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Sample records for acid dnase activity

  1. Partial characterization of Acanthamoeba castellanii (T4 genotype) DNase activity.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Panjwani, Shamvil; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    The deoxyribonuclease (DNase) activities of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype were investigated. Using zymographic assays, the DNase activities had approximate molecular masses of 25 and 35 kDa. A. castellanii DNases exhibited activity at wide-ranging temperature of up to 60 °C and at pH ranging from 4 to 9. The DNases activities were unaffected by proteinase-K treatment, divalent cations such as Ca(++), Cu(++), Mg(++), and Zn(++), or divalent cation chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The non-reliance on divalent cations and homology data suggests that A. castellanii DNases belong to the class of eukaryotic lysosomal DNase II but exhibit robust properties. The DNases activity in A. castellanii interfered with the genomic DNA extraction. Extraction methods involving EDTA, SDS, and proteinase-K resulted in low yield of genomic DNA. On the other hand, these methods resulted in high yield of genomic DNA from human cells suggesting the robust nature of A. castellanii DNases that are unaffected by reagents normally used in blocking eukaryotic DNases. In contrast, the use of chaotropic agent such as guanidine thiocyanate improved the yield of genomic DNA from A. castellanii cells significantly. Further purification and characterization of Acanthamoeba DNases is needed to study their non-classic distinct properties and to determine their role in the biology, cellular differentiation, cell cycle progression, and arrest of Acanthamoeba.

  2. Inhalable DNase I microparticles engineered with biologically active excipients.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rihab; Al Jamal, Khuloud T; Kan, Pei-Lee; Awad, Gehanne; Mortada, Nahed; El-Shamy, Abd-Elhameed; Alpar, Oya

    2013-12-01

    Highly viscous mucus poses a big challenge for the delivery of particulates carrying therapeutics to patients with cystic fibrosis. In this study, surface modifying DNase I loaded particles using different excipients to achieve better lung deposition, higher enzyme stability or better biological activity had been exploited. For the purpose, controlled release microparticles (MP) were prepared by co-spray drying DNase I with the polymer poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and the biocompatible lipid surfactant 1,2-dipalmitoyl-Sn-phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) using various hydrophilic excipients. The effect of the included modifiers on the particle morphology, size, zeta potential as well as enzyme encapsulation efficiency, biological activity and release had been evaluated. Powder aerosolisation performance and particle phagocytosis by murine macrophages were also investigated. The results showed that more than 80% of enzyme activity was recovered after MP preparation and that selected surface modifiers greatly increased the enzyme encapsulation efficiency. The particle morphology was greatly modified altering in turn the powders inhalation indices where dextran, ovalbumin and chitosan hydrochloride increased considerably the respirable fraction compared to the normal hydrophilic carriers lactose and PVP. Despite of the improved aerosolisation caused by chitosan hydrochloride, yet retardation of chitosan coated particles in artificial mucus samples discouraged its application. On the other hand, dextran and polyanions enhanced DNase I effect in reducing cystic fibrosis mucus viscosity. DPPC proved good ability to reduce particles phagocytic uptake even in the presence of the selected adjuvants. The prepared MP systems were biocompatible with lung epithelial cells. To conclude, controlled release DNase I loaded PLGA-MP with high inhalation indices and enhanced mucolytic activity on CF sputum could be obtained by surface modifying the particles with PGA or dextran. PMID

  3. Apoptosis induced by Na+/H+ antiport inhibition activates the LEI/L-DNase II pathway.

    PubMed

    Altairac, S; Zeggai, S; Perani, P; Courtois, Y; Torriglia, A

    2003-05-01

    L-DNase II is derived from its precursor leucocyte elastase inhibitor (LEI) by post-translational modification. In vitro, the conversion of LEI into L-DNase II can be induced by incubation of LEI at an acidic pH. In this study, we proposed to analyze the effects of intracellular acidification on this transformation. Amiloride derivatives, like hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), are known to provoke a decrease of cytosolic pH by inhibiting the Na(+)/H(+) antiport. In BHK cells, treatment with HMA-induced apoptosis accompanied by an increase in L-DNase II immunoreactivity and L-DNase II enzymatic activity. Overexpression of L-DNase II precursor led to a significant increase of apoptosis in these cells supporting the involvement of L-DNase II in HMA induced apoptosis. As previously shown in other cells, etoposide-induced apoptosis did not activate L-DNase. On the contrary, LEI overexpression significantly increased cell survival in etoposide-induced apoptosis. Together these results suggest differential roles of LEI and L-DNase II in response to different types of apoptotic inducers.

  4. Interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with four nucleic acid binding proteins DNase I, RNase A, reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Utpal; Giri, Kalyan; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.

    2009-12-01

    In the investigation of interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with four biologically important proteins we observed inhibition of enzymatic activity of DNase I, RNase A, M-MLV reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase by ATA in vitro assay. As the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the main catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, we also monitored effect of ATA on telomerase activity in vivo and observed dose-dependent inhibition of telomerase activity in Chinese hamster V79 cells treated with ATA. Direct association of ATA with DNase I ( Kd = 9.019 μM)), RNase A ( Kd = 2.33 μM) reverse transcriptase ( Kd = 0.255 μM) and Taq polymerase ( Kd = 81.97 μM) was further shown by tryptophan fluorescence quenching studies. Such association altered the three-dimensional conformation of DNase I, RNase A and Taq polymerase as detected by circular dichroism. We propose ATA inhibits enzymatic activity of the four proteins through interfering with DNA or RNA binding to the respective proteins either competitively or allosterically, i.e. by perturbing three-dimensional structure of enzymes.

  5. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg-Arska, M.; van Strijp, J.A.; Hoekstra, W.P.; Verhoef, J.

    1984-05-01

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. (/sup 3/H)Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes.

  6. The C. elegans apoptotic nuclease NUC-1 is related in sequence and activity to mammalian DNase II.

    PubMed

    Lyon, C J; Evans, C J; Bill, B R; Otsuka, A J; Aguilera, R J

    2000-07-11

    The Caenorhabditis elegans nuc-1 gene has previously been implicated in programmed cell death due to the presence of persistent undegraded apoptotic DNA in nuc-1 mutant animals. In this report, we describe the cloning and characterization of nuc-1, which encodes an acidic nuclease with significant sequence similarity to mammalian DNase II. Database searches performed with human DNase II protein sequence revealed a significant similarity with the predicted C. elegans C07B5.5 ORF. Subsequent analysis of crude C. elegans protein extracts revealed that wild-type animals contained a potent endonuclease activity with a cleavage preference similar to DNase II, while nuc-1 mutant worms demonstrated a marked reduction in this nuclease activity. Sequence analysis of C07B5.5 DNA and mRNA also revealed that nuc-1(e1392), but not wild-type animals contained a nonsense mutation within the CO7B5.5 coding region. Furthermore, nuc-1 transgenic lines carrying the wild-type C07B5.5 locus demonstrated a complete complementation of the nuc-1 mutant phenotype. Our results therefore provide compelling evidence that the C07B5.5 gene encodes the NUC-1 apoptotic nuclease and that this nuclease is related in sequence and activity to DNase II.

  7. Fungal mitochondrial DNases: effectors with the potential to activate plant defenses in nonhost resistance.

    PubMed

    Hadwiger, Lee A; Polashock, James

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports on the model nonhost resistance interaction between Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli and pea endocarp tissue have described the disease resistance-signaling role of a fungal DNase1-like protein. The response resulted in no further growth beyond spore germination. This F. solani f. sp. phaseoli DNase gene, constructed with a pathogenesis-related (PR) gene promoter, when transferred to tobacco, generated resistance against Pseudomonas syringe pv. tabaci. The current analytical/theoretical article proposes similar roles for the additional nuclear and mitochondrial nucleases, the coding regions for which are identified in newly available fungal genome sequences. The amino acid sequence homologies within functional domains are conserved within a wide array of fungi. The potato pathogen Verticillium dahliae nuclease was divergent from that of the saprophyte, yeast; however, the purified DNase from yeast also elicited nonhost defense responses in pea, including pisatin accumulation, PR gene induction, and resistance against a true pea pathogen. The yeast mitochondrial DNase gene (open reading frame) predictably codes for a signal peptide providing the mechanism for secretion. Mitochondrial DNase genes appear to provide an unlimited source of components for developing transgenic resistance in all transformable plants. PMID:23228145

  8. Characterisation of eye-lens DNases: long term persistence of activity in post apoptotic lens fibre cells.

    PubMed

    Arruti, C; Chaudun, E; De Maria, A; Courtois, Y; Counis, M F

    1995-01-01

    Fibre cells in the ocular lens exhibit a constitutive apoptotic process of nuclear degradation that includes chromatin breakage, generating a ladder pattern of DNA fragments. This process is intrinsic to the normal terminal differentiation program. Despite the loss of nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, the terminal differentiated fibre cells remain in the lens during the whole life span of the individual. The lens cells thus provide a unique system in which to determine the presence and fate of endonucleases once the chromatin has been cleaved. We report here on the presence of DNase activity in nucleated and anucleated lens cells. Using a nuclease gel assay and double-stranded DNA as substrate, we found active 30 and 60 kDa DNases. The enzymatic activities were Ca(2+), Mg(2+) dependent, and active at neutral pH. The relative amount of these forms changed during development and aging of the lens fibre cells. Both forms were inhibited by Zn(2+), aurintricarboxylic acid, and G-actin. The proteins were also separated by SDS-PAGE, renatured after removing SDS and incubated in the presence of native DNA adsorbed to a membrane. Therefore it was possible to demonstrate, by means of a nick translation reaction, that the enzymes produced single strand cuts. Based on these findings we propose that these chick lens nucleases are probably related to DNase I.

  9. Characterisation of eye-lens DNases: long term persistence of activity in post apoptotic lens fibre cells.

    PubMed

    Arruti, C; Chaudun, E; De Maria, A; Courtois, Y; Counis, M F

    1995-01-01

    Fibre cells in the ocular lens exhibit a constitutive apoptotic process of nuclear degradation that includes chromatin breakage, generating a ladder pattern of DNA fragments. This process is intrinsic to the normal terminal differentiation program. Despite the loss of nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, the terminal differentiated fibre cells remain in the lens during the whole life span of the individual. The lens cells thus provide a unique system in which to determine the presence and fate of endonucleases once the chromatin has been cleaved. We report here on the presence of DNase activity in nucleated and anucleated lens cells. Using a nuclease gel assay and double-stranded DNA as substrate, we found active 30 and 60 kDa DNases. The enzymatic activities were Ca(2+), Mg(2+) dependent, and active at neutral pH. The relative amount of these forms changed during development and aging of the lens fibre cells. Both forms were inhibited by Zn(2+), aurintricarboxylic acid, and G-actin. The proteins were also separated by SDS-PAGE, renatured after removing SDS and incubated in the presence of native DNA adsorbed to a membrane. Therefore it was possible to demonstrate, by means of a nick translation reaction, that the enzymes produced single strand cuts. Based on these findings we propose that these chick lens nucleases are probably related to DNase I. PMID:17180015

  10. Determination of Pulmozyme (dornase alpha) stability using a kinetic colorimetric DNase I activity assay.

    PubMed

    Lichtinghagen, Ralf

    2006-07-01

    An enzymatic activity assay was developed for the determination of dornase alpha human recombinant desoxyribonuclease (DNase I) stability. The method was adapted from a colorimetric endpoint enzyme activity assay for DNase I based on the degradation of a DNA/methyl green complex. With the described modifications the kinetic measurement of enzyme activity is feasible on an automated analyzer system within a rather short time. The development of this assay was based on the need for reliable detection of a possible loss of enzyme activity after transferring the commercial therapeutic agent into sealed glass vials required for a placebo-controlled study. The measuring range of this stability test was from 0 to 3000 U/L corresponding to 0-120% of the original enzyme activity; CV values of control solutions inside the measuring range were between 3% and 5%. The enzyme activity decreased less than 15% during the observation period of 180 days. In conclusion the current kinetic assay is a reliable method for a simple time-saving determination of DNase I activity to test Pulmozyme stability as required for quality control. As dornase alpha is used for inhalation, this method also proved its reliability in testing DNase stability during aerosolization with new inhalation devices (e-flow). PMID:16682175

  11. Characterization of anticancer, DNase and antifungal activity of pumpkin 2S albumin.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Prabhat Pratap Singh; Nikhil, Kumar; Singh, Anamika; Selvakumar, Purushotham; Roy, Partha; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-06-13

    The plant 2S albumins exhibit a spectrum of biotechnologically exploitable functions. Among them, pumpkin 2S albumin has been shown to possess RNase and cell-free translational inhibitory activities. The present study investigated the anticancer, DNase and antifungal activities of pumpkin 2S albumin. The protein exhibited a strong anticancer activity toward breast cancer (MCF-7), ovarian teratocarcinoma (PA-1), prostate cancer (PC-3 and DU-145) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell lines. Acridine orange staining and DNA fragmentation studies indicated that cytotoxic effect of pumpkin 2S albumin is mediated through induction of apoptosis. Pumpkin 2S albumin showed DNase activity against both supercoiled and linear DNA and exerted antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum. Secondary structure analysis by CD showed that protein is highly stable up to 90°C and retains its alpha helical structure. These results demonstrated that pumpkin 2S albumin is a multifunctional protein with host of potential biotechnology applications.

  12. Monitoring the multitask mechanism of DNase I activity using graphene nanoassemblies.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Neil M; Hizir, Mustafa Salih; Balcioglu, Mustafa; Rana, Muhit; Yumak, Hasan; Ecevit, Ozgur; Yigit, Mehmet V

    2015-04-15

    Here we have demonstrated that graphene serves as a remarkable platform for monitoring the multitask activity of an enzyme with fluorescence spectroscopy. Our studies showed that four different simultaneous enzymatic tasks of DNase I can be observed and measured in a high throughput fashion using graphene oxide and oligonucleotide nanoassemblies. We have used phosphorothioate modified oligonucleotides to pinpoint the individual and highly specific functions of DNase I with single stranded DNA, RNA, and DNA/DNA and DNA/RNA duplexes. DNase I resulted in fluorescence recovery in the nanoassemblies and enhanced the intensity tremendously in the presence of sequence specific DNA or RNA molecules with different degrees of amplification. Our study enabled us to discover the sources of this remarkable signal enhancement, which has been used for biomedical applications of graphene for sensitive detection of specific oncogenes. The significant difference in the signal amplification observed for the detection of DNA and RNA molecules is a result of the positive and/or reductive signal generating events with the enzyme. In the presence of DNA there are four possible ways that the fluorescence reading is influenced, with two of them resulting in a gain in signal while the other two result in a loss. Since the observed signal is a summation of all the events together, the absence of the two fluorescence reduction events with RNA gives a greater degree of fluorescence signal enhancement when compared to target DNA molecules. Overall, our study demonstrates that graphene has powerful features for determining the enzymatic functions of a protein and reveals some of the unknowns observed in the graphene and oligonucleotide assemblies with DNase I. PMID:25734834

  13. Identification of putative active-site residues in the DNase domain of colicin E9 by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Garinot-Schneider, C; Pommer, A J; Moore, G R; Kleanthous, C; James, R

    1996-08-01

    We have used random mutagenesis to identify putative active-site residues in the C-terminal cytotoxic endonuclease domain of the bacterial toxin colicin E9. Six single-site mutations in the DNase domain were isolated which destroyed the toxic action of the colicin. DNA sequencing identified the mutations as Gly460Asp, Arg544Gly, Glu548Gly, Thr571Ile, His575Tyr and His579Tyr. All six wild-type residues are highly conserved in the DNase domains of both the E group colicins and the closely related pyocins. Site-directed mutagenesis was then used to substitute the wild-type amino acid residue at each of these positions for an alanine residue in order to distinguish important from unimportant sites. Two of the six alanine-mutant colicins (Gly460Ala and His579Ala) exhibited significant in vivo activity, unlike the original mutation of these residues, and were therefore not characterised further. The Thr571Ala mutant colicin, although not inactive, was significantly less active than the control. The other three alanine mutants (Arg544Ala, Glu548Ala and His575Ala remained completely inactive in the in vivo tests. Each 15 kDa alanine-mutant DNase domain was overexpressed and purified using a tandem-expression strategy which relies on the enzyme being able to bind to the natural inhibitor, Im9. Tryptophan emission spectra of the alanine mutants showed significant alterations in the emission maxima of all but the His575Ala mutant, suggesting changes in the tertiary structure of these mutant proteins. Activity measurements, using the spectrophotometric Kunitz assay, indicated that the Thr571Ala mutant was partially active as an endonuclease but the remaining alanine mutants were all completely inactive. All four mutant proteins, however, retained their ability to bind DNA in a gel shift assay, suggesting the mutations affect catalytic rather than substrate-binding residues. Searching the sequence databases for possible homology to other DNA-binding proteins revealed a

  14. Caspase-2 cleaves DNA fragmentation factor (DFF45)/inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD).

    PubMed

    Dahal, Giri Raj; Karki, Pratap; Thapa, Arjun; Shahnawaz, Mohammad; Shin, Song Yub; Lee, Jung Sup; Cho, Byungyun; Park, Il-Seon

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the signal transduction pathway of caspase-2, cell permeable Tat-reverse-caspase-2 was constructed, characterized and utilized for biochemical and cellular studies. It could induce the cell death as early as 2h, and caspase-2-specific VDVADase activity but not other caspase activities including DEVDase and IETDase. Interestingly, nuclear DNA fragmentation occurred and consistently DNA fragmentation factor (DFF45)/Inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD) was cleaved inside the cell as well as in vitro, suggesting a role of caspase-2 in nuclear DNA fragmentation. PMID:17945178

  15. NETosis and lack of DNase activity are key factors in Echis carinatus venom-induced tissue destruction

    PubMed Central

    Katkar, Gajanan D.; Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K.; Swethakumar, Basavarajaiah; Sharma, Rachana D.; Paul, Manoj; Vishalakshi, Gopalapura J.; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Girish, Kesturu S.; Kemparaju, Kempaiah

    2016-01-01

    Indian Echis carinatus bite causes sustained tissue destruction at the bite site. Neutrophils, the major leukocytes in the early defence process, accumulate at the bite site. Here we show that E. carinatus venom induces neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. The NETs block the blood vessels and entrap the venom toxins at the injection site, promoting tissue destruction. The stability of NETs is attributed to the lack of NETs-degrading DNase activity in E. carinatus venom. In a mouse tail model, mice co-injected with venom and DNase 1, and neutropenic mice injected with the venom, do not develop NETs, venom accumulation and tissue destruction at the injected site. Strikingly, venom-induced mice tail tissue destruction is also prevented by the subsequent injection of DNase 1. Thus, our study suggests that DNase 1 treatment may have a therapeutic potential for preventing the tissue destruction caused by snake venom. PMID:27093631

  16. Fungal mitochondrial DNases: Effectors with the potential to activate plant defenses in nonhost resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous reports on the model nonhost resistance interaction between Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli (Fsph) and pea endocarp tissue, have described the signaling role of a fungal DNase1-like protein. This enzyme termed, FsphDNase, induced complete resistance in pea tissue against pea pathogens, no ...

  17. Novel nuclear targeting coiled-coil protein of Helicobacter pylori showing Ca(2+)-independent, Mg(2+)-dependent DNase I activity.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Chul; Kim, Sinil; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Je Chul; Cho, Myung-Je; Lee, Woo-Kon; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Song, Jae-Young; Baik, Seung Chul; Ro, Hyeon Su

    2016-05-01

    HP0059, an uncharacterized gene of Helicobacter pylori, encodes a 284-aa-long protein containing a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and multiple leucine-rich heptad repeats. Effects of HP0059 proteins in human stomach cells were assessed by incubation of recombinant HP0059 proteins with the AGS human gastric carcinoma cell line. Wild-type HP0059 proteins showed cytotoxicity in AGS cells in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas NLS mutant protein showed no effect, suggesting that the cytotoxicity is attributed to host nuclear localization. AGS cells transfected with pEGFP-HP0059 plasmid showed strong GFP signal merged to the chromosomal DNA region. The chromosome was fragmented into multiple distinct dots merged with the GFP signal after 12 h of incubation. The chromosome fragmentation was further explored by incubation of AGS chromosomal DNA with recombinant HP0059 proteins, which leaded to complete degradation of the chromosomal DNA. HP0059 protein also degraded circular plasmid DNA without consensus, being an indication of DNase I activity. The DNase was activated by MgCl2, but not by CaCl2. The activity was completely blocked by EDTA. The optimal pH and temperature for DNase activity were 7.0-8.0 and 55°C, respectively. These results indicate that HP0059 possesses a novel DNase I activity along with a role in the genomic instability of human gastric cells, which may result in the transformation of gastric cells. PMID:27095458

  18. Domain organization of DNase from Thioalkalivibrio sp. provides insights into retention of activity in high salt environments.

    PubMed

    Alzbutas, Gediminas; Kaniusaite, Milda; Grybauskas, Algirdas; Lagunavicius, Arunas

    2015-01-01

    Our study indicates that DNA binding domains are common in many halophilic or halotolerant bacterial DNases and they are potential activators of enzymatic activity at high ionic strength. Usually, proteins adapt to high ionic strength by increasing the number of negatively charged residues on the surface. However, in DNases such adaptation would hinder the binding to negatively charged DNA, a step critical for catalysis. In our study we demonstrate how evolution has solved this dilemma by engaging the DNA binding domain. We propose a mechanism, which enables the enzyme activity at salt concentrations as high as 4 M of sodium chloride, based on collected experimental data and domain structure analysis of a secreted bacterial DNase from the extremely halotolerant bacterium Thioalkalivibrio sp. K90mix. The enzyme harbors two domains: an N-terminal domain, that exhibits DNase activity, and a C-terminal domain, comprising a duplicate DNA binding helix-hairpin-helix motif. Here we present experimental data demonstrating that the C-terminal domain is responsible for the enzyme's resistance to high ionic strength. PMID:26191053

  19. Identification of neutral and acidic deoxyribonuclease activities in Tetrahymena thermophila life stages.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Erhan; Arslanyolu, Muhittin

    2015-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleases (DNases) play a major role in apoptotic DNA fragmentation/degradation, and apoptotic-like DNA degradation is also observed during conjugation of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila; however, the characteristics of neutral and acidic DNases are still undefined in its life stages. Here, we report the biochemical characterization of DNase activities displayed in three different Tetrahymena life stages in a comparative manner. Maximum DNase activity of Tetrahymena was observed under acidic conditions, indicating that Tetrahymena has strong DNase II-like activities. Zymography revealed that Tetrahymena has at least five distinct DNase activity bands at 28, 32, 33.8, 35.5, and 69-kDa, and that the activities at 32 and 33.8-kDa were also secreted into starvation buffer. Cofactor analysis demonstrated that Mg(2+) exerted inhibitory effects on neutral DNase activities. Unexpectedly, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) had favorable effects on acidic DNase activities. The DNase activity profile of conjugating Tetrahymena cells revealed that the 32 and 33.8-kDa activities at pH 5.0 increased from 14 to 18 h of conjugation, corresponding to the final resorption of the old macronucleus by lysosomal enzymes during programmed nuclear death (PND). Overall, we found that Tetrahymena DNases exhibit different biochemical properties and a possible involvement of DNase II-like activities in PND.

  20. Globular body production, their anatomy, DNase gel analysis and NDP kinase activity in root tips of Poncirus trifoliata L.

    PubMed

    Tzatzani, Thiresia-Teresa; Dimassi-Theriou, Kortessa; Yupsanis, Traianos; Bosabalidis, Artemios; Therios, Ioannis; Sarropoulou, Virginia

    2013-10-01

    Green globular bodies were developed from Poncirus trifoliata L. root tip explants as a response to addition in the substrate of different growth regulators. From the globular bodies, shoots initiated and grew. Median section of the globular bodies reveals that they are composed of parenchyma cells and originate from the pericycle. The activity of DNases during shoot formation from globular bodies was influenced by the type and concentration of plant growth regulators that were added in the nutrient substrate. Peptide bands formation was also influenced by the increase of BA concentration. Consequently, BA, NAA and IAA combination influenced 5'-triphosphonucleosides (NTPs) appearance and activity in the presence of metal. Peptide bands resulted from the electrophoretic analysis of endogenous protein phosphorylation, proved to be catalytic subunits of NDP kinases, as they all phosphorylate diphosphonucleosides. The enzymes DNases and NDP kinases could be used as a scientific tool for the study of shoot formation from P. trifoliata L. green globular bodies.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Intrapleural Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase during Extended Use in Complicated Pleural Space Infections

    PubMed Central

    McClune, Jason R.; Wilshire, Candice L.; Gorden, Jed A.; Louie, Brian E.; Farviar, Alexander S.; Stefanski, Michael J.; Vallieres, Eric; Aye, Ralph W.

    2016-01-01

    The use of intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase improves outcomes in patients with complicated pleural space infections. However, little data exists for the use of combination intrapleural therapy after the initial dosing period of six doses. We sought to describe the safety profile and outcomes of intrapleural therapy beyond this standard dosing. A retrospective review of patients receiving intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase was performed at two institutions. We identified 101 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 receiving intrapleural therapy for complicated pleural space infection. The extended use of intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and DNase therapy beyond six doses was utilized in 20% (20/101) of patients. The mean number of doses in those undergoing extended dosing was 9.8 (range of 7–16). Within the population studied there appears to be no statistically significant increased risk of complications, need for surgical referral, or outcome differences when comparing those receiving standard or extended dosing intrapleural therapy. Future prospective study of intrapleural therapy as an alternative option for patients who fail initial pleural drainage and are unable to tolerate/accept a surgical intervention appears a potential area of study. PMID:27445574

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Intrapleural Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase during Extended Use in Complicated Pleural Space Infections.

    PubMed

    McClune, Jason R; Wilshire, Candice L; Gorden, Jed A; Louie, Brian E; Farviar, Alexander S; Stefanski, Michael J; Vallieres, Eric; Aye, Ralph W; Gilbert, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    The use of intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase improves outcomes in patients with complicated pleural space infections. However, little data exists for the use of combination intrapleural therapy after the initial dosing period of six doses. We sought to describe the safety profile and outcomes of intrapleural therapy beyond this standard dosing. A retrospective review of patients receiving intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase was performed at two institutions. We identified 101 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 receiving intrapleural therapy for complicated pleural space infection. The extended use of intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and DNase therapy beyond six doses was utilized in 20% (20/101) of patients. The mean number of doses in those undergoing extended dosing was 9.8 (range of 7-16). Within the population studied there appears to be no statistically significant increased risk of complications, need for surgical referral, or outcome differences when comparing those receiving standard or extended dosing intrapleural therapy. Future prospective study of intrapleural therapy as an alternative option for patients who fail initial pleural drainage and are unable to tolerate/accept a surgical intervention appears a potential area of study.

  3. Safety and Efficacy of Intrapleural Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase during Extended Use in Complicated Pleural Space Infections.

    PubMed

    McClune, Jason R; Wilshire, Candice L; Gorden, Jed A; Louie, Brian E; Farviar, Alexander S; Stefanski, Michael J; Vallieres, Eric; Aye, Ralph W; Gilbert, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    The use of intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase improves outcomes in patients with complicated pleural space infections. However, little data exists for the use of combination intrapleural therapy after the initial dosing period of six doses. We sought to describe the safety profile and outcomes of intrapleural therapy beyond this standard dosing. A retrospective review of patients receiving intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase was performed at two institutions. We identified 101 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 receiving intrapleural therapy for complicated pleural space infection. The extended use of intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and DNase therapy beyond six doses was utilized in 20% (20/101) of patients. The mean number of doses in those undergoing extended dosing was 9.8 (range of 7-16). Within the population studied there appears to be no statistically significant increased risk of complications, need for surgical referral, or outcome differences when comparing those receiving standard or extended dosing intrapleural therapy. Future prospective study of intrapleural therapy as an alternative option for patients who fail initial pleural drainage and are unable to tolerate/accept a surgical intervention appears a potential area of study. PMID:27445574

  4. Aberrant caspase-activated DNase (CAD) transcripts in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S Y; Liaw, S F; Lee, S N; Hsieh, P S; Lin, K H; Chu, C M; Liaw, Y F

    2003-01-27

    The gene of caspase-activated DNase (CAD), the key enzyme for nucleosome cleavage during apoptosis, is mapped at chromosome 1p36, a region usually associated with hemizygous deletions in human cancers, particularly in hepatoma (HCC). It is tempting to speculate that CAD plays a tumour-suppressive role in hepatocarcinogenesis. To address this, we examined the CAD transcripts in six human HCC cell lines, one liver tissue from a non-HCC subject, and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from three healthy individuals. Alternatively spliced CAD transcripts with fusion of exon 1 to exon 7 were isolated in most of the examined samples including HCC cells and normal controls. However, relatively abundant alternatively spliced CAD transcripts with fusion of exon 2 to exon 6 or 7, in which the corresponding domain directing CAD interaction with ICAD was preserved, were found only in poorly differentiated Mahlavu and SK-Hep1 cells. Interestingly, an abnormal CAD transcript with its exon 3 replaced by a truncated transposable Alu repeat was isolated in Hep3B cells, indicative of the implication of an Alu-mediated genomic mutation. Moreover, mis-sense mutations in the CAD genes were identified in all six HCC cell lines. Upon UV-induced apoptosis, DNA fragmentation efficiency was found to be intact, partially reduced and remarkably reduced in Huh7 and J328, Hep3B and HepG2, and Mahlavu cells, respectively. That mutations and aberrantly spliced transcripts for the CAD gene are frequently present in human HCC cells, especially in poorly differentiated HCC cells, suggests a significant role of CAD in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

  5. Very stable high molecular mass multiprotein complex with DNase and amylase activities in human milk.

    PubMed

    Soboleva, Svetlana E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Verkhovod, Timofey D; Buneva, Valentina N; Sedykh, Sergey E; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-01-01

    For breastfed infants, human milk is more than a source of nutrients; it furnishes a wide array of proteins, peptides, antibodies, and other components promoting neonatal growth and protecting infants from viral and bacterial infection. It has been proposed that most biological processes are performed by protein complexes. Therefore, identification and characterization of human milk components including protein complexes is important for understanding the function of milk. Using gel filtration, we have purified a stable high molecular mass (~1000 kDa) multiprotein complex (SPC) from 15 preparations of human milk. Light scattering and gel filtration showed that the SPC was stable in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl and MgCl2 but dissociated efficiently under the conditions that destroy immunocomplexes (2 M MgCl2 , 0.5 M NaCl, and 10 mM DTT). Such a stable complex is unlikely to be a casual associate of different proteins. The relative content of the individual SPCs varied from 6% to 25% of the total milk protein. According to electrophoretic and mass spectrometry analysis, all 15 SPCs contained lactoferrin (LF) and α-lactalbumin as major proteins, whereas human milk albumin and β-casein were present in moderate or minor amounts; a different content of IgGs and sIgAs was observed. All SPCs efficiently hydrolyzed Plasmid supercoiled DNA and maltoheptaose. Some freshly prepared SPC preparations contained not only intact LF but also small amounts of its fragments, which appeared in all SPCs during their prolonged storage; the fragments, similar to intact LF, possessed DNase and amylase activities. LF is found in human epithelial secretions, barrier body fluids, and in the secondary granules of leukocytes. LF is a protein of the acute phase response and nonspecific defense against different types of microbial and viral infections. Therefore, LF complexes with other proteins may be important for its functions not only in human milk.

  6. Characterization of a DNA binding activity in DNAse I hypersensitive site 4 of the human globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M; Kim, C; Gelinas, R

    1991-01-01

    A portion of the beta-globin Locus Control Region (LCR), which included DNAse I hypersensitive site 4 (HS4), was analyzed for its interactions with nuclear extracts and its contribution to LCR activity in a functional assay. In gel retardation assays, a short fragment from HS4 formed complexes with nuclear extracts from both erythroid and nonerythroid cells, and a core protected sequence 5'GACTGGC3' was revealed by DNAse I protection and methylation interference studies. This sequence resembles the binding sites of CCAAT-family members. Purified CP-2 but not CP-1 was shown to bind this HS4 sequence in a gel shift reaction, suggesting that the HS4 binding activity shares some sequence specificity with the CCAAT-factor family. Utilizing a transient expression assay in murine erythroleukemia cells, steady-state RNA levels were measured from pairs of LCR constructs linked to distinguishable beta-globin reporter genes. A short DNA fragment from HS4 which included the binding site for this novel binding activity accounted for most of the contribution to high level expression made by the entire HS4 region. Images PMID:1923823

  7. Cutting Edge: DNase II deficiency prevents activation of autoreactive B cells by double-stranded DNA endogenous ligands.

    PubMed

    Pawaria, Sudesh; Moody, Krishna; Busto, Patricia; Nündel, Kerstin; Choi, Chee-Ho; Ghayur, Tariq; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann

    2015-02-15

    In mice that fail to express the phagolysosomal endonuclease DNase II and the type I IFN receptor, excessive accrual of undegraded DNA results in a STING-dependent, TLR-independent inflammatory arthritis. These double-knockout (DKO) mice develop additional indications of systemic autoimmunity, including anti-nuclear autoantibodies and splenomegaly, that are not found in Unc93b1(3d/3d) DKO mice and, therefore, are TLR dependent. The DKO autoantibodies predominantly detect RNA-associated autoantigens, which are commonly targeted in TLR7-dominated systemic erythematosus lupus-prone mice. To determine whether an inability of TLR9 to detect endogenous DNA could explain the absence of dsDNA-reactive autoantibodies in DKO mice, we used a novel class of bifunctional autoantibodies, IgM/DNA dual variable domain Ig molecules, to activate B cells through a BCR/TLR9-dependent mechanism. DKO B cells could not respond to the IgM/DNA dual variable domain Ig molecule, despite a normal response to both anti-IgM and CpG ODN 1826. Thus, DKO B cells only respond to RNA-associated ligands because DNase II-mediated degradation of self-DNA is required for TLR9 activation.

  8. Crystal structure of a KSHV-SOX-DNA complex: insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying DNase activity and host shutoff.

    PubMed

    Bagnéris, Claire; Briggs, Louise C; Savva, Renos; Ebrahimi, Bahram; Barrett, Tracey E

    2011-07-01

    The early lytic phase of Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus infection is characterized by viral replication and the global degradation (shutoff) of host mRNA. Key to both activities is the virally encoded alkaline exonuclease KSHV SOX. While the DNase activity of KSHV SOX is required for the resolution of viral genomic DNA as a precursor to encapsidation, its exact involvement in host shutoff remains to be determined. We present the first crystal structure of a KSHV SOX-DNA complex that has illuminated the catalytic mechanism underpinning both its endo and exonuclease activities. We further illustrate that KSHV SOX, similar to its Epstein-Barr virus homologue, has an intrinsic RNase activity in vitro that although an element of host shutoff, cannot solely account for the phenomenon.

  9. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of benzophenone tagged pyridine analogues towards activation of caspase activated DNase mediated nuclear fragmentation in Dalton's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghorbani, Mohammed; Thirusangu, Prabhu; Gurupadaswamy, H D; Girish, V; Shamanth Neralagundi, H G; Prabhakar, B T; Khanum, Shaukath Ara

    2016-04-01

    A series of benzophenones possessing pyridine nucleus 8a-l were synthesized by multistep reaction sequence and evaluated for antiproliferative activity against DLA cells by in vitro and in vivo studies. The results suggested that, compounds 8b with fluoro group and 8e with chloro substituent at the benzoyl ring of benzophenone scaffold as well as pyridine ring with hydroxy group exhibited significant activity. Further investigation in mouse model suggests that compounds 8b and 8e have the potency to activate caspase activated DNase (endonuclease) which is responsible for DNA fragmentation, a primary hallmark of apoptosis and thereby inhibits the Dalton's lymphoma ascites tumour growth. PMID:26874345

  10. Bacillus subtilis polynucleotide phosphorylase 3'-to-5' DNase activity is involved in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Paula P; Carrasco, Begoña; Sanchez, Humberto; Deikus, Gintaras; Bechhofer, David H; Alonso, Juan C

    2009-07-01

    In the presence of Mn(2+), an activity in a preparation of purified Bacillus subtilis RecN degrades single-stranded (ss) DNA with a 3' --> 5' polarity. This activity is not associated with RecN itself, because RecN purified from cells lacking polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) does not show the exonuclease activity. We show here that, in the presence of Mn(2+) and low-level inorganic phosphate (P(i)), PNPase degrades ssDNA. The limited end-processing of DNA is regulated by ATP and is inactive in the presence of Mg(2+) or high-level P(i). In contrast, the RNase activity of PNPase requires Mg(2+) and P(i), suggesting that PNPase degradation of RNA and ssDNA occur by mutually exclusive mechanisms. A null pnpA mutation (DeltapnpA) is not epistatic with Delta recA, but is epistatic with DeltarecN and Delta ku, which by themselves are non-epistatic. The addA5, Delta recO, Delta recQ (Delta recJ), Delta recU and Delta recG mutations (representative of different epistatic groups), in the context of DeltapnpA, demonstrate gain- or loss-of-function by inactivation of repair-by-recombination, depending on acute or chronic exposure to the damaging agent and the nature of the DNA lesion. Our data suggest that PNPase is involved in various nucleic acid metabolic pathways, and its limited ssDNA exonuclease activity plays an important role in RecA-dependent and RecA-independent repair pathways. PMID:19433509

  11. DNase I hypersensitivity sites and nuclear protein binding on the fatty acid synthase gene: identification of an element with properties similar to known glucose-responsive elements.

    PubMed Central

    Foufelle, F; Lepetit, N; Bosc, D; Delzenne, N; Morin, J; Raymondjean, M; Ferré, P

    1995-01-01

    We have shown previously that fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene expression is positively regulated by glucose in rat adipose tissue and liver. In the present study, we have identified in the first intron of the gene a sequence closely related to known glucose-responsive elements such as in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes, including a putative upstream stimulatory factor/major late transcription factor (USF/MLTF) binding site (E-box) (+ 292 nt to + 297 nt). Location of this sequence corresponds to a site of hypersensitivity to DNase I which is present in the liver but not in the spleen. Moreover, using this information from a preliminary report of the present work, others have shown that a + 283 nt to + 303 nt sequence of the FAS gene can confer glucose responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. The protein binding to this region has been investigated in vitro by a combination of DNase I footprinting and gel-retardation experiments with synthetic oligonucleotides and known nuclear proteins. DNase I footprinting experiments using a + 161 nt to + 405 nt fragment of the FAS gene demonstrate that a region from + 290 nt to + 316 nt is protected by nuclear extracts from liver and spleen. This region binds two ubiquitous nuclear factors, USF/MLTF and the CAAT-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor 1 (CTF/NF1). Binding of these factors is similar in nuclear extracts from liver which does or does not express the FAS gene as observed for glucose-responsive elements in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes. This suggests a posttranslational modification of a factor of the complex after glucose stimulation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7772036

  12. DNase I hypersensitivity sites and nuclear protein binding on the fatty acid synthase gene: identification of an element with properties similar to known glucose-responsive elements.

    PubMed

    Foufelle, F; Lepetit, N; Bosc, D; Delzenne, N; Morin, J; Raymondjean, M; Ferré, P

    1995-06-01

    We have shown previously that fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene expression is positively regulated by glucose in rat adipose tissue and liver. In the present study, we have identified in the first intron of the gene a sequence closely related to known glucose-responsive elements such as in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes, including a putative upstream stimulatory factor/major late transcription factor (USF/MLTF) binding site (E-box) (+ 292 nt to + 297 nt). Location of this sequence corresponds to a site of hypersensitivity to DNase I which is present in the liver but not in the spleen. Moreover, using this information from a preliminary report of the present work, others have shown that a + 283 nt to + 303 nt sequence of the FAS gene can confer glucose responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. The protein binding to this region has been investigated in vitro by a combination of DNase I footprinting and gel-retardation experiments with synthetic oligonucleotides and known nuclear proteins. DNase I footprinting experiments using a + 161 nt to + 405 nt fragment of the FAS gene demonstrate that a region from + 290 nt to + 316 nt is protected by nuclear extracts from liver and spleen. This region binds two ubiquitous nuclear factors, USF/MLTF and the CAAT-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor 1 (CTF/NF1). Binding of these factors is similar in nuclear extracts from liver which does or does not express the FAS gene as observed for glucose-responsive elements in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes. This suggests a posttranslational modification of a factor of the complex after glucose stimulation.

  13. DNase I hypersensitive sites within the inducible qa gene cluster of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, J A; Giles, N H

    1986-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive regions were mapped within the 17.3-kilobase qa (quinic acid) gene cluster of Neurospora crassa. The 5'-flanking regions of the five qa structural genes and the two qa regulatory genes each contain DNase I hypersensitive sites under noninducing conditions and generally exhibit increases in DNase I cleavage upon induction of transcription with quinic acid. The two large intergenic regions of the qa gene cluster appear to be similarly organized with respect to the positions of constitutive and inducible DNase I hypersensitive sites. Inducible hypersensitive sites on the 5' side of one qa gene, qa-x, appear to be differentially regulated. Employing these and previously published data, we have identified a conserved sequence element that may mediate the activator function of the qa-1F regulatory gene. Variants of the 16-base-pair consensus sequence are consistently found within DNase I-protected regions adjacent to inducible DNase I hypersensitive sites within the gene cluster. Images PMID:2944110

  14. Characterization of the rat DNA fragmentation factor 35/Inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (Short form). The endogenous inhibitor of caspase-dependent DNA fragmentation in neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Stetler, R A; Cao, G; Pei, W; O'Horo, C; Yin, X M; Chen, J

    2000-12-01

    Nuclear changes, including internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, are classical manifestations of apoptosis for which the biochemical mechanisms have not been fully elucidated, particularly in neuronal cells. We have cloned the rat DNA fragmentation factor 35/inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (short form) (DFF35/ICAD(S)) and found it to be the predominant form of ICAD present in rodent brain cells as well as in many other types of cells. DFF35/ICAD(S) forms a functional complex with DFF40/caspase-activated DNase (CAD) in the nucleus, and when its caspase-resistant mutant is over-expressed, it inhibits the nuclease activity, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and nuclear fragmentation but not the shrinkage and condensation of the nucleus, in neuron-differentiated PC12 cells in response to apoptosis inducers. DFF40/CAD is found to be localized mainly in the nucleus, and during neuronal apoptosis, there is no evidence of further nuclear translocation of this molecule. It is further suggested that inactivation of DFF40/CAD-bound DFF35 and subsequent activation of DFF40/CAD during apoptosis of neuronal cells may not occur in the cytosol but rather in the nucleus through a novel mechanism that requires nuclear translocation of caspases. These results establish that DFF35/ICAD(S) is the endogenous inhibitor of DFF40/CAD and caspase-dependent apoptotic DNA fragmentation in neurons.

  15. Analysis of DNase 1 sensitivity and methylation of active and inactive X chromosomes of kangaroos (Macropus robustus) by in situ nick translation.

    PubMed

    Loebel, D A; Johnston, P G

    1993-01-01

    The overall nuclease sensitivity and methylation of active and inactive X chromosomes of kangaroos were examined by in situ nick translation. Cultured fibroblasts of subspecies wallaroo-euro (Macropus robustus robustus; Macropus robustus erubescens) hybrids were used, enabling the paternally and maternally derived X chromosomes to be distinguished. No difference was found between the active and inactive X chromosomes with DNase I or MspI digestion. When chromosomes were digested with the methylation sensitive restriction enzymes HpaII and HhaI, the inactive X chromosome was labelled to a greater extent. These results indicate no overall difference in chromatin condensation between the active and inactive X chromosomes and greater overall methylation of the active X chromosome. This relative undermethylation of the inactive X chromosome may be important in X chromosome inactivation, but its function, if any, remains to be determined. PMID:8381740

  16. The pathogenesis-related protein PR-4b from Theobroma cacao presents RNase activity, Ca2+ and Mg2+ dependent-DNase activity and antifungal action on Moniliophthora perniciosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The production and accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR proteins) in plants in response to biotic or abiotic stresses is well known and is considered as a crucial mechanism for plant defense. A pathogenesis-related protein 4 cDNA was identified from a cacao-Moniliophthora perniciosa interaction cDNA library and named TcPR-4b. Results TcPR-4b presents a Barwin domain with six conserved cysteine residues, but lacks the chitin-binding site. Molecular modeling of TcPR-4b confirmed the importance of the cysteine residues to maintain the protein structure, and of several conserved amino acids for the catalytic activity. In the cacao genome, TcPR-4b belonged to a small multigene family organized mainly on chromosome 5. TcPR-4b RT-qPCR analysis in resistant and susceptible cacao plants infected by M. perniciosa showed an increase of expression at 48 hours after infection (hai) in both cacao genotypes. After the initial stage (24-72 hai), the TcPR-4b expression was observed at all times in the resistant genotypes, while in the susceptible one the expression was concentrated at the final stages of infection (45-90 days after infection). The recombinant TcPR-4b protein showed RNase, and bivalent ions dependent-DNase activity, but no chitinase activity. Moreover, TcPR-4b presented antifungal action against M. perniciosa, and the reduction of M. perniciosa survival was related to ROS production in fungal hyphae. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of a PR-4 showing simultaneously RNase, DNase and antifungal properties, but no chitinase activity. Moreover, we showed that the antifungal activity of TcPR-4b is directly related to RNase function. In cacao, TcPR-4b nuclease activities may be related to the establishment and maintenance of resistance, and to the PCD mechanism, in resistant and susceptible cacao genotypes, respectively. PMID:24920373

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Black and Red Pepper and Thyme Extracts and Essential Oils on Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and DNase Activity of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Zarringhalam, Maryam; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Shadnoush, Mehdi; Safaeyan, Firouzeh; Tekieh, Elaheh

    2013-01-01

    In this study, extracts and essential oils of Black and Red pepper and Thyme were tested for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli O157: H7 and Staphylococcus aureus. Black and Red pepper and Thyme were provided from Iranian agricultural researches center. 2 g of each plant powder was added to 10 cc ethanol 96°. After 24 h, the crude extract was separated as an alcoholic extract and concentrated by distillation method. Plants were examined for determining their major component and essential oils were separated. Phytochemical analyses were done for detection of some effective substances in extracts. The antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli O157: H7 and Staphylococcus aureus was tested and the results showed that all extracts and essential oils were effective and essential oils were more active. The extracts and oils that showed antimicrobial activity were later tested to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Dilution (MID) for those bacteria. They were also effective on the inhibition of DNase activity. This study was indicated that extracts and essential oils of Black and Red pepper and Thyme can play a significant role in inhibition of Escherichia coli O157: H7 and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:24250643

  18. Characterization of a pathogenesis-related protein 4 (PR-4) induced in Capsicum chinense L3 plants with dual RNase and DNase activities.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Morato, Maria Angeles; de Lacoba, Mario García; García-Luque, Isabel; Serra, Maria Teresa

    2010-07-01

    Resistance conferred by the L(3) gene is active against most of the tobamoviruses, including the Spanish strain (PMMoV-S), a P(1),(2) pathotype, but not against certain strains of pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), termed as P(1),(2),(3) pathotype, such as the Italian strain (PMMoV-I). PMMoV-S induces a hypersensitive reaction (HR) in C. chinense PI159236 plant leaves with the formation of necrotic local lesions and restriction of the virus at the primary infection sites. In this paper, a C. chinense PR-4 protein induced during both the compatible and the incompatible interactions has been identified. It was strongly associated with HR induction and to a lesser extent with the compatible interaction, but only in the later stages of infection. Moreover, it was found to accumulate during the necrogenic reaction induced by Potato virus X. The C. chinense PR-4 protein belongs to the PR-4 protein subgroup II, based on the absence of a hevein domain. Furthermore, it is shown that the purified protein does not have chitinase activity, as previously proposed for PR-4 proteins. Instead, it has both RNase and DNase activity, although its contribution to the bulk activity of nucleases in infected plants is very low.

  19. Characterization of a pathogenesis-related protein 4 (PR-4) induced in Capsicum chinense L3 plants with dual RNase and DNase activities

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Morato, Maria Ángeles; de Lacoba, Mario García; García-Luque, Isabel; Serra, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Resistance conferred by the L3 gene is active against most of the tobamoviruses, including the Spanish strain (PMMoV-S), a P1,2 pathotype, but not against certain strains of pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), termed as P1,2,3 pathotype, such as the Italian strain (PMMoV-I). PMMoV-S induces a hypersensitive reaction (HR) in C. chinense PI159236 plant leaves with the formation of necrotic local lesions and restriction of the virus at the primary infection sites. In this paper, a C. chinense PR-4 protein induced during both the compatible and the incompatible interactions has been identified. It was strongly associated with HR induction and to a lesser extent with the compatible interaction, but only in the later stages of infection. Moreover, it was found to accumulate during the necrogenic reaction induced by Potato virus X. The C. chinense PR-4 protein belongs to the PR-4 protein subgroup II, based on the absence of a hevein domain. Furthermore, it is shown that the purified protein does not have chitinase activity, as previously proposed for PR-4 proteins. Instead, it has both RNase and DNase activity, although its contribution to the bulk activity of nucleases in infected plants is very low. PMID:20511278

  20. Amphibian DNases I are characterized by a C-terminal end with a unique, cysteine-rich stretch and by the insertion of a serine residue into the Ca2+-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, H; Yasuda, T; Iida, R; Nakajima, T; Mori, S; Mogi, K; Kaneko, Y; Kishi, K

    2001-01-01

    We purified four amphibian deoxyribonucleases I from the pancreases of one toad, two frog and one newt species, by using three different column chromatography methods in sequence. Each of the purified enzymes had a molecular mass of approx. 40 kDa and an optimal pH for activity of approx. 8.0. These values were significantly greater than those for other vertebrate DNases I. The full-length cDNA encoding each amphibian DNase I was constructed from the total RNA of the pancreas by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Nucleotide sequence analyses revealed two structural characteristics unique to amphibian DNases I: a stretch of approx. 70 amino acids with a high cysteine content (approx. 15%) in the C-terminal region, and the insertion of a serine residue at position 205 (in a domain containing an essential Ca2+-binding site). Expression analysis of a series of mutant constructs indicated that both of these structures are essential in generating the active form of the enzyme. 'DNase I signature sequences', which are well conserved in other vertebrate DNases I, could not be found in any of the amphibian DNases I tested, whereas a 'somatomedin B motif' was identified in the Cys-rich stretches of all four. Although DNase I has so far been considered to be a secretory glycoprotein, amphibian DNase I seems to be non-glycosylated. These structural findings indicate strongly that amphibian DNases I are situated in a unique position on the phylogenetic tree of the DNase I family. PMID:11439097

  1. Caspase-activated DNase Is Necessary and Sufficient for Oligonucleosomal DNA Breakdown, but Not for Chromatin Disassembly during Caspase-dependent Apoptosis of LN-18 Glioblastoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Osuna, María; Garcia-Belinchón, Mercè; Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Gil-Guiñón, Estel; Casanelles, Elisenda; Yuste, Victor J.

    2014-01-01

    Caspase-dependent apoptosis is a controlled type of cell death characterized by oligonucleosomal DNA breakdown and major nuclear morphological alterations. Other kinds of cell death do not share these highly distinctive traits because caspase-activated DNase (DFF40/CAD) remains inactive. Here, we report that human glioblastoma multiforme-derived LN-18 cells do not hydrolyze DNA into oligonucleosomal fragments after apoptotic insult. Furthermore, their chromatin remains packaged into a single mass, with no signs of nuclear fragmentation. However, ultrastructural analysis reveals that nuclear disassembly occurs, although compacted chromatin does not localize into apoptotic nuclear bodies. Caspases become properly activated, and ICAD, the inhibitor of DFF40/CAD, is correctly processed. Using cell-free in vitro assays, we show that chromatin from isolated nuclei of LN-18 cells is suitable for hydrolysis into oligonuclesomal fragments by staurosporine-pretreated SH-SY5Y cytoplasms. However, staurosporine-pretreated LN-18 cytoplasms do not induce DNA laddering in isolated nuclei from either LN-18 or SH-SY5Y cells because LN-18 cells express lower amounts of DFF40/CAD. DFF40/CAD overexpression makes LN-18 cells fully competent to degrade their DNA into oligonucleosome-sized fragments, and yet they remain unable to arrange their chromatin into nuclear clumps after apoptotic insult. Indeed, isolated nuclei from LN-18 cells were resistant to undergoing apoptotic nuclear morphology in vitro. The use of LN-18 cells has uncovered a previously unsuspected cellular model, whereby a caspase-dependent chromatin package is DFF40/CAD-independent, and DFF40/CAD-mediated double-strand DNA fragmentation does not warrant the distribution of the chromatin into apoptotic nuclear bodies. The studies highlight a not-yet reported DFF40/CAD-independent mechanism driving conformational nuclear changes during caspase-dependent cell death. PMID:24838313

  2. DNase I aggravates islet β-cell apoptosis in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, BIN; ZHANG, LEI; ZHANG, YUE-YING; WANG, LEI; LI, XIN-GANG; LIU, TENG; FU, YU-KE; ZHENG, YAN-FEI; LI, PING; ZHAO, ZHI-GANG

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) is an endonuclease responsible for the destruction of chromatin during apoptosis. However, its role in diabetes remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of DNase I combined with high glucose levels in β-cell apoptosis. Human samples were collected and the DNase I activity was examined. High glucose-cultured INS-1 cells were transfected with DNase I small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the cell apoptosis was examined by western blotting and flow cytometry. Cell viability was analyzed by the Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Cell apoptosis resulting from 50 mU/μl DNase I was also observed by flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling stain and western blotting. Compared with healthy controls, the serum DNase I activity of patients with diabetes was significantly increased (P<0.05). In addition, DNase I expression was observed to be significantly increased in human pancreatic tissues. The addition of high glucose upregulated the cell apoptotic rate, whereas DNase I knockdown significantly reduced apoptosis in cells treated with high glucose. In addition, the western blotting results indicated that caspase-3 was increased subsequent to treatment of cells with 30 mM high glucose, however, this increase can be reversed by transfection with DNase I siRNA (P<0.05). Compared with cells cultured in normal conditions and high glucose, 50 mU/μl DNase I was able to significantly increase the cell apoptotic rate and level of caspase-3. DNase I activity was observed to be increased in type 2 diabetes, and high glucose combined with increased DNase I is suggested to aggravate β-cell apoptosis. PMID:27082840

  3. Recombinant human DNase I decreases biofilm and increases antimicrobial susceptibility in staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Jeffrey B; LoVetri, Karen; Cardona, Silvia T; Madhyastha, Srinivasa; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Saïd; Izano, Era A

    2012-02-01

    Extracellular DNA is an adhesive component of staphylococcal biofilms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiofilm activity of recombinant human DNase I (rhDNase) against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Using a 96-well microtiter plate crystal-violet binding assay, we found that biofilm formation by S. aureus was efficiently inhibited by rhDNase at 1-4 μg l⁻¹, and preformed S. aureus biofilms were efficiently detached in 2 min by rhDNase at 1 mg l⁻¹. Pretreatment of S. aureus biofilms for 10 min with 10 mg l⁻¹ rhDNase increased their sensitivity to biocide killing by 4-5 log units. rhDNase at 10 mg l⁻¹ significantly inhibited biofilm formation by S. epidermidis in medium supplemented with sub-MICs of antibiotics. We also found that rhDNase significantly increased the survival of S. aureus-infected Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes treated with tobramycin compared with nematodes treated with tobramycin alone. We concluded that rhDNase exhibits potent antibiofilm and antimicrobial-sensitizing activities against S. aureus and S. epidermidis at clinically achievable concentrations. rhDNase, either alone or in combination with antimicrobial agents, may have applications in treating or preventing staphylococcal biofilm-related infections. PMID:22167157

  4. A unique DNase activity shares the active site with ATPase activity of the RecA/Rad51 homologue (Pk-REC) from a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Rashid, N; Morikawa, M; Kanaya, S; Atomi, H; Imanaka, T

    1999-02-19

    A RecA/Rad51 homologue from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 (Pk-REC) is the smallest protein among various RecA/Rad51 homologues. Nevertheless, Pk-Rec is a super multifunctional protein and shows a deoxyribonuclease activity. This deoxyribonuclease activity was inhibited by 3 mM or more ATP, suggesting that the catalytic centers of the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities are overlapped. To examine whether these two enzymatic activities share the same active site, a number of site-directed mutations were introduced into Pk-REC and the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities of the mutant proteins were determined. The mutant enzyme in which double mutations Lys-33 to Ala and Thr-34 to Ala were introduced, fully lost both of these activities, indicating that Lys-33 and/or Thr-34 are important for both ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities. The mutation of Asp-112 to Ala slightly and almost equally reduced both ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities. In addition, the mutation of Glu-54 to Gln did not seriously affect the ATPase, deoxyribonuclease, and UV tolerant activities. These results strongly suggest that the active sites of the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities of Pk-REC are common. It is noted that unlike Glu-96 in Escherichia coli RecA, which has been proposed to be a catalytic residue for the ATPase activity, the corresponding residual Glu-54 in Pk-REC is not involved in the catalytic function of the protein.

