatus and an atomically flat conductive substrate with stretched DNA molecules.

  11. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  12. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  13. Characteristics of cloned repeated DNA sequences in the barley genome

    SciTech Connect

    Anan'ev, E.V.; Bochkanov, S.S.; Ryzhik, M.V.; Sonina, N.V.; Chernyshev, A.I.; Shchipkova, N.I.; Yakovleva, E.Yu.

    1986-12-01

    A partial clone library of barley DNA fragments based on plasmid pBR325 was created. The cloned EcoRI-fragments of chromosomal DNA are from 2 to 14 kbp in length. More than 95% of the barley DNA inserts comprise repeated sequences of different complexity and copy number. Certain of these DNA sequences are from families comprising at least 1% of the barley genome. A significant proportion of the clones hybridize with numerous sets of restriction fragments of genome DNA and they are dispersed throughout the barley chromosomes.

  14. Affordable Hands-On DNA Sequencing and Genotyping: An Exercise for Teaching DNA Analysis to Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Kushani; Thomas, Shelby; Stein, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe a 5-week laboratory exercise for undergraduate biology and biochemistry students in which students learn to sequence DNA and to genotype their DNA for selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Students use miniaturized DNA sequencing gels that require approximately 8 min to run. The students perform G, A, T, C…

  15. DNA polymerases drive DNA sequencing-by-synthesis technologies: both past and present.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Yao

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized modern biological and biomedical research. The engines responsible for this innovation are DNA polymerases; they catalyze the biochemical reaction for deriving template sequence information. In fact, DNA polymerase has been a cornerstone of DNA sequencing from the very beginning. Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I proteolytic (Klenow) fragment was originally utilized in Sanger's dideoxy chain-terminating DNA sequencing chemistry. From these humble beginnings followed an explosion of organism-specific, genome sequence information accessible via public database. Family A/B DNA polymerases from mesophilic/thermophilic bacteria/archaea were modified and tested in today's standard capillary electrophoresis (CE) and NGS sequencing platforms. These enzymes were selected for their efficient incorporation of bulky dye-terminator and reversible dye-terminator nucleotides respectively. Third generation, real-time single molecule sequencing platform requires slightly different enzyme properties. Enterobacterial phage ϕ29 DNA polymerase copies long stretches of DNA and possesses a unique capability to efficiently incorporate terminal phosphate-labeled nucleoside polyphosphates. Furthermore, ϕ29 enzyme has also been utilized in emerging DNA sequencing technologies including nanopore-, and protein-transistor-based sequencing. DNA polymerase is, and will continue to be, a crucial component of sequencing technologies.

  16. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.

    1997-03-25

    A modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase is disclosed. The modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase. 6 figs.

  17. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase wherein the modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase.

  18. Neandertal DNA sequences and the origin of modern humans.

    PubMed

    Krings, M; Stone, A; Schmitz, R W; Krainitzki, H; Stoneking, M; Pääbo, S

    1997-07-11

    DNA was extracted from the Neandertal-type specimen found in 1856 in western Germany. By sequencing clones from short overlapping PCR products, a hitherto unknown mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequence was determined. Multiple controls indicate that this sequence is endogenous to the fossil. Sequence comparisons with human mtDNA sequences, as well as phylogenetic analyses, show that the Neandertal sequence falls outside the variation of modern humans. Furthermore, the age of the common ancestor of the Neandertal and modern human mtDNAs is estimated to be four times greater than that of the common ancestor of human mtDNAs. This suggests that Neandertals went extinct without contributing mtDNA to modern humans.

  19. A model organism for new gene discovery by cDNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    El-Saved, N.M.; Donelson, J.E.; Alarcon, C.M.

    1994-09-01

    One method of new gene discovery is single pass sequencing of cDNAs to identify expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Model organisms can have biological properties which makes their use advantageous over studies with humans. One such model organism with advantages for cDNA sequencing is the African trypanosome T. brucei rhodesiense. This organism has the same 40 nucleotide sequence (splice leader sequence) on the 5{prime} end of all mRNAs. We have constructed a 5{prime} cDNA library by priming off the splice leader sequence and have begun sequencing this cDNA library. To date, over nearly 500 such cDNA expressed sequence tags (ESTs) have been examined. Forty-three percent of the sequences sampled from the trypanosome cDNA library have significant similarities to sequences already in the protein and translated nucleic acid databases. Among these are cDNA sequences which encode previously reported T. brucej proteins such as the VSG, tubulin, calflagin, etc., and proteins previously identified in other trypanosomatids. Other cDNAs display significant similarities to genes in unrelated organisms encoding several ribosomal proteins, metabolic enzymes, GTP binding proteins, transcription factors, cyclophillin, nucleosomal histones, histone H1, and a macrophage stress protein, among others. The 57% of the cDNAs that are not similar to sequences currently in the databases likely encode both trypanosome-specific proteins and housekeeping proteins shared with other eukaryotes. These cDNA ESTs provide new avenues of research for exploring both the biochemistry and the genome organization of this parasite, as well as a resource for identifying the 5{prime} sequence of novel genes likely to have homology to genes expressed in other organisms.

  20. [cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of pluripotency genes in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai-Yun; Ma, Yun-Han; He, Da-Jian; Yang, Shi-Hua

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, partial sequences of the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc genes were cloned and sequenced, which were 382, 612, and 485 bp in length and encoded 127, 204, and 161 amino acids, respectively. Whereas, their cDNA sequence identities with those of human were 89%, 98%, and 89%, respectively. Their phylogenetic tree results indicated different topologies and suggested individual evolutional pathways. These results can facilitate further functional studies.

  1. Application of 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Tan, Mingshu; Ding, Kequan

    2005-10-01

    Recently, we proposed a 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence [Bo Liao, A 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence, Chem. Phys. Lett. 401 (2005) 196-199]. Based on this representation, we consider properties of mutations and compute the similarities among 11 mitochondrial sequences belonging to different species. The elements of the similarity matrix are used to construct phylogenic tree. Unlike most existing phylogeny construction methods, the proposed method does not require multiple alignment.

  2. Spectral entropy criteria for structural segmentation in genomic DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechetkin, V. R.; Lobzin, V. V.

    2004-07-01

    The spectral entropy is calculated with Fourier structure factors and characterizes the level of structural ordering in a sequence of symbols. It may efficiently be applied to the assessment and reconstruction of the modular structure in genomic DNA sequences. We present the relevant spectral entropy criteria for the local and non-local structural segmentation in DNA sequences. The results are illustrated with the model examples and analysis of intervening exon-intron segments in the protein-coding regions.

  3. DNA and RNA sequencing by nanoscale reading through programmable electrophoresis and nanoelectrode-gated tunneling and dielectric detection

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James W.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2005-06-14

    An apparatus and method for performing nucleic acid (DNA and/or RNA) sequencing on a single molecule. The genetic sequence information is obtained by probing through a DNA or RNA molecule base by base at nanometer scale as though looking through a strip of movie film. This DNA sequencing nanotechnology has the theoretical capability of performing DNA sequencing at a maximal rate of about 1,000,000 bases per second. This enhanced performance is made possible by a series of innovations including: novel applications of a fine-tuned nanometer gap for passage of a single DNA or RNA molecule; thin layer microfluidics for sample loading and delivery; and programmable electric fields for precise control of DNA or RNA movement. Detection methods include nanoelectrode-gated tunneling current measurements, dielectric molecular characterization, and atomic force microscopy/electrostatic force microscopy (AFM/EFM) probing for nanoscale reading of the nucleic acid sequences.

  4. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P M; Tellam, J; May, V L; Strauss, A W

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) precursor derived from nucleotide sequence of the cDNA. A single synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe was used to screen a rat atrial cDNA library constructed in lambda gt10. A 1.2 kb full-length cDNA clone provided the first complete amino acid sequence of pre-mMDH. The 1014 nucleotide-long open reading frame encodes the 314 residue long mature mMDH protein and a 24 amino acid NH2-terminal extension which directs mitochondrial import and is cleaved from the precursor after import to generate mature mMDH. The amino acid composition of the transit peptide is polar and basic. The pre-mMDH transit peptide shows marked homology with those of two other enzymes targeted to the rat mitochondrial matrix. Images PMID:3755817

  5. Evolution of a complex minisatellite DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Barros, Paula; Blanco, Miguel G; Boán, Francisco; Gómez-Márquez, Jaime

    2008-11-01

    Minisatellites are tandem repeats of short DNA units widely distributed in genomes. However, the information on their dynamics in a phylogenetic context is very limited. Here we have studied the organization of the MsH43 locus in several species of primates and from these data we have reconstructed the evolutionary history of this complex minisatellite. Overall, with the exception of gibbon, MsH43 has an organization that is asymmetric, since the distribution of repeats is distinct between the 5' and 3' halves, and heterogeneous since there are many different repeats, some of them characteristic of each species. Inspection of the MsH43 arrays showed the existence of many duplications and deletions, suggesting the implication of slippage processes in the generation of polymorphism. Concerning the evolutionary history of this minisatellite, we propose that the birth of MsH43 may be situated before the divergence of Old World Monkeys since we found the existence of some MsH43 repeat motifs in prosimians and New World Monkeys. The analysis of MsH43 in apes revealed the existence of an evolutionary breakpoint in the pathway that originated African great apes and humans. Remarkably, human MsH43 is more homologous to orang-utan than to the corresponding sequence in gorilla and chimpanzee. This finding does not comply with the evolutionary paradigm that continuous alterations occur during the course of genome evolution. To adjust our results to the standard phylogeny of primates, we propose the existence of a wandering allele that was maintained almost unaltered during the period that extends between orang-utan and humans.

  6. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  7. Advanced microinstrumentation for rapid DNA sequencing and large DNA fragment separation

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, J.; Davidson, J.; Brewer, L.; Gingrich, J.; Koo, J.; Mariella, R.; Carrano, A.

    1995-01-25

    Our efforts to develop novel technology for a rapid DNA sequencer and large fragment analysis system based upon gel electrophoresis are described. We are using microfabrication technology to build dense arrays of high speed micro electrophoresis lanes that will ultimately increase the sequencing rate of DNA by at least 100 times the rate of current sequencers. We have demonstrated high resolution DNA fragment separation needed for sequencing in polyacrylamide microgels formed in glass microchannels. We have built prototype arrays of microchannels having up to 48 channels. Significant progress has also been made in developing a sensitive fluorescence detection system based upon a confocal microscope design that will enable the diagnostics and detection of DNA fragments in ultrathin microchannel gels. Development of a rapid DNA sequencer and fragment analysis system will have a major impact on future DNA instrumentation used in clinical, molecular and forensic analysis of DNA fragments.

  8. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  9. Simulations Using Random-Generated DNA and RNA Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, C. F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Using a very simple computer program written in BASIC, a very large number of random-generated DNA or RNA sequences are obtained. Students use these sequences to predict complementary sequences and translational products, evaluate base compositions, determine frequencies of particular triplet codons, and suggest possible secondary structures.…

  10. Multiplexed Sequence Encoding: A Framework for DNA Communication

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Bijan; Carr, Peter A.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic DNA has great propensity for efficiently and stably storing non-biological information. With DNA writing and reading technologies rapidly advancing, new applications for synthetic DNA are emerging in data storage and communication. Traditionally, DNA communication has focused on the encoding and transfer of complete sets of information. Here, we explore the use of DNA for the communication of short messages that are fragmented across multiple distinct DNA molecules. We identified three pivotal points in a communication—data encoding, data transfer & data extraction—and developed novel tools to enable communication via molecules of DNA. To address data encoding, we designed DNA-based individualized keyboards (iKeys) to convert plaintext into DNA, while reducing the occurrence of DNA homopolymers to improve synthesis and sequencing processes. To address data transfer, we implemented a secret-sharing system—Multiplexed Sequence Encoding (MuSE)—that conceals messages between multiple distinct DNA molecules, requiring a combination key to reveal messages. To address data extraction, we achieved the first instance of chromatogram patterning through multiplexed sequencing, thereby enabling a new method for data extraction. We envision these approaches will enable more widespread communication of information via DNA. PMID:27050646

  11. [DNA analysis for the post genome-sequencing era].

    PubMed

    Kambara, Hideki

    2002-05-01

    With the completion of the human genome sequencing, the new post genome-sequencing era has started. The major subjects are clarifying the function of genes to apply this information to medical as well as various industrial fields. Various DNA analysis methods and instruments for gene expression profiling as well as genetic diversity including SNPs typing are required and have been developed. Here, the history and technologies related to DNA analysis including the Wada project in the early 1980's, and the Human genome project from 1990 are described. Various new technologies have developed in this decade. They include a capillary gel array DNA sequencer, DNA chips, bead probe arrays, a new DNA sequencing method using pyrosequencing and an efficient SNP typing method by BAMPER.

  12. Haplogrouping mitochondrial DNA sequences in Legal Medicine/Forensic Genetics.

    PubMed

    Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; van Oven, Mannis; Salas, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Haplogrouping refers to the classification of (partial) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences into haplogroups using the current knowledge of the worldwide mtDNA phylogeny. Haplogroup assignment of mtDNA control-region sequences assists in the focused comparison with closely related complete mtDNA sequences and thus serves two main goals in forensic genetics: first is the a posteriori quality analysis of sequencing results and second is the prediction of relevant coding-region sites for confirmation or further refinement of haplogroup status. The latter may be important in forensic casework where discrimination power needs to be as high as possible. However, most articles published in forensic genetics perform haplogrouping only in a rudimentary or incorrect way. The present study features PhyloTree as the key tool for assigning control-region sequences to haplogroups and elaborates on additional Web-based searches for finding near-matches with complete mtDNA genomes in the databases. In contrast, none of the automated haplogrouping tools available can yet compete with manual haplogrouping using PhyloTree plus additional Web-based searches, especially when confronted with artificial recombinants still present in forensic mtDNA datasets. We review and classify the various attempts at haplogrouping by using a multiplex approach or relying on automated haplogrouping. Furthermore, we re-examine a few articles in forensic journals providing mtDNA population data where appropriate haplogrouping following PhyloTree immediately highlights several kinds of sequence errors.

  13. A mathematical model and numerical method for thermoelectric DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liwei; Guilbeau, Eric J.; Nestorova, Gergana; Dai, Weizhong

    2014-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are single base pair variations within the genome that are important indicators of genetic predisposition towards specific diseases. This study explores the feasibility of SNP detection using a thermoelectric sequencing method that measures the heat released when DNA polymerase inserts a deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate into a DNA strand. We propose a three-dimensional mathematical model that governs the DNA sequencing device with a reaction zone that contains DNA template/primer complex immobilized to the surface of the lower channel wall. The model is then solved numerically. Concentrations of reactants and the temperature distribution are obtained. Results indicate that when the nucleoside is complementary to the next base in the DNA template, polymerization occurs lengthening the complementary polymer and releasing thermal energy with a measurable temperature change, implying that the thermoelectric conceptual device for sequencing DNA may be feasible for identifying specific genes in individuals.

  14. DNA Shape Dominates Sequence Affinity in Nucleosome Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Gordon S.; Lequieu, Joshua P.; Hinckley, Daniel M.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-10-01

    Nucleosomes provide the basic unit of compaction in eukaryotic genomes, and the mechanisms that dictate their position at specific locations along a DNA sequence are of central importance to genetics. In this Letter, we employ molecular models of DNA and proteins to elucidate various aspects of nucleosome positioning. In particular, we show how DNA's histone affinity is encoded in its sequence-dependent shape, including subtle deviations from the ideal straight B-DNA form and local variations of minor groove width. By relying on high-precision simulations of the free energy of nucleosome complexes, we also demonstrate that, depending on DNA's intrinsic curvature, histone binding can be dominated by bending interactions or electrostatic interactions. More generally, the results presented here explain how sequence, manifested as the shape of the DNA molecule, dominates molecular recognition in the problem of nucleosome positioning.

  15. Flavin reductase: sequence of cDNA from bovine liver and tissue distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, K S; Hultquist, D E

    1994-01-01

    Flavin reductase catalyzes electron transfer from reduced pyridine nucleotides to methylene blue or riboflavin, and this catalysis is the basis of the therapeutic use of methylene blue or riboflavin in the treatment of methemoglobinemia. A cDNA for a mammalian flavin reductase has been isolated and sequenced. Degenerate oligonucleotides, with sequences based on amino acid sequences of peptides derived from bovine erythrocyte flavin reductase, were used as primers in PCR to selectively amplify a partial cDNA that encodes the bovine reductase. The template used in the PCR was first strand cDNA synthesized from bovine liver total RNA using oligo(dT) primers. A PCR product was used as a specific probe to screen a bovine liver cDNA library. The sequence determined from two overlapping clones contains an open reading frame of 621 nucleotides and encodes 206 amino acids. The amino acid sequence deduced from the bovine liver flavin reductase cDNA matches the amino acid sequences determined for erythrocyte reductase-derived peptides, and the predicted molecular mass of 22,001 Da for the liver reductase agrees well with the molecular mass of 21,994 Da determined for the erythrocyte reductase by electrospray mass spectrometry. The amino acid sequence at the N terminus of the reductase has homology to sequences of pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes, and the predicted secondary structure, beta alpha beta, resembles the common nucleotide-binding structural motif. RNA blot analysis indicates a single 1-kilobase reductase transcript in human heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, placenta, and skeletal muscle. Images PMID:7937764

  16. An Evolution Based Biosensor Receptor DNA Sequence Generation Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eungyeong; Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M.; Lee, Jaewan; Zang, Yupeng

    2010-01-01

    A biosensor is composed of a bioreceptor, an associated recognition molecule, and a signal transducer that can selectively detect target substances for analysis. DNA based biosensors utilize receptor molecules that allow hybridization with the target analyte. However, most DNA biosensor research uses oligonucleotides as the target analytes and does not address the potential problems of real samples. The identification of recognition molecules suitable for real target analyte samples is an important step towards further development of DNA biosensors. This study examines the characteristics of DNA used as bioreceptors and proposes a hybrid evolution-based DNA sequence generating algorithm, based on DNA computing, to identify suitable DNA bioreceptor recognition molecules for stable hybridization with real target substances. The Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) approach is applied in the proposed algorithm to evaluate the safety and fitness of the generated DNA sequences. This approach improves efficiency and stability for enhanced and variable-length DNA sequence generation and allows extension to generation of variable-length DNA sequences with diverse receptor recognition requirements. PMID:22315543

  17. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA analysis and sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.

    1995-03-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been considered as a potential new method for fast DNA sequencing. Our approach is to use matrix-assisted laser desorption to produce parent ions of DNA segments and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to identify the sizes of DNA segments. Thus, the approach is similar to gel electrophoresis sequencing using Sanger`s enzymatic method. However, gel, radioactive tagging, and dye labeling are not required. In addition, the sequencing process can possibly be finished within a few hundred microseconds instead of hours and days. In order to use mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing, the following three criteria need to be satisfied. They are (1) detection of large DNA segments, (2) sensitivity reaching the femtomole region, and (3) mass resolution good enough to separate DNA segments of a single nucleotide difference. It has been very difficult to detect large DNA segments by mass spectrometry before due to the fragile chemical properties of DNA and low detection sensitivity of DNA ions. We discovered several new matrices to increase the production of DNA ions. By innovative design of a mass spectrometer, we can increase the ion energy up to 45 KeV to enhance the detection sensitivity. Recently, we succeeded in detecting a DNA segment with 500 nucleotides. The sensitivity was 100 femtomole. Thus, we have fulfilled two key criteria for using mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing. The major effort in the near future is to improve the resolution. Different approaches are being pursued. When high resolution of mass spectrometry can be achieved and automation of sample preparation is developed, the sequencing speed to reach 500 megabases per year can be feasible.

  18. Double-coding nucleic acids: introduction of a nucleobase sequence in the major groove of the DNA duplex using double-headed nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Sorinas, Antoni Figueras; Nielsen, Lise J; Slot, Maria; Skytte, Kirstine; Nielsen, Annie S; Jensen, Michael D; Sharma, Pawan K; Vester, Birte; Petersen, Michael; Nielsen, Poul

    2014-09-05

    A series of double-headed nucleosides were synthesized using the Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction. In the reactions, additional nucleobases (thymine, cytosine, adenine, or guanine) were attached to the 5-position of 2'-deoxyuridine or 2'-deoxycytidine through a propyne linker. The modified nucleosides were incorporated into oligonucleotides, and these were combined in different duplexes that were analyzed by thermal denaturation studies. All of the monomers were well tolerated in the DNA duplexes and induced only small changes in the thermal stability. Consecutive incorporations of the monomers led to increases in duplex stability owing to increased stacking interactions. The modified nucleotide monomers maintained the Watson-Crick base pair fidelity. Stable duplexes were observed with heavily modified oligonucleotides featuring 14 consecutive incorporations of different double-headed nucleotide monomers. Thus, modified duplexes with an array of nucleobases on the exterior of the duplex were designed. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that the additional nucleobases could expose their Watson-Crick and/or Hoogsteen faces for recognition in the major groove. This presentation of nucleobases may find applications in providing molecular information without unwinding the duplex.

  19. An Optimal Seed Based Compression Algorithm for DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Gopakumar; Karunakaran, Muralikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a seed based lossless compression algorithm to compress a DNA sequence which uses a substitution method that is similar to the LempelZiv compression scheme. The proposed method exploits the repetition structures that are inherent in DNA sequences by creating an offline dictionary which contains all such repeats along with the details of mismatches. By ensuring that only promising mismatches are allowed, the method achieves a compression ratio that is at par or better than the existing lossless DNA sequence compression algorithms. PMID:27555868

  20. DNA Methyltransferase Accessibility Protocol for Individual Templates by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Darst, Russell P.; Nabilsi, Nancy H.; Pardo, Carolina E.; Riva, Alberto; Kladde, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    A single-molecule probe of chromatin structure can uncover dynamic chromatin states and rare epigenetic variants of biological importance that bulk measures of chromatin structure miss. In bisulfite genomic sequencing, each sequenced clone records the methylation status of multiple sites on an individual molecule of DNA. An exogenous DNA methyltransferase can thus be used to image nucleosomes and other protein–DNA complexes. In this chapter, we describe the adaptation of this technique, termed Methylation Accessibility Protocol for individual templates, to modern high-throughput sequencing, which both simplifies the workflow and extends its utility. PMID:22929770

  1. DNA sequence analysis with droplet-based microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Adam R.; Hung, Tony; Sperling, Ralph A.; Mary, Pascaline; Rotem, Assaf; Agresti, Jeremy J.; Weiner, Michael A.; Weitz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic techniques can form and process micrometer scale droplets at thousands per second. Each droplet can house an individual biochemical reaction, allowing millions of reactions to be performed in minutes with small amounts of total reagent. This versatile approach has been used for engineering enzymes, quantifying concentrations of DNA in solution, and screening protein crystallization conditions. Here, we use it to read the sequences of DNA molecules with a FRET-based assay. Using probes of different sequences, we interrogate a target DNA molecule for polymorphisms. With a larger probe set, additional polymorphisms can be interrogated as well as targets of arbitrary sequence. PMID:24185402

  2. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  3. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  4. Sequence of the cDNA encoding an actin homolog in the crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Kang, W K; Naya, Y

    1993-11-15

    A cDNA library was constructed by using mRNAs purified from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) muscle. Using a homology search of the nucleotide (nt) sequences, a clone of the library was found to encode a protein homologous to actin (Act). The insert fragment of this cDNA clone was 1072 nt in length. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nt sequence showed significant similarity to Act of various organisms as follows: 88.1% to Drosophila melanogaster, 88.2% to silk worm, 87.3% to brine shrimp, 86.3% to rat, and 86.3% to human (% identity).

  5. Human insulin genome sequence map, biochemical structure of insulin for recombinant DNA insulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mungantiwar, Ashish A

    2003-08-01

    Insulin is a essential molecule for type I diabetes that is marketed by very few companies. It is the first molecule, which was made by recombinant technology; but the commercialization process is very difficult. Knowledge about biochemical structure of insulin and human insulin genome sequence map is pivotal to large scale manufacturing of recombinant DNA Insulin. This paper reviews human insulin genome sequence map, the amino acid sequence of porcine insulin, crystal structure of porcine insulin, insulin monomer, aggregation surfaces of insulin, conformational variation in the insulin monomer, insulin X-ray structures for recombinant DNA technology in the synthesis of human insulin in Escherichia coli.

  6. Current-voltage characteristics of double-strand DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerril, L. M.; Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; de Oliveira, E. L.; de Sousa, J. S.

    2009-09-01

    We use a tight-binding formulation to investigate the transmissivity and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of sequences of double-strand DNA molecules. In order to reveal the relevance of the underlying correlations in the nucleotides distribution, we compare the results for the genomic DNA sequence with those of artificial sequences (the long-range correlated Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro one) and a random sequence, which is a kind of prototype of a short-range correlated system. The random sequence is presented here with the same first neighbors pair correlations of the human DNA sequence. We found that the long-range character of the correlations is important to the transmissivity spectra, although the I-V curves seem to be mostly influenced by the short-range correlations.

  7. Ray Wu as Fifth Business: Deconstructing collective memory in the history of DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Onaga, Lisa A

    2014-06-01

    The concept of 'Fifth Business' is used to analyze a minority standpoint and bring serious attention to the role of scientists who play a galvanizing role in a science but for multiple reasons appear less prominently in more common recounts of any particular development. Biochemist Ray Wu (1928-2008) published a DNA sequencing experiment in March 1970 using DNA polymerase catalysis and specific nucleotide labeling, both of which are foundational to general sequencing methods today. The scant mention of Wu's work from textbooks, research articles, and other accounts of DNA sequencing calls into question how scientific collective memory forms. This alternative history seeks to understand why a key figure in nucleic acid sequence analysis has remained less visibly connected or peripheral to solidifying narratives about the history of DNA sequencing. The study resists predictable dismissals of Wu's work in order to seriously examine the formation of his nucleic acid sequence analysis research program and how he shared his knowledge of sequencing during a period of rapid advancement in the field. An analysis of Wu's work on sequencing the cohesive ends of lambda bacteriophage in the 1960s and 1970s exemplifies how a variety of individuals and groups attempted to develop protocol for sequencing the order of nucleotide base pairs comprising DNA. This historical examination of the sociality of scientific research suggests a way to understand how Wu and others contributed to the very collective memory of DNA sequencing that Wu eventually tried to repair. The study of Wu, who was a Chinese immigrant to the United States, provides a foundation for further critical scholarship on the heterogeneous histories of Asian American bioscientists, the sociality of their scientific works, and how the resulting knowledge produced is preserved, if not evenly, in a scientific field's collective memory.

  8. Computer selection of oligonucleotide probes from amino acid sequences for use in gene library screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Ye, J H; Wallace, D C

    1984-01-11

    We present a computer program, FINPROBE, which utilizes known amino acid sequence data to deduce minimum redundancy oligonucleotide probes for use in screening cDNA or genomic libraries or in primer extension. The user enters the amino acid sequence of interest, the desired probe length, the number of probes sought, and the constraints on oligonucleotide synthesis. The computer generates a table of possible probes listed in increasing order of redundancy and provides the location of each probe in the protein and mRNA coding sequence. Activation of a next function provides the amino acid and mRNA sequences of each probe of interest as well as the complementary sequence and the minimum dissociation temperature of the probe. A final routine prints out the amino acid sequence of the protein in parallel with the mRNA sequence listing all possible codons for each amino acid.

  9. DNA Sequencing by Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanopore: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-01-01

    The single molecule detection associated with DNA sequencing has motivated intensive efforts to identify single DNA bases. However, little research has been reported utilizing single-layer hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) for DNA sequencing. Here we employ molecular dynamics simulations to explore pathways for single-strand DNA (ssDNA) sequencing by nanopore on the hBN sheet. We first investigate the adhesive strength between nucleobases and the hBN sheet, which provides the foundation for the hBN-base interaction and nanopore sequencing mechanism. Simulation results show that the purine base has a more remarkable energy profile and affinity than the pyrimidine base on the hBN sheet. The threading of ssDNA through the hBN nanopore can be clearly identified due to their different energy profiles and conformations with circular nanopores on the hBN sheet. The sequencing process is orientation dependent when the shape of the hBN nanopore deviates from the circle. Our results open up a promising avenue to explore the capability of DNA sequencing by hBN nanopore.

  10. A molecular code dictates sequence-specific DNA recognition by homeodomains.

    PubMed Central

    Damante, G; Pellizzari, L; Esposito, G; Fogolari, F; Viglino, P; Fabbro, D; Tell, G; Formisano, S; Di Lauro, R

    1996-01-01

    Most homeodomains bind to DNA sequences containing the motif 5'-TAAT-3'. The homeodomain of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1HD) binds to sequences containing a 5'-CAAG-3' core motif, delineating a new mechanism for differential DNA recognition by homeodomains. We investigated the molecular basis of the DNA binding specificity of TTF-1HD by both structural and functional approaches. As already suggested by the three-dimensional structure of TTF-1HD, the DNA binding specificities of the TTF-1, Antennapedia and Engrailed homeodomains, either wild-type or mutants, indicated that the amino acid residue in position 54 is involved in the recognition of the nucleotide at the 3' end of the core motif 5'-NAAN-3'. The nucleotide at the 5' position of this core sequence is recognized by the amino acids located in position 6, 7 and 8 of the TTF-1 and Antennapedia homeodomains. These data, together with previous suggestions on the role of amino acids in position 50, indicate that the DNA binding specificity of homeodomains can be determined by a combinatorial molecular code. We also show that some specific combinations of the key amino acid residues involved in DNA recognition do not follow a simple, additive rule. Images PMID:8890172

  11. Plasmonic Nanopores for Trapping, Controlling Displacement, and Sequencing of DNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of developing a DNA sequencing methodology, we theoretically examine the feasibility of using nanoplasmonics to control the translocation of a DNA molecule through a solid-state nanopore and to read off sequence information using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that high-intensity optical hot spots produced by a metallic nanostructure can arrest DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore, thus providing a physical knob for controlling the DNA speed. Switching the plasmonic field on and off can displace the DNA molecule in discrete steps, sequentially exposing neighboring fragments of a DNA molecule to the pore as well as to the plasmonic hot spot. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the exposed DNA fragments contains information about their nucleotide composition, possibly allowing the identification of the nucleotide sequence of a DNA molecule transported through the hot spot. The principles of plasmonic nanopore sequencing can be extended to detection of DNA modifications and RNA characterization. PMID:26401685

  12. Kinetics of DNA Strand Displacement Systems with Locked Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Olson, Xiaoping; Kotani, Shohei; Yurke, Bernard; Graugnard, Elton; Hughes, William L

    2017-03-30

    Locked nucleic acids (LNAs) are conformationally restricted RNA nucleotides. Their increased thermal stability and selectivity toward their complements make them well-suited for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although the structural and thermodynamic properties of LNA-LNA, LNA-RNA, and LNA-DNA hybridizations are known, the kinetic effects of incorporating LNA nucleotides into DNA strand displacement systems are not. Here, we thoroughly studied the strand displacement kinetics as a function of the number and position of LNA nucleotides in DNA oligonucleotides. When compared to that of an all-DNA control, with an identical sequence, the leakage rate constant was reduced more than 50-fold, to an undetectable level, and the invasion rate was preserved for a hybrid DNA/LNA system. The total performance enhancement ratio also increased more than 70-fold when calculating the ratio of the invading rate to the leakage rate constants for a hybrid system. The rational substitution of LNA nucleotides for DNA nucleotides preserves sequence space while improving the signal-to-noise ratio of strand displacement systems. Hybrid DNA/LNA systems offer great potential for high-performance chemical reaction networks that include catalyzed hairpin assemblies, hairpin chain reactions, motors, walkers, and seesaw gates.

  13. DNA sequence compression using the burrows-wheeler transform.

    PubMed

    Adjeroh, Don; Zhang, Yong; Mukherjee, Amar; Powell, Matt; Bell, Tim

    2002-01-01

    We investigate off-line dictionary oriented approaches to DNA sequence compression, based on the Burrows-Wheeler Transform (BWT). The preponderance of short repeating patterns is an important phenomenon in biological sequences. Here, we propose off-line methods to compress DNA sequences that exploit the different repetition structures inherent in such sequences. Repetition analysis is performed based on the relationship between the BWT and important pattern matching data structures, such as the suffix tree and suffix array. We discuss how the proposed approach can be incorporated in the BWT compression pipeline.