  5. The Ca2+ -dependent DNases are involved in secondary xylem development in Eucommia ulmoides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Min; Pang, Yu; Zeng, Jun; Ding, Qi; Yin, Shen-Yi; Liu, Chao; Lu, Meng-Zhu; Cui, Ke-Ming; He, Xin-Qiang

    2012-07-01

    Secondary xylem development has long been recognized as a typical case of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. During PCD, the degradation of genomic DNA is catalyzed by endonucleases. However, to date, no endonuclease has been shown to participate in secondary xylem development. Two novel Ca(2+) -dependent DNase genes, EuCaN1 and EuCaN2, were identified from the differentiating secondary xylem of the tree Eucommia ulmoides Oliv., their functions were studied by DNase activity assay, in situ hybridization, protein immunolocalization and virus-induced gene silencing experiments. Full-length cDNAs of EuCaN1 and EuCaN2 contained an open reading frame of 987 bp, encoding two proteins of 328 amino acids with SNase-like functional domains. The genomic DNA sequence for EuCaN1 had no introns, while EuCaN2 had 8 introns. EuCaN1 and EuCaN2 digested ssDNA and dsDNA with Ca(2+) -dependence at neutral pH. Their expression was confined to differentiating secondary xylem cells and the proteins were localized in the nucleus. Their activity dynamics was closely correlated with secondary xylem development. Secondary xylem cell differentiation is influenced by RNAi of endonuclease genes. The results provide evidence that the Ca(2+) -dependent DNases are involved in secondary xylem development.

  6. DNase I Inhibits a Late Phase of Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Munafo, Daniela B.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Brzezinska, Agnieszka A.; Ellis, Beverly A.; Wood, Malcolm R.; Catz, Sergio D.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils kill bacteria on extracellular complexes of DNA fibers and bactericidal proteins known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). The NET composition and the bactericidal mechanisms they use are not fully understood. Here, we show that treatment with deoxyribonuclease (DNase I) impairs a late oxidative response elicited by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and also by phorbol ester. Isoluminol-dependent chemiluminescence elicited by opsonized Listeria monocytogenes-stimulated neutrophils was inhibited by DNase I, and the DNase inhibitory effect was also evident when phagocytosis was blocked, suggesting that DNase inhibits an extracellular mechanism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The DNase inhibitory effect was independent of actin polymerization. Phagocytosis and cell viability were not impaired by DNase I. Immunofluorescence analysis shows that myeloperoxidase is present on NETs. Furthermore, granular proteins were detected in NETs from Rab27a-deficient neutrophils which have deficient exocytosis, suggesting that exocytosis and granular protein distribution on NETs proceed by independent mechanisms. NADPH oxidase subunits were also detected on NETs, and the detection of extracellular trap-associated NADPH oxidase subunits was abolished by treatment with DNase I and dependent on cell stimulation. In vitro analyses demonstrate that MPO and NADPH oxidase activity are not directly inhibited by DNase I, suggesting that its effect on ROS production depends on NET disassembly. Altogether, our data suggest that inhibition of ROS production by microorganism-derived DNase would contribute to their ability to evade killing. PMID:20375609

  7. Characterization of a recently purified thermophilic DNase from a novel thermophilic fungus.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kyle S; Levin, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    A newly isolated thermophilic fungus was found to produce a partially inducible extracellular DNase. This manuscript focuses on the characterization of this novel thermophilic DNase in terms of optimal enzyme conditions, molecular weight, and certain kinetic properties. The DNase was found to be inactivated by the presence of EDTA demonstrating its dependence on metal cofactors for activity. Maximum activity occurred at pH 6.0 with no activity at pH 2.0 or 10.0. The optimal temperature for the purified DNase was 65 °C. The thermophilic DNase was found to be an exonuclease with an estimated molecular weight of 56 kDa.

  8. Cutting edge: AIM2 and endosomal TLRs differentially regulate arthritis and autoantibody production in DNase II-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Baum, Rebecca; Sharma, Shruti; Carpenter, Susan; Li, Quan-Zhen; Busto, Patricia; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Gravallese, Ellen M

    2015-02-01

    Innate immune pattern recognition receptors sense nucleic acids from microbes and orchestrate cytokine production to resolve infection. Inappropriate recognition of host nucleic acids also results in autoimmune disease. In this study, we use a model of inflammation resulting from accrual of self DNA (DNase II(-/-) type I IFN receptor [Ifnar](-/-)) to understand the role of pattern recognition receptor-sensing pathways in arthritis and autoantibody production. Using triple knockout (TKO) mice deficient in DNase II/IFNaR together with deficiency in either stimulator of IFN genes (STING) or absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), we reveal central roles for the STING and AIM2 pathways in arthritis. AIM2 TKO mice show limited inflammasome activation and, similar to STING TKO mice, have reduced inflammation in joints. Surprisingly, autoantibody production is maintained in AIM2 and STING TKO mice, whereas DNase II(-/-) Ifnar(-/-) mice also deficient in Unc93b, a chaperone required for TLR7/9 endosomal localization, fail to produce autoantibodies to nucleic acids. Collectively, these data support distinct roles for cytosolic and endosomal nucleic acid-sensing pathways in disease manifestations.

  9. Enhancement of DNaseI Salt Tolerance by Mimicking the Domain Structure of DNase from an Extremely Halotolerant Bacterium Thioalkalivibrio sp. K90mix.

    PubMed

    Alzbutas, Gediminas; Kaniusaite, Milda; Lagunavicius, Arunas

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we showed that DNaseI-like protein from an extremely halotolerant bacterium Thioalkalivibrio sp. K90mix retained its activity at salt concentrations as high as 4 M NaCl and the key factor allowing this was the C-terminal DNA-binding domain, which comprised two HhH (helix-hairpin-helix) motifs. The further investigations revealed that this domain originated from proteins related to bacterial competence ComEA/ComE proteins. It is likely that in the course of evolution the DNA-binding domain from these proteins was fused to a metallo-β-lactamase superfamily domain. Very likely such domain organization having proteins subsequently "donated" the DNA-binding domain to bacterial DNases. In this study we have mimicked this evolutionary step by fusing bovine DNaseI and DNA-binding domains. We have created two fusions: one harboring the DNA-binding domain of DNaseI-like protein from Thioalkalivibrio sp. K90mix and the second one harboring the DNA-binding domain of bacterial competence protein ComEA from Bacillus subtilis. Both domains enhanced salt tolerance of DNaseI, albeit to different extent. Molecular modeling revealed the essential differences between their interaction with DNA shedding some light on the differences in salt tolerance. In this study we have enhanced salt tolerance of bovine DNaseI; thus, we successfully mimicked the Nature's evolutionary engineering that created the extremely halotolerant bacterial DNase. We have demonstrated that the newly engineered DNaseI variants can be successfully used in applications where activity of the wild type bovine DNaseI is impeded by buffers used. PMID:26939122

  10. Enhancement of DNaseI Salt Tolerance by Mimicking the Domain Structure of DNase from an Extremely Halotolerant Bacterium Thioalkalivibrio sp. K90mix

    PubMed Central

    Alzbutas, Gediminas; Kaniusaite, Milda; Lagunavicius, Arunas

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we showed that DNaseI-like protein from an extremely halotolerant bacterium Thioalkalivibrio sp. K90mix retained its activity at salt concentrations as high as 4 M NaCl and the key factor allowing this was the C-terminal DNA-binding domain, which comprised two HhH (helix-hairpin-helix) motifs. The further investigations revealed that this domain originated from proteins related to bacterial competence ComEA/ComE proteins. It is likely that in the course of evolution the DNA-binding domain from these proteins was fused to a metallo-β-lactamase superfamily domain. Very likely such domain organization having proteins subsequently “donated” the DNA-binding domain to bacterial DNases. In this study we have mimicked this evolutionary step by fusing bovine DNaseI and DNA-binding domains. We have created two fusions: one harboring the DNA-binding domain of DNaseI-like protein from Thioalkalivibrio sp. K90mix and the second one harboring the DNA-binding domain of bacterial competence protein ComEA from Bacillus subtilis. Both domains enhanced salt tolerance of DNaseI, albeit to different extent. Molecular modeling revealed the essential differences between their interaction with DNA shedding some light on the differences in salt tolerance. In this study we have enhanced salt tolerance of bovine DNaseI; thus, we successfully mimicked the Nature’s evolutionary engineering that created the extremely halotolerant bacterial DNase. We have demonstrated that the newly engineered DNaseI variants can be successfully used in applications where activity of the wild type bovine DNaseI is impeded by buffers used. PMID:26939122

  11. Anti-DNase I antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: diagnostic value and share in the enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Trofimenko, A S; Gontar, I P; Zborovsky, A B; Paramonova, O V

    2016-04-01

    Diagnostic accuracy of anti-DNase I antibodies measurement in a differentiation between SLE and other autoimmune rheumatic diseases was evaluated. The share of anti-DNase I and actin in the DNase I activity decrease in SLE was established. Serum samples were obtained from 54 patients with verified SLE, 52 control patients with other autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and 44 healthy persons. Anti-DNase I concentrations were measured by ELISA. Free and actin inhibited DNase I activities were evaluated in the fresh serum samples. The appraisal of antibodies and actin effects on DNase I activity was made using multiple regression. Anti-DNase I antibodies were positive in 35 SLE and 8 control patients, without significant difference between the mean antibody concentrations. Sensitivity of this test was 64.81 %, and specificity-84.62 %. Mean free DNase I activity in SLE was somewhat lower than in the control group as a result of augmented frequency of extremely low enzyme activities. On the contrary, after the exclusion of the latter cases we have revealed elevated mean free DNase I activity in the other SLE patients comparing to the similar control subgroup. Unlike the controls, low serum DNase I activity in SLE arose not only from actin and antibody action, but also, in half of the cases, from unidentified factor, related to active SLE. The accuracy of the anti-DNase I antibodies measurement is approximate to the present reference standard of SLE diagnostics. We first demonstrated that neither antibodies nor actin caused DNase I activity decrease in SLE.

  12. Cloning and Characterization of a Novel Drosophila Stress Induced DNase

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Chang-Soo; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Tang, Xiaolei; Anchondo, Brenda; Magallanes, Diego; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster flies mount an impressive immune response to a variety of pathogens with an efficient system comprised of both humoral and cellular responses. The fat body is the main producer of the anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) with anti-pathogen activity. During bacterial infection, an array of secreted peptidases, proteases and other enzymes are involved in the dissolution of debris generated by pathogen clearance. Although pathogen destruction should result in the release a large amount of nucleic acids, the mechanisms for its removal are still not known. In this report, we present the characterization of a nuclease gene that is induced not only by bacterial infection but also by oxidative stress. Expression of the identified protein has revealed that it encodes a potent nuclease that has been named Stress Induced DNase (SID). SID belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved cation-dependent nucleases that degrade both single and double-stranded nucleic acids. Down-regulation of sid expression via RNA interference leads to significant reduction of fly viability after bacterial infection and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that SID protects flies from the toxic effects of excess DNA/RNA released by pathogen destruction and from oxidative damage. PMID:25083901

  13. DNase-activatable fluorescence probes visualizing the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Shi, Bihua; Zhang, Pengfei; Hu, Dehong; Zheng, Mingbin; Zheng, Cuifang; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2012-03-01

    This work presents a method to visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells using a novel type of activatable fluorescence imaging probe. Deoxyribonuclease (DNase)-activatable fluorescence probes (DFProbes) are composed of double strands deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) which is labeled with fluorophore (ROX or Cy3) and quencher on the end of one of its strands, and stained with SYBR Green I. In the absence of DNase, DFProbes produce the green fluorescence signal of SYBR Green I. In the presence of DNase, SYBR Green I is removed from the DFProbes and the labeled fluorophore is separated from the quencher owing to the degradation of DFProbes by DNase, resulting in the decrease of the green fluorescence signal and the occurrence of a red fluorescence signal due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). DNase in biological samples was detected using DFProbes and the fluorescence imaging in living cells was performed using DFprobe-modified Au nanoparticles. The results show that DFProbes have good responses to DNase, and can clearly visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in cells in real time. The well-designed probes might be useful in tracing the dynamic changes of exogenous DNA and nanocarriers in vitro and in vivo.This work presents a method to visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells using a novel type of activatable fluorescence imaging probe. Deoxyribonuclease (DNase)-activatable fluorescence probes (DFProbes) are composed of double strands deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) which is labeled with fluorophore (ROX or Cy3) and quencher on the end of one of its strands, and stained with SYBR Green I. In the absence of DNase, DFProbes produce the green fluorescence signal of SYBR Green I. In the presence of DNase, SYBR Green I is removed from the DFProbes and the labeled fluorophore is separated from the quencher owing to the degradation of DFProbes by DNase, resulting in the decrease of the green fluorescence signal and the

  14. Disassembling bacterial extracellular matrix with DNase-coated nanoparticles to enhance antibiotic delivery in biofilm infections.

    PubMed

    Baelo, Aida; Levato, Riccardo; Julián, Esther; Crespo, Anna; Astola, José; Gavaldà, Joan; Engel, Elisabeth; Mateos-Timoneda, Miguel Angel; Torrents, Eduard

    2015-07-10

    Infections caused by biofilm-forming bacteria are a major threat to hospitalized patients and the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. There is an urgent necessity for novel therapeutic approaches, since current antibiotic delivery fails to eliminate biofilm-protected bacteria. In this study, ciprofloxacin-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles, which were functionalized with DNase I, were fabricated using a green-solvent based method and their antibiofilm activity was assessed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Such nanoparticles constitute a paradigm shift in biofilm treatment, since, besides releasing ciprofloxacin in a controlled fashion, they are able to target and disassemble the biofilm by degrading the extracellular DNA that stabilize the biofilm matrix. These carriers were compared with free-soluble ciprofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin encapsulated in untreated and poly(lysine)-coated nanoparticles. DNase I-activated nanoparticles were not only able to prevent biofilm formation from planktonic bacteria, but they also successfully reduced established biofilm mass, size and living cell density, as observed in a dynamic environment in a flow cell biofilm assay. Moreover, repeated administration over three days of DNase I-coated nanoparticles encapsulating ciprofloxacin was able to reduce by 95% and then eradicate more than 99.8% of established biofilm, outperforming all the other nanoparticle formulations and the free-drug tested in this study. These promising results, together with minimal cytotoxicity as tested on J774 macrophages, allow obtaining novel antimicrobial nanoparticles, as well as provide clues to design the next generation of drug delivery devices to treat persistent bacterial infections. PMID:25913364

  15. Disassembling bacterial extracellular matrix with DNase-coated nanoparticles to enhance antibiotic delivery in biofilm infections.

    PubMed

    Baelo, Aida; Levato, Riccardo; Julián, Esther; Crespo, Anna; Astola, José; Gavaldà, Joan; Engel, Elisabeth; Mateos-Timoneda, Miguel Angel; Torrents, Eduard

    2015-07-10

    Infections caused by biofilm-forming bacteria are a major threat to hospitalized patients and the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. There is an urgent necessity for novel therapeutic approaches, since current antibiotic delivery fails to eliminate biofilm-protected bacteria. In this study, ciprofloxacin-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles, which were functionalized with DNase I, were fabricated using a green-solvent based method and their antibiofilm activity was assessed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Such nanoparticles constitute a paradigm shift in biofilm treatment, since, besides releasing ciprofloxacin in a controlled fashion, they are able to target and disassemble the biofilm by degrading the extracellular DNA that stabilize the biofilm matrix. These carriers were compared with free-soluble ciprofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin encapsulated in untreated and poly(lysine)-coated nanoparticles. DNase I-activated nanoparticles were not only able to prevent biofilm formation from planktonic bacteria, but they also successfully reduced established biofilm mass, size and living cell density, as observed in a dynamic environment in a flow cell biofilm assay. Moreover, repeated administration over three days of DNase I-coated nanoparticles encapsulating ciprofloxacin was able to reduce by 95% and then eradicate more than 99.8% of established biofilm, outperforming all the other nanoparticle formulations and the free-drug tested in this study. These promising results, together with minimal cytotoxicity as tested on J774 macrophages, allow obtaining novel antimicrobial nanoparticles, as well as provide clues to design the next generation of drug delivery devices to treat persistent bacterial infections.

  16. Mapping nucleosome positions using DNase-seq.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianling; Luo, Kaixuan; Winter, Peter S; Crawford, Gregory E; Iversen, Edwin S; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2016-03-01

    Although deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) was used to probe the structure of the nucleosome in the 1960s and 1970s, in the current high-throughput sequencing era, DNase I has mainly been used to study genomic regions devoid of nucleosomes. Here, we reveal for the first time that DNase I can be used to precisely map the (translational) positions of in vivo nucleosomes genome-wide. Specifically, exploiting a distinctive DNase I cleavage profile within nucleosome-associated DNA--including a signature 10.3 base pair oscillation that corresponds to accessibility of the minor groove as DNA winds around the nucleosome--we develop a Bayes-factor-based method that can be used to map nucleosome positions along the genome. Compared to methods that require genetically modified histones, our DNase-based approach is easily applied in any organism, which we demonstrate by producing maps in yeast and human. Compared to micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-based methods that map nucleosomes based on cuts in linker regions, we utilize DNase I cuts both outside and within nucleosomal DNA; the oscillatory nature of the DNase I cleavage profile within nucleosomal DNA enables us to identify translational positioning details not apparent in MNase digestion of linker DNA. Because the oscillatory pattern corresponds to nucleosome rotational positioning, it also reveals the rotational context of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. We show that potential binding sites within nucleosome-associated DNA are often centered preferentially on an exposed major or minor groove. This preferential localization may modulate TF interaction with nucleosome-associated DNA as TFs search for binding sites. PMID:26772197

  17. Mapping nucleosome positions using DNase-seq

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianling; Luo, Kaixuan; Winter, Peter S.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Hartemink, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    Although deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) was used to probe the structure of the nucleosome in the 1960s and 1970s, in the current high-throughput sequencing era, DNase I has mainly been used to study genomic regions devoid of nucleosomes. Here, we reveal for the first time that DNase I can be used to precisely map the (translational) positions of in vivo nucleosomes genome-wide. Specifically, exploiting a distinctive DNase I cleavage profile within nucleosome-associated DNA—including a signature 10.3 base pair oscillation that corresponds to accessibility of the minor groove as DNA winds around the nucleosome—we develop a Bayes-factor–based method that can be used to map nucleosome positions along the genome. Compared to methods that require genetically modified histones, our DNase-based approach is easily applied in any organism, which we demonstrate by producing maps in yeast and human. Compared to micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-based methods that map nucleosomes based on cuts in linker regions, we utilize DNase I cuts both outside and within nucleosomal DNA; the oscillatory nature of the DNase I cleavage profile within nucleosomal DNA enables us to identify translational positioning details not apparent in MNase digestion of linker DNA. Because the oscillatory pattern corresponds to nucleosome rotational positioning, it also reveals the rotational context of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. We show that potential binding sites within nucleosome-associated DNA are often centered preferentially on an exposed major or minor groove. This preferential localization may modulate TF interaction with nucleosome-associated DNA as TFs search for binding sites. PMID:26772197

  18. Prevention of biofilm formation and removal of existing biofilms by extracellular DNases of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Brown, Helen L; Reuter, Mark; Hanman, Kate; Betts, Roy P; van Vliet, Arnoud H M

    2015-01-01

    The fastidious nature of the foodborne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contrasts with its ability to survive in the food chain. The formation of biofilms, or the integration into existing biofilms by C. jejuni, is thought to contribute to food chain survival. As extracellular DNA (eDNA) has previously been proposed to play a role in C. jejuni biofilms, we have investigated the role of extracellular DNases (eDNases) produced by C. jejuni in biofilm formation. A search of 2791 C. jejuni genomes highlighted that almost half of C. jejuni genomes contains at least one eDNase gene, but only a minority of isolates contains two or three of these eDNase genes, such as C. jejuni strain RM1221 which contains the cje0256, cje0566 and cje1441 eDNase genes. Strain RM1221 did not form biofilms, whereas the eDNase-negative strains NCTC 11168 and 81116 did. Incubation of pre-formed biofilms of NCTC 11168 with live C. jejuni RM1221 or with spent medium from a RM1221 culture resulted in removal of the biofilm. Inactivation of the cje1441 eDNase gene in strain RM1221 restored biofilm formation, and made the mutant unable to degrade biofilms of strain NCTC 11168. Finally, C. jejuni strain RM1221 was able to degrade genomic DNA from C. jejuni NCTC 11168, 81116 and RM1221, whereas strain NCTC 11168 and the RM1221 cje1441 mutant were unable to do so. This was mirrored by an absence of eDNA in overnight cultures of C. jejuni RM1221. This suggests that the activity of eDNases in C. jejuni affects biofilm formation and is not conducive to a biofilm lifestyle. These eDNases do however have a potential role in controlling biofilm formation by C. jejuni strains in food chain relevant environments.

  19. Contamination of DNase Preparations Confounds Analysis of the Role of DNA in Alum-Adjuvanted Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Noges, Laura E; White, Janice; Cambier, John C; Kappler, John W; Marrack, Philippa

    2016-08-15

    Aluminum salt (alum) adjuvants have been used for many years as adjuvants for human vaccines because they are safe and effective. Despite its widespread use, the means by which alum acts as an adjuvant remains poorly understood. Recently, it was shown that injected alum is rapidly coated with host chromatin within mice. Experiments suggested that the host DNA in the coating chromatin contributed to alum's adjuvant activity. Some of the experiments used commercially purchased DNase and showed that coinjection of these DNase preparations with alum and Ag reduced the host's immune response to the vaccine. In this study, we report that some commercial DNase preparations are contaminated with proteases. These proteases are responsible for most of the ability of DNase preparations to inhibit alum's adjuvant activity. Nevertheless, DNase somewhat reduces responses to some Ags with alum. The effect of DNase is independent of its ability to cleave DNA, suggesting that alum improves CD4 responses to Ag via a pathway other than host DNA sensing. PMID:27357147

  20. Contamination of DNase Preparations Confounds Analysis of the Role of DNA in Alum-Adjuvanted Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Noges, Laura E.; White, Janice; Cambier, John C.; Kappler, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum salt (alum) adjuvants have been used for many years as adjuvants for human vaccines because they are safe and effective. Despite its widespread use, the means by which alum acts as an adjuvant remains poorly understood. Recently, it was shown that injected alum is rapidly coated with host chromatin within mice. Experiments suggested that the host DNA in the coating chromatin contributed to alum’s adjuvant activity. Some of the experiments used commercially purchased DNase and showed that coinjection of these DNase preparations with alum and Ag reduced the host’s immune response to the vaccine. In this study, we report that some commercial DNase preparations are contaminated with proteases. These proteases are responsible for most of the ability of DNase preparations to inhibit alum’s adjuvant activity. Nevertheless, DNase somewhat reduces responses to some Ags with alum. The effect of DNase is independent of its ability to cleave DNA, suggesting that alum improves CD4 responses to Ag via a pathway other than host DNA sensing. PMID:27357147

  1. Influence of HumDN1 VNTR polymorphism on DNASE1 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    AlFadhli, Suad; Ghanem, Aqeel A M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of the HumDN1 VNTR polymorphism on DNASE1 mRNA expression and enzyme activity in lupus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to healthy control (HC). Kuwait subjects (n = 500) matched by age/gender/ethnicity were genotyped by fragment-analysis. DNASE1 expression was analysed using quantitative Real-Time-PCR and sera from subjects were screened for DNase1 reduction activity by ELISA. Allele and genotype distribution of HumDN1 VNTR revealed a significant association with susceptibility to SLE and RA (p < 0.05, OR > 1). Relative expression analysis revealed a significant increase in DNASE1 mRNA in SLE (p = 0.0001) and RA (p = 0.002) compared to HC. Stratification of subjects revealed, increased DNASE1 expression in SLE with 5/5 (p = 0.0001), 3/4 (p = 0.0001) and 3/5 genotype (p = 0.01). A reduction in DNASE1 expression was specifically observed in SLE with 4,4 genotype (p = 0.0004). RA patients with 3/4 genotype (p = 0.02) showed a significant increase in DNASE1 expression. Similarly a significant association was observed between DNase1 reduction activity and SLE (p = 0.0001). SLE patients with 3,4 (p = 0.0001) and 5,5 genotype (p = 0.0001) showed increased DNase1 reduction activity, while a lack of association was observed with RA. The present study is the first to reveal the effect of HumDN1 VNTR on DNASE1 expression in SLE and RA.

  2. In vivo effects of recombinant human DNase I on sputum in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, P. L.; Scott, S. F.; Knight, R. A.; Marriott, C.; Ranasinha, C.; Hodson, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Viscoelastic secretions in cystic fibrosis cause impaired mucus clearance and persistence of bacteria within the lung. The abnormal rheology is partly due to the presence of high molecular weight deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Recombinant human DNase I (rhDNase) has been shown to depolymerise DNA and thereby reduce the in vitro viscoelasticity of sputum in patients with cystic fibrosis. A phase II double blind placebo controlled study showed that rhDNase improved pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis. The object of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of rhDNase on sputum rheology and to determine whether these were correlated with changes in pulmonary function. METHODS: Patients were randomised to receive either placebo or rhDNase 2.5 mg twice daily for 10 days. Sputum samples were collected in sterile containers during screening and during treatment with the study drug. Pulmonary function and rheological analysis were the primary outcomes evaluated. Other parameters assessed were quantitative sputum bacteriology, sputum DNA concentration, and change in molecular mass of DNA polymers. RESULTS: The viscoelasticity of the sputum in untreated patients with cystic fibrosis was high and treatment with rhDNase reduced all the rheological parameters measured: dynamic storage modulus (a measure of elasticity), dynamic loss modulus (a measure of viscosity), and log complex modulus (a measure of mucus rigidity). The calculated cough clearance index was also improved following treatment with rhDNase. These rheological parameters showed a correlation with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) which was improved by a mean (SE) of 13.3 (5.6)% on day 10 of treatment with rhDNase compared with a change of 0.2 (3.1)% in the placebo group. There was no change in bacterial colony counts or sputum DNA concentrations following treatment with rhDNase, but a small decrease in high molecular weight DNA was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Patients

  3. DNase I induced DNA degradation is inhibited by neomycin.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, M; Burgmann, H; Davies, J; Graninger, W

    2000-03-01

    Preparations of antimicrobials from biotechnological sources containing nucleic acids may serve as vector for the dissemination of resistance genes. An essential prerequisite for the acquisition of a new resistance phenotype in a transformational scenario is the availability of physically intact DNA molecules capable of transforming competent microorganisms. DNA is thought to be an easy target for catabolic processes when present in the natural habitat of bacteria (e.g. gastrointestinal tract, soil) due to the overall presence of nucleolytic enzymes. Aminoglycoside antibiotics are known to display a strong affinity to nucleic acids rendering these compounds to be primary candidates for exerting DNA protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract when applied orally during antibiotic chemotherapy. Using a DNase I protection assay it could be demonstrated that neomycin B at a concentration of 2 mM completely inhibited degradation of plasmid DNA in vitro. No inhibition of degradation was observed with streptomycin and kanamycin and the non-aminoglycoside antibiotics oxytetracycline and ampicillin under identical assay conditions. Thus, neomycin preparations may be able to promote structural integrity of contaminating DNA-fragments in DNase-rich environments. PMID:10819299

  4. Analysis of computational footprinting methods for DNase sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Gusmao, Eduardo G; Allhoff, Manuel; Zenke, Martin; Costa, Ivan G

    2016-04-01

    DNase-seq allows nucleotide-level identification of transcription factor binding sites on the basis of a computational search of footprint-like DNase I cleavage patterns on the DNA. Frequently in high-throughput methods, experimental artifacts such as DNase I cleavage bias affect the computational analysis of DNase-seq experiments. Here we performed a comprehensive and systematic study on the performance of computational footprinting methods. We evaluated ten footprinting methods in a panel of DNase-seq experiments for their ability to recover cell-specific transcription factor binding sites. We show that three methods--HINT, DNase2TF and PIQ--consistently outperformed the other evaluated methods and that correcting the DNase-seq signal for experimental artifacts significantly improved the accuracy of computational footprints. We also propose a score that can be used to detect footprints arising from transcription factors with potentially short residence times.

  5. Genome-wide detection of DNase I hypersensitive sites in single cells and FFPE tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wenfei; Tang, Qingsong; Wan, Mimi; Cui, Kairong; Zhang, Yi; Ren, Gang; Ni, Bing; Sklar, Jeffrey; Przytycka, Teresa M; Childs, Richard; Levens, David; Zhao, Keji

    2015-12-01

    DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) provide important information on the presence of transcriptional regulatory elements and the state of chromatin in mammalian cells. Conventional DNase sequencing (DNase-seq) for genome-wide DHSs profiling is limited by the requirement of millions of cells. Here we report an ultrasensitive strategy, called single-cell DNase sequencing (scDNase-seq) for detection of genome-wide DHSs in single cells. We show that DHS patterns at the single-cell level are highly reproducible among individual cells. Among different single cells, highly expressed gene promoters and enhancers associated with multiple active histone modifications display constitutive DHS whereas chromatin regions with fewer histone modifications exhibit high variation of DHS. Furthermore, the single-cell DHSs predict enhancers that regulate cell-specific gene expression programs and the cell-to-cell variations of DHS are predictive of gene expression. Finally, we apply scDNase-seq to pools of tumour cells and pools of normal cells, dissected from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue slides from patients with thyroid cancer, and detect thousands of tumour-specific DHSs. Many of these DHSs are associated with promoters and enhancers critically involved in cancer development. Analysis of the DHS sequences uncovers one mutation (chr18: 52417839G>C) in the tumour cells of a patient with follicular thyroid carcinoma, which affects the binding of the tumour suppressor protein p53 and correlates with decreased expression of its target gene TXNL1. In conclusion, scDNase-seq can reliably detect DHSs in single cells, greatly extending the range of applications of DHS analysis both for basic and for translational research, and may provide critical information for personalized medicine. PMID:26605532

  6. Expression of the DNase encoded by the BGLF5 gene of Epstein-Barr virus in nasopharyngeal carcinoma epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sbih-Lammali, F; Berger, F; Busson, P; Ooka, T

    1996-08-01

    In contrast with most Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected healthy carriers, nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients frequently have increased serum levels of antibodies directed against EBV-DNase. These antibodies are potentially interesting serological markers for the diagnosis and the follow-up of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this context, it is important to determine whether malignant EBV-infected cells are the source of significant amounts of EBV-DNase contributing to antigenic stimulation. Therefore EBV-DNase expression has been investigated in several NPC specimens. A significant expression of this viral enzyme was demonstrated in both fresh biopsies and transplanted tumor lines. The DNase isolated from tumor has a molecular weight varying between 52 and 60 kDa and its activity eluted from a single-stranded DNA affinity column was specifically inhibited by both NPC sera and the rabbit polyclonal antibody against EBV-DNase. The enzyme activity was functional in the presence of 300 mM KCl, with which cellular DNases are completely inhibited. The DNase was mainly localized in epithelial tumor cells of both NPC biopsies and nude mice-derived NPC cells. PMID:8806488

  7. Actin-resistant DNAse I Expression From Oncolytic Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Enhances Its Intratumoral Spread and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, Alison; Illingworth, Sam; Brown, Alice; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2016-04-01

    Spread of oncolytic viruses through tumor tissue is essential to effective virotherapy. Interstitial matrix is thought to be a significant barrier to virus particle convection between "islands" of tumor cells. One way to address this is to encode matrix-degrading enzymes within oncolytic viruses, for secretion from infected cells. To test the hypothesis that extracellular DNA provides an important barrier, we assessed the ability of DNase to promote virus spread. Nonreplicating Ad5 vectors expressing actin-resistant DNase (aDNAse I), proteinase K (PK), hyaluronidase (rhPH20), and chondroitinase ABC (CABC) were injected into established DLD human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts, transcomplemented with a replicating Ad5 virus. Each enzyme improved oncolysis by the replicating adenovirus, with no evidence of tumor cells being shed into the bloodstream. aDNAse I and rhPH20 hyaluronidase were then cloned into conditionally-replicating group B adenovirus, Enadenotucirev (EnAd). EnAd encoding each enzyme showed significantly better antitumor efficacy than the parental virus, with the aDNAse I-expressing virus showing improved spread. Both DNase and hyaluronidase activity was still measurable 32 days postinfection. This is the first time that extracellular DNA has been implicated as a barrier for interstitial virus spread, and suggests that oncolytic viruses expressing aDNAse I may be promising candidates for clinical translation. PMID:26708004

  8. Actin-resistant DNAse I Expression From Oncolytic Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Enhances Its Intratumoral Spread and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, Alison; Illingworth, Sam; Brown, Alice; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2016-04-01

    Spread of oncolytic viruses through tumor tissue is essential to effective virotherapy. Interstitial matrix is thought to be a significant barrier to virus particle convection between "islands" of tumor cells. One way to address this is to encode matrix-degrading enzymes within oncolytic viruses, for secretion from infected cells. To test the hypothesis that extracellular DNA provides an important barrier, we assessed the ability of DNase to promote virus spread. Nonreplicating Ad5 vectors expressing actin-resistant DNase (aDNAse I), proteinase K (PK), hyaluronidase (rhPH20), and chondroitinase ABC (CABC) were injected into established DLD human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts, transcomplemented with a replicating Ad5 virus. Each enzyme improved oncolysis by the replicating adenovirus, with no evidence of tumor cells being shed into the bloodstream. aDNAse I and rhPH20 hyaluronidase were then cloned into conditionally-replicating group B adenovirus, Enadenotucirev (EnAd). EnAd encoding each enzyme showed significantly better antitumor efficacy than the parental virus, with the aDNAse I-expressing virus showing improved spread. Both DNase and hyaluronidase activity was still measurable 32 days postinfection. This is the first time that extracellular DNA has been implicated as a barrier for interstitial virus spread, and suggests that oncolytic viruses expressing aDNAse I may be promising candidates for clinical translation.

  9. DNase I and II present in avian oocytes: a possible involvement in sperm degradation at polyspermic fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Stepińska, Urszula; Olszańska, Bozenna

    2003-02-01

    During polyspermic fertilisation in birds numerous spermatozoa enter the eggs, in contrast to the situation in mammals where fertilisation is monospermic. However, in birds only one of the spermatozoa which have entered an egg participates in zygote nucleus formation, while the supernumerary spermatozoa degenerate at early embryogenesis. Our previous work has demonstrated the presence in preovulatory quail oocytes of DNase I and II activities able to digest naked lambdaDNA/HindIII substrate in vitro. In the present studies, the activities of both DNases in quail oocytes at different stages of oogenesis and in ovulated mouse oocytes were assayed in vitro using the same substrate. Degradation of quail spermatozoa by quail oocyte extracts was also checked. Digestion of the DNA substrate was evaluated by electrophoresis on agarose gels. The activities of DNase I and II in quail oocytes increased during oogenesis and were the highest in mature oocytes. The activities were present not only in germinal discs but also in a thin layer of cytoplasm adhering to the perivitelline layer surrounding the yolk. At all stages of oogenesis the activity of DNase II was much higher than that of DNase I. DNA contained in spermatozoa was also degraded by the quail oocyte extracts under conditions optimal for both DNases. In contrast to what is observed in quail oocytes, no DNase activities were detected in ovulated mouse eggs; this is logical as they would be useless or even harmful in monospermic fertilisation. The possible role of DNase activities in avian oocytes, in degradation of accessory spermatozoa during polyspermic fertilisation, is discussed. PMID:12625527

  10. Autonomous and non-autonomous roles of DNase II during cell death in C. elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsiang; Lai, Huey-Jen; Lin, Tai-Wei; Lo, Szecheng J

    2015-04-27

    Generation of DNA fragments is a hallmark of cell apoptosis and is executed within the dying cells (autonomous) or in the engulfing cells (non-autonomous). The TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling) method is used as an in situ assay of apoptosis by labelling DNA fragments generated by caspase-associated DNase (CAD), but not those by the downstream DNase II. In the present study, we report a method of ToLFP (topoisomerase ligation fluorescence probes) for directly visualizing DNA fragments generated by DNase II in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. ToLFP analysis provided the first demonstration of a cell autonomous mode of DNase II activity in dying cells in ced-1 embryos, which are defective in engulfing apoptotic bodies. Compared with the number of ToLFP signals between ced-1 and wild-type (N2) embryos, a 30% increase in N2 embryos was found, suggesting that the ratio of non-autonomous and autonomous modes of DNase II was ~3-7. Among three DNase II mutant embryos (nuc-1, crn-6 and crn-7), nuc-1 embryos exhibited the least number of ToLFP. The ToLFP results confirmed the previous findings that NUC-1 is the major DNase II for degrading apoptotic DNA. To further elucidate NUC-1's mode of action, nuc-1-rescuing transgenic worms that ectopically express free or membrane-bound forms of NUC-1 fusion proteins were utilized. ToLFP analyses revealed that anteriorly expressed NUC-1 digests apoptotic DNA in posterior blastomeres in a non-autonomous and secretion-dependent manner. Collectively, we demonstrate that the ToLFP method can be used to differentiate the locations of blastomeres where DNase II acts autonomously or non-autonomously in degrading apoptotic DNA.

  11. Autonomous and non-autonomous roles of DNase II during cell death in C. elegans embryos

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hsiang; Lai, Huey-Jen; Lin, Tai-Wei; Lo, Szecheng J.

    2015-01-01

    Generation of DNA fragments is a hallmark of cell apoptosis and is executed within the dying cells (autonomous) or in the engulfing cells (non-autonomous). The TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling) method is used as an in situ assay of apoptosis by labelling DNA fragments generated by caspase-associated DNase (CAD), but not those by the downstream DNase II. In the present study, we report a method of ToLFP (topoisomerase ligation fluorescence probes) for directly visualizing DNA fragments generated by DNase II in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. ToLFP analysis provided the first demonstration of a cell autonomous mode of DNase II activity in dying cells in ced-1 embryos, which are defective in engulfing apoptotic bodies. Compared with the number of ToLFP signals between ced-1 and wild-type (N2) embryos, a 30% increase in N2 embryos was found, suggesting that the ratio of non-autonomous and autonomous modes of DNase II was ~3–7. Among three DNase II mutant embryos (nuc-1, crn-6 and crn-7), nuc-1 embryos exhibited the least number of ToLFP. The ToLFP results confirmed the previous findings that NUC-1 is the major DNase II for degrading apoptotic DNA. To further elucidate NUC-1′s mode of action, nuc-1-rescuing transgenic worms that ectopically express free or membrane-bound forms of NUC-1 fusion proteins were utilized. ToLFP analyses revealed that anteriorly expressed NUC-1 digests apoptotic DNA in posterior blastomeres in a non-autonomous and secretion-dependent manner. Collectively, we demonstrate that the ToLFP method can be used to differentiate the locations of blastomeres where DNase II acts autonomously or non-autonomously in degrading apoptotic DNA. PMID:26182365

  12. Activities of lysosomal enzymes in rabbit brain with experimental neurofibrillary changes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Takeda, M; Nakamura, Y; Tada, K; Hariguchi, S; Nishimura, T

    1988-06-29

    Rabbits were injected intracerebrally with aluminum salt leading to experimental neurofibrillary change formation as a model of Alzheimer neurofibrillary change. Eleven days after the injection, the brain tissues were excised from the cortex, hippocampus, and cervical region of spinal cord. Five lysosomal enzymes (cathepsin D, beta-glucuronidase, acid phosphatase, acid DNase, alkaline DNase) were assayed and compared with the control. Cathepsin D, acid DNase and beta-glucuronidase activities increased significantly in all 3 areas of aluminum-injected brain. On the other hand, acid phosphatase and alkaline DNase activities remained at the same level. The results showed the lysosomal enzymes did not change in parallel after aluminum administration, suggesting a role of the increased enzymes in the brain with neurofibrillary changes.

  13. In vivo DNase I sensitivity of the Streptomyces coelicolor chromosome correlates with gene expression: implications for bacterial chromosome structure.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Michael; Bibb, Mervyn

    2006-01-01

    For a bacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) contains a relatively large genome (8.7 Mb) with a complex and adaptive pattern of gene regulation. We discovered a correlation between the physical structure of the S.coelicolor genome and the transcriptional activity of the genes therein. Twelve genes were surveyed throughout 72 h of growth for both in vivo sensitivity to DNase I digestion and levels of transcription. DNase I-sensitivity correlated positively with transcript levels, implying that it was predictive of gene expression, and indicating increased accessibility of transcribed DNA. The genome was fractionated based on the sensitivity to DNase I digestion, with the low molecular weight (frequently cut) fraction highly enriched for actively transcribed sequences when compared to the infrequently cut fraction, which was representative of the entire genome. This approach will allow comparison of nucleoid proteins, and any modifications thereof, associated with transcriptionally active and inactive regions of the bacterial genome.

  14. A caspase-independent cell clearance program. The LEI/L-DNase II pathway.

    PubMed

    Torriglia, A; Perani, P; Brossas, J Y; Altairac, S; Zeggai, S; Martin, E; Tréton, J; Courtois, Y; Counis, M F

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of caspase-mitochondrial pathway counts as one of the most important discovery in apoptosis biochemistry. Today, however, we begin to recognize its limits. Inhibition of caspase does not prevent cell death in many mammalian models. Targeted disruption of caspases does not impair every type of apoptosis. Other pathways, caspase independent, are now described. Here we present one of these pathways. It is a serine-protease dependent pathway and its key event is the transformation of LEI (a serine protease inhibitor) into L-DNase II (an endonuclease). When using this apoptotic pathway the cell activates, at the same time, its endonuclease activity (L-DNase II appears) and its protease activity (there is a release of inhibition of proteases).

  15. DNase I hypersensitivity and methylation of the 5'-flanking region of the alpha 1-fetoprotein gene during developmental and glucocorticoid-induced repression of its activity in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, B; Guertin, M; Chevrette, M; LaRue, H; Bélanger, L

    1986-01-01

    Three major regions of DNase I hypersensitivity (DH) were found in alpha 1-fetoprotein (AFP) chromatin of rat liver. DH site I is located at the transcription initiation site and associated with ongoing AFP transcription. DH site II is located 2.5 kb upstream from the cap site: it is developmental stage-dependent but dissociable from ongoing AFP transcription. DH site III, 3.7 kb upstream from the cap site, behaves as hepatocyte-constitutive. DH sites are present in similar regions of liver albumin chromatin. Dexamethasone-induced AFP gene repression is accompanied by the selective loss of AFP DH site I, a likely result of glucocorticoid receptors binding to a DNA recognition sequence located 5'-adjacent to DH site I. Sl nuclease-hypersensitive sites were found on naked superhelical AFP and albumin DNA, but do not appear to contribute DH sites in liver chromatin. The extent of hypomethylation of HpaII sites at the 5'-end of the AFP gene correlates positively with the level of potential and actual expression of the gene. We conclude that developmental and hormonal regulation of the AFP gene is confined within congruent to 4 kb of 5'-flanking DNA, and we discuss possible hierarchical interactions among DH sites, in relation to DNA methylation and replication. Images PMID:2433681

  16. The in vivo expression of actin/salt-resistant hyperactive DNase I inhibits the development of anti-ssDNA and anti-histone autoantibodies in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Manderson, Anthony P; Carlucci, Francesco; Lachmann, Peter J; Lazarus, Robert A; Festenstein, Richard J; Cook, H Terence; Walport, Mark J; Botto, Marina

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterised by the production of autoantibodies against ubiquitous antigens, especially nuclear components. Evidence makes it clear that the development of these autoantibodies is an antigen-driven process and that immune complexes involving DNA-containing antigens play a key role in the disease process. In rodents, DNase I is the major endonuclease present in saliva, urine and plasma, where it catalyses the hydrolysis of DNA, and impaired DNase function has been implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE. In this study we have evaluated the effects of transgenic over-expression of murine DNase I endonucleases in vivo in a mouse model of lupus. We generated transgenic mice having T-cells that express either wild-type DNase I (wt.DNase I) or a mutant DNase I (ash.DNase I), engineered for three new properties – resistance to inhibition by G-actin, resistance to inhibition by physiological saline and hyperactivity compared to wild type. By crossing these transgenic mice with a murine strain that develops SLE we found that, compared to control non-transgenic littermates or wt.DNase I transgenic mice, the ash.DNase I mutant provided significant protection from the development of anti-single-stranded DNA and anti-histone antibodies, but not of renal disease. In summary, this is the first study in vivo to directly test the effects of long-term increased expression of DNase I on the development of SLE. Our results are in line with previous reports on the possible clinical benefits of recombinant DNase I treatment in SLE, and extend them further to the use of engineered DNase I variants with increased activity and resistance to physiological inhibitors. PMID:16606442

  17. Purification and characterization of DNase VII, a 3'. -->. 5'-directed exonuclease from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, G.F.; Grossman, L.

    1981-01-01

    An exonuclease, DNase VII, has been purified 6000-fold from human placenta. The enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 43,000, requires Mg/sup 2 +/ for activity, and has a pH optimum of 7.8. The enzyme hydrolyzes single-stranded and nicked duplex DNA at the same rate proceeding in a 3' ..-->.. 5' direction liberating 5'-mononucleotides. It does not measurably hydrolyze polyribonucleotides.

  18. DNase expression allows the pathogen group A Streptococcus to escape killing in neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, John T; Simpson, Amelia J; Aziz, Ramy K; Liu, George Y; Kristian, Sascha A; Kotb, Malak; Feramisco, James; Nizet, Victor

    2006-02-21

    The innate immune response plays a crucial role in satisfactory host resolution of bacterial infection. In response to chemotactic signals, neutrophils are early responding cells that migrate in large numbers to sites of infection. The recent discovery of secreted neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of DNA and histones opened a novel dimension in our understanding of the microbial killing capacity of these specialized leukocytes. M1 serotype strains of the pathogen Group A Streptococcus (GAS) are associated with invasive infections including necrotizing fasciitis (NF) and express a potent DNase (Sda1). Here we apply a molecular genetic approach of allelic replacement mutagenesis, single gene complementation, and heterologous expression to demonstrate that DNase Sda1 is both necessary and sufficient to promote GAS neutrophil resistance and virulence in a murine model of NF. Live fluorescent microscopic cell imaging and histopathological analysis are used to establish for the first time a direct linkage between NET degradation and bacterial pathogenicity. Inhibition of GAS DNase activity with G-actin enhanced neutrophil clearance of the pathogen in vitro and reduced virulence in vivo. The results demonstrate a significant role for NETs in neutrophil-mediated innate immunity, and at the same time identify a novel therapeutic target against invasive GAS infection.

  19. Romulus: robust multi-state identification of transcription factor binding sites from DNase-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, Aleksander; Tiuryn, Jerzy; Prabhakar, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Computational prediction of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in the genome remains a challenging task. Here, we present Romulus, a novel computational method for identifying individual TF binding sites from genome sequence information and cell-type–specific experimental data, such as DNase-seq. It combines the strengths of previous approaches, and improves robustness by reducing the number of free parameters in the model by an order of magnitude. Results: We show that Romulus significantly outperforms existing methods across three sources of DNase-seq data, by assessing the performance of these tools against ChIP-seq profiles. The difference was particularly significant when applied to binding site prediction for low-information-content motifs. Our method is capable of inferring multiple binding modes for a single TF, which differ in their DNase I cut profile. Finally, using the model learned by Romulus and ChIP-seq data, we introduce Binding in Closed Chromatin (BCC) as a quantitative measure of TF pioneer factor activity. Uniquely, our measure quantifies a defining feature of pioneer factors, namely their ability to bind closed chromatin. Availability and Implementation: Romulus is freely available as an R package at http://github.com/ajank/Romulus. Contact: ajank@mimuw.edu.pl Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153645

  20. A Multinuclear Metal Complex Based DNase-Mimetic Artificial Enzyme: Matrix Cleavage for Combating Bacterial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaowei; Ji, Haiwei; Liu, Chaoqun; Bing, Wei; Wang, Zhenzhen; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-08-26

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an essential structural component during biofilm formation, including initial bacterial adhesion, subsequent development, and final maturation. Herein, the construction of a DNase-mimetic artificial enzyme (DMAE) for anti-biofilm applications is described. By confining passivated gold nanoparticles with multiple cerium(IV) complexes on the surface of colloidal magnetic Fe3 O4  /SiO2 core/shell particles, a robust and recoverable artificial enzyme with DNase-like activity was obtained, which exhibited high cleavage ability towards both model substrates and eDNA. Compared to the high environmental sensitivity of natural DNase in anti-biofilm applications, DMAE exhibited a much better operational stability and easier recoverability. When DMAE was coated on substratum surfaces, biofilm formation was inhibited for prolonged periods of time, and the DMAE excelled in the dispersion of established biofilms of various ages. Finally, the presence of DMAE remarkably potentiated the efficiency of traditional antibiotics to kill biofilm-encased bacteria and eradiate biofilms. PMID:27484616

  1. Mi2β Shows Chromatin Enzyme Specificity by Erasing a DNase I-hypersensitive Site Established by ACF*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Haruhiko; Du, Hansen; Zhang, Zhaoqing; Henderson, Angus; Sen, Ranjan; Pazin, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes are linked to changes in gene expression; however, it is not clear how the multiple remodeling enzymes found in eukaryotes differ in function and work together. In this report, we demonstrate that the ATP-dependent remodeling enzymes ACF and Mi2β can direct consecutive, opposing chromatin-remodeling events, when recruited to chromatin by different transcription factors. In a cell-free system based on the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene enhancer, we show that TFE3 induces a DNase I-hypersensitive site in an ATP-dependent reaction that requires ACF following transcription factor binding to chromatin. In a second step, PU.1 directs Mi2β to erase an established DNase I-hypersensitive site, in an ATP-dependent reaction subsequent to PU.1 binding to chromatin, whereas ACF will not support erasure. Erasure occurred without displacing the transcription factor that initiated the site. Other tested enzymes were unable to erase the DNase I-hypersensitive site. Establishing and erasing the DNase I-hypersensitive site required transcriptional activation domains from TFE3 and PU.1, respectively. Together, these results provide important new mechanistic insight into the combinatorial control of chromatin structure. PMID:19158090

  2. The Enzyme and the cDNA Sequence of a Thermolabile and Double-Strand Specific DNase from Northern Shrimps (Pandalus borealis)

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Inge W.; Øverbø, Kersti; Jensen Havdalen, Linda; Elde, Morten; Gjellesvik, Dag Rune; Lanes, Olav

    2010-01-01

    Background We have previously isolated a thermolabile nuclease specific for double-stranded DNA from industrial processing water of Northern shrimps (Pandalus borealis) and developed an application of the enzyme in removal of contaminating DNA in PCR-related technologies. Methodology/Principal Findings A 43 kDa nuclease with a high specific activity of hydrolysing linear as well as circular forms of DNA was purified from hepatopancreas of Northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis). The enzyme displayed a substrate preference that was shifted from exclusively double-stranded DNA in the presence of magnesium to also encompass significant activity against single-stranded DNA when calcium was added. No activity against RNA was detected. Although originating from a cold-environment animal, the shrimp DNase has only minor low-temperature activity. Still, the enzyme was irreversibly inactivated by moderate heating with a half-life of 1 min at 65°C. The purified protein was partly sequenced and derived oligonucleotides were used to prime amplification of the encoding cDNA. This cDNA sequence revealed an open reading frame encoding a 404 amino acid protein containing a signal peptide. By sequence similarity the enzyme is predicted to belong to a family of DNA/RNA non-specific nucleases even though this shrimp DNase lacks RNase activity and is highly double-strand specific in some respects. These features are in agreement with those previously established for endonucleases classified as similar to the Kamchatka crab duplex-specific nuclease (Par_DSN). Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses confirmed that the Northern shrimp nuclease resembles the Par_DSN-like nucleases and displays a more distant relationship to the Serratia family of nucleases. Conclusions/Significance The shrimp nuclease contains enzyme activity that may be controlled by temperature or buffer compositions. The double-stranded DNA specificity, as well as the thermolabile feature, strengthens its potential

  3. Using Pulmozyme DNase treatment in lentiviral vector production.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Aaron; Bischof, Daniela; Jasti, Aparna; Ernstberger, Aaron; Hawkins, Troy; Cornetta, Kenneth

    2012-02-01

    In the production of lentiviral vector for clinical studies the purity of the final product is of vital importance. To remove plasmid and producer cell line DNA, investigators have incubated the vector product with Benzonase, a bacterially derived DNase. As an alternative we investigated the use of Pulmozyme, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved human DNase for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, by comparing the efficiency of DNA removal from lentiviral vector preparations. A green fluorescent protein-expressing lentiviral vector was prepared by transient calcium phosphate transfection of HEK 293T cells and DNA removal was compared when treating vector after harvest or immediately after transfection. The effectiveness of DNase treatment was measured by quantitative PCR using primers for vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G viral envelope plasmid. When treating the final product, 1-hr incubations (37°C) with Pulmozyme at 20 U/ml reduced plasmid DNA to undetectable levels. Longer incubations (up to 4 hr) did not improve DNA removal at lower concentrations and the effectiveness was equivalent to or better than Benzonase at 50 U/ml. Attempting to use Pulmozyme immediately after transfection, but before final medium change, as a means to decrease Pulmozyme concentration in the final product provided a 2-log reduction in DNA but was inferior to treatment at the end of production. Pulmozyme, at concentrations up to 100 U/ml, had no measurable effect on infectious titer of the final vector product. The use of Pulmozyme is likely to increase the cost of DNase treatment when preparing vector product and should be considered when generating clinical-grade vector products. PMID:22428981

  4. Synergy between Hematopoietic and Radioresistant Stromal Cells Is Required for Autoimmune Manifestations of DNase II-/-IFNaR-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Baum, Rebecca; Nündel, Kerstin; Pawaria, Sudesh; Sharma, Shruti; Busto, Patricia; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Gravallese, Ellen M; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Detection of endogenous nucleic acids by cytosolic receptors, dependent on STING, and endosomal sensors, dependent on Unc93b1, can provoke inflammatory responses that contribute to a variety of autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. In DNase II-deficient mice, the excessive accrual of undegraded DNA leads to both a STING-dependent inflammatory arthritis and additional Unc93b1-dependent autoimmune manifestations, including splenomegaly, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and autoantibody production. In this study, we use bone marrow chimeras to show that clinical and histological inflammation in the joint depends upon DNase II deficiency in both donor hematopoietic cells and host radioresistant cells. Additional features of autoimmunity in these mice, known to depend on Unc93b1 and therefore endosomal TLRs, also require DNase II deficiency in both donor and host compartments, but only require functional TLRs in the hematopoietic cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate a major role of both stromal and hematopoietic cells in all aspects of DNA-driven autoimmunity. These findings further point to the importance of cytosolic nucleic acid sensors in creating an inflammatory environment that facilitates the development of Unc93b1-dependent autoimmunity.

  5. Genome-wide mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenli; Jiang, Jiming

    2015-01-01

    Genomic regions associated with regulatory proteins are known to be highly sensitive to DNase I digestion and are termed DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs). DHSs can be identified by DNase I digestion followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNase-seq). DNase-seq has become a powerful technique for genome-wide mapping of chromatin accessibility in eukaryotes with a sequenced genome. We have developed a DNase-seq procedure in plants. This procedure was adapted from the protocol originally developed for mammalian cell lines. It includes plant nuclei isolation, digestion of purified nuclei with DNase I, recovery of DNase-trimmed DNA fragments, DNase-seq library development, Illumina sequencing and data analysis. We also introduce a barcoding system for library preparation. We have conducted DNase-seq in both Arabidopsis thaliana and rice, and developed genome-wide open chromatin maps in both species. These DHS datasets have been used to detect footprints from regulatory protein binding and to reveal genome-wide nucleosome positioning patterns.

  6. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  7. The TatD-like DNase of Plasmodium is a virulence factor and a potential malaria vaccine candidate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zhiguang; Jiang, Ning; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Huijun; Yin, Jigang; Wahlgren, Mats; Cheng, Xunjia; Cao, Yaming; Chen, Qijun

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), composed primarily of DNA and proteases, are released from activated neutrophils and contribute to the innate immune response by capturing pathogens. Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe malaria, thrives in its host by counteracting immune elimination. Here, we report the discovery of a novel virulence factor of P. falciparum, a TatD-like DNase (PfTatD) that is expressed primarily in the asexual blood stage and is likely utilized by the parasite to counteract NETs. PfTatD exhibits typical deoxyribonuclease activity, and its expression is higher in virulent parasites than in avirulent parasites. A P. berghei TatD-knockout parasite displays reduced pathogenicity in mice. Mice immunized with recombinant TatD exhibit increased immunity against lethal challenge. Our results suggest that the TatD-like DNase is an essential factor for the survival of malarial parasites in the host and is a potential malaria vaccine candidate. PMID:27151551

  8. The biofilm matrix destabilizers, EDTA and DNaseI, enhance the susceptibility of nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae biofilms to treatment with ampicillin and ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ball, Jessica L; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2014-08-01

    Nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes chronic biofilm infections of the ears and airways. The biofilm matrix provides structural integrity to the biofilm and protects biofilm cells from antibiotic exposure by reducing penetration of antimicrobial compounds into the biofilm. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major matrix component of biofilms formed by many species of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including NTHi. Interestingly, the cation chelator ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) has been shown to reduce the matrix strength of biofilms of several bacterial species as well as to have bactericidal activity against various pathogens. EDTA exerts its antimicrobial activity by chelating divalent cations necessary for growth and membrane stability and by destabilizing the matrix thus enhancing the detachment of bacterial cells from the biofilm. In this study, we have explored the role of divalent cations in NTHi biofilm development and stability. We have utilized in vitro static and continuous flow models of biofilm development by NTHi to demonstrate that magnesium cations enhance biofilm formation by NTHi. We found that the divalent cation chelator EDTA is effective at both preventing NTHi biofilm formation and at treating established NTHi biofilms. Furthermore, we found that the matrix destablilizers EDTA and DNaseI increase the susceptibility of NTHi biofilms to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. Our observations indicate that DNaseI and EDTA enhance the efficacy of antibiotic treatment of NTHi biofilms. These observations may lead to new strategies that will improve the treatment options available to patients with chronic NTHi infections.

  9. The biofilm matrix destabilizers, EDTA and DNaseI, enhance the susceptibility of nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae biofilms to treatment with ampicillin and ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ball, Jessica L; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2014-08-01

    Nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes chronic biofilm infections of the ears and airways. The biofilm matrix provides structural integrity to the biofilm and protects biofilm cells from antibiotic exposure by reducing penetration of antimicrobial compounds into the biofilm. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major matrix component of biofilms formed by many species of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including NTHi. Interestingly, the cation chelator ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) has been shown to reduce the matrix strength of biofilms of several bacterial species as well as to have bactericidal activity against various pathogens. EDTA exerts its antimicrobial activity by chelating divalent cations necessary for growth and membrane stability and by destabilizing the matrix thus enhancing the detachment of bacterial cells from the biofilm. In this study, we have explored the role of divalent cations in NTHi biofilm development and stability. We have utilized in vitro static and continuous flow models of biofilm development by NTHi to demonstrate that magnesium cations enhance biofilm formation by NTHi. We found that the divalent cation chelator EDTA is effective at both preventing NTHi biofilm formation and at treating established NTHi biofilms. Furthermore, we found that the matrix destablilizers EDTA and DNaseI increase the susceptibility of NTHi biofilms to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. Our observations indicate that DNaseI and EDTA enhance the efficacy of antibiotic treatment of NTHi biofilms. These observations may lead to new strategies that will improve the treatment options available to patients with chronic NTHi infections. PMID:25044339

  10. Recombinant Human DNase I Reduces the Viscosity of Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shak, Steven; Capon, Daniel J.; Hellmiss, Renate; Marsters, Scot A.; Baker, Carrie L.

    1990-12-01

    Respiratory distress and progressive lung destruction in cystic fibrosis can be attributed to bacterial persistence and the accumulation of viscous purulent secretions in the airways. More than 30 yr ago it was suggested that the large amounts of DNA in purulent secretions contribute to its viscosity and that bovine pancreatic DNase I could reduce the viscosity. To evaluate the potential clinical utility of recombinant human DNase I (rhDNase) in the treatment of cystic fibrosis, we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed rhDNase. Catalytic amounts of rhDNase greatly reduce the viscosity of purulent cystic fibrosis sputum, transforming it within minutes from a nonflowing viscous gel to a flowing liquid. The reduction in viscosity is associated with a decrease in size of DNA in the sputum. Inhalation of a rhDNase aerosol may be a simple direct approach that will help individuals with cystic fibrosis and other patients with pneumonia or bronchitis to clear their airways of purulent secretions.

  11. Activation of carboxylic acids in asymmetric organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Mattia Riccardo; Poladura, Belén; Diaz de Los Bernardos, Miriam; Leutzsch, Markus; Goddard, Richard; List, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    Organocatalysis, catalysis using small organic molecules, has recently evolved into a general approach for asymmetric synthesis, complementing both metal catalysis and biocatalysis. Its success relies to a large extent upon the introduction of novel and generic activation modes. Remarkably though, while carboxylic acids have been used as catalyst directing groups in supramolecular transition-metal catalysis, a general and well-defined activation mode for this useful and abundant substance class is still lacking. Herein we propose the heterodimeric association of carboxylic acids with chiral phosphoric acid catalysts as a new activation principle for organocatalysis. This self-assembly increases both the acidity of the phosphoric acid catalyst and the reactivity of the carboxylic acid. To illustrate this principle, we apply our concept in a general and highly enantioselective catalytic aziridine-opening reaction with carboxylic acids as nucleophiles.

  12. Critical roles of DNase1l3l in lens nuclear degeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Iida, Atsumi; Tabata, Yoko; Baba, Yukihiro; Fujii, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2014-11-01

    The vertebrate lens undergoes organelle and nuclear degradation during lens development, allowing the lens to become transparent. DNase2b is an enzyme responsible for nuclear degradation in the mouse lens; however, dnase2b expression in zebrafish showed a distribution pattern that differed from that in mice. No zebrafish dnase2b was detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction until around 120 h postfertilization (hpf), suggesting that dnase2b is not expressed in the critical period for lens nuclear degradation, which corresponds to 56-74 hpf. However, public database searches have indicated that dnase1l3l is strongly and specifically expressed in embryonic zebrafish lens. Whole mount in situ hybridization showed that dnase1l3l expression began around 36 hpf and was found exclusively in the lens until the adult stage. Morpholino (MO)-dependent downregulation of dnase1l3l expression during early development in zebrafish led to the failure of nuclear degradation in the lens. Immunostaining of lens sections showed that expression of Pax6, Prox1 and β-catenin was comparable to the control in the early stage of development in dnase1l3l-MO injected embryos. However, downregulation of expression of these genes in lens was not observed in dnase1l3l-MO-treated zebrafish at 72 hpf, suggesting that the lens development was halted. Taken together, we showed that dnase1l3l plays major roles in nuclear degradation in zebrafish lens development. No homologous gene was found in other species in public databases, suggesting that dnase1l3l developed and acquired its function specifically in zebrafish.

  13. Building biologically active nucleic acid nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Smith, C I Edvard; Lundin, Karin E; Simonson, Oscar E; Moreno, Pedro M D; Svahn, Mathias G; Wenska, Malgorzata; Strömberg, Roger

    2008-01-01

    The Bioplex technology allows the hybridization of functional entities to various forms of nucleic acids by the use of synthetic nucleic acid analogs. Such supramolecular assemblies can be made in a predetermined fashion and can confer new properties. The Zorro technology is based on a novel construct generated to simultaneously bind to both DNA strands. Such compounds may have gene silencing activity.

  14. Zymographic detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Pastor, F I Javier; Diaz, Pilar

    2002-11-01

    The manuscript includes a concise description of a new, fast and simple method for detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity. The method is based on a color shift caused a by pH change and may be an excellent procedure for large screenings of samples from natural sources, as it involves no complex sample processing or purification. The method developed can be used in preliminary approaches to biotransformation processes involving detection of hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

  15. Genome-wide Detection of DNase I Hypersensitive Sites in Single Cells and FFPE Samples

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wenfei; Tang, Qingsong; Wan, Mimi; Cui, Kairong; Zhang, Yi; Ren, Gang; Ni, Bing; Sklar, Jeffrey; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Childs, Richard; Levens, David; Zhao, Keji

    2015-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) provide important information on the presence of transcriptional regulatory elements and the state of chromatin in mammalian cells1–3. Conventional DNase-Seq for genome-wide DHSs profiling is limited by the requirement of millions of cells4,5. Here we report an ultrasensitive strategy, called Pico-Seq, for detection of genome-wide DHSs in single cells. We show that DHS patterns at the single cell level are highly reproducible among individual cells. Among different single cells, highly expressed gene promoters and the enhancers associated with multiple active histone modifications display constitutive DHS while chromatin regions with fewer histone modifications exhibit high variation of DHS. Furthermore, the single-cell DHSs predict enhancers that regulate cell-specific gene expression programs and the cell-to-cell variations of DHS are predictive of gene expression. Finally, we apply Pico-Seq to pools of tumor cells and pools of normal cells, dissected from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue slides from thyroid cancer patients, and detect thousands of tumor-specific DHSs. Many of these DHSs are associated with promoters and enhancers critically involved in cancer development. Analysis of the DHS sequences uncovers one single-nucleotide variant (chr18:52417839 G>C) in the tumor cells of a follicular thyroid carcinoma patient, which affects the binding of the tumor suppressor protein p53 and correlates with decreased expression of its target gene TXNL1. In conclusion, Pico-Seq can reliably detect DHSs in single cells, greatly extending the range of applications of DHS analysis for both basic and translational research and may provide critical information for personalized medicine. PMID:26605532

  16. Analysis of optimized DNase-seq reveals intrinsic bias in transcription factor footprint identification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Wei; Zang, Chongzhi; Liu, Yin; Rao, Prakash K.; Fei, Teng; Xu, Han; Long, Henry; Liu, X. Shirley; Brown, Myles

    2014-01-01

    DNase-seq is a powerful technique for identifying cis-regulatory elements across the genome. We studied the key experimental parameters to optimize the performance of DNase-seq. We found that sequencing short 50-100bp fragments that accumulate in long inter-nucleosome linker regions is more efficient for identifying transcription factor binding sites than using longer fragments. We also assessed the potential of DNase-seq to predict transcription factor occupancy through the generation of nucleotide-resolution transcription factor footprints. In modeling the sequence-specific DNaseI cutting bias we found a surprisingly strong effect that varied over more than two orders of magnitude. This confounds DNaseI footprint analysis to the extent that the nucleotide resolution cleavage patterns at most transcription factor binding sites are derived from intrinsic DNaseI cleavage bias rather than from specific protein-DNA interactions. In contrast, quantitative comparison of DNaseI hypersensitivity between states can predict transcription factor occupancy associated with particular biological perturbations. PMID:24317252

  17. Biological Activities of Uric Acid in Infection Due to Enteropathogenic and Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Broome, Jacqueline E.; Lis, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    In previous work, we identified xanthine oxidase (XO) as an important enzyme in the interaction between the host and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC). Many of the biological effects of XO were due to the hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzyme. We wondered, however, if uric acid generated by XO also had biological effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Uric acid triggered inflammatory responses in the gut, including increased submucosal edema and release of extracellular DNA from host cells. While uric acid alone was unable to trigger a chloride secretory response in intestinal monolayers, it did potentiate the secretory response to cyclic AMP agonists. Uric acid crystals were formed in vivo in the lumen of the gut in response to EPEC and STEC infections. While trying to visualize uric acid crystals formed during EPEC and STEC infections, we noticed that uric acid crystals became enmeshed in the neutrophilic extracellular traps (NETs) produced from host cells in response to bacteria in cultured cell systems and in the intestine in vivo. Uric acid levels in the gut lumen increased in response to exogenous DNA, and these increases were enhanced by the actions of DNase I. Interestingly, addition of DNase I reduced the numbers of EPEC bacteria recovered after a 20-h infection and protected against EPEC-induced histologic damage. PMID:26787720

  18. DNase-Sensitive and -Resistant Modes of Biofilm Formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zetzmann, Marion; Okshevsky, Mira; Endres, Jasmin; Sedlag, Anne; Caccia, Nelly; Auchter, Marc; Waidmann, Mark S.; Desvaux, Mickaël; Meyer, Rikke L.; Riedel, Christian U.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is able to form biofilms on various surfaces and this ability is thought to contribute to persistence in the environment and on contact surfaces in the food industry. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a component of the biofilm matrix of many bacterial species and was shown to play a role in biofilm establishment of L. monocytogenes. In the present study, the effect of DNaseI treatment on biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes EGD-e was investigated under static and dynamic conditions in normal or diluted complex medium at different temperatures. Biofilm formation was quantified by crystal violet staining or visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biomass of surface-attached L. monocytogenes varies depending on temperature and dilution of media. Interestingly, L. monocytogenes EGD-e forms DNase-sensitive biofilms in diluted medium whereas in full strength medium DNaseI treatment had no effect. In line with these observations, eDNA is present in the matrix of biofilms grown in diluted but not full strength medium and supernatants of biofilms grown in diluted medium contain chromosomal DNA. The DNase-sensitive phenotype could be clearly linked to reduced ionic strength in the environment since dilution of medium in PBS or saline abolished DNase sensitivity. Several other but not all species of the genus Listeria display DNase-sensitive and -resistant modes of biofilm formation. These results indicate that L. monocytogenes biofilms are DNase-sensitive especially at low ionic strength, which might favor bacterial lysis and release of chromosomal DNA. Since low nutrient concentrations with increased osmotic pressure are conditions frequently found in food processing environments, DNaseI treatment represents an option to prevent or remove Listeria biofilms in industrial settings. PMID:26733972

  19. Mapping 3D genome architecture through in situ DNase Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Cusanovich, Darren A; Hause, Ronald J; Ma, Wenxiu; Qiu, Ruolan; Deng, Xinxian; Blau, C Anthony; Disteche, Christine M; Noble, William S; Shendure, Jay; Duan, Zhijun

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of massively parallel sequencing, considerable work has gone into adapting chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques to study chromosomal architecture at a genome-wide scale. We recently demonstrated that the inactive murine X chromosome adopts a bipartite structure using a novel 3C protocol, termed in situ DNase Hi-C. Like traditional Hi-C protocols, in situ DNase Hi-C requires that chromatin be chemically cross-linked, digested, end-repaired, and proximity-ligated with a biotinylated bridge adaptor. The resulting ligation products are optionally sheared, affinity-purified via streptavidin bead immobilization, and subjected to traditional next-generation library preparation for Illumina paired-end sequencing. Importantly, in situ DNase Hi-C obviates the dependence on a restriction enzyme to digest chromatin, instead relying on the endonuclease DNase I. Libraries generated by in situ DNase Hi-C have a higher effective resolution than traditional Hi-C libraries, which makes them valuable in cases in which high sequencing depth is allowed for, or when hybrid capture technologies are expected to be used. The protocol described here, which involves ∼4 d of bench work, is optimized for the study of mammalian cells, but it can be broadly applicable to any cell or tissue of interest, given experimental parameter optimization.

  20. Mapping 3D genome architecture through in situ DNase Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Cusanovich, Darren A; Hause, Ronald J; Ma, Wenxiu; Qiu, Ruolan; Deng, Xinxian; Blau, C Anthony; Disteche, Christine M; Noble, William S; Shendure, Jay; Duan, Zhijun

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of massively parallel sequencing, considerable work has gone into adapting chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques to study chromosomal architecture at a genome-wide scale. We recently demonstrated that the inactive murine X chromosome adopts a bipartite structure using a novel 3C protocol, termed in situ DNase Hi-C. Like traditional Hi-C protocols, in situ DNase Hi-C requires that chromatin be chemically cross-linked, digested, end-repaired, and proximity-ligated with a biotinylated bridge adaptor. The resulting ligation products are optionally sheared, affinity-purified via streptavidin bead immobilization, and subjected to traditional next-generation library preparation for Illumina paired-end sequencing. Importantly, in situ DNase Hi-C obviates the dependence on a restriction enzyme to digest chromatin, instead relying on the endonuclease DNase I. Libraries generated by in situ DNase Hi-C have a higher effective resolution than traditional Hi-C libraries, which makes them valuable in cases in which high sequencing depth is allowed for, or when hybrid capture technologies are expected to be used. The protocol described here, which involves ∼4 d of bench work, is optimized for the study of mammalian cells, but it can be broadly applicable to any cell or tissue of interest, given experimental parameter optimization. PMID:27685100

  1. DNase I hypersensitivity mapping and promoter polymorphism analysis of human C4

    SciTech Connect

    Vaishnaw, A.K.; Hargreaves, R.; Morley, B.J.

    1995-04-01

    Human complement component C4 is encoded by two structurally distinct loci in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region. The two isotypes, C4A and C4B, differ at only four residues in the C4d fragment, but C4 constitutes the most polymorphic of the complement components. It is not known, however, whether the regions involved in the regulation of C4 expression also display polymorphic variation. By using the technique of DNase I hypersensitivity mapping, we established that the only area of transcriptional activity for C4 in the hepatocyte cell line, HepG2, occurs approximately 500 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. This region was found to be remarkably constant in sequence when analyzed in the context of differing MHC haplotypes including HLA B57, C4A6, C4B1, DR7, which has been correlated with reduced expression of the C4A isotype. Similarly, polymerase chain reaction followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis failed to demonstrate any promoter polymorphisms in 103 individuals comprising 52 systemic lupus erythermatosus patients and 51 healthy controls. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Photoinduced biochemical activity of fullerene carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuyama, Hidetoshi; Yamago, Shigeru; Nakamura, Eiichi; Shiraki, Takashi; Sugiura, Yukio

    1993-08-25

    Here we report the preparation of a water-miscible fullerene carboxylic acid (2) and its biological activity-cytotoxicity and G-selective DNA cleaving ability. What is truly remarkable is that the biological activity of C{sub 60} was observed only under irradiation with visible light and not in the dark, suggesting that fullerenes may serve as useful photosensitive biochemical probes. We have found, for the first time, that even low-energy visible light is surfficient to induce biological activity in fullerene derivatives. Among the numerous implications of the present findings, the most exciting prospect includes the use of fullerene derivatives for photodynamic therapy. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. I-DNASE21 system: development and SWGDAM validation of a new STR 21-plex reaction.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Jose María; Celorrio, David; Odriozola, Adrian; Köhnemann, Stephan; Bravo, María Luisa; Builes, Juan Jose; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Herrera, René J; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2014-01-01

    I-DNASE21 is a new STR multiplex system that amplifies 21 STR autosomal loci, plus the amelogenin locus in one reaction. This system has been designed to analyze all the STR loci included in the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), Interpol Standard Set of Loci (ISSL), Extended European Standard Set (ESS-Extended), UK National Criminal Intelligence DNA Database (NDNAD) and German Core loci (GCL). This manuscript presents the validation of the I-DNASE21 system according to the revised guidelines issued by the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM). The results of this validation, added to the extremely high discriminatory power showed, suggest that I-DNASE21 could be a potentially helpful tool for identification and kinship determination even in complex paternity cases.

  4. Identification of bovine papilloma virus 10 in teat warts of cattle by DNase-SISPA.

    PubMed

    Rai, Gaurava K; Saxena, Meeta; Singh, Vidya; Somvanshi, Ramesh; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2011-01-27

    Papilloma viruses are detected and identified by PCR with consensus primers designed from human papilloma virus sequences. These and other primers could not detect papilloma virus in bovine teat wart samples despite repeated attempts. DNase-SISPA, a metagenomic method for identifying viruses, could identify bovine papilloma virus type 10 in bovine teat warts. The sequence comparison between consensus primers and bovine papilloma virus type 10 sequences revealed many differences between consensus primers and BPV-10 sequences. We suggest, DNase-SISPA may be used as an alternate method for papilloma virus diagnosis, in cases where PCR fails to identify papilloma viruses.

  5. Mobile Element Insertions Causing Mutations in the Drosophila Suppressor of Sable Locus Occur in Dnase I Hypersensitive Subregions of 5'-Transcribed Nontranslated Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Voelker, R. A.; Graves, J.; Gibson, W.; Eisenberg, M.

    1990-01-01

    The locations of 16 mobile element insertions causing mutations at the Drosophila suppressor of sable [su(s)] locus were determined by restriction mapping and DNA sequencing of the junction sites. The transposons causing the mutations are: P element (5 alleles), gypsy (3 alleles), 17.6, HMS Beagle, springer, Delta 88, prygun, Stalker, and a new mobile element which was named roamer (2 alleles). Four P element insertions occur in 5' nontranslated leader sequences, while the fifth P element and all 11 non-P elements inserted into the 2053 nucleotide, 5'-most intron that is spliced from the 5' nontranslated leader ~100 nucleotides upstream of the translation start. Fifteen of the 16 mobile elements inserted within a ~1900 nucleotide region that contains seven 100-200-nucleotide long DNase I-hypersensitive subregions that alternate with DNase I-resistant intervals of similar lengths. The locations of these 15 insertion sites correlate well with the roughly estimated locations of five of the DNase I-hypersensitive subregions. These findings suggest that the features of chromatin structure that accompany gene activation may also make the DNA susceptible to insertion of mobile elements. PMID:1963868

  6. Identification of cis-acting elements as DNase I hypersensitive sites in lysozyme gene chromatin.

    PubMed

    Sippel, A E; Saueressig, H; Huber, M C; Hoefer, H C; Stief, A; Borgmeyer, U; Bonifer, C

    1996-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive sites in chromatin of eukaryotic cells mark the positions of multifactorial cis-acting elements. Mapping DH sites by indirect end labeling is a convenient procedure used for identifying regulatory elements within extensive regions of chromatin and for gaining information about their functional specificity as well as their fine structure.

  7. Identification of cis-acting elements as DNase I hypersensitive sites in lysozyme gene chromatin.

    PubMed

    Sippel, A E; Saueressig, H; Huber, M C; Hoefer, H C; Stief, A; Borgmeyer, U; Bonifer, C

    1996-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive sites in chromatin of eukaryotic cells mark the positions of multifactorial cis-acting elements. Mapping DH sites by indirect end labeling is a convenient procedure used for identifying regulatory elements within extensive regions of chromatin and for gaining information about their functional specificity as well as their fine structure. PMID:8902808

  8. "JCE" Classroom Activity #109: My Acid Can Beat Up Your Acid!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putti, Alice

    2011-01-01

    In this guided-inquiry activity, students investigate the ionization of strong and weak acids. Bead models are used to study acid ionization on a particulate level. Students analyze seven strong and weak acid models and make generalizations about the relationship between acid strength and dissociation. (Contains 1 table and 2 figures.)

  9. NUC-1, a caenorhabditis elegans DNase II homolog, functions in an intermediate step of DNA degradation during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y C; Stanfield, G M; Horvitz, H R

    2000-03-01

    One hallmark of apoptosis is the degradation of chromosomal DNA. We cloned the Caenorhabditis elegans gene nuc-1, which is involved in the degradation of the DNA of apoptotic cells, and found that nuc-1 encodes a homolog of mammalian DNase II. We used the TUNEL technique to assay DNA degradation in nuc-1 and other mutants defective in programmed cell death and discovered that TUNEL labels apoptotic cells only during a transient intermediate stage. Mutations in nuc-1 allowed the generation of TUNEL-reactive DNA but blocked the conversion of TUNEL-reactive DNA to a subsequent TUNEL-unreactive state. Completion of DNA degradation did not occur in the absence of cell-corpse engulfment. Our data suggest that the process of degradation of the DNA of a cell corpse occurs in at least three distinct steps and requires activities provided by both the dying and the engulfing cell.

  10. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of cinnamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sova, M

    2012-07-01

    Cinnamic acid is an organic acid occurring naturally in plants that has low toxicity and a broad spectrum of biological activities. In the search for novel pharmacologically active compounds, cinnamic acid derivatives are important and promising compounds with high potential for development into drugs. Many cinnamic acid derivatives, especially those with the phenolic hydroxyl group, are well-known antioxidants and are supposed to have several health benefits due to their strong free radical scavenging properties. It is also well known that cinnamic acid has antimicrobial activity. Cinnamic acid derivatives, both isolated from plant material and synthesized, have been reported to have antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties. Acids, esters, amides, hydrazides and related derivatives of cinnamic acid with such activities are here reviewed.

  11. Loss of DNase II function in the gonad is associated with a higher expression of antimicrobial genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsiang; Lai, Huey-Jen; Lin, Tai-Wei; Chen, Chang-Shi; Lo, Szecheng J

    2015-08-15

    Three waves of apoptosis shape the development of Caenorhabditis elegans. Although the exact roles of the three DNase II genes (nuc-1, crn-6 and crn-7), which are known to mediate degradation of apoptotic DNA, in the embryonic and larval phases of apoptosis have been characterized, the DNase II acting in the third wave of germ cell apoptosis remains undetermined. In the present study, we performed in vitro and in vivo assays on various mutant nematodes to demonstrate that NUC-1 and CRN-7, but not CRN-6, function in germ cell apoptosis. In addition, in situ DNA-break detection and anti-phosphorylated ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) staining illustrated the sequential and spatially regulated actions of NUC-1 and CRN-7, at the pachytene zone of the gonad and at the loop respectively. In line with the notion that UV-induced DNA fragment accumulation in the gonad activates innate immunity responses, we also found that loss of NUC-1 and CRN-7 lead to up-regulation of antimicrobial genes (abf-2, spp-1, nlp-29, cnc-2, and lys-7). Our observations suggest that an incomplete digestion of DNA fragments resulting from the absence of NUC-1 or CRN-7 in the gonad could induce the ERK signalling, consequently activating antimicrobial gene expression. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate for the first time that nuc-1 and crn-7 play a role in degrading apoptotic DNA in distinct sites of the gonad, and act as negative regulators of innate immunity in C. elegans.

  12. Recombinant human DNase nebulisation in children with cystic fibrosis: before bedtime or after waking up?

    PubMed

    van der Giessen, L J; Gosselink, R; Hop, W C J; Tiddens, H A W M

    2007-10-01

    The present study focused on patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), who were on maintenance therapy with recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase), with the aim of comparing efficacy and possible side effects of nebulisation of rhDNase when taken before bedtime with efficacy and side effects when taken after waking up. A randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, crossover study group was used. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) CF, 2) stable clinical condition and 3) rhDNase maintenance therapy. Patients in group I inhaled rhDNase before bedtime and a placebo after waking up in weeks 1-2. The protocol was reversed during weeks 3-4. Group II patients performed the reverse of this sequence. Patients continued with their daily routine sputum expectoration. The primary end-point was classified as the maximal instantaneous forced flow when 25% of the forced vital capacity remained to be exhaled (MEF(25%)). Pulmonary functions tests were performed on days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28. At 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks arterial oxygen saturation and cough frequency were measured during the night. A total of 24 patients completed the study. The mean (range) age of the patients was 13 (6-19) yrs. MEF(25%), taken to be the primary end-point, did not show a significant difference between nebulisation of rhDNase before bedtime compared with when taken after waking up. Nocturnal cough, oxygen saturation, and other secondary end-points were not significantly different between the two study periods. In conclusion, the present study found that it is equally effective and safe to nebulise recombinant human deoxyribonuclease before bedtime compared with when performed after waking up in children with cystic fibrosis, who are on maintenance treatment with recombinant human deoxyribonuclease.

  13. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  14. Fluxless soldering using activated acid vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Frear, D.R.; Keicher, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Acid vapors have been used to fluxlessly reduce metal oxides and enhance wetting of solder on metallizations. Dilute solutions of hydrogen, acetic acid and formic acid in an inert carrier gas of nitrogen or argon were used with the sessile drop technique for 60Sn-40 Pb solder on Cu and Au/Ni metallizations. The time to reduce metal oxides and the extent of wetting as a function of acid vapor concentrations were characterized. Acetic and formic acids reduce the surface metal oxides sufficiently to form metallurgically sound solder joints. Hydrogen did not reduce oxides rapidly enough at 220{degree}C to be suitable for soldering applications. The optimum conditions for oxide reduction with formic acid was with an acid vapor concentration in nitrogen carrier gas of 4% for Cu metallizations and 1.6% on Au/Ni. The acetic acid vapor concentration, also in nitrogen, was optimized at 1.5% for both metallizations. Above a vapor concentration of 1.5%, the acetic acid combined with the bare metal to form acetates which increased the wetting time. These results indicate that acid vapor fluxless soldering is a viable alternative to traditional flux soldering.

  15. Self-quenched covalent fluorescent dye-nucleic acid conjugates as polymeric substrates for enzymatic nuclease assays.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hagstrom, James E; Budker, Vladimir G

    2002-01-01

    A fluorescent method is described for assessing nuclease activity. The technique is based on the preparation of quenched fluorophore-nucleic acid covalent conjugates and their subsequent dequenching due to degradation by nucleases. The resulting fluorescence increase can be measured by a spectrofluorometer and exhibits subpicogram per milliliter sensitivity level for RNase A and low picogram per milliliter level for DNase I. The method is adaptable for quantitative nuclease inhibitor testing.

  16. Cell viability of bovine spermatozoa subjected to DNA electroporation and DNAse I treatment.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Paulo Varoni; Milazzotto, Marcella Pecora; Simões, Renata; Nichi, Marcilio; de Oliveira Barros, Flavia Regina; Visintin, Jose Antonio; Assumpção, Mayra Elena Ortiz D'Avila

    2016-04-15

    Many mechanisms involved in sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) are still unknown. It is still a matter of debate whether exogenous DNA fragments incorporated by the embryo are originated from those bound to the sperm membrane or by those that penetrated the intracellular compartment. In an attempt to elucidate the transmission mechanism of exogenous DNA molecules by sperm, some authors suggested a treatment with DNAse I to remove DNA molecules outside the sperm. But little is known regarding the effects of DNAse I treatment on sperm viability and its impact on sperm organelles. An important aspect of the SMGT technique is the amount of exogenous DNA incubated with sperm, which may influence the internalization rate. Due to the inconsistencies found in literature, this work aimed to contribute to bovine sperm physiology knowledge evaluating the effects of different DNA concentrations, electroporation, and DNAse I treatments on sperm viability characteristics, DNA uptake, and IVF. For that, the effects of different concentrations of exogenous DNA (250, 500 and 1000 ng/10(6) cells) and incubation or electroporation were tested on sperm functional characteristics and in vitro embryo production. No effect of DNA concentration was observed on uptake, plasma membrane integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential. The addition of exogenous DNA induced a decrease on acrosomal lesion in the 500-ng group when compared to the control. Cells incubated with DNA, electroporated, and treated with DNAse I presented a deleterious influence on mitochondrial membrane potential. In vitro fertilization was made with 1000 ng of DNA, sperm cells incubated or electroporated followed by DNAse I treatment. No significant difference was found in cleavage rate. Blastocyst rates were 24.36% for the control; 19.65% for incubated; 3.5% for electroporated control; and 17.40% for electroporated. There is a significant difference in blastocyst rate between the control and electroporated control

  17. Effects of combined treatment with rhDNase and airflow oscillations on spinnability of cystic fibrosis sputum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, B; Tomkiewicz, R P; Boyd, W A; Brown, N E; King, M

    1995-08-01

    Treatment with either rhDNase or high-frequency oscillation has been shown to be effective in improving the physical and transport properties of airway secretions in cystic fibrosis (CF). The objects of this in vitro study was to examine whether combined treatment with oscillation and rhDNase results in greater change of CF sputum spinnability than either treatment by itself. Aliquots of sputum (0.4 g) from eight CF patients were subjected to the following protocols for 15 minutes and then followed for a total of 30 minutes: 1) incubation with 0.04 ml DNase 50 micrograms rhDNase/normal saline (10% dilution) at 37 degrees C to achieve 5 micrograms DNase/g of sputum final concentration; 2) airflow oscillation at 27 Hz similar to the airflow magnitude produced by a commercial high-frequency chest compression (HFCC) device; 3) negative control with no treatment; 4) positive (dilution) control, incubating with 10% saline by volume; 5) combination of DNase and oscillation, and 6) combination of saline and oscillation. For each protocol, sputum spinnability (in mm, mean +/- SD) was measured by means of a filancemeter at baseline, 15, and 30 minutes. Treatment with DNase decreased spinnability significantly more than either saline or oscillation at 15 and 30 minutes (P < 0.02 and P < 0.04, respectively). Incubation with saline or oscillation of CF sputum for 15 and 30 minutes decreased spinnability significantly compared with control. The combination of DNase and oscillation decreased spinnability significantly more than treatment with DNase alone (3.74 +/- 0.45 vs. 6.54 +/- 0.73 at 15 minutes, P < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Endolysosomes Are the Principal Intracellular Sites of Acid Hydrolase Activity.

    PubMed

    Bright, Nicholas A; Davis, Luther J; Luzio, J Paul

    2016-09-12

    The endocytic delivery of macromolecules from the mammalian cell surface for degradation by lysosomal acid hydrolases requires traffic through early endosomes to late endosomes followed by transient (kissing) or complete fusions between late endosomes and lysosomes. Transient or complete fusion results in the formation of endolysosomes, which are hybrid organelles from which lysosomes are re-formed. We have used synthetic membrane-permeable cathepsin substrates, which liberate fluorescent reporters upon proteolytic cleavage, as well as acid phosphatase cytochemistry to identify which endocytic compartments are acid hydrolase active. We found that endolysosomes are the principal organelles in which acid hydrolase substrates are cleaved. Endolysosomes also accumulated acidotropic probes and could be distinguished from terminal storage lysosomes, which were acid hydrolase inactive and did not accumulate acidotropic probes. Using live-cell microscopy, we have demonstrated that fusion events, which form endolysosomes, precede the onset of acid hydrolase activity. By means of sucrose and invertase uptake experiments, we have also shown that acid-hydrolase-active endolysosomes and acid-hydrolase-inactive, terminal storage lysosomes exist in dynamic equilibrium. We conclude that the terminal endocytic compartment is composed of acid-hydrolase-active, acidic endolysosomes and acid hydrolase-inactive, non-acidic, terminal storage lysosomes, which are linked and function in a lysosome regeneration cycle. PMID:27498570

  19. Physiological activities of hydroxyl fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the search of value-added products from surplus soybean oil, we produced many new hydroxy fatty acids through microbial bioconversion. Hydroxy fatty acids are used in a wide range of industrial products, such as resins, waxes, nylons plastics, lubricants, cosmetics, and additives in coatings and...

  20. Physical activity as a determinant of fecal bile acid levels

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Betsy C.; Martínez, María Elena; Ashbeck, Erin L.; Roe, Denise J.; Jacobs, Elizabeth T.; Alberts, David S.; Thompson, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity is protective against colon cancer, whereas colonic bile acid exposure is a suspected risk factor. While likely related, the association between physical activity and bile acid levels has not been well studied. Furthermore, the effect of triglycerides, which are known to modify bile acid levels, on this relationship has not been investigated. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline fecal bile acid levels for 735 colorectal adenoma formers obtained from participants in a phase III ursodeoxycholic acid chemoprevention trial. Compared to the lowest quartile of recreational physical activity duration, the highest quartile was associated with a 17% lower fecal bile acid concentration, adjusted for age, sex, dietary fiber intake, and body mass index (P = 0.042). Furthermore, consistent with a previously established relationship between serum triglyceride levels and bile acid metabolism, we stratified by triglyceride level and observed a 34% lower fecal bile acid concentration (highest versus lowest quartiles of physical activity) in individuals with low triglycerides (< 136 mg/dL; P = 0.002). In contrast, no association between physical activity and fecal bile acid concentration was observed for subjects with high triglycerides (≥ 136 mg/dL). Our results suggest that the biological mechanism responsible for the protective effect of physical activity on the incidence of colon cancer may be partially mediated by decreasing colonic bile acid exposure. However, this effect may be limited to individuals with lower triglyceride levels. PMID:19383885

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Streptococcus sanguis DNase necessary for repair of DNA damage induced by UV light and methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Lindler, L.E.; Macrina, F.L.

    1987-07-01

    We developed a method for cloning cellular nucleases from streptococci. Recombinant lambda gt11 bacteriophage containing streptococcal nuclease determinants were identified by the production of pink plaques on toluidine blue O DNase plates. We used this technique to clone a 3.2-kilobase-pair EcoRI fragment with DNase activity from the chromosome of Streptococcus sanguis. The locus was designated don (DNase one) and could be subcloned and stably maintained on plasmid vectors in Escherichia coli. Minicell analyses of various subclones of the don locus allowed us to determine the coding region and size of the Don nuclease in E. coli. The don gene product had an apparent molecular mass of 34 kilodaltons and degraded native DNA most efficiently, with lesser activity against denatured DNA and no detectable activity against RNA. S. sanguis don deletion mutants were constructed by transformation of competent cells with in vitro-prepared plasmid constructs. S. sanguis don deletion mutants retained normal transformation frequencies for exogenously added donor DNA. However, when compared with Don+ wild-type cells, these mutants were hypersensitive to DNA damage induced by UV light and methyl methanesulfonate. An S. sanguis don-specific DNA probe detected homology to chromosomal DNA isolated from Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans Bratthall serogroups d and g. Our results suggested that the don locus was the S. sanguis allele of the previously described S. pneumoniae major exonuclease and was involved in repair of DNA damage. Furthermore, hybridization studies suggested that the don locus was conserved among species of oral streptococci.

  2. Croconaine rotaxane for acid activated photothermal heating and ratiometric photoacoustic imaging of acidic pH†

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Samit; Shaw, Gillian Karen; Mitcham, Trevor M.; Bouchard, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    Absorption of 808 nm laser light by liposomes containing a pH sensitive, near-infrared croconaine rotaxane dye increases dramatically in weak acid. A stealth liposome composition permits acid activated, photothermal heating and also acts as an effective nanoparticle probe for ratiometric photoacoustic imaging of acidic pH in deep sample locations, including a living mouse. PMID:26502996

  3. NMR investigation of the interaction of the inhibitor protein Im9 with its partner DNase.

    PubMed Central

    Boetzel, R.; Czisch, M.; Kaptein, R.; Hemmings, A. M.; James, R.; Kleanthous, C.; Moore, G. R.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial toxin colicin E9 is secreted by producing Escherichia coli cells with its 9.5 kDa inhibitor protein Im9 bound tightly to its 14.5 kDa C-terminal DNase domain. Double- and triple-resonance NMR spectra of the 24 kDa complex of uniformly 13C and 15N labeled Im9 bound to the unlabeled DNase domain have provided sufficient constraints for the solution structure of the bound Im9 to be determined. For the final ensemble of 20 structures, pairwise RMSDs for residues 3-84 were 0.76 +/- 0.14 A for the backbone atoms and 1.36 +/- 0.15 A for the heavy atoms. Representative solution structures of the free and bound Im9 are highly similar, with backbone and heavy atom RMSDs of 1.63 and 2.44 A, respectively, for residues 4-83, suggesting that binding does not cause a major conformational change in Im9. The NMR studies have also allowed the DNase contact surface on Im9 to be investigated through changes in backbone chemical shifts and NOEs between the two proteins determined from comparisons of 1H-1H-13C NOESY-HSQC spectra with and without 13C decoupling. The NMR-defined interface agrees well with that determined in a recent X-ray structure analysis with the major difference being that a surface loop of Im9, which is at the interface, has a different conformation in the solution and crystal structures. Tyr54, a key residue on the interface, is shown to exhibit NMR characteristics indicative of slow rotational flipping. A mechanistic description of the influence binding of Im9 has on the dynamic behavior of E9 DNase, which is known to exist in two slowly interchanging conformers in solution, is proposed. PMID:11045617

  4. DNA associated with hyperacetylated histone is preferentially digested by DNase I.

    PubMed Central

    Sealy, L; Chalkley, R

    1978-01-01

    Butyrate-treated cells give rise to massive hyperacetylation of histones and have been used to test the idea that regions of DNA in association with hyperacetylated histones are preferentially solubilized upon digestion with DNase I. Such hyperacetylated histones can be derived from both pre-existing histones or from histone newly synthesized in the presence of butyrate which leads to extreme modification. The DNA in association with both types of hypermodified histone is equally and selectively digested. PMID:673837

  5. Potentiometric Acid-Base Titrations with Activated Graphite Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riyazuddin, P.; Devika, D.

    1997-10-01

    Dry cell graphite (DCG) electrodes activated with potassium permanganate are employed as potentiometric indicator electrodes for acid-base titrations. Special attention is given to an indicator probe comprising activated DCG-non-activiated DCG electrode couple. This combination also proves suitable for the titration of strong or weak acids.

  6. The Arabidopsis Adh gene exhibits diverse nucleosome arrangements within a small DNase I-sensitive domain.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Palas, M A; Ferl, R J

    1995-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene from Arabidopsis shows enhanced sensitivity to DNase I in cells that express the gene. This generalized sensitivity to DNase I is demarcated by position -500 on the 5' side and the end of the mRNA on the 3' side. Thus, the gene defined as the promoter and mRNA coding region corresponds very closely in size with the gene defined as a nuclease-sensitive domain. This is a remarkably close correspondence between a sensitive domain and a eukaryotic transcriptional unit, because previously reported DNase I-sensitive domains include large regions of DNA that are not transcribed. Nucleosomes are present in the coding region of the Adh gene when it is expressed, indicating that the transcriptional elongation process causes nucleosome disruption rather than release of nucleosomes from the coding region. In addition, the regulatory region contains a loosely positioned nucleosome that is separated from adjacent nucleosomes by internucleosomic DNA segments longer than the average linker DNA in bulk chromatin. This specific array of nucleosomes coexists with bound transcription factors that could contribute to the organization of the nucleosome arrangement. These results enhance our understanding of the complex interactions among DNA, nucleosomes, and transcription factors during gene expression in plants. PMID:8535143

  7. Acceptor sites for retroviral integrations map near DNase I-hypersensitive sites in chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, S; Steffen, D L; Robinson, H L

    1986-01-01

    Seven cellular loci with acceptor sites for retroviral integrations have been mapped for the presence of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in chromatin. Integrations in three of these loci, chicken c-erbB, rat c-myc, and a rat locus, dsi-1, had been selected for in retrovirus-induced tumors. Of the remaining four, two, designated dsi-3 and dsi-4, harbored acceptor sites for apparently unselected integrations of Moloney murine leukemia virus in a Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced thymoma, and two, designated C and F, harbored unselected acceptor sites for Moloney murine leukemia virus integrations in a rat fibroblast cell line. Each acceptor site mapped to within 500 base pairs of a DNase I-hypersensitive site. In the analyses of the unselected integrations, six hypersensitive sites were observed in 39 kilobases of DNA. The four acceptor sites in this DNA were localized between 0.05 and 0.43 kilobases of a hypersensitive site. The probability of this close association occurring by chance was calculated to be extremely low. Hypersensitive sites were mapped in cells representing the lineage in which integration had occurred as well as in an unrelated lineage. In six of the seven acceptor loci hypersensitive sites could not be detected in the unrelated lineage. Our results indicate that retroviruses preferentially integrate close to DNase I-hypersensitive sites and that many of these sites are expressed in some but not all cells. Images PMID:3490582

  8. Natural cinnamic acids, synthetic derivatives and hybrids with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Juan David

    2014-11-25

    Antimicrobial natural preparations involving cinnamon, storax and propolis have been long used topically for treating infections. Cinnamic acids and related molecules are partly responsible for the therapeutic effects observed in these preparations. Most of the cinnamic acids, their esters, amides, aldehydes and alcohols, show significant growth inhibition against one or several bacterial and fungal species. Of particular interest is the potent antitubercular activity observed for some of these cinnamic derivatives, which may be amenable as future drugs for treating tuberculosis. This review intends to summarize the literature data on the antimicrobial activity of the natural cinnamic acids and related derivatives. In addition, selected hybrids between cinnamic acids and biologically active scaffolds with antimicrobial activity were also included. A comprehensive literature search was performed collating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each cinnamic acid or derivative against the reported microorganisms. The MIC data allows the relative comparison between series of molecules and the derivation of structure-activity relationships.

  9. Abundant DNase I-Sensitive Bacterial DNA in Healthy Porcine Lungs and Its Implications for the Lung Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Kelly, Patrick H.; Nassar, Boulos S.; Rutland, Cedric J.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Dohrn, Cassie L.; Costello, Andrew J.; Stoltz, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Human lungs are constantly exposed to bacteria in the environment, yet the prevailing dogma is that healthy lungs are sterile. DNA sequencing-based studies of pulmonary bacterial diversity challenge this notion. However, DNA-based microbial analysis currently fails to distinguish between DNA from live bacteria and that from bacteria that have been killed by lung immune mechanisms, potentially causing overestimation of bacterial abundance and diversity. We investigated whether bacterial DNA recovered from lungs represents live or dead bacteria in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung samples in young healthy pigs. Live bacterial DNA was DNase I resistant and became DNase I sensitive upon human antimicrobial-mediated killing in vitro. We determined live and total bacterial DNA loads in porcine BAL fluid and lung tissue by comparing DNase I-treated versus untreated samples. In contrast to the case for BAL fluid, we were unable to culture bacteria from most lung homogenates. Surprisingly, total bacterial DNA was abundant in both BAL fluid and lung homogenates. In BAL fluid, 63% was DNase I sensitive. In 6 out of 11 lung homogenates, all bacterial DNA was DNase I sensitive, suggesting a predominance of dead bacteria; in the remaining homogenates, 94% was DNase I sensitive, and bacterial diversity determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing was similar in DNase I-treated and untreated samples. Healthy pig lungs are mostly sterile yet contain abundant DNase I-sensitive DNA from inhaled and aspirated bacteria killed by pulmonary host defense mechanisms. This approach and conceptual framework will improve analysis of the lung microbiome in disease. PMID:23872563

  10. [Biological activity of retinoic acid and methylretinoate].

    PubMed

    Dusheĭko, A A; Chernukhina, L A; Blazhevich, M A; Davydova, L P

    1980-01-01

    Vitamin A lack in the diet of chicken produces a significant increase in the glandular stomach as well as formation of erosions and ulcers on the surface of the mucous membrane of the intermediate zone. Replacement of retinyl acetate in the diet by retinoic acid or methyl retionate gives no rise to changes in the morphological integrity of the glandular stomach of the chickens. Moreover, these compounds produce a reverse development of vitamin A-induced changes. It is thus concluded that when the diet lacks vitamin A, both retinoic acid and methyl retionate are capable of maintaining the structural integrity of the stomach.

  11. Safeguarding Stem Cell-Based Regenerative Therapy against Iatrogenic Cancerogenesis: Transgenic Expression of DNASE1, DNASE1L3, DNASE2, DFFB Controlled By POLA1 Promoter in Proliferating and Directed Differentiation Resisting Human Autologous Pluripotent Induced Stem Cells Leads to their Death

    PubMed Central

    Malecki, Marek; LaVanne, Christine; Alhambra, Dominique; Dodivenaka, Chaitanya; Nagel, Sarah; Malecki, Raf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The worst possible complication of using stem cells for regenerative therapy is iatrogenic cancerogenesis. The ultimate goal of our work is to develop a self-triggering feedback mechanism aimed at causing death of all stem cells, which resist directed differentiation, keep proliferating, and can grow into tumors. Specific aim The specific aim was threefold: (1) to genetically engineer the DNA constructs for the human, recombinant DNASE1, DNASE1L3, DNASE2, DFFB controlled by POLA promoter; (2) to bioengineer anti-SSEA-4 antibody guided vectors delivering transgenes to human undifferentiated and proliferating pluripotent stem cells; (3) to cause death of proliferating and directed differentiation resisting stem cells by transgenic expression of the human recombinant the DNases (hrDNases). Methods The DNA constructs for the human, recombinant DNASE1, DNASE1L3, DNASE2, DFFB controlled by POLA promoter were genetically engineered. The vectors targeting specifically SSEA-4 expressing stem cells were bioengineered. The healthy volunteers’ bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) were induced into human, autologous, pluripotent stem cells with non-integrating plasmids. Directed differentiation of the induced stem cells into endothelial cells was accomplished with EGF and BMP. The anti-SSEA 4 antibodies’ guided DNA vectors delivered the transgenes for the human recombinant DNases’ into proliferating stem cells. Results Differentiation of the pluripotent induced stem cells into the endothelial cells was verified by highlighting formation of tight and adherens junctions through transgenic expression of recombinant fluorescent fusion proteins: VE cadherin, claudin, zona occludens 1, and catenin. Proliferation of the stem cells was determined through highlighting transgenic expression of recombinant fluorescent proteins controlled by POLA promoter, while also reporting expression of the transgenes for the hrDNases. Expression of the transgenes for the DNases

  12. Perfluoroalkyl acids : Recent activities and research progress

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of man-made fluorinated organic chemicals consisting of a carbon backbone typically of four to fourteen in length and a charged functional moiety (primarily carboxylate, sulfonate or phosphonate). The two most widely known PFAAs are ...

  13. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early gene is associated with induction of DNase I-hypersensitive sites.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J A; Groudine, M

    1986-01-01

    Human teratocarcinoma cells were used to examine structural features associated with expression of the major immediate-early (IE) gene of human cytomegalovirus. By immunofluorescence, comparison of RNA levels, and in vitro transcription of nuclei, we showed that the major IE gene is inactive in undifferentiated but active in differentiated cells. Therefore, the block in human cytomegalovirus replication in teratocarcinoma cells appears to be at the transcriptional level, in one of the initial genes transcribed. In addition, the in vitro transcription experiments demonstrated that in permissive infections the gene was transcriptionally inactive late in infection. A comparison of the structural features of the promoter region with the active and inactive IE genes showed the presence of constitutive and inducible DNase I-hypersensitive sites. The majority of the constitutive sites existed at -175, -275, -375, -425, and -525 relative to the cap site in an area which has been shown to be capable of simian virus 40 enhancer function. In contrast, the inducible DNase I sites were located outside this region at -650, -775, -875, and -975. Images PMID:3023848

  15. Effects of temperature and incubation time on the in vitro expression of proteases, phospholipases, lipases and DNases by different species of Trichosporon.

    PubMed

    Bentubo, Henri Donnarumma Levy; Gompertz, Olga Fischman

    2014-01-01

    Fungi produce a broad spectrum of enzymes capable of degrading different substrates in nature. When the substrate is the tissue of a vertebrate host, these enzymes acts as a fungal virulence factor that increases the pathogenicity of the fungus. Trichosporon yeasts are emerging pathogens that infect immunocompromised patients. Little is known about the virulence characteristics of these fungi. The aim of this research was to characterize the behavior of protease, phospholipase, lipase and DNase production in different species of Trichosporon, with a focus on the influence of incubation temperature on the expression of these enzymes. Classical methodologies were used in all of the experiments, and the results were statistically analyzed. The proportions of the samples that produced each type of enzyme were as follows: lipases (95.5%), phospholipases (56.8%), proteases (50,0%) and DNases (38.6%). The incubation temperature was an important factor in the expression of enzymatic activity, and it influenced the incubation period of each species. Although these data concerning the enzymatic activity expressed by isolates of Trichosporon are valuable, further research is warranted to completely characterize this new pathogen, as well as in vivo studies to determine the roles of these enzymes in the pathogenesis of trichosporonosis.

  16. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of dioleoyl glyceric acids showing antitrypsin activity.

    PubMed

    Habe, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Sato, Shun; Kitamoto, Dai; Sakaki, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    Previously, Lešová et al. reported the isolation and identification of metabolite OR-1, showing antitrypsin activity, produced during fermentation by Penicillium funiculosum. The structure of OR-1 was a mixture of glyceric acid (GA), esterified with C(14)-C(18) fatty acids, and oleic acid (C18:1) as the most predominant fatty acid (Folia Microbiol. 46, 21-23, 2001). In this study, dioleoyl D-GA and dioleoyl L-GA were synthesized via diesterification with oleoyl chloride, and their antitrypsin activities were evaluated using both a disk diffusion method and spectral absorption measurements. The results show that both compounds and their equivalent mixtures possess antitrypsin activities; however, their IC(50) values (approximately 2 mM) are much higher than that of OR-1 (4.25 µM), suggesting that dioleoyl GA does not play a major role in the OR-1 antitrypsin activity. PMID:21606621

  18. Multiple forms of acid phosphatase activity in Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J P; Peters, S P; Glew, R H; Lee, R E; McCafferty, L R; Mercer, D W; Wenger, D A

    1978-07-01

    Although the primary genetic defect in all individuals with Gaucher's disease is a deficiency in glucocerebrosidase activity, the finding of marked elevations in splenic and serum acid phosphatase activity is almost as consistent a finding. Gaucher spleen and serum contain at least two forms of acid phosphatase that can be readily separated by chromatography on columns containing the cation exchange resin Sulphopropyl Sephadex. The major species of acid phosphatase (designated SP-I) contained in Triton X-100 (1% v/v) extracts of Gaucher spleen accounts for 65%--95% of the total activity and has the following properties: (1) it does not bind to the cation exchange column; (2) it exhibitis a pH optimum of 4.5--5.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride (15 mM), L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM), and beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The minor acid phosphatase activity (designated SP-II) present in extracts of Gaucher spleen has properties similar to those of the major species of acid phosphatase activity contained in serum from patients with Gaucher's disease: (1) it binds firmly to cation exchange columns (eluted by 0.5 M sodium chloride); (2) it exhibits a pH optimum of 5.0--6.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride and sodium dithionite; and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M) and L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM). In addition, a second form of acid phosphatase that is tartrate resistant was found to be elevated in Gaucher serum. This form of serum acid phosphatase did not bind to Sulphopropyl Sephadex, was found to be significantly resistant to beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and was only partially inhibited by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The findings reported here indicate that at least three distinct forms of acid phosphatase activity are elevated in Gaucher's disease. Furthermore, the minor acid phosphatase activity contained in spleen homogenates has properties very similar to

  19. Restoring enzyme activity in nonfunctional low erucic acid Brassica napus fatty acid elongase 1 by a single amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Katavic, Vesna; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Barton, Dennis L; Giblin, E Michael; Reed, Darwin W; Taylor, David C

    2002-11-01

    Genomic fatty acid elongation 1 (FAE1) clones from high erucic acid (HEA) Brassica napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, and low erucic acid (LEA) B. napus cv. Westar, were amplified by PCR and expressed in yeast cells under the control of the strong galactose-inducible promoter. As expected, yeast cells expressing the FAE1 genes from HEA Brassica spp. synthesized very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids that are not normally found in yeast, while fatty acid profiles of yeast cells expressing the FAE1 gene from LEA B. napus were identical to control yeast samples. In agreement with published findings regarding different HEA and LEA B. napus cultivars, comparison of FAE1 protein sequences from HEA and LEA Brassicaceae revealed one crucial amino acid difference: the serine residue at position 282 of the HEA FAE1 sequences is substituted by phenylalanine in LEA B. napus cv. Westar. Using site directed mutagenesis, the phenylalanine 282 residue was substituted with a serine residue in the FAE1 polypeptide from B. napus cv. Westar, the mutated gene was expressed in yeast and GC analysis revealed the presence of very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids (VLCMFAs), indicating that the elongase activity was restored in the LEA FAE1 enzyme by the single amino acid substitution. Thus, for the first time, the low erucic acid trait in canola B. napus can be attributed to a single amino acid substitution which prevents the biosynthesis of the eicosenoic and erucic acids.

  20. Activation of Inactive Nitrogenase by Acid-Treated Component I

    PubMed Central

    Nagatani, H. H.; Shah, Vinod K.; Brill, Winston J.

    1974-01-01

    When Azotobacter vinelandii was derepressed for nitrogenase synthesis in a N-free medium containing tungstate instead of molybdate, an inactive component I was synthesized. Although this inactive component I could be activated in vivo upon addition of molybdate to the medium, it could not be activated in vitro when molybdate was added to the extracts. Activation occurred, however, when an acid-treated component I was added to extracts of cells derepressed in medium containing tungstate. Acid treatment completely abolished component I activity. Mutant strains UW45 and UW10 were unable to fix N2. Both strains synthesized normal levels of component II but produced inactive component I. Acid-treated component I activated inactive component I in extracts of mutant strain UW45 but not mutant strain UW10. This activating factor could be obtained from N2-fixing Klebsiella pneumoniae, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Rhodospirillum rubrum. PMID:4218230

  1. Synthesis and antituberculosis activity of new fatty acid amides.

    PubMed

    D'Oca, Caroline Da Ros Montes; Coelho, Tatiane; Marinho, Tamara Germani; Hack, Carolina Rosa Lopes; Duarte, Rodrigo da Costa; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes

    2010-09-01

    This work reports the synthesis of new fatty acid amides from C16:0, 18:0, 18:1, 18:1 (OH), and 18:2 fatty acids families with cyclic and acyclic amines and demonstrate for the first time the activity of these compounds as antituberculosis agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv, M. tuberculosis rifampicin resistance (ATCC 35338), and M. tuberculosis isoniazid resistance (ATCC 35822). The fatty acid amides derivate from ricinoleic acid were the most potent one among a series of tested compounds, with a MIC 6.25 microg/mL for resistance strains.

  2. Human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II exhibit different DNase I protection patterns.

    PubMed

    Altman, R; Harrich, D; Garcia, J A; Gaynor, R B

    1988-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) are human retroviruses which normally infect T-lymphoid cells. HTLV-I infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, and HTLV-II is associated with an indolent form of hairy-cell leukemia. To identify potential transcriptional regulatory elements of these two related human retroviruses, we performed DNase I footprinting of both the HTLV-I and HTLV-II long terminal repeats (LTRs) by using extracts prepared from uninfected T cells, HTLV-I and HTLV-II transformed T cells, and HeLa cells. Five regions of the HTLV-I LTR and three regions of the HTLV-II LTR showed protection by DNase I footprinting. All three of the 21-base-pair repeats previously shown to be important in HTLV transcriptional regulation were protected in the HTLV-I LTR, whereas only one of these repeats was protected in the HTLV-II LTR. Several regions exhibited altered protection in extracts prepared from lymphoid cells as compared with HeLa cells, but there were minimal differences in the protection patterns between HTLV-infected and uninfected lymphoid extracts. A number of HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTR fragments which contained regions showing protection in DNase I footprinting were able to function as inducible enhancer elements in transient CAT gene expression assays in the presence of the HTLV-II tat protein. The alterations in the pattern of the cellular proteins which bind to the HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTRs may in part be responsible for differences in the transcriptional regulation of these two related viruses.