  14. Comparison of Levels of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 RNA in Plasma as Measured by the NucliSens Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification and Quantiplex Branched-DNA Assays

    PubMed Central

    Ginocchio, C. C.; Tetali, S.; Washburn, D.; Zhang, F.; Kaplan, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    This study compared levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the Quantiplex branched-DNA and NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays. RNA was detectable in 118 of 184 samples (64.13%) by the Quantiplex assay and in 171 of 184 samples (92.94%) by the NucliSens assay. Regression analysis indicated that a linear relationship existed between the two sets of values (P < 0.0001), although the Quantiplex and NucliSens values were significantly different (P < 0.001), with the NucliSens values being approximately 0.323 log higher. Spearman correlation analysis indicated that the overall changes in patient viral load patterns were highly correlative between the two assays: r = 0.912, P < 0.0001. The lower limits of sensitivity were determined to be approximately 100 copies/ml and 1,200 to 1,400 copies/ml for the NucliSens and Quantiplex assays, respectively. PMID:10074556

  15. Comparison of levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification and Quantiplex branched-DNA assays.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, C C; Tetali, S; Washburn, D; Zhang, F; Kaplan, M H

    1999-04-01

    This study compared levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the Quantiplex branched-DNA and NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays. RNA was detectable in 118 of 184 samples (64.13%) by the Quantiplex assay and in 171 of 184 samples (92.94%) by the NucliSens assay. Regression analysis indicated that a linear relationship existed between the two sets of values (P < 0.0001), although the Quantiplex and NucliSens values were significantly different (P < 0.001), with the NucliSens values being approximately 0.323 log higher. Spearman correlation analysis indicated that the overall changes in patient viral load patterns were highly correlative between the two assays: r = 0.912, P < 0.0001. The lower limits of sensitivity were determined to be approximately 100 copies/ml and 1,200 to 1,400 copies/ml for the NucliSens and Quantiplex assays, respectively.

  16. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  17. DNA sequencing using polymerase substrate-binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Previte, Michael John Robert; Zhou, Chunhong; Kellinger, Matthew; Pantoja, Rigo; Chen, Cheng-Yao; Shi, Jin; Wang, BeiBei; Kia, Amirali; Etchin, Sergey; Vieceli, John; Nikoomanzar, Ali; Bomati, Erin; Gloeckner, Christian; Ronaghi, Mostafa; He, Molly Min

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has transformed genomic research by decreasing the cost of sequencing. However, whole-genome sequencing is still costly and complex for diagnostics purposes. In the clinical space, targeted sequencing has the advantage of allowing researchers to focus on specific genes of interest. Routine clinical use of targeted NGS mandates inexpensive instruments, fast turnaround time and an integrated and robust workflow. Here we demonstrate a version of the Sequencing by Synthesis (SBS) chemistry that potentially can become a preferred targeted sequencing method in the clinical space. This sequencing chemistry uses natural nucleotides and is based on real-time recording of the differential polymerase/DNA-binding kinetics in the presence of correct or mismatch nucleotides. This ensemble SBS chemistry has been implemented on an existing Illumina sequencing platform with integrated cluster amplification. We discuss the advantages of this sequencing chemistry for targeted sequencing as well as its limitations for other applications. PMID:25612848

  18. Characterizing self-similarity in bacteria DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Sun, Zhirong; Chen, Huimin; Li, Yanda

    1998-09-01

    In this paper some parametric methods are introduced to characterize the self-similarity of DNA sequences. Compared with Fourier analysis, these methods perform statistically more stably and yield more reliable results. Using these methods, eight whole genomes of bacteria provided by NCBI are analyzed. Long-range correlation properties in the nucleotide density distribution along these DNA sequences are explored. Estimation results show that the long-range correlation structure prevails through the entire molecule of DNA. Higher order statistics through coarse graining reveal that rather than multifractal, there are only monofractal phenomena presented in the sequences. Hence, the nucleotide density distribution can be modeled asymptotically as fractional Gaussian noise. This result points to a new direction for analyzing and understanding the intrinsic structures of DNA sequences.

  19. Microchannel DNA Sequencing by End-Labelled Free Solution Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, A.

    2005-09-29

    The further development of End-Labeled Free-Solution Electrophoresis will greatly simplify DNA separation and sequencing on microfluidic devices. The development and optimization of drag-tags is critical to the success of this research.

  20. ATRF Houses the Latest DNA Sequencing Technologies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer By the end of October, the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) will be one of the few facilities in the world to house all of the latest DNA sequencing technologies.

  1. DNA Sequence Analysis of SLC26A5, Encoding Prestin, in a Patient-Control Cohort: Identification of Fourteen Novel DNA Sequence Variations

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Jacob S.; Tang, Hsiao-Yuan; Pereira, Fred A.; Alford, Raye Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Background Prestin, encoded by the gene SLC26A5, is a transmembrane protein of the cochlear outer hair cell (OHC). Prestin is required for the somatic electromotile activity of OHCs, which is absent in OHCs and causes severe hearing impairment in mice lacking prestin. In humans, the role of sequence variations in SLC26A5 in hearing loss is less clear. Although prestin is expected to be required for functional human OHCs, the clinical significance of reported putative mutant alleles in humans is uncertain. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the hypothesis that SLC26A5 may act as a modifier gene, affecting the severity of hearing loss caused by an independent etiology, a patient-control cohort was screened for DNA sequence variations in SLC26A5 using sequencing and allele specific methods. Patients in this study carried known pathogenic or controversial sequence variations in GJB2, encoding Connexin 26, or confirmed or suspected sequence variations in SLC26A5; controls included four ethnic populations. Twenty-three different DNA sequence variations in SLC26A5, 14 of which are novel, were observed: 4 novel sequence variations were found exclusively among patients; 7 novel sequence variations were found exclusively among controls; and, 12 sequence variations, 3 of which are novel, were found in both patients and controls. Twenty-one of the 23 DNA sequence variations were located in non-coding regions of SLC26A5. Two coding sequence variations, both novel, were observed only in patients and predict a silent change, p.S434S, and an amino acid substitution, p.I663V. In silico analysis of the p.I663V amino acid variation suggested this variant might be benign. Using Fisher's exact test, no statistically significant difference was observed between patients and controls in the frequency of the identified DNA sequence variations. Haplotype analysis using HaploView 4.0 software revealed the same predominant haplotype in patients and controls and derived haplotype blocks

  2. Sequence-Specific Molecular Lithography on Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keren, Kinneret; Krueger, Michael; Gilad, Rachel; Ben-Yoseph, Gdalyahu; Sivan, Uri; Braun, Erez

    2002-07-01

    Recent advances in the realization of individual molecular-scale electronic devices emphasize the need for novel tools and concepts capable of assembling such devices into large-scale functional circuits. We demonstrated sequence-specific molecular lithography on substrate DNA molecules by harnessing homologous recombination by RecA protein. In a sequence-specific manner, we patterned the coating of DNA with metal, localized labeled molecular objects and grew metal islands on specific sites along the DNA substrate, and generated molecularly accurate stable DNA junctions for patterning the DNA substrate connectivity. In our molecular lithography, the information encoded in the DNA molecules replaces the masks used in conventional microelectronics, and the RecA protein serves as the resist. The molecular lithography works with high resolution over a broad range of length scales from nanometers to many micrometers.

  3. Draft versus finished sequence data for DNA and protein diagnostic signature development

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M W; Smith, J R; Torres, C L; Slezak, T R

    2004-10-29

    Sequencing pathogen genomes is costly, demanding careful allocation of limited sequencing resources. We built a computational Sequencing Analysis Pipeline (SAP) to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing necessary to develop high-quality diagnostic DNA and protein signatures. SAP uses simulations to estimate the number of target genomes and close phylogenetic relatives (near neighbors, or NNs) to sequence. We use SAP to assess whether draft data is sufficient or finished sequencing is required using Marburg and variola virus sequences. Simulations indicate that intermediate to high quality draft with error rates of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -5} ({approx} 8x coverage) of target organisms is suitable for DNA signature prediction. Low quality draft with error rates of {approx} 1% (3x to 6x coverage) of target isolates is inadequate for DNA signature prediction, although low quality draft of NNs is sufficient, as long as the target genomes are of high quality. For protein signature prediction, sequencing errors in target genomes substantially reduce the detection of amino acid sequence conservation, even if the draft is of high quality. In summary, high quality draft of target and low quality draft of NNs appears to be a cost-effective investment for DNA signature prediction, but may lead to underestimation of predicted protein signatures.

  4. Nucleotide correlations and electronic transport of DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Lyra, M. L.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2005-02-01

    We use a tight-binding formulation to investigate the transmissivity and wave-packet dynamics of sequences of single-strand DNA molecules made up from the nucleotides guanine G , adenine A , cytosine C , and thymine T . In order to reveal the relevance of the underlying correlations in the nucleotides distribution, we compare the results for the genomic DNA sequence with those of two artificial sequences: (i) the Rudin-Shapiro one, which has long-range correlations; (ii) a random sequence, which is a kind of prototype of a short-range correlated system, presented here with the same first-neighbor pair correlations of the human DNA sequence. We found that the long-range character of the correlations is important to the persistence of resonances of finite segments. On the other hand, the wave-packet dynamics seems to be mostly influenced by the short-range correlations.

  5. Real-Time DNA Sequencing in the Antarctic Dry Valleys Using the Oxford Nanopore Sequencer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah S.; Zaikova, Elena; Goerlitz, David S.; Bai, Yu; Tighe, Scott W.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to sequence DNA outside of the laboratory setting has enabled novel research questions to be addressed in the field in diverse areas, ranging from environmental microbiology to viral epidemics. Here, we demonstrate the application of offline DNA sequencing of environmental samples using a hand-held nanopore sequencer in a remote field location: the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Sequencing was performed using a MK1B MinION sequencer from Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT; Oxford, United Kingdom) that was equipped with software to operate without internet connectivity. One-direction (1D) genomic libraries were prepared using portable field techniques on DNA isolated from desiccated microbial mats. By adequately insulating the sequencer and laptop, it was possible to run the sequencing protocol for up to 2½ h under arduous conditions. PMID:28337073

  6. Real-Time DNA Sequencing in the Antarctic Dry Valleys Using the Oxford Nanopore Sequencer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah S; Zaikova, Elena; Goerlitz, David S; Bai, Yu; Tighe, Scott W

    2017-04-01

    The ability to sequence DNA outside of the laboratory setting has enabled novel research questions to be addressed in the field in diverse areas, ranging from environmental microbiology to viral epidemics. Here, we demonstrate the application of offline DNA sequencing of environmental samples using a hand-held nanopore sequencer in a remote field location: the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Sequencing was performed using a MK1B MinION sequencer from Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT; Oxford, United Kingdom) that was equipped with software to operate without internet connectivity. One-direction (1D) genomic libraries were prepared using portable field techniques on DNA isolated from desiccated microbial mats. By adequately insulating the sequencer and laptop, it was possible to run the sequencing protocol for up to 2½ h under arduous conditions.

  7. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences from two Denisovan individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Susanna; Renaud, Gabriel; Viola, Bence; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Shunkov, Michael V.; Derevianko, Anatoly P.; Prüfer, Kay; Pääbo, Svante

    2015-01-01

    Denisovans, a sister group of Neandertals, have been described on the basis of a nuclear genome sequence from a finger phalanx (Denisova 3) found in Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains. The only other Denisovan specimen described to date is a molar (Denisova 4) found at the same site. This tooth carries a mtDNA sequence similar to that of Denisova 3. Here we present nuclear DNA sequences from Denisova 4 and a morphological description, as well as mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data, from another molar (Denisova 8) found in Denisova Cave in 2010. This new molar is similar to Denisova 4 in being very large and lacking traits typical of Neandertals and modern humans. Nuclear DNA sequences from the two molars form a clade with Denisova 3. The mtDNA of Denisova 8 is more diverged and has accumulated fewer substitutions than the mtDNAs of the other two specimens, suggesting Denisovans were present in the region over an extended period. The nuclear DNA sequence diversity among the three Denisovans is comparable to that among six Neandertals, but lower than that among present-day humans. PMID:26630009

  8. Effects of sequence on DNA wrapping around histones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Vanessa

    2011-03-01

    A central question in biophysics is whether the sequence of a DNA strand affects its mechanical properties. In epigenetics, these are thought to influence nucleosome positioning and gene expression. Theoretical and experimental attempts to answer this question have been hindered by an inability to directly resolve DNA structure and dynamics at the base-pair level. In our previous studies we used a detailed model of DNA to measure the effects of sequence on the stability of naked DNA under bending. Sequence was shown to influence DNA's ability to form kinks, which arise when certain motifs slide past others to form non-native contacts. Here, we have now included histone-DNA interactions to see if the results obtained for naked DNA are transferable to the problem of nucleosome positioning. Different DNA sequences interacting with the histone protein complex are studied, and their equilibrium and mechanical properties are compared among themselves and with the naked case. NLM training grant to the Computation and Informatics in Biology and Medicine Training Program (NLM T15LM007359).

  9. Probe mapping to facilitate transposon-based DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Strausbaugh, L.D.; Bourke, M.T.; Sommer, M.T.; Coon, M.E.; Berg, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    A promising strategy for DNA sequencing exploits transposons to provide mobile sites for the binding of sequencing primers. For such a strategy to be maximally efficient, the location and orientation of the transposon must be readily determined and the insertion sites should be randomly distributed. The authors demonstrate an efficient probe-based method for the localization and orientation of transposon-borne primer sites, which is adaptable to large-scale sequencing strategies. This approach requires no prior restriction enzyme mapping or knowledge of the cloned sequence and eliminates the inefficiency inherent in totally random sequencing methods. To test the efficiency of probe mapping, 49 insertions of the transposon {gamma}{delta} (Tn1000) in a cloned fragment of Drosophila melanogaster DNA were mapped and oriented. In addition, oligonucleotide primers specific for unique subterminal {gamma}{delta} segments were used to prime dideoxynucleotide double-stranded sequencing. These data provided an opportunity to rigorously examine {gamma}{delta} insertion sites. The insertions were quire randomly distributed, even though the target DNA fragment had both A+T-rich and G+C-rich regions; in G+C-rich DNA, the insertions were found in A+T-rich valleys. These data demonstrate that {gamma}{delta} is an excellent choice for supplying mobile primer binding sites to cloned DNA and that transposon-based probe mapping permits the sequences of large cloned segments to be determined without any subcloning.

  10. Affordable hands-on DNA sequencing and genotyping: an exercise for teaching DNA analysis to undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kushani; Thomas, Shelby; Stein, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe a 5-week laboratory exercise for undergraduate biology and biochemistry students in which students learn to sequence DNA and to genotype their DNA for selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Students use miniaturized DNA sequencing gels that require approximately 8 min to run. The students perform G, A, T, C Sanger sequencing reactions. They prepare and run the gels, perform Southern blots (which require only 10 min), and detect sequencing ladders using a colorimetric detection system. Students enlarge their sequencing ladders from digital images of their small nylon membranes, and read the sequence manually. They compare their reads with the actual DNA sequence using BLAST2. After mastering the DNA sequencing system, students prepare their own DNA from a cheek swab, polymerase chain reaction-amplify a region of their DNA that encompasses a SNP of interest, and perform sequencing to determine their genotype at the SNP position. A family pedigree can also be constructed. The SNP chosen by the instructor was rs17822931, which is in the ABCC11 gene and is the determinant of human earwax type. Genotypes at the rs178229931 site vary in different ethnic populations.

  11. DNA fingerprinting, DNA barcoding, and next generation sequencing technology in plants.

    PubMed

    Sucher, Nikolaus J; Hennell, James R; Carles, Maria C

    2012-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting of plants has become an invaluable tool in forensic, scientific, and industrial laboratories all over the world. PCR has become part of virtually every variation of the plethora of approaches used for DNA fingerprinting today. DNA sequencing is increasingly used either in combination with or as a replacement for traditional DNA fingerprinting techniques. A prime example is the use of short, standardized regions of the genome as taxon barcodes for biological identification of plants. Rapid advances in "next generation sequencing" (NGS) technology are driving down the cost of sequencing and bringing large-scale sequencing projects into the reach of individual investigators. We present an overview of recent publications that demonstrate the use of "NGS" technology for DNA fingerprinting and DNA barcoding applications.

  12. DNA sequence similarity recognition by hybridization to short oligomers

    DOEpatents

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    1999-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for the comparison of nucleic acid sequences. Data is generated by hybridizing sets of oligomers with target nucleic acids. The data thus generated is manipulated simultaneously with respect to both (i) matching between oligomers and (ii) matching between oligomers and putative reference sequences available in databases. Using data compression methods to manipulate this mutual information, sequences for the target can be constructed.

  13. cDNA sequencing and expression analysis of Dicentrarchus labrax heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Prevot-D'Alvise, N; Pierre, S; Gaillard, S; Gouze, E; Gouze, J-N; Aubert, J; Richard, S; Grillasca, J-P

    2008-11-17

    The liver cDNA encoding heme oxygenase--1 (HO-1) was sequenced from European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) (accession number no. EF139130). The HO-1 cDNA was 1250 bp in nucleotide length and the open reading frame encoded 277 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the European sea bass had 75% and 50% identity with the amino acid sequences of tetraodontiformes (Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes) and human HO-1 proteins, respectively. A short hydrophobic transmembrane domain at the C--terminal region was found, and four histidine residues were highly conserved, including human his25 that is essential for HO catalytic activity. RT-PCR of mRNA from eight different European sea bass tissues revealed that, in a homeostatis state, the heme oxygenase--1 was abundant in the spleen and liver but not in the brain.

  14. The properties and applications of single-molecule DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule sequencing enables DNA or RNA to be sequenced directly from biological samples, making it well-suited for diagnostic and clinical applications. Here we review the properties and applications of this rapidly evolving and promising technology. PMID:21349208

  15. Human gamma X satellite DNA: an X chromosome specific centromeric DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Li, X; Jabs, E W; Court, D; Lin, C C

    1995-11-01

    The cosmid clone, CX16-2D12, was previously localized to the centromeric region of the human X chromosome and shown to lack human X-specific alpha satellite DNA. A 1.2 kb EcoRI fragment was subcloned from the CX16-2D12 cosmid and was named 2D12/E2. DNA sequencing revealed that this 1,205 bp fragment consisted of approximately five tandemly repeated DNA monomers of 220 bp. DNA sequence homology between the monomers of 2D12/E2 ranged from 72.8% to 78.6%. Interestingly, DNA sequence analysis of the 2D12/E2 clone displayed a change in monomer unit orientation between nucleotide positions 585-586 from a "tail-to-head" arrangement to a "head-to-tail" configuration. This may reflect the existence of at least one inversion within this repetitive DNA array in the centromeric region of the human X chromosome. The DNA consensus sequence derived from a compilation of these 220 bp monomers had approximately 62% DNA sequence similarity to the previously determined gamma 8 satellite DNA consensus sequence. Comparison of the 2D12/E2 and gamma 8 consensus sequences revealed a 20 bp DNA sequence that was well conserved in both DNA consensus sequences. Slot-blot analysis revealed that this repetitive DNA sequence comprises approximately 0.015% of the human genome, similar to that found with gamma 8 satellite DNA. These observations suggest that this satellite DNA clone is derived from a subfamily of gamma satellite DNA and is thus designated gamma X satellite DNA. When genomic DNA from six unrelated males and two unrelated females was cut with SstI or HpaI and separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, no restriction fragment length polymorphisms were observed for either gamma X (2D12/E2) or gamma 8 (50E4) probes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the 2D12/E2 clone to the lateral sides of the primary constriction specifically on the human X chromosome.

  16. Microfabricated bioprocessor for integrated nanoliter-scale Sanger DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Blazej, Robert G; Kumaresan, Palani; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-05-09

    An efficient, nanoliter-scale microfabricated bioprocessor integrating all three Sanger sequencing steps, thermal cycling, sample purification, and capillary electrophoresis, has been developed and evaluated. Hybrid glass-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wafer-scale construction is used to combine 250-nl reactors, affinity-capture purification chambers, high-performance capillary electrophoresis channels, and pneumatic valves and pumps onto a single microfabricated device. Lab-on-a-chip-level integration enables complete Sanger sequencing from only 1 fmol of DNA template. Up to 556 continuous bases were sequenced with 99% accuracy, demonstrating read lengths required for de novo sequencing of human and other complex genomes. The performance of this miniaturized DNA sequencer provides a benchmark for predicting the ultimate cost and efficiency limits of Sanger sequencing.

  17. Electronic Transport and Thermopower in Aperiodic DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Stephan; Maciá, Enrique

    A detailed study of charge transport properties of synthetic and genomic DNA sequences is reported. Genomic sequences of the Chromosome 22, λ-bacteriophage, and D1s80 genes of Human and Pygmy chimpanzee are considered in this work, and compared with both periodic and quasiperiodic (Fibonacci) sequences of nucleotides. Charge transfer efficiency is compared for all these different sequences, and large variations in charge transfer efficiency, stemming from sequence-dependent effects, are reported. In addition, basic characteristics of tunneling currents, including contact effects, are described. Finally, the thermoelectric power of nucleobases connected in between metallic contacts at different temperatures is presented.

  18. Beyond reasonable doubt: evolution from DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    White, W Timothy J; Zhong, Bojian; Penny, David

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitatively that, as predicted by evolutionary theory, sequences of homologous proteins from different species converge as we go further and further back in time. The converse, a non-evolutionary model can be expressed as probabilities, and the test works for chloroplast, nuclear and mitochondrial sequences, as well as for sequences that diverged at different time depths. Even on our conservative test, the probability that chance could produce the observed levels of ancestral convergence for just one of the eight datasets of 51 proteins is ≈1×10⁻¹⁹ and combined over 8 datasets is ≈1×10⁻¹³². By comparison, there are about 10⁸⁰ protons in the universe, hence the probability that the sequences could have been produced by a process involving unrelated ancestral sequences is about 10⁵⁰ lower than picking, among all protons, the same proton at random twice in a row. A non-evolutionary control model shows no convergence, and only a small number of parameters are required to account for the observations. It is time that that researchers insisted that doubters put up testable alternatives to evolution.

  19. DNA-protein recognition and sequence-dependent variations of DNA conformational properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Parameters of B-DNA, the major form of the double helix, depend on its sequence. This dependence can contribute to the recognition of specific DNA sequences by proteins. Here we try to analyze this contribution quantitatively. In the first approach to this goal we used experimental data on the sequence dependence of DNA bending rigidity and its helical repeat. The solution data on these parameters of B-DNA were derived from the experiments on cyclization of short DNA fragments with specially designed sequences. The data allowed calculating the sequence variations of DNA bending energy, as well as the variations of the energy of torsional deformation of the double helix associated with a protein binding. The results show that DNA conformational parameters can have very limited influence on the sequence specificity of protein binding. In the second approach we analyzed the experimental data on the binding affinity of the nucleosome core with DNA fragments of different sequences. The conclusions derived in these two approaches are in a good agreement with one another.

  20. Sequence specificity of DNA cleavage by Micrococcus luteus. gamma. endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Hentosh, P.; Henner, W.D.; Reynolds, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    DNA fragments of defined sequence have been used to determine the sites of cleavage by ..gamma..-endonuclease activity in extracts prepared from Micrococcus luteus. End-labeled DNA restriction fragments of pBR322 DNA that had been irradiated under nitrogen in the presence of potassium iodide or t-butanol were treated with M. luteus ..gamma.. endonuclease and analyzed on irradiated DNA preferentially at the positions of cytosines and thymines. DNA cleavage occurred immediately to the 3' side of pyrimidines in irradiated DNA and resulted in fragments that terminate in a 5'-phosphoryl group. These studies indicate that both altered cytosines and thymines may be important DNA lesions requiring repair after exposure to ..gamma.. radiation.

  1. DNA sequence detection using surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy in a homogeneous multiplexed assay.

    PubMed

    MacAskill, Alexandra; Crawford, David; Graham, Duncan; Faulds, Karen

    2009-10-01

    Detection of specific DNA sequences is central to modern molecular biology and also to molecular diagnostics where identification of a particular disease is based on nucleic acid identification. Many methods exist, and fluorescence spectroscopy dominates the detection technologies employed with different assay formats. This study demonstrates the use of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) to detect specific DNA sequences when coupled with modified SERRS-active probes that have been designed to modify the affinity of double- and single-stranded DNA for the surface of silver nanoparticles resulting in discernible differences in the SERRS which can be correlated to the specific DNA hybridization event. The principle of the assay lies on the lack of affinity of double-stranded DNA for silver nanoparticle surfaces; therefore, hybridization of the probe to the target results in a reduction in the SERRS signal. Use of locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues in the DNA probes resulted in greater discrimination between exact match and mismatches when used in comparison to unmodified labeled DNA probes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were detected using this methodology, and ultimately a multiplex detection of sequences relating to a hospital-acquired infection, namely, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), demonstrated the versatility and applicability of this approach to real-life situations.

  2. Sequence and transcription analysis of the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzarides, T.; Bankier, A.T.; Satchwell, S.C.; Weston, K.; Tomlinson, P.; Barrell, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis has revealed that the gene coding for the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase is present within the long unique region of the virus genome. Identification is based on extensive amino acid homology between the predicted HCMV open reading frame HFLF2 and the DNA polymerase of herpes simplex virus type 1. The authors present here a 5280 base-pair DNA sequence containing the HCMV pol gene, along with the analysis of transcripts encoded within this region. Since HCMV pol also shows homology to the predicted Epstein-Barr virus pol, they were able to analyze the extent of homology between the DNA polymerases of three distantly related herpes viruses, HCMV, Epstein-Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus. The comparison shows that these DNA polymerases exhibit considerable amino acid homology and highlights a number of highly conserved regions; two such regions show homology to sequences within the adenovirus type 2 DNA polymerase. The HCMV pol gene is flanked by open reading frames with homology to those of other herpes viruses; upstream, there is a reading frame homologous to the glycoprotein B gene of herpes simplex virus type I and Epstein-Barr virus, and downstream there is a reading frame homologous to BFLF2 of Epstein-Barr virus.

  3. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Nirasawa, S; Nakaya, K; Kurihara, Y

    1995-08-19

    A cDNA clone encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin (MIR), was isolated and sequenced. The encoded precursor to MIR was composed of 220 amino acid (aa) residues, including a possible signal sequence of 29 aa. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA encoding MIR was already expressed in fruits of Richadella dulcifica at 3 weeks after pollination and was present specifically in the pulp.

  4. Molecular Poltergeists: Mitochondrial DNA Copies (numts) in Sequenced Nuclear Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Zeller, Raymond M.; Martin, William

    2010-01-01

    The natural transfer of DNA from mitochondria to the nucleus generates nuclear copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) and is an ongoing evolutionary process, as genome sequences attest. In humans, five different numts cause genetic disease and a dozen human loci are polymorphic for the presence of numts, underscoring the rapid rate at which mitochondrial sequences reach the nucleus over evolutionary time. In the laboratory and in nature, numts enter the nuclear DNA via non-homolgous end joining (NHEJ) at double-strand breaks (DSBs). The frequency of numt insertions among 85 sequenced eukaryotic genomes reveal that numt content is strongly correlated with genome size, suggesting that the numt insertion rate might be limited by DSB frequency. Polymorphic numts in humans link maternally inherited mitochondrial genotypes to nuclear DNA haplotypes during the past, offering new opportunities to associate nuclear markers with mitochondrial markers back in time. PMID:20168995

  5. Nanopore-based fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanxiao; Zhang, Yuechuan; Ying, Cuifeng; Wang, Deqiang; Du, Chunlei

    2015-02-01

    Nanopore-based sequencers, as the fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology, have the potential to quickly and reliably sequence the entire human genome for less than $1000, and possibly for even less than $100. The single-molecule techniques used by this technology allow us to further study the interaction between DNA and protein, as well as between protein and protein. Nanopore analysis opens a new door to molecular biology investigation at the single-molecule scale. In this article, we have reviewed academic achievements in nanopore technology from the past as well as the latest advances, including both biological and solid-state nanopores, and discussed their recent and potential applications.

  6. Efficient depletion of host DNA contamination in malaria clinical sequencing.

    PubMed

    Oyola, Samuel O; Gu, Yong; Manske, Magnus; Otto, Thomas D; O'Brien, John; Alcock, Daniel; Macinnis, Bronwyn; Berriman, Matthew; Newbold, Chris I; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Swerdlow, Harold P; Quail, Michael A

    2013-03-01

    The cost of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is decreasing rapidly as next-generation sequencing technology continues to advance, and the prospect of making WGS available for public health applications is becoming a reality. So far, a number of studies have demonstrated the use of WGS as an epidemiological tool for typing and controlling outbreaks of microbial pathogens. Success of these applications is hugely dependent on efficient generation of clean genetic material that is free from host DNA contamination for rapid preparation of sequencing libraries. The presence of large amounts of host DNA severely affects the efficiency of characterizing pathogens using WGS and is therefore a serious impediment to clinical and epidemiological sequencing for health care and public health applications. We have developed a simple enzymatic treatment method that takes advantage of the methylation of human DNA to selectively deplete host contamination from clinical samples prior to sequencing. Using malaria clinical samples with over 80% human host DNA contamination, we show that the enzymatic treatment enriches Plasmodium falciparum DNA up to ∼9-fold and generates high-quality, nonbiased sequence reads covering >98% of 86,158 catalogued typeable single-nucleotide polymorphism loci.

  7. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  8. Sequence-based prediction of protein-binding sites in DNA: comparative study of two SVM models.

    PubMed

    Park, Byungkyu; Im, Jinyong; Tuvshinjargal, Narankhuu; Lee, Wook; Han, Kyungsook

    2014-11-01

    As many structures of protein-DNA complexes have been known in the past years, several computational methods have been developed to predict DNA-binding sites in proteins. However, its inverse problem (i.e., predicting protein-binding sites in DNA) has received much less attention. One of the reasons is that the differences between the interaction propensities of nucleotides are much smaller than those between amino acids. Another reason is that DNA exhibits less diverse sequence patterns than protein. Therefore, predicting protein-binding DNA nucleotides is much harder than predicting DNA-binding amino acids. We computed the interaction propensity (IP) of nucleotide triplets with amino acids using an extensive dataset of protein-DNA complexes, and developed two support vector machine (SVM) models that predict protein-binding nucleotides from sequence data alone. One SVM model predicts protein-binding nucleotides using DNA sequence data alone, and the other SVM model predicts protein-binding nucleotides using both DNA and protein sequences. In a 10-fold cross-validation with 1519 DNA sequences, the SVM model that uses DNA sequence data only predicted protein-binding nucleotides with an accuracy of 67.0%, an F-measure of 67.1%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.340. With an independent dataset of 181 DNAs that were not used in training, it achieved an accuracy of 66.2%, an F-measure 66.3% and a MCC of 0.324. Another SVM model that uses both DNA and protein sequences achieved an accuracy of 69.6%, an F-measure of 69.6%, and a MCC of 0.383 in a 10-fold cross-validation with 1519 DNA sequences and 859 protein sequences. With an independent dataset of 181 DNAs and 143 proteins, it showed an accuracy of 67.3%, an F-measure of 66.5% and a MCC of 0.329. Both in cross-validation and independent testing, the second SVM model that used both DNA and protein sequence data showed better performance than the first model that used DNA sequence data. To the best of

  9. Ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of DNA sequencing gels

    SciTech Connect

    Mathies, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    During the three years of this grant we have: (1) Developed and applied a new theory for optimizing high-sensitivity fluorescence detection. (2) Developed and patented a new high-sensitivity confocal-fluorescence laser-excited gel-scanner. (3) Applied this scanner to the development of a new class of versatile and sensitive fluorescent dyes for DNA detection. (4) Developed methods for the detection of single fluorescent molecules by fluorescence burst detection. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Recognizing a Single Base in an Individual DNA Strand: A Step Toward Nanopore DNA Sequencing**

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenasy, N.; Sánchez-Quesada, J.; Ghadiri, M. R.; Bayley, H.