  3. Structural Requirements for the Procoagulant Activity of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gansler, Julia; Jaax, Miriam; Leiting, Silke; Appel, Bettina; Greinacher, Andreas; Fischer, Silvia; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids, especially extracellular RNA, are exposed following tissue- or vessel damage and have previously been shown to activate the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in vitro and in vivo. Yet, no information on structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids is available. A comparison of linear and hairpin-forming RNA- and DNA-oligomers revealed that all tested oligomers forming a stable hairpin structure were protected from degradation in human plasma. In contrast to linear nucleic acids, hairpin forming compounds demonstrated highest procoagulant activities based on the analysis of clotting time in human plasma and in a prekallikrein activation assay. Moreover, the procoagulant activities of the DNA-oligomers correlated well with their binding affinity to high molecular weight kininogen, whereas the binding affinity of all tested oligomers to prekallikrein was low. Furthermore, four DNA-aptamers directed against thrombin, activated protein C, vascular endothelial growth factor and nucleolin as well as the naturally occurring small nucleolar RNA U6snRNA were identified as effective cofactors for prekallikrein auto-activation. Together, we conclude that hairpin-forming nucleic acids are most effective in promoting procoagulant activities, largely mediated by their specific binding to kininogen. Thus, in vivo application of therapeutic nucleic acids like aptamers might have undesired prothrombotic or proinflammatory side effects. PMID:23226277

  4. Antiproliferative activity of synthetic fatty acid amides from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane S; Piovesan, Luciana A; D'Oca, Caroline R Montes; Hack, Carolina R Lopes; Treptow, Tamara G M; Rodrigues, Marieli O; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T G; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; D'Oca, Marcelo G Montes

    2015-01-15

    In the work, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a series of synthetic fatty acid amides were investigated in seven cancer cell lines. The study revealed that most of the compounds showed antiproliferative activity against tested tumor cell lines, mainly on human glioma cells (U251) and human ovarian cancer cells with a multiple drug-resistant phenotype (NCI-ADR/RES). In addition, the fatty methyl benzylamide derived from ricinoleic acid (with the fatty acid obtained from castor oil, a renewable resource) showed a high selectivity with potent growth inhibition and cell death for the glioma cell line-the most aggressive CNS cancer.

  5. Activation of PPARα by Fatty Acid Accumulation Enhances Fatty Acid Degradation and Sulfatide Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Feng, Yuyao; Zhang, Xiaowei; Nakajima, Takero; Tanaka, Naoki; Sugiyama, Eiko; Kamijo, Yuji; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) catalyzes the first reaction in the mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. VLCAD deficiency is associated with the accumulation of fat in multiple organs and tissues, which results in specific clinical features including cardiomyopathy, cardiomegaly, muscle weakness, and hepatic dysfunction in infants. We speculated that the abnormal fatty acid metabolism in VLCAD-deficient individuals might cause cell necrosis by fatty acid toxicity. The accumulation of fatty acids may activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a master regulator of fatty acid metabolism and a potent nuclear receptor for free fatty acids. We examined six skin fibroblast lines, derived from VLCAD-deficient patients and identified fatty acid accumulation and PPARα activation in these cell lines. We then found that the expression levels of three enzymes involved in fatty acid degradation, including long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (LACS), were increased in a PPARα-dependent manner. This increased expression of LACS might enhance the fatty acyl-CoA supply to fatty acid degradation and sulfatide synthesis pathways. In fact, the first and last reactions in the sulfatide synthesis pathway are regulated by PPARα. Therefore, we also measured the expression levels of enzymes involved in sulfatide metabolism and the regulation of cellular sulfatide content. The levels of these enzymes and cellular sulfatide content both increased in a PPARα-dependent manner. These results indicate that PPARα activation plays defensive and compensative roles by reducing cellular toxicity associated with fatty acids and sulfuric acid. PMID:27644403

  6. Novel Bioactivity of Ellagic Acid in Inhibiting Human Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi; Chen, Wei-Fan; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lin, Li-Jyun; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Chang, Chao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranates are widely consumed either as fresh fruit or in beverage form as juice and wine. Ellagic acid possesses potent antioxidative properties; it is known to be an effective phytotherapeutic agent with antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic qualities. Ellagic acid (20 to 80 μM) exhibited a potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen; however, it did not inhibit platelet aggregation stimulated by thrombin, arachidonic acid, or U46619. Treatment with ellagic acid (50 and 80 μM) significantly inhibited platelet activation stimulated by collagen; this alteration was accompanied by the inhibition of relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, and the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt, as well as hydroxyl radical (OH●) formation. In addition, ellagic acid also inhibited p38 MAPK and Akt phosphorylation stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. By contrast, ellagic acid did not significantly affect PKC activation and platelet aggregation stimulated by PDBu. This study is the first to show that, in addition to being considered a possible agent for preventing tumor growth, ellagic acid possesses potent antiplatelet properties. It appears to initially inhibit the PLCγ2-PKC cascade and/or hydroxyl radical formation, followed by decreased phosphorylation of MAPKs and Akt, ultimately inhibiting platelet aggregation. PMID:23533502

  7. Biological Activities of Oleanolic Acid Derivatives from Calendula officinalis Seeds.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Ahmed; Ashour, Ahmed; Mira, Amira; Kishikawa, Asuka; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Zhu, Qinchang; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Phytochemical examination of butanol fraction of Calendula officinalis seeds led to the isolation of two compounds identified as 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS1) and oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS2). Biological evaluation was carried out for these two compounds such as melanin biosynthesis inhibitory, hyaluronic acid production activities, anti obesity using lipase inhibition and adipocyte differentiation as well as evaluation of the protective effect against hydrogen peroxide induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells. The results showed that, compound CS2 has a melanin biosynthesis stimulatory activity; however, compound CS1 has a potent stimulatory effect for the production of hyaluronic acid on normal human dermal fibroblast from adult (NHDF-Ad). Both compounds did not show any inhibitory effect on both lipase and adipocyte differentiation. Compound CS2 could protect neuro-2A cells and increased cell viability against H2 O2 . These activities (melanin biosynthesis stimulatory and protective effect against H2 O2 of CS2 and hyaluronic acid productive activities of these triterpene derivatives) have been reported for the first time. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26887328

  8. Biological Activities of Oleanolic Acid Derivatives from Calendula officinalis Seeds.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Ahmed; Ashour, Ahmed; Mira, Amira; Kishikawa, Asuka; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Zhu, Qinchang; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Phytochemical examination of butanol fraction of Calendula officinalis seeds led to the isolation of two compounds identified as 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS1) and oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS2). Biological evaluation was carried out for these two compounds such as melanin biosynthesis inhibitory, hyaluronic acid production activities, anti obesity using lipase inhibition and adipocyte differentiation as well as evaluation of the protective effect against hydrogen peroxide induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells. The results showed that, compound CS2 has a melanin biosynthesis stimulatory activity; however, compound CS1 has a potent stimulatory effect for the production of hyaluronic acid on normal human dermal fibroblast from adult (NHDF-Ad). Both compounds did not show any inhibitory effect on both lipase and adipocyte differentiation. Compound CS2 could protect neuro-2A cells and increased cell viability against H2 O2 . These activities (melanin biosynthesis stimulatory and protective effect against H2 O2 of CS2 and hyaluronic acid productive activities of these triterpene derivatives) have been reported for the first time. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Bovine DNase I: gene organization, mRNA expression, and changes in the topological distribution of the protein during apoptosis in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    De María, Alicia; Arruti, Cristina

    2003-12-19

    Genomic DNA sequencing and alignment with the known DNase I mRNA showed that the bovine gene consists of 9 exons and that only the last 8 encode the protein, since initial ATG was found at exon II. RT-PCR was used to identify DNase I mRNA in lens epithelium in vivo and in cultured epithelial cells. We found DNase I transcripts having the same nucleotide sequence as the pancreas form and others lacking almost all exon V. The lens protein presented a slightly higher relative molecular weight than the pancreatic enzyme. Lens DNase I was located in secretory pathway organelles and excluded from the nucleus. Nevertheless, in apoptotic lens epithelial cells in vitro, DNase I translocated to the nucleus and co-localized with TUNEL positive chromatin aggregates. These results indicate that cells in the lens epithelium constitutively express DNase I, and suggest a direct involvement of this nuclease in the final phases of chromatin degradation.

  10. Bovine DNase I: gene organization, mRNA expression, and changes in the topological distribution of the protein during apoptosis in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    De María, Alicia; Arruti, Cristina

    2003-12-19

    Genomic DNA sequencing and alignment with the known DNase I mRNA showed that the bovine gene consists of 9 exons and that only the last 8 encode the protein, since initial ATG was found at exon II. RT-PCR was used to identify DNase I mRNA in lens epithelium in vivo and in cultured epithelial cells. We found DNase I transcripts having the same nucleotide sequence as the pancreas form and others lacking almost all exon V. The lens protein presented a slightly higher relative molecular weight than the pancreatic enzyme. Lens DNase I was located in secretory pathway organelles and excluded from the nucleus. Nevertheless, in apoptotic lens epithelial cells in vitro, DNase I translocated to the nucleus and co-localized with TUNEL positive chromatin aggregates. These results indicate that cells in the lens epithelium constitutively express DNase I, and suggest a direct involvement of this nuclease in the final phases of chromatin degradation. PMID:14680812

  11. Antibody to Epstein-Barr virus specific DNase in sera of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and other nine most common cancer patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, M M; Chen, J Y; Liu, M Y; Lynn, T C; Tu, S M; Yang, C S

    1984-08-01

    Sera from 119 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), 33 patients with other cancers of the head and neck, 220 normal subjects and various numbers of patients with each of the other nine most common cancers in Taiwan were examined for their serum antibody response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific DNase. The positive rate (neutralizing activity greater than 2 units) in normal subjects was 5.5%; 12.1% in patients with other cancers of the head and neck, 87.4% in NPC patients and 0% (colon or rectal cancer) to 30% (lung cancer) in the other nine cancer patients. There is statistically significant difference of positive rates between NPC patients and lung cancer patients (p less than 0.001). Briefly, the test has 87% sensitivity and 95% specificity for NPC patients. Therefore titration of the serum antibody reactivity to EBV-specific DNase can be used as a method for massive screening for the early diagnosis of NPC.

  12. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-En; Yu, Jiayu; Ouyang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period. Results showed that earthworms tended to escape from the soil and eventually died for the SAR at pH = 2.0 as a result of acid toxicity. The catalase activity in the earthworms decreased with the SAR pH levels, whereas the superoxide dismutases activity in the earthworms showed a fluctuate pattern: decreasing from pH 6.5 to 5.0 and increasing from pH 5.0 to 4.0. Results implied that the growth of earthworms was retarded at the SAR pH ≤ 3.0.

  13. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of ellagic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim; Bayrak, Yüksel

    2014-09-01

    Ellagic acid (EA, C14H6O8) is a natural dietary polyphenol whose benefits in a variety of diseases shown in epidemiological and experimental studies involve anti-inflammation, anti-proliferation, anti-angiogenesis, anticarcinogenesis and anti-oxidation properties. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of EA were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. EA inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 69.8%, 66.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, EA had an effective DPPH• scavenging, ABTSrad + scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that EA can be used in the pharmacological, food industry and medicine because of these properties.

  14. Chromosomal position effects in chicken lysozyme gene transgenic mice are correlated with suppression of DNase I hypersensitive site formation.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, M C; Bosch, F X; Sippel, A E; Bonifer, C

    1994-01-01

    The complete chicken lysozyme gene locus is expressed copy number dependently and at a high level in macrophages of transgenic mice. Gene expression independent of genomic position can only be achieved by the concerted action of all cis regulatory elements located on the lysozyme gene domain. Position independency of expression is lost if one essential cis regulatory region is deleted. Here we compared the DNase I hypersensitive site (DHS) pattern formed on the chromatin of position independently and position dependently expressed transgenes in order to assess the influence of deletions within the gene domain on active chromatin formation. We demonstrate, that in position independently expressed transgene all DHSs are formed with the authentic relative frequency on all genes. This is not the case for position dependently expressed transgenes. Our results show that the formation of a DHS during cellular differentiation does not occur autonomously. In case essential regulatory elements of the chicken lysozyme gene domain are lacking, the efficiency of DHS formation on remaining cis regulatory elements during myeloid differentiation is reduced and influenced by the chromosomal position. Hence, no individual regulatory element on the lysozyme domain is capable of organizing the chromatin structure of the whole locus in a dominant fashion. Images PMID:7937145

  15. Protein-DNA interactions within DNase I-hypersensitive sites located downstream of the HIV-1 promoter.

    PubMed

    el Kharroubi, A; Verdin, E

    1994-08-01

    We have examined by in vitro footprinting a region located downstream of the human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) promoter found to be hypersensitive to DNase I digestion in vivo. Recognition sites for several constitutive or inducible DNA binding factors were identified. Three AP-1 binding sites and an AP-3-like motif were situated within the R-U5 region of the long terminal repeat. A novel purine-rich motif (5'-GAAAGC-GAAAGDD-3' (D represents G, A, or T residues)), which interacts with a nuclear factor designated downstream binding factor 1 (DBF1), and two juxtaposed Sp-1 binding sites were located in the untranslated sequence immediately downstream of the 5'-long terminal repeat. Genomic footprinting of these sequence elements in the HIV-1 chronically infected cell lines revealed that the DBF1 and Sp-1 sites are occupied in vivo. Furthermore, transient transfection assays showed that point mutations in the DBF1 binding site decreased significantly the HIV-1 basal promoter activity. Taken together, these results suggest that the DBF1 play a role in the HIV-1 transcription regulation. PMID:8051074

  16. Silencing of DNase Colicin E8 Gene Expression by a Complex Nucleoprotein Assembly Ensures Timely Colicin Induction

    PubMed Central

    Podlesek, Zdravko; Busby, Stephen J. W.; Žgur-Bertok, Darja; Butala, Matej

    2015-01-01

    Colicins are plasmid-encoded narrow spectrum antibiotics that are synthesized by strains of Escherichia coli and govern intraspecies competition. In a previous report, we demonstrated that the global transcriptional factor IscR, co dependently with the master regulator of the DNA damage response, LexA, delays induction of the pore forming colicin genes after SOS induction. Here we show that IscR is not involved in the regulation of nuclease colicins, but that the AsnC protein is. We report that AsnC, in concert with LexA, is the key controller of the temporal induction of the DNA degrading colicin E8 gene (cea8), after DNA damage. We demonstrate that a large AsnC nucleosome-like structure, in conjunction with two LexA molecules, prevent cea8 transcription initiation and that AsnC binding activity is directly modulated by L asparagine. We show that L-asparagine is an environmental factor that has a marked impact on cea8 promoter regulation. Our results show that AsnC also modulates the expression of several other DNase and RNase colicin genes but does not substantially affect pore-forming colicin K gene expression. We propose that selection pressure has “chosen” highly conserved regulators to control colicin expression in E. coli strains, enabling similar colicin gene silencing among bacteria upon exchange of colicinogenic plasmids. PMID:26114960

  17. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M.; Park, Jin-Byung

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass. PMID:27681369

  18. The antimicrobial activities of the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing-Yi; Xiong, Jia-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Chao; Wen Ye

    2011-11-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a well-established natural antimicrobial compound. It is probable for cinnamaldehyde to react with amino acid forming Schiff base adduct in real food system. In this paper, 9 such kind of adducts were prepared by the direct reaction of amino acids with cinnamaldehyde at room temperature. Their antimicrobial activities against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated with benzoic acid as a reference. The adducts showed a dose-dependent activities against the three microbial strains. Both cinnamaldehyde and their adducts were more active against B. subtilis than on E. coli, and their antimicrobial activities were higher at lower pH. Both cinnamaldehyde and its adducts were more active than benzoic acid at the same conditions. The adduct compound A was non-toxic by primary oral acute toxicity study in mice. However, in situ effect of the adduct compound A against E. coli was a little lower than cinnamaldehyde in fish meat. This paper for the first time showed that the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids had similar strong antimicrobial activities as cinnamaldehyde, which may provide alternatives to cinnamaldehyde in food to avoid the strong unacceptable odor of cinnamaldehyde. PMID:21856030

  19. Catalytic Ethanol Dehydration over Different Acid-activated Montmorillonite Clays.

    PubMed

    Krutpijit, Chadaporn; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the catalytic dehydration of ethanol to obtain ethylene over montmorillonite clays (MMT) with mineral acid activation including H2SO4 (SA-MMT), HCl (HA-MMT) and HNO3 (NA-MMT) was investigated at temperature range of 200 to 400°C. It revealed that HA-MMT exhibited the highest catalytic activity. Ethanol conversion and ethylene selectivity were found to increase with increased reaction temperature. At 400°C, the HA-MMT yielded 82% of ethanol conversion having 78% of ethylene yield. At lower temperature (i.e. 200 to 300°C), diethyl ether (DEE) was a major product. The highest activity obtained from HA-MMT can be attributed to an increase of weak acid sites and acid density by the activation of MMT with HCl. It can be also proven by various characterization techniques that in most case, the main structure of MMT did not alter by acid activation (excepted for NA-MMT). Upon the stability test for 72 h during the reaction, the MMT and HA-MMT showed only slight deactivation due to carbon deposition. Hence, the acid activation of MMT by HCl is promising to enhance the catalytic dehydration of ethanol. PMID:27041515

  20. Antileishmanial activity of diterpene acids in copaiba oil

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Adriana Oliveira; Izumi, Erika; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias-Filho, Benedito Prado; da Veiga-Júnior, Valdir Florêncio; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease. According to the World Health Organization, there are approximately 1.5-two million new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis each year worldwide. Chemotherapy against leishmaniasis is based on pentavalent antimonials, which were developed more than a century ago. The goals of this study were to investigate the antileishmanial activity of diterpene acids in copaiba oil, as well as some possible targets of their action against Leishmania amazonensis. Methyl copalate and agathic, hydroxycopalic, kaurenoic, pinifolic and polyaltic acids isolated from Copaifera officinales oleoresins were utilised. Ultrastructural changes and the specific organelle targets of diterpenes were investigated with electron microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. All compounds had some level of activity against L. amazonensis. Hydroxycopalic acid and methyl copalate demonstrated the most activity against promastigotes and had 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 2.5 and 6.0 µg/mL, respectively. However, pinifolic and kaurenoic acid demonstrated the most activity against axenic amastigote and had IC50 values of 3.5 and 4.0 µg/mL, respectively. Agathic, kaurenoic and pinifolic acid caused significant increases in plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial membrane depolarisation of the protozoan. In conclusion, copaiba oil and its diterpene acids should be explored for the development of new antileishmanial drugs. PMID:23440116

  1. The antimicrobial activity of liposomal lauric acids against Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Darren; Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Chan, Michael; Carson, Dennis; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhang, Liangfang

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of lauric acid (LA) and its liposomal derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), the bacterium that promotes inflammatory acne. First, the antimicrobial study of three free fatty acids (lauric acid, palmitic acid and oleic acid) demonstrated that LA gives the strongest bactericidal activity against P. acnes. However, a setback of using LA as a potential treatment for inflammatory acne is its poor water solubility. Then the LA was incorporated into a liposome formulation to aid its delivery to P. acnes. It was demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity of LA was not only well maintained in its liposomal derivatives but also enhanced at low LA concentration. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of LA-loaded liposomes (LipoLA) mainly depended on the LA loading concentration per single liposomes. Further study found that the LipoLA could fuse with the membranes of P. acnes and release the carried LA directly into the bacterial membranes, thereby killing the bacteria effectively. Since LA is a natural compound that is the main acid in coconut oil and also resides in human breast milk and liposomes have been successfully and widely applied as a drug delivery vehicle in the clinic, the LipoLA developed in this work holds great potential of becoming an innate, safe and effective therapeutic medication for acne vulgaris and other P. acnes associated diseases. PMID:19665786

  2. Urease inhibitory activities of β-boswellic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Boswellia carterii have been used in traditional medicine for many years for management different gastrointestinal disorders. In this study, we wish to report urease inhibitory activity of four isolated compound of boswellic acid derivative. Methods 4 pentacyclic triterpenoid acids were isolated from Boswellia carterii and identified by NMR and Mass spectroscopic analysis (compounds 1, 3-O-acetyl-9,11-dehydro-β-boswellic acid; 2, 3-O-acetyl-11-hydroxy-β-boswellic acid; 3. 3-O- acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid and 4, 11-keto-β-boswellic acid. Their inhibitory activity on Jack bean urease were evaluated. Docking and pharmacophore analysis using AutoDock 4.2 and Ligandscout 3.03 programs were also performed to explain possible mechanism of interaction between isolated compounds and urease enzyme. Results It was found that compound 1 has the strongest inhibitory activity against Jack bean urease (IC50 = 6.27 ± 0.03 μM), compared with thiourea as a standard inhibitor (IC50 = 21.1 ± 0.3 μM). Conclusion The inhibition potency is probably due to the formation of appropriate hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions between the investigated compounds and urease enzyme active site and confirms its traditional usage. PMID:23351363

  3. Nitric acid vapor removal by activated, impregnated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory and industrial workers can be exposed to vapors of nitric acid, especially in accidents, such as spills. Nitric acid can also be a product of incineration for energy production or waste (e.g., CW agent) disposal. Activated carbons containing impregnants for enhancing vapor and gas removal have been tested for effectiveness in removing vapors of nitric acid from air. The nitric acid vapor was generated from concentrated acid solutions and detected by trapping in a water bubbler for pH measurements. Both low and moderate relative humidity conditions were used. All carbons were effective at vapor contact times representative of air-purifying respirator use. One surprising observation was the desorption of low levels of ammonia from impregnated carbons. This was apparently due to residual ammonia from the impregnation processes.

  4. PeaKDEck: a kernel density estimator-based peak calling program for DNaseI-seq data.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Michael T; O'Callaghan, Christopher A

    2014-05-01

    Hypersensitivity to DNaseI digestion is a hallmark of open chromatin, and DNaseI-seq allows the genome-wide identification of regions of open chromatin. Interpreting these data is challenging, largely because of inherent variation in signal-to-noise ratio between datasets. We have developed PeaKDEck, a peak calling program that distinguishes signal from noise by randomly sampling read densities and using kernel density estimation to generate a dataset-specific probability distribution of random background signal. PeaKDEck uses this probability distribution to select an appropriate read density threshold for peak calling in each dataset. We benchmark PeaKDEck using published ENCODE DNaseI-seq data and other peak calling programs, and demonstrate superior performance in low signal-to-noise ratio datasets. PMID:24407222

  5. Synthesis and antimicrobial activities of new higher amino acid Schiff base derivatives of 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 7-aminocephalosporanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir (nee Güngör), Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan; Özçelik, Berrin; Oyardı, Özlem

    2016-02-01

    Novel β-lactam derivatives (1c-3c) (1d-3d) were produced by using 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) and the higher amino acid Schiff bases. The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H/13C NMR and UV-vis spectra. Antibacterial activities of all the higher amino acid Schiff bases (1a-3a) (1b-3b) and β-lactam derivatives were screened against three gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Acinetobacter baumannii RSKK 02026), three gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 07005, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) and their drug-resistant isolates by using broth microdilution method. Two fungi (Candida albicans and Candida krusei) were used for antifungal activity.

  6. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Victor M

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipase in situ, in vitro, and after challenge with phagocytic stimuli. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of fluorescently labeled native, aceto-acetylated, and oxidized LDL was studied in vitro and in vivo. LDL effects on RPE lysosomal enzymes were assessed. Lysosomal enzyme activity was compared in RPE cells from monkeys fed diets rich in fish oil to those from control animals and in cultured RPE cells exposed to sera from these monkeys. RESULTS: RPE acid lipase activity was substantial and comparable to that of mononuclear phagocytes. Acid lipase activity increased significantly following phagocytic challenge with photoreceptor outer segment (POS) membranes. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of labeled lipoproteins was determined in vitro. Distinctive uptake of labeled lipoproteins occurred in RPE cells and mononuclear phagocytes in vivo. Native LDL enhanced RPE lysosomal enzyme activity. RPE lysosomal enzymes increased significantly in RPE cells from monkeys fed fish oil-rich diets and in cultured RPE cells exposed to their sera. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cells contain substantial acid lipase for efficient metabolism of lipids imbibed by POS phagocytosis and LDL uptake. Diets rich in fish oil-derived omega-3 fatty acids, by enhancing acid lipase, may reduce RPE lipofuscin accumulation, RPE oxidative damage, and the development of ARMD. PMID:12545699

  7. Synthesis and antifungal activity of cinnamic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Tawata, S; Taira, S; Kobamoto, N; Zhu, J; Ishihara, M; Toyama, S

    1996-05-01

    Cinnamic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids were isolated from pineapple stems (Ananas comosus var. Cayenne). Twenty-four kinds of esters were prepared from these acids, alcohols and the components of Alpinia. Isopropyl 4-hydroxycinnamate (11) and butyl 4-hydroxycinnamate (12) were found to have almost the same effectiveness in antifungal activity against Pythium sp. at 10 ppm as that of the commercial fungicide iprobenfos (kitazin P).

  8. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A.

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  9. Identification of critical residues in the colicin E9 DNase binding region of the Im9 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, M J; Wallis, R; Leung, K Y; Williams, G; Lian, L Y; James, R; Kleanthous, C; Moore, G R

    1997-01-01

    1H-15N NMR studies, in conjunction with mutagenesis experiments, have been used to delineate the DNase-binding surface of the colicin E9 inhibitor protein Im9 (where Im stands for immunity protein). Complexes were formed between the 15 kDa unlabelled E9 DNase domain and the 9.5 kDa Im9 protein uniformly labelled with 15N. Approx. 90% of the amide resonances of the bound Im9 were assigned and spectral parameters obtained from 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra were compared with those for the free Im9 assigned previously. Many of the amide resonances were shifted on complex formation, some by more than 2 p.p.m. in the 15N dimension and more than 0.5 p.p.m. in the 1H dimension. Most of the strongly shifted amides are located on the surfaces of two of the four helices, helix II and helix III. Whereas helix II had already been identified through genetic and biochemical investigations as an important determinant of biological specificity, helix III had not previously been implicated in binding to the DNase. To test the robustness of the NMR-delineated DNase-binding site, a selection of Im9 alanine mutants were constructed and their dissociation rate constants from E9 DNase-immunity protein complexes quantified by radioactive subunit exchange kinetics. Their off-rates correlated well with the NMR perturbation analysis; for example, residues that were highly perturbed in HSQC experiments, such as residues 34 (helix II) and 54 (helix III), had a marked effect on the DNase-immunity protein dissociation rate when replaced by alanine. The NMR and mutagenesis data are consistent with a DNase-binding region on Im9 composed of invariant residues in helix III and variable residues in helix II. The relationship of this binding site model to the wide range of affinities (Kd values in the range 10(-4) to 10(-16)M) that have been measured for cognate and non-cognate colicin DNase-immunity protein interactions is discussed. PMID:9169618

  10. Dihydroasparagusic acid: antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activities and improved synthesis.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Alessandro; Mandrone, Manuela; Serrilli, Anna Maria; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Iannello, Carmelina; Poli, Ferruccio; Antognoni, Fabiana

    2013-07-17

    Dihydroasparagusic acid (DHAA) is the reduced form of asparagusic acid, a sulfur-containing flavor component produced by Asparagus plants. In this work, DHAA was synthetically produced by modifying some published protocols, and the synthesized molecule was tested in several in vitro assays (DPPH, ABTS, FRAP-ferrozine, BCB, deoxyribose assays) to evaluate its radical scavenging activity. Results show that DHAA is endowed with a significant in vitro antioxidant activity, comparable to that of Trolox. DHAA was also evaluated for its inhibitory activity toward tyrosinase, an enzyme involved, among others, in melanogenesis and in browning processes of plant-derived foods. DHAA was shown to exert an inhibitory effect on tyrosinase activity, and the inhibitor kinetics, analyzed by a Lineweaver-Burk plot, exhibited a competitive mechanism. Taken together, these results suggest that DHAA may be considered as a potentially active molecule for use in various fields of application, such as pharmaceutical, cosmetics, agronomic and food. PMID:23790134

  11. EtpE Binding to DNase X Induces Ehrlichial Entry via CD147 and hnRNP-K Recruitment, Followed by Mobilization of N-WASP and Actin

    PubMed Central

    Mohan Kumar, Dipu; Lin, Mingqun; Xiong, Qingming; Webber, Mathew James; Kural, Comert

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obligate intracellular bacteria, such as Ehrlichia chaffeensis, perish unless they can enter eukaryotic cells. E. chaffeensis is the etiological agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease. To infect cells, Ehrlichia uses the C terminus of the outer membrane invasin entry-triggering protein (EtpE) of Ehrlichia (EtpE-C), which directly binds the mammalian cell surface glycosylphosphatidyl inositol-anchored protein, DNase X. How this binding drives Ehrlichia entry is unknown. Here, using affinity pulldown of host cell lysates with recombinant EtpE-C (rEtpE-C), we identified two new human proteins that interact with EtpE-C: CD147 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K). The interaction of CD147 with rEtpE-C was validated by far-Western blotting and coimmunoprecipitation of native EtpE with endogenous CD147. CD147 was ubiquitous on the cell surface and also present around foci of rEtpE-C-coated-bead entry. Functional neutralization of surface-exposed CD147 with a specific antibody inhibited Ehrlichia internalization and infection but not binding. Downregulation of CD147 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) impaired E. chaffeensis infection. Functional ablation of cytoplasmic hnRNP-K by a nanoscale intracellular antibody markedly attenuated bacterial entry and infection but not binding. EtpE-C also interacted with neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is activated by hnRNP-K. Wiskostatin, which inhibits N-WASP activation, and cytochalasin D, which inhibits actin polymerization, inhibited Ehrlichia entry. Upon incubation with host cell lysate, EtpE-C but not an EtpE N-terminal fragment stimulated in vitro actin polymerization in an N-WASP- and DNase X-dependent manner. Time-lapse video images revealed N-WASP recruitment at EtpE-C-coated bead entry foci. Thus, EtpE-C binding to DNase X drives Ehrlichia entry by engaging CD147 and hnRNP-K and activating N-WASP-dependent actin polymerization. PMID:26530384

  12. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects.

  13. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects. PMID:26629697

  14. Oleanolic acid and ursolic acid: novel hepatitis C virus antivirals that inhibit NS5B activity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbao; Li, Shanshan; Liao, Qingjiao; Zhang, Yanni; Sun, Ruina; Zhu, Xiangdong; Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyu; Fang, Xiaonan; Zhu, Ying

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects up to 170 million people worldwide and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, current therapy is only curative in approximately 50% of HCV patients and has adverse side effects, which warrants the need to develop novel and effective antivirals against HCV. We have previously reported that the Chinese herb Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) directly inhibited HCV NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity (Kong et al., 2007). In this study, we found that the FLL aqueous extract strongly suppressed HCV replication. Further high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis combined with inhibitory assays indicates that oleanolic acid and ursolic acid are two antiviral components within FLL aqueous extract that significantly suppressed the replication of HCV genotype 1b replicon and HCV genotype 2a JFH1 virus. Moreover, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid exhibited anti-HCV activity at least partly through suppressing HCV NS5B RdRp activity as noncompetitive inhibitors. Therefore, our results for the first time demonstrated that natural products oleanolic acid and ursolic acid could be used as potential HCV antivirals that can be applied to clinic trials either as monotherapy or in combination with other HCV antivirals. PMID:23422646

  15. Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Komadel, P.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2009-04-01

    Modified bentonites are of widespread technological importance. Common modifications include acid activation and organic treatment. Acid activation has been used for decades to prepare bleaching earths for adsorbing impurities from edible and industrial oils. Organic treatment has sparked an explosive interest in a class of materials called polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNs). The most commonly used clay mineral in PCNs is montmorillonite, which is the main constituent of bentonite. PCN materials are used for structural reinforcement and mechanical strength, for gas permeability barriers, as flame retardants, and to minimize surface erosion (ablation). Other specialty applications include use as conducting nanocomposites and bionanocomposites.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of poly(acrylic acid) block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gratzl, Günther; Paulik, Christian; Hild, Sabine; Guggenbichler, Josef P; Lackner, Maximilian

    2014-05-01

    The increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has developed into a major health problem. In particular, biofilms are the main reason for hospital-acquired infections and diseases. Once formed, biofilms are difficult to remove as they have specific defense mechanisms against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial surfaces must therefore kill or repel bacteria before they can settle to form a biofilm. In this study, we describe that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) containing diblock copolymers can kill bacteria and prevent from biofilm formation. The PAA diblock copolymers with poly(styrene) and poly(methyl methacrylate) were synthesized via anionic polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate with styrene or methyl methacrylate and subsequent acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the tert-butyl ester. The copolymers were characterized via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis, and acid-base titrations. Copolymer films with a variety of acrylic acid contents were produced by solvent casting, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tested for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of the acidic diblock copolymers increased with increasing acrylic acid content, independent of the copolymer-partner, the chain length and the nanostructure.

  17. Review of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) in the management of patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pressler, Tacjana

    2008-01-01

    The most important problem in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is chronic airway inflammation and infection, which starts early in life. To prevent severe lung damage, it is important to mobilize as much sputum as possible from the lung on a daily basis. RhDNase is an enzyme that breaks down DNA strands in airway secretions, hydrolyzes the DNA present in sputum/mucus of CF patients, reducing viscosity in the lungs and promoting secretion clearance. Several well performed trials have proven its efficacy in young CF patients with mild disease as well as in older patients with more advanced lung disease. Daily inhalation of this agent slows down lung function decline and decreases the frequency of respiratory exacerbations. The drug is well tolerated by most patients independent of the severity of lung disease. PMID:19707442

  18. The tertiary structure of the four-way DNA junction affords protection against DNase I cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Murchie, A I; Carter, W A; Portugal, J; Lilley, D M

    1990-01-01

    The accessibility of phosphodiester bonds in the DNA of four-way helical junctions has been probed with the nuclease DNase I. Regions of protection were observed on all four strands of the junctions, that tended to be longer on the strands that are exchanged between the coaxially stacked pairs of helices. The protected regions on the continuous strands of the stacked helices were not located exactly at the junction, but were displaced towards the 3' side of the strand. This is the region of backbone that becomes located in the major groove of the opposed helix in the non-crossed, right-handed structure for the junction, and might therefore be predicted to be protected against cleavage by an enzyme. However, the major grooves of the structure remain accessible to the much smaller probe dimethyl sulphate. Images PMID:2339051

  19. Interactions of DNA with clay minerals and soil colloidal particles and protection against degradation by DNase.

    PubMed

    Cai, Peng; Huang, Qiao-Yun; Zhang, Xue-Wen

    2006-05-01

    Adsorption, desorption, and degradation by nucleases of DNA on four different colloidal fractions from a Brown soil and clay minerals were studied. The adsorption of DNase I and the structures of native DNA, adsorbed and desorbed, were also investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopy, to determine the protection mechanism of DNA molecules by soil colloids and minerals against enzymatic degradation. Kaolinite exhibited the highest adsorption affinity for DNA among the examined soil colloids and clay minerals. In comparison with organomineral complexes (organic clays), DNA was tightly adsorbed by H2O2-treated clays (inorganic clays). FTIR spectra showed that the binding of DNA on kaolinite and inorganic clays changed its conformation from the B-form to the Z-form, whereas montmorillonite and organic clays retained the original B-form of DNA. A structural change from the B- to the C-form in DNA molecules desorbed from kaolinite was observed by CD spectroscopy and confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy. The presence of soil colloids and minerals provided protection to DNA against degradation by DNase I. The higher level of protection was found with montmorillonite and organic clays compared to kaolinite and inorganic clays. The protection of DNA against nuclease degradation by soil colloids and minerals is apparently not controlled by the adsorption affinity of DNA molecules for the colloids and the conformational change of bound DNA. The higher stability of DNA seemed to be attributed mainly to the presence of organic matter in the system and the adsorption of nucleases on soil colloids and minerals. The information obtained in this study is of fundamental significance for the understanding of the behavior of extracellular DNA in soil environment.

  20. Oxygenation of Organoboronic Acids by a Nonheme Iron(II) Complex: Mimicking Boronic Acid Monooxygenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-10-19

    Phenolic compounds are important intermediates in the bacterial biodegradation of aromatic compounds in the soil. An Arthrobacter sp. strain has been shown to exhibit boronic acid monooxygenase activity through the conversion of different substituted phenylboronic acids to the corresponding phenols using dioxygen. While a number of methods have been reported to cleave the C-B bonds of organoboronic acids, there is no report on biomimetic iron complex exhibiting this activity using dioxygen as the oxidant. In that direction, we have investigated the reactivity of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of an iron(II)-benzilate complex [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate), toward organoboronic acids. The oxidant converts different aryl/alkylboronic acids to the corresponding oxygenated products with the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen. This method represents an efficient protocol for the oxygenation of boronic acids with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant.

  1. Oxygenation of Organoboronic Acids by a Nonheme Iron(II) Complex: Mimicking Boronic Acid Monooxygenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-10-19

    Phenolic compounds are important intermediates in the bacterial biodegradation of aromatic compounds in the soil. An Arthrobacter sp. strain has been shown to exhibit boronic acid monooxygenase activity through the conversion of different substituted phenylboronic acids to the corresponding phenols using dioxygen. While a number of methods have been reported to cleave the C-B bonds of organoboronic acids, there is no report on biomimetic iron complex exhibiting this activity using dioxygen as the oxidant. In that direction, we have investigated the reactivity of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of an iron(II)-benzilate complex [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate), toward organoboronic acids. The oxidant converts different aryl/alkylboronic acids to the corresponding oxygenated products with the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen. This method represents an efficient protocol for the oxygenation of boronic acids with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant. PMID:26430780

  2. Structure-activity relationship of caffeoylquinic acids on the accelerating activity on ATP production.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yusaku; Kurisu, Manami; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    Caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) is one of the phenylpropanoids which have various bioactivities such as antioxidant, antibacterial, anticancer, antihistamic, and other biological effects. We previously reported that 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid inhibited amyloid β(1-42)-induced cellular toxicity on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and increased the mRNA expression level of glycolytic enzymes and the intracellular ATP level. To investigate structure-activity relationship on the accelerating activity on ATP production, we synthesized 1,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and other derivatives. Additionally, we evaluated intracellular ATP level in SH-SY5Y treated with each CQA derivative. As a result, 3,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid showed the highest accelerating activity on ATP production among tested compounds. It was suggested that caffeoyl groups bound to quinic acid are important for activity and the more caffeoyl groups are bound to quinic acid, the higher accelerating activity on ATP production exhibits.

  3. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Teacher's Resource Guide on Acidic Precipitation with Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    The purpose of this teacher's resource guide is to help science teachers incorporate the topic of acidic precipitation into their curricula. A survey of recent junior high school science textbooks found a maximum of one paragraph devoted to the subject; in addition, none of these books had any related laboratory activities. It was on the basis of…

  6. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  7. Inhibition of bacterial activity in acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurdeep; Bhatnagar, Miss Mridula

    1988-12-01

    Acid mine drainage water give rise to rapid growth and activity of an iron- and sulphur- oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidians which greatly accelerate acid producing reactions by oxidation of pyrite material associated with coal and adjoining strata. The role of this bacterium in production of acid mine drainage is described. This study presents the data which demonstrate the inhibitory effect of certain organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate, quarternary ammonium compounds on the growth of the acidophilic aerobic autotroph Thiobacillus ferrooxidians. In each experiment, 10 milli-litres of laboratory developed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians was added to 250 milli-litres Erlenmeyer flask containing 90 milli-litres of 9-k media supplemented with FeSO4 7H2O and organic compounds at various concentrations. Control experiments were also carried out. The treated and untreated (control) samples analysed at various time intervals for Ferrous Iron and pH levels. Results from this investigation showed that some organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate and quarternary ammonium compounds at low concentration (10-2 M, 10-50 ppm concentration levels) are effective bactericides and able to inhibit and reduce the Ferrous Iron oxidation and acidity formation by inhibiting the growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians is also discussed and presented

  8. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  9. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-En; Yu, Jiayu; Ouyang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period. Results showed that earthworms tended to escape from the soil and eventually died for the SAR at pH = 2.0 as a result of acid toxicity. The catalase activity in the earthworms decreased with the SAR pH levels, whereas the superoxide dismutases activity in the earthworms showed a fluctuate pattern: decreasing from pH 6.5 to 5.0 and increasing from pH 5.0 to 4.0. Results implied that the growth of earthworms was retarded at the SAR pH ≤ 3.0. PMID:25351717

  10. A potential plant-derived antifungal acetylenic acid mediates its activity by interfering with fatty acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    6-Nonadecynoic acid (6-NDA), a plant-derived acetylenic acid, exhibits strong inhibitory activity against the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. In the present study, transcriptional profiling coupled with mutant and biochemical analyses...

  11. Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid activate a common defense system in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, Daisuke; Seo, Shigemi; Yamada, Shoko; Kano, Akihito; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Shishido, Hodaka; Miyoshi, Seika; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play important roles in plant defense systems. JA and SA signaling pathways interact antagonistically in dicotyledonous plants, but, the status of crosstalk between JA and SA signaling is unknown in monocots. Our rice microarray analysis showed that more than half of the genes upregulated by the SA analog BTH are also upregulated by JA, suggesting that a major portion of the SA-upregulated genes are regulated by JA-dependent signaling in rice. A common defense system that is activated by both JA and SA is thus proposed which plays an important role in pathogen defense responses in rice. PMID:23518581

  12. Antiplatelet activity of a novel formula composed of malic acid, succinic acid and citric acid from Cornus officinalis fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Chun; Zhao, Yue; Bian, Hui-Min

    2013-12-01

    The present study investigated the antiplatelet activity of a novel formula composed by malic acid, succinic acid and citric acid with a ratio of 3:2:2. The IC50 and inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by various agonists as well as platelet adhesion were evaluated in vitro. Of note, the IC50 for the formula inhibiting adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was 0.185 mg/mL. Meanwhile, the formula showed more potent inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP and thrombin than the single component at same concentration (0.37 mg/mL). Moreover, the formula could prevent platelet adhesion significantly without influence on platelet viability.

  13. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment. PMID:25513761

  14. Impact of dietary aromatic amino acids on osteoclastic activity.

    PubMed

    Refaey, Mona El; Zhong, Qing; Ding, Ke-Hong; Shi, Xing-Ming; Xu, Jianrui; Bollag, Wendy B; Hill, William D; Chutkan, Norman; Robbins, Richard; Nadeau, Hugh; Johnson, Maribeth; Hamrick, Mark W; Isales, Carlos M

    2014-08-01

    We had shown that aromatic amino acid (phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) supplementation prevented bone loss in an aging C57BL/6 mice model. In vivo results from the markers of bone breakdown suggested an inhibition of osteoclastic activity or differentiation. To assess osteoclastic differentiation, we examined the effects of aromatic amino acids on early /structural markers as vitronectin receptor, calcitonin receptor, and carbonic anhydrase II as well as, late/functional differentiation markers; cathepsin K and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). Our data demonstrate that the aromatic amino acids down-regulated early and late osteoclastic differentiation markers as measured by real time PCR. Our data also suggest a link between the vitronectin receptor and the secreted cathepsin K that both showed consistent effects to the aromatic amino acid treatment. However, the non-attachment related proteins, calcitonin receptor, and carbonic anhydrase II, demonstrated less consistent effects in response to treatment. Our data are consistent with aromatic amino acids down-regulating osteoclastic differentiation by suppressing remodeling gene expression thus contributing initially to the net increase in bone mass seen in vivo.

  15. [Blood acid-base balance of sportsmen during physical activity].

    PubMed

    Petrushova, O P; Mikulyak, N I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acid-base balance parameters in blood of sportsmen by physical activity. Before exercise lactate concentration in blood was normal. Carbon dioxide pressure (рСО2), bicarbonate concentration (НСО3 -), base excess (BE), were increased immediately after physical activity lactate concentration increased, while pH, BE, НСО3 -, рСО2 decreased in capillary blood of sportsmen. These changes show the development of lactate-acidosis which is partly compensated with bicarbonate buffering system and respiratory alkalosis. During postexercise recovery lactate concentration decreased, while рСО2, НСО3 -, BE increased. The results of this study can be used for diagnostics of acid-base disorders and their medical treatment for preservation of sportsmen physical capacity.

  16. Immune Activation in the Liver by Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qian; Wang, Qingde; Scott, Melanie J.; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Viral infection in the liver, including hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, is a major health problem worldwide, especially in developing countries. The infection triggers a pro-inflammatory response in patients that is crucial for host defense. Recent studies have identified multiple transmembrane and cytosolic receptors that recognize pathogen-derived nucleic acids, and these receptors are essential for driving immune activation in the liver. In addition to sensing DNA/RNA from pathogens, these intracellular receptors can be activated by nucleic acids of host origin in response to sterile injuries. In this review, we discuss the expanding roles of these receptors in both immune and nonimmune cells in the liver. PMID:27350945

  17. Synthesis and antifungal activity of bile acid-derived oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía R; Svetaz, Laura; Butassi, Estefanía; Zacchino, Susana A; Palermo, Jorge A; Sánchez, Marianela

    2016-04-01

    Peracetylated bile acids (1a-g) were used as starting materials for the preparation of fourteen new derivatives bearing an oxazole moiety in their side chain (6a-g, 8a-g). The key step for the synthetic path was a Dakin-West reaction followed by a Robinson-Gabriel cyclodehydration. A simpler model oxazole (12) was also synthesized. The antifungal activity of the new compounds (6a-g) as well as their starting bile acids (1a-g) was tested against Candida albicans. Compounds 6e and 6g showed the highest percentages of inhibition (63.84% and 61.40% at 250 μg/mL respectively). Deacetylation of compounds 6a-g, led to compounds 8a-g which showed lower activities than the acetylated derivatives. PMID:26827629

  18. Toxocara canis: Larvicidal activity of fatty acid amides.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, Taís; D'Oca, Caroline da Ros Montes; Mata-Santos, Hílton Antônio; Fenalti, Juliana; Pinto, Nitza; Coelho, Tatiane; Berne, Maria Elisabeth; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; Scaini, Carlos James

    2016-02-01

    Considering the therapeutic potential of fatty acid amides, the present study aimed to evaluate their in vitro activity against Toxocara canis larvae and their cytotoxicity for the first time. Linoleylpyrrolidilamide was the most potent, with a minimal larvicidal concentration (MLC) of 0.05 mg/mL and 27% cytotoxicity against murine peritoneal macrophages C57BL/6 mice, as assessed by the MTT assay. PMID:26783180

  19. Bactericidal activity of the human skin fatty acid cis-6-hexadecanoic acid on Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cartron, Michaël L; England, Simon R; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Josten, Michaele; Turner, Robert; Rauter, Yvonne; Hurd, Alexander; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Jones, Simon; Foster, Simon J

    2014-07-01

    Human skin fatty acids are a potent aspect of our innate defenses, giving surface protection against potentially invasive organisms. They provide an important parameter in determining the ecology of the skin microflora, and alterations can lead to increased colonization by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Harnessing skin fatty acids may also give a new avenue of exploration in the generation of control measures against drug-resistant organisms. Despite their importance, the mechanism(s) whereby skin fatty acids kill bacteria has remained largely elusive. Here, we describe an analysis of the bactericidal effects of the major human skin fatty acid cis-6-hexadecenoic acid (C6H) on the human commensal and pathogen S. aureus. Several C6H concentration-dependent mechanisms were found. At high concentrations, C6H swiftly kills cells associated with a general loss of membrane integrity. However, C6H still kills at lower concentrations, acting through disruption of the proton motive force, an increase in membrane fluidity, and its effects on electron transfer. The design of analogues with altered bactericidal effects has begun to determine the structural constraints on activity and paves the way for the rational design of new antistaphylococcal agents.

  20. Bactericidal Activity of the Human Skin Fatty Acid cis-6-Hexadecanoic Acid on Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Cartron, Michaël L.; England, Simon R.; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Josten, Michaele; Turner, Robert; Rauter, Yvonne; Hurd, Alexander; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Jones, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Human skin fatty acids are a potent aspect of our innate defenses, giving surface protection against potentially invasive organisms. They provide an important parameter in determining the ecology of the skin microflora, and alterations can lead to increased colonization by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Harnessing skin fatty acids may also give a new avenue of exploration in the generation of control measures against drug-resistant organisms. Despite their importance, the mechanism(s) whereby skin fatty acids kill bacteria has remained largely elusive. Here, we describe an analysis of the bactericidal effects of the major human skin fatty acid cis-6-hexadecenoic acid (C6H) on the human commensal and pathogen S. aureus. Several C6H concentration-dependent mechanisms were found. At high concentrations, C6H swiftly kills cells associated with a general loss of membrane integrity. However, C6H still kills at lower concentrations, acting through disruption of the proton motive force, an increase in membrane fluidity, and its effects on electron transfer. The design of analogues with altered bactericidal effects has begun to determine the structural constraints on activity and paves the way for the rational design of new antistaphylococcal agents. PMID:24709265

  1. Biological Activity of Aminophosphonic Acids and Their Short Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejczak, Barbara; Kafarski, Pawel

    The biological activity and natural occurrence of the aminophosphonic acids were described half a century ago. Since then the chemistry and biology of this class of compounds have developed into the separate field of phosphorus chemistry. Today it is well acknowledged that these compounds possess a wide variety of promising, and in some cases commercially useful, physiological activities. Thus, they have found applications ranging from agrochemical (with the herbicides glyphosate and bialaphos being the most prominent examples) to medicinal (with the potent antihypertensive fosinopril and antiosteoporetic bisphosphonates being examples).

  2. Sulfation mediates activity of zosteric acid against biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Caroline; Cavas, Levent; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Zosteric acid (ZA), a metabolite from the marine sea grass Zostera marina, has attracted much attention due to its attributed antifouling (AF) activity. However, recent results on dynamic transformations of aromatic sulfates in marine phototrophic organisms suggest potential enzymatic desulfation of metabolites like ZA. The activity of ZA was thus re-investigated using biofilm assays and simultaneous analytical monitoring by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Comparison of ZA and its non-sulfated form para-coumaric acid (CA) revealed that the active substance was in all cases the non-sulfated CA while ZA was virtually inactive. CA exhibited a strong biofilm inhibiting activity against Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens. The LC/MS data revealed that the apparent biofilm inhibiting effects of ZA on V. natriegens can be entirely attributed to CA released from ZA by sulfatase activity. In the light of various potential applications, the (a)biotic transformation of ZA to CA has thus to be considered in future AF formulations.

  3. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  4. Which Genetics Variants in DNase-Seq Footprints Are More Likely to Alter Binding?

    PubMed Central

    Moyerbrailean, Gregory A.; Kalita, Cynthia A.; Harvey, Chris T.; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Large experimental efforts are characterizing the regulatory genome, yet we are still missing a systematic definition of functional and silent genetic variants in non-coding regions. Here, we integrated DNaseI footprinting data with sequence-based transcription factor (TF) motif models to predict the impact of a genetic variant on TF binding across 153 tissues and 1,372 TF motifs. Each annotation we derived is specific for a cell-type condition or assay and is locally motif-driven. We found 5.8 million genetic variants in footprints, 66% of which are predicted by our model to affect TF binding. Comprehensive examination using allele-specific hypersensitivity (ASH) reveals that only the latter group consistently shows evidence for ASH (3,217 SNPs at 20% FDR), suggesting that most (97%) genetic variants in footprinted regulatory regions are indeed silent. Combining this information with GWAS data reveals that our annotation helps in computationally fine-mapping 86 SNPs in GWAS hit regions with at least a 2-fold increase in the posterior odds of picking the causal SNP. The rich meta information provided by the tissue-specificity and the identity of the putative TF binding site being affected also helps in identifying the underlying mechanism supporting the association. As an example, the enrichment for LDL level-associated SNPs is 9.1-fold higher among SNPs predicted to affect HNF4 binding sites than in a background model already including tissue-specific annotation. PMID:26901046

  5. PlantDHS: a database for DNase I hypersensitive sites in plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Marand, Alexandre P.; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by orchestrated binding of regulatory proteins to promoters and other cis-regulatory DNA elements (CREs). Several plant databases have been developed for mapping promoters or DNA motifs associated with promoters. However, there is a lack of databases that allow investigation for all CREs. Here we present PlantDHS (http://plantdhs.org), a plant DNase I hypersensitive site (DHS) database that integrates histone modification, RNA sequencing, nucleosome positioning/occupancy, transcription factor binding sites, and genomic sequence within an easily navigated user interface. DHSs are indicative of all CREs, including promoters, enhancers, silencers, insulators and transcription factor binding sites; all of which play immense roles in global gene expression regulation. PlantDHS provides a platform to predict all CREs associated with individual genes from three model plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon and rice (Oryza sativa). PlantDHS is especially valuable in the detection of distant CREs that are located away from promoters. PMID:26400163

  6. Adsorption of plasmid DNA to mineral surfaces and protection against DNase I.

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, G; Lorenz, M G; Wackernagel, W

    1991-01-01

    The adsorption of [3H]thymidine-labeled plasmid DNA (pHC314; 2.4 kb) of different conformations to chemically pure sand was studied in a flowthrough microenvironment. The extent of adsorption was affected by the concentration and valency of cations, indicating a charge-dependent process. Bivalent cations (Mg2+, Ca2+) were 100-fold more effective than monovalent cations (Na+, K+, NH4+). Quantitative adsorption of up to 1 microgram of negatively supercoiled or linearized plasmid DNA to 0.7 g of sand was observed in the presence of 5 mM MgCl2 at pH 7. Under these conditions, more than 85% of DNA adsorbed within 60 s. Maximum adsorption was 4 micrograms of DNA to 0.7 g of sand. Supercoil molecules adsorbed slightly less than linearized or open circular plasmids. An increase of the pH from 5 to 9 decreased adsorption at 0.5 mM MgCl2 about eightfold. It is concluded that adsorption of plasmid DNA to sand depends on the neutralization of negative charges on the DNA molecules and the mineral surfaces by cations. The results are discussed on the grounds of the polyelectrolyte adsorption model. Sand-adsorbed DNA was 100 times more resistant against DNase I than was DNA free in solution. The data support the idea that plasmid DNA can enter the extracellular bacterial gene pool which is located at mineral surfaces in natural bacterial habitats. PMID:1647748

  7. DNase I hypersensitive sites flank the mouse class II major histocompatibility complex during B cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, S

    1991-01-01

    The mouse class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encodes a polymorphic, multigene family important in the immune response, and is expressed mainly on mature B cells, on certain types of dendritic cells and is also inducible by gamma-interferon on antigen presenting cells. To study the regulatory elements which control this expression pattern, we have examined the chromatin structure flanking the class II MHC region, in particular during B cell differentiation. Using a panel of well-characterised mouse cell lines specific for different stages of B cell development (pre-B, B, plasma cell) as well as non-B cell lines, we have mapped the DNase I hypersensitive (DHS) sites adjacent to the mouse MHC class II region. The results presented show, for the first time that there are specific hypersensitive sites flanking the class II MHC locus during pre B cell, B cell and plasma cell stages of B cell differentiation, irrespective of the status of class II MHC expression. These hypersensitive sites are not found in T cell, fibroblast or uninduced myelomonocytic cell lines. This suggests that these DHS sites define a developmentally stable, chromatin structure, which can be used as a marker of B cell lineage commitment and may indicate that a combination of these hypersensitive sites reflect regulatory proteins involved in the immediate expression of a particular class II MHC gene or possibly control of the entire locus. Images PMID:1923768

  8. Role of upstream DNase I hypersensitive sites in the regulation of human alpha globin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, J A; Summerhill, R J; Vyas, P; Gourdon, G; Higgs, D R; Wood, W G

    1993-09-01

    Erythroid-specific DNase 1 hypersensitive sites have been identified at the promoters of the human alpha-like genes and within the region from 4 to 40 kb upstream of the gene cluster. One of these sites, HS-40, has been shown previously to be the major regulator of tissue-specific alpha-globin gene expression. We have now examined the function of other hypersensitive sites by studying the expression in mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells of various fragments containing these sites attached to HS-40 and an alpha-globin gene. High level expression of the alpha gene was observed in all cases. When clones of MEL cells bearing a single copy of the alpha-globin gene fragments were examined, expression levels were similar to those of the endogenous mouse alpha genes and similar to MEL cells bearing beta gene constructs under the control of the beta-globin locus control region. However, there was no evidence that the additional hypersensitive sites increased the level of expression or conferred copy number dependence on the expression of a linked alpha gene in MEL cells. PMID:7689876

  9. Induction of renal cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid epoxygenase activity by dietary gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhigang; Ng, Valerie Y; Su, Ping; Engler, Marguerite M; Engler, Mary B; Huang, Yong; Lin, Emil; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2006-05-01

    Dietary gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid found in borage oil (BOR), lowers systolic blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). GLA is converted into arachidonic acid (AA) by elongation and desaturation steps. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) are cytochrome P450 (P450)-derived AA eicosanoids with important roles in regulating blood pressure. This study tested the hypothesis that the blood pressure-lowering effect of a GLA-enriched diet involves alteration of P450-catalyzed AA metabolism. Microsomes and RNA were isolated from the renal cortex of male SHRs fed a basal fat-free diet for 5 weeks to which 11% by weight of sesame oil (SES) or BOR was added. There was a 2.6- to 3.5-fold increase in P450 epoxygenase activity in renal microsomes isolated from the BOR-fed SHRs compared with the SES-fed rats. Epoxygenase activity accounted for 58% of the total AA metabolism in the BOR-treated kidney microsomes compared with 33% in the SES-treated rats. More importantly, renal 14,15- and 8,9-EET levels increased 1.6- to 2.5-fold after dietary BOR treatment. The increase in EET formation is consistent with increases in CYP2C23, CYP2C11, and CYP2J protein levels. There were no differences in the level of renal P450 epoxygenase mRNA between the SES- and BOR-treated rats. Enhanced synthesis of the vasodilatory EETs and decreased formation of the vasoconstrictive 20-HETE suggests that changes in P450-mediated AA metabolism may contribute, at least in part, to the blood pressure-lowering effect of a BOR-enriched diet. PMID:16421287

  10. Anaerobic decomposition of benzoic acid during methane fermentation: Specific activity of fatty acid intermediates and postion of radioactive label

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the pathway of anaerobic decomposition of benzoic acid by a mixed methanogenic culture of bacteria was conducted. Specific activities of the possible fatty acid intermediates cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, propanoic acid, and acetic acid were determined. In the case of propanoic acid, the position of the radioactive label was also determined by isotropic trapping and Phares-Schmidt degradation of the intermediate. The specific activities of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid and propanoic acid are the same as the benzoate substrate fed to the mixed methanogenic cultures. These fatty acids must be direct breakdown products from the aromatic ring. When (4{minus}{sup 14}C) benzoate is the substrate, the propanoic acid produced is labeled exclusively in the carboxyl position. This supports the pathway proposed by Keith et al. (1978), but would be unlikely for the pathway proposed by Evans (1977). The specific activity of the acetic acid isolated from a culture fed (4{minus}{sup 14}C) benzoate is 42% of the specific activity of the substrate. This is possible only if the methylmalonyl-CoA pathway for the conversion of propanoate to acetate is not being utilized. The amount of various intermediates found indicates that at least three syntrophically linked organisms are present in the mixed methanogenic culture. One is responsible for the production of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, one for the production of acetate from propanoate, and one for the production of methane.