    2007-01-01

    Functional supramolecular chemistry at the single-molecule level. Single strands of DNA can be captured inside α-hemolysin transmembrane pore protein to form single-species α-HL·DNA pseudorotaxanes. This process can be used to identify a single adenine nucleotide at a specific location on a strand of DNA by the characteristic reductions in the α-HL ion conductance. This study suggests that α-HL-mediated single-molecule DNA sequencing might be fundamentally feasible. PMID:15666419

  11. PCR Primers for Metazoan Mitochondrial 12S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Kweskin, Matthew; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessment of the biodiversity of communities of small organisms is most readily done using PCR-based analysis of environmental samples consisting of mixtures of individuals. Known as metagenetics, this approach has transformed understanding of microbial communities and is beginning to be applied to metazoans as well. Unlike microbial studies, where analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence is standard, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In this study we designed a set of PCR primers for the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequence based on 64 complete mitochondrial genomes and then tested their efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of the 64 complete mitochondrial genome sequences representing all metazoan classes available in GenBank were downloaded using the NCBI Taxonomy Browser. Alignment of sequences was performed for the excised mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences, and conserved regions were identified for all 64 mitochondrial genomes. These regions were used to design a primer pair that flanks a more variable region in the gene. Then all of the complete metazoan mitochondrial genomes available in NCBI's Organelle Genome Resources database were used to determine the percentage of taxa that would likely be amplified using these primers. Results suggest that these primers will amplify target sequences for many metazoans. Conclusions/Significance Newly designed 12S ribosomal DNA primers have considerable potential for metazoan metagenetic analysis because of their ability to amplify sequences from many metazoans. PMID:22536450

  12. Analysis of sequence variation in Gnathostoma spinigerum mitochondrial DNA by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Ngarmamonpirat, Charinthon; Waikagul, Jitra; Petmitr, Songsak; Dekumyoy, Paron; Rojekittikhun, Wichit; Anantapruti, Malinee T

    2005-03-01

    Morphological variations were observed in the advance third stage larvae of Gnathostoma spinigerum collected from swamp eel (Fluta alba), the second intermediate host. Larvae with typical and three atypical types were chosen for partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequence analysis. A 450 bp polymerase chain reaction product of the COI gene was amplified from mitochondrial DNA. The variations were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The nucleotide variations of the COI gene in the four types of larvae indicated the presence of an intra-specific variation of mitochondrial DNA in the G. spinigerum population.

  13. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid...

  14. Theoretical modelling of epigenetically modified DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alexandra Teresa Pires; Gouveia, Maria Leonor; Raju Kanna, Charan; Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.; Platts, Jamie; Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2015-01-01

    We report herein a set of calculations designed to examine the effects of epigenetic modifications on the structure of DNA. The incorporation of methyl, hydroxymethyl, formyl and carboxy substituents at the 5-position of cytosine is shown to hardly affect the geometry of CG base pairs, but to result in rather larger changes to hydrogen-bond and stacking binding energies, as predicted by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) methods. The same modifications within double-stranded GCG and ACA trimers exhibit rather larger structural effects, when including the sugar-phosphate backbone as well as sodium counterions and implicit aqueous solvation. In particular, changes are observed in the buckle and propeller angles within base pairs and the slide and roll values of base pair steps, but these leave the overall helical shape of DNA essentially intact. The structures so obtained are useful as a benchmark of faster methods, including molecular mechanics (MM) and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. We show that previously developed MM parameters satisfactorily reproduce the trimer structures, as do QM/MM calculations which treat bases with dispersion-corrected DFT and the sugar-phosphate backbone with AMBER. The latter are improved by inclusion of all six bases in the QM region, since a truncated model including only the central CG base pair in the QM region is considerably further from the DFT structure. This QM/MM method is then applied to a set of double-stranded DNA heptamers derived from a recent X-ray crystallographic study, whose size puts a DFT study beyond our current computational resources. These data show that still larger structural changes are observed than in base pairs or trimers, leading us to conclude that it is important to model epigenetic modifications within realistic molecular contexts. PMID:26448859

  15. Probabilistic models for semisupervised discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Kyoung; Choi, Seungjin

    2011-01-01

    Methods for discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), searching only for patterns that differentiate two sets (positive and negative sets) of sequences. On one hand, discriminative methods increase the sensitivity and specificity of motif discovery, compared to generative models. On the other hand, generative models can easily exploit unlabeled sequences to better detect functional motifs when labeled training samples are limited. In this paper, we develop a hybrid generative/discriminative model which enables us to make use of unlabeled sequences in the framework of discriminative motif discovery, leading to semisupervised discriminative motif discovery. Numerical experiments on yeast ChIP-chip data for discovering DNA motifs demonstrate that the best performance is obtained between the purely-generative and the purely-discriminative and the semisupervised learning improves the performance when labeled sequences are limited.

  16. Selective enrichment of damaged DNA molecules for ancient genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Contamination by present-day human and microbial DNA is one of the major hindrances for large-scale genomic studies using ancient biological material. We describe a new molecular method, U selection, which exploits one of the most distinctive features of ancient DNA—the presence of deoxyuracils—for selective enrichment of endogenous DNA against a complex background of contamination during DNA library preparation. By applying the method to Neanderthal DNA extracts that are heavily contaminated with present-day human DNA, we show that the fraction of useful sequence information increases ∼10-fold and that the resulting sequences are more efficiently depleted of human contamination than when using purely computational approaches. Furthermore, we show that U selection can lead to a four- to fivefold increase in the proportion of endogenous DNA sequences relative to those of microbial contaminants in some samples. U selection may thus help to lower the costs for ancient genome sequencing of nonhuman samples also. PMID:25081630

  17. Applications of recursive segmentation to the analysis of DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentian; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro; Haghighi, Fatameh; Grosse, Ivo

    2002-07-01

    Recursive segmentation is a procedure that partitions a DNA sequence into domains with a homogeneous composition of the four nucleotides A, C, G and T. This procedure can also be applied to any sequence converted from a DNA sequence, such as to a binary strong(G + C)/weak(A + T) sequence, to a binary sequence indicating the presence or absence of the dinucleotide CpG, or to a sequence indicating both the base and the codon position information. We apply various conversion schemes in order to address the following five DNA sequence analysis problems: isochore mapping, CpG island detection, locating the origin and terminus of replication in bacterial genomes, finding complex repeats in telomere sequences, and delineating coding and noncoding regions. We find that the recursive segmentation procedure can successfully detect isochore borders, CpG islands, and the origin and terminus of replication, but it needs improvement for detecting complex repeats as well as borders between coding and noncoding regions.

  18. Human and Tree Shrew Alpha-synuclein: Comparative cDNA Sequence and Protein Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng-Cun; Huang, Zhang-Qiong; Jiang, Qin-Fang; Dai, Jie-Jie; Zhang, Ying; Gao, Jia-Hong; Sun, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Nai-Hong; Yuan, Yu-He; Li, Cong; Han, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yun; Ma, Kai-Li

    2015-10-01

    The synaptic protein alpha-synuclein (α-syn) is associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and homology analyses among many species have been reported. Nevertheless, little is known about the cDNA sequence and protein structure of α-syn in tree shrews, and this information might contribute to our understanding of its role in both health and disease. We designed primers to the human α-syn cDNA sequence; then, tree shrew α-syn cDNA was obtained by RT-PCR and sequenced. Based on the acquired tree shrew α-syn cDNA sequence, both the amino acid sequence and the spatial structure of α-syn were predicted and analyzed. The homology analysis results showed that the tree shrew cDNA sequence matches the human cDNA sequence exactly except at nucleotide positions 45, 60, 65, 69, 93, 114, 147, 150, 157, 204, 252, 270, 284, 298, 308, and 324. Further protein sequence analysis revealed that the tree shrew α-syn protein sequence is 97.1 % identical to that of human α-syn. The secondary protein structure of tree shrew α-syn based on random coils and α-helices is the same as that of the human structure. The phosphorylation sites are highly conserved, except the site at position 103 of tree shrew α-syn. The predicted spatial structure of tree shrew α-syn is identical to that of human α-syn. Thus, α-syn might have a similar function in tree shrew and in human, and tree shrew might be a potential animal model for studying the pathogenesis of α-synucleinopathies.

  19. A Fast Algorithm for Exonic Regions Prediction in DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Saberkari, Hamidreza; Shamsi, Mousa; Heravi, Hamed; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a fast method for gene prediction in DNA sequences based on the period-3 property in exons. First, the symbolic DNA sequences were converted to digital signal using the electron ion interaction potential method. Then, to reduce the effect of background noise in the period-3 spectrum, we used the discrete wavelet transform at three levels and applied it on the input digital signal. Finally, the Goertzel algorithm was used to extract period-3 components in the filtered DNA sequence. The proposed algorithm leads to decrease the computational complexity and hence, increases the speed of the process. Detection of small size exons in DNA sequences, exactly, is another advantage of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm ability in exon prediction was compared with several existing methods at the nucleotide level using: (i) specificity - sensitivity values; (ii) receiver operating curves (ROC); and (iii) area under ROC curve. Simulation results confirmed that the proposed method can be used as a promising tool for exon prediction in DNA sequences. PMID:24672762

  20. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  1. DNA sequence and structure requirements for cleavage of V(D)J recombination signal sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, C A; Mundy, C L; Oettinger, M A

    1996-01-01

    Purified RAG1 and RAG2 proteins can cleave DNA at V(D)J recombination signals. In dissecting the DNA sequence and structural requirements for cleavage, we find that the heptamer and nonamer motifs of the recombination signal sequence can independently direct both steps of the cleavage reaction. Proper helical spacing between these two elements greatly enhances the efficiency of cleavage, whereas improper spacing can lead to interference between the two elements. The signal sequences are surprisingly tolerant of structural variation and function efficiently when nicks, gaps, and mismatched bases are introduced or even when the signal sequence is completely single stranded. Sequence alterations that facilitate unpairing of the bases at the signal/coding border activate the cleavage reaction, suggesting that DNA distortion is critical for V(D)J recombination. PMID:8816481

  2. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS) that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/. PMID:21385349

  3. Nucleotide sequence of cloned cDNA for human pancreatic kallikrein.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, D; Kitamura, N; Nakanishi, S

    1985-12-31

    Cloned cDNA sequences for human pancreatic kallikrein have been isolated and determined by molecular cloning and sequence analysis. The identity between human pancreatic and urinary kallikreins is indicated by the complete coincidence between the amino acid sequence deduced from the cloned cDNA sequence and that reported partially for urinary kallikrein. The active enzyme form of the human pancreatic kallikrein consists of 238 amino acids and is preceded by a signal peptide and a profragment of 24 amino acids. A sequence comparison of this with other mammalian kallikreins indicates that key amino acid residues required for both serine protease activity and kallikrein-like cleavage specificity are retained in the human sequence, and residues corresponding to some external loops of the kallikrein diverge from other kallikreins. Analyses by RNA blot hybridization, primer extension, and S1 nuclease mapping indicate that the pancreatic kallikrein mRNA is also expressed in the kidney and sublingual gland, suggesting the active synthesis of urinary kallikrein in these tissues. Furthermore, the tissue-specific regulation of the expression of the members of the human kallikrein gene family has been discussed.

  4. Mapping DNA polymerase errors by single-molecule sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David F.; Lu, Jenny; Chang, Seungwoo; Loparo, Joseph J.; Xie, Xiaoliang S.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic integrity is compromised by DNA polymerase replication errors, which occur in a sequence-dependent manner across the genome. Accurate and complete quantification of a DNA polymerase's error spectrum is challenging because errors are rare and difficult to detect. We report a high-throughput sequencing assay to map in vitro DNA replication errors at the single-molecule level. Unlike previous methods, our assay is able to rapidly detect a large number of polymerase errors at base resolution over any template substrate without quantification bias. To overcome the high error rate of high-throughput sequencing, our assay uses a barcoding strategy in which each replication product is tagged with a unique nucleotide sequence before amplification. This allows multiple sequencing reads of the same product to be compared so that sequencing errors can be found and removed. We demonstrate the ability of our assay to characterize the average error rate, error hotspots and lesion bypass fidelity of several DNA polymerases. PMID:27185891

  5. Label-free DNA sequencing using Millikan detection.

    PubMed

    Dettloff, Roger; Leiske, Danielle; Chow, Andrea; Farinas, Javier

    2015-10-15

    A label-free method for DNA sequencing based on the principle of the Millikan oil drop experiment was developed. This sequencing-by-synthesis approach sensed increases in bead charge as nucleotides were added by a polymerase to DNA templates attached to beads. The balance between an electrical force, which was dependent on the number of nucleotide charges on a bead, and opposing hydrodynamic drag and restoring tether forces resulted in a bead velocity that was a function of the number of nucleotides attached to the bead. The velocity of beads tethered via a polymer to a microfluidic channel and subjected to an oscillating electric field was measured using dark-field microscopy and used to determine how many nucleotides were incorporated during each sequencing-by-synthesis cycle. Increases in bead velocity of approximately 1% were reliably detected during DNA polymerization, allowing for sequencing of short DNA templates. The method could lead to a low-cost, high-throughput sequencing platform that could enable routine sequencing in medical applications.

  6. Label-Free DNA Sequencing Using Millikan Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dettloff, Roger; Leiske, Danielle; Chow, Andrea; Farinas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A label-free method for DNA sequencing based on the principle of the Millikan oil drop experiment was developed. This sequencing-by-synthesis approach sensed increases in bead charge as nucleotides were added by a polymerase to DNA templates attached to beads. The balance between an electrical force, which was dependent on the number of nucleotide charges on a bead, and opposing hydrodynamic drag and restoring tether forces resulted in a bead velocity that was a function of the number of nucleotides attached to the bead. The velocity of beads tethered via a polymer to a microfluidic channel and subjected to an oscillating electric field was measured using dark-field microscopy and used to determine how many nucleotides were incorporated during each sequencing-by-synthesis cycle. Increases in bead velocity of ~ 1% were reliably detected during DNA polymerization allowing for sequencing of short DNA templates. The method could lead to a low-cost, high-throughput sequencing platform that could enable routine sequencing in medical applications. PMID:26151683

  7. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing of human immunoglobulin epsilon chain cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Seno, M; Kurokawa, T; Ono, Y; Onda, H; Sasada, R; Igarashi, K; Kikuchi, M; Sugino, Y; Nishida, Y; Honjo, T

    1983-01-01

    DNA complementary to mRNA of human immunoglobulin E heavy chain (epsilon chain) isolated and purified from U266 cells has been synthesized and inserted into the PstI site of pBR322 by G-C tailing. This recombinant plasmid was used to transform E. coli chi 1776 to screen 1445 tetracycline resistant colonies. Nine clones (pGETI - 9) containing cDNA coding for the human epsilon chain were recognized by colony hybridization and Southern blotting analysis with a nick-translated human IgE genome fragment. The nucleotide sequence of the longest cDNA contained in pGET2 was determined. The results indicate that the sequence of 1657 nucleotides codes for 494 amino acids covering a part of the variable region and all of the constant region of the human epsilon chain. Most of the amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence is in substantial agreement with that reported. Furthermore a termination codon after the -COOH terminal amino acid marks the beginning of a 3' untranslated region of 125 nucleotides with a poly A tail. Taking this into account, the structure of the human epsilon chain mRNA, except a part of the 5' end, is conserved fairly well in the cDNA insert in pGET2. Images PMID:6300763

  8. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of cDNA for human liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Takiguchi, M.; Amaya, Y.; Kawamoto, S.; Matsuda, I.; Mori, M.

    1987-01-01

    Arginase (EC3.5.3.1) catalyzes the last step of the urea cycle in the liver of ureotelic animals. Inherited deficiency of the enzyme results in argininemia, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hyperammonemia. To facilitate investigation of the enzyme and gene structures and to elucidate the nature of the mutation in argininemia, the authors isolated cDNA clones for human liver arginase. Oligo(dT)-primed and random primer human liver cDNA libraries in lambda gt11 were screened using isolated rat arginase cDNA as a probe. Two of the positive clones, designated lambda hARG6 and lambda hARG109, contained an overlapping cDNA sequence with an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 322 amino acid residues (predicted M/sub r/, 34,732), a 5'-untranslated sequence of 56 base pairs, a 3'-untranslated sequence of 423 base pairs, and a poly(A) segment. Arginase activity was detected in Escherichia coli cells transformed with the plasmid carrying lambda hARG6 cDNA insert. RNA gel blot analysis of human liver RNA showed a single mRNA of 1.6 kilobases. The predicted amino acid sequence of human liver arginase is 87% and 41% identical with those of the rat liver and yeast enzymes, respectively. There are several highly conserved segments among the human, rat, and yeast enzymes.

  9. Flexibility of nucleic acids: From DNA to RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bao; Xi, Zhang; Lei, Jin; Zhi-Jie, Tan

    2016-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB933600), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175132, 11575128, and 11374234), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents, China (Grant No. NCET 08-0408).

  10. Cloning and sequencing of the PIF gene involved in repair and recombination of yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Foury, F; Lahaye, A

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear gene PIF of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for both repair of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and recognition of a recombinogenic signal characterized by a 26-bp palindromic AT sequence in the ery region of mtDNA. This gene has been cloned in yeast by genetic complementation of pif mutants. Its chromosomal disruption does not destroy the genetic function of mitochondria. The nucleotide sequence of the 3.5-kb insert from a complementing plasmid reveals an open reading frame encoding a potential protein of 857 amino acids and Mr = 97,500. An ATP-binding domain is present in the central part of the gene and in the carboxy-terminal region a putative DNA-binding site is present. Its alpha helix-turn-alpha helix motif is found in DNA-binding proteins such as lambda and lactose repressors which recognize symmetric sequences. Significant amino acid homology is observed with yeast RAD3 and E. coli UvrD (helicase II) proteins which are required for excision repair of damaged DNA. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3038524

  11. Dialects of the DNA Uptake Sequence in Neisseriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Stephan A.; Nilsen, Mariann; Tønjum, Tone; Ambur, Ole Herman

    2013-01-01

    In all sexual organisms, adaptations exist that secure the safe reassortment of homologous alleles and prevent the intrusion of potentially hazardous alien DNA. Some bacteria engage in a simple form of sex known as transformation. In the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and in related bacterial species, transformation by exogenous DNA is regulated by the presence of a specific DNA Uptake Sequence (DUS), which is present in thousands of copies in the respective genomes. DUS affects transformation by limiting DNA uptake and recombination in favour of homologous DNA. The specific mechanisms of DUS–dependent genetic transformation have remained elusive. Bioinformatic analyses of family Neisseriaceae genomes reveal eight distinct variants of DUS. These variants are here termed DUS dialects, and their effect on interspecies commutation is demonstrated. Each of the DUS dialects is remarkably conserved within each species and is distributed consistent with a robust Neisseriaceae phylogeny based on core genome sequences. The impact of individual single nucleotide transversions in DUS on meningococcal transformation and on DNA binding and uptake is analysed. The results show that a DUS core 5′-CTG-3′ is required for transformation and that transversions in this core reduce DNA uptake more than two orders of magnitude although the level of DNA binding remains less affected. Distinct DUS dialects are efficient barriers to interspecies recombination in N. meningitidis, N. elongata, Kingella denitrificans, and Eikenella corrodens, despite the presence of the core sequence. The degree of similarity between the DUS dialect of the recipient species and the donor DNA directly correlates with the level of transformation and DNA binding and uptake. Finally, DUS–dependent transformation is documented in the genera Eikenella and Kingella for the first time. The results presented here advance our understanding of the function and evolution of DUS and genetic transformation

  12. Genomic and cDNA actin sequences from a virulent strain of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Edman, U; Meza, I; Agabian, N

    1987-01-01

    Invasiveness of Entamoeba histolytica strains that cause acute amoebiasis is characterized by aggressive behavior associated with cell motility and actin function. Analysis of actin genes from E. histolytica was initiated by devising methods for the isolation of biologically active nucleic acids, which allowed the preparation of cDNA and genomic DNA libraries. E. histolytica actin-encoding cDNAs and genomic clones have been isolated from libraries prepared from the virulent HM1:IMSS strain using a heterologous actin probe. Nucleotide sequence analysis of three independent cDNA clones and one genomic clone reveals a highly unusual codon bias and the absence of intervening sequences in E. histolytica actin. The coding sequence of the genomic clone is identical to that of two of the three cDNA clones. These represent at least two distinct mRNAs differing only by five silent changes in the protein coding sequence. Multiple genomic copies of the actin gene can be detected by Southern hybridization. E. histolytica actin exhibits a higher degree of homology to cytoplasmic than to muscle actin. Although the protein has been shown not to bind DNase I, the inferred amino acid sequence indicates conservation of all residues implied to participate in this binding. Images PMID:2883657

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Divergence among Lycopersicon and Related Solanum Species

    PubMed Central

    McClean, Phillip E.; Hanson, Maureen R.

    1986-01-01

    Sequence divergence among the mitochondrial (mt) DNA of nine Lycopersicon and two closely related Solanum species was estimated using the shared fragment method. A portion of each mt genome was highlighted by probing total DNA with a series of plasmid clones containing mt-specific DNA fragments from Lycopersicon pennellii. A total of 660 fragments were compared. As calculated by the shared fragment method, sequence divergence among the mtDNAs ranged from 0.4% for the L. esculentum-L. esculentum var. cerasiforme pair to 2.7% for the Solanum rickii-L. pimpinellifolium and L. cheesmanii-L. chilense pairs. The mtDNA divergence is higher than that reported for Lycopersicon chloroplast (cp) DNA, which indicates that the DNAs of the two plant organelles are evolving at different rates. The percentages of shared fragments were used to construct a phenogram that illustrates the present-day relationships of the mtDNAs. The mtDNA-derived phenogram places L. hirsutum closer to L. esculentum than taxonomic and cpDNA comparisons. Further, the recent assignment of L. pennellii to the genus Lycopersicon is supported by the mtDNA analysis. PMID:17246320

  14. Metagenomics to paleogenomics: large-scale sequencing of mammoth DNA.

    PubMed

    Poinar, Hendrik N; Schwarz, Carsten; Qi, Ji; Shapiro, Beth; Macphee, Ross D E; Buigues, Bernard; Tikhonov, Alexei; Huson, Daniel H; Tomsho, Lynn P; Auch, Alexander; Rampp, Markus; Miller, Webb; Schuster, Stephan C

    2006-01-20

    We sequenced 28 million base pairs of DNA in a metagenomics approach, using a woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) sample from Siberia. As a result of exceptional sample preservation and the use of a recently developed emulsion polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing technique, 13 million base pairs (45.4%) of the sequencing reads were identified as mammoth DNA. Sequence identity between our data and African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was 98.55%, consistent with a paleontologically based divergence date of 5 to 6 million years. The sample includes a surprisingly small diversity of environmental DNAs. The high percentage of endogenous DNA recoverable from this single mammoth would allow for completion of its genome, unleashing the field of paleogenomics.

  15. Accelerating Computation of DNA Sequence Alignment in Distributed Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tao; Li, Guiyang; Deaton, Russel

    Sequence similarity and alignment are most important operations in computational biology. However, analyzing large sets of DNA sequence seems to be impractical on a regular PC. Using multiple threads with JavaParty mechanism, this project has successfully implemented in extending the capabilities of regular Java to a distributed environment for simulation of DNA computation. With the aid of JavaParty and the design of multiple threads, the results of this study demonstrated that the modified regular Java program could perform parallel computing without using RMI or socket communication. In this paper, an efficient method for modeling and comparing DNA sequences with dynamic programming and JavaParty was firstly proposed. Additionally, results of this method in distributed environment have been discussed.

  16. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. Both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging. PMID:27149617

  17. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1987-10-07

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  18. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1990-10-09

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  19. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Moyzis, Robert K.; Ratliff, Robert L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Stewart, Carleton C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed.

  20. Multiple Base Substitution Corrections in DNA Sequence Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczuk, M.; Mackiewicz, P.; Szczepanik, D.; Nowicka, A.; Dudkiewicz, M.; Dudek, M. R.; Cebrat, S.

    We discuss the Jukes and Cantor's one-parameter model and Kimura's two-parameter model unability to describe evolution of asymmetric DNA molecules. The standard distance measure between two DNA sequences, which is the number of substitutions per site, should include the effect of multiple base substitutions separately for each type of the base. Otherwise, the respective tables of substitutions cannot reconstruct the asymmetric DNA molecule with respect to the composition. Basing on Kimura's neutral theory, we have derived a linear law for the correlation of the mean survival time of nucleotides under constant mutation pressure and their fraction in the genome. According to the law, the corrections to Kimura's theory have been discussed to describe evolution of genomes with asymmetric nucleotide composition. We consider the particular case of the strongly asymmetric Borrelia burgdorferi genome and we discuss in detail the corrections, which should be introduced into the distance measure between two DNA sequences to include multiple base substitutions.

  1. Next Generation DNA Sequencing and the Future of Genomic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew W.; Schrijver, Iris

    2010-01-01

    In the years since the first complete human genome sequence was reported, there has been a rapid development of technologies to facilitate high-throughput sequence analysis of DNA (termed “next-generation” sequencing). These novel approaches to DNA sequencing offer the promise of complete genomic analysis at a cost feasible for routine clinical diagnostics. However, the ability to more thoroughly interrogate genomic sequence raises a number of important issues with regard to result interpretation, laboratory workflow, data storage, and ethical considerations. This review describes the current high-throughput sequencing platforms commercially available, and compares the inherent advantages and disadvantages of each. The potential applications for clinical diagnostics are considered, as well as the need for software and analysis tools to interpret the vast amount of data generated. Finally, we discuss the clinical and ethical implications of the wealth of genetic information generated by these methods. Despite the challenges, we anticipate that the evolution and refinement of high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies will catalyze a new era of personalized medicine based on individualized genomic analysis. PMID:24710010

  2. Ancient mtDNA sequences from the First Australians revisited

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankar; Wright, Joanne L.; Endicott, Phillip; Westaway, Michael Carrington; Huynen, Leon; Parson, Walther; Millar, Craig D.; Willerslev, Eske; Lambert, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The publication in 2001 by Adcock et al. [Adcock GJ, et al. (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98(2):537–542] in PNAS reported the recovery of short mtDNA sequences from ancient Australians, including the 42,000-y-old Mungo Man [Willandra Lakes Hominid (WLH3)]. This landmark study in human ancient DNA suggested that an early modern human mitochondrial lineage emerged in Asia and that the theory of modern human origins could no longer be considered solely through the lens of the “Out of Africa” model. To evaluate these claims, we used second generation DNA sequencing and capture methods as well as PCR-based and single-primer extension (SPEX) approaches to reexamine the same four Willandra Lakes and Kow Swamp 8 (KS8) remains studied in the work by Adcock et al. Two of the remains sampled contained no identifiable human DNA (WLH15 and WLH55), whereas the Mungo Man (WLH3) sample contained no Aboriginal Australian DNA. KS8 reveals human mitochondrial sequences that differ from the previously inferred sequence. Instead, we recover a total of five modern European contaminants from Mungo Man (WLH3). We show that the remaining sample (WLH4) contains ∼1.4% human DNA, from which we assembled two complete mitochondrial genomes. One of these was a previously unidentified Aboriginal Australian haplotype belonging to haplogroup S2 that we sequenced to a high coverage. The other was a contaminating modern European mitochondrial haplotype. Although none of the sequences that we recovered matched those reported by Adcock et al., except a contaminant, these findings show the feasibility of obtaining important information from ancient Aboriginal Australian remains. PMID:27274055

  3. Ancient mtDNA sequences from the First Australians revisited.

    PubMed

    Heupink, Tim H; Subramanian, Sankar; Wright, Joanne L; Endicott, Phillip; Westaway, Michael Carrington; Huynen, Leon; Parson, Walther; Millar, Craig D; Willerslev, Eske; Lambert, David M

    2016-06-21

    The publication in 2001 by Adcock et al. [Adcock GJ, et al. (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98(2):537-542] in PNAS reported the recovery of short mtDNA sequences from ancient Australians, including the 42,000-y-old Mungo Man [Willandra Lakes Hominid (WLH3)]. This landmark study in human ancient DNA suggested that an early modern human mitochondrial lineage emerged in Asia and that the theory of modern human origins could no longer be considered solely through the lens of the "Out of Africa" model. To evaluate these claims, we used second generation DNA sequencing and capture methods as well as PCR-based and single-primer extension (SPEX) approaches to reexamine the same four Willandra Lakes and Kow Swamp 8 (KS8) remains studied in the work by Adcock et al. Two of the remains sampled contained no identifiable human DNA (WLH15 and WLH55), whereas the Mungo Man (WLH3) sample contained no Aboriginal Australian DNA. KS8 reveals human mitochondrial sequences that differ from the previously inferred sequence. Instead, we recover a total of five modern European contaminants from Mungo Man (WLH3). We show that the remaining sample (WLH4) contains ∼1.4% human DNA, from which we assembled two complete mitochondrial genomes. One of these was a previously unidentified Aboriginal Australian haplotype belonging to haplogroup S2 that we sequenced to a high coverage. The other was a contaminating modern European mitochondrial haplotype. Although none of the sequences that we recovered matched those reported by Adcock et al., except a contaminant, these findings show the feasibility of obtaining important information from ancient Aboriginal Australian remains.

  4. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  5. Partial sequencing of a single DNA molecule with a scanning tunnelling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Tomoji

    2009-08-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope is capable of the real-space imaging and spectroscopy of molecules on an atomic scale. Numerous attempts have been made to use the scanning tunnelling microscope to sequence single DNA molecules, but difficulties in preparing samples of long-chain DNA molecules on surfaces, and problems in reproducing results have limited these experiments. Here, we report single-molecule DNA sequencing with a scanning tunnelling microscope by using an oblique pulse-injection method to deposit the molecules onto a copper surface. First, we show that guanine bases have a distinct electronic state that allows them to be distinguished from the other nucleic acid bases. Then, by comparing data on M13mp18, a single-stranded phage DNA, with a known base sequence, the `electronic fingerprint' of guanine bases in the DNA molecule is identified. These results show that it is possible to sequence individual guanine bases in real long-chain DNA molecules with high-resolution scanning tunnelling microscope imaging and spectroscopy.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA sequences from a 7000-year old brain.

    PubMed Central

    Pääbo, S; Gifford, J A; Wilson, A C

    1988-01-01

    Pieces of mitochondrial DNA from a 7000-year-old human brain were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Albumin and high concentrations of polymerase were required to overcome a factor in the brain extract that inhibits amplification. For this and other sources of ancient DNA, we find an extreme inverse dependence of the amplification efficiency on the length of the sequence to be amplified. This property of ancient DNA distinguishes it from modern DNA and thus provides a new criterion of authenticity for use in research on ancient DNA. The brain is from an individual recently excavated from Little Salt Spring in southwestern Florida and the anthropologically informative sequences it yielded are the first obtained from archaeologically retrieved remains. The sequences show that this ancient individual belonged to a mitochondrial lineage that is rare in the Old World and not previously known to exist among Native Americans. Our finding brings to three the number of maternal lineages known to have been involved in the prehistoric colonization of the New World. Images PMID:3186445

  7. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  8. Preparation of next-generation sequencing libraries from damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Adrian W; Heyn, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized ancient DNA research, especially when combined with high-throughput target enrichment methods. However, attaining high sequencing depth and accuracy from samples often remains problematic due to the damaged state of ancient DNA, in particular the extremely low copy number of ancient DNA and the abundance of uracil residues derived from cytosine deamination that lead to miscoding errors. It is therefore critical to use a highly efficient procedure for conversion of a raw DNA extract into an adaptor-ligated sequencing library, and equally important to reduce errors from uracil residues. We present a protocol for NGS library preparation that allows highly efficient conversion of DNA fragments into an adaptor-ligated form. The protocol incorporates an option to remove the vast majority of uracil miscoding lesions as part of the library preparation process. The procedure requires only two spin column purification steps and no gel purification or bead handling. Starting from an aliquot of DNA extract, a finished, highly amplified library can be generated in 5 h, or under 3 h if uracil removal is not required.

  9. Isolation of a sex-linked DNA sequence in cranes.

    PubMed

    Duan, W; Fuerst, P A

    2001-01-01

    A female-specific DNA fragment (CSL-W; crane sex-linked DNA on W chromosome) was cloned from female whooping cranes (Grus americana). From the nucleotide sequence of CSL-W, a set of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers was identified which amplify a 227-230 bp female-specific fragment from all existing crane species and some other noncrane species. A duplicated versions of the DNA segment, which is found to have a larger size (231-235 bp) than CSL-W in both sexes, was also identified, and was designated CSL-NW (crane sex-linked DNA on non-W chromosome). The nucleotide similarity between the sequences of CSL-W and CSL-NW from whooping cranes was 86.3%. The CSL primers do not amplify any sequence from mammalian DNA, limiting the potential for contamination from human sources. Using the CSL primers in combination with a quick DNA extraction method allows the noninvasive identification of crane gender in less than 10 h. A test of the methodology was carried out on fully developed body feathers from 18 captive cranes and resulted in 100% successful identification.

  10. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  11. Bayesian estimation of sequence damage in ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simon Y W; Heupink, Tim H; Rambaut, Andrew; Shapiro, Beth

    2007-06-01

    DNA extracted from archaeological and paleontological remains is usually damaged by biochemical processes postmortem. Some of these processes lead to changes in the structure of the DNA molecule, which can result in the incorporation of incorrect nucleotides during polymerase chain reaction. These base misincorporations, or miscoding lesions, can lead to the inclusion of spurious additional mutations in ancient DNA (aDNA) data sets. This has the potential to affect the outcome of phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, including estimates of mutation rates and genetic diversity. We present a novel model, termed the delta model, which estimates the amount of damage in DNA data and accounts for its effects in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. The ability of the delta model to estimate damage is first investigated using a simulation study. The model is then applied to 13 aDNA data sets. The amount of damage in these data sets is shown to be significant but low (about 1 damaged base per 750 nt), suggesting that precautions for limiting the influence of damaged sites, such as cloning and enzymatic treatment, are worthwhile. The results also suggest that relatively high rates of mutation previously estimated from aDNA data are not entirely an artifact of sequence damage and are likely to be due to other factors such as the persistence of transient polymorphisms. The delta model appears to be particularly useful for placing upper credibility limits on the amount of sequence damage in an alignment, and this capacity might be beneficial for future aDNA studies or for the estimation of sequencing errors in modern DNA.

  12. Real-time DNA sequencing from single polymerase molecules.

    PubMed

    Eid, John; Fehr, Adrian; Gray, Jeremy; Luong, Khai; Lyle, John; Otto, Geoff; Peluso, Paul; Rank, David; Baybayan, Primo; Bettman, Brad; Bibillo, Arkadiusz; Bjornson, Keith; Chaudhuri, Bidhan; Christians, Frederick; Cicero, Ronald; Clark, Sonya; Dalal, Ravindra; Dewinter, Alex; Dixon, John; Foquet, Mathieu; Gaertner, Alfred; Hardenbol, Paul; Heiner, Cheryl; Hester, Kevin; Holden, David; Kearns, Gregory; Kong, Xiangxu; Kuse, Ronald; Lacroix, Yves; Lin, Steven; Lundquist, Paul; Ma, Congcong; Marks, Patrick; Maxham, Mark; Murphy, Devon; Park, Insil; Pham, Thang; Phillips, Michael; Roy, Joy; Sebra, Robert; Shen, Gene; Sorenson, Jon; Tomaney, Austin; Travers, Kevin; Trulson, Mark; Vieceli, John; Wegener, Jeffrey; Wu, Dawn; Yang, Alicia; Zaccarin, Denis; Zhao, Peter; Zhong, Frank; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen

    2009-01-02

    We present single-molecule, real-time sequencing data obtained from a DNA polymerase performing uninterrupted template-directed synthesis using four distinguishable fluorescently labeled deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). We detected the temporal order of their enzymatic incorporation into a growing DNA strand with zero-mode waveguide nanostructure arrays, which provide optical observation volume confinement and enable parallel, simultaneous detection of thousands of single-molecule sequencing reactions. Conjugation of fluorophores to the terminal phosphate moiety of the dNTPs allows continuous observation of DNA synthesis over thousands of bases without steric hindrance. The data report directly on polymerase dynamics, revealing distinct polymerization states and pause sites corresponding to DNA secondary structure. Sequence data were aligned with the known reference sequence to assay biophysical parameters of polymerization for each template position. Consensus sequences were generated from the single-molecule reads at 15-fold coverage, showing a median accuracy of 99.3%, with no systematic error beyond fluorophore-dependent error rates.

  13. RNA–DNA sequence differences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Isabel X.; Grunseich, Christopher; Chung, Youree G.; Kwak, Hojoong; Ramrattan, Girish; Zhu, Zhengwei; Cheung, Vivian G.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of RNA sequences and structures, such as those from editing and alternative splicing, result in two or more RNA transcripts from a DNA template. It was thought that in yeast, RNA editing only occurs in tRNAs. Here, we found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae have all 12 types of RNA–DNA sequence differences (RDDs) in the mRNA. We showed these sequence differences are propagated to proteins, as we identified peptides encoded by the RNA sequences in addition to those by the DNA sequences at RDD sites. RDDs are significantly enriched at regions with R-loops. A screen of yeast mutants showed that RDD formation is affected by mutations in genes regulating R-loops. Loss-of-function mutations in ribonuclease H, senataxin, and topoisomerase I that resolve RNA–DNA hybrids lead to increases in RDD frequency. Our results demonstrate that RDD is a conserved process that diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and provide a mechanistic link between R-loops and RDDs. PMID:27638543

  14. Reduced-stringency DNA reassociation: sequence specific duplex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Burr, H E; Schimke, R T

    1982-01-01

    Reduced-stringency DNA reassociation conditions allow low stability duplexes to be detected in prokaryotic, plant, fish, avian, mammalian, and primate genomes. Highly diverged families of sequences can be detected in avian, mouse, and human unique sequence dNAs. Such a family has been described among twelve species of birds; based on species specific melting profiles and fractionation of sequences belonging to this family, it was concluded that permissive reassociation conditions did not artifactually produce low stability structures (1). We report S1 nuclease and optical melting experiments, and further fractionation of the diverged family to confirm sequence specific DNA reassociation at 50 degrees in 0.5 M phosphate buffer. PMID:6278429

  15. Identification of Bacterial Species in Kuwaiti Waters Through DNA Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.

    2017-01-01

    With an objective of identifying the bacterial diversity associated with ecosystem of various Kuwaiti Seas, bacteria were cultured and isolated from 3 water samples. Due to the difficulties for cultured and isolated fecal coliforms on the selective agar plates, bacterial isolates from marine agar plates were selected for molecular identification. 16S rRNA genes were successfully amplified from the genome of the selected isolates using Universal Eubacterial 16S rRNA primers. The resulted amplification products were subjected to automated DNA sequencing. Partial 16S rDNA sequences obtained were compared directly with sequences in the NCBI database using BLAST as well as with the sequences available with Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

  16. An optimization approach and its application to compare DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liwei; Li, Chao; Bai, Fenglan; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Ying

    2015-02-01

    Studying the evolutionary relationship between biological sequences has become one of the main tasks in bioinformatics research by means of comparing and analyzing the gene sequence. Many valid methods have been applied to the DNA sequence alignment. In this paper, we propose a novel comparing method based on the Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity to compare biological sequences. Moreover, we introduce a new distance measure and make use of the corresponding similarity matrix to construct phylogenic tree without multiple sequence alignment. Further, we construct phylogenic tree for 24 species of Eutherian mammals and 48 countries of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) by an optimization approach. The results indicate that this new method improves the efficiency of sequence comparison and successfully construct phylogenies.

  17. Contrasting DNA sequence organisation patterns in sauropsidian genomes.

    PubMed

    Epplen, J T; Diedrich, U; Wagenmann, M; Schmidtke, J; Engel, W

    1979-11-01

    The genomic DNA organisation patterns of four sauropsidian species, namely Python reticularis, Caiman crocodilus, Terrapene carolina triungius and Columba livia domestica were investigated by reassociation of short and long DNA fragments, by hyperchromicity measurements of reannealed fragments and by length estimations of S1-nuclease resistant repetitive duplexes. While the genomic DNA of the three reptilian species shows a short period interspersion pattern, the genome of the avian species is organised in a long period interspersion pattern apparently typical for birds. These findings are discussed in view of the close phylogenetic relationships of birds and reptiles, and also with regard to a possible relationship between the extent of sequence interspersion and genome size.

  18. Base-sequence-dependent sliding of proteins on DNA.

    PubMed

    Barbi, M; Place, C; Popkov, V; Salerno, M

    2004-10-01

    The possibility that the sliding motion of proteins on DNA is influenced by the base sequence through a base pair reading interaction, is considered. Referring to the case of the T7 RNA-polymerase, we show that the protein should follow a noise-influenced sequence-dependent motion which deviate from the standard random walk usually assumed. The general validity and the implications of the results are discussed.

  19. Feature Extraction From DNA Sequences by Multifractal Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    genome may lead to an under- standing of the genome and to the understanding of life. Recently a draft sequence of the human genome ...which covers 96% of the entire human genome containing base pairs, has been published by the Human Genome Project (HGP) and Celera Genomics . However...time series model based on the global structure of the complete genome , and showed long-range correlations in the bacteria DNA sequences . Although

  20. Cloning and sequence of DNA encoding structural proteins of the autonomous parvovirus feline panleukopenia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, J; Rushlow, K; Maxwell, I; Maxwell, F; Winston, S; Hahn, W

    1985-01-01

    Approximately 80% of the genome of feline panleukopenia virus was cloned into pBR322. This DNA included the transcription unit for the major viral mRNA species. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned portion of the genome was determined. Comparison of the feline panleukopenia virus sequence with the sequences of the parvoviruses minute virus of mice and H-1 revealed considerable homology between the three viruses on both the nucleic acid and protein levels. Based on this homology, a model for the generation of the two size classes of viral structural proteins (VP1 and VP2') is proposed. Images PMID:2991581

  1. Alignments of DNA and protein sequences containing frameshift errors.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Uberbacher, E C

    1996-02-01

    Molecular sequences, like all experimental data, are subject to error. Many current DNA sequencing protocols have very significant error rates and often generate artefactual insertions and deletions of bases (indels) which corrupt the translation of sequences and compromise the detection of protein homologies. The impact of these errors on the utility of molecular sequence data is dependent on the analytic technique used to interpret the data. In the presence of frameshift errors, standard algorithms using six-frame translation can miss important homologies because only subfragments of the correct translation are available in any given frame. We present a new algorithm which can detect and correct frameshift errors in DNA sequences during comparison of translated sequences with protein sequences in the databases. This algorithm can recognize homologous proteins sharing 30% identity even in the presence of a 7% frameshift error rate. Our algorithm uses dynamic programming, producing a guaranteed optimal alignment in the presence of frameshifts, and has a sensitivity equivalent to Smith-Waterman. The computational efficiency of the algorithm is O(nm) where n and m are the sizes of two sequences being compared. The algorithm does not rely on prior knowledge or heuristic rules and performs significantly better than any previously reported method.

  2. Sequence dependence of electron-induced DNA strand breakage revealed by DNA nanoarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Adrian; Rackwitz, Jenny; Cauët, Emilie; Liévin, Jacques; Körzdörfer, Thomas; Rotaru, Alexandru; Gothelf, Kurt V.; Besenbacher, Flemming; Bald, Ilko

    2014-12-01

    The electronic structure of DNA is determined by its nucleotide sequence, which is for instance exploited in molecular electronics. Here we demonstrate that also the DNA strand breakage induced by low-energy electrons (18 eV) depends on the nucleotide sequence. To determine the absolute cross sections for electron induced single strand breaks in specific 13 mer oligonucleotides we used atomic force microscopy analysis of DNA origami based DNA nanoarrays. We investigated the DNA sequences 5'-TT(XYX)3TT with X = A, G, C and Y = T, BrU 5-bromouracil and found absolute strand break cross sections between 2.66 . 10-14 cm2 and 7.06 . 10-14 cm2. The highest cross section was found for 5'-TT(ATA)3TT and 5'-TT(ABrUA)3TT, respectively. BrU is a radiosensitizer, which was discussed to be used in cancer radiation therapy. The replacement of T by BrU into the investigated DNA sequences leads to a slight increase of the absolute strand break cross sections resulting in sequence-dependent enhancement factors between 1.14 and 1.66. Nevertheless, the variation of strand break cross sections due to the specific nucleotide sequence is considerably higher. Thus, the present results suggest the development of targeted radiosensitizers for cancer radiation therapy.

  3. Sequence dependence of electron-induced DNA strand breakage revealed by DNA nanoarrays

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Adrian; Rackwitz, Jenny; Cauët, Emilie; Liévin, Jacques; Körzdörfer, Thomas; Rotaru, Alexandru; Gothelf, Kurt V.; Besenbacher, Flemming; Bald, Ilko

    2014-01-01

    The electronic structure of DNA is determined by its nucleotide sequence, which is for instance exploited in molecular electronics. Here we demonstrate that also the DNA strand breakage induced by low-energy electrons (18 eV) depends on the nucleotide sequence. To determine the absolute cross sections for electron induced single strand breaks in specific 13 mer oligonucleotides we used atomic force microscopy analysis of DNA origami based DNA nanoarrays. We investigated the DNA sequences 5′-TT(XYX)3TT with X = A, G, C and Y = T, BrU 5-bromouracil and found absolute strand break cross sections between 2.66 · 10−14 cm2 and 7.06 · 10−14 cm2. The highest cross section was found for 5′-TT(ATA)3TT and 5′-TT(ABrUA)3TT, respectively. BrU is a radiosensitizer, which was discussed to be used in cancer radiation therapy. The replacement of T by BrU into the investigated DNA sequences leads to a slight increase of the absolute strand break cross sections resulting in sequence-dependent enhancement factors between 1.14 and 1.66. Nevertheless, the variation of strand break cross sections due to the specific nucleotide sequence is considerably higher. Thus, the present results suggest the development of targeted radiosensitizers for cancer radiation therapy. PMID:25487346

  4. Investigation of a Sybr-Green-Based Method to Validate DNA Sequences for DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    stranded DNA . We previously demonstrated that this technique can be exploited to distinguish between stably-hybridized Watson - Crick duplexes and...et al., 2004) we described the difference between the canonical Watson - Crick base pairs of DNA and the usually less stable mismatches that can also...computing, cross-hybridized duplexes represent errors. It is therefore crucial that DNA sequences be designed so that the formation of a Watson - Crick

  5. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in the Arctoidea.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y P; Ryder, O A

    1993-01-01

    Some taxa in the superfamily Arctoidea, such as the giant panda and the lesser panda, have presented puzzles to taxonomists. In the present study, approximately 397 bases of the cytochrome b gene, 364 bases of the 12S rRNA gene, and 74 bases of the tRNA(Thr) and tRNA(Pro) genes from the giant panda, lesser panda, kinkajou, raccoon, coatimundi, and all species of the Ursidae were sequenced. The high transition/transversion ratios in cytochrome b and RNA genes prior to saturation suggest that the presumed transition bias may represent a trend for some mammalian lineages rather than strictly a primate phenomenon. Transversions in the 12S rRNA gene accumulate in arctoids at about half the rate reported for artiodactyls. Different arctoid lineages evolve at different rates: the kinkajou, a procyonid, evolves the fastest, 1.7-1.9 times faster than the slowest lineage that comprises the spectacled and polar bears. Generation-time effect can only partially explain the different rates of nucleotide substitution in arctoids. Our results based on parsimony analysis show that the giant panda is more closely related to bears than to the lesser panda; the lesser panda is neither closely related to bears nor to the New World procyonids. The kinkajou, raccoon, and coatimundi diverged from each other very early, even though they group together. The polar bear is closely related to the spectacled bear, and they began to diverge from a common mitochondrial ancestor approximately 2 million years ago. Relationships of the remaining five bear species are derived. PMID:8415740

  6. A prediction of the amino acids and structures involved in DNA recognition by type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, S S; Dryden, D T

    1997-01-01

    The S subunits of type I DNA restriction/modification enzymes are responsible for recognising the DNA target sequence for the enzyme. They contain two domains of approximately 150 amino acids, each of which is responsible for recognising one half of the bipartite asymmetric target. In the absence of any known tertiary structure for type I enzymes or recognisable DNA recognition motifs in the highly variable amino acid sequences of the S subunits, it has previously not been possible to predict which amino acids are responsible for sequence recognition. Using a combination of sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction methods to analyse the sequences of S subunits, we predict that all of the 51 known target recognition domains (TRDs) have the same tertiary structure. Furthermore, this structure is similar to the structure of the TRD of the C5-cytosine methyltransferase, Hha I, which recognises its DNA target via interactions with two short polypeptide loops and a beta strand. Our results predict the location of these sequence recognition structures within the TRDs of all type I S subunits. PMID:9254696

  7. Comparison of latent and nominal rabbit Ig VHa1 allotype cDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    McCormack, W T; Dhanarajan, P; Roux, K H

    1988-09-15

    The genetic basis for the expression of a latent VH allotype in the rabbit was investigated. VH region cDNA libraries were produced from spleen mRNA derived from a homozygous a2a2 rabbit expressing an induced latent VHa1 allotype and, for comparison, from a normal homozygus a1a1 rabbit expressing nominal VHa1 allotype. The deduced amino acid sequences of the nominal VHa1 cDNA were concordant with previously published VHa1 protein sequences. A comparison of two complete VH-DH-JH and six partial VHa1 sequences reveals highly conserved sequence within VH framework regions (FR) and considerable diversity in complementarity-determining regions and D region sequences. Two functional JH genes or alleles are evident. Amino acid sequencing of the N-terminal 15 residues of pooled affinity-purified latent VHa1 H chain showed complete sequence identity with the nominal VHa1 sequences. Possible latent VHa1-encoding cDNA clones, derived from the a2a2 rabbit, were selected by hybridization with oligonucleotide probes corresponding to the VHa1 allotype-associated segments of the first and third framework regions (FR1 and FR3). cDNA sequence analysis reveals that the 5' untranslated regions of nominal and latent VHa1 cDNA were virtually identical to each other and to previously reported sequences associated with VHa2 and VHa-negative genes. Moreover, some latent VHa1 genes encode FR1 segments that are essentially homologous to the corresponding segment of a nominal VHa1 allotype. In contrast, other putative latent genes display blocks of VHa1 sequence in either FR1 or FR3 that are flanked by blocks of sequence identical to other rabbit VH genes (i.e., VHa2 or VHa-negative). These composite sequences may be directly encoded by composite germ-line VH genes or may be the products of somatically generated recombination or gene conversion between genes encoding latent and nominal allotypes. The data do not support the hypothesis that latent genes are the result of extensive modification

  8. Compilation and analysis of Escherichia coli promoter DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, D K; McClure, W R

    1983-01-01

    The DNA sequence of 168 promoter regions (-50 to +10) for Escherichia coli RNA polymerase were compiled. The complete listing was divided into two groups depending upon whether or not the promoter had been defined by genetic (promoter mutations) or biochemical (5' end determination) criteria. A consensus promoter sequence based on homologies among 112 well-defined promoters was determined that was in substantial agreement with previous compilations. In addition, we have tabulated 98 promoter mutations. Nearly all of the altered base pairs in the mutants conform to the following general rule: down-mutations decrease homology and up-mutations increase homology to the consensus sequence. PMID:6344016

  9. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding partial putative molt-inhibiting hormone from Penaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zai-Zhao; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2002-09-01

    Total RNA was extracted from eyestalks of shrimp Penaeus chinensis. Eyestalk cDNA was obtained from total RNA by reverse transcription. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was initiated using eyestalk cDNA and degenerate primers designed from the amino acid sequence of molt-inhibiting hormone from shrimp Penaeus japonicus. A specific cDNA was obtained and cloned into a T vector for sequencing. The cDNA consisted of 201 base pairs and encoding for a peptide of 67 amino acid residues. The peptide of P. chinensis had the highest identity with molt-inhibiting hormones of P. japonicus. The cDNA could be a partial gene of molt-inhibiting hormones from P. chinensis. This paper reports for the first time cDNA encoding for neuropeptide of P. chinensis.

  10. Effect of Noise on DNA Sequencing via Transverse Electronic Transport

    PubMed Central

    Krems, Matt; Zwolak, Michael; Pershin, Yuriy V.; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Previous theoretical studies have shown that measuring the transverse current across DNA strands while they translocate through a nanopore or channel may provide a statistically distinguishable signature of the DNA bases, and may thus allow for rapid DNA sequencing. However, fluctuations of the environment, such as ionic and DNA motion, introduce important scattering processes that may affect the viability of this approach to sequencing. To understand this issue, we have analyzed a simple model that captures the role of this complex environment in electronic dephasing and its ability to remove charge carriers from current-carrying states. We find that these effects do not strongly influence the current distributions due to the off-resonant nature of tunneling through the nucleotides—a result we expect to be a common feature of transport in molecular junctions. In particular, only large scattering strengths, as compared to the energetic gap between the molecular states and the Fermi level, significantly alter the form of the current distributions. Since this gap itself is quite large, the current distributions remain protected from this type of noise, further supporting the possibility of using transverse electronic transport measurements for DNA sequencing. PMID:19804730

  11. Light-generated oligonucleotide arrays for rapid DNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, A C; Solas, D; Sullivan, E J; Cronin, M T; Holmes, C P; Fodor, S P

    1994-01-01

    In many areas of molecular biology there is a need to rapidly extract and analyze genetic information; however, current technologies for DNA sequence analysis are slow and labor intensive. We report here how modern photolithographic techniques can be used to facilitate sequence analysis by generating miniaturized arrays of densely packed oligonucleotide probes. These probe arrays, or DNA chips, can then be applied to parallel DNA hybridization analysis, directly yielding sequence information. In a preliminary experiment, a 1.28 x 1.28 cm array of 256 different octanucleotides was produced in 16 chemical reaction cycles, requiring 4 hr to complete. The hybridization pattern of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide targets was then detected by epifluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence signals from complementary probes were 5-35 times stronger than those with single or double base-pair hybridization mismatches, demonstrating specificity in the identification of complementary sequences. This method should prove to be a powerful tool for rapid investigations in human genetics and diagnostics, pathogen detection, and DNA molecular recognition. Images PMID:8197176

  12. Generalized Levy-walk model for DNA nucleotide sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1993-01-01

    We propose a generalized Levy walk to model fractal landscapes observed in noncoding DNA sequences. We find that this model provides a very close approximation to the empirical data and explains a number of statistical properties of genomic DNA sequences such as the distribution of strand-biased regions (those with an excess of one type of nucleotide) as well as local changes in the slope of the correlation exponent alpha. The generalized Levy-walk model simultaneously accounts for the long-range correlations in noncoding DNA sequences and for the apparently paradoxical finding of long subregions of biased random walks (length lj) within these correlated sequences. In the generalized Levy-walk model, the lj are chosen from a power-law distribution P(lj) varies as lj(-mu). The correlation exponent alpha is related to mu through alpha = 2-mu/2 if 2 < mu < 3. The model is consistent with the finding of "repetitive elements" of variable length interspersed within noncoding DNA.

  13. DNA methylation mapping by tag-modified bisulfite genomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Han, Weiguo; Cauchi, Stephane; Herman, James G; Spivack, Simon D

    2006-08-01

    A tag-modified bisulfite genomic sequencing (tBGS) method employing direct cycle sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products at kilobase scale, without conventional DNA fragment cloning, was developed for simplified evaluation of DNA methylation sites. The method entails subjecting bisulfite-modified genomic DNA to a second-round PCR amplification employing GC-tagged primers. Qualitative results from tBGS closely correlated with those from conventional BGS (R=0.935, p=0.002). In application, the intertissue and interindividual CpG methylation differences in promoter sequence for two genes, CYP1B1 and GSTP1, were then explored across four human tissue types (peripheral blood cells, exfoliated buccal cells, paired nontumor-tumor lung tissues), and two lung cell types in culture (normal NHBE and malignant A549). Predominantly conserved methylation maps for the two gene promoters were apparent across donors and tissues. At any given CpG site, variation in the degree of methylation could be determined by the relative height of C and T peaks in the sequencing trace. Methylation maps for the GSTP1 promoter diverged between NHBE (unmethylated) and A549 (completely methylated) cells in a previously unexplored upstream region, correlating with a 2.7-fold difference in GSTP1 mRNA expression (p<0.01). The tBGS method simplifies detailed methylation scanning of kilobase-scale genomic DNA, facilitating more ambitious genomic methylation mapping studies.

  14. Decoding long nanopore sequencing reads of natural DNA.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Andrew H; Derrington, Ian M; Ross, Brian C; Brinkerhoff, Henry; Adey, Andrew; Nova, Ian C; Craig, Jonathan M; Langford, Kyle W; Samson, Jenny Mae; Daza, Riza; Doering, Kenji; Shendure, Jay; Gundlach, Jens H

    2014-08-01

    Nanopore sequencing of DNA is a single-molecule technique that may achieve long reads, low cost and high speed with minimal sample preparation and instrumentation. Here, we build on recent progress with respect to nanopore resolution and DNA control to interpret the procession of ion current levels observed during the translocation of DNA through the pore MspA. As approximately four nucleotides affect the ion current of each level, we measured the ion current corresponding to all 256 four-nucleotide combinations (quadromers). This quadromer map is highly predictive of ion current levels of previously unmeasured sequences derived from the bacteriophage phi X 174 genome. Furthermore, we show nanopore sequencing reads of phi X 174 up to 4,500 bases in length, which can be unambiguously aligned to the phi X 174 reference genome, and demonstrate proof-of-concept utility with respect to hybrid genome assembly and polymorphism detection. This work provides a foundation for nanopore sequencing of long, natural DNA strands.

  15. Derivatized versions of ligase enzymes for constructing DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Christian, Allen T.; Tucker, James D.; Dzenitis, John M.; Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.

    2006-08-15

    A method of making very long, double-stranded synthetic poly-nucleotides. A multiplicity of short oligonucleotides is provided. The short oligonucleotides are sequentially hybridized to each other. Enzymatic ligation of the oligonucleotides provides a contiguous piece of PCR-ready DNA of predetermined sequence.

  16. Probing the linearity and nonlinearity in DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsonis, Anastasios A.; Heller, Fred L.; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.

    2002-09-01

    In this paper, we apply the principles of information theory that relate to the definition of nonlinear predictability, which is a measure that describes both the linear and nonlinear components of a system. By comparing this measure to a measure of linear predictability, one can assess whether a given system has a strong linear or a strong nonlinear component. This provides insights as to whether the system should be modeled by a nonlinear or a linear model. We apply these ideas to DNA sequences. Our results, which extend previous results on this issue indicate that all DNA sequences (coding and noncoding) exhibit strong nonlinear structure. At the same time the results provide insights to understand DNA structure and possible clues about evolutionary mechanisms.

  17. Electronic density of states in sequence dependent DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, B. P. W.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.

    2006-09-01

    We report in this work a numerical study of the electronic density of states (DOS) in π-stacked arrays of DNA single-strand segments made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T, forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) as well as a Fibonacci (FB) polyGC quasiperiodic sequences. Both structures are constructed starting from a G nucleotide as seed and following their respective inflation rules. Our theoretical method uses Dyson's equation together with a transfer-matrix treatment, within an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model, suitable to describe the DNA segments modelled by the quasiperiodic chains. We compared the DOS spectra found for the quasiperiodic structure to those using a sequence of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22, with a remarkable concordance, as far as the RS structure is concerned. The electronic spectrum shows several peaks, corresponding to localized states, as well as a striking self-similar aspect.

  18. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-12-01

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  19. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-12-28

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  20. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  1. A blind testing design for authenticating ancient DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Golenberg, E M; Shoshani, J

    1997-04-01

    Reproducibility is a serious concern among researchers of ancient DNA. We designed a blind testing procedure to evaluate laboratory accuracy and authenticity of ancient DNA obtained from closely related extant and extinct species. Soft tissue and bones of fossil and contemporary museum proboscideans were collected and identified based on morphology by one researcher, and other researchers carried out DNA testing on the samples, which were assigned anonymous numbers. DNA extracted using three principal isolation methods served as template in PCR amplifications of a segment of the cytochrome b gene (mitochondrial genome), and the PCR product was directly sequenced and analyzed. The results show that such a blind testing design performed in one laboratory, when coupled with phylogenetic analysis, can nonarbitrarily test the consistency and reliability of ancient DNA results. Such reproducible results obtained from the blind testing can increase confidence in the authenticity of ancient sequences obtained from postmortem specimens and avoid bias in phylogenetic analysis. A blind testing design may be applicable as an alternative to confirm ancient DNA results in one laboratory when independent testing by two laboratories is not available.

  2. Reiterated DNA sequences in Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, M; González, V; Brom, S; Martínez, E; Piñero, D; Romero, D; Dávila, G; Palacios, R

    1987-01-01

    Repeated DNA sequences are a general characteristic of eucaryotic genomes. Although several examples of DNA reiteration have been found in procaryotic organisms, only in the case of the archaebacteria Halobacterium halobium and Halobacterium volcanii [C. Sapienza and W. F. Doolittle, Nature (London) 295:384-389, 1982], has DNA reiteration been reported as a common genomic feature. The genomes of two Rhizobium phaseoli strains, one Rhizobium meliloti strain, and one Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain were analyzed for the presence of repetitive DNA. Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp. are closely related soil bacteria that interact with plants and that belong to the taxonomical family Rhizobiaceae. Rhizobium species establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in the roots of legumes, whereas Agrobacterium species is a pathogen in different plants. The four strains revealed a large number of repeated DNA sequences. The family size was usually small, from 2 to 5 elements, but some presented more than 10 elements. Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp. contain large plasmids in addition to the chromosomes. Analysis of the two Rhizobium strains indicated that DNA reiteration is not confined to the chromosome or to some plasmids but is a property of the whole genome. Images PMID:3450286

  3. Applying machine learning techniques to DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlik, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing a machine learning system that modifies existing knowledge about specific types of biological sequences. It does this by considering sample members and nonmembers of the sequence motif being learned. Using this information (which we call a domain theory''), our learning algorithm produces a more accurate representation of the knowledge needed to categorize future sequences. Specifically, the KBANN algorithm maps inference rules, such as consensus sequences, into a neural (connectionist) network. Neural network training techniques then use the training examples of refine these inference rules. We have been applying this approach to several problems in DNA sequence analysis and have also been extending the capabilities of our learning system along several dimensions.

  4. Applying machine learning techniques to DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlik, J.W. . Dept. of Computer Sciences); Noordewier, M.O. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1992-01-01

    We are primarily developing a machine teaming (ML) system that modifies existing knowledge about specific types of biological sequences. It does this by considering sample members and nonmembers of the sequence motif being teamed. Using this information, our teaming algorithm produces a more accurate representation of the knowledge needed to categorize future sequences. Specifically, our KBANN algorithm maps inference rules about a given recognition task into a neural network. Neural network training techniques then use the training examples to refine these inference rules. We call these rules a domain theory, following the convention in the machine teaming community. We have been applying this approach to several problems in DNA sequence analysis. In addition, we have been extending the capabilities of our teaming system along several dimensions. We have also been investigating parallel algorithms that perform sequence alignments in the presence of frameshift errors.

  5. Genomic localization, sequence analysis, and transcription of the putative human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; Jahn, G; Bürkle, A; Freese, U K; Fleckenstein, B; zur Hausen, H

    1987-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced DNA polymerase has been well characterized biochemically and functionally, but its genomic location has not yet been assigned. To identify the coding sequence, cross-hybridization with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) polymerase gene was used, as suggested by the close similarity of the herpes group virus-induced DNA polymerases to the HCMV DNA polymerase. A cosmid and plasmid library of the entire HCMV genome was screened with the BamHI Q fragment of HSV-1 at different stringency conditions. One PstI-HincII restriction fragment of 850 base pairs mapping within the EcoRI M fragment of HCMV cross-hybridized at Tm - 25 degrees C. Sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame spanning the entire sequence. The amino acid sequence showed a highly conserved domain of 133 amino acids shared with the HSV and putative Epstein-Barr virus polymerase sequences. This domain maps within the C-terminal part of the HSV polymerase gene, which has been suggested to contain part of the catalytic center of the enzyme. Transcription analysis revealed one 5.4-kilobase early transcript in the sense orientation with respect to the open reading frame identified. This transcript appears to code for the 140-kilodalton HCMV polymerase protein. Images PMID:3023689

  6. Genomic localization, sequence analysis, and transcription of the putative human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, T.; Jahn, G.; Buerkle, A.; Freese, U.K.; Fleckenstein, B.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced DNA polymerase has been well characterized biochemically and functionally, but its genomic location has not yet been assigned. To identify the coding sequence, cross-hybridization with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) polymerase gene was used, as suggested by the close similarity of the herpes group virus-induced DNA polymerases to the HCMV DNA polymerase. A cosmid and plasmid library of the entire HCMV genome was screened with the BamHI Q fragment of HSF-1 at different stringency conditions. One PstI-HincII restriction fragment of 850 base pairs mapping within the EcoRI M fragment of HCMV cross-hybridized at T/sub m/ - 25/degrees/C. Sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame spanning the entire sequence. The amino acid sequence showed a highly conserved domain of 133 amino acids shared with the HSV and putative Esptein-Barr virus polymerase sequences. This domain maps within the C-terminal part of the HSV polymerase gene, which has been suggested to contain part of the catalytic center of the enzyme. Transcription analysis revealed one 5.4-kilobase early transcript in the sense orientation with respect to the open reading frame identified. This transcript appears to code for the 140-kilodalton HCMV polymerase protein.