  11. Influence of ethylenediamine-n,n’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) concentration on the bactericidal activity of fatty acids in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antibacterial activity of mixtures of ethylenediamine-N,N’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) and antibacterial fatty acids (FA) was examined using the agar diffusion assay. Solutions of caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids dissolved in potassium hydroxide (KOH) were supplemented with 0, 5, or 10 mM ...

  12. Antimicrobial activity and stability of weakly acidified chlorous acid water.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Isanori; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Tamiko; Imaohji, Haruyuki; Murakami, Kazuya; Kino, Yasuhiro; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime; Fujita, Yatsuka; Goda, Hisataka; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of weakly acidified chlorous acid water (WACAW) against Staphylococcus aureus, non-pathogenic Escherichia coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC O157:H7), Candida albicans, and spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus species was evaluated in vitro. The antiviral activity was also examined using feline calicivirus (FCV). Diluted WACAW (>100 ppm) effectively reduced the number of non-spore-forming bacteria (>4 log10 CFU reductions) within 5 min. Treatment with this sanitizer at 400 ppm for 30 min achieved>5 log10 CFU reductions in spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus species while an equivalent concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) resulted in only a 0.98 and 2.72 log10 CFU reduction, respectively. The effect of this sanitizer against FCV was equivalent to that of NaClO. Immersion in WACAW (400 ppm) achieved >4 and 2.26 log10 CFU reductions in Campylobacter jejuni and EHEC, respectively, on artificially contaminated broiler carcass pieces. Finally, theantimicrobial activity of this sanitizer was shown to be maintained for at least 28 d when in contact with nonwoven fabric (100% cotton). This study showed that pH control of chlorous acid is expected to modify its antimicrobial activity and stability. WACAW is expected to have applications in various settings such as the food processing and healthcare industries. PMID:25817812

  13. Deciphering molecular mechanism underlying hypolipidemic activity of echinocystic Acid.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Lai, Peng; Du, Jun-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that a triterpene mixture, consisting of echinocystic acid (EA) and oleanolic acid (OA) at a ratio of 4 : 1, dose-dependently ameliorated the hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat/high cholesterol diets. This study was aimed at exploring the mechanisms underlying antihyperlipidemic effect of EA. Molecular docking simulation of EA was performed using Molegro Virtual Docker (version: 4.3.0) to investigate the potential targets related to lipid metabolism. Based on the molecular docking information, isotope labeling method or spectrophotometry was applied to examine the effect of EA on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) in rat liver microsomes. Our results revealed a strong affinity of EA towards ACAT and DGAT in molecular docking analysis, while low binding affinity existed between EA and HMG-CoA reductase as well as between EA and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Consistent with the results of molecular docking, in vitro enzyme activity assays showed that EA inhibited ACAT and DGAT, with IC50 values of 103 and 139  μ M, respectively, and exhibited no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. The present findings suggest that EA may exert hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting the activity of ACAT and DGAT. PMID:24669228

  14. Evaluation of the ecological state of the Sea of Japan and the Sea of Okhotsk using the DNase test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzorova, N. I.; Rasskazov, V. A.

    2009-12-01

    A study of the state of the Russian coastal marine ecosystems of the Sea of Japan (the Tumen River mouth) and the Sea of Okhotsk (the eastern shelf of Sakhalin Island and the Sakhalin Gulf) and Kraternya Bight (Yankich Island, Kuril Islands) was carried out during the 29th expedition of the R/V Akademik Oparin. A highly sensitive express analysis using the DNase of the Strongylocentrotus intermedius sea urchin was utilized in order to evaluate the quality of the natural marine water of the areas experiencing different degrees of anthropogenic impact. The marine water quality was evaluated according to the degree of the DNase inhibition in the samples. The presence of ecological stress was shown at the aforementioned sites excluding Kraternya Bight. The method allows the fast (1 hour) analysis of the pollution of marine areas and, coupled with data on the hydrological, hydrochemical, and microbiological studies of water samples, provides the possibility to make an ecological forecast.

  15. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C–50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO4−• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO4−•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF2-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn−1F2n−1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  16. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C-50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO₄(-)• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO₄(-)•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF₂-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn-1F2n-1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  17. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C-50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO₄(-)• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO₄(-)•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF₂-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn-1F2n-1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs.

  18. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R

    2016-02-04

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression.

  19. Antiradical activity of gallic acid included in lipid interphases.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, C L; Frías, M A; Cutro, A C; Nazareno, M A; Disalvo, E A

    2014-10-01

    Polyphenols are well known as antioxidant agents and by their effects on the hydration layers of lipid interphases. Among them, gallic acid and its derivatives are able to decrease the dipole potential and to act in water as a strong antioxidant. In this work we have studied both effects on lipid interphases in monolayers and bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. The results show that gallic acid (GA) increases the negative surface charges of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and decreases the dipole potential of the lipid interphase. As a result, positively charged radical species such as ABTS(+) are able to penetrate the membrane forming an association with GA. These results allow discussing the antiradical activity (ARA) of GA at the membrane phase which may be taking place in water spaces between the lipids.

  20. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease. PMID:27336156

  1. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  2. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus: DNase and Mannitol salt agar improve the efficiency of the tube coagulase test

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ideal identification of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates requires a battery of tests and this is costly in resource limited settings. In many developing countries, the tube coagulase test is usually confirmatory for S. aureus and is routinely done using either human or sheep plasma. This study evaluated Mannitol salt agar and the deoxyribonuclease (DNase) test for improving the efficiency of the tube coagulase test in resource limited settings. The efficiency of human and sheep plasma with tube coagulase tests was also evaluated. Methods One hundred and eighty Gram positive, Catalase positive cocci occurring in pairs, short chains or clusters were subjected to growth on Mannitol salt agar, deoxyribonuclease and tube coagulase tests. Of these, isolates that were positive for at least two of the three tests (n = 60) were used to evaluate the performance of the tube coagulase test for identification of S. aureus, using PCR-amplification of the nuc gene as a gold standard. Results Human plasma was more sensitive than sheep plasma for the tube coagulase test (sensitivity of 91% vs. 81% respectively), but both plasmas had very low specificity (11% and 7% respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of the tube coagulase test (human plasma) was markedly improved when Mannitol salt agar and DNase were introduced as a tri-combination test for routine identification of Staphylococcus aureus (100% specificity and 75% sensitivity). The specificity and sensitivity of Mannitol salt agar/DNase/tube coagulase (sheep plasma) combination was 100% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion The efficiency of the tube coagulase test can be markedly improved by sequel testing of the isolates with Mannitol salt agar, DNase and Tube coagulase. There is no single phenotypic test (including tube coagulase) that can guarantee reliable results in the identification of Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:20707914

  3. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-01-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease. PMID:27336156

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of Oleanolic and Ursolic Acids: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Jéssica A.; Lago, João Henrique G.; Laurenti, Márcia D.; Yamamoto, Eduardo S.; Passero, Luiz Felipe D.

    2015-01-01

    Triterpenoids are the most representative group of phytochemicals, as they comprise more than 20,000 recognized molecules. These compounds are biosynthesized in plants via squalene cyclization, a C30 hydrocarbon that is considered to be the precursor of all steroids. Due to their low hydrophilicity, triterpenes were considered to be inactive for a long period of time; however, evidence regarding their wide range of pharmacological activities is emerging, and elegant studies have highlighted these activities. Several triterpenic skeletons have been described, including some that have presented with pentacyclic features, such as oleanolic and ursolic acids. These compounds have displayed incontestable biological activity, such as antibacterial, antiviral, and antiprotozoal effects, which were not included in a single review until now. Thus, the present review investigates the potential use of these triterpenes against human pathogens, including their mechanisms of action, via in vivo studies, and the future perspectives about the use of compounds for human or even animal health are also discussed. PMID:25793002

  5. Synthesis and antiplasmodial activity of betulinic acid and ursolic acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Innocente, Adrine M; Silva, Gloria N S; Cruz, Laura Nogueira; Moraes, Miriam S; Nakabashi, Myna; Sonnet, Pascal; Gosmann, Grace; Garcia, Célia R S; Gnoatto, Simone C B

    2012-10-12

    More than 40% of the World population is at risk of contracting malaria, which affects primarily poor populations in tropical and subtropical areas. Antimalarial pharmacotherapy has utilised plant-derived products such as quinine and artemisinin as well as their derivatives. However, worldwide use of these antimalarials has caused the spread of resistant parasites, resulting in increased malaria morbidity and mortality. Considering that the literature has demonstrated the antimalarial potential of triterpenes, specially betulinic acid (1) and ursolic acid (2), this study investigated the antimalarial activity against P. falciparum chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strain of some new derivatives of 1 and 2 with modifications at C-3 and C-28. The antiplasmodial study employed flow cytometry and spectrofluorimetric analyses using YOYO-1, dihydroethidium and Fluo4/AM for staining. Among the six analogues obtained, compounds 1c and 2c showed excellent activity (IC₅₀ = 220 and 175 nM, respectively) while 1a and b demonstrated good activity (IC₅₀ = 4 and 5 μM, respectively). After cytotoxicity evaluation against HEK293T cells, 1a was not toxic, while 1c and 2c showed IC₅₀ of 4 μM and a selectivity index (SI) value of 18 and 23, respectively. Moreover, compound 2c, which presents the best antiplasmodial activity, is involved in the calcium-regulated pathway(s).

  6. Fate of retinoic acid-activated embryonic cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Dollé, Pascal; Fraulob, Valérie; Gallego-Llamas, Jabier; Vermot, Julien; Niederreither, Karen

    2010-12-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a vitamin A derivative, is synthesized by specific cell populations and acts as a diffusible embryonic signal activating ligand-inducible transcription factors, the RA receptors (RARs). RA-activatable transgenic systems have revealed many discrete, transient sites of RA action during development. However, there has been no attempt to permanently label the RA-activated cell lineages during mouse ontogenesis. We describe the characterization of a RA-activatable Cre transgene, which through crosses with a conditional reporter strain (the ROSA26R lacZ reporter), leads to a stable labeling of the cell populations experiencing RA signaling during embryogenesis. RA response-element (RARE)-driven Cre activity mimics at early stages the known activity of the corresponding RARE-lacZ transgene (Rossant et al.,1991). Stable labeling of the Cre-excised cell populations allows to trace the distribution of the RA-activated cell lineages at later stages. These are described in relationship with current models of RA activity in various developmental systems, including the embryonic caudal region, limb buds, hindbrain, sensory organs, and heart. PMID:21046629

  7. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF.

  8. Synthesis and biological activity of novel deoxycholic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Popadyuk, Irina I; Markov, Andrey V; Salomatina, Oksana V; Logashenko, Evgeniya B; Shernyukov, Andrey V; Zenkova, Marina A; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis and biological activity of new semi-synthetic derivatives of naturally occurring deoxycholic acid (DCA) bearing 2-cyano-3-oxo-1-ene, 3-oxo-1(2)-ene or 3-oxo-4(5)-ene moieties in ring A and 12-oxo or 12-oxo-9(11)-ene moieties in ring C. Bioassays using murine macrophage-like cells and tumour cells show that the presence of the 9(11)-double bond associated with the increased polarity of ring A or with isoxazole ring joined to ring A, improves the ability of the compounds to inhibit cancer cell growth. PMID:26037611

  9. Synthesis and biological activity of novel deoxycholic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Popadyuk, Irina I; Markov, Andrey V; Salomatina, Oksana V; Logashenko, Evgeniya B; Shernyukov, Andrey V; Zenkova, Marina A; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis and biological activity of new semi-synthetic derivatives of naturally occurring deoxycholic acid (DCA) bearing 2-cyano-3-oxo-1-ene, 3-oxo-1(2)-ene or 3-oxo-4(5)-ene moieties in ring A and 12-oxo or 12-oxo-9(11)-ene moieties in ring C. Bioassays using murine macrophage-like cells and tumour cells show that the presence of the 9(11)-double bond associated with the increased polarity of ring A or with isoxazole ring joined to ring A, improves the ability of the compounds to inhibit cancer cell growth.

  10. Kinetics of salicylic acid adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Polakovic, Milan; Gorner, Tatiana; Villiéras, Frédéric; de Donato, Philippe; Bersillon, Jean Luc

    2005-03-29

    The adsorption and desorption of salicylic acid from water solutions was investigated in HPLC microcolumns packed with activated carbon. The adsorption isotherm was obtained by the step-up frontal analysis method in a concentration range of 0-400 mg/L and was well fitted with the Langmuir equation. The investigation of rate aspects of salicylic acid adsorption was based on adsorption/desorption column experiments where different inlet concentrations of salicylic acid were applied in the adsorption phase and desorption was conducted with pure water. The concentration profiles of individual adsorption/desorption cycles data were fitted using several single-parameter models of the fixed-bed adsorption to assess the influence of different phenomena on the column behavior. It was found that the effects of axial dispersion and extraparticle mass transfer were negligible. A rate-determining factor of fixed-bed column dynamics was the kinetics of pore surface adsorption. A bimodal kinetic model reflecting the heterogeneous character of adsorbent pores was verified by a simultaneous fit of the column outlet concentration in four adsorption/desorption cycles. The fitted parameters were the fraction of mesopores and the adsorption rate constants in micropores and mesopores, respectively. It was shown that the former rate constant was an intrinsic one whereas the latter one was an apparent value due to the effects of pore blocking and diffusional hindrances in the micropores. PMID:15779975

  11. Activity of capryloyl collagenic acid against bacteria involved in acne.

    PubMed

    Fourniat, J; Bourlioux, P

    1989-12-01

    Synopsis Capryloyl collagenic acid (Lipacide C8Co) has similar bacteriostatic activity in vitro to that of benzoyl peroxide towards the bacteria found in acne lesions (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes) (MIC between 1 and 4 mg ml(-1) for C8Co, and between 0.5 and 5 mg ml(-1) for benzoyl peroxide). The presence of Emulgine M8 did not affect the bacteriostatic activity of C8Co. A 4% w/v solution of C8Co (incorporating Emulgine M8) fulfilled the criteria for an antiseptic preparation as laid down by the French Pharmacopoeia (10th Edition), and had a spectrum 5 bactericidal activity according to the French Standard AFNOR NF T 72-151. The excellent cutaneous tolerance of capryloyl collagenic acid would indicate that an aqueous solution might be of value for topical treatment of the bacterial component of acne. Résumé Activité antibactérienne de l'acide capryloyl-collagénique vis à vis des bactéries impliquées dans l'etiologie de l'acné L'acide capryloyl-collagénique (Lipacide C8Co) et le peroxyde de benzoyle présentent une activité bactériostatique in-vitroéquivalente vis à vis des espèces bactériennes retrouvées au niveau des lésions acnéiques (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis et Propionibacterium acnes) (CMI comprise entre 1 et 4 mg ml(-1) pour le lipoaminoacide, et 0,5 et 5 mg ml(-1) pour le peroxyde de benzoyle). La mise en solution aqueuse de l'acide capryloyl-collagénique en présence d'Emulgine M8 ne modifie pas son activité bactériostatique. Une telle solution, à 4% m/V d'acide capryloyl-collagénique et 5% m/V d'Emulgine M8, satisfait à l'essai d'activité des préparations antiseptiques décrit à la Pharmacopée Française (Xème Ed.) (concentration minimale antiseptique: 10% v/V, pour un temps de contact de 5 min à 32 degrees C entre les germes tests et la solution diluée en eau distillée), et posséde une activité bactéricide antiseptique spectre 5 conforme à la norme AFNOR NF T

  12. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S; Testerink, C; Wang, M

    2000-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C), calcium, potassium, pH and a transient activation of MAP kinase. The ABA signal transduction cascades have been shown to be tissue-specific, the transient activation of MAP kinase has until now only been found in barley aleurone cells. However, type 2C phosphatases are involved in the induction of most ABA responses, as shown by the PP2C-deficient abi-mutants. These phosphatases show high homology with phosphatases that regulate MAP kinase activity in yeast. In addition, the role of farnesyl transferase as a negative regulator of ABA responses also indicates towards involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction. Farnesyl transferase is known to regulate Ras proteins, Ras proteins in turn are known to regulate MAP kinase activation. Interestingly, Ras-like proteins were detected in barley aleurone cells. Further establishment of the involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction and its role therein, still awaits more study.

  14. Amino acid residues modulating the activities of staphylococcal glutamyl endopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Ono, Toshio; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Shimoyama, Yu; Okawara, Hisami; Kobayakawa, Takeshi; Baba, Tomomi T; Kimura, Shigenobu; Nemoto, Takayuki K

    2010-10-01

    The glutamyl endopeptidase family of enzymes from staphylococci has been shown to be important virulence determinants of pathogenic family members, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Previous studies have identified the N-terminus and residues from positions 185-195 as potentially important regions that determine the activity of three members of the family. Cloning and sequencing of the new family members from Staphylococcus caprae (GluScpr) and Staphylococcus cohnii (GluScoh) revealed that the N-terminal Val residue is maintained in all family members. Mutants of the GluV8 enzyme from S. aureus with altered N-terminal residues, including amino acids with similar properties, were inactive, indicating that the Val residue is specifically required at the N-terminus of this enzyme family in order for them to function correctly. Recombinant GluScpr was found to have peptidase activity intermediate between GluV8 and GluSE from Staphylococcus epidermis and to be somewhat less specific in its substrate requirements than other family members. The 185-195 region was found to contribute to the activity of GluScpr, although other regions of the enzyme must also play a role in defining the activity. Our results strongly indicate the importance of the N-terminal and the 185-195 region in the activity of the glutamyl endopeptidases of staphylococci. PMID:20707600

  15. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of glutamic acid-based dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Silveira-Dorta, Gastón; Martín, Víctor S; Padrón, José M

    2015-08-01

    A small and focused library of 22 dipeptides derived from N,N-dibenzylglutamic acid α- and γ-benzyl esters was prepared in a straightforward manner. The evaluation of the antiproliferative activity in the human solid tumor cell lines HBL-100 (breast), HeLa (cervix), SW1573 (non-small cell lung), T-47D (breast), and WiDr (colon) provided γ-glutamyl methionine (GI50 = 6.0-41 μM) and α-glutamyl proline (GI50 = 7.5-18 μM) as lead compounds. In particular, glutamyl serine and glutamyl proline dipeptides were more active in the resistant cancer cell line WiDr than the conventional anticancer drugs cisplatin and etoposide. Glutamyl tryptophan dipeptides did not affect cell growth of HBL-100, while in T-47D cells, proliferation was inhibited. This result might be attributed to the inhibition of the ATB(0,+) transporter.

  16. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of glutamic acid-based dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Silveira-Dorta, Gastón; Martín, Víctor S; Padrón, José M

    2015-08-01

    A small and focused library of 22 dipeptides derived from N,N-dibenzylglutamic acid α- and γ-benzyl esters was prepared in a straightforward manner. The evaluation of the antiproliferative activity in the human solid tumor cell lines HBL-100 (breast), HeLa (cervix), SW1573 (non-small cell lung), T-47D (breast), and WiDr (colon) provided γ-glutamyl methionine (GI50 = 6.0-41 μM) and α-glutamyl proline (GI50 = 7.5-18 μM) as lead compounds. In particular, glutamyl serine and glutamyl proline dipeptides were more active in the resistant cancer cell line WiDr than the conventional anticancer drugs cisplatin and etoposide. Glutamyl tryptophan dipeptides did not affect cell growth of HBL-100, while in T-47D cells, proliferation was inhibited. This result might be attributed to the inhibition of the ATB(0,+) transporter. PMID:25900811

  17. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  18. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying; Naleway, John Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson's Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  19. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids exhibit antimicrobial activity for oral microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chifu B.; Altimova, Yelena; Myers, Taylor M.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the antibacterial activity of short-, medium-, and long-chain fatty acids against various oral microorganisms. Methods The short-chain fatty acids [formic acid (C1), acetic acid (C2), propionic acid (C3), butyric acid (C4), isobutyric acid (C4), isovaleric acid (C5), hexanoic acid (C6)], medium-chain fatty acids [octanoic acid (C8), capric acid (C10), lauric acid (12)], and long-chain fatty acids [myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16)], were investigated for antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, S. gordonii, S. sanguis, Candida albicans, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Results The data demonstrated that the fatty acids exhibited patterns of inhibition against oral bacteria with some specificity that appeared related more to the bacterial species that the general structural characteristics of the microorganism. As a group the fatty acids were much less effective against C. albicans than the oral bacteria, with effectiveness limited to hexanoic, octanoic, and lauric acids. Formic acid, capric, and lauric acids were broadly inhibitory for the bacteria. Interestingly, fatty acids that are produced at metabolic end-products by a number of these bacteria, were specifically inactive against the producing species, while substantially inhibiting the growth of other oral microorganisms. Conclusions The results indicate that the antimicrobial activity of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs), long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) could influence the microbial ecology in the oral cavity via at least 2 potential pathways. First, the agents delivered exogenously as therapeutic adjuncts could be packaged to enhance a microbial-regulatory environment in the subgingival sulcus. Second, it would be the intrinsic nature of these fatty acid inhibitors in contributing to the characteristics of the microbial biofilms, their evolution, and emergence of

  20. Activated carbon passes tests for acid-gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-06-24

    Use of activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid-gas feed to Claus sulfur-recovery units has been successfully pilot tested in Saudi Arabia. Pilot plant results are discussed here along with issues involved in scale-up to commercial size. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}+s from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated by use of low-pressure steam. A post-regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. The paper discusses feed contaminants, vapor-phase cleanup, testing design, test parameters and results, bed drying after regeneration, regeneration conditions, basic flow, system control, and full-scale installation.

  1. [Inhibition of glutamine synthetase activity by biologically active derivatives of glutamic acid].

    PubMed

    Firsova, N A; Selivanova, K M; Alekseeva, L V; Evstigneeva, Z G

    1986-05-01

    The inhibition of activity of glutamine synthetase from Chlorella and porcine brain by 4-hydroxy-D-4-fluoro-D,L- and 4-amino-D,L-glutamic acids diastereoisomers was studied. Each compound was shown to exert the same inhibiting effect on glutamine synthetase from both sources. In case of threo-4-hydroxy-D-glutamic acid the inhibition of the Chlorella enzyme was of a competitive and of a completely mixed type. The enzyme inhibition by 4-fluoro-D, L-glutamic acids seemed to be of a completely non-competitive type. The Ki values for all inhibition reactions were determined. A comparison of biochemical parameters and biological activity revealed that the most effective inhibitors of the enzyme exert a most potent antitumour and antiviral action.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activity of dihydroasparagusic acid in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Salemme, Adele; Togna, Anna Rita; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Cammisotto, Vittoria; Ottaviani, Monica; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Venditti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The activation of microglia and subsequent release of toxic pro-inflammatory factors are crucially associated with neurodegenerative disease, characterized by increased oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and multiple sclerosis. Dihydroasparagusic acid is the reduced form of asparagusic acid, a sulfur-containing flavor component produced by Asparagus plants. It has two thiolic functions able to coordinate the metal ions, and a carboxylic moiety, a polar function, which may enhance excretion of the complexes. Thiol functions are also present in several biomolecules with important physiological antioxidant role as glutathione. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential effect of dihydroasparagusic acid on microglial activation in an in vitro model of neuroinflammation. We have used lipopolysaccharide to induce an inflammatory response in primary rat microglial cultures. Our results suggest that dihydroasparagusic acid significantly prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced production of pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators such as nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, prostaglandin E2, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression and lipoxygenase activity in microglia cells. Moreover it effectively suppressed the level of reactive oxygen species and affected lipopolysaccharide-stimulated activation of mitogen activated protein kinase, including p38, and nuclear factor-kB pathway. These results suggest that dihydroasparagusic acid's neuroprotective properties may be due to its ability to dampen induction of microglial activation. It is a compound that can effectively inhibit inflammatory and oxidative processes that are important factors of the etiopathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26592472

  3. Sorption of perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluoroheptanoic acid on granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Luo, Qi; Gao, Bin; Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Woodward, David; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    The sorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) on granular activated carbon (GAC) was characterized and compared to explore the underlying mechanisms. Sorption of the three perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) on GAC appeared to be a rapid intra-particle diffusion process, which were well represented by the pseudo-second-order rate model with the sorption rate following the order PFOS > PFOA > PFHpA. Sorption isotherm data were well fitted by the Freundlich model with the sorption capacity (Kf) of PFOS, PFOA and PFHpA being 4.45, 2.42 and 1.66 respectively. This suggests that the hydrophilic head group on PFAAs, i.e. sulfonate vs carboxylic, has a strong influence on their sorption. Comparison between PFOA and PFHpA revealed that hydrophobicity could also play a role in the sorption of PFAAs on GAC when the fluorocarbon chain length is different. Analyses using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR)-Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested possible formation of a negative charge-assisted H-bond between PFAAs and the functionalities on GAC surfaces, including non-aromatic ketones, sulfides, and halogenated hydrocarbons. PMID:26606188

  4. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  5. The antimicrobial activity of extracts of the lichen Cladonia foliacea and its (-)-usnic acid, atranorin, and fumarprotocetraric acid constituents.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Meral; Türk, Ayşen Ozdemir; Tay, Turgay; Kivanç, Merih

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the chloroform, diethyl ether, acetone, petroleum ether, and ethanol extracts of the lichen Cladonia foliacea and its (-)-usnic acid, atranorin, and fumarprotocetraric acid constituents against 9 bacteria and fungi has been investigated. The extracts and pure compounds alone were found active against the same bacteria and the same yeasts. Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Proteus vulgaris, Listeria monocytogenes, Aeromonas hydrophila, Candida albicans, and Candida glabrata growth were inhibited. In addition, the MICs of the extracts, (-)-usnic acid, atranorin and fumarprotocetraric acid were determined. PMID:15241936

  6. An acidic sphingomyelinase Type C activity from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garza, Jorge; González-Salazar, Francisco; Quinn, Frederick D; Karls, Russell K; De La Garza-Salinas, Laura Hermila; Guzmán-de la Garza, Francisco J; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomyelinases (SMases) catalyze the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphorylcholine. Sphingolipids are recognized as diverse and dynamic regulators of a multitude of cellular processes mediating cell cycle control, differentiation, stress response, cell migration, adhesion, and apoptosis. Bacterial SMases are virulence factors for several species of pathogens. Whole cell extracts of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains H37Rv and CDC1551 were assayed using [N-methyl-(14)C]-sphingomyelin as substrate. Acidic Zn(2+)-dependent SMase activity was identified in both strains. Peak SMase activity was observed at pH 5.5. Interestingly, overall SMase activity levels from CDC1551 extracts are approximately 1/3 of those of H37Rv. The presence of exogenous SMase produced by M. tuberculosis during infection may interfere with the normal host inflammatory response thus allowing the establishment of infection and disease development. This Type C activity is different from previously identified M. tuberculosis SMases. Defining the biochemical characteristics of M. tuberculosis SMases helps to elucidate the roles that these enzymes play during infection and disease. PMID:26948102

  7. An acidic sphingomyelinase Type C activity from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garza, Jorge; González-Salazar, Francisco; Quinn, Frederick D; Karls, Russell K; De La Garza-Salinas, Laura Hermila; Guzmán-de la Garza, Francisco J; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomyelinases (SMases) catalyze the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphorylcholine. Sphingolipids are recognized as diverse and dynamic regulators of a multitude of cellular processes mediating cell cycle control, differentiation, stress response, cell migration, adhesion, and apoptosis. Bacterial SMases are virulence factors for several species of pathogens. Whole cell extracts of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains H37Rv and CDC1551 were assayed using [N-methyl-(14)C]-sphingomyelin as substrate. Acidic Zn(2+)-dependent SMase activity was identified in both strains. Peak SMase activity was observed at pH 5.5. Interestingly, overall SMase activity levels from CDC1551 extracts are approximately 1/3 of those of H37Rv. The presence of exogenous SMase produced by M. tuberculosis during infection may interfere with the normal host inflammatory response thus allowing the establishment of infection and disease development. This Type C activity is different from previously identified M. tuberculosis SMases. Defining the biochemical characteristics of M. tuberculosis SMases helps to elucidate the roles that these enzymes play during infection and disease.

  8. Pillared clays and pillared acid-activated clays: A comparative study of physical, acidic, and catalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mokaya, R.; Jones, W.

    1995-04-15

    The preparation, characterisation, and catalytic properties of alumina-pillared materials derived from an acid-treated host clay matrix is described. Various levels of acid treatment are studied in order to ascertain the level of acid treatment which yields pillared materials with the most suitable physicochemical properties and thermal stability. The pillared acid-activated clays prepared possess basal spacing (19.3 {angstrom} after thermal treatment at 500{degrees}C) and surface areas (315-374 m{sup 2}/g) comparable to conventional pillared clays but significantly higher pore volume (0.33-0.48 cm{sup 3}/g), average pore diameter and surface acidity. The improvement in acidity is mainly of the Broensted acid type. As a result of improved acidity, the pillared acid-activated clays are better catalysts compared to conventional pillared clays and they exhibit activity indicative of the presence of strong Broensted acid sites in the temperature range 250-400{degrees}C. 36 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Influence of different forms of acidities on soil microbiological properties and enzyme activities at an acid mine drainage contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Prafulla Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Tripathy, Subhasish; Equeenuddin, Sk Md; Panigrahi, M K

    2010-07-15

    Assessment of microbial parameters, viz. microbial biomass, fluorescence diacetate, microbial respiration, acid phosphatase, beta-glucosidase and urease with respect to acidity helps in evaluating the quality of soils. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different forms of acidities on soil microbial parameters in an acid mine drainage contaminated site around coal deposits in Jainta Hills of India. Total potential and exchangeable acidity, extractable and exchangeable aluminium were significantly higher in contaminated soil compared to the baseline (p<0.01). Different forms of acidity were significantly and positively correlated with each other (p<0.05). Further, all microbial properties were positively and significantly correlated with organic carbon and clay (p<0.05). The ratios of microbial parameters with organic carbon were negatively correlated with different forms of acidity. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses showed that the microbial activities are not directly influenced by the total potential acidity and extractable aluminium. Though acid mine drainage affected soils had higher microbial biomass and activities due to higher organic matter content than those of the baseline soils, the ratios of microbial parameters/organic carbon indicated suppression of microbial growth and activities due to acidity stress. PMID:20417031

  10. A novel nucleic acid analogue shows strong angiogenic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Sakakibara, Norikazu; Maruyama, Tokumi; Igarashi, Junsuke; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Kubota, Yasuo; Tokuda, Masaaki; Ashino, Hiromi; Hattori, Kenichi; Tanaka, Shinji; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Konishi, Ryoji

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} A novel nucleic acid analogue (2Cl-C.OXT-A, m.w. 284) showed angiogenic potency. {yields} It stimulated the tube formation, proliferation and migration of HUVEC in vitro. {yields} 2Cl-C.OXT-A induced the activation of ERK1/2 and MEK in HUVEC. {yields} Angiogenic potency in vivo was confirmed in CAM assay and rabbit cornea assay. {yields} A synthesized small angiogenic agent would have great clinical therapeutic value. -- Abstract: A novel nucleic acid analogue (2Cl-C.OXT-A) significantly stimulated tube formation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Its maximum potency at 100 {mu}M was stronger than that of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a positive control. At this concentration, 2Cl-C.OXT-A moderately stimulated proliferation as well as migration of HUVEC. To gain mechanistic insights how 2Cl-C.OXT-A promotes angiogenic responses in HUVEC, we performed immunoblot analyses using phospho-specific antibodies as probes. 2Cl-C.OXT-A induced robust phosphorylation/activation of MAP kinase ERK1/2 and an upstream MAP kinase kinase MEK. Conversely, a MEK inhibitor PD98059 abolished ERK1/2 activation and tube formation both enhanced by 2Cl-C.OXT-A. In contrast, MAP kinase responses elicited by 2Cl-C.OXT-A were not inhibited by SU5416, a specific inhibitor of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase. Collectively these results suggest that 2Cl-C.OXT-A-induces angiogenic responses in HUVEC mediated by a MAP kinase cascade comprising MEK and ERK1/2, but independently of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase. In vivo assay using chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and rabbit cornea also suggested the angiogenic potency of 2Cl-C.OXT-A.

  11. Changes in Dehydrodiferulic Acids and Peroxidase Activity against Ferulic Acid Associated with Cell Walls during Growth of Pinus pinaster Hypocotyl.

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, M.; Pena, M. J.; Revilla, G.; Zarra, I.

    1996-01-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids associated with hypocotyl cell walls of dark-grown seedlings of Pinus pinaster Aiton were extracted with 1 N NaOH and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main hydroxycinnamic acid found was ferulic acid. Diferulic acid dehydrodimers were also found, with the 8,8-coupled isomer (compound 11) being the dehydrodiferulate present in the highest amount. However, the 5,5-coupled isomer, commonly referred to referred to as diferulic acid, was not detected. Two truxillic acids, 4-4[prime]-dihydroxy-3-3[prime]-dimethoxy-[alpha]-truxillic acids I and II, were tentatively identified. The 8,8-coupled dehydrodiferulic acid (compound 11) was the phenolic acid that showed the most conspicuous changes with hypocotyl age as well as along the hypocotyl axis. Peroxidase activity against ferulic acid was found in the apoplastic fluid as well as being ionically and covalently bound to the cell walls. The peroxidase activity increased with hypocotyl age as well as from the subapical toward the basal region of the hypocotyls. A key role in the cell-wall stiffening of 8,8 but not 5,5 dimerization of ferulic acid catalyzed by cell-wall peroxidases is proposed. PMID:12226339

  12. Anti-Thrombosis Activity of Sinapic Acid Isolated from the Lees of Bokbunja Wine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Shin, Woo-Chang; Kang, Dong-Kyoon; Sohn, Ho-Yong

    2016-01-01

    From the lees of bokbunja wine (LBW) made from Rubus coreanus Miquel, we have identified six compounds (1: trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid; 2: trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid; 3: 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid; 4: 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid; 5: 3,5-dimethoxy-4- hydroxybenzoic acid; and 6: 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (sinapic acid)) through silica gel chromatography and UHPLC-MS. The compounds 1-6 showed strong anticoagulation and platelet aggregation inhibitory activities without hemolytic effect against human red blood cells. To date, this is the first report of the in vitro anti-thrombosis activity of sinapic acid. Our results suggest that different cinnamic and benzoic acid derivatives are closely linked to the anti-thrombosis activity of LBW, and sinapic acid could be developed as a promising anti-thrombosis agent. PMID:26387815

  13. Metabolically active eukaryotic communities in extremely acidic mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Baker, Brett J; Lutz, Michelle A; Dawson, Scott C; Bond, Philip L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2004-10-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial communities contain microbial eukaryotes (both fungi and protists) that confer a biofilm structure and impact the abundance of bacteria and archaea and the community composition via grazing and other mechanisms. Since prokaryotes impact iron oxidation rates and thus regulate AMD generation rates, it is important to analyze the fungal and protistan populations. We utilized 18S rRNA and beta-tubulin gene phylogenies and fluorescent rRNA-specific probes to characterize the eukaryotic diversity and distribution in extremely acidic (pHs 0.8 to 1.38), warm (30 to 50 degrees C), metal-rich (up to 269 mM Fe(2+), 16.8 mM Zn, 8.5 mM As, and 4.1 mM Cu) AMD solutions from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, Calif. A Rhodophyta (red algae) lineage and organisms from the Vahlkampfiidae family were identified. The fungal 18S rRNA and tubulin gene sequences formed two distinct phylogenetic groups associated with the classes Dothideomycetes and Eurotiomycetes. Three fungal isolates that were closely related to the Dothideomycetes clones were obtained. We suggest the name "Acidomyces richmondensis" for these isolates. Since these ascomycete fungi were morphologically indistinguishable, rRNA-specific oligonucleotide probes were designed to target the Dothideomycetes and Eurotiomycetes via fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH analyses indicated that Eurotiomycetes are generally more abundant than Dothideomycetes in all of the seven locations studied within the Richmond Mine system. This is the first study to combine the culture-independent detection of fungi with in situ detection and a demonstration of activity in an acidic environment. The results expand our understanding of the subsurface AMD microbial community structure.

  14. Acid Rain: A Teacher's Guide. Activities for Grades 4 to 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This guide on acid rain for elementary and secondary students is divided into three study areas: (1) What Causes Acid Rain; (2) What Problems Acid Rain Has Created; (3) How You and Your Students Can Help Combat Acid Rain. Each section presents background information and a series of lessons pertaining to the section topic. Activities include…

  15. Acid Rain. Activities for Grades 4 to 12. A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, David; Bryant, Jeannette

    This teacher's guide on acid rain is divided into three study areas to explain: (1) what causes acid rain; (2) what problems acid rain has created; and (3) what teachers and students can do to help combat acid rain. Instructions for activities within the study areas include suggested grade levels, objectives, materials needed, and directions for…

  16. Benzoic acid derivatives from Piper species and their fungitoxic activity against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum.

    PubMed

    Lago, João Henrique G; Ramos, Clécio Sousa; Casanova, Diego Campos C; Morandim, Andreia de A; Bergamo, Debora Cristina B; Cavalheiro, Alberto J; Bolzani, Vanderlan da S; Furlan, Maysa; Guimarães, Elsie F; Young, Maria Claudia M; Kato, Massuo J

    2004-11-01

    Piper crassinervium, P. aduncum, P. hostmannianum, and P. gaudichaudianum contain the new benzoic acid derivatives crassinervic acid (1), aduncumene (8), hostmaniane (18), and gaudichaudianic acid (20), respectively, as major secondary metabolites. Additionally, 19 known compounds such as benzoic acids, chromenes, and flavonoids were isolated and identified. The antifungal activity of these compounds was evaluated by bioautographic TLC assay against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum.

  17. Phytanic acid and pristanic acid, branched-chain fatty acids associated with Refsum disease and other inherited peroxisomal disorders, mediate intracellular Ca2+ signaling through activation of free fatty acid receptor GPR40.

    PubMed

    Kruska, Nicol; Reiser, Georg

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of the two branched-chain fatty acids phytanic acid and pristanic acid is known to play an important role in several diseases with peroxisomal impairment, like Refsum disease, Zellweger syndrome and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency. Recent studies elucidated that the toxic activity of phytanic acid and pristanic acid is mediated by multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions, generation of reactive oxygen species and Ca2+ deregulation via the InsP3-Ca2+ signaling pathway in glial cells. However, the exact signaling mechanism through which both fatty acids mediate toxicity is still under debate. Here, we studied the ability of phytanic acid and pristanic acid to activate the free fatty acid receptor GPR40, a G-protein-coupled receptor, which was described to be involved in the Ca2+ signaling of fatty acids. We treated HEK 293 cells expressing the GPR40 receptor with phytanic acid or pristanic acid. This resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular Ca2+ level, similar to the effect seen after treatment with the synthetic GPR40 agonist GW9508. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the GPR40 activation might be due to an interaction of the carboxylate moiety of fatty acids with the receptor. Our findings indicate that the phytanic acid- and pristanic acid-mediated Ca2+ deregulation can involve the activation of GPR40. Therefore, we suppose that activation of GPR40 might be part of the signaling cascade of the toxicity of phytanic and pristanic acids.

  18. Plant plasma membrane-bound staphylococcal-like DNases as a novel class of eukaryotic nucleases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The activity of degradative nucleases responsible for genomic DNA digestion has been observed in all kingdoms of life. It is believed that the main function of DNA degradation occurring during plant programmed cell death is redistribution of nucleic acid derived products such as nitrogen, phosphorus and nucleotide bases. Plant degradative nucleases that have been studied so far belong mainly to the S1-type family and were identified in cellular compartments containing nucleic acids or in the organelles where they are stored before final application. However, the explanation of how degraded DNA components are exported from the dying cells for further reutilization remains open. Results Bioinformatic and experimental data presented in this paper indicate that two Arabidopsis staphylococcal-like nucleases, named CAN1 and CAN2, are anchored to the cell membrane via N-terminal myristoylation and palmitoylation modifications. Both proteins possess a unique hybrid structure in their catalytic domain consisting of staphylococcal nuclease-like and tRNA synthetase anticodon binding-like motifs. They are neutral, Ca2+-dependent nucleaces showing a different specificity toward the ssDNA, dsDNA and RNA substrates. A study of microarray experiments and endogenous nuclease activity revealed that expression of CAN1 gene correlates with different forms of programmed cell death, while the CAN2 gene is constitutively expressed. Conclusions In this paper we present evidence showing that two plant staphylococcal-like nucleases belong to a new, as yet unidentified class of eukaryotic nucleases, characterized by unique plasma membrane localization. The identification of this class of nucleases indicates that plant cells possess additional, so far uncharacterized, mechanisms responsible for DNA and RNA degradation. The potential functions of these nucleases in relation to their unique intracellular location are discussed. PMID:23102437

  19. Nanofiltration and granular activated carbon treatment of perfluoroalkyl acids.

    PubMed

    Appleman, Timothy D; Dickenson, Eric R V; Bellona, Christopher; Higgins, Christopher P

    2013-09-15

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are of concern because of their persistence in the environment and the potential toxicological effects on humans exposed to PFAAs through a variety of possible exposure routes, including contaminated drinking water. This study evaluated the efficacy of nanofiltration (NF) and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption in removing a suite of PFAAs from water. Virgin flat-sheet NF membranes (NF270, Dow/Filmtec) were tested at permeate fluxes of 17-75 Lm(-2)h(-1) using deionized (DI) water and artificial groundwater. The effects of membrane fouling by humic acid on PFAA rejection were also tested under constant permeate flux conditions. Both virgin and fouled NF270 membranes demonstrated >93% removal for all PFAAs under all conditions tested. GAC efficacy was tested using rapid small-scale columns packed with Calgon Filtrasorb300 (F300) carbon and DI water with and without dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM effects were also evaluated with F600 and Siemens AquaCarb1240C. The F300 GAC had <20% breakthrough of all PFAAs in DI water for up to 125,000 bed volumes (BVs). When DOM was present, >20% breakthrough of all PFAAs by 10,000 BVs was observed for all carbons.

  20. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  1. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-08-06

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated).

  2. Biological activity of phenylpropionic acid isolated from a terrestrial Streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Kolla J P; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra; Krishna, Palakodety S J

    2007-01-01

    The strain ANU 6277 was isolated from laterite soil and identified as Streptomyces sp. closely related to Streptomyces albidoflavus cluster by 16S rRNA analysis. The cultural, morphological and physiological characters of the strain were recorded. The strain exhibited resistance to chloramphenicol, penicillin and streptomycin. It had the ability to produce enzymes such as amylase and chitinase. A bioactive compound was isolated from the strain at stationary phase of culture and identified as 3-phenylpropionic acid (3-PPA) by FT-IR, EI-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral studies. It exhibited antimicrobial activity against different bacteria like Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. flourescens, Staphylococcus aureus and some fungi including Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, Candida albicans, Fusarium oxysporum, F. udum and Penicillium citrinum. The antifungal activity of 3-PPA of the strain was evaluated in in vivo and in vitro conditions against Fusarium udum causing wilt disease in pigeon pea. The compound 3-PPA is an effective antifungal agent when compared to tricyclozole (fungicide) to control wilt caused by F. udum, but it exhibited less antifungal activity than carbendazim. PMID:18062653

  3. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-sensitive antiphagocytic activity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, R S; Fulbright, R S; Eads, M E; Sawyer, W D

    1977-01-01

    Colonial types of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were examined for the presence of pilus-independent antiphagocytic activity. Type 3 and depiliated type 1 gonococci had a shearing- and protease-resistant antiphagocytic activity that was eliminated by treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and that was not present on type 4 bacteria. Incubation of EDTA-treated bacteria 37 degrees C for 90 min resulted in fas prevented by antibiotics that block the final assembly of cell wall macromolecules that depend on the C55-isoprenoid carrier for export. These include both lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan. Restoration was, however, unaffected by drugs that interfere with the synthesis of peptidoglycan, but not that of lipopolysaccharide, and by inhibitors of protein synthesis. These data suggested that gonococci have an antiphagocytic mechanism in addition to the previously described determinant (presumably pili) that was removed by blending or by treatment with proteases. Of the two antiphagocytic activities, type 1 had both, type 3 had only the EDTA-sensitive component, and type 4 had neither. PMID:404246

  4. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  5. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated). PMID:26287131

  6. Biological activity of phenylpropionic acid isolated from a terrestrial Streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Kolla J P; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra; Krishna, Palakodety S J

    2007-01-01

    The strain ANU 6277 was isolated from laterite soil and identified as Streptomyces sp. closely related to Streptomyces albidoflavus cluster by 16S rRNA analysis. The cultural, morphological and physiological characters of the strain were recorded. The strain exhibited resistance to chloramphenicol, penicillin and streptomycin. It had the ability to produce enzymes such as amylase and chitinase. A bioactive compound was isolated from the strain at stationary phase of culture and identified as 3-phenylpropionic acid (3-PPA) by FT-IR, EI-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral studies. It exhibited antimicrobial activity against different bacteria like Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. flourescens, Staphylococcus aureus and some fungi including Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, Candida albicans, Fusarium oxysporum, F. udum and Penicillium citrinum. The antifungal activity of 3-PPA of the strain was evaluated in in vivo and in vitro conditions against Fusarium udum causing wilt disease in pigeon pea. The compound 3-PPA is an effective antifungal agent when compared to tricyclozole (fungicide) to control wilt caused by F. udum, but it exhibited less antifungal activity than carbendazim.

  7. Acid-activated biochar increased sulfamethazine retention in soils.

    PubMed

    Vithanage, Meththika; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Zhang, Ming; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Lee, Sang Soo; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-02-01

    Sulfamethazine (SMZ) is an ionizable and highly mobile antibiotic which is frequently found in soil and water environments. We investigated the sorption of SMZ onto soils amended with biochars (BCs) at varying pH and contact time. Invasive plants were pyrolyzed at 700 °C and were further activated with 30 % sulfuric (SBBC) and oxalic (OBBC) acids. The sorption rate of SMZ onto SBBC and OBBC was pronouncedly pH dependent and was decreased significantly when the values of soil pH increased from 3 to 5. Modeled effective sorption coefficients (K D,eff) values indicated excellent sorption on SBBC-treated loamy sand and sandy loam soils for 229 and 183 L/kg, respectively. On the other hand, the low sorption values were determined for OBBC- and BBC700-treated loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Kinetic modeling demonstrated that the pseudo second order model was the best followed by intra-particle diffusion and the Elovich model, indicating that multiple processes govern SMZ sorption. These findings were also supported by sorption edge experiments based on BC characteristics. Chemisorption onto protonated and ligand containing functional groups of the BC surface, and diffusion in macro-, meso-, and micro-pores of the acid-activated BCs are the proposed mechanisms of SMZ retention in soils. Calculated and experimental q e (amount adsorbed per kg of the adsorbent at equilibrium) values were well fitted to the pseudo second order model, and the predicted maximum equilibrium concentration of SBBC for loamy sand soils was 182 mg/kg. Overall, SBBC represents a suitable soil amendment because of its high sorption rate of SMZ in soils.

  8. A widely used retinoic acid receptor antagonist induces peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activity.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Michael; Curtin, Joshua C; Kim, Roy J; Billin, Andrew N; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2007-05-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription factors whose activity is regulated by the binding of small lipophilic ligands, including hormones, vitamins, and metabolites. Pharmacological NR ligands serve as important therapeutic agents; for example, all-trans retinoic acid, an activating ligand for retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha), is used to treat leukemia. Another RARalpha ligand, (E)-S,S-dioxide-4-(2-(7-(heptyloxy)-3,4-dihydro-4,4-dimethyl-2H-1-benzothiopyran-6-yl)-1-propenyl)-benzoic acid (Ro 41-5253), is a potent antagonist that has been a useful and purportedly specific probe of RARalpha function. Here, we report that Ro 41-5253 also activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation and target of widely prescribed antidiabetic thiazolidinediones (TZDs). Ro 41-5253 enhanced differentiation of mouse and human preadipocytes and activated PPARgamma target genes in mature adipocytes. Like the TZDs, Ro 41-5253 also down-regulated PPARgamma protein expression in adipocytes. In addition, Ro 41-5253 activated the PPARgamma-ligand binding domain in transiently transfected HEK293T cells. These effects were not prevented by a potent RARalpha agonist or by depleting cells of RARalpha, indicating that PPARgamma activation was not related to RARalpha antagonism. Indeed, Ro 41-5253 was able to compete with TZD ligands for binding to PPARgamma, suggesting that Ro 41-5253 directly affects PPAR activity. These results vividly demonstrate that pharmacological NR ligands may have "off-target" effects on other NRs. Ro 41-5253 is a PPARgamma agonist as well as an RARalpha antagonist whose pleiotropic effects on NRs may signify a unique spectrum of biological responses.

  9. Scandium trifluoromethanesulfonate as an extremely active Lewis acid catalyst in acylation of alcohols with acid anhydrides and mixed anhydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, K.; Kubota, M.; Kurihara, H.; Yamamoto, H.

    1996-07-12

    Scandium triflate catalyzes the acylation of alcohols with acid anhydrides or the esterification of alcohols by carboxylic acids in the presence of p-nitrobenzoic anhydrides. The catalytic activity of the scandium triflates is found to be quite high allowing the acylation of secondary and tertiary alcohols.

  10. Antioxidant Activity and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities of the Polycondensate of Catechin with Glyoxylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hanjun; Liu, Benguo

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate polymeric flavonoids, the polycondensate of catechin with glyoxylic acid (PCG) was prepared and its chemically antioxidant, cellular antioxidant (CAA) and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated. The DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities and antiproliferative effect of PCG were lower than those of catechin, while PCG had higher CAA activity than catechin. In addition, PCG had very high α-glucosidase inhibitory activities (IC50 value, 2.59 μg/mL) in comparison to catechin (IC50 value, 239.27 μg/mL). Inhibition kinetics suggested that both PCG and catechin demonstrated a mixture of noncompetitive and anticompetitive inhibition. The enhanced CAA and α-glucosidase inhibitor activities of PCG could be due to catechin polymerization enhancing the binding capacity to the cellular membrane and enzymes. PMID:26960205

  11. Synthesis and biological activity of some 5-substituted aminomethyl-8-hydroxyquinoline-7-sulphonic acids.

    PubMed

    Yanni, A S; Mohharam, A M

    1990-01-01

    5-Aryl (or alkyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline-7-sulphonic acids have been prepared by the Mannich reaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline-7-sulphonic acid with primary and secondary amines. Their bactericidal activities have been determined.

  12. [Activated Sludge Bacteria Transforming Cyanopyridines and Amides of Pyridinecarboxylic Acids].

    PubMed

    Demakov, V A; Vasil'ev, D M; Maksimova, Yu G; Pavlova, Yu A; Ovechkina, G V; Maksimov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Species diversity of bacteria from the activated sludge of Perm biological waste treatment facilities capable of transformation of cyanopyridines and amides of pyridinecarboxylic acids was investigated. Enrichment cultures in mineral media with 3-cyanopyridine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were used to obtain 32 clones of gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria exhibiting moderate growth on solid and liquid media with 3- and 4-cyanopyridine. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that the clones with homology of at least 99% belonged to the genera Acinetobacte, Alcaligenes, Delftia, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Xanthobacter. PCR analysis showed that 13 out of 32 isolates contained the sequences (-1070 bp) homologous to the nitrilase genes reported previously in Alcaligenes faecalis JM3 (GenBank, D13419.1). Nine clones were capable of nitrile and amide transformation in minimal salt medium. Acinetobacter sp. 11 h and Alcaligenes sp. osv transformed 3-cyanopyridine to nicotinamide, while most of the clones possessed amidase activity (0.5 to 46.3 mmol/(g h) for acetamide and 0.1 to 5.6 mmol/(g h) for nicotinamide). Nicotinamide utilization by strain A. faecalis 2 was shown to result in excretion of a secondary metabolite, which was identified as dodecyl acrylate at 91% probability. PMID:26263697

  13. Chemical modifications of natural triterpenes - glycyrrhetinic and boswellic acids: evaluation of their biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Subba Rao, G. S. R.; Kondaiah, Paturu; Singh, Sanjay K.; Ravanan, Palaniyandi; Sporn, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic analogues of naturally occurring triterpenoids; glycyrrhetinic acid, arjunolic acid and boswellic acids, by modification of A-ring with a cyano- and enone- functionalities, have been reported. A novel method of synthesis of α-cyanoenones from isoxazoles is reported. Bio-assays using primary mouse macrophages and tumor cell lines indicate potent anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities associated with cyanoenones of boswellic acid and glycyrrhetinic acid. PMID:20622928

  14. Oleic acid and linoleic acid from Tenebrio molitor larvae inhibit BACE1 activity in vitro: molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Youn, Kumju; Yun, Eun-Young; Lee, Jinhyuk; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2014-02-01

    In our ongoing research to find therapeutic compounds for Alzheimer's disease (AD) from natural resources, the inhibitory activity of the BACE1 enzyme by Tenebrio molitor larvae and its major compounds were evaluated. The T. molitor larvae extract and its fractions exhibited strong BACE1 suppression. The major components of hexane fraction possessing both high yield and strong BACE1 inhibition were determined by thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. A remarkable composition of unsaturated long chain fatty acids, including oleic acid and linoleic acid, were identified. Oleic acid, in particular, noncompetitively attenuated BACE1 activity with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) value of 61.31 μM and Ki value of 34.3 μM. Furthermore, the fatty acids were stably interacted with BACE1 at different allosteric sites of the enzyme bound with the OH of CYS319 and the NH₃ of TYR320 for oleic acid and with the C=O group of GLN304 for linoleic acid. Here, we first revealed novel pharmacophore features of oleic acids and linoleic acid to BACE1 by in silico docking studies. The present findings would clearly suggest potential guidelines for designing novel BACE1 selective inhibitors.