  7. Cloning, sequencing and analysis of dnaK -dnaJ gene cluster of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Bao, Fangming; Gong, Lei; Shao, Weilan

    2008-12-01

    The DNA fragment of heat shock genes (hrcA-grpE-dnaK-dnaJ) containing complete hrcA-grpE-dnaK operon and the transcription unit of dnaJ was cloned, sequensed and analyzed from Bacillus megaterium RF5. The sequence of hrcA, grpE and dnaJ were first time reported, and their coding products exibit 60%, 63% and 81% of identities to the homologs of B. subtilis. A sigmaA-type promoter of Gram-positive bacteria (PA1) and a terminator were located upstream of the hrcA and downstream of dnaK, and a Controlling inverted repeat of chaperone expression element (CIRCE) was identified between PA1 and hrcA. Another sigmaA-type promoter (PA2) and a terminator were found upstream and downstream of dnaJ, indicating B. megaterium has a transcription unit containing a single gene dnaJ. The structure of dnaJ transcription unit is more similar to that of Listeria monocytogenes than other species of Bacillus. A partial protein-based phylogenetic tree, derived from Gram-positive bacteria using HrcA sequence, indicated a closer phylogenetic relationship between B. megaterium and Geobacillus species than other two Bacillus species.

  8. Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Sphaeridiotrema pseudoglobulus (Digenea): Species Differentiation Based on mtDNA (Barcode) and Partial LSUrDNA Sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergmame, L.; Huffman, J.; Cole, R.; Dayanandan, S.; Tkach, V.; McLaughlin, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Flukes belonging to Sphaeridiotrema are important parasites of waterfowl, and 2 morphologically similar species Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Sphaeridiotrema pseudoglobulus, have been implicated in waterfowl mortality in North America. Cytochrome oxidase I (barcode region) and partial LSU-rDNA sequences from specimens of S. globulus and S. pseudoglobulus, obtained from naturally and experimentally infected hosts from New Jersey and Quebec, respectively, confirmed that these species were distinct. Barcode sequences of the 2 species differed at 92 of 590 nucleotide positions (15.6%) and the translated sequences differed by 13 amino acid residues. Partial LSU-rDNA sequences differed at 29 of 1,208 nucleotide positions (2.4%). Additional barcode sequences from specimens collected from waterfowl in Wisconsin and Minnesota and morphometric data obtained from specimens acquired along the north shore of Lake Superior revealed the presence of S. pseudoglobulus in these areas. Although morphometric data suggested the presence of S. globulus in the Lake Superior sample, it was not found among the specimens sequenced from Wisconsin or Minnesota. ?? 2011 American Society of Parasitologists.

  9. DNA sequence analysis using hierarchical ART-based classification networks

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, C.; Hruska, S.I.; Katholi, C.R.; Unnasch, T.R.

    1994-12-31

    Adaptive resonance theory (ART) describes a class of artificial neural network architectures that act as classification tools which self-organize, work in real-time, and require no retraining to classify novel sequences. We have adapted ART networks to provide support to scientists attempting to categorize tandem repeat DNA fragments from Onchocerca volvulus. In this approach, sequences of DNA fragments are presented to multiple ART-based networks which are linked together into two (or more) tiers; the first provides coarse sequence classification while the sub- sequent tiers refine the classifications as needed. The overall rating of the resulting classification of fragments is measured using statistical techniques based on those introduced to validate results from traditional phylogenetic analysis. Tests of the Hierarchical ART-based Classification Network, or HABclass network, indicate its value as a fast, easy-to-use classification tool which adapts to new data without retraining on previously classified data.

  10. Methyl-binding DNA capture Sequencing for Patient Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Rohit R.; Wang, Yao V.; Hsu, Ya-Ting; Liu, Joseph; Garcia, Dawn; Lai, Zhao; Huang, Tim H. M.; Jin, Victor X.

    2016-01-01

    Methylation is one of the essential epigenetic modifications to the DNA, which is responsible for the precise regulation of genes required for stable development and differentiation of different tissue types. Dysregulation of this process is often the hallmark of various diseases like cancer. Here, we outline one of the recent sequencing techniques, Methyl-Binding DNA Capture sequencing (MBDCap-seq), used to quantify methylation in various normal and disease tissues for large patient cohorts. We describe a detailed protocol of this affinity enrichment approach along with a bioinformatics pipeline to achieve optimal quantification. This technique has been used to sequence hundreds of patients across various cancer types as a part of the 1,000 methylome project (Cancer Methylome System). PMID:27842364

  11. Spectral sum rules and search for periodicities in DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechetkin, V. R.

    2011-04-01

    Periodic patterns play the important regulatory and structural roles in genomic DNA sequences. Commonly, the underlying periodicities should be understood in a broad statistical sense, since the corresponding periodic patterns have been strongly distorted by the random point mutations and insertions/deletions during molecular evolution. The latent periodicities in DNA sequences can be efficiently displayed by Fourier transform. The criteria of significance for observed periodicities are obtained via the comparison versus the counterpart characteristics of the reference random sequences. We show that the restrictions imposed on the significance criteria by the rigorous spectral sum rules can be rationally described with De Finetti distribution. This distribution provides the convenient intermediate asymptotic form between Rayleigh distribution and exact combinatoric theory.

  12. Detection of DNA sequence polymorphisms in human genomic DNA by using denaturing gradient gel blots

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis can detect sequence differences outside restriction-enzyme recognition sites. DNA sequence polymorphisms can be detected as restriction-fragment melting polymorphisms (RFMPs) in genomic DNA by using blots made from denaturing gradient gels. In contrast to the use of Southern blots to find sequence differences, denaturing gradient gel blots can detect differences almost anywhere, not just at 4-6-bp restriction-enzyme recognition sites. Human genomic DNA was digested with one of several randomly selected 4-bp recognition-site restriction enzymes, electrophoresed in denaturing gradient gels, and transferred to nylon membranes. The blots were hydridized with radioactive probes prepared from the factor VIII, type II collagen, insulin receptor, [beta][sub 2]-adrenergic receptor, and 21-hydroxylase genes; in unrelated individuals, several RFM's were found in fragments from every locus tested. No restriction map or sequence information was used to detect RFMP's.

  13. Chloroplast DNA Sequence Homologies among Vascular Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Lamppa, Gayle K.; Bendich, Arnold J.

    1979-01-01

    The extent of sequence conservation in the chloroplast genome of higher plants has been investigated. Supercoiled chloroplast DNA, prepared from pea seedlings, was labeled in vitro and used as a probe in reassociation experiments with a high concentration of total DNAs extracted from several angiosperms, gymnosperms, and lower vascular plants. In each case the probe reassociation was accelerated, demonstrating that some chloroplast sequences have been highly conserved throughout the evolution of vascular plants. Only among the flowering plants were distinct levels of cross-reaction with the pea chloroplast probe evident; broad bean and barley exhibited the highest and lowest levels, respectively. With the hydroxylapatite assay these levels decreased with a decrease in probe fragment length (from 1,860 to 735 bases), indicating that many conserved sequences in the chloroplast genome are separated by divergent sequences on a rather fine scale. Despite differences observed in levels of homology with the hydroxylapatite assay, S1 nuclease analysis of heteroduplexes showed that outside of the pea family the extent of sequence relatedness between the probe and various heterologous DNAs is approximately the same: 30%. In our interpretation, the fundamental changes in the chloroplast genome during angiosperm evolution involved the rearrangement of this 30% with respect to the more rapidly changing sequences of the genome. These rearrangements may have been more extensive in dicotyledons than in monocotyledons. We have estimated the amount of conserved and divergent DNA interspersed between one another. From the reassociation experiments, determinations were made of the percentage of chloroplast DNA in total DNA extracts from different higher plants; this value remained relatively constant when compared with the large variation in the diploid genome size of the plants. PMID:16660786

  14. Identification of parasite DNA in common bile duct stones by PCR and DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ji Sun; Kim, Kyung Ho; Yu, Jae-Ran

    2007-01-01

    We attempted to identify parasite DNA in the biliary stones of humans via PCR and DNA sequencing. Genomic DNA was isolated from each of 15 common bile duct (CBD) stones and 5 gallbladder (GB) stones. The patients who had the CBD stones suffered from cholangitis, and the patients with GB stones showed acute cholecystitis, respectively. The 28S and 18S rDNA genes were amplified successfully from 3 and/or 1 common bile duct stone samples, and then cloned and sequenced. The 28S and 18S rDNA sequences were highly conserved among isolates. Identity of the obtained 28S D1 rDNA with that of Clonorchis sinensis was higher than 97.6%, and identity of the 18S rDNA with that of other Ascarididae was 97.9%. Almost no intra-specific variations were detected in the 28S and 18S rDNA with the exception of a few nucleotide variations, i.e., substitution and deletion. These findings suggest that C. sinensis and Ascaris lumbricoides may be related with the biliary stone formation and development. PMID:18165713

  15. A DNA Sequence Recognition Loop on APOBEC3A Controls Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Dhuey, Erica; Zhang, Ruonan; Cao, Ping; Herate, Cecile; Chauveau, Lise; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2014-01-01

    APOBEC3A (A3A), one of the seven-member APOBEC3 family of cytidine deaminases, lacks strong antiviral activity against lentiviruses but is a potent inhibitor of adeno-associated virus and endogenous retroelements. In this report, we characterize the biochemical properties of mammalian cell-produced and catalytically active E. coli-produced A3A. The enzyme binds to single-stranded DNA with a Kd of 150 nM and forms dimeric and monomeric fractions. A3A, unlike APOBEC3G (A3G), deaminates DNA substrates nonprocessively. Using a panel of oligonucleotides that contained all possible trinucleotide contexts, we identified the preferred target sequence as TC (A/G). Based on a three-dimensional model of A3A, we identified a putative binding groove that contains residues with the potential to bind substrate DNA and to influence target sequence specificity. Taking advantage of the sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of A3G, we generated A3A/A3G chimeric proteins and analyzed their target site preference. We identified a recognition loop that altered A3A sequence specificity, broadening its target sequence preference. Mutation of amino acids in the predicted DNA binding groove prevented substrate binding, confirming the role of this groove in substrate binding. These findings shed light on how APOBEC3 proteins bind their substrate and determine which sites to deaminate. PMID:24827831

  16. Nucleotide sequence and the encoded amino acids of human apolipoprotein A-I mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Brewer, H B

    1984-01-01

    The cDNA clones encoding the precursor form of human liver apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), preproapoA-I, have been isolated from a cDNA library. A 17-base synthetic oligonucleotide based on residues 108-113 of apoA-I and a 26-base primer-extended, dideoxynucleotide-terminated cDNA were used as hybridization probes to select for recombinant plasmids bearing the apoA-I sequence. The complete nucleic acid sequence of human liver preproapoA-I has been determined by analysis of the cloned cDNA. The sequence is composed of 801 nucleotides encoding 267 amino acid residues. PreproapoA-I contains an 18-amino-acid prepeptide and a 6-amino-acid propeptide connected to the amino terminus of the 243-amino acid mature apoA-I. Southern blotting analysis of chromosomal DNA obtained from peripheral blood indicated the apoA-I gene is contained in a 2.1-kilobase-pair Pst I fragment and there is no gross difference in structural organization between the normal apoA-I gene and the Tangier disease apoA-I gene. Images PMID:6198645

  17. Detecting and Analyzing DNA Sequencing Errors: Toward a Higher Quality of the Bacillus subtilis Genome Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Médigue, Claudine; Rose, Matthias; Viari, Alain; Danchin, Antoine

    1999-01-01

    During the determination of a DNA sequence, the introduction of artifactual frameshifts and/or in-frame stop codons in putative genes can lead to misprediction of gene products. Detection of such errors with a method based on protein similarity matching is only possible when related sequences are available in databases. Here, we present a method to detect frameshift errors in DNA sequences that is based on the intrinsic properties of the coding sequences. It combines the results of two analyses, the search for translational initiation/termination sites and the prediction of coding regions. This method was used to screen the complete Bacillus subtilis genome sequence and the regions flanking putative errors were resequenced for verification. This procedure allowed us to correct the sequence and to analyze in detail the nature of the errors. Interestingly, in several cases in-frame termination codons or frameshifts were not sequencing errors but confirmed to be present in the chromosome, indicating that the genes are either nonfunctional (pseudogenes) or subject to regulatory processes such as programmed translational frameshifts. The method can be used for checking the quality of the sequences produced by any prokaryotic genome sequencing project. PMID:10568751

  18. Entire Mitochondrial DNA Sequencing on Massively Parallel Sequencing for the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome analysis has been a potent tool in forensic practice as well as in the understanding of human phylogeny in the maternal lineage. The traditional mtDNA analysis is focused on the control region, but the introduction of massive parallel sequencing (MPS) has made the typing of the entire mtDNA genome (mtGenome) more accessible for routine analysis. The complete mtDNA information can provide large amounts of novel genetic data for diverse populations as well as improved discrimination power for identification. The genetic diversity of the mtDNA sequence in different ethnic populations has been revealed through MPS analysis, but the Korean population not only has limited MPS data for the entire mtGenome, the existing data is mainly focused on the control region. In this study, the complete mtGenome data for 186 Koreans, obtained using Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) technology and retrieved from rather common mtDNA haplogroups based on the control region sequence, are described. The results showed that 24 haplogroups, determined with hypervariable regions only, branched into 47 subhaplogroups, and point heteroplasmy was more frequent in the coding regions. In addition, sequence variations in the coding regions observed in this study were compared with those presented in other reports on different populations, and there were similar features observed in the sequence variants for the predominant haplogroups among East Asian populations, such as Haplogroup D and macrohaplogroups M9, G, and D. This study is expected to be the trigger for the development of Korean specific mtGenome data followed by numerous future studies. PMID:28244283

  19. A Novel Method for Alignment-free DNA Sequence Similarity Analysis Based on the Characterization of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Zhong, Pianyu; Zhang, Tinghui

    2016-01-01

    Determination of sequence similarity is one of the major steps in computational phylogenetic studies. One of the major tasks of computational biologists is to develop novel mathematical descriptors for similarity analysis. DNA clustering is an important technology that automatically identifies inherent relationships among large-scale DNA sequences. The comparison between the DNA sequences of different species helps determine phylogenetic relationships among species. Alignment-free approaches have continuously gained interest in various sequence analysis applications such as phylogenetic inference and metagenomic classification/clustering, particularly for large-scale sequence datasets. Here, we construct a novel and simple mathematical descriptor based on the characterization of cis sequence complex DNA networks. This new approach is based on a code of three cis nucleotides in a gene that could code for an amino acid. In particular, for each DNA sequence, we will set up a cis sequence complex network that will be used to develop a characterization vector for the analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence phylogenetic relationships among nine species. The resulting phylogenetic relationships among the nine species were determined to be in agreement with the actual situation. PMID:27746676

  20. A Novel Method for Alignment-free DNA Sequence Similarity Analysis Based on the Characterization of Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Zhong, Pianyu; Zhang, Tinghui

    2016-01-01

    Determination of sequence similarity is one of the major steps in computational phylogenetic studies. One of the major tasks of computational biologists is to develop novel mathematical descriptors for similarity analysis. DNA clustering is an important technology that automatically identifies inherent relationships among large-scale DNA sequences. The comparison between the DNA sequences of different species helps determine phylogenetic relationships among species. Alignment-free approaches have continuously gained interest in various sequence analysis applications such as phylogenetic inference and metagenomic classification/clustering, particularly for large-scale sequence datasets. Here, we construct a novel and simple mathematical descriptor based on the characterization of cis sequence complex DNA networks. This new approach is based on a code of three cis nucleotides in a gene that could code for an amino acid. In particular, for each DNA sequence, we will set up a cis sequence complex network that will be used to develop a characterization vector for the analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence phylogenetic relationships among nine species. The resulting phylogenetic relationships among the nine species were determined to be in agreement with the actual situation.

  1. Next generation sequencing of DNA-launched Chikungunya vaccine virus

    SciTech Connect

    Hidajat, Rachmat; Nickols, Brian; Forrester, Naomi; Tretyakova, Irina; Weaver, Scott; Pushko, Peter

    2016-03-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) represents a pandemic threat with no approved vaccine available. Recently, we described a novel vaccination strategy based on iDNA® infectious clone designed to launch a live-attenuated CHIKV vaccine from plasmid DNA in vitro or in vivo. As a proof of concept, we prepared iDNA plasmid pCHIKV-7 encoding the full-length cDNA of the 181/25 vaccine. The DNA-launched CHIKV-7 virus was prepared and compared to the 181/25 virus. Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing revealed that with the exception of the 3′ untranslated region, CHIKV-7 viral RNA consistently showed a lower frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphisms than the 181/25 RNA including at the E2-12 and E2-82 residues previously identified as attenuating mutations. In the CHIKV-7, frequencies of reversions at E2-12 and E2-82 were 0.064% and 0.086%, while in the 181/25, frequencies were 0.179% and 0.133%, respectively. We conclude that the DNA-launched virus has a reduced probability of reversion mutations, thereby enhancing vaccine safety. - Highlights: • Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging pandemic threat. • In vivo DNA-launched attenuated CHIKV is a novel vaccine technology. • DNA-launched virus was sequenced using HiSeq2000 and compared to the 181/25 virus. • DNA-launched virus has lower frequency of SNPs at E2-12 and E2-82 attenuation loci.

  2. The sequence of carnation etched ring virus DNA: comparison with cauliflower mosaic virus and retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hull, R.; Sadler, J.; Longstaff, M.

    1986-01-01

    Carnation etched ring virus (CERV) DNA comprises 7932 bp. CERV primer binding sites and overall genome organization are similar to those of the related cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV). The six open reading frames of CERV showed amino acid homology (50-80%) with CaMV ORFs I-VI; no homologues of CaMV ORFs VII or VIII were found. CERV ORFs 1-5 interface each other with the sequence ATGA. The comparison of CERV ORF5 with CaMV ORFV highlighted regions which show homologies to retrovirus gag/pol protease, RNase H and DNA polymerase domains; the possibility that the DNA polymerase domain comprises two subdomains, operating off different templates, is discussed. Both CERV and CaMV ORFs I have sequence homology to tobacco mosaic virus P30 and plastocyanin. PMID:16453731

  3. Timing of human protein evolution as revealed by massively parallel capture of Neandertal nuclear DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Hodges, Emily; Green, Richard E.; Briggs, Adrian W.; Krause, Johannes; Meyer, Matthias; Good, Jeffrey M.; Maricic, Tomislav; Johnson, Philipp L.F.; Xuan, Zhenyu; Rooks, Michelle; Bhattacharjee, Arindam; Brizuela, Leonardo; Albert, Frank W.; de la Rasilla, Marco; Fortea, Javier; Rosas, Antonio; Lachmann, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Pääbo, Svante

    2010-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequencing is now possible for extinct organisms, as well as the targeted capture of specific regions. However, targeted resequencing of megabase sized parts of nuclear genomes has yet to be demonstrated for ancient DNA. Here we show that hybridization capture on microarrays can be used to generate large scale targeted data from Neandertal DNA even in the presence of ~99.8% microbial DNA. It is thus now possible to generate high quality data from large regions of the nuclear genome from Neandertals and other extinct organisms. Using this approach we have sequenced ~14,000 protein coding positions that have been inferred to have changed on the human lineage since the last common ancestor shared with chimpanzees. We identify 88 amino acid substitutions that have become fixed in all humans since the divergence from the Neandertals. PMID:20448179

  4. Advanced Molecular Probes for Sequence-Specific DNA Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto

    DNA detection can be achieved using the Watson-Crick base pairing with oligonucleotides or oligonucleotide analogs, followed by generation of a physical or chemical signal coupled with a transducer device. The nature of the probe is an essential feature which determines the performances of the sensing device. Many synthetic processes are presently available for "molecular engineering" of DNA probes, enabling label-free and PCR-free detection to be performed. Furthermore, many DNA analogs with improved performances are available and are under development; locked nucleic acids (LNA), peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and their analogs, morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) and other modified probes have shown improved properties of affinity and selectivity in target recognition compared to those of simple DNA probes. The performances of these probes in sensing devices, and the requirements for detection of unamplified DNA will be discussed in this chapter. Chemistry and architectures for conjugation of probes to reporter units, surfaces and nanostructures will also be discussed. Examples of probes used in ultrasensitive detection of unamplified DNA are listed.

  5. cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of human pancreatic procarboxypeptidase A1.

    PubMed Central

    Catasús, L; Villegas, V; Pascual, R; Avilés, F X; Wicker-Planquart, C; Puigserver, A

    1992-01-01

    Using polyclonal antibodies raised against human pancreatic procarboxypeptidases, a full-length cDNA coding for an A-type proenzyme was isolated from a lambda gt11 human pancreatic library. This cDNA contains standard 3' and 5' flanking regions, a poly(A)+ tail and a central region of 1260 nucleotides coding for a protein of 419 amino acids. On the basis of sequence comparisons, the human protein was classified as a procarboxypeptidase A1 which is very similar to the previously described A1 forms from rat and bovine pancreatic glands. The presence of the amino acid sequences assumed to be of importance for the zymogen inhibition by its activation segment, primarily on the basis of the recently reported crystal structure of the B form, further supports the proposed classification. PMID:1417781

  6. Delineating relative homogeneous G+C domains in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, W

    2001-10-03

    The concept of homogeneity of G+C content is always relative and subjective. This point is emphasized and quantified in this paper using a simple example of one sequence segmented into two subsequences. Whether the sequence is homogeneous or not can be answered by whether the two-subsequence model describes the DNA sequence better than the one-sequence model. There are at least three equivalent ways of looking at the 1-to-2 segmentation: Jensen-Shannon divergence measure, log likelihood ratio test, and model selection using Bayesian information criterion. Once a criterion is chosen, a DNA sequence can be recursively segmented into multiple domains. We use one subjective criterion called segmentation strength based on the Bayesian information criterion. Whether or not a sequence is homogeneous and how many domains it has depend on this criterion. We compare six different genome sequences (yeast S. cerevisiae chromosome III and IV, bacterium M. pneumoniae, human major histocompatibility complex sequence, longest contigs in human chromosome 21 and 22) by recursive segmentations at different strength criteria. Results by recursive segmentation confirm that yeast chromosome IV is more homogeneous than yeast chromosome III, human chromosome 21 is more homogeneous than human chromosome 22, and bacterial genomes may not be homogeneous due to short segments with distinct base compositions. The recursive segmentation also provides a quantitative criterion for identifying isochores in human sequences. Some features of our recursive segmentation, such as the possibility of delineating domain borders accurately, are superior to those of the moving-window approach commonly used in such analyses.

  7. A measure of DNA sequence similarity by Fourier Transform with applications on hierarchical clustering.

    PubMed

    Yin, Changchuan; Chen, Ying; Yau, Stephen S-T

    2014-10-21

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a prominent method for classification of DNA sequences, yet it is hampered with inherent limitations in computational complexity. Alignment-free methods have been developed over past decade for more efficient comparison and classification of DNA sequences than MSA. However, most alignment-free methods may lose structural and functional information of DNA sequences because they are based on feature extractions. Therefore, they may not fully reflect the actual differences among DNA sequences. Alignment-free methods with information conservation are needed for more accurate comparison and classification of DNA sequences. We propose a new alignment-free similarity measure of DNA sequences using the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). In this method, we map DNA sequences into four binary indicator sequences and apply DFT to the indicator sequences to transform them into frequency domain. The Euclidean distance of full DFT power spectra of the DNA sequences is used as similarity distance metric. To compare the DFT power spectra of DNA sequences with different lengths, we propose an even scaling method to extend shorter DFT power spectra to equal the longest length of the sequences compared. After the DFT power spectra are evenly scaled, the DNA sequences are compared in the same DFT frequency space dimensionality. We assess the accuracy of the similarity metric in hierarchical clustering using simulated DNA and virus sequences. The results demonstrate that the DFT based method is an effective and accurate measure of DNA sequence similarity.

  8. Pericentric satellite DNA sequences in Pipistrellus pipistrellus (Vespertilionidae; Chiroptera).

    PubMed

    Barragán, M J L; Martínez, S; Marchal, J A; Fernández, R; Bullejos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R; Sánchez, A

    2003-09-01

    This paper reports the molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a HindIII family of satellite DNA in the bat species Pipistrellus pipistrellus. This satellite is organized in tandem repeats of 418 bp monomer units, and represents approximately 3% of the whole genome. The consensus sequence from five cloned monomer units has an A-T content of 62.20%. We have found differences in the ladder pattern of bands between two populations of the same species. These differences are probably because of the absence of the target sites for the HindIII enzyme in most monomer units of one population, but not in the other. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) localized the satellite DNA in the pericentromeric regions of all autosomes and the X chromosome, but it was absent from the Y chromosome. Digestion of genomic DNAs with HpaII and its isoschizomer MspI demonstrated that these repetitive DNA sequences are not methylated. Other bat species were tested for the presence of this repetitive DNA. It was absent in five Vespertilionidae and one Rhinolophidae species, indicating that it could be a species/genus specific, repetitive DNA family.

  9. Cloning and sequencing of a dextranase-encoding cDNA from Penicillium minioluteum.

    PubMed

    Garcia, B; Margolles, E; Roca, H; Mateu, D; Raices, M; Gonzales, M E; Herrera, L; Delgado, J

    1996-10-01

    A cDNA from Penicillium minioluteum HI-4 encoding a dextranase (1,6-alpha-glucan hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.11) was isolated and characterized. cDNA clones corresponding to genes expressed in dextran-induced cultures were identified by differential hybridization. Southern hybridization and restriction mapping analysis of selected clones revealed four different groups of cDNAs. The dextranase cDNA was identified after expressing a cDNA fragment from each of the isolated groups of cDNA clones in the Escherichia coli T7 system. The expression of a 2 kb cDNA fragment in E. coli led to the production of a 67 kDa protein which was recognized by an anti-dextranase polyclonal antibody. The cDNA contains 2109 bp plus a poly(A) tail, coding for a protein of 608 amino acids, including 20 N-terminal amino acid residues which might correspond to a signal peptide. There was 29% sequence identity between the P. minioluteum dextranase and the dextranase from Arthrobacter sp. CB-8.

  10. A CLIQUE algorithm using DNA computing techniques based on closed-circle DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Xiyu

    2011-07-01

    DNA computing has been applied in broad fields such as graph theory, finite state problems, and combinatorial problem. DNA computing approaches are more suitable used to solve many combinatorial problems because of the vast parallelism and high-density storage. The CLIQUE algorithm is one of the gird-based clustering techniques for spatial data. It is the combinatorial problem of the density cells. Therefore we utilize DNA computing using the closed-circle DNA sequences to execute the CLIQUE algorithm for the two-dimensional data. In our study, the process of clustering becomes a parallel bio-chemical reaction and the DNA sequences representing the marked cells can be combined to form a closed-circle DNA sequences. This strategy is a new application of DNA computing. Although the strategy is only for the two-dimensional data, it provides a new idea to consider the grids to be vertexes in a graph and transform the search problem into a combinatorial problem.

  11. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  12. Directly repeated sequences associated with pathogenic mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Johns, D R; Rutledge, S L; Stine, O C; Hurko, O

    1989-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequences of junctional regions associated with large deletions of mitochondrial DNA found in four unrelated individuals with a phenotype of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. In each patient, the deletion breakpoint occurred within a directly repeated sequence of 13-18 base pairs, present in different regions of the normal mitochondrial genome-separated by 4.5-7.7 kilobases. In two patients, the deletions were identical. When all four repeated sequences are compared, a consensus sequence of 11 nucleotides emerges, similar to putative recombination signals, suggesting the involvement of a recombinational event. Partially deleted and normal mitochondrial DNAs were found in all tissues examined, but in very different proportions, indicating that these mutations originated before the primary cell layers diverged. Images PMID:2813377

  13. cDNA sequence and chromosomal localization of human enterokinase, the proteolytic activator of trypsinogen.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Y; Veile, R A; Donis-Keller, H; Sadler, J E

    1995-04-11

    Enterokinase is a serine protease of the duodenal brush border membrane that cleaves trypsinogen and produces active trypsin, thereby leading to the activation of many pancreatic digestive enzymes. Overlapping cDNA clones that encode the complete human enterokinase amino acid sequence were isolated from a human intestine cDNA library. Starting from the first ATG codon, the composite 3696 nt cDNA sequence contains an open reading frame of 3057 nt that encodes a 784 amino acid heavy chain followed by a 235 amino acid light chain; the two chains are linked by at least one disulfide bond. The heavy chain contains a potential N-terminal myristoylation site, a potential signal anchor sequence near the amino terminus, and six structural motifs that are found in otherwise unrelated proteins. These domains resemble motifs of the LDL receptor (two copies), complement component Clr (two copies), the metalloprotease meprin (one copy), and the macrophage scavenger receptor (one copy). The enterokinase light chain is homologous to the trypsin-like serine proteinases. These structural features are conserved among human, bovine, and porcine enterokinase. By Northern blotting, a 4.4 kb enterokinase mRNA was detected only in small intestine. The enterokinase gene was localized to human chromosome 21q21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  14. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the banded dogfish (Triakis scyllia) interleukin-8 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuuki; Haruta, Chiaki; Usui, Kazushige; Moritomo, Tadaaki; Nakanishi, Teruyuki

    2003-03-01

    The dogfish (Triakis scyllia) interleukin-8 (IL-8) cDNA was isolated from mitogen-stimulated peripheral white blood cells (WBCs) utilising the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cDNA sequence showed that the dogfish IL-8 clones contained an open reading frame encoding 101 amino acids. A short 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 70 nucleotides and a long 3' UTR of 893 nucleotides were also present in this 1.2-kb cDNA. Furthermore, the 3' UTR of the mRNA contained the AUUUA sequence that has been implicated in shortening of the half-life of several cytokines and growth factors. The predicted IL-8 peptide had one potential N-linked glycosylation site (Asn-72-Thr-74) that is not conserved in other vertebrates. It also contained four cysteine residues (Cys-34, 36, 61 and 77), which are characteristic of CXC subfamily cytokines and found in all vertebrates, to date. The dogfish IL-8 lacked an ELR motif as found in the lamprey and trout. Comparison of the deduced amino acids showed that the dogfish IL-8 sequence shared 50.5, 41.2, 37.1 and 40.4-45.5% identity with the chicken, lamprey, trout and mammalian IL-8 sequences, respectively.

  15. Viral Discovery and Sequence Recovery Using DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David; Urisman, Anatoly; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Springer, Michael; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Erdman, Dean D; Mardis, Elaine R; Hickenbotham, Matthew; Magrini, Vincent; Eldred, James; Latreille, J. Phillipe; Wilson, Richard K; Ganem, Don

    2003-01-01

    Because of the constant threat posed by emerging infectious diseases and the limitations of existing approaches used to identify new pathogens, there is a great demand for new technological methods for viral discovery. We describe herein a DNA microarray-based platform for novel virus identification and characterization. Central to this approach was a DNA microarray designed to detect a wide range of known viruses as well as novel members of existing viral families; this microarray contained the most highly conserved 70mer sequences from every fully sequenced reference viral genome in GenBank. During an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in March 2003, hybridization to this microarray revealed the presence of a previously uncharacterized coronavirus in a viral isolate cultivated from a SARS patient. To further characterize this new virus, approximately 1 kb of the unknown virus genome was cloned by physically recovering viral sequences hybridized to individual array elements. Sequencing of these fragments confirmed that the virus was indeed a new member of the coronavirus family. This combination of array hybridization followed by direct viral sequence recovery should prove to be a general strategy for the rapid identification and characterization of novel viruses and emerging infectious disease. PMID:14624234

  16. A syntactic pattern recognition system for DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Searls, D.; Dong, S.

    1993-12-31

    The authors review both theoretical and practical results of a linguistic approach to studying the structure of features of DNA sequences. Using generative grammars, complex assemblages can not only be described and analyzed abstractly, but also concretely, such that features can be searched for by a general-purpose parser. Their parser, called GENLANG, uses an extended logic grammar formalism and has found features as complex as TRNA genes, group 1 introns, and protein-encoding genes, within input sequences on a genomic scale.

  17. Detection theory in identification of RNA-DNA sequence differences using RNA-sequencing.

    PubMed

    Toung, Jonathan M; Lahens, Nicholas; Hogenesch, John B; Grant, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technology have allowed for detailed analyses of the transcriptome at single-nucleotide resolution, facilitating the study of RNA editing or sequence differences between RNA and DNA genome-wide. In humans, two types of post-transcriptional RNA editing processes are known to occur: A-to-I deamination by ADAR and C-to-U deamination by APOBEC1. In addition to these sequence differences, researchers have reported the existence of all 12 types of RNA-DNA sequence differences (RDDs); however, the validity of these claims is debated, as many studies claim that technical artifacts account for the majority of these non-canonical sequence differences. In this study, we used a detection theory approach to evaluate the performance of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and associated aligners in accurately identifying RNA-DNA sequence differences. By generating simulated RNA-Seq datasets containing RDDs, we assessed the effect of alignment artifacts and sequencing error on the sensitivity and false discovery rate of RDD detection. Overall, we found that even in the presence of sequencing errors, false negative and false discovery rates of RDD detection can be contained below 10% with relatively lenient thresholds. We also assessed the ability of various filters to target false positive RDDs and found them to be effective in discriminating between true and false positives. Lastly, we used the optimal thresholds we identified from our simulated analyses to identify RDDs in a human lymphoblastoid cell line. We found approximately 6,000 RDDs, the majority of which are A-to-G edits and likely to be mediated by ADAR. Moreover, we found the majority of non A-to-G RDDs to be associated with poorer alignments and conclude from these results that the evidence for widespread non-canonical RDDs in humans is weak. Overall, we found RNA-Seq to be a powerful technique for surveying RDDs genome-wide when coupled with the appropriate thresholds and filters.

  18. cisExpress: motif detection in DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Triska, Martin; Grocutt, David; Southern, James; Murphy, Denis J.; Tatarinova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: One of the major challenges for contemporary bioinformatics is the analysis and accurate annotation of genomic datasets to enable extraction of useful information about the functional role of DNA sequences. This article describes a novel genome-wide statistical approach to the detection of specific DNA sequence motifs based on similarities between the promoters of similarly expressed genes. This new tool, cisExpress, is especially designed for use with large datasets, such as those generated by publicly accessible whole genome and transcriptome projects. cisExpress uses a task farming algorithm to exploit all available computational cores within a shared memory node. We demonstrate the robust nature and validity of the proposed method. It is applicable for use with a wide range of genomic databases for any species of interest. Availability: cisExpress is available at www.cisexpress.org. Contact: tatiana.tatarinova@usc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23793750

  19. Effect of dephasing on DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zwolak, Michael; Krems, Matt; Pershin, Yuriy V; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    We study theoretically the effects of dephasing on DNA sequencing in a nanopore via transverse electronic transport. To do this, we couple classical molecular dynamics simulations with transport calculations using scattering theory. Previous studies, which did not include dephasing, have shown that by measuring the transverse current of a particular base multiple times, one can get distributions of currents for each base that are distinguishable. We introduce a dephasing parameter into transport calculations to simulate the effects of the ions and other fluctuations. These effects lower the overall magnitude of the current, but have little effect on the current distributions themselves. The results of this work further implicate that distinguishing DNA bases via transverse electronic transport has potential as a sequencing tool.

  20. T-DNA integration into the Arabidopsis genome depends on sequences of pre-insertion sites

    PubMed Central

    Brunaud, Véronique; Balzergue, Sandrine; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Aubourg, Sébastien; Samson, Franck; Chauvin, Stéphanie; Bechtold, Nicole; Cruaud, Corinne; DeRose, Richard; Pelletier, Georges; Lepiniec, Loïc; Caboche, Michel; Lecharny, Alain

    2002-01-01

    A statistical analysis of 9000 flanking sequence tags characterizing transferred DNA (T-DNA) transformants in Arabidopsis sheds new light on T-DNA insertion by illegitimate recombination. T-DNA integration is favoured in plant DNA regions with an A-T-rich content. The formation of a short DNA duplex between the host DNA and the left end of the T-DNA sets the frame for the recombination. The sequence immediately downstream of the plant A-T-rich region is the master element for setting up the DNA duplex, and deletions into the left end of the integrated T-DNA depend on the location of a complementary sequence on the T-DNA. Recombination at the right end of the T-DNA with the host DNA involves another DNA duplex, 2–3 base pairs long, that preferentially includes a G close to the right end of the T-DNA. PMID:12446565

  1. Measuring Cation Dependent DNA Polymerase Fidelity Landscapes by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kording, Konrad; Schmidt, Daniel; Martin-Alarcon, Daniel; Tyo, Keith; Boyden, Edward S.; Church, George

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput recording of signals embedded within inaccessible micro-environments is a technological challenge. The ideal recording device would be a nanoscale machine capable of quantitatively transducing a wide range of variables into a molecular recording medium suitable for long-term storage and facile readout in the form of digital data. We have recently proposed such a device, in which cation concentrations modulate the misincorporation rate of a DNA polymerase (DNAP) on a known template, allowing DNA sequences to encode information about the local cation concentration. In this work we quantify the cation sensitivity of DNAP misincorporation rates, making possible the indirect readout of cation concentration by DNA sequencing. Using multiplexed deep sequencing, we quantify the misincorporation properties of two DNA polymerases – Dpo4 and Klenow exo− – obtaining the probability and base selectivity of misincorporation at all positions within the template. We find that Dpo4 acts as a DNA recording device for Mn2+ with a misincorporation rate gain of ∼2%/mM. This modulation of misincorporation rate is selective to the template base: the probability of misincorporation on template T by Dpo4 increases >50-fold over the range tested, while the other template bases are affected less strongly. Furthermore, cation concentrations act as scaling factors for misincorporation: on a given template base, Mn2+ and Mg2+ change the overall misincorporation rate but do not alter the relative frequencies of incoming misincorporated nucleotides. Characterization of the ion dependence of DNAP misincorporation serves as the first step towards repurposing it as a molecular recording device. PMID:22928047

  2. Negatively supercoiled simian virus 40 DNA contains Z-DNA segments within transcriptional enhancer sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordheim, A.; Rich, A.

    1983-01-01

    Three 8-base pair (bp) segments of alternating purine-pyrimidine from the simian virus 40 enhancer region form Z-DNA on negative supercoiling; minichromosome DNase I-hypersensitive sites determined by others bracket these three segments. A survey of transcriptional enhancer sequences reveals a pattern of potential Z-DNA-forming regions which occur in pairs 50-80 bp apart. This may influence local chromatin structure and may be related to transcriptional activation.

  3. Diepoxybutane cross-links DNA at 5'-GNC sequences.

    PubMed

    Millard, J T; White, M M

    1993-03-02

    Epoxides are cancer-causing agents chemically analogous to the nitrogen mustards, a family of powerful antitumor drugs. We found that the DNA interstrand cross-linking sequence preference of diepoxybutane is the same as that of the mustard mechlorethamine: 5'-GNC. Therefore, the genomic site of cross-linking alone cannot explain why some interstrand cross-linkers act as antitumor agents whereas others are deadly toxins.

  4. DSBCapture: in situ capture and sequencing of DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Stefanie V; Marsico, Giovanni; Hänsel-Hertsch, Robert; Lam, Enid Y; Tannahill, David; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2016-10-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) continuously arise and cause mutations and chromosomal rearrangements. Here, we present DSBCapture, a sequencing-based method that captures DSBs in situ and directly maps these at single-nucleotide resolution, enabling the study of DSB origin. DSBCapture shows substantially increased sensitivity and data yield compared with other methods. Using DSBCapture, we uncovered a striking relationship between DSBs and elevated transcription within nucleosome-depleted chromatin.

  5. TranslatorX: multiple alignment of nucleotide sequences guided by amino acid translations.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Zardoya, Rafael; Telford, Maximilian J

    2010-07-01

    We present TranslatorX, a web server designed to align protein-coding nucleotide sequences based on their corresponding amino acid translations. Many comparisons between biological sequences (nucleic acids and proteins) involve the construction of multiple alignments. Alignments represent a statement regarding the homology between individual nucleotides or amino acids within homologous genes. As protein-coding DNA sequences evolve as triplets of nucleotides (codons) and it is known that sequence similarity degrades more rapidly at the DNA than at the amino acid level, alignments are generally more accurate when based on amino acids than on their corresponding nucleotides. TranslatorX novelties include: (i) use of all documented genetic codes and the possibility of assigning different genetic codes for each sequence; (ii) a battery of different multiple alignment programs; (iii) translation of ambiguous codons when possible; (iv) an innovative criterion to clean nucleotide alignments with GBlocks based on protein information; and (v) a rich output, including Jalview-powered graphical visualization of the alignments, codon-based alignments coloured according to the corresponding amino acids, measures of compositional bias and first, second and third codon position specific alignments. The TranslatorX server is freely available at http://translatorx.co.uk.

  6. DNA topology confers sequence specificity to nonspecific architectural proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan; Czapla, Luke; Grosner, Michael A; Swigon, David; Olson, Wilma K

    2014-11-25

    Topological constraints placed on short fragments of DNA change the disorder found in chain molecules randomly decorated by nonspecific, architectural proteins into tightly organized 3D structures. The bacterial heat-unstable (HU) protein builds up, counter to expectations, in greater quantities and at particular sites along simulated DNA minicircles and loops. Moreover, the placement of HU along loops with the "wild-type" spacing found in the Escherichia coli lactose (lac) and galactose (gal) operons precludes access to key recognition elements on DNA. The HU protein introduces a unique spatial pathway in the DNA upon closure. The many ways in which the protein induces nearly the same closed circular configuration point to the statistical advantage of its nonspecificity. The rotational settings imposed on DNA by the repressor proteins, by contrast, introduce sequential specificity in HU placement, with the nonspecific protein accumulating at particular loci on the constrained duplex. Thus, an architectural protein with no discernible DNA sequence-recognizing features becomes site-specific and potentially assumes a functional role upon loop formation. The locations of HU on the closed DNA reflect long-range mechanical correlations. The protein responds to DNA shape and deformability—the stiff, naturally straight double-helical structure—rather than to the unique features of the constituent base pairs. The structures of the simulated loops suggest that HU architecture, like nucleosomal architecture, which modulates the ability of regulatory proteins to recognize their binding sites in the context of chromatin, may influence repressor-operator interactions in the context of the bacterial nucleoid.

  7. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli (update 1992)

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred; Wahl, Ralf; Schachtel, Gabriel; Rice, Peter

    1992-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli available from the GENBANK and EMBL data libraries and over a period of several years independently from the literature. This is the fourth listing replacing and increasing the former listings substantially. However, in order to save space this printed version contains DNA sequence information only, if they are publically available in electronic form. The complete compilation including a full set of genetic map data and the E.coli protein index can be obtained in machine readable form from the EMBL data library (ECD release 10) or from the CD-ROM version of this supplement issue directly. After deletion of all detected overlaps a total of 1 820 237 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1992. This corresponds to a total of 38.56% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2,5% derived from lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and various DNA sequences already received for other strains of E.coli. PMID:1598239

  8. Surveying the repair of ancient DNA from bones via high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mouttham, Nathalie; Klunk, Jennifer; Kuch, Melanie; Fourney, Ron; Poinar, Hendrik

    2015-07-01

    DNA damage in the form of abasic sites, chemically altered nucleotides, and strand fragmentation is the foremost limitation in obtaining genetic information from many ancient samples. Upon cell death, DNA continues to endure various chemical attacks such as hydrolysis and oxidation, but repair pathways found in vivo no longer operate. By incubating degraded DNA with specific enzyme combinations adopted from these pathways, it is possible to reverse some of the post-mortem nucleic acid damage prior to downstream analyses such as library preparation, targeted enrichment, and high-throughput sequencing. Here, we evaluate the performance of two available repair protocols on previously characterized DNA extracts from four mammoths. Both methods use endonucleases and glycosylases along with a DNA polymerase-ligase combination. PreCR Repair Mix increases the number of molecules converted to sequencing libraries, leading to an increase in endogenous content and a decrease in cytosine-to-thymine transitions due to cytosine deamination. However, the effects of Nelson Repair Mix on repair of DNA damage remain inconclusive.

  9. A novel chaos-based image encryption algorithm using DNA sequence operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiuli; Chen, Yiran; Broyde, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    An image encryption algorithm based on chaotic system and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence operations is proposed in this paper. First, the plain image is encoded into a DNA matrix, and then a new wave-based permutation scheme is performed on it. The chaotic sequences produced by 2D Logistic chaotic map are employed for row circular permutation (RCP) and column circular permutation (CCP). Initial values and parameters of the chaotic system are calculated by the SHA 256 hash of the plain image and the given values. Then, a row-by-row image diffusion method at DNA level is applied. A key matrix generated from the chaotic map is used to fuse the confused DNA matrix; also the initial values and system parameters of the chaotic system are renewed by the hamming distance of the plain image. Finally, after decoding the diffused DNA matrix, we obtain the cipher image. The DNA encoding/decoding rules of the plain image and the key matrix are determined by the plain image. Experimental results and security analyses both confirm that the proposed algorithm has not only an excellent encryption result but also resists various typical attacks.

  10. Sequence-specific DNA recognition by the thyroid transcription factor-1 homeodomain.

    PubMed Central

    Damante, G; Fabbro, D; Pellizzari, L; Civitareale, D; Guazzi, S; Polycarpou-Schwartz, M; Cauci, S; Quadrifoglio, F; Formisano, S; Di Lauro, R

    1994-01-01

    The molecular basis for the DNA binding specificity of the thyroid transcription factor 1 homeodomain (TTF-1HD) has been investigated. Methylation and ethylation interference experiments show that the TTF-1HD alone recapitulates the DNA binding properties of the entire protein. Studies carried out with mutant derivatives of TTF-1HD indicate a precise correspondence of some of its amino acid residues with specific bases in its binding site, allowing a crude orientation of the TTF-1HD within the protein-DNA complex. TTF-1HD shows an overall geometry of interaction with DNA similar to that previously observed for Antennapedia class HDs, even though the binding specificities of these two types of HDs are distinct. We demonstrate that the crucial difference between the binding sites of Antennapedia class and TTF-1 HDs is in the motifs 5'-TAAT-3', recognized by Antennapedia, and 5'-CAAG-3', preferentially bound by TTF-1. Furthermore, the binding of wild type and mutants TTF-1 HD to oligonucleotides containing either 5'-TAAT-3' or 5'-CAAG-3' indicate that only in the presence of the latter motif the Gln50 in TTF-1 HD is utilized for DNA recognition. Since the Gln at position 50 is an essential determinant for DNA binding specificity for several other HDs that bind to 5'-TAAT-3' containing sequences, we suggest that utilization by different HDs of key residues may depend on the sequence context and probably follows a precise hierarchy of contacts. Images PMID:7915030

  11. Ultrasensitive determination of DNA sequences by flow injection chemiluminescence using silver ions as labels.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lichun; Liu, Xiuhui; Zhou, Min; Ma, Yongjun; Wu, Guofan; Lu, Xiaoquan

    2014-10-27

    We presented a new strategy for ultrasensitive detection of DNA sequences based on the novel detection probe which was labeled with Ag(+) using metallothionein (MT) as a bridge. The assay relied on a sandwich-type DNA hybridization in which the DNA targets were first hybridized to the captured oligonucleotide probes immobilized on Fe3O4@Au composite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and then the Ag(+)-modified detection probes were used to monitor the presence of the specific DNA targets. After being anchored on the hybrids, Ag(+) was released down through acidic treatment and sensitively determined by a coupling flow injection-chemiluminescent reaction system (Ag(+)-Mn(2+)-K2S2O8-H3PO4-luminol) (FI-CL). The experiment results showed that the CL intensities increased linearly with the concentrations of DNA targets in the range from 10 to 500 pmol L(-1) with a detection limit of 3.3 pmol L(-1). The high sensitivity in this work may be ascribed to the high molar ratio of Ag(+)-MT, the sensitive determination of Ag(+) by the coupling FI-CL reaction system and the perfect magnetic separation based on Fe3O4@Au composite MNPs. Moreover, the proposed strategy exhibited excellent selectivity against the mismatched DNA sequences and could be applied to real samples analysis.

  12. Short-Sequence DNA Repeats in Prokaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, Alex; Scherer, Stewart; van Alphen, Loek; Verbrugh, Henri

    1998-01-01

    Short-sequence DNA repeat (SSR) loci can be identified in all eukaryotic and many prokaryotic genomes. These loci harbor short or long stretches of repeated nucleotide sequence motifs. DNA sequence motifs in a single locus can be identical and/or heterogeneous. SSRs are encountered in many different branches of the prokaryote kingdom. They are found in genes encoding products as diverse as microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules and specific bacterial virulence factors such as lipopolysaccharide-modifying enzymes or adhesins. SSRs enable genetic and consequently phenotypic flexibility. SSRs function at various levels of gene expression regulation. Variations in the number of repeat units per locus or changes in the nature of the individual repeat sequences may result from recombination processes or polymerase inadequacy such as slipped-strand mispairing (SSM), either alone or in combination with DNA repair deficiencies. These rather complex phenomena can occur with relative ease, with SSM approaching a frequency of 10−4 per bacterial cell division and allowing high-frequency genetic switching. Bacteria use this random strategy to adapt their genetic repertoire in response to selective environmental pressure. SSR-mediated variation has important implications for bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary fitness. Molecular analysis of changes in SSRs allows epidemiological studies on the spread of pathogenic bacteria. The occurrence, evolution and function of SSRs, and the molecular methods used to analyze them are discussed in the context of responsiveness to environmental factors, bacterial pathogenicity, epidemiology, and the availability of full-genome sequences for increasing numbers of microorganisms, especially those that are medically relevant. PMID:9618442

  13. The expressed TCRβ CDR3 repertoire is dominated by conserved DNA sequences in channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Findly, R Craig; Niagro, Frank D; Dickerson, Harry W

    2017-03-01

    We analyzed by high-throughput sequencing T cell receptor beta CDR3 repertoires expressed by αβ T cells in outbred channel catfish before and after an immunizing infection with the parasitic protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. We compared CDR3 repertoires in caudal fin before infection and at three weeks after infection, and in skin, PBL, spleen and head kidney at seven and twenty-one weeks after infection. Public clonotypes with the same CDR3 amino acid sequence were expressed by αβ T cells that underwent clonal expansion following development of immunity. These clonally expanded αβ T cells were primarily located in spleen and skin, which is a site of infection. Although multiple DNA sequences were expected to code for each public clonotype, each public clonotype was predominately coded by an identical CDR3 DNA sequence in combination with the same J gene in all fish. The processes underlying this shared use of CDR3 DNA sequences are not clear.

  14. Detection and mapping of homologous, repeated and amplified DNA sequences by DNA renaturation in agarose gels.

    PubMed Central

    Roninson, I B

    1983-01-01

    A new molecular hybridization approach to the analysis of complex genomes has been developed. Tracer and driver DNAs were digested with the same restriction enzyme(s), and tracer DNA was labeled with 32P using T4 DNA polymerase. Tracer DNA was mixed with an excess amount of driver, and the mixture was electrophoresed in an agarose gel. Following electrophoresis, DNA was alkali-denatured in situ and allowed to reanneal in the gel, so that tracer DNA fragments could hybridize to the driver only when homologous driver DNA sequences were present at the same place in the gel, i.e. within a restriction fragment of the same size. After reannealing, unhybridized single-stranded DNA was digested in situ with S1 nuclease. The hybridized tracer DNA was detected by autoradiography. The general applicability of this technique was demonstrated in the following experiments. The common EcoRI restriction fragments were identified in the genomes of E. coli and four other species of bacteria. Two of these fragments are conserved in all Enterobacteriaceae. In other experiments, repeated EcoRI fragments of eukaryotic DNA were visualized as bands of various intensity after reassociation of a total genomic restriction digest in the gel. The situation of gene amplification was modeled by the addition of varying amounts of lambda phage DNA to eukaryotic DNA prior to restriction enzyme digestion. Restriction fragments of lambda DNA were detectable at a ratio of 15 copies per chicken genome and 30 copies per human genome. This approach was used to detect amplified DNA fragments in methotrexate (MTX)-resistant mouse cells and to identify commonly amplified fragments in two independently derived MTX-resistant lines. Images PMID:6310499

  15. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  16. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  17. DNA sequence chromatogram browsing using JAVA and CORBA.

    PubMed

    Parsons, J D; Buehler, E; Hillier, L

    1999-03-01

    DNA sequence chromatograms (traces) are the primary data source for all large-scale genomic and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing projects. Access to the sequencing trace assists many later analyses, for example contig assembly and polymorphism detection, but obtaining and using traces is problematic. Traces are not collected and published centrally, they are much larger than the base calls derived from them, and viewing them requires the interactivity of a local graphical client with local data. To provide efficient global access to DNA traces, we developed a client/server system based on flexible Java components integrated into other applications including an applet for use in a WWW browser and a stand-alone trace viewer. Client/server interaction is facilitated by CORBA middleware which provides a well-defined interface, a naming service, and location independence. [The software is packaged as a Jar file available from the following URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/jparsons. Links to working examples of the trace viewers can be found at http://corba.ebi.ac.uk/EST. All the Washington University mouse EST traces are available for browsing at the same URL.

  18. Analysis of the complete DNA sequence of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlinson, W D; Farrell, H E; Barrell, B G

    1996-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the Smith strain of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was determined from virion DNA by using a whole-genome shotgun approach. The genome has an overall G+C content of 58.7%, consists of 230,278 bp, and is arranged as a single unique sequence with short (31-bp) terminal direct repeats and several short internal repeats. Significant similarity to the genome of the sequenced human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strain AD169 is evident, particularly for 78 open reading frames encoded by the central part of the genome. There is a very similar distribution of G+C content across the two genomes. Sequences toward the ends of the MCMV genome encode tandem arrays of homologous glycoproteins (gps) arranged as two gene families. The left end encodes 15 gps that represent one family, and the right end encodes a different family of 11 gps. A homolog (m144) of cellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes is located at the end of the genome opposite the HCMV MHC class I homolog (UL18). G protein-coupled receptor (GCR) homologs (M33 and M78) occur in positions congruent with two (UL33 and UL78) of the four putative HCMV GCR homologs. Counterparts of all of the known enzyme homologs in HCMV are present in the MCMV genome, including the phosphotransferase gene (M97), whose product phosphorylates ganciclovir in HCMV-infected cells, and the assembly protein (M80). PMID:8971012

  19. Correlation approach to identify coding regions in DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossadnik, S. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, it was observed that noncoding regions of DNA sequences possess long-range power-law correlations, whereas coding regions typically display only short-range correlations. We develop an algorithm based on this finding that enables investigators to perform a statistical analysis on long DNA sequences to locate possible coding regions. The algorithm is particularly successful in predicting the location of lengthy coding regions. For example, for the complete genome of yeast chromosome III (315,344 nucleotides), at least 82% of the predictions correspond to putative coding regions; the algorithm correctly identified all coding regions larger than 3000 nucleotides, 92% of coding regions between 2000 and 3000 nucleotides long, and 79% of coding regions between 1000 and 2000 nucleotides. The predictive ability of this new algorithm supports the claim that there is a fundamental difference in the correlation property between coding and noncoding sequences. This algorithm, which is not species-dependent, can be implemented with other techniques for rapidly and accurately locating relatively long coding regions in genomic sequences.

  20. Model identification for DNA sequence-structure relationships.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Stephen Dwyer; Chiu, Anita; Chizeck, Howard Jay

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the use of algebraic state-space models for the sequence dependent properties of DNA. By considering the DNA sequence as an input signal, rather than using an all atom physical model, computational efficiency is achieved. A challenge in deriving this type of model is obtaining its structure and estimating its parameters. Here we present two candidate model structures for the sequence dependent structural property Slide and a method of encoding the models so that a recursive least squares algorithm can be applied for parameter estimation. These models are based on the assumption that the value of Slide at a base-step is determined by the surrounding tetranucleotide sequence. The first model takes the four bases individually as inputs and has a median root mean square deviation of 0.90 A. The second model takes the four bases pairwise and has a median root mean square deviation of 0.88 A. These values indicate that the accuracy of these models is within the useful range for structure prediction. Performance is comparable to published predictions of a more physically derived model, at significantly less computational cost.

  1. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  2. Denoising DNA deep sequencing data-high-throughput sequencing errors and their correction.

    PubMed

    Laehnemann, David; Borkhardt, Arndt; McHardy, Alice Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the errors generated by common high-throughput sequencing platforms and telling true genetic variation from technical artefacts are two interdependent steps, essential to many analyses such as single nucleotide variant calling, haplotype inference, sequence assembly and evolutionary studies. Both random and systematic errors can show a specific occurrence profile for each of the six prominent sequencing platforms surveyed here: 454 pyrosequencing, Complete Genomics DNA nanoball sequencing, Illumina sequencing by synthesis, Ion Torrent semiconductor sequencing, Pacific Biosciences single-molecule real-time sequencing and Oxford Nanopore sequencing. There is a large variety of programs available for error removal in sequencing read data, which differ in the error models and statistical techniques they use, the features of the data they analyse, the parameters they determine from them and the data structures and algorithms they use. We highlight the assumptions they make and for which data types these hold, providing guidance which tools to consider for benchmarking with regard to the data properties. While no benchmarking results are included here, such specific benchmarks would greatly inform tool choices and future software development. The development of stand-alone error correctors, as well as single nucleotide variant and haplotype callers, could also benefit from using more of the knowledge about error profiles and from (re)combining ideas from the existing approaches presented here.

  3. Mixed sequence reader: a program for analyzing DNA sequences with heterozygous base calling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Tien; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Tang, Chuan Yi; Chen, Chun-Houh; Lian, Jang-Hau; Hu, Chi-Yu; Tsai, Chia-Lung; Chao, Angel; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Lee, Yun-Shien

    2012-01-01

    The direct sequencing of PCR products generates heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatograms that are useful for identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion-deletions (indels), short tandem repeats (STRs), and paralogous genes. Indels and STRs can be easily detected using the currently available Indelligent or ShiftDetector programs, which do not search reference sequences. However, the detection of other genomic variants remains a challenge due to the lack of appropriate tools for heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatogram data analysis. In this study, we developed a free web-based program, Mixed Sequence Reader (MSR), which can directly analyze heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatogram data in .abi file format using comparisons with reference sequences. The heterozygous sequences are identified as two distinct sequences and aligned with reference sequences. Our results showed that MSR may be used to (i) physically locate indel and STR sequences and determine STR copy number by searching NCBI reference sequences; (ii) predict combinations of microsatellite patterns using the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (CODIS); (iii) determine human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes by searching current viral databases in cases of double infections; (iv) estimate the copy number of paralogous genes, such as β-defensin 4 (DEFB4) and its paralog HSPDP3.

  4. A sequence-dependent rigid-base model of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, O.; Petkevičiutė, D.; Maddocks, J. H.

    2013-02-01

    A novel hierarchy of coarse-grain, sequence-dependent, rigid-base models of B-form DNA in solution is introduced. The hierarchy depends on both the assumed range of energetic couplings, and the extent of sequence dependence of the model parameters. A significant feature of the models is that they exhibit the phenomenon of frustration: each base cannot simultaneously minimize the energy of all of its interactions. As a consequence, an arbitrary DNA oligomer has an intrinsic or pre-existing stress, with the level of this frustration dependent on the particular sequence of the oligomer. Attention is focussed on the particular model in the hierarchy that has nearest-neighbor interactions and dimer sequence dependence of the model parameters. For a Gaussian version of this model, a complete coarse-grain parameter set is estimated. The parameterized model allows, for an oligomer of arbitrary length and sequence, a simple and explicit construction of an approximation to the configuration-space equilibrium probability density function for the oligomer in solution. The training set leading to the coarse-grain parameter set is itself extracted from a recent and extensive database of a large number of independent, atomic-resolution molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of short DNA oligomers immersed in explicit solvent. The Kullback-Leibler divergence between probability density functions is used to make several quantitative assessments of our nearest-neighbor, dimer-dependent model, which is compared against others in the hierarchy to assess various assumptions pertaining both to the locality of the energetic couplings and to the level of sequence dependence of its parameters. It is also compared directly against all-atom MD simulation to assess its predictive capabilities. The results show that the nearest-neighbor, dimer-dependent model can successfully resolve sequence effects both within and between oligomers. For example, due to the presence of frustration, the model can

  5. From DNA sequence to transcriptional behaviour: a quantitative approach.

    PubMed

    Segal, Eran; Widom, Jonathan

    2009-07-01

    Complex transcriptional behaviours are encoded in the DNA sequences of gene regulatory regions. Advances in our understanding of these behaviours have been recently gained through quantitative models that describe how molecules such as transcription factors and nucleosomes interact with genomic sequences. An emerging view is that every regulatory sequence is associated with a unique binding affinity landscape for each molecule and, consequently, with a unique set of molecule-binding configurations and transcriptional outputs. We present a quantitative framework based on existing methods that unifies these ideas. This framework explains many experimental observations regarding the binding patterns of factors and nucleosomes and the dynamics of transcriptional activation. It can also be used to model more complex phenomena such as transcriptional noise and the evolution of transcriptional regulation.

  6. On-Demand Indexing for Referential Compression of DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Fernando; Cogo, Vinicius; Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf; Bessani, Alysson

    2015-01-01

    The decreasing costs of genome sequencing is creating a demand for scalable storage and processing tools and techniques to deal with the large amounts of generated data. Referential compression is one of these techniques, in which the similarity between the DNA of organisms of the same or an evolutionary close species is exploited to reduce the storage demands of genome sequences up to 700 times. The general idea is to store in the compressed file only the differences between the to-be-compressed and a well-known reference sequence. In this paper, we propose a method for improving the performance of referential compression by removing the most costly phase of the process, the complete reference indexing. Our approach, called On-Demand Indexing (ODI) compresses human chromosomes five to ten times faster than other state-of-the-art tools (on average), while achieving similar compression ratios. PMID:26146838

  7. Conservation patterns in angiosperm rDNA ITS2 sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovitz, M A; Zimmer, E A

    1996-01-01

    The two internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA have become commonly exploited sources of informative variation for interspecific-/intergeneric-level phylogenetic analyses among angiosperms and other eukaryotes. We present an alignment in which one-third to one-half of the ITS2 sequence is alignable above the family level in angiosperms and a phenetic analysis showing that ITS2 contains information sufficient to diagnose lineages at several hierarchical levels. Base compositional analysis shows that angiosperm ITS2 is inherently GC-rich, and that the proportion of T is much more variable than that for other bases. We propose a general model of angiosperm ITS2 secondary structure that shows common pairing relationships for most of the conserved sequence tracts. Variations in our secondary structure predictions for sequences from different taxa indicate that compensatory mutation is not limited to paired positions. PMID:8760866

  8. Multigenome DNA sequence conservation identifies Hox cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Steven G.; Schwarz, Erich M.; DeModena, John A.; De Buysscher, Tristan; Trout, Diane; Shizuya, Hiroaki; Sternberg, Paul W.; Wold, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    To learn how well ungapped sequence comparisons of multiple species can predict cis-regulatory elements in Caenorhabditis elegans, we made such predictions across the large, complex ceh-13/lin-39 locus and tested them transgenically. We also examined how prediction quality varied with different genomes and parameters in our comparisons. Specifically, we sequenced ∼0.5% of the C. brenneri and C. sp. 3 PS1010 genomes, and compared five Caenorhabditis genomes (C. elegans, C. briggsae, C. brenneri, C. remanei, and C. sp. 3 PS1010) to find regulatory elements in 22.8 kb of noncoding sequence from the ceh-13/lin-39 Hox subcluster. We developed the MUSSA program to find ungapped DNA sequences with N-way transitive conservation, applied it to the ceh-13/lin-39 locus, and transgenically assayed 21 regions with both high and low degrees of conservation. This identified 10 functional regulatory elements whose activities matched known ceh-13/lin-39 expression, with 100% specificity and a 77% recovery rate. One element was so well conserved that a similar mouse Hox cluster sequence recapitulated the native nematode expression pattern when tested in worms. Our findings suggest that ungapped sequence comparisons can predict regulatory elements genome-wide. PMID:18981268

  9. Next Generation Sequencing of DNA-Launched Chikungunya Vaccine Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hidajat, Rachmat; Nickols, Brian; Forrester, Naomi; Tretyakova, Irina; Weaver, Scott; Pushko, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) represents a pandemic threat with no approved vaccine available. Recently, we described a novel vaccination strategy based on iDNA® infectious clone designed to launch a live-attenuated CHIKV vaccine from plasmid DNA in vitro or in vivo. As a proof of concept, we prepared iDNA plasmid pCHIKV-7 encoding the full-length cDNA of the 181/25 vaccine. The DNA-launched CHIKV-7 virus was prepared and compared to the 181/25 virus. Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing revealed that with the exception of the 3’ untranslated region, CHIKV-7 viral RNA consistently showed a lower frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphisms than the 181/25 RNA including at the E2-12 and E2-82 residues previously identified as attenuating mutations. In the CHIKV-7, frequencies of reversions at E2-12 and E2-82 were 0.064% and 0.086%, while in the 181/25, frequencies were 0.179% and 0.133%, respectively. We conclude that the DNA-launched virus has a reduced probability of reversion mutations, thereby enhancing vaccine safety. PMID:26855330

  10. Maternal Plasma DNA and RNA Sequencing for Prenatal Testing.

    PubMed

    Tamminga, Saskia; van Maarle, Merel; Henneman, Lidewij; Oudejans, Cees B M; Cornel, Martina C; Sistermans, Erik A

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing has recently become indispensable in diagnostic testing and screening. In the prenatal setting, this type of testing is often called noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). With a number of techniques, using either next-generation sequencing or single nucleotide polymorphism-based approaches, fetal cfDNA in maternal plasma can be analyzed to screen for rhesus D genotype, common chromosomal aneuploidies, and increasingly for testing other conditions, including monogenic disorders. With regard to screening for common aneuploidies, challenges arise when implementing NIPT in current prenatal settings. Depending on the method used (targeted or nontargeted), chromosomal anomalies other than trisomy 21, 18, or 13 can be detected, either of fetal or maternal origin, also referred to as unsolicited or incidental findings. For various biological reasons, there is a small chance of having either a false-positive or false-negative NIPT result, or no result, also referred to as a "no-call." Both pre- and posttest counseling for NIPT should include discussing potential discrepancies. Since NIPT remains a screening test, a positive NIPT result should be confirmed by invasive diagnostic testing (either by chorionic villus biopsy or by amniocentesis). As the scope of NIPT is widening, professional guidelines need to discuss the ethics of what to offer and how to offer. In this review, we discuss the current biochemical, clinical, and ethical challenges of cfDNA testing in the prenatal setting and its future perspectives including novel applications that target RNA instead of DNA.