  15. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of p-coumaric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliç, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim

    2013-11-01

    p-coumaric acid (4-hydroxycinnamic acid), a phenolic acid, is a hydroxyl derivative of cinnamic acid. It decreases low density lipoprotein (LDL) peroxidation and reduces the risk of stomach cancer. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of p-coumaric acid were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. p-Coumaric acid inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 66.8%, 69.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, p-coumaric acid had an effective DPPHrad scavenging, ABTSrad + scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that p-coumaric acid can be used in the pharmacological and food industry because of these properties.

  16. [Study of antioxidant and membrane activity of rosmarinic acid using different model systems].

    PubMed

    Popov, A M; Osipov, A N; Korepanova, E A; Krivoshapko, O N; Artiukov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid is found in many species of different families of higher plants and its chemical structure is phenol propanoid with various biological activity. In this paper, we conducted a comparative study of antioxidant (radical-scavenging) properties of rosmarinic acid in systems of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-methylpropionamidin)dihydrochloride-luminol and hemoglobin-hydrogen peroxide-lu- minol, determined its protective potential in preventing peroxidation of linoleic acid, and evaluated the effect on the permeability of planar bilayer lipid membranes. Linoleic acid peroxidation was assessed by iron-thiocyanate method. In these studies, trolox was used as a reference antioxidant, and ascorbic acid, and dihydroquercetin were taken as standards. Rosmarinic acid is significantly superior to trolox, ascorbic acid and dihydroquercetin in the tests for antioxidant activity in the systems studied, as well as in inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation. According to their activity the investigated substances can be arranged in the following order: rosmarinic acid > dihydroquercetin trolox > ascorbic acid. Rosmarinic acid does not cause significant changes in the permeability of planar bilayer membranes in a dose range of 0.5 to 10 mkg/mL. Antioxidant activity of rosmarinic acid is due to the neutralization of reactive oxygen species and/or luminol radicals generated in model systems. The observed features of the antioxidant and membrane activity of rosmarinic acid, which may underlie the previously mentioned pharmacological effects are discussed. PMID:25481945

  17. Activity of the antiestrogenic cajanin stilbene acid towards breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yujie; Kadioglu, Onat; Wiench, Benjamin; Wei, Zuofu; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Yang, Xiaohe; Gu, Chengbo; Zu, Yuangang; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Antiestrogenic therapy is a mainstay for estrogen receptor (ERα)-positive breast cancer. Due to the development of resistance to established antihormones such as tamoxifen, novel compounds are required. The low abundant cajanin stilbene acid (CSA) recently isolated by us from Pigeon Pea (Cajanus cajan) has structural similarities with estrogen. We analyzed the cytotoxic and anticancer activity of CSA in ERα-positive and -negative human breast cancer cells in vitro, in vivo and in silico. CSA exerts anticancer and antiestrogenic activities towards ERα-positive breast cancer, and it showed cytotoxicity towards tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 cells, implying that CSA may be active against tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. CSA showed low cytotoxicity in ERα-negative breast tumor cells as expected. Comparable cytotoxicity was observed towards p53 negative MCF-7 cells, implying that CSA is effective independent of the p53 status. Xenografted MCF-7 cells in nude mice were better inhibited by CSA than by cyclophosphamide. Testing of 8 primary cell cultures derived from human breast cancer biopsies showed that cell cultures from ER-positive tumors were more sensitive than from ER-negative ones. Dose-dependent decrease in ERα protein levels was observed upon CSA treatment. Synergistic effect with tamoxifen was observed in terms of increased p53 protein level. CSA affected pathways related to p53, cancer and cell proliferation. Gene promoter analyses supported the ERα regulation. CSA bound to the same site as 17β-estradiol and tamoxifen on ERα. In conclusion, CSA exerts its anticancer effects in ERα-positive breast cancer cells by binding and inhibiting ERα. PMID:26365581

  18. Application of hexafluoroacetone as protecting and activating reagent in amino acid and peptide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Burger, K; Rudolph, M; Fehn, S; Worku, A; Golubev, A

    1995-06-01

    Using hexafluoroacetone as protecting and activating reagent, multifunctional amino acids like aspartic acid can be functionalized regioselectively. This strategy offers i.a. a two-step synthesis for aspartame and preparatively simple access to multifunctional natural and unnatural amino acids, like 4-oxo-L-amino acids, 5-diazo-4-oxo-L-amino acids, 4-substituted L-proline derivatives and various heterocyclic L-amino acids. On application of this strategy to amino diacetic acid N-substituted glycines become readily available.

  19. Abscisic Acid Induces Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in Barley Aleurone Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Knetsch, MLW.; Wang, M.; Snaar-Jagalska, B. E.; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.

    1996-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) induces a rapid and transient mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in barley aleurone protoplasts. MAP kinase activity, measured as myelin basic protein phosphorylation by MAP kinase immunoprecipitates, increased after 1 min, peaked after 3 min, and decreased to basal levels after ~5 min of ABA treatment in vivo. Antibodies recognizing phosphorylated tyrosine residues precipitate with myelin basic protein kinase activity that has identical ABA activation characteristics and demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinase occurs during activation. The half-maximal concentration of ABA required for MAP kinase activation, 3 x 10-7 M, is very similar to that required for ABA-induced rab16 gene expression. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor phenylarsine oxide can completely block ABA-induced MAP kinase activation and rab16 gene expression. These results lead us to conclude that ABA activates MAP kinase via a tyrosine phosphatase and that these steps are a prerequisite for ABA induction of rab16 gene expression.

  20. Abscisic Acid Induces Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in Barley Aleurone Protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Knetsch, MLW.; Wang, M.; Snaar-Jagalska, B. E.; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.

    1996-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) induces a rapid and transient mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in barley aleurone protoplasts. MAP kinase activity, measured as myelin basic protein phosphorylation by MAP kinase immunoprecipitates, increased after 1 min, peaked after 3 min, and decreased to basal levels after ~5 min of ABA treatment in vivo. Antibodies recognizing phosphorylated tyrosine residues precipitate with myelin basic protein kinase activity that has identical ABA activation characteristics and demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinase occurs during activation. The half-maximal concentration of ABA required for MAP kinase activation, 3 x 10-7 M, is very similar to that required for ABA-induced rab16 gene expression. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor phenylarsine oxide can completely block ABA-induced MAP kinase activation and rab16 gene expression. These results lead us to conclude that ABA activates MAP kinase via a tyrosine phosphatase and that these steps are a prerequisite for ABA induction of rab16 gene expression. PMID:12239411

  1. Activity of virgin coconut oil, lauric acid or monolaurin in combination with lactic acid against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tangwatcharin, Pussadee; Khopaibool, Prapaporn

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro activities of virgin coconut oil, lauric acid and monolaurin in combination with lactic acid against two strains of Staphylococcus aureus, ATCC 25923 and an isolate from a pig carcass, by determination of Fractional Bactericidal Concentration Index (FBCI), time-kill method, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of lauric acid, monolaurin and lactic acid were 3.2 mg/ml, 0.1 mg/ml and 0.4% (v/v), respectively. The effects of lauric acid + lactic acid and monolaurin + lactic acid combinations were synergistic against both strains, exhibiting FBCIs of 0.25 and 0.63, respectively. In time-kill studies, lauric acid and monolaurin + lactic acid combinations added at their minimum inhibitory concentrations produced a bactericidal effect. The induction of stress in non-stressed cells was dependent on the type and concentration of antimicrobial. This resulted in a loss and change of the cytoplasm and membrane in cells of the bacterium. In contrast, virgin coconut oil (10%) was not active against S. aureus. The bacterial counts found in pork loin treated with lauric acid and monolaurin alone were significantly higher (p <0.05) than those treated with both lipids in combination with lactic acid at sub-inhibitory concentrations. The color, odor and overall acceptability of the pork loins were adversely affected by treatment with the three lipids and lactic acid alone but when combinations of the agents were used the sensory quality was acceptable.

  2. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  3. Changes of phenolic acids and antioxidant activities during potherb mustard (Brassica juncea, Coss.) pickling.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhongxiang; Hu, Yuxia; Liu, Donghong; Chen, Jianchu; Ye, Xingqian

    2008-06-01

    Phenolic acids in potherb mustard (Brassica juncea, Coss.) were determined and the effects of pickling methods on the contents of total free phenolic acids, total phenolic acids, total phenolics, and antioxidant activities were investigated. Gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and sinapic acid were identified in the present study. The contents of total free phenolic acids, total phenolic acids and total phenolics in fresh potherb mustard were 84.8±0.58μg/g dry weight (DW), 539±1.36μg/g DW, and 7.95±0.28mg/g DW, respectively. The total free phenolic acids increased during the pickling processes, but the total phenolic acids, total phenolics, and antioxidant activities decreased. However, after 5 weeks of fermentation, all the pickling methods retained over 70% of total phenolic contents and above 65% of antioxidant capacities. The results indicated that pickling processes were relatively good methods for the preservation of phenolic acids and antioxidants for potherb mustard. PMID:26065739

  4. Biological activities of Toninia candida and Usnea barbata together with their norstictic acid and usnic acid constituents.

    PubMed

    Ranković, Branislav; Kosanić, Marijana; Stanojković, Tatjana; Vasiljević, Perica; Manojlović, Nedeljko

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Toninia candida and Usnea barbata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts together with some of their major metabolites. The chemical composition of T. candida and U. barbata extracts was determined using HPLC-UV analysis. The major phenolic compounds in these extracts were norstictic acid (T. candida) and usnic acid (U. barbata). Antioxidant activity was evaluated by free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, reducing power and determination of total phenolic compounds. Results of the study proved that norstictic acid had the largest antioxidant activity. The total content of phenols in the extracts was determined as the pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration using the broth microdilution method. The most active was usnic acid with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.0008 to 0.5 mg/mL. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using the microculture tetrazolium test. Usnic acid was found to have the strongest anticancer activity towards both cell lines with IC(50) values of 12.72 and 15.66 μg/mL. PMID:23203090

  5. Biological Activities of Toninia candida and Usnea barbata Together with Their Norstictic Acid and Usnic Acid Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Ranković, Branislav; Kosanić, Marijana; Stanojković, Tatjana; Vasiljević, Perica; Manojlović, Nedeljko

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Toninia candida and Usnea barbata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts together with some of their major metabolites. The chemical composition of T. candida and U. barbata extracts was determined using HPLC-UV analysis. The major phenolic compounds in these extracts were norstictic acid (T. candida) and usnic acid (U. barbata). Antioxidant activity was evaluated by free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, reducing power and determination of total phenolic compounds. Results of the study proved that norstictic acid had the largest antioxidant activity. The total content of phenols in the extracts was determined as the pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration using the broth microdilution method. The most active was usnic acid with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.0008 to 0.5 mg/mL. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using the microculture tetrazolium test. Usnic acid was found to have the strongest anticancer activity towards both cell lines with IC50 values of 12.72 and 15.66 μg/mL. PMID:23203090

  6. Production of starch with antioxidative activity by baking starch with organic acids.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Shoji; Nakamura, Megumi; Okuno, Michiko; Miyazaki, Hisako; Watanabe, Jun; Ishikawa-Takano, Yuko; Miura, Makoto; Takase, Nao; Hayakawa, Sachio; Kobayashi, Shoichi

    2011-01-01

    A starch ingredient with antioxidative activity, as measured by the DPPH method, was produced by baking corn starch with an organic acid; it has been named ANOX sugar (antioxidative sugar). The baking temperature and time were fixed at 170 °C and 60 min, and the organic acid used was selected from preliminary trials of various kinds of acid. The phytic acid ANOX sugar preparation showed the highest antioxidative activity, but the color of the preparation was almost black; we therefore selected L-tartaric acid which had the second highest antioxidative activity. The antioxidative activity of the L-tartaric acid ANOX sugar preparation was stable against temperature, light, and enzyme treatments (α-amylase and glucoamylase). However, the activity was not stable against variations in water content and pH value. The antioxidative activity of ANOX sugar was stabilized by treating with boiled water or nitrogen gas, or by pH adjustment.

  7. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (<50% of control) to polystyrene. Treatment of established 72h biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with <25% biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms.

  8. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (<50% of control) to polystyrene. Treatment of established 72h biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with <25% biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. PMID:25043896

  9. Radical scavenging activity of lipophilized products from transesterification of flaxseed oil with cinnamic acid or ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Choo, Wee-Sim; Birch, Edward John; Stewart, Ian

    2009-09-01

    Lipase-catalyzed transesterification of flaxseed oil with cinnamic acid (CA) or ferulic acid (FA) using an immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica (E.C. 3.1.1.3) was conducted to evaluate whether the lipophilized products provided enhanced antioxidant activity in the oil. Lipase-catalyzed transesterification of flaxseed oil with CA or FA produced a variety of lipophilized products (identified using ESI-MS-MS) such as monocinnamoyl/feruloyl-diacylglycerol, dicinnamoyl-monoacylglycerol and monocinnamoyl-monoacylglycerol. The free radical scavenging activity of the lipophilized products of lipase-catalyzed transesterification of flaxseed oil with CA or FA toward 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH.) were both examined in ethanol and ethyl acetate. The polarity of the solvents proved important in determining the radical scavenging activity of the substrates. Unesterified FA showed the highest free radical scavenging activity among all substrates tested while CA had negligible activity. The esterification of CA or FA with flaxseed oil resulted in significant increase and decrease in the radical scavenging activity compared with the native phenolic acid, respectively. Based on the ratio of a substrate to DPPH. concentration, lipophilized FA was a much more efficient free radical scavenger compared to lipophilized CA and was able to provide enhanced antioxidant activity in the flaxseed oil. Lipophilized cinnamic acid did not provide enhanced radical scavenging activity in the flaxseed oil as the presence of natural hydrophilic antioxidants in the oil had much greater radical scavenging activity.

  10. Terminal Amino Acids Disturb Xylanase Thermostability and Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liangwei; Zhang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Zhang; Wang, Suya; Chen, Hongge

    2011-01-01

    Protein structure is composed of regular secondary structural elements (α-helix and β-strand) and non-regular region. Unlike the helix and strand, the non-regular region consists of an amino acid defined as a disordered residue (DR). When compared with the effect of the helix and strand, the effect of the DR on enzyme structure and function is elusive. An Aspergillus niger GH10 xylanase (Xyn) was selected as a model molecule of (β/α)8 because the general structure consists of ∼10% enzymes. The Xyn has five N-terminal DRs and one C-terminal DR, respectively, which were deleted to construct three mutants, XynΔN, XynΔC, and XynΔNC. Each mutant was ∼2-, 3-, or 4-fold more thermostable and 7-, 4-, or 4-fold more active than the Xyn. The N-terminal deletion decreased the xylanase temperature optimum for activity (Topt) 6 °C, but the C-terminal deletion increased its Topt 6 °C. The N- and C-terminal deletions had opposing effects on the enzyme Topt but had additive effects on its thermostability. The five N-terminal DR deletions had more effect on the enzyme kinetics but less effect on its thermo property than the one C-terminal DR deletion. CD data showed that the terminal DR deletions increased regular secondary structural contents, and hence, led to slow decreased Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG0) in the thermal denaturation process, which ultimately enhanced enzyme thermostabilities. PMID:22072708

  11. [Degradation of Acid Orange 7 with Persulfate Activated by Silver Loaded Granular Activated Carbon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-ming; Huang, Tian-yin; Chen, Jia-bin; Li, Wen-wei; Zhang, Li-ming

    2015-11-01

    Granular activated carbon with silver loaded as activator (Ag/GAC) was prepared using impregnation method. N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were adopted to characterize the Ag/GAC, showing that silver was successfully loaded on granular activated carbon. The oxidation degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7) by the Ag/GAC activated by persulfate (PS) was investigated at ambient temperature. The influences of factors such as Ag loading, PS or Ag/GAC dosages and initial pH on the degradation of AO7 were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the degradation rate of AO7 could reach more than 95.0% after 180 min when the Ag loading content, PS/AO7 molar ratio, the Ag/GAC dosage were 12.7 mg x g(-1), 120: 1, 1.0 g x L(-1), respectively. The initial pH had significant effect on the AO7 degradation, with pH 5.0 as the optimal pH for the degradation of AO7. The possible degradation pathway was proposed for the AO7 degradation by using UV-visible spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GG/MS). The azo bond and naphthalene ring in the AO7 were destroyed during the degradation, with phthalic acid and acetophenone as the main degradation products. PMID:26910999

  12. Antifungal activity of 4-substituted crotonic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Gershon, H; Shanks, L; Gawiak, D E

    1976-08-01

    Twenty-three 4-substituted crotonic acid esters were tested for antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, Mucor mucedo, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. For the analogues of the methyl ester containing substituents in the 4 position, the following order of fungitoxicity was observed: I greater than Br greater than Cl greater than CH3S greater than CH3O greater than F=H. Of the homologues of the esters of the 4-iodo and 4-bromo compounds which included methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, n-butyl, n-pentyl, and n-hexyl, ethyl 4-iodocrotonate was most toxic to the four fungi at pH 7.0 in the presence of 10% beef serum (C. albicans, 18mug/ml, A. niger, 40 mug/ml, M. mucedo, 5 mug/ml, T. mentagrophytes, 4 mug/ml). It is believed that the mechanism of fungitoxicity is due, in part, to a nucleophilic reaction involving SH-containing compounds. This is based on the correlation of fungitoxicity with the order of leaving groups in the nucleophilic reaction and the protection against the toxicity of the test compounds to the fungi by cysteine and glutathione.

  13. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  14. Porous texture of activated carbons prepared by phosphoric acid activation of woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Díez, M. A.; Gómez-Serrano, V.; Fernández González, C.; Cuerda-Correa, E. M.; Macías-García, A.

    2004-11-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared using chestnut, cedar and walnut wood shavings from furniture industries located in the Comunidad Autónoma de Extremadura (SW Spain). Phosphoric acid (H3PO4) at different concentrations (i.e. 36 and 85 wt.%) has been used as activating agent. ACs have been characterized from the results obtained by N2 adsorption at 77 K. Moreover, the fractal dimension (D) has been calculated in order to determine the AC surface roughness degree. Optimal textural properties of ACs have been obtained by chemical activation with H3PO4 36 wt.%. This is corroborated by the slightly lower values of D for samples treated with H3PO4 85 wt.%.

  15. Organic acid-catalyzed polyurethane formation via a dual-activated mechanism: unexpected preference of N-activation over O-activation of isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Sardon, Haritz; Engler, Amanda C; Chan, Julian M W; García, Jeannette M; Coady, Daniel J; Pascual, Ana; Mecerreyes, David; Jones, Gavin O; Rice, Julia E; Horn, Hans W; Hedrick, James L

    2013-10-30

    A systematic study of acid organocatalysts for the polyaddition of poly(ethylene glycol) to hexamethylene diisocyanate in solution has been performed. Among organic acids evaluated, sulfonic acids were found the most effective for urethane formations even when compared with conventional tin-based catalysts (dibutyltin dilaurate) or 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene. In comparison, phosphonic and carboxylic acids showed considerably lower catalytic activities. Furthermore, sulfonic acids gave polyurethanes with higher molecular weights than was observed using traditional catalyst systems. Molecular modeling was conducted to provide mechanistic insight and supported a dual activation mechanism, whereby ternary adducts form in the presence of acid and engender both electrophilic isocyanate activation and nucleophilic alcohol activation through hydrogen bonding. Such a mechanism suggests catalytic activity is a function of not only acid strength but also inherent conjugate base electron density. PMID:24083673

  16. Molecular mechanisms behind the antimicrobial activity of hop iso-α-acids in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Schurr, Benjamin C; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-04-01

    The main bittering component in beer, hop iso-α-acids, have been characterised as weak acids, which act as ionophores impairing microbial cells' function under acidic conditions as present in beer. Besides medium pH, divalent cations play a central role regarding the efficacy of the antimicrobial effect. The iso-α-acids' non-bitter derivatives humulinic acids can be found in isomerised hop extracts and can be generated during hop storage. Therefore, they have been under investigation concerning their influence on beer sensory properties. This study sketches the molecular mechanism behind iso-α-acids' antimicrobial activity in Lactobacillus (L.) brevis regarding their ionophore activity versus the dependence of the inhibitory potential on manganese binding, and suggests humulinic acids as novel tasteless food preservatives. We designed and synthesised chemically modified iso-α-acids to enhance the basic understanding of the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial iso-α-acids. It could be observed that a manganese-binding dependent transmembrane redox reaction (oxidative stress) plays a crucial role in inhibition. Privation of an acidic hydroxyl group neither erased ionophore activity, nor did it entirely abolish antimicrobial activity. Humulinic acids proved to be highly inhibitory, even outperforming iso-α-acids.

  17. Antioxidant and Antimelanogenic activities of polyamine conjugates from corn bran and related hydroxycinnamic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antioxidant activity of three major polyamine conjugates, N,N'-dicoumaroyl- putrescine (DCP), N-p-coumaroyl-N'-feruloylputrescine (CFP) and N,N'-diferuloyl- putrescine (DFP) isolated from corn bran, and their related hydroxycinnamic acids, p-coumaric acid (CA) and ferulic acid (FA), were evaluat...

  18. Molecular mechanisms behind the antimicrobial activity of hop iso-α-acids in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Schurr, Benjamin C; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-04-01

    The main bittering component in beer, hop iso-α-acids, have been characterised as weak acids, which act as ionophores impairing microbial cells' function under acidic conditions as present in beer. Besides medium pH, divalent cations play a central role regarding the efficacy of the antimicrobial effect. The iso-α-acids' non-bitter derivatives humulinic acids can be found in isomerised hop extracts and can be generated during hop storage. Therefore, they have been under investigation concerning their influence on beer sensory properties. This study sketches the molecular mechanism behind iso-α-acids' antimicrobial activity in Lactobacillus (L.) brevis regarding their ionophore activity versus the dependence of the inhibitory potential on manganese binding, and suggests humulinic acids as novel tasteless food preservatives. We designed and synthesised chemically modified iso-α-acids to enhance the basic understanding of the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial iso-α-acids. It could be observed that a manganese-binding dependent transmembrane redox reaction (oxidative stress) plays a crucial role in inhibition. Privation of an acidic hydroxyl group neither erased ionophore activity, nor did it entirely abolish antimicrobial activity. Humulinic acids proved to be highly inhibitory, even outperforming iso-α-acids. PMID:25475328

  19. Discovery of a novel activator of 5-lipoxygenase from an anacardic acid derived compound collection

    PubMed Central

    Wisastra, Rosalina; Kok, Petra A.M; Eleftheriadis, Nikolaos; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) and cyclooxygenases (COXs) metabolize poly-unsaturated fatty acids into inflammatory signaling molecules. Modulation of the activity of these enzymes may provide new approaches for therapy of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we screened novel anacardic acid derivatives as modulators of human 5-LOX and COX-2 activity. Interestingly, a novel salicylate derivative 23a was identified as a surprisingly potent activator of human 5-LOX. This compound showed both non-competitive activation towards the human 5-LOX activator adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and non-essential mixed type activation against the substrate linoleic acid, while having no effect on the conversion of the substrate arachidonic acid. The kinetic analysis demonstrated a non-essential activation of the linoleic acid conversion with a KA of 8.65 μM, αKA of 0.38 μM and a β value of 1.76. It is also of interest that a comparable derivative 23d showed a mixed type inhibition for linoleic acid conversion. These observations indicate the presence of an allosteric binding site in human 5-LOX distinct from the ATP binding site. The activatory and inhibitory behavior of 23a and 23d on the conversion of linoleic compared to arachidonic acid are rationalized by docking studies, which suggest that the activator 23a stabilizes linoleic acid, whereas the larger inhibitor 23d blocks the enzyme active site. PMID:24231650

  20. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  1. Hyaluronic acid-coated liposomes for active targeting of gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Arpicco, Silvia; Lerda, Carlotta; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Costanzo, Chiara; Tsapis, Nicolas; Stella, Barbara; Donadelli, Massimo; Dando, Ilaria; Fattal, Elias; Cattel, Luigi; Palmieri, Marta

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was the preparation, characterization, and preliminary evaluation of the targeting ability toward pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells of liposomes containing the gemcitabine lipophilic prodrug [4-(N)-lauroyl-gemcitabine, C12GEM]. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was selected as targeting agent since it is biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be chemically modified and its cell surface receptor CD44 is overexpressed on various tumors. For this purpose, conjugates between a phospholipid, the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), and HA of two different low molecular weights 4800 Da (12 disaccharidic units) and 12,000 Da (32 disaccharidic units), were prepared, characterized, and introduced in the liposomes during the preparation. Different liposomal formulations were prepared and their characteristics were analyzed: size, Z potential, and TEM analyses underline a difference in the HA-liposomes from the non-HA ones. In order to better understand the HA-liposome cellular localization and to evaluate their interaction with CD44 receptor, confocal microscopy studies were performed. The results demonstrate that HA facilitates the recognition of liposomes by MiaPaCa2 cells (CD44(+)) and that the uptake increases with increase in the polymer molecular weight. Finally, the cytotoxicity of the different preparations was evaluated and data show that incorporation of C12GEM increases their cytotoxic activity and that HA-liposomes inhibit cell growth more than plain liposomes. Altogether, the results demonstrate the specificity of C12GEM targeting toward CD44-overexpressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line using HA as a ligand.

  2. Hyaluronic acid-coated liposomes for active targeting of gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Arpicco, Silvia; Lerda, Carlotta; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Costanzo, Chiara; Tsapis, Nicolas; Stella, Barbara; Donadelli, Massimo; Dando, Ilaria; Fattal, Elias; Cattel, Luigi; Palmieri, Marta

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was the preparation, characterization, and preliminary evaluation of the targeting ability toward pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells of liposomes containing the gemcitabine lipophilic prodrug [4-(N)-lauroyl-gemcitabine, C12GEM]. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was selected as targeting agent since it is biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be chemically modified and its cell surface receptor CD44 is overexpressed on various tumors. For this purpose, conjugates between a phospholipid, the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), and HA of two different low molecular weights 4800 Da (12 disaccharidic units) and 12,000 Da (32 disaccharidic units), were prepared, characterized, and introduced in the liposomes during the preparation. Different liposomal formulations were prepared and their characteristics were analyzed: size, Z potential, and TEM analyses underline a difference in the HA-liposomes from the non-HA ones. In order to better understand the HA-liposome cellular localization and to evaluate their interaction with CD44 receptor, confocal microscopy studies were performed. The results demonstrate that HA facilitates the recognition of liposomes by MiaPaCa2 cells (CD44(+)) and that the uptake increases with increase in the polymer molecular weight. Finally, the cytotoxicity of the different preparations was evaluated and data show that incorporation of C12GEM increases their cytotoxic activity and that HA-liposomes inhibit cell growth more than plain liposomes. Altogether, the results demonstrate the specificity of C12GEM targeting toward CD44-overexpressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line using HA as a ligand. PMID:23791684

  3. Aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid using activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Cheng, Ka Yu; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid (SA) by an acclimatized activated sludge. The sludge was enriched for over three months with SA (>500 mg/L) as the sole carbon and energy source and dissolved oxygen (DO, >5mg/L) as the primary electron acceptor. Effects of aeration rate (0-1.74 L/min), DO concentration (0-7 mg/L) and initial SA concentration (104-1085 mg/L) on SA biodegradation were quantified. A modified Haldane substrate inhibition model was used to obtain kinetic parameters of SA biodegradation and oxygen uptake rate (OUR). Positive linear correlations were obtained between OUR and SA degradation rate (R(2)≥ 0.91). Over time, the culture consumed more oxygen per SA degraded, signifying a gradual improvement in SA mineralization (mass ratio of O(2): SA at day 30, 60 and 120 were 0.44, 0.51 and 0.78, respectively). The concomitant release of near stoichiometric quantity of sulphate (3.2 mmol SO(4)(2-) released from 3.3 mmol SA) and the high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficacy (97.1%) indicated that the enriched microbial consortia could drive the overall SA oxidation close to a complete mineralization. In contrast to other pure-culture systems, the ammonium released from the SA oxidation was predominately converted into nitrate, revealing the presence of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the mixed culture. No apparent inhibitory effect of SA on the nitrification was noted. This work also indicates that aerobic SA biodegradation could be monitored by real-time DO measurement.

  4. 2-Octynoic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection through Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darong; Xue, Binbin; Wang, Xiaohong; Yu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Nianli; Gao, Yimin; Liu, Chen; Zhu, Haizhen

    2013-01-01

    Many chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients with current therapy do not clear the virus. It is necessary to find novel treatments. The effect of 2-octynoic acid (2-OA) on HCV infection in human hepatocytes was examined. The mechanism of 2-OA antiviral activity was explored. Our data showed that 2-OA abrogated lipid accumulation in HCV replicon cells and virus-infected hepatocytes. It suppressed HCV RNA replication and infectious virus production with no cytotoxicity to the host cells. 2-OA did not affect hepatitis B virus replication in HepG2.2.15 cells derived from HepG2 cells transfected with full genome of HBV. Further study demonstrated that 2-OA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase in viral-infected cells. Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK, inhibited AMPK activity and reversed the reduction of intracellular lipid accumulation and the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Knockdown of AMPK expression by RNA interference abolished the activation of AMPK by 2-OA and blocked 2-OA antiviral activity. Interestingly, 2-OA induced interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and inhibited microRNA-122 (miR-122) expression in virus-infected hepatocytes. MiR-122 overexpression reversed the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Furthermore, knockdown of AMPK expression reversed both the induction of ISGs and suppression of miR-122 by 2-OA, implying that activated AMPK induces the intracellular innate response through the induction of ISGs and inhibiting miR-122 expression. 2-OA inhibits HCV infection through regulation of innate immune response by activated AMPK. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which active AMPK inhibits HCV infection. 2-OA and its derivatives hold promise for novel drug development for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:23741428

  5. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin.

  6. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. PMID:27348124

  7. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. PMID:27348124

  8. Direct activation of GABAA receptors by substances in the organic acid fraction of Japanese sake.

    PubMed

    Izu, Hanae; Shigemori, Kensuke; Eguchi, Masaya; Kawane, Shuhei; Fujii, Shouko; Kitamura, Yuji; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Yamada, Yasue

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effect of substances present in Japanese sake on the response of ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Sake was fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. The fraction containing organic acids (OA fraction) showed agonist activities on the GABAA receptor. OA fractions from sake were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). Of the 64 compounds identified, 13 compounds showed GABAA receptor agonist activities. Especially, l-lactic acid showed high agonist activity and its EC50 value was 37μM. Intraperitoneal injections of l-lactic acid, gluconic acid, and pyruvic acid (10, 10, and 5mg/kg BW, respectively), which showed agonistic activity on the GABAA receptor, led to significant anxiolytic effects during an elevated plus-maze test in mice. PMID:27507485

  9. Antifungal Activity and Biochemical Response of Cuminic Acid against Phytophthora capsici Leonian.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xing; Feng, Juntao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora blight of pepper caused by Phytophthora capsici Leonian is a destructive disease throughout the world. Cuminic acid, extracted from the seed of Cuminum cyminum L., belongs to the benzoic acid chemical class. In this study, the sensitivity and biochemical response of P. capsici to cuminic acid was determined. The mean EC50 (50% effective concentration) values for cuminic acid in inhibiting mycelial growth and zoospore germination of the 54 studied P. capsici isolates were 14.54 ± 5.23 μg/mL and 6.97 ± 2.82 μg/mL, respectively. After treatment with cuminic acid, mycelial morphology, sporangium formation and mycelial respiration were significantly influenced; cell membrane permeability and DNA content increased markedly, but pyruvic acid content, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, and ATPase activity decreased compared with the untreated control. In pot experiments, cuminic acid exhibited both protective and curative activity. Importantly, POD and PAL activity of the pepper leaves increased after being treated with cuminic acid. These indicated that cuminic acid not only showed antifungal activity, but also could improve the defense capacity of the plants. All the results suggested that cuminic acid exhibits the potential to be developed as a new phytochemical fungicide, and this information increases our understanding of the mechanism of action of cuminic acid against Phytophthora capsici. PMID:27294911

  10. Effect of acidic amino acids engineered into the active site cleft of Thermopolyspora flexuosa GH11 xylanase.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Turunen, Ossi

    2015-01-01

    Thermopolyspora flexuosa GH11 xylanase (XYN11A) shows optimal activity at pH 6-7 and 75-80 °C. We studied how mutation to aspartic acid (N46D and V48D) in the vicinity of the catalytic acid/base affects the pH activity of highly thermophilic GH11 xylanase. Both mutations shifted the pH activity profile toward acidic pH. In general, the Km values were lower at pH 4-5 than at pH 6, and in line with this, the rate of hydrolysis of xylotetraose was slightly faster at pH 4 than at pH 6. The N46D mutation and also lower pH in XYN11A increased the hydrolysis of xylotriose. The Km value increased remarkably (from 2.5 to 11.6 mg/mL) because of V48D, which indicates the weakening of binding affinity of the substrate to the active site. Xylotetraose functioned well as a substrate for other enzymes, but with lowered reaction rate for V48D. Both N46D and V48D increased the enzyme inactivation by ionic liquid [emim]OAc. In conclusion, the pH activity profile could be shifted to acidic pH due to an effect from two different directions, but the tightly packed GH11 active site can cause steric problems for the mutations.

  11. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  12. Exploration of the antiplatelet activity profile of betulinic acid on human platelets.

    PubMed

    Tzakos, Andreas G; Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Tsoumani, Maria; Kyriakou, Eleni; Hwa, John; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Tselepis, Alexandros D

    2012-07-18

    Betulinic acid, a natural pentacyclic triterpene acid, presents a diverse mode of biological actions including antiretroviral, antibacterial, antimalarial, and anti-inflammatory activities. The potency of betulinic acid as an inhibitor of human platelet activation was evaluated, and its antiplatelet profile against in vitro platelet aggregation, induced by several platelet agonists (adenosine diphosphate, thrombin receptor activator peptide-14, and arachidonic acid), was explored. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to examine the effect of betulinic acid on P-selectin membrane expression and PAC-1 binding to activated platelets. Betulinic acid potently inhibits platelet aggregation and also reduced PAC-1 binding and the membrane expression of P-selectin. Principal component analysis was used to screen, on the chemical property space, for potential common pharmacophores of betulinic acid with approved antithrombotic drugs. A common pharmacophore was defined between the NMR-derived structure of betulinic acid and prostacyclin agonists (PGI2), and the importance of its carboxylate group in its antiplatelet activity was determined. The present results indicate that betulinic acid has potential use as an antithrombotic compound and suggest that the mechanism underlying the antiplatelet effects of betulinic acid is similar to that of the PGI2 receptor agonists, a hypothesis that deserves further investigation. PMID:22720759

  13. Exploration of the antiplatelet activity profile of betulinic acid on human platelets.

    PubMed

    Tzakos, Andreas G; Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Tsoumani, Maria; Kyriakou, Eleni; Hwa, John; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Tselepis, Alexandros D

    2012-07-18

    Betulinic acid, a natural pentacyclic triterpene acid, presents a diverse mode of biological actions including antiretroviral, antibacterial, antimalarial, and anti-inflammatory activities. The potency of betulinic acid as an inhibitor of human platelet activation was evaluated, and its antiplatelet profile against in vitro platelet aggregation, induced by several platelet agonists (adenosine diphosphate, thrombin receptor activator peptide-14, and arachidonic acid), was explored. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to examine the effect of betulinic acid on P-selectin membrane expression and PAC-1 binding to activated platelets. Betulinic acid potently inhibits platelet aggregation and also reduced PAC-1 binding and the membrane expression of P-selectin. Principal component analysis was used to screen, on the chemical property space, for potential common pharmacophores of betulinic acid with approved antithrombotic drugs. A common pharmacophore was defined between the NMR-derived structure of betulinic acid and prostacyclin agonists (PGI2), and the importance of its carboxylate group in its antiplatelet activity was determined. The present results indicate that betulinic acid has potential use as an antithrombotic compound and suggest that the mechanism underlying the antiplatelet effects of betulinic acid is similar to that of the PGI2 receptor agonists, a hypothesis that deserves further investigation.

  14. Effect of stilbene and chalcone scaffolds incorporation in clofibric acid on PPARα agonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Giampietro, Letizia; D'Angelo, Alessandra; Giancristofaro, Antonella; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; De Filippis, Barbara; Di Matteo, Mauro; Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Linciano, Pasquale; Maccallini, Cristina; Amoroso, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to develop safe and efficacious compounds for the treatment of metabolic disorders, new compounds based on a combination of clofibric acid, the active metabolite of clofibrate, and trans-stilbene, chalcone, and other lipophilic groups were synthesized. They were evaluated for PPARα transactivation activity; all branched derivatives showed an increase of the transcriptional activity of receptor compared to the linear ones. Noteworthy, stilbene and benzophenone branched derivatives activated the PPARα better than clofibric acid. PMID:23432317

  15. Saturated fatty acids activate TLR-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 were shown to be activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs) but inhibited by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, one report (ATVB 11:1944, 2009) suggested that SFA-induced TLR activation in cell culture systems is due to contaminants in BSA used for conjugating f...

  16. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one of the predominant perfluoroalkyl acids in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. PFNA strongly activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) in vitro and negatively impacts development ...

  17. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  18. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  19. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  20. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  1. VLDL hydrolysis by LPL activates PPAR-alpha through generation of unbound fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Maxwell A; Goldenson, Benjamin; Orasanu, Gabriela; Johnston, Thomas P; Plutzky, Jorge; Krauss, Ronald M

    2010-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that lipoproteins serve as circulating reservoirs of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) ligands that are accessible through lipolysis. The present study was conducted to determine the biochemical basis of PPAR-alpha activation by lipolysis products and their contribution to PPAR-alpha function in vivo. PPAR-alpha activation was measured in bovine aortic endothelial cells following treatment with human plasma, VLDL lipolysis products, or oleic acid. While plasma failed to activate PPAR-alpha, oleic acid performed similarly to VLDL lipolysis products. Therefore, fatty acids are likely to be the PPAR-alpha ligands generated by VLDL lipolysis. Indeed, unbound fatty acid concentration determined PPAR-alpha activation regardless of fatty acid source, with PPAR-alpha activation occurring only at unbound fatty acid concentrations that are unachievable under physiological conditions without lipase action. In mice, a synthetic lipase inhibitor (poloxamer-407) attenuated fasting-induced changes in expression of PPAR-alpha target genes. Apolipoprotein CIII (apoCIII), an endogenous inhibitor of lipoprotein and hepatic lipase, regulated access to the lipoprotein pool of PPAR-alpha ligands, because addition of exogenous apoCIII inhibited, and removal of endogenous apoCIII potentiated, lipolytic PPAR-alpha activation. These data suggest that the PPAR-alpha response is generated by unbound fatty acids released locally by lipase activity and not by circulating plasma fatty acids.

  2. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  3. Synthesis, Structure-Activity Relationship, and Mechanistic Investigation of Lithocholic Acid Amphiphiles for Colon Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Priyanshu; Singh, Ashima; Motiani, Rajender K.; Shyam, Radhey; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Sengupta, Sagar; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    We report a structure-activity relationship of lithocholic acid amphiphiles for their anticancer activities against colon cancer. We synthesized ten cationic amphiphiles differing in nature of cationic charged head groups using lithocholic acid. We observed that anticancer activities of these amphiphiles against colon cancer cell lines are contingent on nature of charged head group. Lithocholic acid based amphiphile possessing piperidine head group (LCA-PIP1) is ~10 times more cytotoxic as compared to its precursor. Biochemical studies revealed that enhanced activity of LCA-PIP1 as compared to lithocholic acid is due to greater activation of apoptosis.LCA-PIP1 induces sub G0 arrest and causes cleavage of caspases. A single dose of lithocholic acid-piperidine derivative is enough to reduce the tumor burden by 75% in tumor xenograft model. PMID:25685308

  4. Effects of fatty acid activation on photosynthetic production of fatty acid-based biofuels in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Direct conversion of solar energy and carbon dioxide to drop in fuel molecules in a single biological system can be achieved from fatty acid-based biofuels such as fatty alcohols and alkanes. These molecules have similar properties to fossil fuels but can be produced by photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Results Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutant strains containing either overexpression or deletion of the slr1609 gene, which encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AAS), have been constructed. The complete segregation and deletion in all mutant strains was confirmed by PCR analysis. Blocking fatty acid activation by deleting slr1609 gene in wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 led to a doubling of the amount of free fatty acids and a decrease of alkane production by up to 90 percent. Overexpression of slr1609 gene in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 had no effect on the production of either free fatty acids or alkanes. Overexpression or deletion of slr1609 gene in the Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutant strain with the capability of making fatty alcohols by genetically introducing fatty acyl-CoA reductase respectively enhanced or reduced fatty alcohol production by 60 percent. Conclusions Fatty acid activation functionalized by the slr1609 gene is metabolically crucial for biosynthesis of fatty acid derivatives in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. It is necessary but not sufficient for efficient production of alkanes. Fatty alcohol production can be significantly improved by the overexpression of slr1609 gene. PMID:22433663

  5. Enzymatic activity of poliovirus RNA polymerase mutants with single amino acid changes in the conserved YGDD amino acid motif.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, S A; Luo, M; Morrow, C D

    1991-09-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases contain a highly conserved region of amino acids with a core segment composed of the amino acids YGDD which have been hypothesized to be at or near the catalytic active site of the molecule. Six mutations in this conserved YGDD region of the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were made by using oligonucleotide site-directed DNA mutagenesis of the poliovirus cDNA to substitute A, C, M, P, S, or V for the amino acid G. The mutant polymerase genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified RNA polymerases were tested for in vitro enzyme activity. Two of the mutant RNA polymerases (those in which the glycine residue was replaced with alanine or serine) exhibited in vitro enzymatic activity ranging from 5 to 20% of wild-type activity, while the remaining mutant RNA polymerases were inactive. Alterations in the in vitro reaction conditions by modification of temperature, metal ion concentration, or pH resulted in no significant differences in the activities of the mutant RNA polymerases relative to that of the wild-type enzyme. An antipeptide antibody directed against the wild-type core amino acid segment containing the YGDD region of the poliovirus polymerase reacted with the wild-type recombinant RNA polymerase and to a limited extent with the two enzymatically active mutant polymerases; the antipeptide antibody did not react with the mutant RNA polymerases which did not have in vitro enzyme activity. These results are discussed in the context of secondary-structure predictions for the core segment containing the conserved YGDD amino acids in the poliovirus RNA polymerase. PMID:1651402

  6. Improvement of the antifungal activity of lactic acid bacteria by addition to the growth medium of phenylpyruvic acid, a precursor of phenyllactic acid.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Francesca; Di Biase, Mariaelena; Lattanzio, Veronica M T; Lavermicocca, Paola

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to improve the antifungal activity of eight lactic acid bacterial (LAB) strains by the addition of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), a precursor of the antifungal compound phenyllactic acid (PLA), to a defined growth medium (DM). The effect of PPA addition on the LABs antifungal activity related to the production of organic acids (PLA, d-lactic, l-lactic, acetic, citric, formic and 4-hydroxy-phenyllactic acids) and of other phenylpyruvic-derived molecules, was investigated. In the presence of PPA the inhibitory activity (expressed as growth inhibition percentage) against fungal bread contaminants Aspergillus niger and Penicillium roqueforti significantly increased and was, even if not completely, associated to PLA increase (from a mean value of 0.44 to 0.93 mM). While the inhibitory activity against Endomyces fibuliger was mainly correlated to the low pH and to lactic, acetic and p-OH-PLA acids. When the PCA analysis based on data of growth inhibition percentage and organic acid concentrations was performed, strains grown in DM+PPA separated from those grown in DM and the most active strains Lactobacillus plantarum 21B, Lactobacillus fermentum 18B and Lactobacillus brevis 18F grouped together. The antifungal activity resulted to be strain-related, based on a different mechanism of action for filamentous fungi and the yeast and was not exclusively associated to the increase of PLA. Therefore, a further investigation on the unique unidentified peak in HPLC-UV chromatograms, was performed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Actually, full scan mass spectra (negative ion mode) recorded at the retention time of the unknown compound, showed a main peak of m/z 291.0 which was consistent with the nominal mass of the molecular ion [M-H](-) of polyporic acid, a PPA derivative whose antifungal activity has been previously reported (Brewer et al., 1977). In conclusion, the addition of PPA to the growth medium contributed to improve the antifungal activity of LAB

  7. Improvement of the antifungal activity of lactic acid bacteria by addition to the growth medium of phenylpyruvic acid, a precursor of phenyllactic acid.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Francesca; Di Biase, Mariaelena; Lattanzio, Veronica M T; Lavermicocca, Paola

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to improve the antifungal activity of eight lactic acid bacterial (LAB) strains by the addition of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), a precursor of the antifungal compound phenyllactic acid (PLA), to a defined growth medium (DM). The effect of PPA addition on the LABs antifungal activity related to the production of organic acids (PLA, d-lactic, l-lactic, acetic, citric, formic and 4-hydroxy-phenyllactic acids) and of other phenylpyruvic-derived molecules, was investigated. In the presence of PPA the inhibitory activity (expressed as growth inhibition percentage) against fungal bread contaminants Aspergillus niger and Penicillium roqueforti significantly increased and was, even if not completely, associated to PLA increase (from a mean value of 0.44 to 0.93 mM). While the inhibitory activity against Endomyces fibuliger was mainly correlated to the low pH and to lactic, acetic and p-OH-PLA acids. When the PCA analysis based on data of growth inhibition percentage and organic acid concentrations was performed, strains grown in DM+PPA separated from those grown in DM and the most active strains Lactobacillus plantarum 21B, Lactobacillus fermentum 18B and Lactobacillus brevis 18F grouped together. The antifungal activity resulted to be strain-related, based on a different mechanism of action for filamentous fungi and the yeast and was not exclusively associated to the increase of PLA. Therefore, a further investigation on the unique unidentified peak in HPLC-UV chromatograms, was performed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Actually, full scan mass spectra (negative ion mode) recorded at the retention time of the unknown compound, showed a main peak of m/z 291.0 which was consistent with the nominal mass of the molecular ion [M-H](-) of polyporic acid, a PPA derivative whose antifungal activity has been previously reported (Brewer et al., 1977). In conclusion, the addition of PPA to the growth medium contributed to improve the antifungal activity of LAB

  8. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  9. Polyphenolic acids from mint (the aerial of Mentha haplocalyx Briq.) with DPPH radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    She, G-M; Xu, C; Liu, B; Shi, R-B

    2010-05-01

    Vegetables of mint (the aerial part of Mentha haplocalyx) contain a significant amount of polyphenols with many health benefits. The crude aqueous acetone extract exhibited high antioxidant activity (IC(50)= 45.67 mug/mL) in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. The activity-guided separation of chlorophyll removal fraction on column chromatography afforded 8 polyphenolic acids, including a new compound, cis-salvianolic acid J (1), and 7 known compounds, salvianolic acid J (2), lithospermic acid (3), rosmarinic acid (4), lithospermic acid B (5), magnesium lithospermate B (6), sodium lithospermate B (7), and danshensu (8), respectively. Their structural elucidations of all the compounds were based on extensive spectroscopic methods, including HRESIMS and 2D NMR experiments (HSQC, HMBC, and ROESY) and by comparison with reference values. Compounds 2, 3, and 5 to 8 were isolated from Mentha genus for the 1st time. The DPPH radical scavenging activities of all the isolated compounds were evaluated.

  10. Synthesis, antidepressant and antimicrobial activities of some novel stearic acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Jubie, Selvaraj; Ramesh, Patil Nilesh; Dhanabal, Palanichamy; Kalirajan, Rajagopal; Muruganantham, Nithyanantham; Antony, Anthoniswamy Shanish

    2012-08-01

    Stearic acid, a saturated fatty acid was isolated from the microalga Spirulina platensis. Some novel stearic acid analogues having 1,3,4-oxadiazole, 1,2,4-triazole and 1,2,4-triazolo-[3,4-b]-1,3,4-thiadiazole are synthesized and characterized by IR, NMR and mass spectral analysis. All the synthesized compounds were screened for antimicrobial activity by using cup plate method. The synthesized compounds have been further screened for their antidepressant activity in swiss albino mice by forced swim test (FST), midbrain dopamine has been estimated and quantified. All the compounds showed good antimicrobial activity and compound 6 showed significant antidepressant activity.

  11. Antagonism of histamine-activated adenylate cyclase in brain by D-lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Green, J P; Johnson, C L; Weinstein, H; Maayani, S

    1977-12-01

    D-Lysergic acid diethylamide and D-2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide are competitive antagonists of the histamine activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing); E.C. 4.6.1.1] in broken cell preparations of the hippocampus and cortex of guinea pig brain. The adenylate cyclase is linked to the histamine H2-receptor. Both D-lysergic acid diethylamide and D-2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide show topological congruency with potent H2-antagonists. D-2-Bromolysergic acid diethylamide is 10 times more potent as an H2-antagonist than cimetidine, which has been the most potent H2-antagonist reported, and D-lysergic acid diethylamide is about equipotent to cimetidine. Blockade of H2-receptors could contribute to the behavioral effects of D-2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide and D-lysergic acid diethylamide.

  12. Antioxidant activities of rosemary (Rosmarinus Officinalis L.) extract, blackseed (Nigella sativa L.) essential oil, carnosic acid, rosmarinic acid and sesamol.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Naciye; Ayranci, Guler; Ayranci, Erol

    2008-09-01

    Antioxidant activities of three pure compounds: carnosic acid, rosmarinic acid and sesamol, as well as two plant extracts: rosemary extract and blackseed essential oil, were examined by applying DPPH and ABTS(+) radical-scavenging assays and the ferric thiocyanate test. All three test methods proved that rosemary extract had a higher antioxidant activity than blackseed essential oil. The order of antioxidant activity of pure compounds showed variations in different tests. This was attributed to structural factors of individual compounds. Phenolic contents of blackseed essential oil and rosemary extract were also determined. Rosemary extract was found to have a higher phenolic content than blackseed essential oil. This fact was utilised in explaining the higher antioxidant activity of rosemary extract.

  13. Antioxidant activities of rosemary (Rosmarinus Officinalis L.) extract, blackseed (Nigella sativa L.) essential oil, carnosic acid, rosmarinic acid and sesamol.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Naciye; Ayranci, Guler; Ayranci, Erol

    2008-09-01

    Antioxidant activities of three pure compounds: carnosic acid, rosmarinic acid and sesamol, as well as two plant extracts: rosemary extract and blackseed essential oil, were examined by applying DPPH and ABTS(+) radical-scavenging assays and the ferric thiocyanate test. All three test methods proved that rosemary extract had a higher antioxidant activity than blackseed essential oil. The order of antioxidant activity of pure compounds showed variations in different tests. This was attributed to structural factors of individual compounds. Phenolic contents of blackseed essential oil and rosemary extract were also determined. Rosemary extract was found to have a higher phenolic content than blackseed essential oil. This fact was utilised in explaining the higher antioxidant activity of rosemary extract. PMID:26050168

  14. THE EFFECTS OF PANTOTHENIC ACID ON RESPIRATORY ACTIVITY.

    PubMed

    Pratt, E F; Williams, R J

    1939-05-20

    Experiments using the Warburg-Barcroft apparatus led to the following results and conclusions: (1) Two yeasts in three different media were strikingly stimulated in their respiration by minute amounts of pantothenic acid. (2) Nine other compounds (vitamins and other biologically important substances) were tested and found in all cases to have on the deficient G.M. yeast, lesser and in some cases no appreciable stimulative effect. Thiamin was the most effective of these compounds. Its action was shown to be different and in some ways antagonistic to that of pantothenic acid. (3) Liver extract (Lilly's Number 343) contains substances capable of speeding up respiration (and growth) to a much higher level than seems possible with known compounds. (4) Pantothenic acid was found to have a definite stimulative effect on fermentation by dialyzed maceration juice from yeast. (5) It likewise stimulated respiration of apple and potato tissue and indications of a similar effect on certain animal tissues were obtained.

  15. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and phospholipdase A activities in plasma membranes from fusing muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kent, C; Vagelos, P R

    1976-06-17

    Plasma membrane from fusing embryonic muscle cells were assayed for phospholipase A activity to determine if this enzyme plays a role in cell fusion. The membranes were assayed under a variety of conditions with phosphatidylcholine as the substrate and no phospholipase A activity was found. The plasma membranes did contain a phosphatidic acid phosphatase which was optimally active in the presence of Triton X-100 and glycerol. The enzyme activity was constant from pH 5.2 to 7.0, and did not require divalent cations. Over 97% of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity was in the particulate fraction. The subcellular distribution of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase was the same as the distributions of the plasma membrane markers, (Na+ + k+)-ATPase and the acetylcholine receptor, which indicates that this phosphatase is located exclusively in the plasma membranes. There was no detectable difference in the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities of plasma membranes from fusing and non-fusing cells.

  16. Effect of low temperature on highly unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    He, Su; Ding, Li-Li; Xu, Ke; Geng, Jin-Ju; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature is a limiting factor for the microbial activity of activated sludge for sewage treatment plant in winter. Highly unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) constituents and microbial structure in activated sludge at low temperature were investigated. Over 12 gigabases of metagenomic sequence data were generated with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The result showed 43.11% of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) in the activated sludge participated in UFA biosynthesis, and γ-Linolenic could be converted to Arachidonic acid at low temperature. The highly UFA biosynthesis in activated sludge was n-6 highly UFA biosynthesis, rather than n-3 highly UFA biosynthesis. The microbial community structures of activated sludge were analyzed by PLFA and high-throughput sequencing (HiSeq) simultaneously. Acidovorax, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Polaromonas occupied higher percentage at 5°C, and genetic changes of highly UFA biosynthesis derived from microbial community structures change.

  17. Activation of transcription by PU.1 requires both acidic and glutamine domains.

    PubMed Central

    Klemsz, M J; Maki, R A

    1996-01-01

    The B-lymphocyte- and macrophage-specific transcription factor PU.1 is a member of the ets family of proteins. To understand how PU.1 functions as a transcription factor, we initiated a series of experiments to define its activation domain. Using deletion analysis, we showed that the activation domain of PU.1 is located in the amino-terminal half of the protein. Within this region, we identified three acidic subdomains and one glutamine-rich subdomain. The deletion of any of these subdomains resulted in a significant loss in the ability of PU.1 to transactivate in cotransfection studies. Amino acid substitution analysis showed that the activation of transcription by PU.1 requires acidic residues between amino acids 7 and 74 and a group of glutamine residues between amino acids 75 and 84. These data show that PU.1 contains two types of known activation domains and that both are required for maximal transactivation. PMID:8524320

  18. [Primary research on anti-tumor activity of panaxadiol fatty acid esters].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Lian-Xue; Li, Xiang-Gao; Gao, Yu-Gang; Liu, Ya-Jing

    2006-11-01

    For making use of Ginseng resources and finding new anti-tumor drugs, the anti-tumor activity of three kinds of new panaxadiol fatty acid ester derivates: 3beta-acetoxy panaxadiol (I), 3beta-palmitic acid aceloxy panaxadiol (II), 3beta-octadecanoic acid aceloxy panaxadiol (Ill) and panaxaiol were compared through the method of cell stain and counting. Tumor cell was Vero cell line. Positive control was 5-FU. Blank was RPM11640 culture medium. Negative control was RPM11640 culture medium and the solvent for subjected drugs. The result showed that compound I had the strongest anti-tumor activity, second was panaxadiol, II and III had the same and the weakest antitumor activity. Furthermore, the anti-tumor activities of panaxadiol fatty acid ester derivates showed positive correlation with subjects' concentrations, but no relationship with molecular weight of fatty acid. PMID:17228662

  19. [Effect of acid rain, copper, and atrazine on soil hydrolase activity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangshen; Xu, Dongmei; Li, Kebin; Liu, Weiping

    2004-01-01

    The effects of acid rain, Cu2+ and atrazine on the activities of soil urease, invertase and acid phosphatase were studied by means of orthogonal test. The results showed that the inhibition rate was H+ > Cu2+, and atrazine had no significant influence on urease and intertase. Interaction analysis revealed that Cu x atrazine exhibited synergism on soil acid phosphatase activity, Cu x H had antagonism on soil invertase and urease, but atrazine x H had no interaction within the investigated concentration range. Among the three enzymes, soil acid phosphatase was the most sensitive one to the contaminations.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of the lichen Xanthoparmelia pokornyi and its gyrophoric and stenosporic acid constituents.

    PubMed

    Candan, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Meral; Tay, Turgay; Kivanç, Merih; Türk, Hayrettin

    2006-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the diethyl ether, acetone, chloroform, petroleum ether, and ethanol extracts of the lichen Xanthoparmelia pokornyi and its gyrophoric acid and stenosporic acid constituents has been screened against some foodborne bacteria and fungi. Both the extracts and the acids showed antimicrobial activity against Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. The extracts were inactive against the tested filamentous fungi. The MIC values of the extracts and the acids for the bacteria have also been determined.

  1. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  2. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  3. Experiments on the origins of optical activity. [in amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Flores, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted concerning the asymmetric adsorption of phenylalanine enantiomers by kaolin. No preferential adsorption of either phenylalanine enantiomer could be detected and there was no resolution of the racemic phenylalanine by kaolin. The attempted asymmetric polymerization of aspartic acid by kaolin is also discussed along with a strontium-90 bremsstrahlung radiolysis of leucine.