  11. A convenient and adaptable microcomputer environment for DNA and protein sequence manipulation and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pustell, J; Kafatos, F C

    1986-01-01

    We describe the further development of a widely used package of DNA and protein sequence analysis programs for microcomputers (1,2,3). The package now provides a screen oriented user interface, and an enhanced working environment with powerful formatting, disk access, and memory management tools. The new GenBank floppy disk database is supported transparently to the user and a similar version of the NBRF protein database is provided. The programs can use sequence file annotation to automatically annotate printouts and translate or extract specified regions from sequences by name. The sequence comparison programs can now perform a 5000 X 5000 bp analysis in 12 minutes on an IBM PC. A program to locate potential protein coding regions in nucleic acids, a digitizer interface, and other additions are also described. PMID:3753784

  12. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  13. Luminescent and electroactive labels for DNA sequencing and mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    New labels for DNA based on metalloorganic compounds that are either electrochemically active or have long-lived luminescent excited states have been prepared. A derivative of the macrocyclic chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetracyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) was used to attach the lanthanide [Ln(III)] ion to oligonucleotides. This ligand proved stable providing kinetically inert complexes with such metal ions.

  14. Characterization of cDNA clones encoding rabbit and human serum paraoxonase: The mature protein retains its signal sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, C.; Richter, R.J.; Humbert, R.; Omiecinski, C.J.; Furlong, C.E. ); Chapline, C.; Crabb, J.W. )

    1991-10-22

    Serum paraoxonase hydrolyzes the toxic metabolites of a variety of organophosphorus insecticides. High serum paraoxonase levels appear to protect against the neurotoxic effects of organophosphorus substrates of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence accounting for 42% of rabbit paraoxonase was determined. From these data, two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized and used to screen a rabbit liver cDNA library. Human paraoxonase clones were isolated from a liver cDNA library by using the rabbit cDNA as a hybridization probe. Inserts from three of the longest clones were sequenced, and one full-length clone contained an open reading frame encoding 355 amino acids, four less than the rabbit paraoxonase protein. Amino-terminal sequences derived from purified rabbit and human paraoxonase proteins suggested that the signal sequence is retained, with the exception of the initiator methionine residue. Characterization of the rabbit and human paraoxonase cDNA clones confirms that the signal sequences are not processed, except for the N-terminal methionine residue. The rabbit and human cDNA clones demonstrate striking nucleotide and deduced amino acid similarities (greater than 85%), suggesting an important metabolic role and constraints on the evolution of this protein.

  15. Complete DNA sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the black chiton, Katharina tunicata.

    PubMed

    Boore, J L; Brown, W M

    1994-10-01

    The DNA sequence of the 15,532-base pair (bp) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the chiton Katharina tunicata has been determined. The 37 genes typical of metazoan mtDNA are present: 13 for protein subunits involved in oxidative phosphorylation, 2 for rRNAs and 22 for tRNAs. The gene arrangement resembles those of arthropods much more than that of another mollusc, the bivalve Mytilus edulis. Most genes abut directly or overlap, and abbreviated stop codons are inferred for four genes. Four junctions between adjacent pairs of protein genes lack intervening tRNA genes; however, at each of these junctions there is a sequence immediately adjacent to the start codon of the downstream gene that is capable of forming a stem-and-loop structure. Analysis of the tRNA gene sequences suggests that the D arm is unpaired in tRNA(ser)(AGN), which is typical of metazoan mtDNAs, and also in tRNA(ser)(UCN), a condition found previously only in nematode mtDNAs. There are two additional sequences in Katharina mtDNA that can be folded into structures resembling tRNAs; whether these are functional genes is unknown. All possible codons except the stop codons TAA and TAG are used in the protein-encoding genes, and Katharina mtDNA appears to use the same variation of the mitochondrial genetic code that is used in Drosophila and Mytilus. Translation initiates at the codons ATG, ATA and GTG. A + T richness appears to have affected codon usage patterns and, perhaps, the amino acid composition of the encoded proteins. A 142-bp non-coding region between tRNA(glu) and CO3 contains a 72-bp tract of alternating A and T.

  16. Complete DNA Sequence of the Mitochondrial Genome of the Black Chiton, Katharina Tunicata

    PubMed Central

    Boore, J. L.; Brown, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the 15,532-base pair (bp) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the chiton Katharina tunicata has been determined. The 37 genes typical of metazoan mtDNA are present: 13 for protein subunits involved in oxidative phosphorylation, 2 for rRNAs and 22 for tRNAs. The gene arrangement resembles those of arthropods much more than that of another mollusc, the bivalve Mytilus edulis. Most genes abut directly or overlap, and abbreviated stop codons are inferred for four genes. Four junctions between adjacent pairs of protein genes lack intervening tRNA genes; however, at each of these junctions there is a sequence immediately adjacent to the start codon of the downstream gene that is capable of forming a stem-and-loop structure. Analysis of the tRNA gene sequences suggests that the D arm is unpaired in tRNA(ser(AGN)), which is typical of metazoan mtDNAs, and also in tRNA(ser(UCN)), a condition found previously only in nematode mtDNAs. There are two additional sequences in Katharina mtDNA that can be folded into structures resembling tRNAs; whether these are functional genes is unknown. All possible codons except the stop codons TAA and TAG are used in the protein-encoding genes, and Katharina mtDNA appears to use the same variation of the mitochondrial genetic code that is used in Drosophila and Mytilus. Translation initiates at the codons ATG, ATA and GTG. A + T richness appears to have affected codon usage patterns and, perhaps, the amino acid composition of the encoded proteins. A 142-bp non-coding region between tRNA(glu) and CO3 contains a 72-bp tract of alternating A and T. PMID:7828825

  17. DNA sequence determinants controlling affinity, stability and shape of DNA complexes bound by the nucleoid protein Fis

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, Stephen P.; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C.; Leng, Fenfei

    2016-03-09

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequences in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. Lastly, the affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions.

  18. Complete genome sequence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Massimiliano; Costelli, Cristina; Malavasi, Veronica; Cusano, Roberto; Concas, Alessandro; Angius, Andrea; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of mitochondrial genome of the Chlorella sorokiniana strain (SAG 111-8 k) is presented in this work. Within the Chlorella genus, it represents the second species with a complete sequenced and annotated mitochondrial genome (GenBank accession no. KM241869). The genome consists of circular chromosomes of 52,528 bp and encodes a total of 31 protein coding genes, 3 rRNAs and 26 tRNAs. The overall AT contents of the C. sorokiniana mtDNA is 70.89%, while the coding sequence is of 97.4%.

  19. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  20. Amino acid sequence of anionic peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei.

    PubMed

    Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Li, Qing X

    2014-12-10

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications.

  1. Phylogenetic Analysis of Geographically Diverse Radopholus similis via rDNA Sequence Reveals a Monomorphic Motif.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Thomas, W K; Frisse, L M; Sarah, J L; Stanton, J M; Speijer, P R; Marin, D H; Opperman, C H

    2000-06-01

    The nucleic acid sequences of rDNA ITS1 and the rDNA D2/D3 expansion segment were compared for 57 burrowing nematode isolates collected from Australia, Cameroon, Central America, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Florida, Guadeloupe, Hawaii, Nigeria, Honduras, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Puerto Rico, South Africa, and Uganda. Of the 57 isolates, 55 were morphologically similar to Radopholus similis and seven were citrus-parasitic. The nucleic acid sequences for PCR-amplified ITS1 and for the D2/D3 expansion segment of the 28S rDNA gene were each identical for all putative R. similis. Sequence divergence for both the ITS1 and the D2/D3 was concordant with morphological differences that distinguish R. similis from other burrowing nematode species. This result substantiates previous observations that the R. similis genome is highly conserved across geographic regions. Autapomorphies that would delimit phylogenetic lineages of non-citrus-parasitic R. similis from those that parasitize citrus were not observed. The data presented herein support the concept that R. similis is comprised of two pathotypes-one that parasitizes citrus and one that does not.

  2. A Coxiella burnetti repeated DNA element resembling a bacterial insertion sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, T A; Vodkin, M H; Williams, J C

    1992-01-01

    A DNA fragment located on the 3' side of the Coxiella burnetii htpAB operon was determined by Southern blotting to exist in approximately 19 copies in the Nine Mile I genome. The DNA sequences of this htpAB-associated repetitive element and two other independent copies were analyzed to determine the size and nature of the element. The three copies of the element were 1,450, 1,452, and 1,458 bp long, with less than 2% divergence among the three sequences. Several features characteristic of bacterial insertion sequences were discovered. These included a single significant open reading frame that would encode a 367-amino-acid polypeptide which was predicted to be highly basic, to have a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix motif, to have a leucine zipper motif, and to have homology to polypeptides found in several other bacterial insertion sequences. Identical 7-bp inverted repeats were found at the ends of all three copies of the element. However, duplications generated by many bacterial mobile elements in the recipient DNA during insertion events did not flank the inverted repeats of any of the three C. burnetii elements examined. A second pair of inverted repeats that flanked the open reading frame was also found in all three copies of the element. Most of the divergence among the three copies of the element occurred in the region between the two inverted repeat sequences in the 3' end of the element. Despite the sequence changes, all three copies of the element have retained significant dyad symmetry in this region. Images PMID:1324903

  3. The chemical structure of DNA sequence signals for RNA transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, D. G.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed recognition sites for RNA transcription for E. coli NRA polymerase, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, and eukaryotic RNA polymerase Pol II are evaluated in the light of the requirements for efficient recognition. It is shown that although there is good experimental evidence that specific nucleic acid sequence patterns are involved in transcriptional regulation in bacteria and bacterial viruses, among the sequences now available, only in the case of the promoters recognized by bacteriophage T7 polymerase does it seem likely that the pattern is sufficient. It is concluded that the eukaryotic pattern that is investigated is not restrictive enough to serve as a recognition site.

  4. Sequence Heterogeneity Accelerates Protein Search for Targets on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Alexey; Kolomeisky, Anatoly

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry and heterogeneity of a genome. The work was supported by the Welch Foundation (Grant C-1559), by the NSF (Grant CHE-1360979), and by the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-1427654).

  5. Using Synthetic Nanopores for Single-Molecule Analyses: Detecting SNPs, Trapping DNA Molecules, and the Prospects for Sequencing DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitrov, Valentin V.

    2009-01-01

    This work focuses on studying properties of DNA molecules and DNA-protein interactions using synthetic nanopores, and it examines the prospects of sequencing DNA using synthetic nanopores. We have developed a method for discriminating between alleles that uses a synthetic nanopore to measure the binding of a restriction enzyme to DNA. There exists…

  6. Phylogenetic diversity of insecticolous fusaria inferred from multilocus DNA sequence data and their molecular identification via FUSARIUM-ID and Fusarium MLST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We constructed several multilocus Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence datasets to assess the phylogenetic diversity of insecticolous fusaria, especially focusing on those housed in the Agricultural Research Service Collection of Entomopathogenic Fungi (ARSEF), and to facilitate molecular identifica...

  7. Significance of satellite DNA revealed by conservation of a widespread repeat DNA sequence among angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Shweta; Goel, Shailendra; Raina, Soom Nath; Rajpal, Vijay Rani

    2014-08-01

    The analysis of plant genome structure and evolution requires comprehensive characterization of repetitive sequences that make up the majority of plant nuclear DNA. In the present study, we analyzed the nature of pCtKpnI-I and pCtKpnI-II tandem repeated sequences, reported earlier in Carthamus tinctorius. Interestingly, homolog of pCtKpnI-I repeat sequence was also found to be present in widely divergent families of angiosperms. pCtKpnI-I showed high sequence similarity but low copy number among various taxa of different families of angiosperms analyzed. In comparison, pCtKpnI-II was specific to the genus Carthamus and was not present in any other taxa analyzed. The molecular structure of pCtKpnI-I was analyzed in various unrelated taxa of angiosperms to decipher the evolutionary conserved nature of the sequence and its possible functional role.

  8. Genetic variability of Taenia saginata inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Sima; Salavati, Reza; Beech, Robin N; Babaei, Zahra; Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2015-04-01

    Taenia saginata is an important tapeworm, infecting humans in many parts of the world. The present study was undertaken to identify inter- and intraspecific variation of T. saginata isolated from cattle in different parts of Iran using two mitochondrial CO1 and 12S rRNA genes. Up to 105 bovine specimens of T. saginata were collected from 20 slaughterhouses in three provinces of Iran. DNA were extracted from the metacestode Cysticercus bovis. After PCR amplification, sequencing of CO1 and 12S rRNA genes were carried out and two phylogenetic analyses of the sequence data were generated by Bayesian inference on CO1 and 12S rRNA sequences. Sequence analyses of CO1 and 12S rRNA genes showed 11 and 29 representative profiles respectively. The level of pairwise nucleotide variation between individual haplotypes of CO1 gene was 0.3-2.4% while the overall nucleotide variation among all 11 haplotypes was 4.6%. For 12S rRNA sequence data, level of pairwise nucleotide variation was 0.2-2.5% and the overall nucleotide variation was determined as 5.8% among 29 haplotypes of 12S rRNA gene. Considerable genetic diversity was found in both mitochondrial genes particularly in 12S rRNA gene.

  9. Phylogenetic inference of Indian malaria vectors from multilocus DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Jyotsana; Srivastava, Hemlata; Sharma, Meenu; Das, Manoj K; Singh, O P; Raghavendra, K; Nanda, Nutan; Dash, Aditya P; Saksena, D N; Das, Aparup

    2010-08-01

    Inferences on the taxonomic positions, phylogenetic interrelationships and divergence time among closely related species of medical importance is essential to understand evolutionary patterns among species, and based on which, disease control measures could be devised. To this respect, malaria is one of the important mosquito borne diseases of tropical and sub-tropical parts of the globe. Taxonomic status of malaria vectors has been so far documented based on morphological, cytological and few molecular genetic features. However, utilization of multilocus DNA sequences in phylogenetic inferences are still in dearth. India contains one of the richest resources of mosquito species diversity but little molecular taxonomic information is available in Indian malaria vectors. We herewith utilized the whole genome sequence information of An. gambiae to amplify and sequence three orthologous nuclear genetic regions in six Indian malaria vector species (An. culicifacies, An. minimus, An. sundaicus, An. fluviatilis, An. annularis and An. stephensi). Further, we utilized the previously published DNA sequence information on the COII and ITS2 genes in all the six species, making the total number of loci to five. Multilocus molecular phylogenetic study of Indian anophelines and An. gambiae was conducted at each individual genetic region using Neighbour Joining (NJ), Maximum Likelihood (ML), Maximum Parsimony (MP) and Bayesian approaches. Although tree topologies with COII, and ITS2 genes were similar, for no other three genetic regions similar tree topologies were observed. In general, the reconstructed phylogenetic status of Indian malaria vectors follows the pattern based on morphological and cytological classifications that was reconfirmed with COII and ITS2 genetic regions. Further, divergence times based on COII gene sequences were estimated among the seven Anopheles species which corroborate the earlier hypothesis on the radiation of different species of the Anopheles

  10. Isolation and analysis of high quality nuclear DNA with reduced organellar DNA for plant genome sequencing and resequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics by drastically reducing the cost of sequencing, making it feasible for individual labs to sequence or resequence plant genomes. Obtaining high quality, high molecular weight DNA from plants poses significant challenges due to the high copy number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA, as well as high levels of phenolic compounds and polysaccharides. Multiple methods have been used to isolate DNA from plants; the CTAB method is commonly used to isolate total cellular DNA from plants that contain nuclear DNA, as well as chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA. Alternatively, DNA can be isolated from nuclei to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. Results We describe optimized protocols for isolation of nuclear DNA from eight different plant species encompassing both monocot and eudicot species. These protocols use nuclei isolation to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. We also developed a protocol to determine the number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies relative to the nuclear DNA using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). We compared DNA isolated from nuclei to total cellular DNA isolated with the CTAB method. As expected, DNA isolated from nuclei consistently yielded nuclear DNA with fewer chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies, as compared to the total cellular DNA prepared with the CTAB method. This protocol will allow for analysis of the quality and quantity of nuclear DNA before starting a plant whole genome sequencing or resequencing experiment. Conclusions Extracting high quality, high molecular weight nuclear DNA in plants has the potential to be a bottleneck in the era of whole genome sequencing and resequencing. The methods that are described here provide a framework for researchers to extract and quantify nuclear DNA in multiple types of plants. PMID:21599914

  11. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  12. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  13. Computational identification of transcriptional regulatory elements in DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    GuhaThakurta, Debraj

    2006-01-01

    Identification and annotation of all the functional elements in the genome, including genes and the regulatory sequences, is a fundamental challenge in genomics and computational biology. Since regulatory elements are frequently short and variable, their identification and discovery using computational algorithms is difficult. However, significant advances have been made in the computational methods for modeling and detection of DNA regulatory elements. The availability of complete genome sequence from multiple organisms, as well as mRNA profiling and high-throughput experimental methods for mapping protein-binding sites in DNA, have contributed to the development of methods that utilize these auxiliary data to inform the detection of transcriptional regulatory elements. Progress is also being made in the identification of cis-regulatory modules and higher order structures of the regulatory sequences, which is essential to the understanding of transcription regulation in the metazoan genomes. This article reviews the computational approaches for modeling and identification of genomic regulatory elements, with an emphasis on the recent developments, and current challenges. PMID:16855295

  14. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli (update 1993).

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, M; Wahl, R; Rice, P

    1993-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E. coli available from the GENBANK and EMBL data libraries and over a period of several years independently from the literature. This is the fifth listing replacing and increasing the former listings substantially. However, in order to save space this printed version contains DNA sequence information only, if they are publically available in electronic form. The complete compilation including a full set of genetic map data and the E. coli protein index can be obtained in machine readable form from the EMBL data library (ECD release 15) as a part of the CD-ROM issue of the EMBL sequence database, released and updated every three months. After deletion of all detected overlaps a total of 2,353,635 individual bp is found to be determined till the end of April 1993. This corresponds to a total of 49.87% of the entire E. coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by 9161 bp derived from other strains of E. coli. PMID:8332520

  15. Dipeptide Sequence Determination: Analyzing Phenylthiohydantoin Amino Acids by HPLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Janice S.; Tang, Chung-Fei; Reed, Steven S.

    2000-02-01

    Amino acid composition and sequence determination, important techniques for characterizing peptides and proteins, are essential for predicting conformation and studying sequence alignment. This experiment presents improved, fundamental methods of sequence analysis for an upper-division biochemistry laboratory. Working in pairs, students use the Edman reagent to prepare phenylthiohydantoin derivatives of amino acids for determination of the sequence of an unknown dipeptide. With a single HPLC technique, students identify both the N-terminal amino acid and the composition of the dipeptide. This method yields good precision of retention times and allows use of a broad range of amino acids as components of the dipeptide. Students learn fundamental principles and techniques of sequence analysis and HPLC.

  16. DNA sequence determinants controlling affinity, stability and shape of DNA complexes bound by the nucleoid protein Fis

    DOE PAGES

    Hancock, Stephen P.; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; ...

    2016-03-09

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequencesmore » in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. Lastly, the affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions.« less

  17. Signal-exon trap: a novel method for the identification of signal sequences from genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Péterfy, Miklós; Gyuris, Tibor; Takács, László

    2000-01-01

    We describe a genomic DNA-based signal sequence trap method, signal-exon trap (SET), for the identification of genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins. SET is based on the coupling of an exon trap to the translation of captured exons, which allows screening of the exon-encoded polypeptides for signal peptide function. Since most signal sequences are expected to be located in the 5′-terminal exons of genes, we first demonstrate that trapping of these exons is feasible. To test the applicability of SET for the screening of complex genomic DNA, we evaluated two critical features of the method. Specificity was assessed by the analysis of random genomic DNA and efficiency was demonstrated by screening a 425 kb YAC known to contain the genes of four secretory or membrane-bound proteins. All trapped clones contained a translation initiation signal followed by a hydrophobic stretch of amino acids representing either a known signal peptide, transmembrane domain or novel sequence. Our results suggest that SET is a potentially useful method for the isolation of signal sequence-containing genes and may find application in the discovery of novel members of known secretory gene clusters, as well as in other positional cloning approaches. PMID:10710443

  18. Legume genomics: understanding biology through DNA and RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Jamie A.; Bolon, Yung-Tsi; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Vance, Carroll P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The legume family (Leguminosae) consists of approx. 17 000 species. A few of these species, including, but not limited to, Phaseolus vulgaris, Cicer arietinum and Cajanus cajan, are important dietary components, providing protein for approx. 300 million people worldwide. Additional species, including soybean (Glycine max) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), are important crops utilized mainly in animal feed. In addition, legumes are important contributors to biological nitrogen, forming symbiotic relationships with rhizobia to fix atmospheric N2 and providing up to 30 % of available nitrogen for the next season of crops. The application of high-throughput genomic technologies including genome sequencing projects, genome re-sequencing (DNA-seq) and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) by the legume research community has provided major insights into genome evolution, genomic architecture and domestication. Scope and Conclusions This review presents an overview of the current state of legume genomics and explores the role that next-generation sequencing technologies play in advancing legume genomics. The adoption of next-generation sequencing and implementation of associated bioinformatic tools has allowed researchers to turn each species of interest into their own model organism. To illustrate the power of next-generation sequencing, an in-depth overview of the transcriptomes of both soybean and white lupin (Lupinus albus) is provided. The soybean transcriptome focuses on analysing seed development in two near-isogenic lines, examining the role of transporters, oil biosynthesis and nitrogen utilization. The white lupin transcriptome analysis examines how phosphate deficiency alters gene expression patterns, inducing the formation of cluster roots. Such studies illustrate the power of next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in elucidating the gene networks underlying biological processes. PMID:24769535

  19. Mitochondrial DNA Sequencing of Cat Hair: An Informative Forensic Tool*

    PubMed Central

    Tarditi, Christy R.; Grahn, Robert A.; Evans, Jeffrey J.; Kurushima, Jennifer D.; Lyons, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 81.7 million cats are in 37.5 million USA households. Shed fur can be criminal evidence due to transfer to victims, suspects, and / or their belongings. To improve cat hairs as forensic evidence, the mtDNA control region from single hairs, with and without root tags, was sequenced. A dataset of a 402 bp CR segment from 174 random-bred cats representing four USA geographic areas was generated to determine the informativeness of the mtDNA region. Thirty-two mtDNA mitotypes were observed ranging in frequencies from 0.6-27%. Four common types occurred in all populations. Low heteroplasmy, 1.7%, was determined. Unique mitotypes were found in 18 individuals, 10.3% of the population studied. The calculated discrimination power implied that 8.3 of 10 randomly selected individuals can be excluded by this region. The genetic characteristics of the region and the generated dataset support the use of this cat mtDNA region in forensic applications. PMID:21077873

  20. Retroviral DNA Sequences as a Means for Determining Ancient Diets

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Perez, Jessica I.; Cano, Raul J.; Narganes-Storde, Yvonne; Chanlatte-Baik, Luis; Toranzos, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    For ages, specialists from varying fields have studied the diets of the primeval inhabitants of our planet, detecting diet remains in archaeological specimens using a range of morphological and biochemical methods. As of recent, metagenomic ancient DNA studies have allowed for the comparison of the fecal and gut microbiomes associated to archaeological specimens from various regions of the world; however the complex dynamics represented in those microbial communities still remain unclear. Theoretically, similar to eukaryote DNA the presence of genes from key microbes or enzymes, as well as the presence of DNA from viruses specific to key organisms, may suggest the ingestion of specific diet components. In this study we demonstrate that ancient virus DNA obtained from coprolites also provides information reconstructing the host’s diet, as inferred from sequences obtained from pre-Columbian coprolites. This depicts a novel and reliable approach to determine new components as well as validate the previously suggested diets of extinct cultures and animals. Furthermore, to our knowledge this represents the first description of the eukaryotic viral diversity found in paleofaeces belonging to pre-Columbian cultures. PMID:26660678

  1. A Simulation of DNA Sequencing Utilizing 3M Post-It[R] Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Doug

    2009-01-01

    An inexpensive and equipment free approach to teaching the technical aspects of DNA sequencing. The activity described requires an instructor with a familiarity of DNA sequencing technology but provides a straight forward method of teaching the technical aspects of sequencing in the absence of expensive sequencing equipment. The final sequence…

  2. High speed DNA sequence analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry. Final report for period February 15, 1991 - February 14, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Lloyd M.

    2001-04-17

    This grant had as its focus (i) to develop chemistry and enzymology to permit the enzymatic synthesis of 2' fluoro modified Sanger sequencing reactions, which would be resistant to fragmentation during MALDI process, (ii) to develop rapid MALDI analyses of DNA sequence polymorphisms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) DNA analogs in conjunction with solid phase chemistry (iii) to study the fundamental mechanisms occurring in the MALDI analysis of nucleic acids.

  3. Chromatin opening of DNA satellites by targeted sequence-specific drugs.

    PubMed

    Janssen, S; Durussel, T; Laemmli, U K

    2000-11-01

    There are few tools available for dissecting and elucidating the functions of DNA satellites and other nongenic DNA. To address this, we have explored the experimental potential of DNA sequence-specific drugs containing pyrrole and imidazole amino acids (polyamides). Compounds were synthesized that target different Drosophila melanogaster satellites. Dimeric oligopyrroles were shown to target the AT-rich satellites I, III, and SARs (scaffold associated regions). One polyamide (P31) specifically binds the GAGAA satellite V. Specificity of targeting was established by footprinting, epifluorescence of nuclei, and polytene chromosomes stained with fluorescent derivatives. These polyamides were shown to mediate satellite-specific chromatin opening of the chromatin fiber. Remarkably, certain polyamides induced defined gain or loss-of-function phenotypes when fed to Drosophila melanogaster.

  4. Entropy and long-range correlations in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Melnik, S S; Usatenko, O V

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the structure of DNA molecules of different organisms by using the additive Markov chain approach. Transforming nucleotide sequences into binary strings, we perform statistical analysis of the corresponding "texts". We develop the theory of N-step additive binary stationary ergodic Markov chains and analyze their differential entropy. Supposing that the correlations are weak we express the conditional probability function of the chain by means of the pair correlation function and represent the entropy as a functional of the pair correlator. Since the model uses two point correlators instead of probability of block occurring, it makes possible to calculate the entropy of subsequences at much longer distances than with the use of the standard methods. We utilize the obtained analytical result for numerical evaluation of the entropy of coarse-grained DNA texts. We believe that the entropy study can be used for biological classification of living species.

  5. Sequence and Temperature Influence on Kinetics of DNA Strand Displacement at Gold Electrode Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Biala, Katarzyna; Sedova, Ada; Flechsig, Gerd-Uwe

    2015-09-16

    Understanding complex contributions of surface environment to tethered nucleic acid sensing experiments has proven challenging, yet it is important because it is essential for interpretation and calibration of indispensable methods, such as microarrays. We investigate the effects of DNA sequence and solution temperature gradients on the kinetics of strand displacement at heated gold wire electrodes, and at gold disc electrodes in a heated solution. Addition of a terminal double mismatch (toehold) provides a reduction in strand displacement energy barriers sufficient to probe the secondary mechanisms involved in the hybridization process. In four different DNA capture probe sequences (relevant for the identification of genetically modified maize MON810), all but one revealed a high activation energy up to 200 kJ/mol during hybridization, that we attribute to displacement of protective strands by capture probes. Protective strands contain 4 to 5 mismatches to ease their displacement by the surface-confined probes at the gold electrodes. A low activation energy (30 kJ/mol) was observed for the sequence whose protective strand contained a toehold and one central mismatch, its kinetic curves displayed significantly different shapes, and we observed a reduced maximum signal intensity as compared to other sequences. These findings point to potential sequence-related contributions to oligonucleotide diffusion influencing kinetics. Additionally, for all sequences studied with heated wire electrodes, we observed a 23 K lower optimal hybridization temperature in comparison with disc electrodes in heated solution, and greatly reduced voltammetric signals after taking into account electrode surface area. We propose that thermodiffusion due to temperature gradients may influence both hybridization and strand displacement kinetics at heated microelectrodes, an explanation supported by computational fluid dynamics. DNA assays with surface-confined capture probes and temperature

  6. Optimization of ELFSE DNA Sequencing with EOF Counterflow and Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkopf, Max A.; Mukherjee, Tamal; Ydstie, B. Erik; Schneider, James W.

    2015-01-01

    We present a non-linear optimization study of different implementations of the DNA electrophoretic method ”End-labeled Free-solution Electrophoresis” (ELFSE) in commercial capillary electrophoresis systems and microfluidics to improve the time required for readout. Here, the effect of electro-osmotic counterflows (EOF) and snap-shot detection are considered to allow for detection of peaks soon after they are electorphoretically resolved. Using drag tags available in micelle form, we identify a design capable of sequencing 600 bases in 2.8 minutes. PMID:25154385

  7. Nonlinear analysis of correlations in Alu repeat sequences in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yi; Huang, Yanzhao; Li, Mingfeng; Xu, Ruizhen; Xiao, Saifeng

    2003-12-01

    We report on a nonlinear analysis of deterministic structures in Alu repeats, one of the richest repetitive DNA sequences in the human genome. Alu repeats contain the recognition sites for the restriction endonuclease AluI, which is what gives them their name. Using the nonlinear prediction method developed in chaos theory, we find that all Alu repeats have novel deterministic structures and show strong nonlinear correlations that are absent from exon and intron sequences. Furthermore, the deterministic structures of Alus of younger subfamilies show panlike shapes. As young Alus can be seen as mutation free copies from the “master genes,” it may be suggested that the deterministic structures of the older subfamilies are results of an evolution from a “panlike” structure to a more diffuse correlation pattern due to mutation.