  4. Biological activity and biotechnological aspects of peptide nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Karin E; Good, Liam; Strömberg, Roger; Gräslund, Astrid; Smith, C I Edvard

    2006-01-01

    During the latest decades a number of different nucleic acid analogs containing natural nucleobases on a modified backbone have been synthesized. An example of this is peptide nucleic acid (PNA), a DNA mimic with a noncyclic peptide-like backbone, which was first synthesized in 1991. Owing to its flexible and neutral backbone PNA displays very good hybridization properties also at low-ion concentrations and has subsequently attracted large interest both in biotechnology and biomedicine. Numerous modifications have been made, which could be of value for particular settings. However, the original PNA does so far perform well in many diverse applications. The high biostability makes it interesting for in vivo use, although the very limited diffusion over lipid membranes requires further modifications in order to make it suitable for treatment in eukaryotic cells. The possibility to use this nucleic acid analog for gene regulation and gene editing is discussed. Peptide nucleic acid is now also used for specific genetic detection in a number of diagnostic techniques, as well as for site-specific labeling and hybridization of functional molecules to both DNA and RNA, areas that are also discussed in this chapter.

  5. Anti-inflammatory activities of oleanolic acid on HMGB1 activated HUVECs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun-Ju; Lee, Wonhwa; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Song, Kyung-Sik; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2012-05-01

    As a late mediator of inflammation, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein up-regulates pro-inflammatory cytokines in several inflammatory diseases. Further, high plasma levels of HMGB1 correlate with poor prognosis and increased mortality in patients with severe inflammation. Oleanolic acid (OA), a triterpenoid known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, is commonly present in several medicinal plants but the effects of OA on HMGB1-mediated pro-inflammatory responses of human endothelial cells is not well-studied. In this study, we investigated this question by monitoring the effect of OA on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated release of HMGB1 and the HMGB1-mediated modulation of inflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA potently inhibited the release of HMGB1 by HUVECs as well as down-regulated HMGB1-dependent adhesion and migration of the monocytic cell line THP-1 to activated HUVECs. OA also down-regulated the cell surface expression of the receptor of HMGB1, thereby inhibiting HMGB1-dependent pro-inflammatory responses by inhibiting activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by HMGB1. Given these results, OA showed anti-inflammatory activities and could be a candidate as a therapeutic agent for various inflammatory diseases through the inhibition of the HMGB1 signaling pathway.

  6. Insights into properties of activated carbons prepared from different raw precursors by pyrophosphoric acid activation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu

    2016-03-01

    Low-cost activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from four kinds of solid wastes: petroleum coke, Enteromorpha prolifera, lignin from papermaking black liquid and hair, by pyrophosphoric acid (H4P2O7) activation. Thermo-gravimetric analysis of the pyrolysis of H4P2O7-precursor mixtures implied that H4P2O7 had different influences on the pyrolysis behavior of the four raw materials. N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and adsorption capacities for dyes were used to characterize the prepared activated carbons. AC derived from E. prolifera exhibited the highest surface area (1094m(2)/g) and maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for malachite green (1250mg/g). Kinetic studies showed that the experimental data were in agreement with the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption isotherms were well described by the Langmuir isotherm model, indicating the adsorption of dye onto the ACs proceeded by monolayers. PMID:26969070

  7. Effects of exogenous fatty acids and cholesterol on aminopeptidase activities in rat astroglia.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Expósito, M J; García, M J; Mayas, M D; Ramírez, M; Martínez-Martos, J M

    2002-12-01

    Several studies have addressed the interaction between fatty acids and lipids with central nervous system peptides. Because aminopeptidases (AP) are involved in the regulation of neuropeptides, this work studies several AP expressed in cultured astroglia, after exogenous addition of oleic and linoleic fatty acids and cholesterol to the culture medium. Alanyl-AP, arginyl-AP, cystyl-AP, leucyl-AP, tyrosyl-AP and pyroglutamyl-AP activities were analysed in whole cells using the corresponding aminoacyl-beta-naphthylamides as substrates. Oleic acid inhibits alanyl-AP, cystyl-AP and leucyl-AP activities, whereas linoleic acid inhibits alanyl-AP, arginyl-AP and tyrosyl-AP activities. Neither oleic acid nor linoleic acid modifies pyroglutamyl-AP activity. In contrast, cholesterol increases arginyl-AP, cystyl-AP, leucyl-AP, tyrosyl-AP and pyroglutamyl-AP activities, although it does not modify alanyl-AP activity. The changes reported here suggest that oleic and linoleic fatty acids and cholesterol can modulate peptide activities via their degradation route involving aminopeptidases; each of them being differentially regulated.

  8. Quantitation of volatiles and nonvolatile acids in an extract from coffee beverages: correlation with antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2006-08-01

    The antioxidant activities of a commercial brewed coffee were investigated by measuring malonaldehyde (MA) formation from oxidized cod liver oil using a gas chromatographic method (MA-GC assay) and a thiobarbituric acid method (TBA assay). The highest antioxidant activity obtained by the MA-GC assay was from regular whole brewed coffee (97.8%) at a level of 20%, and the highest antioxidant activity obtained by the TBA assay was from decaffeinated whole brewed coffee (96.6%) at a level of 5%. Among 31 chemicals identified in a dichloromethane extract, guaiacol, ethylguaiacol, and vinylguaiacol exhibited antioxidant activities, which were comparable to that of alpha-tocopherol. Among nine chlorogenic acids (three caffeoylquinic acids, three feruloylquinic acids, and three dicaffeoylquinic acids) identified, 5-caffeoylquinic acid contained the greatest amount both in regular (883.5 microg/mL) and in decaffeinated (1032.6 microg/mL) coffees; it exhibited 24.5% activity by the MA-GC assay and 45.3% activity by the TBA assay at a level of 10 microg/mL. Caffeic and ferulic acids showed moderate antioxidant activities in both assays. PMID:16881716

  9. Inhibition of type 1 and type 2 5alpha-reductase activity by free fatty acids, active ingredients of Permixon.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Jean Pierre; Cousse, Henri; Martin, Pierre Marie

    2002-10-01

    In different cell systems, the lipido-sterolic extract of Serenoa repens (LSESr, Permixon inhibits both type 1 and type 2 5alpha-reductase activity (5alphaR1 and 5alphaR2). LSESr is mainly constituted of fatty acids (90+/-5%) essentially as free fatty acids (80%). Among these free fatty acids, the main components are oleic and lauric acids which represent 65% and linoleic and myristic acids 15%. To evaluate the inhibitory effect of the different components of LSESr on 5alphaR1 or 5alphaR2 activity, the corresponding type 1 and type 2 human genes have been cloned and expressed in the baculovirus-directed insect cell expression system Sf9. The cells were incubated at pH 5.5 (5alphaR2) and pH 7.4 (5alphaR1) with 1 or 3nM testosterone in presence or absence of various concentrations of LSESr or of its different components. Dihydrotestosterone formation was measured with an automatic system combining HPLC and an on-line radiodetector. The inhibition of 5alphaR1 and 5alphaR2 activity was only observed with free fatty acids: esterified fatty acids, alcohols as well as sterols assayed were inactive. A specificity of the fatty acids in 5alphaR1 or 5alphaR2 inhibition has been found. Long unsaturated chains (oleic and linolenic) were active (IC(50)=4+/-2 and 13+/-3 microg/ml, respectively) on 5alphaR1 but to a much lesser extent (IC(50)>100 and 35+/-21 microg/ml, respectively) on 5alphaR2. Palmitic and stearic acids were inactive on the two isoforms. Lauric acid was active on 5alphaR1 (IC(50)=17+/-3 microg/ml) and 5alphaR2 (IC(50)=19+/-9 microg/ml). The inhibitory activity of myristic acid was evaluated on 5alphaR2 only and found active on this isoform (IC(50)=4+/-2 microg/ml). The dual inhibitory activity of LSESr on 5alpha-reductase type 1 and type 2 can be attributed to its high content in free fatty acids.

  10. Joint effect of organic acids and inorganic salts on cloud droplet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, M.; Prisle, N. L.; Bilde, M.; Varga, Z.; Kiss, G.

    2011-04-01

    We have investigated CCN properties of internally mixed particles composed of one organic acid (oxalic acid dihydrate, succinic acid, adipic acid, citric acid, cis-pinonic acid, or Nordic reference fulvic acid) and one inorganic salt (sodium chloride or ammonium sulphate). Surface tension and water activity of aqueous model solutions with concentrations relevant for CCN activation were measured using a tensiometer and osmometry, respectively. The measurements were used to calculate Köhler curves and critical supersaturations, which were compared to measured critical supersaturations of particles with the same chemical compositions, determined with a cloud condensation nucleus counter. Surfactant surface partitioning was not accounted for. For the aqueous solutions containing cis-pinonic acid and fulvic acid, a depression of surface tension was observed, but for the remaining solutions the effect on surface tension was negligible at concentrations relevant for cloud droplet activation. The surface tension depression of aqueous solutions containing both organic acid and inorganic salt was approximately the same as or smaller than that of aqueous solutions containing the same mass of the corresponding pure organic acids. Water activity was found to be highly dependent on the type and amount of inorganic salt. Sodium chloride was able to decrease water activity more than ammonium sulphate and both inorganic salts are predicted to have a smaller Raoult term than the studied organic acids. Increasing the mass ratio of the inorganic salt led to a decrease in water activity. Water activity measurements were compared to results from the E-AIM model and values estimated from both constant and variable van't Hoff factors. The correspondence between measurements and estimates was overall good, except for highly concentrated solutions. Critical supersaturations calculated with Köhler theory based on measured water activity and surface tension, but not accounting for surface

  11. Kinetics and Quantitative Structure—Activity Relationship Study on the Degradation Reaction from Perfluorooctanoic Acid to Trifluoroacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure–activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure–activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure–activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1–C2 (RC1–C2 and EC1–C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated. PMID:25196516

  12. Kinetics and quantitative structure-activity relationship study on the degradation reaction from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-08-14

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure-activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure-activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure-activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1-C2 (RC1-C2 and EC1-C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated.

  13. HPLC Quantification of Phenolic Acids from Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash and Its Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Prajna, Jha; Richa, Jindal; Dipjyoti, Chakraborty

    2013-01-01

    Extraction procedure was standardized and for the soluble, glycoside, and wall-bound fractions of phenolic acids from Vetiveria zizanioides. The water soluble alkaline extract which represents the cell wall-bound fraction contained the highest amount of phenolic acids (2.62 ± 1.2 μM/g fwt GA equivalents). Increased phenolic content in the cell wall indicates more lignin deposition which has an important role in plant defense and stress mitigation. Antioxidant property expressed as percentage TEAC value obtained by ABTS assay was correlated with the amount of phenolic acids and showed a Pearson's coefficient 0.988 (significant at 0.01 level). The compounds p-coumaric acid, p-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and ferulic acid were detected in the acidic extracts by HPLC analysis. The plant extracts exhibited considerable antimicrobial activity against tested bacterial and fungal strains. PMID:26555971

  14. The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is activated by alterations of its membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Axel; Lenzig, Pia; Oslender-Bujotzek, Adrienne; Kusch, Jana; Lucas, Susana Dias; Gründer, Stefan; Wiemuth, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the DEG/ENaC family of ion channels. Channels of this family are characterized by a common structure, their physiological functions and modes of activation, however, are diverse. Rat BASIC is expressed in brain, liver and intestinal tract and activated by bile acids. The physiological function of BASIC and its mechanism of bile acid activation remain a puzzle. Here we addressed the question whether amphiphilic bile acids activate BASIC by directly binding to the channel or indirectly by altering the properties of the surrounding membrane. We show that membrane-active substances other than bile acids also affect the activity of BASIC and that activation by bile acids and other membrane-active substances is non-additive, suggesting that BASIC is sensitive for changes in its membrane environment. Furthermore based on results from chimeras between BASIC and ASIC1a, we show that the extracellular and the transmembrane domains are important for membrane sensitivity.

  15. A convenient and efficient approach to polyfluorosalicylic acids and their tuberculostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Shchegol'kov, Evgeny V; Shchur, Irina V; Burgart, Yanina V; Saloutin, Victor I; Solodnikov, Sergey Yu; Krasnykh, Olga P; Kravchenko, Marionella A

    2016-05-15

    We have developed the practical method for polyfluorosalicylic acids synthesis via nucleophilic ortho-mono-substitution of fluorine atom with magnesium methoxide. We have managed to increase the yield of targeted polyfluorosalicylic acids from good to quantitative. We have studied the tuberculostatic activity of polyfluorosalicylic acids. It has been found that minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of compounds is from 0.7 to 6.5μg/mL depending on the structure. PMID:27072906

  16. Lactic Acid Bacterial Starter Culture with Antioxidant and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Biosynthetic Activities Isolated from Flatfish-Sikhae Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Won, Yeong Geol; Yu, Hyun-Hee; Chang, Young-Hyo; Hwang, Han-Joon

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to select a lactic acid bacterial strain as a starter culture for flatfish-Sikhae fermentation and to evaluate its suitability for application in a food system. Four strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from commercial flatfish-Sikhae were identified and selected as starter culture candidates through investigation of growth rates, salt tolerance, food safety, and functional properties such as antioxidative and antimicrobial activities. The fermentation properties of the starter candidates were also examined in food systems prepared with these strains (candidate batch) in comparison with a spontaneous fermentation process without starter culture (control batch) at 15°C. The results showed that the candidate YG331 batch had better fermentation properties such as viable cell count, pH, and acidity than the other experimental batches, including the control batch. The results are expressed according to selection criteria based on a preliminary sensory evaluation and physiochemical investigation. Also, only a small amount of histamine was detected with the candidate YG331 batch. The radical scavenging activity of the candidate batches was better compared with the control batch, and especially candidate YG331 batch showed the best radical scavenging activity. Also, we isolated another starter candidate (identified as Lactobacillus brevis PM03) with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing activity from commercial flatfish-Sikhae products. The sensory scores of the candidate YG331 batch were better than those of the other experimental batches in terms of flavor, color, and overall acceptance. In this study, we established selection criteria for the lactic acid bacterial starter for the flatfish-Sikhae production and finally selected candidate YG331 as the most suitable starter.

  17. Identification, quantitative determination, and antioxidative activities of chlorogenic acid isomers in prune (Prunus domestica L. ).

    PubMed

    Nakatani, N; Kayano, S; Kikuzaki, H; Sumino, K; Katagiri, K; Mitani, T

    2000-11-01

    Neochlorogenic acid (3-CQA) and cryptochlorogenic acid (4-CQA), isolated from prune (Prunus domestica L.), were identified by NMR and MS analyses. In addition, the quantity of chlorogenic acid isomers in prune were measured by HPLC. These isomers, 3-CQA, 4-CQA, and chlorogenic acid (5-CQA), were contained in the ratio 78.7:18. 4:3.9, respectively. 4-CQA was identified and quantified in prune for the first time, and relatively high amounts of this isomer were characteristic. Antioxidative activities of the chlorogenic acid isomers, such as scavenging activity on superoxide anion radicals and inhibitory effect against oxidation of methyl linoleate, were also evaluated. Each isomer showed antioxidative activities which were almost the same.

  18. Medium chain fatty acid ethyl esters - activation of antimicrobial effects by Malassezia enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Free medium and short chain fatty acids are known to have broad antimicrobial activity. However, their practical use in topical therapy is limited by their intensive smell and acidity. Surprisingly, a nearly identical antimicrobial effect was found with the ethyl ester derivatives of these fatty acids, but only against Malassezia (M.) yeast, not against Candida spp. Obviously, these esters are hydrolysed by M. enzymes, thus generating a selective activation of antimicrobial activity especially in areas well populated with these yeast ('targeting'). Octanoic acid ethyl ester (CAS 106-32-1) was found to be most suitable. In an agar dilution test, the minimal inhibitory concentrations against M. globosa, M. pachydermatis and M. sympodialis, respectively, ranged between ~5 and 10 mmol l(-1) after 10 days of incubation. The effect started immediately and was not delayed by other lipid sources applied simultaneously. Based on these data, fatty acid monoesters may represent a new therapeutic concept in M.-associated diseases. PMID:25676074

  19. Joint effect of organic acids and inorganic salts on cloud droplet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, M.; Prisle, N. L.; Bilde, M.; Varga, Z.; Kiss, G.

    2010-07-01

    We have investigated CCN properties of internally mixed particles composed of one organic acid (oxalic acid, succinic acid, adipic acid, citric acid, cis-pinonic acid, or nordic reference fulvic acid) and one inorganic salt (sodium chloride or ammonium sulphate). Surface tension and water activity of aqueous model solutions with concentrations relevant for CCN activation were measured using a tensiometer and osmometry, respectively. The measurements were used to calculate Köhler curves, which were compared to measured critical supersaturations of particles with the same chemical compositions, determined with a cloud condensation nucleus counter. Surfactant surface partitioning was not accounted for. For the mixtures containing cis-pinonic acid or fulvic acid, a depression of surface tension was observed, but for the remaining mixtures the effect on surface tension was negligle at concentrations relevant for cloud droplet activation, and water activity was the more significant term in the Köhler equation. The surface tension depression of aqueous solutions containing both organic acid and inorganic salt was approximately the same as or smaller than that of aqueous solutions containing the same mass of the corresponding pure organic acids. Water activity was found to be highly dependent on the type and amount of inorganic salt. Sodium chloride was able to decrease water activity more than ammonium sulphate and both inorganic compounds had a higher effect on water activity than the studied organic acids, and increasing the mass ratio of the inorganic compound led to a decrease in water activity. Water activity measurements were compared to results from the E-AIM model and values estimated from both constant and variable van't Hoff factors to evaluate the performance of these approaches. The correspondence between measuments and estimates was overall good, except for highly concentrated solutions. Critical supersaturations calculated with Köhler theory based on

  20. p21 induction plays a dual role in anti-cancer activity of ursolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xudong; Song, Xinhua; Yin, Shutao; Zhao, Chong; Fan, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis by ursolic acid is associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) protein p21 in multiple types of cancer cells. However, the functional role of p21 induction in G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and the mechanisms of p21 induction by ursolic acid have not been critically addressed. In the current study, we demonstrated that p21 played a mediator role in G1 cell cycle arrest by ursolic acid, whereas p21-mediated up-regulation of Mcl-1 compromised apoptotic effect of ursolic acid. These results suggest that p21 induction plays a dual role in the anti-cancer activity of ursolic acid in terms of cell cycle and apoptosis regulation. p21 induction by ursolic acid was attributed to p53 transcriptional activation. Moreover, we found that ursolic acid was able to inhibit murine double minute-2 protein (MDM2) and T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK), the two negative regulator of p53, which in turn contributed to ursolic acid-induced p53 activation. Our findings provided novel insights into understanding of the mechanisms involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in response to ursolic acid exposure. PMID:26582056

  1. Hepatic Fasting-Induced PPARα Activity Does Not Depend on Essential Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Arnaud; Fouché, Edwin; Ducheix, Simon; Lasserre, Frédéric; Marmugi, Alice P; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Loiseau, Nicolas; Wahli, Walter; Guillou, Hervé; Montagner, Alexandra

    2016-09-24

    The liver plays a central role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, which is highly sensitive to transcriptional responses to nutrients and hormones. Transcription factors involved in this process include nuclear hormone receptors. One such receptor, PPARα, which is highly expressed in the liver and activated by a variety of fatty acids, is a critical regulator of hepatic fatty acid catabolism during fasting. The present study compared the influence of dietary fatty acids and fasting on hepatic PPARα-dependent responses. Pparα(-/-) male mice and their wild-type controls were fed diets containing different fatty acids for 10 weeks prior to being subjected to fasting or normal feeding. In line with the role of PPARα in sensing dietary fatty acids, changes in chronic dietary fat consumption influenced liver damage during fasting. The changes were particularly marked in mice fed diets lacking essential fatty acids. However, fasting, rather than specific dietary fatty acids, induced acute PPARα activity in the liver. Taken together, the data imply that the potent signalling involved in triggering PPARα activity during fasting does not rely on essential fatty acid-derived ligand.

  2. Hepatic Fasting-Induced PPARα Activity Does Not Depend on Essential Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Arnaud; Fouché, Edwin; Ducheix, Simon; Lasserre, Frédéric; Marmugi, Alice P.; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Loiseau, Nicolas; Wahli, Walter; Guillou, Hervé; Montagner, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, which is highly sensitive to transcriptional responses to nutrients and hormones. Transcription factors involved in this process include nuclear hormone receptors. One such receptor, PPARα, which is highly expressed in the liver and activated by a variety of fatty acids, is a critical regulator of hepatic fatty acid catabolism during fasting. The present study compared the influence of dietary fatty acids and fasting on hepatic PPARα-dependent responses. Pparα−/− male mice and their wild-type controls were fed diets containing different fatty acids for 10 weeks prior to being subjected to fasting or normal feeding. In line with the role of PPARα in sensing dietary fatty acids, changes in chronic dietary fat consumption influenced liver damage during fasting. The changes were particularly marked in mice fed diets lacking essential fatty acids. However, fasting, rather than specific dietary fatty acids, induced acute PPARα activity in the liver. Taken together, the data imply that the potent signalling involved in triggering PPARα activity during fasting does not rely on essential fatty acid-derived ligand. PMID:27669233

  3. Hepatic Fasting-Induced PPARα Activity Does Not Depend on Essential Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Arnaud; Fouché, Edwin; Ducheix, Simon; Lasserre, Frédéric; Marmugi, Alice P; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Loiseau, Nicolas; Wahli, Walter; Guillou, Hervé; Montagner, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, which is highly sensitive to transcriptional responses to nutrients and hormones. Transcription factors involved in this process include nuclear hormone receptors. One such receptor, PPARα, which is highly expressed in the liver and activated by a variety of fatty acids, is a critical regulator of hepatic fatty acid catabolism during fasting. The present study compared the influence of dietary fatty acids and fasting on hepatic PPARα-dependent responses. Pparα(-/-) male mice and their wild-type controls were fed diets containing different fatty acids for 10 weeks prior to being subjected to fasting or normal feeding. In line with the role of PPARα in sensing dietary fatty acids, changes in chronic dietary fat consumption influenced liver damage during fasting. The changes were particularly marked in mice fed diets lacking essential fatty acids. However, fasting, rather than specific dietary fatty acids, induced acute PPARα activity in the liver. Taken together, the data imply that the potent signalling involved in triggering PPARα activity during fasting does not rely on essential fatty acid-derived ligand. PMID:27669233

  4. Role of the AMP-activated protein kinase in regulating fatty acid metabolism during exercise.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Gregory R

    2009-06-01

    During moderate-intensity exercise, fatty acids are the predominant substrate for working skeletal muscle. The release of fatty acids from adipose tissue stores, combined with the ability of skeletal muscle to actively fine tune the gradient between fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism, depending on substrate availability and energetic demands, requires a coordinated system of metabolic control. Over the past decade, since the discovery that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was increased in accordance with exercise intensity, there has been significant interest in the proposed role of this ancient stress-sensing kinase as a critical integrative switch controlling metabolic responses during exercise. In this review, studies examining the role of AMPK as a regulator of fatty acid metabolism in both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle during exercise will be discussed. Exercise induces activation of AMPK in adipocytes and regulates triglyceride hydrolysis and esterfication through phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and glycerol-3-phosphate acyl-transferase, respectively. In skeletal muscle, exercise-induced activation of AMPK is associated with increases in fatty acid uptake, phosphorylation of HSL, and increased fatty acid oxidation, which is thought to occur via the acetyl-CoA carboxylase-malony-CoA-CPT-1 signalling axis. Despite the importance of AMPK in regulating fatty acid metabolism under resting conditions, recent evidence from transgenic models of AMPK deficiency suggest that alternative signalling pathways may also be important for the control of fatty acid metabolism during exercise.

  5. Evaluation of Perfluoroalkyl Acid Activity Using Primary Mouse and Human Hepatocytes.

    EPA Science Inventory

    While perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been studied at length, less is known about the biological activity of other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment. Using a transient transfection assay developed in COS-1 cells, our group h...

  6. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROALKYL ACID ACTIVITY USING PRIMARY MOUSE AND HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    While perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been studied at length, less is know about the biological activity of other environmental perfluoroalkyl acids (pFAAs). Using a transient transfection assay developed in COS-l cells, our group has previ...

  7. Synthesis and Anti-microbial Activity of Novel Phosphatidylethanolamine-N-amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vijeetha, Tadla; Balakrishna, Marrapu; Karuna, Mallampalli Sri Lakshmi; Surya Koppeswara Rao, Bhamidipati Venkata; Prasad, Rachapudi Badari Narayana; Kumar, Koochana Pranay; Surya Narayana Murthy, Upadyaula

    2015-01-01

    The study involved synthesis of five novel amino acid derivatives of phosphatidylethanolamine isolated from egg yolk lecithin employing a three step procedure i) N-protection of L-amino acids with BOC anhydride in alkaline medium ii) condensation of - CO2H group of N-protected amino acid with free -NH2 of PE by a peptide linkage and iii) deprotection of N-protected group of amino acids to obtain phosphatidylethanolamine-N-amino acid derivatives in 60-75% yield. The five L-amino acids used were L glycine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-phenylalanine. The amino acid derivatives were screened for anti-baterial activity against B. subtilis, S. aureus, P. aeroginosa and E. coli taking Streptomycin as reference compound and anti-fungal activity against C. albicans, S. cervisiae, A. niger taking AmphotericinB as reference compound. All the amino acid derivatives exhibited extraordinary anti-bacterial activities about 3 folds or comparable to Streptomycin and moderate or no anti-fungal activity against Amphotericin-B.

  8. Relationship between the electrochemical activity of Raney nickel and the rate of hydrogenation of maleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pervii, E.N.; Sofronkov, A.N.; Fedyshina, N.M.

    1986-02-10

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the conditions in which a direct correlation exists between the rate of hydrogenation of maleic acid and the electrochemical activity of catalysts of hydrogen ionization. The rate of maleic acid hydrogenation in presence of Raney nickel catalyst was studied by a combination of volumetric and potentiometric methods.

  9. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-05-16

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

  10. Acute larvicidal activity against mosquitoes and oxygen consumption inhibitory activity of dihydroguaiaretic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Tabara, Yoshimi; Kishida, Taro; Nishi, Kosuke; Shuto, Yoshihiro; Sugahara, Takuya; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2015-03-11

    (-)-Dihydroguaiaretic acid (DGA) and its derivatives having 3-hydroxyphenyl (3-OH-DGA) and variously substituted phenyl groups instead of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl groups were synthesized to measure their larvicidal activity against the mosquito Culex pipiens Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera: Culicidae). Compared with DGA and 3-OH-DGA (LC50 (M), 3.52 × 10(-5) and 4.57 × 10(-5), respectively), (8R,8'R)-lignan-3-ol (3) and its 3-Me (10), 2-OH (12), 3-OH (13), and 2-OMe (15) derivatives showed low potency (ca. 6-8 × 10(-5) M). The 4-Me derivative (11) showed the lowest potency (12.1 × 10(-5) M), and the 2-F derivative (4) showed the highest (2.01 × 10(-5) M). All of the synthesized compounds induced an acute toxic symptom against mosquito larvae, with potency varying with the type and position of the substituents. The 4-F derivative (6), which killed larvae almost completely within 45 min, suppressed the O2 consumption of the mitochondrial fraction, demonstrating that this compound inhibited mitochondrial O2 consumption contributing to a respiratory inhibitory activity.

  11. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis, inhibits Helicobacter pylori peptide deformylase activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kunqiang; Lu, Weiqiang; Zhu, Lili; Shen, Xu; Huang, Jin

    2013-05-31

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major causative factor for gastrointestinal illnesses, H. pylori peptide deformylase (HpPDF) catalyzes the removal of formyl group from the N-terminus of nascent polypeptide chains, which is essential for H. pylori survival and is considered as a promising drug target for anti-H. pylori therapy. Propolis, a natural antibiotic from honeybees, is reported to have an inhibitory effect on the growth of H. pylori in vitro. In addition, previous studies suggest that the main active constituents in the propolis are phenolic compounds. Therefore, we evaluated a collection of phenolic compounds derived from propolis for enzyme inhibition against HpPDF. Our study results show that Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), one of the main medicinal components of propolis, is a competitive inhibitor against HpPDF, with an IC50 value of 4.02 μM. Furthermore, absorption spectra and crystal structural characterization revealed that different from most well known PDF inhibitors, CAPE block the substrate entrance, preventing substrate from approaching the active site, but CAPE does not have chelate interaction with HpPDF and does not disrupt the metal-dependent catalysis. Our study provides valuable information for understanding the potential anti-H. pylori mechanism of propolis, and CAPE could be served as a lead compound for further anti-H. pylori drug discovery. PMID:23611786

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis, inhibits Helicobacter pylori peptide deformylase activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kunqiang; Lu, Weiqiang; Zhu, Lili; Shen, Xu; Huang, Jin

    2013-05-31

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major causative factor for gastrointestinal illnesses, H. pylori peptide deformylase (HpPDF) catalyzes the removal of formyl group from the N-terminus of nascent polypeptide chains, which is essential for H. pylori survival and is considered as a promising drug target for anti-H. pylori therapy. Propolis, a natural antibiotic from honeybees, is reported to have an inhibitory effect on the growth of H. pylori in vitro. In addition, previous studies suggest that the main active constituents in the propolis are phenolic compounds. Therefore, we evaluated a collection of phenolic compounds derived from propolis for enzyme inhibition against HpPDF. Our study results show that Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), one of the main medicinal components of propolis, is a competitive inhibitor against HpPDF, with an IC50 value of 4.02 μM. Furthermore, absorption spectra and crystal structural characterization revealed that different from most well known PDF inhibitors, CAPE block the substrate entrance, preventing substrate from approaching the active site, but CAPE does not have chelate interaction with HpPDF and does not disrupt the metal-dependent catalysis. Our study provides valuable information for understanding the potential anti-H. pylori mechanism of propolis, and CAPE could be served as a lead compound for further anti-H. pylori drug discovery.

  13. Studies on tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase that produces the acidic precursor of tetrahydrocannabinol, the pharmacologically active cannabinoid in marijuana.

    PubMed

    Taura, F

    2009-06-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana, is now regarded as a promising medicine because this cannabinoid has been shown to exert a variety of therapeutic activities. It has been demonstrated that THC is generated from the acidic precursor, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) by nonenzymatic decarboxylation, and that THCA is biosynthesized by THCA synthase, which catalyzes a unique biosynthetic reaction, the stereospecific oxidative cyclization of the geranyl group of the substrate cannabigerolic acid. Molecular characterization of THCA synthase has revealed its structural characteristics and reaction mechanism. THCA synthase is the first cannabinoid synthase to be studied and is potentially attractive target for various biotechnological applications as it produces the direct precursor of THC. This review describes the research history of this enzyme, i.e., purification, molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and possible biotechnological application of THCA synthase. PMID:22495534

  14. [Preparation and antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of verticinone-bile acids salts].

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Ruan, Han-Li; Pi, Hui-Fang; Chen, Chang; Wu, Ji-Zhou

    2007-03-01

    To search for potential drugs with potent antitussive, expectorant, antiasthmatic activities and low toxicity, a series of verticinone-bile acids salts were prepared based on the clearly elucidated antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of verticinone in bulbs of Fritillaria and different bile acids in Snake Bile. The antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of these verticinone-bile acid salts were then screened with different animal models. Ver-CA (verticinone-cholic acid salt) and Ver-CDCA (verticinone-chenodeoxycholic acid salt) showed much more potent activities than other compounds. The bioactivities of Ver-CA and Ver-CDCA are worthy to be intensively studied, and it is also deserved to pay much attention to their much more potent antitussive effects than codeine phosphate. In order to elucidate whether they have synergistic effect and attenuated toxicity, their activities will be continuously compared with single verticinone, cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid at the same doses on different animal models. The application of "combination principles" in traditional Chinese medicinal formulations may be a novel way in triditional Chinese medicine research and discovery.

  15. Anti-inflammatory/anti-pyretic salicylic acid esters with low gastric ulcerogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Rainsford, K D; Whitehouse, M W

    1980-11-01

    The methyl and some other esters of acetylsalicylic and salicylic acids and their derivatives were found to have much lower gastric ulcerogenic activity (when assayed in the stress-sensitized rat) compared with their corresponding acids. There was little or no loss in therapeutic potencies of these salicylate esters as determined by assessment of anti-inflammatory activity (against the carrageenan-induced oedema) and antipyretic activity (against yeast-induced fever in rats. The methyl ester of acetylsalicylic acid (=AME) was almost devoid of gastric irritancy/ulcerogenicity (as observed with acetylsalicylic acid) when given orally to pigs for 10 days. AME had appreciable anti-inflammatory activity in the adjuvant-arthritis model and at high doses (200 mg/kg t.i.d.) was without the lethal effects seen with acetylsalicylic acid. Moreover, no toxic effects were seen after long-term administration of 100-1000 mg/kg/day AME for 3-4 months. The results provide further evidence for the hypothesis that the carboxylic acid moiety of salicylates is a major factor in the gastric ulcerogenic activity of these drugs. The methyl esters of these salicylates may be considered as models for the development of pro-drugs and in some cases may be therapeutic alternatives to acetylsalicylic acid or salicylate. PMID:6971045

  16. Bacillus spp. produce antibacterial activities against lactic acid bacteria that contaminate fuel ethanol plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) frequently contaminate commercial fuel ethanol fermentations, reducing yields and decreasing profitability of biofuel production. Microorganisms from environmental sources in different geographic regions of Thailand were tested for antibacterial activity against LAB. Fou...

  17. Generation of benzyne from benzoic acid using C-H activation.

    PubMed

    Cant, Alastair A; Roberts, Lee; Greaney, Michael F

    2010-12-01

    ortho C-H activation of benzoic acids with Pd(II) generates an oxapalladacycle that can decarboxylate to produce a palladium-associated aryne. The arynes then undergo [2+2+2] trimerisation to afford triphenylenes.

  18. Estrogenic Activity of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Juvenile Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential estrogenic activity of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) was determined using separate screening and dose response studies with juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Results of this study indicate that some PFAAs may act as estrogens in fish.

  19. Bibliography for acid-rock drainage and selected acid-mine drainage issues related to acid-rock drainage from transportation activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-rock drainage occurs through the interaction of rainfall on pyrite-bearing formations. When pyrite (FeS2) is exposed to oxygen and water in mine workings or roadcuts, the mineral decomposes and sulfur may react to form sulfuric acid, which often results in environmental problems and potential damage to the transportation infrastructure. The accelerated oxidation of pyrite and other sulfidic minerals generates low pH water with potentially high concentrations of trace metals. Much attention has been given to contamination arising from acid mine drainage, but studies related to acid-rock drainage from road construction are relatively limited. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling acid-rock drainage and contaminant transport from roadcuts in Tennessee. The basic components of acid-rock drainage resulting from transportation activities are described and a bibliography, organized by relevant categories (remediation, geochemical, microbial, biological impact, and secondary mineralization) is presented.

  20. Antidepressant-like activity of gallic acid in mice subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress.

    PubMed

    Chhillar, Ritu; Dhingra, Dinesh

    2013-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate antidepressant-like activity of gallic acid in Swiss young male albino mice subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms for this activity. Gallic acid (5, 10, 20 mg/kg, i.p.) and fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) per se were administered daily to unstressed mice and other groups of mice subjected to unpredictable mild stress, 30 min after the injection for 21 successive days. The antidepressant-like activity was evaluated using forced swim test (FST) and sucrose preference test. Stress significantly increased immobility period of mice in FST. Gallic acid (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) and fluoxetine significantly decreased immobility period of unstressed and stressed mice in FST and prevented the stress-induced decrease in sucrose preference, indicating significant antidepressant-like activity. There was no significant effect on locomotor activity of the mice by the drugs. Gallic acid (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased Monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) activity, malondialdehyde levels, and catalase activity in unstressed mice; and significantly prevented the stress-induced decrease in reduced glutathione and catalase activity; and also significantly prevented stress-induced increase in MAO-A activity, malondialdehyde levels, plasma nitrite, and corticosterone levels. Thus, gallic acid showed antidepressant-like activity in unstressed and stressed mice probably due to its antioxidant activity and through inhibition of MAO-A activity and decrease in plasma nitrite levels. In addition, gallic acid also showed antidepressant-like activity in stressed mice probably through decrease in plasma corticosterone levels.

  1. Nematicidal Activity of Kojic Acid Produced by Aspergillus oryzae against Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Yoon; Jang, Ja Yeong; Jeon, Sun Jeong; Lee, Hye Won; Bae, Chang-Hwan; Yeo, Joo Hong; Lee, Hyang Burm; Kim, In Seon; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2016-08-28

    The fungal strain EML-DML3PNa1 isolated from leaf of white dogwood (Cornus alba L.) showed strong nematicidal activity with juvenile mortality of 87.6% at a concentration of 20% fermentation broth filtrate at 3 days after treatment. The active fungal strain was identified as Aspergillus oryzae, which belongs to section Flavi, based on the morphological characteristics and sequence analysis of the ITS rDNA, calmodulin (CaM), and β-tubulin (BenA) genes. The strain reduced the pH value to 5.62 after 7 days of incubation. Organic acid analysis revealed the presence of citric acid (515.0 mg/kg), malic acid (506.6 mg/kg), and fumaric acid (21.7 mg/kg). The three organic acids showed moderate nematicidal activities, but the mixture of citric acid, malic acid, and fumaric acid did not exhibit the full nematicidal activity of the culture filtrate of EML- DML3PNa1. Bioassay-guided fractionation coupled with (1)H- and (13)C-NMR and EI-MS analyses led to identification of kojic acid as the major nematicidal metabolite. Kojic acid exhibited dose-dependent mortality and inhibited the hatchability of M. incognita, showing EC50 values of 195.2 µg/ml and 238.3 µg/ml, respectively, at 72 h postexposure. These results suggest that A. oryzae EML-DML3PNa1 and kojic acid have potential as a biological control agent against M. incognita.

  2. Cinnabarinic acid, an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, activates type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Fazio, F; Lionetto, L; Molinaro, G; Bertrand, H O; Acher, F; Ngomba, R T; Notartomaso, S; Curini, M; Rosati, O; Scarselli, P; Di Marco, R; Battaglia, G; Bruno, V; Simmaco, M; Pin, J P; Nicoletti, F; Goudet, C

    2012-05-01

    Cinnabarinic acid is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway that meets the structural requirements to interact with glutamate receptors. We found that cinnabarinic acid acts as a partial agonist of type 4 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu4) receptors, with no activity at other mGlu receptor subtypes. We also tested the activity of cinnabarinic acid on native mGlu4 receptors by examining 1) the inhibition of cAMP formation in cultured cerebellar granule cells; 2) protection against excitotoxic neuronal death in mixed cultures of cortical cells; and 3) protection against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine toxicity in mice after local infusion into the external globus pallidus. In all these models, cinnabarinic acid behaved similarly to conventional mGlu4 receptor agonists, and, at least in cultured neurons, the action of low concentrations of cinnabarinic acid was largely attenuated by genetic deletion of mGlu4 receptors. However, high concentrations of cinnabarinic acid were still active in the absence of mGlu4 receptors, suggesting that the compound may have off-target effects. Mutagenesis and molecular modeling experiments showed that cinnabarinic acid acts as an orthosteric agonist interacting with residues of the glutamate binding pocket of mGlu4. Accordingly, cinnabarinic acid did not activate truncated mGlu4 receptors lacking the N-terminal Venus-flytrap domain, as opposed to the mGlu4 receptor enhancer, N-phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide (PHCCC). Finally, we could detect endogenous cinnabarinic acid in brain tissue and peripheral organs by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Levels increased substantially during inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide. We conclude that cinnabarinic acid is a novel endogenous orthosteric agonist of mGlu4 receptors endowed with neuroprotective activity. PMID:22311707

  3. In vitro antiviral activity of mycophenolic acid and its reversal by guanine-type compounds.

    PubMed

    Cline, J C; Nelson, J D; Gerzon, K; Williams, R H; Delong, D C

    1969-07-01

    With the agar diffusion test and BS-C-1 cells, mycophenolic acid was found to give a straight-line dose-response activity in inhibiting the cytopathic effects of vaccinia, herpes simplex, and measles viruses. Plaque tests have shown 100% reduction of virus plaques by mycophenolic acid over drug ranges of 10 to 50 mug/ml and virus input as high as 6,000 plaque-forming units (PFU) per flask. Back titration studies with measles virus inhibited by mycophenolic acid have indicated that extracellular virus titers were reduced by approximately 3 logs(10) and total virus was reduced by 1 log(10). The agar diffusion test system lends itself readily to drug reversal studies. Mycophenolic acid incorporated into agar at 10 mug/ml gave 100% protection to virus-infected cells. Filter paper discs impregnated with selected chemical agents at concentrations of 1,000 mug/ml (20 mug per filter paper disc) were placed on the agar surface. Reversal of the antiviral activity of mycophenolic acid was indicated by virus breakthrough in those cells in close proximity to the filter paper disc. Chemicals showing the best reversal of the antiviral activity of mycophenolic acid were guanine, guanosine, guanylic acid, deoxyguanylic acid, and 2,6-diaminopurine. The reversal of antiviral activity was confirmed by titrations of virus produced with various amounts of both mycophenolic acid and guanine present and by isotope tracer methods with uptakes of labeled uridine, guanine, leucine, and thymidine in treated and nontreated, infected and noninfected cells as parameters. All antiviral effects of mycophenolic acid at 10 mug/ml could be reversed to the range shown by untreated controls by the addition of 10 mug/ml of those chemicals exhibiting reversal activity.

  4. Overview of acid rain monitoring activities in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewski, J.; Kinsman, J.D.

    1982-06-01

    Acid rain is known to acidify natural waters, resulting in damage to fish and other components of the aquatic ecosystem, degradation of drinking water supplies, deterioration of man-made structures, erosion of soils and damage to forests and crops. Recent monitoring devices and 71 studies conducted or on-going in North America are surveyed. Tables are presented that describe the name or title of the study, the organization or agency that funds each study, the chemical parameters monitored, the geographic extent and location of the study, the time period of operation, the types of samples used, where samples are analyzed, and a contact for further information. The Aerochem metrics wet-dry collector is the most widely used instrument for collection of wet deposition and appears to be reliable in collecting precipitation samples for chemical analysis. Much of the wet deposition monitoring focuses on the between-year differences in precipitation acidity. No simple method for monitoring dry deposition is available on an experimental or commercial basis. The frequency of special events needs to be analyzed using existing climatological data. 32 references, 3 tables.

  5. 4-Hydroxy cinnamic acid as mushroom preservation: Anti-tyrosinase activity kinetics and application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Hua; Chen, Qing-Xi; Cui, Yi; Gao, Huan-Juan; Xu, Lian; Yu, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Ying; Yan, Chong-Ling; Wang, Qin

    2016-05-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in post-harvest browning of fruit and vegetable. To control and inhibit its activity is the most effective method for delaying the browning and extend the shelf life. In this paper, the inhibitory kinetics of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid on mushroom tyrosinase was investigated using the kinetics method of substrate reaction. The results showed that the inhibition of tyrosinase by 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid was a slow, reversible reaction with fractional remaining activity. The microscopic rate constants were determined for the reaction on 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid with tyrosinase. Furthermore, the molecular docking was used to simulate 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid dock with tyrosinase. The results showed that 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid interacted with the enzyme active site mainly through the hydroxy competed with the substrate hydroxy group. The cytotoxicity study of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid indicated that it had no effects on the proliferation of normal liver cells. Moreover, the results of effects of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid on the preservation of mushroom showed that it could delay the mushroom browning. These results provide a comprehensive underlying the inhibitory mechanisms of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid and its delaying post-harvest browning, that is beneficial for the application of this compound.

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Pentaherbs Formula, Berberine, Gallic Acid and Chlorogenic Acid in Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Miranda S M; Jiao, Delong; Chan, Ben C L; Hon, Kam-Lun; Leung, Ping C; Lau, Clara B S; Wong, Eric C W; Cheng, Ling; Chan, Carmen K M; Lam, Christopher W K; Wong, Chun K

    2016-04-20

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common allergic skin disease, characterized by dryness, itchiness, thickening and inflammation of the skin. Infiltration of eosinophils into the dermal layer and presence of edema are typical characteristics in the skin biopsy of AD patients. Previous in vitro and clinical studies showed that the Pentaherbs formula (PHF) consisting of five traditional Chinese herbal medicines, Flos Lonicerae, Herba Menthae, Cortex Phellodendri, Cortex Moutan and Rhizoma Atractylodis at w/w ratio of 2:1:2:2:2 exhibited therapeutic potential in treating AD. In this study, an in vivo murine model with oxazolone (OXA)-mediated dermatitis was used to elucidate the efficacy of PHF. Active ingredients of PHF water extract were also identified and quantified, and their in vitro anti-inflammatory activities on pruritogenic cytokine IL-31- and alarmin IL-33-activated human eosinophils and dermal fibroblasts were evaluated. Ear swelling, epidermis thickening and eosinophils infiltration in epidermal and dermal layers, and the release of serum IL-12 of the murine OXA-mediated dermatitis were significantly reduced upon oral or topical treatment with PHF (all p < 0.05). Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid and berberine contents (w/w) in PHF were found to be 0.479%, 1.201% and 0.022%, respectively. Gallic acid and chlorogenic acid could suppress the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and chemokine CCL7 and CXCL8, respectively, in IL-31- and IL-33-treated eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture; while berberine could suppress the release of IL-6, CXCL8, CCL2 and CCL7 in the eosinophil culture and eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture (all p < 0.05). These findings suggest that PHF can ameliorate allergic inflammation and attenuate the activation of eosinophils.

  7. Self-assembled β-lactoglobulin-oleic acid and β-lactoglobulin-linoleic acid complexes with antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Fang, B; Zhang, M; Tian, M; Ren, F Z

    2015-05-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG) can bind to fatty acids such as oleic acid (OA) and linoleic acid (LA). Another whey protein, α-lactalbumin (α-LA), can also bind to OA to give the complex α-LA-OA, which has antitumor properties. Based on reports that the activity of α-LA-OA is highly dependent on OA, as well as the acquisition of similar complexes using other proteins, such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, we speculated whether β-LG could also kill tumor cells after binding to other fatty acids. Therefore, we prepared complexes of β-LG with OA (β-LG-OA) and LA (β-LG-LA) in the current study and evaluated them in terms of antitumor activity and thermostability using the methylene blue method and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The structural features of these complexes were also evaluated using fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism. The binding dynamics of OA and LA to β-LG were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell viability results revealed that β-LG-LA and β-LG-OA exhibited similar antitumor activities. Interestingly, the binding of β-LG to LA led to an increase in its thermostability, whereas its binding to OA had very little effect. The environments of the tryptophan residues in the β-LG-OA and β-LG-LA complexes were very different, with the residues being blue- and red-shifted, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrophobic regions in β-LG were buried after binding of OA, which was slightly changed in β-LG-LA. Circular dichroism results showed that β-LG-OA enhanced the tertiary structure, which was partially lost in β-LG-LA. There were more binding sites for OA than for LA on β-LG, although the binding constants of the 2 fatty acids were similar, with both acids interacting with the protein though van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. This study could help provide a deeper understanding of the structural basis for formation of antitumor protein-fatty acid complexes.

  8. Activation and inactivation of methanol: 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid methyltransferase from Methanosarcina barkeri.

    PubMed Central

    van der Meijden, P; Heythuysen, H J; Sliepenbeek, H T; Houwen, F P; van der Drift, C; Vogels, G D

    1983-01-01

    Methanol is converted to methane by crude extracts of Methanosarcina barkeri. The first reaction involved in this process, is catalyzed by methanol:2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.-). The methyltransferase has an optimum at pH 6.5 and is not inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate acts as an inhibitor (Ki = 0.30 mM). The methyltransferase was tested in the presence of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid, which inhibits the conversion of 2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid to methane. The reaction is subject to activation and inactivation. Inactivation is brought about by the presence of oxygen, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide, and 2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid, the product of the reaction. Activation of the system requires the presence of ATP and Mg2+ and of hydrogen. Hydrogen can be replaced by enzymatic systems, such as pyruvate dehydrogenase, which deliver free hydrogen. PMID:6294063

  9. [Effects of simulated acid rain on chloroplast activity in Dimorcarpus longana Lour. cv. wulongling leaves].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Dongliang; Liu, Xinghui

    2002-12-01

    A decreased content of chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoid (Car) was found in the Dimorcarpus longana Lour. cv. wulongling leaves when treated with < pH 3.5 acid rain. The decline of Chl content was caused by the reduction of Chla, while Chlb was less sensitive to the acid rain, which resulted in a decrease of Chla/Chlb ratio. The content of Car and the ratio of Chla to Chlb reduced with the duration of stress time. The injury of acid rain to photosynthetic pigments was intensified by illumination. The activities of photoreduction, photophosphorylation and H(+)-ATPase activity decreased with the reduction of pH value under the simulated acid rain. Therefore, the injury of electron transport chain and the uncoupling of photophosphorylation might lead to the ineffective absorption, transportation and transformation of light energy. In our study, the process of photophosphorylation was more sensitive to acid rain than that of photoreduction.

  10. Changes in antioxidant activity and phenolic acid composition of tarhana with steel-cut oats.

    PubMed

    Kilci, A; Gocmen, D

    2014-02-15

    Steel-cut oats (SCO) was used to replace wheat flour in the tarhana formulation (control) at the levels of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% (w/w). Control sample included no SCO. Substitution of wheat flour in tarhana formulation with SCO affected the mineral contents positively. SCO additions also increased phenolic acid contents of tarhana samples. The most abundant phenolic acids were ferulic and vanillic acids, followed by syringic acid in the samples with SCO. Tarhana samples with SCO also showed higher antioxidant activities than the control. Compared with the control, the total phenolic content increased when the level of SCO addition was increased. SCO addition did not have a deteriorative effect on sensory properties of tarhana samples and resulted in acceptable soup properties in terms of overall acceptability. SCO addition improved the nutritional and functional properties of tarhana by causing increases in antioxidant activity, phenolic content and phenolic acids.

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of 8-Quinolinols, Salicylic Acids, Hydroxynaphthoic Acids, and Salts of Selected Quinolinols with Selected Hydroxy-Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Herman; Parmegiani, Raulo

    1962-01-01

    Seventy-seven compounds were screened by the disc-plate method against strains of five bacteria and five fungi. A new constant was proposed to describe the antimicrobial activity of a compound in a defined system of organisms. This constant includes not only the inhibitory level of activity of the material but also the number of organisms inhibited. This constant, the antimicrobial spectrum index, was compared with the antimicrobial index of Albert. PMID:13898066

  12. A complex of equine lysozyme and oleic acid with bactericidal activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Emily A; Wilhelm, Kristina R; Schleucher, Jürgen; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A; Hakansson, Anders P

    2013-01-01

    HAMLET and ELOA are complexes consisting of oleic acid and two homologous, yet functionally different, proteins with cytotoxic activities against mammalian cells, with HAMLET showing higher tumor cells specificity, possibly due to the difference in propensity for oleic acid binding, as HAMLET binds 5-8 oleic acid molecules per protein molecule and ELOA binds 11-48 oleic acids. HAMLET has been shown to possess bactericidal activity against a number of bacterial species, particularly those with a respiratory tropism, with Streptococcus pneumoniae displaying the greatest degree of sensitivity. We show here that ELOA also displays bactericidal activity against pneumococci, which at lower concentrations shows mechanistic similarities to HAMLET's bactericidal activity. ELOA binds to S. pneumoniae and causes perturbations of the plasma membrane, including depolarization and subsequent rupture, and activates an influx of calcium into the cells. Selective inhibition of calcium channels and sodium/calcium exchange activity significantly diminished ELOA's bactericidal activity, similar to what we have observed with HAMLET. Finally, ELOA-induced death was also accompanied by DNA fragmentation into high molecular weight fragments - an apoptosis-like morphological phenotype that is seen during HAMLET-induced death. Thus, in contrast to different mechanisms of eukaryote cell death induced by ELOA and HAMLET, these complexes are characterized by rather similar activities towards bacteria. Although the majority of these events could be mimicked using oleic acid alone, the concentrations of oleic acid required were significantly higher than those present in the ELOA complex, and for some assays, the results were not identical between oleic acid alone and the ELOA complex. This indicates that the lipid, as a common denominator in both complexes, is an important component for the complexes' bactericidal activities, while the proteins are required both to solubilize and/or present the

  13. Antiadhesive and antibiofilm activity of hyaluronic acid against bacteria responsible for respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Drago, Lorenzo; Cappelletti, Laura; De Vecchi, Elena; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Torretta, Sara; Mattina, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    To address the problem of limited efficacy of existing antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial biofilm, it is necessary to find alternative remedies. One candidate could be hyaluronic acid; this study therefore aimed to evaluate the in vitro antiadhesive and antibiofilm activity of hyaluronic acid toward bacterial species commonly isolated from respiratory infections. Interference exerted on bacterial adhesion was evaluated by using Hep-2 cells, while the antibiofilm activity was assessed by means of spectrophotometry after incubation of biofilm with hyaluronic acid and staining with crystal violet. Our data suggest that hyaluronic acid is able to interfere with bacterial adhesion to a cellular substrate in a concentration-dependent manner, being notably active when assessed as pure substance. Moreover, we found that Staphylococcus aureus biofilm was more sensitive to the action of hyaluronic acid than biofilm produced by Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. In conclusion, hyaluronic acid is characterized by notable antiadhesive properties, while it shows a moderate activity against bacterial biofilm. As bacterial adhesion to oral cells is the first step for colonization, these results further sustain the role of hyaluronic acid in prevention of respiratory infections. PMID:24698341

  14. Immunomodulatory activity of mefenamic acid in mice models of cell-mediated and humoral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shabbir, Arham; Arshad, Hafiza Maida; Shahzad, Muhammad; Shamsi, Sadia; Ashraf, Muhammad Imran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Previously, different nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been evaluated for their potential immunomodulatory activities. Mefenamic acid is a well-known NSAID and is used in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, inflammation, fever, and pain. To the best of our knowledge, promising data regarding the immunomodulatory activity of mefenamic acid is scarce. Current study investigates the immunomodulatory activity of mefenamic acid in different models of cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Materials and Methods: Immunomodulatory effects on cell-mediated immunity were evaluated using dinitrochlorobenzene-induced delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and cyclophosphamide-induce myelosuppression assays. While effects on humoral immunity were evaluated using hemagglutination assay and mice lethality test. Results: Hematological analysis showed that mefenamic acid significantly reduced white blood cell count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin content, lymphocytes levels, and neutrophils levels in healthy mice as compared with control, suggesting the immunosuppressive activity of mefenamic acid. Treatment with mefenamic acid also significantly reduced all the hematological parameters in cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenic mice, as compared with positive control group. We found that treatment with mefenamic acid significantly suppressed DTH after 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h, as compared with positive control group. Mefenamic acid treated groups showed a significant reduction in antibody titer against sheep RBCs as compared to control group, similar to the effect of cyclophosphamide. We also found increased mice lethality rate in mefenamic acid treated groups, as compared with positive control group. Conclusions: The results provided basic information of immunosuppression of mefenamic acid on both cell-mediated and humoral immunity. PMID:27127320

  15. Soraphen A, an inhibitor of acetyl CoA carboxylase activity, interferes with fatty acid elongation

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises; Olson, L. Karl

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC1 & ACC2) generates malonyl CoA, a substrate for de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and an inhibitor of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO). Malonyl CoA is also a substrate for microsomal fatty acid elongation, an important pathway for saturated (SFA), mono- (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis. Despite the interest in ACC as a target for obesity and cancer therapy, little attention has been given to the role ACC plays in long chain fatty acid synthesis. This report examines the effect of pharmacological inhibition of ACC on DNL & palmitate (16:0) and linoleate (18:2,n-6) metabolism in HepG2 and LnCap cells. The ACC inhibitor, soraphen A, lowers cellular malonyl CoA, attenuates DNL and the formation of fatty acid elongation products derived from exogenous fatty acids, i.e., 16:0 & 18:2,n-6; IC50 ~ 5 nM. Elevated expression of fatty acid elongases (Elovl5, Elovl6) or desaturases (FADS1, FADS2) failed to override the soraphen A effect on SFA, MUFA or PUFA synthesis. Inhibition of fatty acid elongation leads to the accumulation of 16- and 18-carbon unsaturated fatty acids derived from 16:0 and 18:2,n-6, respectively. Pharmacological inhibition of ACC activity will not only attenuate DNL and induce FAO, but will also attenuate the synthesis of very long chain saturated, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:21184748

  16. Free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation induce GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor 4) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Takei, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    GPR120, free fatty acid receptor 4, is a recently deorphanized G protein-coupled receptor that seems to play cardinal roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the present work a GPR120-Venus fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 Flp-In T-REx cells and its function (increase in intracellular calcium) and phosphorylation were studied. It was observed that the fusion protein migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as a band with a mass of ≈70-75kDa, although other bands of higher apparent weight (>130kDa) were also detected. Cell stimulation with docosahexaenoic acid or α-linolenic acid induced concentration-dependent increases in intracellular calcium and GPR120 phosphorylation. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol esters also induced a marked receptor phosphorylation but did not alter the ability of 1µM docosahexaenoic acid to increase the intracellular calcium concentration. Phorbol ester-induced GPR120 phosphorylation, but not that induced with docosahexaenoic acid, was blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors (bis-indolyl-maleimide I and Gö 6976) suggesting that conventional kinase isoforms mediate this action. The absence of effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on agonist-induced GPR120 phosphorylation indicates that this kinase does not play a major role in agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation. Docosahexaenoic acid action was associated with marked GPR120 internalization whereas that induced with phorbol esters was smaller at early times. PMID:24239485

  17. The DNase of gammaherpesviruses impairs recognition by virus-specific CD8+ T cells through an additional host shutoff function.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jianmin; Thomas, Wendy; van Leeuwen, Daphne; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Ressing, Maaike E; Rowe, Martin

    2008-03-01

    The DNase/alkaline exonuclease (AE) genes are well conserved in all herpesvirus families, but recent studies have shown that the AE proteins of gammaherpesviruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) exhibit an additional function which shuts down host protein synthesis. One correlate of this additional shutoff function is that levels of cell surface HLA molecules are downregulated, raising the possibility that shutoff/AE genes of gammaherpesviruses might contribute to viral immune evasion. In this study, we show that both BGLF5 (EBV) and SOX (KSHV) shutoff/AE proteins do indeed impair the ability of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell clones to recognize endogenous antigen via HLA class I. Random mutagenesis of the BGLF5 gene enabled us to genetically separate the shutoff and AE functions and to demonstrate that the shutoff function was the critical factor determining whether BGLF5 mutants can impair T-cell recognition. These data provide further evidence that EBV has multiple mechanisms to modulate HLA class I-restricted T-cell responses, thus enabling the virus to replicate and persist in the immune-competent host.