  8. Optimizing Data Intensive GPGPU Computations for DNA Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Trapnell, Cole; Schatz, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    MUMmerGPU uses highly-parallel commodity graphics processing units (GPU) to accelerate the data-intensive computation of aligning next generation DNA sequence data to a reference sequence for use in diverse applications such as disease genotyping and personal genomics. MUMmerGPU 2.0 features a new stackless depth-first-search print kernel and is 13× faster than the serial CPU version of the alignment code and nearly 4× faster in total computation time than MUMmerGPU 1.0. We exhaustively examined 128 GPU data layout configurations to improve register footprint and running time and conclude higher occupancy has greater impact than reduced latency. MUMmerGPU is available open-source at http://mummergpu.sourceforge.net. PMID:20161021

  9. Photocatalytic probing of DNA sequence by using TiO{sub 2}/dopamine-DNA triads.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; de la Garza, L.; Zhang, L.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Zuo, X.; Tiede, D. M.; Rajh, T.

    2007-10-15

    A method to control charge transfer reaction in DNA using hybrid nanometer-sized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was developed. In this system extended charge separation reflects the sequence of DNA and was measured using metallic silver deposition or by photocurrent response. Light-induced extended charge separation in these systems was found to be dependent on the DNA-bridge length and sequence. The yield of photocatalytic deposition of silver was studied in systems having GG accepting sites imbedded in AT runs at varying distances from the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle surface. Weak distance dependence of charge separation indicative of a hole hopping through mediating adenine (A) sites was found. The quantum yield of silver deposition in the system having a GG accepting site placed 8.5 {angstrom} from the nanoparticle surface was found to be {Phi} = 0.70 (70%) and {Phi} = 0.56 (56%) for (A){sub n} and (AT){sub n/2} bridge, respectively. Hole injection to GG trapping sites as far as 70 {angstrom} from a nanoparticle surface in the absence of G hopping sites was measured. Introduction of G hopping sites increased the efficiency of hole injection. The efficiency of photocatalytic deposition of metallic silver was found to be sensitive to the presence of a single nucleobase mismatch in the DNA sequence.

  10. DNA topology, not DNA sequence, is a critical determinant for Drosophila ORC–DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Remus, Dirk; Beall, Eileen L; Botchan, Michael R

    2004-01-01

    Drosophila origin recognition complex (ORC) localizes to defined positions on chromosomes, and in follicle cells the chorion gene amplification loci are well-studied examples. However, the mechanism of specific localization is not known. We have studied the DNA binding of DmORC to investigate the cis-requirements for DmORC:DNA interaction. DmORC displays at best six-fold differences in the relative affinities to DNA from the third chorion locus and to random fragments in vitro, and chemical probing and DNase1 protection experiments did not identify a discrete binding site for DmORC on any of these fragments. The intrinsic DNA-binding specificity of DmORC is therefore insufficient to target DmORC to origins of replication in vivo. However, the topological state of the DNA significantly influences the affinity of DmORC to DNA. We found that the affinity of DmORC for negatively supercoiled DNA is about 30-fold higher than for either relaxed or linear DNA. These data provide biochemical evidence for the notion that origin specification in metazoa likely involves mechanisms other than simple replicator–initiator interactions and that in vivo other proteins must determine ORC's localization. PMID:14765124

  11. Design of electrochemical biosensor systems for the detection of specific DNA sequences in PCR-amplified nucleic acids related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val108/158Met polymorphism based on intrinsic guanine signal.

    PubMed

    Ozkan-Ariksoysal, Dilsat; Tezcanli, Burcin; Kosova, Buket; Ozsoz, Mehmet

    2008-02-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common and complex diseases that show polygenic and multifactorial heredity. A single nucleotide polymorphism (Val108/158Met) in the catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) gene is related to many psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, alcoholism, bipolar disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Schizophrenia is a complex disorder and a single nucleotide polymorphism (Val108/158Met) at the COMT gene is related to schizophrenia susceptibility. A novel hybridization-based disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of a common functional polymorphism in the COMT gene from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons has been described without using an external label. This developed technology combined with a disposable carbon graphite electrode and differential pulse voltammetry was performed by using short synthetic oligonucleotides and PCR amplicons in length 203 bp to measure the change of guanine oxidation signal obtained at approximately +1.0 V after DNA hybridization between probe and target (synthetic target or denatured PCR samples). COMT-specific oligonucleotides were immobilized onto the carbon surface with a simple adsorption method in two different modes: (a) Guanine-containing targets were attached or (b) inosine-substituted probes were attached onto an electrode. By controlling the surface coverage of the target DNA, the hybridization event between the probes and their synthetic targets or specific PCR products was optimized. The wild-type or polymorphic allele-specific probes/targets were also interacted with an equal amount of noncomplementary and one-base mismatch-containing DNAs in order to measure the sensor selectivity. The decrease or appearance in the intrinsic guanine signal simplified the detection procedure and shortened the assay time because protocol eliminates the label-binding step. The nonspecific binding effects were minimized by using sodium dodecyl sulfate with different washing methods

  12. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  13. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  14. Amino acid sequence of mouse submaxillary gland renin.

    PubMed Central

    Misono, K S; Chang, J J; Inagami, T

    1982-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequences of the heavy chain and light chain of mouse submaxillary gland renin have been determined. The heavy chain consists of 288 amino acid residues having a Mr of 31,036 calculated from the sequence. The light chain contains 48 amino acid residues with a Mr of 5,458. The sequence of the heavy chain was determined by automated Edman degradations of the cyanogen bromide peptides and tryptic peptides generated after citraconylation, as well as other peptides generated therefrom. The sequence of the light chain was derived from sequence analyses of the peptides generated by cyanogen bromide cleavage or by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus protease. The sequences in the active site regions in renin containing two catalytically essential aspartyl residues 32 and 215 were found identical with those in pepsin, chymosin, and penicillopepsin. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of renin with that of porcine pepsin indicated a 42% sequence identity of the heavy chain with the amino-terminal and middle regions and a 46% identity of the light chain with the carboxyl-terminal region of the porcine pepsin sequence. Residues identical in renin and pepsin are distributed throughout the length of the molecules, suggesting a similarity in their overall structures. PMID:6812055

  15. Nucleotide sequence of a complementary DNA encoding pea cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.A.; Zilinskas, B.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors now report the nucleotide sequence of the cytosolic Cu/Zn SOD cloned from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library constructed from mRNA extracted from leaves of 7- to 10-d pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.). The clone was isolated using a 22-base synthetic oligonucleotide complementary to the amino acid sequence CGIIGLQG. This sequence, found at the protein's carboxy terminus, is highly conserved among plant cytosolic Cu/Zn SODs but not chloroplastic Cu/Zn SODs. The 738-base pair sequence contains an open reading frame specifying 152 codons and a predicted M{sub r} of 18,024 D. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly homologous (79-82% identity) with the sequences of other known plant cytosolic Cu/Zn SODs but less highly conserved (63-65%) when compared with several chloroplastic Cu/Zn SODs including pea (10).

  16. Sequence Depth, Not PCR Replication, Improves Ecological Inference from Next Generation DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dylan P.; Peay, Kabir G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular approaches and DNA sequencing have greatly progressed the field of ecology and allowed for the study of complex communities in unprecedented detail. Next generation sequencing (NGS) can reveal powerful insights into the diversity, composition, and dynamics of cryptic organisms, but results may be sensitive to a number of technical factors, including molecular practices used to generate amplicons, sequencing technology, and data processing. Despite the popularity of some techniques over others, explicit tests of the relative benefits they convey in molecular ecology studies remain scarce. Here we tested the effects of PCR replication, sequencing depth, and sequencing platform on ecological inference drawn from environmental samples of soil fungi. We sequenced replicates of three soil samples taken from pine biomes in North America represented by pools of either one, two, four, eight, or sixteen PCR replicates with both 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq. Increasing the number of pooled PCR replicates had no detectable effect on measures of α- and β-diversity. Pseudo-β-diversity – which we define as dissimilarity between re-sequenced replicates of the same sample – decreased markedly with increasing sampling depth. The total richness recovered with Illumina was significantly higher than with 454, but measures of α- and β-diversity between a larger set of fungal samples sequenced on both platforms were highly correlated. Our results suggest that molecular ecology studies will benefit more from investing in robust sequencing technologies than from replicating PCRs. This study also demonstrates the potential for continuous integration of older datasets with newer technology. PMID:24587293

  17. Noncontinuously binding loop-out primers for avoiding problematic DNA sequences in PCR and sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Kelli; Swensen, Jeffrey J; Procter, Melinda; Jama, Mohamed; Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney; Lewis, Tracey; Fong, Michael; Hubley, Lindsey; Schwarz, Monica; Ha, Youna; Paul, Eleri; Brulotte, Benjamin; Lyon, Elaine; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Mao, Rong; Pont-Kingdon, Genevieve; Best, D Hunter

    2014-09-01

    We present a method in which noncontinuously binding (loop-out) primers are used to exclude regions of DNA that typically interfere with PCR amplification and/or analysis by Sanger sequencing. Several scenarios were tested using this design principle, including M13-tagged PCR primers, non-M13-tagged PCR primers, and sequencing primers. With this technique, a single oligonucleotide is designed in two segments that flank, but do not include, a short region of problematic DNA sequence. During PCR amplification or sequencing, the problematic region is looped-out from the primer binding site, where it does not interfere with the reaction. Using this method, we successfully excluded regions of up to 46 nucleotides. Loop-out primers were longer than traditional primers (27 to 40 nucleotides) and had higher melting temperatures. This method allows the use of a standardized PCR protocol throughout an assay, keeps the number of PCRs to a minimum, reduces the chance for laboratory error, and, above all, does not interrupt the clinical laboratory workflow.

  18. Identification, localization, transcription, and sequence analysis of the Choristoneura fumiferana nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA polymerase gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, J J; Carstens, E B

    1995-06-01

    The location of the Choristoneura fumiferana baculovirus DNA polymerase gene was determined by hybridization analysis using a probe prepared from the previously identified polymerase gene from the Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the Choristoneura fumiferana baculovirus DNA polymerase gene consists of 2970 base pairs encoding 990 amino acids (114.2 kDa). Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that overlapping transcripts of 3.2 and 4.6 kb, first detected at 6 hr postinfection, potentially coded for the DNA polymerase gene. The major transcription starts sites, identified at 6 hr postinfection, mapped to baculovirus consensus early start sites CGTGCTCA and CAGT. The relatively low level and late initiation of the DNA polymerase gene coupled with our previous data on the temporal control of DNA replication and late gene synthesis (Liu and Carstens, 1993) suggests that the low virulence of the spruce budworm baculovirus may be related to the regulation of its gene expression at the transcriptional level.

  19. Phylogenomics of Phrynosomatid Lizards: Conflicting Signals from Sequence Capture versus Restriction Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Leaché, Adam D.; Chavez, Andreas S.; Jones, Leonard N.; Grummer, Jared A.; Gottscho, Andrew D.; Linkem, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Sequence capture and restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) are popular methods for obtaining large numbers of loci for phylogenetic analysis. These methods are typically used to collect data at different evolutionary timescales; sequence capture is primarily used for obtaining conserved loci, whereas RADseq is designed for discovering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) suitable for population genetic or phylogeographic analyses. Phylogenetic questions that span both “recent” and “deep” timescales could benefit from either type of data, but studies that directly compare the two approaches are lacking. We compared phylogenies estimated from sequence capture and double digest RADseq (ddRADseq) data for North American phrynosomatid lizards, a species-rich and diverse group containing nine genera that began diversifying approximately 55 Ma. Sequence capture resulted in 584 loci that provided a consistent and strong phylogeny using concatenation and species tree inference. However, the phylogeny estimated from the ddRADseq data was sensitive to the bioinformatics steps used for determining homology, detecting paralogs, and filtering missing data. The topological conflicts among the SNP trees were not restricted to any particular timescale, but instead were associated with short internal branches. Species tree analysis of the largest SNP assembly, which also included the most missing data, supported a topology that matched the sequence capture tree. This preferred phylogeny provides strong support for the paraphyly of the earless lizard genera Holbrookia and Cophosaurus, suggesting that the earless morphology either evolved twice or evolved once and was subsequently lost in Callisaurus. PMID:25663487

  20. Hypervariable minisatellite DNA sequences in the Indian peafowl Pavo cristatus.

    PubMed

    Hanotte, O; Burke, T; Armour, J A; Jeffreys, A J

    1991-04-01

    We report here for the first time the large-scale isolation of hypervariable minisatellite DNA sequences from a non-human species, the Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus). A size-selected genomic DNA fraction, rich in hypervariable minisatellites, was cloned into Charomid 9-36. This library was screened using two multilocus hypervariable probes, 33.6 and 33.15 and also, in a "probe-walking" approach, with five of the peafowl minisatellites initially isolated. Forty-eight positively hybridizing clones were characterized and found to originate from 30 different loci, 18 of which were polymorphic. Five of these variable minisatellite loci were studied further. They all showed Mendelian inheritance. The heterozygosities of these loci were relatively low (range 22-78%) in comparison with those of previously cloned human loci, as expected in view of inbreeding in our semicaptive study population. No new length allele mutations were observed in families and the mean mutation rate per locus is low (less than 0.004, 95% confidence maximum). These loci were also investigated by cross-species hybridization in related taxa. The ability of the probes to detect hypervariable sequences in other species within the same avian family was found to vary, from those probes that are species-specific to those that are apparently general to the family. We also illustrate the potential usefulness of these probes for paternity analysis in a study of sexual selection, and discuss the general application of specific hypervariable probes in behavioral and evolutionary studies.

  1. A DNA sequence analysis program for the Apple Macintosh.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, R H

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a new set of programs for analyzing DNA sequences using the Apple Macintosh computer, a computer ideally suited for this kind of analysis. Because of the Macintosh interface and the availability of high quality software-only speech synthesis, these programs are truly easy to use. Instead of typing in commands, the user directs the program by making selections with the mouse, thereby eliminating most typographical and syntax errors. Output options are selected by "pressing buttons" and then clicking "OK" with the mouse. DNA sequences are confirmed by having the program speak them. The high resolution graphics on the Macintosh not only allow for explanatory diagrams to be used to aid in deciding on input parameters, but can be used to produce slides for presentations and figures for papers. Because of the clipboard and the ability of the Macintosh to readily share data among different applications, data can be saved for use directly in word processing documents (e.g. manuscripts). PMID:3003685

  2. Isolation of cDNA encoding a binding protein specific to 5'-phosphorylated single-stranded DNA with G-rich sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, T R; Fukita, Y; Miyoshi, T; Shimizu, A; Honjo, T

    1993-01-01

    We have isolated the cDNA encoding a binding protein to the sequence motif of the immunoglobulin S mu region by the southwestern method. The binding protein designated S mu bp-2 specifically binds to 5'-phosphorylated single-stranded DNA containing 5'-G and GGGG stretches. The amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA sequence showed that the S mu bp-2 belongs to the putative helicase superfamily which is involved in replication, recombination and repair. Expression of S mu bp-2 mRNA is ubiquitous and augmented in spleen cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and interleukin 4 which also induce class switching. The S mu bp-2 gene is conserved among vertebrates. Possible involvement of S mu bp-2 in class switching is discussed. Images PMID:8493094

  3. Design of Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Molecules for DNA Methyltransferase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The CpG dyad, an important genomic feature in DNA methylation and transcriptional regulation, is an attractive target for small molecules. To assess the utility of minor groove binding oligomers for CpG recognition, we screened a small library of hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides targeting the sequence 5′-CGCG-3′ and assessed their sequence specificity using an unbiased next-generation sequencing assay. Our findings indicate that hairpin polyamide of sequence PyImβIm-γ-PyImβIm (1), previously identified as a high affinity 5′-CGCG-3′ binder, favors 5′-GCGC-3′ in an unanticipated reverse binding orientation. Replacement of one β alanine with Py to afford PyImPyIm-γ-PyImβIm (3) restores the preference for 5′-CGCG-3′ binding in a forward orientation. The minor groove binding hairpin 3 inhibits DNA methyltransferase activity in the major groove at its target site more effectively than 1, providing a molecular basis for design of sequence-specific antagonists of CpG methylation. PMID:24502234

  4. Complete genome sequence of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Massimiliano; Cusano, Roberto; Costelli, Cristina; Malavasi, Veronica; Concas, Alessandro; Angius, Andrea; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Chlorella sorokiniana strain (SAG 111-8 k) is presented in this study. The genome consists of circular chromosomes of 109,811 bp, which encode a total of 109 genes, including 74 proteins, 3 rRNAs and 31 tRNAs. Moreover, introns are not detected and all genes are present in single copy. The overall AT contents of the C. sorokiniana cpDNA is 65.9%, the coding sequence is 59.1% and a large inverted repeat (IR) is not observed.

  5. Molecular cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding human trehalase.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, R; Taketani, S; Sasai-Takedatsu, M; Kino, M; Tokunaga, R; Kobayashi, Y

    1997-11-20

    A complete cDNA clone encoding human trehalase, a glycoprotein of brush-border membranes, has been isolated from a human kidney library. The cDNA encodes a protein of 583 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 66,595. Human enzyme contains a typical cleavable signal peptide at amino terminus, five potential glycosylation sites, and a hydrophobic region at carboxyl terminus where the protein is anchored to plasma membranes via glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human enzyme showed similarity to sequences of the enzyme from rabbit, silk worm, Tenebrio molitor, Escherichia coli and yeast. Northern blots revealed that human trehalase mRNA of approx. 2.0 kb was found mainly in the kidney, liver and small intestine. Expression of the recombinant trehalase in E. coli provided a high level of the enzyme activity. The isolation and expression of cDNA for human trehalase should facilitate studies of the structure of the gene, as well as a basis for a better understanding of the catalytic mechanism.

  6. Mylodon darwinii DNA sequences from ancient fecal hair shafts.

    PubMed

    Clack, Andrew A; MacPhee, Ross D E; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2012-01-20

    Preserved hair has been increasingly used as an ancient DNA source in high throughput sequencing endeavors, and it may actually offer several advantages compared to more traditional ancient DNA substrates like bone. However, cold environments have yielded the most informative ancient hair specimens, while its preservation, and thus utility, in temperate regions is not well documented. Coprolites could represent a previously underutilized preservation substrate for hairs, which, if present therein, represent macroscopic packages of specific cells that are relatively simple to separate, clean and process. In this pilot study, we report amplicons 147-152 base pairs in length (w/primers) from hair shafts preserved in a south Chilean coprolite attributed to Darwin's extinct ground sloth, Mylodon darwinii. Our results suggest that hairs preserved in coprolites from temperate cave environments can serve as an effective source of ancient DNA. This bodes well for potential molecular-based population and phylogeographic studies on sloths, several species of which have been understudied despite leaving numerous coprolites in caves across of the Americas.

  7. Evaluation of microbial community in hydrothermal field by direct DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarabayasi, Y.; Maruyama, A.

    2002-12-01

    Many extremophiles have been discovered from terrestrial and marine hydrothermal fields. Some thermophiles can grow beyond 90°C in culture, while direct microscopic analysis occasionally indicates that microbes may survive in much hotter hydrothermal fluids. However, it is very difficult to isolate and cultivate such microbes from the environments, i.e., over 99% of total microbes remains undiscovered. Based on experiences of entire microbial genome analysis (Y.K.) and microbial community analysis (A.M.), we started to find out unique microbes/genes in hydrothermal fields through direct sequencing of environmental DNA fragments. At first, shotgun plasmid libraries were directly constructed with the DNA molecules prepared from mixed microbes collected by an in situ filtration system from low-temperature fluids at RM24 in the Southern East Pacific Rise (S-EPR). A gene amplification (PCR) technique was not used for preventing mutation in the process. The nucleotide sequences of 285 clones indicated that no sequence had identical data in public databases. Among 27 clones determined entire sequences, no ORF was identified on 14 clones like intron in Eukaryote. On four clones, tetra-nucleotide-long multiple tandem repetitive sequences were identified. This type of sequence was identified in some familiar disease in human. The result indicates that living/dead materials with eukaryotic features may exist in this low temperature field. Secondly, shotgun plasmid libraries were constructed from the environmental DNA prepared from Beppu hot springs. In randomly-selected 143 clones used for sequencing, no known sequence was identified. Unlike the clones in S-EPR library, clear ORFs were identified on all nine clones determined the entire sequence. It was found that one clone, H4052, contained the complete Aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. Phylogenetic analysis using amino acid sequences of this gene indicated that this gene was separated from other Euryarchaea before the

  8. Heterogeneity of mammalian DNA ligase detected on activity and DNA sequencing gels.

    PubMed Central

    Mezzina, M; Sarasin, A; Politi, N; Bertazzoni, U

    1984-01-01

    A new method to detect DNA ligase activity in situ after NaDodSO4 polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis has been developed. After renaturation of active polypeptides the ligase reaction occurs in situ by incubating the intact gel in the presence of Mg++ and ATP. Further treatment with alkaline phosphatase removes the unligated 5'-32P-end of oligo (dT) used as a substrate and active polypeptides having ligase activity are identified by autoradiography. Analysis on DNA sequencing gels of the oligo (dT) reaction products present in the activity bands ensures that the radioactive material detected in activity gels or in standard in vitro ligase assays corresponds unambiguously to a ligase activity. Using these methods, we have analysed the purified phage T4 DNA ligase, and the activities present in crude extracts and in purified fractions from monkey kidney (CV1-P) cells. The purified T4 enzyme yields one or two active peptides with Mr values of 60,000 and 70,000. Crude extracts from CV1-P cells contain several polypeptides having DNA ligase activity. Partial purification of these extracts shows that DNA ligase I isolated from hydroxylapatite column is enriched in polypeptides with Mr 200,000, 150,000 and 120,000, while DNA ligase II is enriched in those with Mr 60,000 and 70,000. Images PMID:6377238

  9. Sequence of a cDNA encoding nitrite reductase from the tree Betula pendula and identification of conserved protein regions.

    PubMed

    Friemann, A; Brinkmann, K; Hachtel, W

    1992-02-01

    The sequence of an mRNA encoding nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.7.1.) from the tree Betula pendula was determined. A cDNA library constructed from leaf poly(A)+ mRNA was screened with an oligonucleotide probe deduced from NiR sequences from spinach and maize. A 2.5 kb cDNA was isolated that hybridized to an mRNA, the steady-state level of which increased markedly upon induction with nitrate. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA contains a reading frame encoding a protein of 583 amino acids that reveals 79% identity with NiR from spinach. The transit peptide of the NiR precursor from birch was determined to be 22 amino acids in size by sequence comparison with NiR from spinach and maize and is the shortest transit peptide reported so far. A graphical evaluation of identities found in the NiR sequence alignment revealed nine well conserved sections each exceeding ten amino acids in size. Sequence comparisons with related redox proteins identified essential residues involved in cofactor binding. A putative binding site for ferredoxin was found in the N-terminal half of the protein.

  10. Analysis of the relationship between ribosomal DNA ITS sequences and active components in Rhodiola plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D J; Yuan, W T; Li, M T; Zhang, Y H

    2016-12-23

    Rhodiola plants are a valuable resource in traditional Chinese medicine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences and the three active components in Rhodiola plants. For this, we determined ITS sequence polymorphisms and the concentrations of active components salidroside, tyrosol, and gallic acid in different Rhodiola species from the Tibetan Plateau. In a total of 23 Rhodiola samples, 16 different haplotypes were defined based on their ITS sequences. Analysis of the active components in these same samples revealed that salidroside was not detected in species with haplotypes H4, H5, or H10, tyrosol was not detected with haplotypes H3, H5, H7, H10, H14, or H15, and gallic acid was detected in with all haplotypes except H14 and H15. In addition, the concentrations of salidroside, tyrosol and gallic acid varied between samples with different haplotypes as well as those with the same haplotype, implying that no significant correlation exists between haplotype and salidroside, tyrosol or gallic acid concentrations. However, a statistically significant positive correlation was observed for among these three active components.

  11. [Molecular cloning and analysis of cDNA sequences encoding serine proteinase and Kunitz type inhibitor in venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper].

    PubMed

    Ramazanova, A S; Fil'kin, S Iu; Starkov, V G; Utkin, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteinases and Kunitz type inhibitors are widely represented in venoms of snakes from different genera. During the study of the venoms from snakes inhabiting Russia we have cloned cDNAs encoding new proteins belonging to these protein families. Thus, a new serine proteinase called nikobin was identified in the venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper. By amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA sequence, nikobin differs from serine proteinases identified in other snake species. Nikobin amino acid sequence contains 15 unique substitutions. This is the first serine proteinase of viper from Vipera genus for which a complete amino acid sequence established. The cDNA encoding Kunitz type inhibitor was also cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of inhibitor is homologous to those of other proteins from that snakes of Vipera genus. However there are several unusual amino acid substitutions that might result in the change of biological activity of inhibitor.

  12. Complete DNA sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi (Chordata, Urochordata).

    PubMed Central

    Yokobori, S i; Ueda, T; Feldmaier-Fuchs, G; Pääbo, S; Ueshima, R; Kondow, A; Nishikawa, K; Watanabe, K

    1999-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 14,771-bp-long mitochondrial (mt) DNA of a urochordate (Chordata)-the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi-was determined. All the Halocynthia mt-genes were found to be located on a single strand, which is rich in T and G rather than in A and C. Like nematode and Mytilus edulis mtDNAs, that of Halocynthia encodes no ATP synthetase subunit 8 gene. However, it does encode an additional tRNA gene for glycine (anticodon TCT) that enables Halocynthia mitochondria to use AGA and AGG codons for glycine. The mtDNA carries an unusual tRNA(Met) gene with a TAT anticodon instead of the usual tRNA(Met)(CAT) gene. As in other metazoan mtDNAs, there is not any long noncoding region. The gene order of Halocynthia mtDNA is completely different from that of vertebrate mtDNAs except for tRNA(His)-tRNA(Ser)(GCU), suggesting that evolutionary change in the mt-gene structure is much accelerated in the urochordate line compared with that in vertebrates. The amino acid sequences of Halocynthia mt-proteins deduced from their gene sequences are quite different from those in other metazoans, indicating that the substitution rate in Halocynthia mt-protein genes is also accelerated. PMID:10581290

  13. Complete DNA sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi (Chordata, Urochordata).

    PubMed

    Yokobori, S i; Ueda, T; Feldmaier-Fuchs, G; Pääbo, S; Ueshima, R; Kondow, A; Nishikawa, K; Watanabe, K

    1999-12-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 14,771-bp-long mitochondrial (mt) DNA of a urochordate (Chordata)-the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi-was determined. All the Halocynthia mt-genes were found to be located on a single strand, which is rich in T and G rather than in A and C. Like nematode and Mytilus edulis mtDNAs, that of Halocynthia encodes no ATP synthetase subunit 8 gene. However, it does encode an additional tRNA gene for glycine (anticodon TCT) that enables Halocynthia mitochondria to use AGA and AGG codons for glycine. The mtDNA carries an unusual tRNA(Met) gene with a TAT anticodon instead of the usual tRNA(Met)(CAT) gene. As in other metazoan mtDNAs, there is not any long noncoding region. The gene order of Halocynthia mtDNA is completely different from that of vertebrate mtDNAs except for tRNA(His)-tRNA(Ser)(GCU), suggesting that evolutionary change in the mt-gene structure is much accelerated in the urochordate line compared with that in vertebrates. The amino acid sequences of Halocynthia mt-proteins deduced from their gene sequences are quite different from those in other metazoans, indicating that the substitution rate in Halocynthia mt-protein genes is also accelerated.

  14. Sequence-specific electrochemical detection of asymmetric PCR amplicons of traditional Chinese medicinal plant DNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas M H; Hsing, I-Ming

    2002-10-01

    In this study, an electrochemistry-based approach to detect nucleic acid amplification products of Chinese herbal genes is reported. Using asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and electrochemical techniques, single-stranded target amplicons are produced from trace amounts of DNA sample and sequence-specific electrochemical detection based on the direct hybridization of the crude amplicon mix and immobilized DNA probe can be achieved. Electrochemically active intercalator Hoechst 33258 is bound to the double-stranded duplex formed by the target amplicon hybridized with the 5'-thiol-derivated DNA probe (16-mer) on the gold electrode surface. The electrochemical current signal of the hybridization event is measured by linear sweep voltammetry, the response of which can be used to differentiate the sequence complementarities of the target amplicons. To improve the reproducibility and sensitivity of the current signal, issues such as electrode surface cleaning, probe immobilization, and target hybridization are addressed. Factors affecting hybridization efficiency including the length and binding region of the target amplicon are discussed. Using our approach, differentiation of Chinese herbal species Fritillaria (F. thunbergii and F. cirrhosa) based on the 16-mer unique sequences in the spacer region of the 5S-rRNA is demonstrated. The ability to detect PCR products using a nonoptical electrochemical detection technique is an important step toward the realization of portable biomicrodevices for on-spot bacterial and viral detections.

  15. PCR/SSCP detects reliably and efficiently DNA sequence variations in large scale screening projects.

    PubMed

    Miterski, B; Krüger, R; Wintermeyer, P; Epplen, J T

    2000-06-01

    A simple and fast method with high reliability is necessary for the identification of mutations, polymorphisms and sequence variants (MPSV) within many genes and many samples, e.g. for clarifying the genetic background of individuals with multifactorial diseases. Here we review our experience with the polymerase chain reaction/single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR/SSCP) analysis to identify MPSV in a number of genes thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of multifactorial neurological disorders, including autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson s disease (PD). The method is based on the property of the DNA that the electrophoretic mobility of single stranded nucleic acids depends not only on their size but also on their sequence. The target sequences were amplified, digested into fragments ranging from 50-240 base pairs (bp), heat-denatured and analysed on native polyacrylamide (PAA) gels of different composition. The analysis of a great number of different PCR products demonstrates that the detection rate of MPSV depends on the fragment lengths, the temperature during electrophoresis and the composition of the gel. In general, the detection of MPSV is neither influenced by their location within the DNA fragment nor by the type of substitution, i.e., transitions or transversions. The standard PCR/SSCP system described here provides high reliability and detection rates. It allows the efficient analysis of a large number of DNA samples and many different genes.

  16. Repeat sequences from complex ds DNA viruses can be used as minisatellite probes for DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Crawford, A M; Buchanan, F C; Fraser, K M; Robinson, A J; Hill, D F

    1991-01-01

    In a search for new fingerprinting probes for use with sheep, repeat sequences derived from five poxviruses, an iridovirus and a baculovirus were screened against DNA from sheep pedigrees. Probes constructed from portions of the parapox viruses, orf virus and papular stomatitis virus and the baculovirus from the alfalfa looper, Autographa californica, nuclear polyhedrosis virus all gave fingerprint patterns. Probes from three other poxviruses and an iridovirus did not give useful banding patterns.

  17. Potential use of DNA barcoding for the identification of Salvia based on cpDNA and nrDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhao, Hong-Xia; Wang, Long; Wang, Tao; Yang, Rui-Wu; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Yong-Hong; Ding, Chun-Bang; Zhang, Li

    2013-10-10

    An effective DNA marker for authenticating the genus Salvia was screened using seven DNA regions (rbcL, matK, trnL-F, and psbA-trnH from the chloroplast genome, and ITS, ITS1, and ITS2 from the nuclear genome) and three combinations (rbcL+matK, psbA-trnH+ITS1, and trnL-F+ITS1). The present study collected 232 sequences from 27 Salvia species through DNA sequencing and 77 sequences within the same taxa from the GenBank. The discriminatory capabilities of these regions were evaluated in terms of PCR amplification success, intraspecific and interspecific divergence, DNA barcoding gaps, and identification efficiency via a tree-based method. ITS1 was superior to the other marker for discriminating between species, with an accuracy of 81.48%. The three combinations did not increase species discrimination. Finally, we found that ITS1 is a powerful barcode for identifying Salvia species, especially Salvia miltiorrhiza.

  18. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers ard probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity.

  19. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, H.U.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-06-27

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers and probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity. 18 figs.

  20. Amino Acid Sequence of Human Cholinesterase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    liquid chromatography (HPLC). Activity testing of the aged, DFP-labeled cholinesterase showed that 99.8% of the active sites had been labeled, since...acids were quantitated by ninhydrin at the AAA Labs, or by derivatization with phenylisothiocyanate at the University of Michigan. The latter method