  18. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound. PMID:27226531

  19. Synthesis, Evaluation of Anticancer Activity and QSAR Study of Heterocyclic Esters of Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Hajmohamad Ebrahim Ketabforoosh, Shima; Amini, Mohsen; Vosooghi, Mohsen; Shafiee, Abbas; Azizi, Ebrahim; Kobarfard, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) suppresses the growth of transformed cells such as human breast cancer cells, hepatocarcinoma , myeloid leukemia, colorectal cancer cells, fibrosarcoma, glioma and melanoma. A group of heterocyclic esters of caffeic acid was synthesized using Mitsunobu reaction and the esters were subjected to further structural modification by electrooxidation of the catechol ring of caffeic acid esters in the presence of sodium benzenesulfinate and sodium toluensulfinate as nucleophiles. Both heterocyclic esters of caffeic acid and their arylsulfonyl derivatives were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against HeLa, SK-OV-3, and HT-29 cancer cell lines. HeLa cells showed the highest sensitivity to the compounds and heterocyclic esters with no substituent on catechol ring showed better activity compared to their substituted counterparts. QSAR studies reemphasized the importance of molecular shape of the compounds for their cytotoxic activity. PMID:24523750

  20. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound.

  1. Key mediators of intracellular amino acids signaling to mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Kunrong; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tang, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by amino acids to promote cell growth via protein synthesis. Specifically, Ras-related guanosine triphosphatases (Rag GTPases) are activated by amino acids, and then translocate mTORC1 to the surface of late endosomes and lysosomes. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) resides on this surface and directly activates mTORC1. Apart from the presence of intracellular amino acids, Rag GTPases and Rheb, other mediators involved in intracellular amino acid signaling to mTORC1 activation include human vacuolar sorting protein-34 (hVps34) and mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3). Those molecular links between mTORC1 and its mediators form a complicate signaling network that controls cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Moreover, it is speculated that amino acid signaling to mTORC1 may start from the lysosomal lumen. In this review, we discussed the function of these mediators in mTORC1 pathway and how these mediators are regulated by amino acids in details.

  2. 9-Oxo-10(E),12(Z),15(Z)-Octadecatrienoic Acid Activates Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Haruya; Kamakari, Kosuke; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Hara, Hideyuki; Mohri, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Nakata, Rieko; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-11-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α is mainly expressed in the liver and plays an important role in the regulation of lipid metabolism. It has been reported that PPARα activation enhances fatty acid oxidation and reduces fat storage. Therefore, PPARα agonists are used to treat dyslipidemia. In the present study, we found that 9-oxo-10(E),12(Z),15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid (9-oxo-OTA), which is a α-linolenic acid (ALA) derivative, is present in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) extract. We showed that 9-oxo-OTA activated PPARα and induced the mRNA expression of PPARα target genes in murine primary hepatocytes. These effects promoted fatty acid uptake and the secretion of β-hydroxybutyrate, which is one of the endogenous ketone bodies. We also demonstrated that these effects of 9-oxo-OTA were not observed in PPARα-knockout (KO) primary hepatocytes. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that 9-oxo-OTA promotes fatty acid metabolism via PPARα activation and discuss its potential as a valuable food-derived compound for use in the management of dyslipidemia. PMID:26387026

  3. Understanding Fatty Acid Metabolism through an Active Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fardilha, M.; Schrader, M.; da Cruz e Silva, O. A. B.; da Cruz e Silva, E. F.

    2010-01-01

    A multi-method active learning approach (MALA) was implemented in the Medical Biochemistry teaching unit of the Biomedical Sciences degree at the University of Aveiro, using problem-based learning as the main learning approach. In this type of learning strategy, students are involved beyond the mere exercise of being taught by listening. Less…

  4. Dynamic changes during acid-induced activation of influenza hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Natalie K.; Guttman, Miklos; Ebner, Jamie L.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus attachment to host cells and fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes during entry. While high-resolution structures are available for the pre-fusion HA ectodomain and the post-fusion HA2 subunit, the sequence of conformational changes during HA activation has eluded structural characterization. Here we apply hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry to examine changes in structural dynamics of the HA ectodomain at various stages of activation, as well as to compare the soluble ectodomain with intact HA on virions. At pH conditions approaching activation (pH 6.0–5.5) HA exhibits increased dynamics at the fusion peptide and neighboring regions, while the interface between receptor-binding subunits (HA1) becomes stabilized. In contrast to many activation models, these data suggest that HA responds to endosomal acidification by releasing the fusion peptide prior to HA1 uncaging and the spring-loaded refolding of HA2. This staged process may facilitate efficient HA-mediated fusion. PMID:25773144

  5. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Binbin Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-15

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl{sub 2} at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of –SO{sub 3}H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and –SO{sub 3}H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres with high surface area and superior catalytic performance were prepared by a facile chemical activation route. - Highlights: • Porous carbon spheres solid acid prepared by a facile chemical activation. • It owns high surface area, superior porosity and uniform spherical morphology. • It possesses

  6. [Effect of phosphorus deficiency on activity of acid phosphatase exuded by wheat roots].

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiguo; Zhang, Fusuo

    2002-03-01

    The activity of acid phosphatase exuded by roots, the tissue location of the enzyme, and the relationship between the enzyme activity and phosphorus efficiency of wheat were studied. The results showed that the activity of acid phosphatase exuded by wheat 81(85)5-3-3-3 and NC37 under P-sufficiency treat were lower than those under P-deficiency, and the enzyme activity of the former variety was significantly higher than that of the latter. There was a significant difference in the enzyme activity among 12 wheat genotypes grown under P-deficiency treat. Acid phosphatase was exuded by epidermis cell of root, especially by epidermal cell of root apex. Thus, there was a linear relationship between the enzyme activity and the surface area of root or the number of root apexes. It implied that the enzyme activity was markedly related to the size of root system. The linear relationship between relative grain yield and acid phosphatase activity was significant. It indicates that the enzyme activity could be used as an early indicator to select P-efficient wheat genotypes.

  7. Screening of Immune-Active Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, E-Nam; Kang, Sang-Mo; Kim, Mi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cell wall extract on the proliferation and cytokine production of immune cells to select suitable probiotics for space food. Ten strains of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. paracasei, L. casei, L. acidophilus, L. plantarum, L. delbruekii, Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, and Pedicoccus pentosaceus) were sub-cultured and further cultured for 3 d to reach 7-10 Log colony-forming units (CFU)/mL prior to cell wall extractions. All LAB cell wall extracts failed to inhibit the proliferation of BALB/c mouse splenocytes or mesenteric lymphocytes. Most LAB cell wall extracts except those of L. plantarum and L. delbrueckii induced the proliferation of both immune cells at tested concentrations. In addition, the production of TH1 cytokine (IFN-γ) rather than that of TH2 cytokine (IL-4) was enhanced by LAB cell wall extracts. Of ten LAB extracts, four (from L. acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. casei, and S. thermophiles) promoted both cell proliferating and TH1 cytokine production. These results suggested that these LAB could be used as probiotics to maintain immunity and homeostasis for astronauts in extreme space environment and for general people in normal life. PMID:26761877

  8. Antitumor effect of sonodynamically activated pyrrolidine tris-acid fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Yumiko; Nishi, Koji; Fujimori, Junya; Fukai, Toshio; Yumita, Nagahiko; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Chen, Fu-shin; Momose, Yasunori; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the sonodynamically induced antitumor effect of pyrrolidine tris-acid fullerene (PTF) was investigated. Sonodynamically induced antitumor effects of PTF by focused ultrasound were investigated using isolated sarcoma-180 cells and mice bearing ectopically-implanted colon 26 carcinoma. Cell damage induced by ultrasonic exposure was enhanced by 5-fold in the presence of 80 µM PTF. The combined treatment of ultrasound and PTF suppressed the growth of the implanted colon 26 carcinoma. Ultrasonically induced 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-1-oxyl (4oxoTEMPO) production in the presence and absence of PTF was assessed, and it was shown that 80 µM PTF enhanced 4oxoTEMPO production as measured by ESR spectroscopy. Histidine, a reactive oxygen scavenger, significantly reduced cell damage and 4oxoTEMPO generation caused by ultrasonic exposure in the presence of PTF. These results suggest that singlet oxygen is likely to be involved in the ultrasonically induced cell damage enhanced by PTF.

  9. Screening of Immune-Active Lactic Acid Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hwang, E-Nam; Kang, Sang-Mo; Kim, Mi-Jung; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cell wall extract on the proliferation and cytokine production of immune cells to select suitable probiotics for space food. Ten strains of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. paracasei, L. casei, L. acidophilus, L. plantarum, L. delbruekii, Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, and Pedicoccus pentosaceus) were sub-cultured and further cultured for 3 d to reach 7-10 Log colony-forming units (CFU)/mL prior to cell wall extractions. All LAB cell wall extracts failed to inhibit the proliferation of BALB/c mouse splenocytes or mesenteric lymphocytes. Most LAB cell wall extracts except those of L. plantarum and L. delbrueckii induced the proliferation of both immune cells at tested concentrations. In addition, the production of TH1 cytokine (IFN-γ) rather than that of TH2 cytokine (IL-4) was enhanced by LAB cell wall extracts. Of ten LAB extracts, four (from L. acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. casei, and S. thermophiles) promoted both cell proliferating and TH1 cytokine production. These results suggested that these LAB could be used as probiotics to maintain immunity and homeostasis for astronauts in extreme space environment and for general people in normal life. PMID:26761877

  10. Boswellic acid activity against glioblastoma stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    SCHNEIDER, HANNAH; WELLER, MICHAEL

    2016-01-01

    Boswellic acids (BAs) have long been considered as useful adjunct pharmacological agents for the treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors, notably glioblastoma. Two principal modes of action associated with BAs have been postulated: i) Anti-inflammatory properties, which are useful for containing edema formation, and ii) intrinsic antitumor cell properties, with a hitherto ill-defined mode of action. The present study assessed the effects of various BA derivatives on the viability and clonogenicity of a panel of nine long-term glioma cell lines and five glioma-initiating cell lines, studied cell cycle progression and the mode of cell death induction, and explored potential synergy with temozolomide (TMZ) or irradiation. BA induced the concentration-dependent loss of viability and clonogenicity that was independent of tumor protein 53 status and O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase expression. The treatment of glioma cells with BA resulted in cell death induction, prior to or upon S phase entry, and exhibited features of apoptotic cell death. Synergy with irradiation or TMZ was detected at certain concentrations; however, the inhibitory effects were mostly additive, and never antagonistic. While the intrinsic cytotoxic properties of BA at low micromolecular concentrations were confirmed and the potential synergy with irradiation and TMZ was identified, the proximate pharmacodynamic target of BA remains to be identified. PMID:27313764

  11. Deoxyribonucleic acid-dependent ribonucleic acid polymerase activity in rat liver after protein restriction.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, G M; von der Decken, A

    1975-01-01

    Rats were fed for 6 days on a diet containing either 3 or 20% high-quality protein. Nuclei were isolated from liver and DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (EC 2.7.7.6) extracted with 1 M-(NH4)2SO4. The proteins were then precipitated with 3.5 M-(NH4)2SO4 and after dialysis applied to a DEAE-Sephadex column. The column was developed with a gradient of (NH4)2SO4. Polymerase I separated well from alpha-amanitin-sensitive polymerase II. The enzyme activities were compared between the two dietary groups. Rats that had received 3% protein showed a lower polymerase I activity per g wet wt. of liver, per mg of DNA and per mg of protein. Polymerase II was lower in activity per g wet wt. of liver and per mg of DNA, but was higher per mg of protein. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoretograms showed a higher proportion of contaminating proteins in polymerase II fractions isolated from 20%-protein-fed rats. The data explain the lower activity obtained per mg of protein in these rats. It is concluded that a decrease in dietary protein content from 20 to 3% induces a fall in content and specific activity of RNA polymerase I and II in liver. PMID:1156400

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Lalit; Tongia, Sudheer K; Pal, Veerendra S; Agrawal, Rajendra P; Nyati, Prem; Phadnis, Pradeep

    2007-01-01

    Forced swimming test is used to induce a characteristic behavior of immobility in rats, which resembles depression in humans to some extent. We evaluated the effect of omega-3 fatty acids alone as well as compared it with the standard antidepressant therapy with fluoxetine in both acute and chronic studies. In both the studies, rats were divided into 4 groups and subjected to the following drug interventions - Group 1- control: Group 2- fluoxetine in dose of 10 mg/kg subcutaneously 23.5, 5 and 1 h before the test: Group 3- omega-3 fatty acids in dose of 500 mg/kg orally; Group 4- fluoxetine plus omega-3 fatty acids both. In acute study, omega-3 fatty acids were given in single dose 2 h prior to the test while in chronic study omega-3 fatty acids were given daily for a period of 28 days. All animals were subjected to a 15-min pretest followed 24 h later by a 5-min test. A time sampling method was used to score the behavioral activity in each group. The results revealed that in acute study, omega-3 fatty acids do not have any significant effect in forced swimming test. However, in chronic study, omega-3 fatty acids affect the immobility and swimming behavior significantly when compared with control (p < 0.01) without any significant effect on climbing behavior and the efficacy of combination of omega-3 fatty acids and fluoxetine is significantly more than that of fluoxetine alone in changing the behavioral activity of rats in forced swimming test. It leads to the conclusion that omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity per se, and the combination of fluoxetine and omega-3 fatty acids has more antidepressant efficacy than fluoxetine alone in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

  13. Effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity in three successional forests in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Liu, J.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, D.; Deng, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth in tropical and subtropical forests. Global climate change has led to alterations in precipitation in the recent years, which inevitably influences P cycling. Soil acid phosphatase plays a vital role in controlling P mineralization, and its activity reflects the capacity of P supply to ecosystems. In order to study the effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity, an experiment of precipitation treatments (no precipitation, natural precipitation and doubled precipitation) in three forests of early-, mid- and advanced-successional stages in Southern China was carried out. Results showed that driven by seasonality of precipitation, changes in soil acid phosphatase activities coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with significantly higher values in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil acid phosphatase activities were closely linked to forest successional stages, with enhanced values in the later stages of forest succession. In the dry season, soil acid phosphatase activities in the three forests showed a rising trend with increasing precipitation treatments. In the wet season, no precipitation treatment depressed soil acid phosphatase activity, while doubled precipitation treatment exerted no positive effects on it, and even significantly lowered it in the advanced forest. These indicate the potential transformation rate of organic P might be more dependent on water in the dry season than in the wet season. The negative responses of soil acid phosphatase activity to precipitation suggest that P supply in subtropical ecosystems might be reduced if there was a drought in a whole year or more rainfall in the wet season in the future. NP, no precipitation; Control, natural precipitation; DP, double precipitation.

  14. Antioxidant and nitric oxide production inhibitory activities of galacturonyl hydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuh-Hwa; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Lee, Chi-Ching; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2008-07-01

    The self-prepared pectin hydroxamic acid has been reported to have antioxidant activities [Yang, S. S., Cheng, K. D., Lin, Y. S., Liu, Y. W., & Hou, W. C. (2004). Pectin hydroxamic acids exhibit antioxidant activities in vitro. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 52, 4270-4273]. In this study, the galacturonic acid (GalA), the monomer unit of the pectin polymer, was esterified with acidic methanol (1N HCl) at 4°C with gentle stirring for 5days to get galacturonic acid methyl ester which was further reacted with alkaline hydroxylamine to get galacturonyl hydroxamic acid (GalA-NHOH). The GalA-NHOH was used to test the antioxidant and antiradical activities in the comparison with GalA. The scavenging activities of GalA-NHOH against DPPH radicals (half-inhibition concentration, IC50, was 82μM), hydroxyl radicals detected by electron spin resonance (IC50 was 0.227nM in the comparison with Trolox of 0.433μM), superoxide radicals (IC50 was 830μM) were determined. The protection activities of GalA-NHOH against hydroxyl radicals-mediated calf thymus DNA damages, linoleic acid peroxidation and peroxynitrite-mediated dihydrorhodamine 123 oxidations were also investigated. It was found that the GalA-NHOH exhibited dose-dependently antioxidant activity and few or none was found in GalA. The GalA-NHOH was used to evaluate the suppressed activity of nitric oxide (NO) productions of RAW264.7 cells in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100ng/ml) as inducers. It was found that GalA-NHOH (0.02-0.1mg/ml) could dose-dependently suppress the NO productions (expressed as nitrite concentrations) in RAW264.7 cells without significant cytotoxicity.

  15. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid suppress osteoclast formation and activity in human CD14+ monocytes, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kasonga, Abe E; Deepak, Vishwa; Kruger, Marlena C; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    An unbalanced diet can have adverse effects on health. Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) have been the focus of research owing to their necessity of inclusion in a healthy diet. However, the effects of LCPUFAs on human osteoclast formation and function have not been explored before. A human CD14+ monocyte differentiation model was used to elucidate the effects of an ω-3 LCPUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and an ω-6 LCPUFA, arachidonic acid (AA), on osteoclast formation and activity. CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors and stimulated with macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand to generate osteoclasts. Data from this study revealed that both the LCPUFAs decreased osteoclast formation potential of CD14+ monocytes in a dose-dependent manner when treated at an early stage of differentiation. Moreover, when exposed at a late stage of osteoclast differentiation AA and DHA impaired the bone resorptive potential of mature osteoclasts without affecting osteoclast numbers. AA and DHA abrogated vitronectin receptor expression in differentiating as well as mature osteoclasts. In contrast, the degree of inhibition for calcitonin receptor expression varied between the LCPUFAs with only AA causing inhibition during osteoclast differentiation. Furthermore, AA and DHA down regulated the expression of key osteoclast-specific genes in differentiating as well as mature osteoclasts. This study demonstrates for the first time that LCPUFAs can modulate osteoclast formation and function in a human primary osteoclast cell line.

  16. Study on Synthesis, Characterization and Antiproliferative Activity of Novel Diisopropylphenyl Esters of Selected Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Yasa Sathyam; Kaki, Shiva Shanker; Rao, Bala Bhaskara; Jain, Nishant; Vijayalakshmi, Penumarthy

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the synthesis, characterization and evaluation of antiproliferative activity of novel diisopropylphenyl esters of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), valproic acid (VA), butyric acid (BA) and 2-ethylhexanoic acid (2-EHA). These esters were chemically synthesized by the esterification of fatty acids with 2,6-diisopropylphenol and 2,4-diisopropylphenol (propofol). The structure of new conjugates viz. propofol-(alpha-linolenic acid) (2,6P-ALA and 2,4P-ALA), propofol-valproic acid (2,6P-VA and 2,4P-VA), propofol-butyric acid (2,6P-BA and 2,4P-BA) and propofol-(2-ethylhexanoic acid) (2,6P2-EHA and 2,4P-2-EHA) were characterized by FT-IR, NMR ((1)H, (13)C) and mass spectral data. The synthesized conjugates having more lipophilic character were tested for antiproliferative in vitro studies on A549, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, Mia-Pa-Ca and HePG2 cancer cell lines. All the conjugates showed specific growth inhibition on studied cancer cell lines. Among the synthesized esters, the conjugates synthesized from BA, VA and 2-EHA exhibited prominent growth inhibition against A549, HeLa, Mia-Pa-Ca and HePG2 cancer cell lines. The preliminary results suggest that the entire novel conjugates possess antiproliferative properties that reduce the proliferation of cancer cells in vitro.

  17. Structure-activity relationships of fatty acid amide ligands in activating and desensitizing G protein-coupled receptor 119

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pritesh; Kumar, Akhilesh; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to apply a high throughput assay to investigate the structure-activity relationships of fatty acid amides for activating and desensitizing G protein-coupled receptor 119, a promising therapeutic target for both type 2 diabetes and obesity. A cell-based, homogenous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) method for measuring G protein-coupled receptor 119-mediated increase of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels was validated and applied in this study. Using novel fatty acid amides and detailed potency and efficacy analyses, we have demonstrated that degree of saturation in acyl chain and charged head groups of fatty acid amides have profound effects on the ability of these compounds to activate G protein-coupled receptor 119. In addition, we have demonstrated for the first time that pretreatments with G protein-coupled receptor 119 agonists desensitize the receptor and the degrees of desensitization caused by fatty acid amides correlate well with their structure-activity relationships in activating the receptor. PMID:24184668

  18. Thyroid hormone activation of retinoic acid synthesis in hypothalamic tanycytes

    PubMed Central

    Stoney, Patrick N.; Helfer, Gisela; Rodrigues, Diana; Morgan, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for adult brain function and its actions include several key roles in the hypothalamus. Although TH controls gene expression via specific TH receptors of the nuclear receptor class, surprisingly few genes have been demonstrated to be directly regulated by TH in the hypothalamus, or the adult brain as a whole. This study explored the rapid induction by TH of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Raldh1), encoding a retinoic acid (RA)‐synthesizing enzyme, as a gene specifically expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, cells that mediate a number of actions of TH in the hypothalamus. The resulting increase in RA may then regulate gene expression via the RA receptors, also of the nuclear receptor class. In vivo exposure of the rat to TH led to a significant and rapid increase in hypothalamic Raldh1 within 4 hours. That this may lead to an in vivo increase in RA is suggested by the later induction by TH of the RA‐responsive gene Cyp26b1. To explore the actions of RA in the hypothalamus as a potential mediator of TH control of gene regulation, an ex vivo hypothalamic rat slice culture method was developed in which the Raldh1‐expressing tanycytes were maintained. These slice cultures confirmed that TH did not act on genes regulating energy balance but could induce Raldh1. RA has the potential to upregulate expression of genes involved in growth and appetite, Ghrh and Agrp. This regulation is acutely sensitive to epigenetic changes, as has been shown for TH action in vivo. These results indicate that sequential triggering of two nuclear receptor signalling systems has the capability to mediate some of the functions of TH in the hypothalamus. GLIA 2016;64:425–439 PMID:26527258

  19. Active-Learning versus Teacher-Centered Instruction for Learning Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Active-learning as a student-centered learning process has begun to take more interest in constructing scientific knowledge. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of active-learning implementation on high-school students' understanding of "acids and bases". Sample: The sample of this study was…

  20. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of new bioconjugates of Salinomycin with amino acid esters.

    PubMed

    Antoszczak, Michał; Sobusiak, Maria; Maj, Ewa; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Huczyński, Adam

    2015-09-01

    New Salinomycin (SAL) bioconjugates with amino acid methyl esters were obtained and their antiproliferative activity against cancer cell lines including drug-resistant ones was studied. New compounds exhibit antiproliferative activity towards leukemia and doxorubicin-resistant colon adenocarcinoma cell line and are more effective and less toxic than the commonly currently used anticancer drugs.

  1. The interleukin-18 inhibitory activities of echinocystic acid and its saponins from Impatiens pritzellii var. hupehensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue-Feng; Tang, Lan; Zhang, Peng; Zhaod, Xiao-Ya; Pi, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Ruan, Han-Li; Liu, Yonghong; Wu, Ji-Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Echinocystic acid (1), an echinocystic acid saponin, 2, and four of its ester saponins, 3-6, obtained from the active fraction of Impatiens pritzellii var. hupehensis, an traditional Chinese medicine for rheumatoid arthritis, were investigated for their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin (IL)-18 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Three of them, 1, 2 and 6, showed obvious activity to inhibit the production of IL-18, especially the ester saponins with a sugar chain at C-28, 6. Structure-activity relationships are discussed in brief.

  2. The ex vivo antiplatelet activation potential of fruit phenolic metabolite hippuric acid.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Abishek Bommannan; Stanley, Roger; Singh, Indu

    2015-08-01

    Polyphenol-rich fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with reduction in platelet hyperactivity, a significant contributor to thrombus formation. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible role of hippuric acid, a predominant metabolite of plant cyclic polyols, phenolic acids and polyphenols, in reduction of platelet activation-related thrombogenesis. Fasting blood samples were collected from 13 healthy subjects to analyse the effect of varying concentrations of hippuric acid (100 μM, 200 μM, 500 μM, 1 mM and 2 mM) on activation-dependant platelet surface-marker expression. Procaspase activating compound-1 (PAC-1) and P-selectin/CD62P monoclonal antibodies were used to evaluate platelet activation-related conformational changes and α-granule release respectively using flow cytometry. Platelets were stimulated ex vivo via the P2Y1/P2Y12- adenosine diphosphate (ADP) pathway of platelet activation. Hippuric acid at a concentration of 1 mM and 2 mM significantly reduced P-selectin/CD62P expression (p = 0.03 and p < 0.001 respectively) induced by ADP. Hippuric acid at 2 mM concentration also inhibited PAC-1 activation-dependant antibody expression (p = 0.03). High ex vivo concentrations of hippuric acid can therefore significantly reduce P-selectin and PAC-1 expression thus reducing platelet activation and clotting potential. However, although up to 11 mM of hippuric acid can be excreted in the urine per day following consumption of fruit, hippuric acid is actively excreted with a recorded Cmax for hippuric acid in human plasma at 250-300 μM. This is lower than the blood concentration of 1-2 mM shown to be bioactive in this research. The contribution of hippuric acid to the protective effects of fruit and vegetable intake against vascular disorders by the pathways measured is therefore low but could be synergistic with lowered doses of antiplatelet drugs and help reduce risk of thrombosis in current antiplatelet drug sensitive populations. PMID

  3. The inhibitory effect of metals and other ions on acid phosphatase activity from Vigna aconitifolia seeds.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pramod Kumar; Anand, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity of acid phosphatase from Vigna aconitifolia seeds to metal ions, fluoride, and phosphate was examined. All the effectors had different degree of inhibitory effect on the enzyme. Among metal ions, molybdate and ferric ion were observed to be most potent inhibitors and both exhibited mixed type of inhibition. Acid phosphatase activity was inhibited by Cu2+ in a noncompetitive manner. Zn and Mn showed mild inhibition on the enzyme activity. Inhibition kinetics analysis explored molybdate as a potent inhibitor for acid phosphatase in comparison with other effectors used in this study. Fluoride was the next most strong inhibitor for the enzyme activity, and caused a mixed type of inhibition. Phosphate inhibited the enzyme competitively, which demonstrates that inhibition due to phosphate is one of the regulatory factors for enzyme activity.

  4. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of antimicrobial fatty acids and derivatives against Staphylococcus aureus *

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Lu; Peng, Li-juan; Dong, Xiao-wu; Wu, Di; Wu, Vivian Chi-Hua; Feng, Feng-qin

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids and derivatives (FADs) are resources for natural antimicrobials. In order to screen for additional potent antimicrobial agents, the antimicrobial activities of FADs against Staphylococcus aureus were examined using a microplate assay. Monoglycerides of fatty acids were the most potent class of fatty acids, among which monotridecanoin possessed the most potent antimicrobial activity. The conventional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) were performed to establish two statistically reliable models (conventional QSAR: R 2=0.942, Q 2 LOO=0.910; CoMFA: R 2=0.979, Q 2=0.588, respectively). Improved forecasting can be achieved by the combination of these two models that provide a good insight into the structure-activity relationships of the FADs and that may be useful to design new FADs as antimicrobial agents. PMID:22302421

  5. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of the lichen Parmelia sulcata and its salazinic acid constituent.

    PubMed

    Candan, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Meral; Tay, Turgay; Erdem, Murat; Türk, Ayşen Ozdemir

    2007-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the acetone, chloroform, diethyl ether, methanol, and petroleum ether extracts of the lichen Parmelia sulcata and its salazinic acid constituent have been screened against twenty eight food-borne bacteria and fungi. All of the extracts with the exception of the petroleum ether extract showed antimicrobial activity against Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Yersinia enterocolitica, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Penicillium notatum. Salazinic acid did not show antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes, P. vulgaris, Y. enterocolitica, and S. faecalis but showed activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium as well. The MIC values of the extracts and the acid for the bacteria and fungi have also been determined. PMID:17913083

  6. Indole-3-acetic acid biosynthetic pathway and aromatic amino acid aminotransferase activities in Pantoea dispersa strain GPK.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, G B; Nayak, A S; Sajjan, S S; Oblesha, A; Karegoudar, T B

    2013-05-01

    This investigation deals with the production of IAA by a bacterial isolate Pantoea dispersa strain GPK (PDG) identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. HPLC and Mass spectral analysis of metabolites from bacterial spent medium revealed that, IAA production by PDG is Trp-dependent and follows indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA) pathway. Substrate specificity study of aromatic amino acid aminotransferase (AAT) showed high activities, only when tryptophan (Trp) and α-ketoglutarate (α-kg) were used as substrates. AAT is highly specific for Trp and α-kg as amino group donor and acceptor, respectively. The effect of exogenous IAA on bacterial growth was established. Low concentration of exogenous IAA induced the growth, whereas high concentration decreased the growth of bacterium. PDG treatment significantly increased the root length, shoot length and dry mass of the chickpea and pigeon pea plants. PMID:23448265

  7. Design, synthesis and biological activity of phenoxyacetic acid derivatives as novel free fatty acid receptor 1 agonists.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Xuekun; Xu, Xue; Yang, Jianyong; Xia, Wenting; Zhou, Xianhao; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-11-15

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1) is a novel antidiabetic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes based on particular mechanism in amplifying glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. We have previously identified a series of phenoxyacetic acid derivatives. Herein, we describe the further chemical modification of this series directed by ligand efficiency and ligand lipophilicity efficiency. All of these efforts lead to the discovery of the promising candidate 16, an excellent FFA1 agonist with robust agonistic activity (43.6 nM), desired LE and LLE values. Moreover, compound 16 revealed a great potential for improving the hyperglycemia levels in both normal and type 2 diabetic mice without the risk of hypoglycemia even at the high dose of 40 mg/kg. PMID:26482570

  8. Coffee polyphenol caffeic acid but not chlorogenic acid increases 5'AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Satoshi; Egawa, Tatsuro; Ma, Xiao; Oshima, Rieko; Kurogi, Eriko; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2012-11-01

    Chlorogenic acid is an ester of caffeic and quinic acids, and is one of the most widely consumed polyphenols because it is abundant in foods, especially coffee. We explored whether chlorogenic acid and its metabolite, caffeic acid, act directly on skeletal muscle to stimulate 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Incubation of rat epitrochlearis muscles with Krebs buffer containing caffeic acid (≥0.1 mM, ≥30 min) but not chlorogenic acid increased the phosphorylation of AMPKα Thr(172), an essential step for kinase activation, and acetyl CoA carboxylase Ser(79), a downstream target of AMPK, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Analysis of isoform-specific AMPK activity revealed that AMPKα2 activity increased significantly, whereas AMPKα1 activity did not change. This enzyme activation was associated with a reduction in phosphocreatine content and an increased rate of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose transport activity in the absence of insulin. These results suggest that caffeic acid but not chlorogenic acid acutely stimulates skeletal muscle AMPK activity and insulin-independent glucose transport with a reduction of the intracellular energy status. PMID:22227267

  9. Transcriptional activation by TFIIB mutants that are severely impaired in interaction with promoter DNA and acidic activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, S; Struhl, K

    1997-01-01

    Biochemical experiments indicate that the general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) can interact directly with acidic activation domains and that activators can stimulate transcription by increasing recruitment of TFIIB to promoters. For promoters at which recruitment of TFIIB to promoters is limiting in vivo, one would predict that transcriptional activity should be particularly sensitive to TFIIB mutations that decrease the association of TFIIB with promoter DNA and/or with activation domains; i.e., such TFIIB mutations should exacerbate a limiting step that occurs in wild-type cells. Here, we describe mutations on the DNA-binding surface of TFIIB that severely affect both TATA-binding protein (TBP)-TFIIB-TATA complex formation and interaction with the VP16 activation domain in vitro. These TFIIB mutations affect the stability of the TBP-TFIIB-TATA complex in vivo because they are synthetically lethal in combination with TBP mutants impaired for TFIIB binding. Interestingly, these TFIIB derivatives support viability, and they efficiently respond to Gal4-VP16 and natural acidic activators in different promoter contexts. These results suggest that in vivo, recruitment of TFIIB is not generally a limiting step for acidic activators. However, one TFIIB derivative shows reduced transcription of GAL4, suggesting that TFIIB may be limiting at a subset of promoters in vivo. PMID:9372910

  10. Phytanic acid oxidation: normal activation and transport yet defective alpha-hydroxylation of phytanic acid in peroxisomes from Refsum disease and rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata.

    PubMed

    Pahan, K; Khan, M; Singh, I

    1996-05-01

    In humans the oxidation of phytanic acid is a peroxisomal function. To understand the possible mechanisms for the pathognomic accumulation of phytanic acid in plasma and body fluids of Refsum disease (RD) and rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP), we investigated activities of various steps (activation, transport, and oxidation) in the metabolism of phytanic acid in peroxisomes isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts from control, RD, and RCDP subjects. Activation of phytanic acid was normal in peroxisomes from both RD and RCDP. Transport of phytanic acid or phytanoyl-CoA in the absence or presence of fatty acid activating cofactors (ATP, MgCl2, and CoASH) into peroxisomes isolated from RD and RCDP skin fibroblasts was also similar to that of peroxisomes from control fibroblasts. Defective oxidation of [(2,3)-3H]- or [1-14C]phytanic acid, or [1-14C]phytanoyl-CoA (substrate for the first step of alpha-oxidation) but normal oxidation of [1-14C] alpha-hydroxyphytanic acid (substrate for the second step of the alpha-oxidation pathway) in peroxisomes from RD clearly demonstrates that excessive accumulation of phytanic acid in plasma and body fluids of RD is due to the deficiency of phytanic acid alpha-hydroxylase in peroxisomes. However, in RCDP peroxisomes, in addition to deficient oxidation of [1-14C]phytanic acid or phytanoyl-CoA or [(2,3)-3H]phytanic acid, the oxidation of [1-14C] alpha-hydroxyphytanic acid was also deficient, indicating that in RCDP the activities both of alpha-hydroxylation of phytanic acid and decarboxylation of alpha-hydroxyphytanic acid are deficient. These observations indicate that peroxisomal membrane functions (phytanic acid activation and transport) in phytanic acid metabolism are normal in both RD and RCDP. The defect in RD is in the alpha-hydroxylation of phytanic acid; whereas in RCDP both alpha-hydroxylation of phytanic acid as well as decarboxylation of alpha-hydroxyphytanic acid are deficient.

  11. Effect alteration of methamphetamine by amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, H; Tadokoro, S

    1983-02-01

    Effect alterations of methamphetamine by pretreatment of amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice were investigated to confirm a fact that certain amino acids, particularly monosodium L-glutamate, are added to methamphetamine by the street users, and that the amino acids augment the effect of methamphetamine. The ambulatory activity of mouse was measured by a tilting-type round activity cage of 25 cm in diameter. The amino acids or their salts tested were monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate, gamma-amino-butyric acid, L-alanine, L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride. A single administration of each chemical at doses of 1 and 2 g/kg i.p. did not induce a marked change in the ambulatory activity in mice. Methamphetamine 2 mg/kg s.c. induced an increase in the ambulatory activity with a peak at 40 min after the administration, and the increased ambulatory activity persisted for 3 hr. The ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine was augmented by the pretreatment of monosodium L-glutamate and monosodium L-aspartate at 30 min before the methamphetamine administration, while attenuated by the pretreatment of L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride in a dose-dependent manner. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not affect the effect of methamphetamine. Similar augmentation and attenuation in the ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine were induced by the pretreatment of sodium bicarbonate 0.9 g/kg i.p. (urinary alkalizer) and ammonium chloride 0.07 g/kg i.p. (urinary acidifier), respectively. The urinary pH level was elevated by the administration of monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate and sodium bicarbonate, and decreased by L-lysine hydrochloride, L-arginine hydrochloride and ammonium chloride. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not elicit a marked change in the urinary pH level. The present experiment confirms the fact in human that monosodium L-glutamate augments the effect of

  12. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-01-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%. PMID:27292280

  13. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  14. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly).

  15. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-06-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%.

  16. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  17. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-01-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%. PMID:27292280

  18. Impacts of simulated acid rain on soil enzyme activities in a latosol.

    PubMed

    Ling, Da-Jiong; Huang, Qian-Chun; Ouyang, Ying

    2010-11-01

    Acid rain pollution is a serious environmental problem in the world. This study investigated impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon four types of soil enzymes, namely the catalase, acid phosphatase, urease, and amylase, in a latosol. Latosol is an acidic red soil and forms in the tropical rainforest biome. Laboratory experiments were performed by spraying the soil columns with the SAR at pH levels of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5., 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, and 7.0 (control) over a 20-day period. Mixed results were obtained in enzyme activities for different kinds of enzymes under the influences of the SAR. The catalase activities increased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then decreased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased sharply to the end of the experiments, whereas the acid phosphatase activities decreased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then increased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased dramatically to the end of the experiments. A decrease in urease activities was observed at all of the SAR pH levels for the entire experimental period, while an increase from day 0 to 5 and then a decrease from day 5 to 20 in amylase activities were observed at all of the SAR pH levels. In general, the catalase, acid phosphatase, and urease activities increased with the SAR pH levels. However, the maximum amylase activity was found at pH 4.0 and decreased as the SAR pH increased from 4.0 to 5.0 or decreased from 4.0 to 2.5. It is apparent that acid rain had adverse environmental impacts on soil enzyme activities in the latosol. Our study further revealed that impacts of the SAR upon soil enzyme activities were in the following order: amylase>catalase>acid phosphatase>urease. These findings provide useful information on better understanding and managing soil biological processes in the nature under the influence of acid rains.

  19. Active-site mutations of diphtheria toxin: effects of replacing glutamic acid-148 with aspartic acid, glutamine, or serine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B A; Reich, K A; Weinstein, B R; Collier, R J

    1990-09-18

    Glutamic acid-148, an active-site residue of diphtheria toxin identified by photoaffinity labeling with NAD, was replaced with aspartic acid, glutamine, or serine by directed mutagenesis of the F2 fragment of the toxin gene. Wild-type and mutant F2 proteins were synthesized in Escherichia coli, and the corresponding enzymic fragment A moieties (DTA) were derived, purified, and characterized. The Glu----Asp (E148D), Glu----Gln (E148Q), and Glu----Ser (E148S) mutations caused reductions in NAD:EF-2 ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of ca. 100-, 250-, and 300-fold, respectively, while causing only minimal changes in substrate affinity. The effects of the mutations on NAD-glycohydrolase activity were considerably different; only a 10-fold reduction in activity was observed for E148S, and the E148D and E148Q mutants actually exhibited a small but reproducible increase in NAD-glycohydrolytic activity. Photolabeling by nicotinamide-radiolabeled NAD was diminished ca. 8-fold in the E148D mutant and was undetectable in the other mutants. The results confirm that Glu-148 plays a crucial role in the ADP-ribosylation of EF-2 and imply an important function for the side-chain carboxyl group in catalysis. The carboxyl group is also important for photochemical labeling by NAD but not for NAD-glycohydrolase activity. The pH dependence of the catalytic parameters for the ADP-ribosyltransferase reaction revealed a group in DTA-wt that titrates with an apparent pKa of 6.2-6.3 and is in the protonated state in the rate-determining step.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Inhibition of lysophospholipase D activity by unsaturated lysophosphatidic acids or seed extracts containing 1-linoleoyl and 1-oleoyl lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Wen; Sok, Dai-Eun; Yook, Hong-Sun; Sohn, Cheon-Bae; Chung, Young-Jin; Kim, Mee Ree

    2007-10-17

    Lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD), generating lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) from lysophosphatidyclcholine (LPC), is known to be inhibited by lysophosphatidic acids. Meanwhile, some plant lipids are known to contain lysophospholipids as minor components. Therefore, it is interesting to test whether edible seed samples, rich in phospholipids, may contain lysophospholipids, which express a strong inhibition of lysoPLD activity. First, the structural importance of fatty acyl group in LPAs was examined by determining the inhibitory effect of various LPAs on bovine lysoPLD activity. The most potent in the inhibition of lysoPLD activity was linoleoyl-LPA ( K i, 0.21 microM), followed by arachidonoyl-LPA ( K i, 0.55 microM), oleoyl-LPA ( K i, 1.2 microM), and palmitoyl-LPA ( K i, 1.4 microM), based on the fluoresecent assay. The same order of inhibitory potency among LPA analogs with different acyl chains was also found in the spectrophotometric assay. Subsequently, the extracts of 12 edible seeds were screened for the inhibition of lysoPLD activity using both spectrophotometric and fluorescent assays. Among seed extracts tested, the extract from soybean seed, sesame seed, or sunflower seed (30 mg seed weight/mL) was found to exhibit a potent inhibition (>80%) of lysoPLD activity. In further study employing ESI-MS/MS analysis, major LPA components in seed extracts were identified to be 1-linoleoyl LPA, 1-oleoyl LPA, and 1-palmitoyl LPA with 1-linoleoyl LPA being more predominant. Thus, the potent inhibition of lysoPLD activity by seed extracts might be ascribed to the presence of LPA with linoleoyl group rather than other acyl chains. PMID:17887800

  1. Characterization of fatty acid modifying enzyme activity in staphylococcal mastitis isolates and other bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatty acid modifying enzyme (FAME) has been shown to modify free fatty acids to alleviate their bactericidal effect by esterifying fatty acids to cholesterol or alcohols. Although it has been shown in previous studies that FAME is required for Staphylococcus aureus survival in skin abscesses, FAME is poorly studied compared to other virulence factors. FAME activity had also been detected in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). However, FAME activity was only surveyed after a bacterial culture was grown for 24 h. Therefore if FAME activity was earlier in the growth phase, it would not have been detected by the assay and those strains would have been labeled as FAME negative. Results Fifty CNS bovine mastitis isolates and several S. aureus, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus uberis strains were assayed for FAME activity over 24 h. FAME activity was detected in 54% of CNS and 80% S. aureus strains surveyed but none in E. coli or S. uberis. While some CNS strains produced FAME activity comparable to the lab strain of S. aureus, the pattern of FAME activity varied among strains and across species of staphylococci. All CNS that produced FAME activity also exhibited lipase activity. Lipase activity relative to colony forming units of these CNS decreased over the 24 h growth period. No relationship was observed between somatic cell count in the milk and FAME activity in CNS. Conclusions Some staphylococcal species surveyed produced FAME activity, but E. coli and S. uberis strains did not. All FAME producing CNS exhibited lipase activity which may indicate that both these enzymes work in concert to alter fatty acids in the bacterial environment. PMID:22726316

  2. Synthesis of organic/inorganic hybrid gel with acid activated clay after γ-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Hoik; Sohn, Daewon

    2014-08-01

    A hybrid gel was prepared from acid activated clay (AA clay) and acrylic acid by gamma ray irradiation. Irradiated inorganic particles which have peroxide groups act as initiator because it generates oxide radicals by increasing temperature. Inorganic nanoparticles which are rigid part in hybrid gel also contribute to increase the mechanical property as a crosslinker. We prepared two hybrid gels to compare the effect of acid activated treatment of clay; one is synthesized with raw clay particles and another is synthesized with AA clay particles. The composition and structure of AA clay particles and raw clay particles were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence instrument and surface area analyzer. And chemical and physical property of hybrid gel with different ratios of acrylic acid and clay particle was tested by Raman spectroscope and universal testing machine (UTM). The synthesized hydrogel with 76% gel contents can elongated approximately 1000% of its original size.

  3. Role of degradation products of chlorogenic acid in the antioxidant activity of roasted coffee.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Masumi; Moon, Joon-Kwan; Jang, Hae Won; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2015-02-25

    Antioxidant activities of brewed coffees prepared from six commercial brands ranged from 63.13 ± 1.01 to 96.80 ± 1.68% at the highest levels tested. Generally, the degree of antioxidant activity of the brewed coffee was inversely proportional to the total chlorogenic acid concentration. A sample obtained from the major chlorogenic acid, 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), heated at 250 °C exhibited potent antioxidant activity (79.12 ± 2.49%) at the level of 10 μg/mL, whereas unheated 5-CQA showed only moderate antioxidant activity (44.41 ± 0.27%) at the level of 100 μg/mL. Heat produced relatively high levels of pyrocatechol (2,809.3 μg/g) and 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol (46.4 μg/g) from 5-CQA, and their antioxidant activity levels were 76.57 ± 3.00 and 98.63 ± 0.01%, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that roasting degrades chlorogenic acids to form potent antioxidants and thus plays an important role in the preparation of high-antioxidant low-acid coffee. PMID:25658375

  4. Activation of stratospheric chlorine by reactions in liquid sulphuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.A.; MacKenzie, A.R. ); Mueller, R.H.; Peter, Th.; Crutzen, P.J. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors discuss activation mechanisms for chlorine compounds in the stratosphere, based on laboratory measurements for the solubility and reaction rates of HOCl and HCl in H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solutions, as found on aerosols in the stratosphere. Their interest is in the impact of the large increase in aerosol loading in the stratosphere in the winter on 1991-92 due to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. While laboratory data is not available for the temperature range close to 190 K, they argue that should the solubility and hydrolysis rates be high enough, this excess aerosol density could have contributed a significant additional amount of reactive chlorine to the stratosphere.

  5. Microbicidal activity of tripotassium phosphate and fatty acids toward spoilage and pathogenic bacteria associated with poultry.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Arthur; Ingram, Kimberly D

    2005-07-01

    The ability of solutions of tripotassium phosphate (TPP) and fatty acids (lauric and myristic acids) to reduce populations of spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms associated with processed poultry was examined. In vitro studies were conducted with cultures of bacteria (Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) and yeasts (Candida ernobii and Yarrowia lipolytica). Cultures of the bacteria and yeasts were suspended in solutions of TPP or mixtures of TPP with lauric or myristic acid and mixed for 5 min. Viable numbers (log CFU per milliliter) in the suspensions were enumerated on microbiological agar. Results indicated that TPP solutions are highly bactericidal toward gram-negative bacteria and that mixtures of TPP and fatty acids are highly microbicidal toward gram-negative bacteria, gram-positive bacteria, and yeasts. The microbicidal activity of mixtures of TPP and fatty acids toward the native bacterial flora of skin of processed broiler carcasses was also examined. Skin samples were washed in mixtures of TPP and fatty acid, and the populations of total aerobic bacteria, campylobacters, enterococci, E. coli, lactic acid bacteria, pseudomonads, staphylococci, and yeasts in the skin rinsates were enumerated on the appropriate microbiological media. Results indicated that washing the skin in mixtures of TPP and fatty acids produced significant reductions in the number of aerobic bacteria, campylobacters, E. coli, pseudomonads, and yeasts recovered from skin rinsates, but there was no significant reduction in the populations of enterococci, lactic acid bacteria, or staphylococci. These findings indicate that mixtures of TPP and fatty acids possess microbicidal activity against several microorganisms associated with processed poultry and that these solutions could be useful as microbicides to reduce the populations of some bacteria and yeasts associated with some poultry

  6. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids: development of a Lewis base catalyzed selenolactonization.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Collins, William R

    2007-09-13

    The concept of Lewis base activation of Lewis acids has been applied to the selenolactonization reaction. Through the use of substoichiometric amounts of Lewis bases with "soft" donor atoms (S, Se, P) significant rate enhancements over the background reaction are seen. Preliminary mechanistic investigations have revealed the resting state of the catalyst as well as the significance of a weak Brønsted acid promoter.

  7. Augmentation of the in vitro activity of azlocillin against Bacteroides fragilis by clavulanic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, M B; Chuah, S K; Thadepalli, H

    1984-01-01

    Azlocillin was active against 90% of 154 strains of Bacteroides fragilis at a concentration of 64 micrograms/ml. Twenty-eight strains of B. fragilis with an azlocillin MIC of greater than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml were retested with a combination of azlocillin plus clavulanic acid. Of these strains, 71% showed a 4- to 32-fold decrease in the MIC of azlocillin plus clavulanic acid. PMID:6517552

  8. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aravind T.; Lakshmi, Sowmya P.; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R.; Reddy, Raju C.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs’ electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease. PMID:27119365

  9. Enzymatic modification of chitosan by cinnamic acids: Antibacterial activity against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Caifeng; Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Yu; Li, Changlong; Sheng, Sheng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Fuan

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to identify chitosan polymers that have antibacterial activity against the bacterial wilt pathogen. The chitosan polymers were enzymatically synthesized using chitosan and five cinnamic acids (CADs): caffeic acid (CA), ferulic acid (FA), cinnamic acid (CIA), p-coumaric acid (COA) and chlorogenic acid (CHA), using laccase from Pleurotus ostreatus as a catalyst. The reaction was performed in a phosphate buffered solution under heterogenous reaction conditions. The chitosan derivatives (CTS-g-CADs) were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, TGA and SEM. FT-IR demonstrated that the reaction products bound covalently to the free amino groups or hydroxyl groups of chitosan via band of amide I or ester band. XRD showed a reduced packing density for grafted chitosan comparing to original chitosan. TGA demonstrated that CTS-g-CADs have a higher thermostability than chitosan. Additionally, chitosan and its derivatives showed similar antibacterial activity. However, the IC50 value of the chitosan-caffeic acid derivative (CTS-g-CA) against the mulberry bacterial wilt pathogen RS-5 was 0.23mg/mL, which was two-fifths of the IC50 value of chitosan. Therefore, the enzymatically synthesized chitosan polymers can be used to control plant diseases in biotechnological domains. PMID:26993531

  10. Enzymatic modification of chitosan by cinnamic acids: Antibacterial activity against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Caifeng; Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Yu; Li, Changlong; Sheng, Sheng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Fuan

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to identify chitosan polymers that have antibacterial activity against the bacterial wilt pathogen. The chitosan polymers were enzymatically synthesized using chitosan and five cinnamic acids (CADs): caffeic acid (CA), ferulic acid (FA), cinnamic acid (CIA), p-coumaric acid (COA) and chlorogenic acid (CHA), using laccase from Pleurotus ostreatus as a catalyst. The reaction was performed in a phosphate buffered solution under heterogenous reaction conditions. The chitosan derivatives (CTS-g-CADs) were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, TGA and SEM. FT-IR demonstrated that the reaction products bound covalently to the free amino groups or hydroxyl groups of chitosan via band of amide I or ester band. XRD showed a reduced packing density for grafted chitosan comparing to original chitosan. TGA demonstrated that CTS-g-CADs have a higher thermostability than chitosan. Additionally, chitosan and its derivatives showed similar antibacterial activity. However, the IC50 value of the chitosan-caffeic acid derivative (CTS-g-CA) against the mulberry bacterial wilt pathogen RS-5 was 0.23mg/mL, which was two-fifths of the IC50 value of chitosan. Therefore, the enzymatically synthesized chitosan polymers can be used to control plant diseases in biotechnological domains.

  11. Biological activities of indoleacetylamino acids and their use as auxins in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Hangarter, R.P.; Peterson, M.D.; Good, N.E.

    1980-05-01

    The auxin activities of a number of indoleacetylamino acid conjugates have been determined in three test systems: growth of tomato hypocotyl explants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Marglobe); growth of tobacco callus cultures (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38); and ethylene production from pea stems (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska). The activities of the conjugates differ greatly depending on the amino acid moiety. Indoleacetyl-L-alanine supports rapid callus growth from the tomato hypocotyls while inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetlyglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetylglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting shoot formation. The other amino acid conjugates tested (valine, leucine, aspartic acid, threonine, methionine, phenylalanine, and proline) support shoot formation without supporting root formation or much callus growth. The tobacco callus system, which forms abundant shoots in the presence or absence of free indoleacetic acid, produces only rapid undifferentiated growth in the presence of indoleacetyl-L-alanine and indoleacetylglycine. The other conjugates inhibit shoot formatin weakly if at all. Most of the conjugates induce sustained ethylene production from the pea stems but at rates well below the initial rates observed with free indoleacetic acid. Many, but not all of the effects of conjugates such as indoleacetyl-L-alanine can be mimicked by frequent renewals of the supply of free indoleacetic acid.

  12. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed PMID:22439557

  13. [Elicitor activity of chitosan and arachidonic acid: their similarity and distinction].

    PubMed

    Vasiukova, N I; Gerasimova, N G; Chalenko, G I; Ozeretskovskaia, O L

    2012-01-01

    Two elicitors-chitosan and arachidonic acid-induced the same defense responses in potatoes, stimulating the processes of wound reparation and inducing the formation of phytoalexins, inhibitors of proteinase, and active forms of oxygen. However, chitosan induced the defense potential of plant tissues at concentrations higher than those of arachidonic acid. The protective action of chitosan was defined by two parameters, i.e., the ability to induce the immune responses in plant tissues and to exhibit a toxic effect on the pathogen development, causing late blight and seedling blight, whereas the elicitor effect of arachidonic acid depended on its ability to induce the defense potential of plant tissues only.

  14. In vitro activity of amoxicillin in combination with clavulanic acid against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cynamon, M H; Palmer, G S

    1983-01-01

    The comparative in vitro activity of amoxicillin alone and in combination with clavulanic acid against 15 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was evaluated by broth dilution susceptibility testing. Amoxicillin inhibited 4 of 15 isolates at 8 micrograms/ml or less but was not bactericidal against any of the isolates at that concentration. Amoxicillin in combination with clavulanic acid was bactericidal for 14 of 15 isolates tested at an amoxicillin concentration of 4 micrograms/ml or less and a clavulanic acid concentration of 2 micrograms/ml or less. PMID:6416162

  15. Mechanisms for the activation of Toll-like receptor 2/4 by saturated fatty acids and inhibition by docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Daniel H; Kim, Jeong-A; Lee, Joo Young

    2016-08-15

    Saturated fatty acids can activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 but polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) inhibit the activation. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lipopetides, ligands for TLR4 and TLR2, respectively, are acylated by saturated fatty acids. Removal of these fatty acids results in loss of their ligand activity suggesting that the saturated fatty acyl moieties are required for the receptor activation. X-ray crystallographic studies revealed that these saturated fatty acyl groups of the ligands directly occupy hydrophobic lipid binding domains of the receptors (or co-receptor) and induce the dimerization which is prerequisite for the receptor activation. Saturated fatty acids also induce the dimerization and translocation of TLR4 and TLR2 into lipid rafts in plasma membrane and this process is inhibited by DHA. Whether saturated fatty acids induce the dimerization of the receptors by interacting with these lipid binding domains is not known. Many experimental results suggest that saturated fatty acids promote the formation of lipid rafts and recruitment of TLRs into lipid rafts leading to ligand independent dimerization of the receptors. Such a mode of ligand independent receptor activation defies the conventional concept of ligand induced receptor activation; however, this may enable diverse non-microbial molecules with endogenous and dietary origins to modulate TLR-mediated immune responses. Emerging experimental evidence reveals that TLRs play a key role in bridging diet-induced endocrine and metabolic changes to immune responses.

  16. Redox control of retinoic acid receptor activity: a novel mechanism for retinoic acid resistance in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Demary, K; Wong, L; Liou, J S; Faller, D V; Spanjaard, R A

    2001-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) slows growth and induces differentiation of tumor cells through activation of RA receptors (RARs). However, melanoma cell lines display highly variable responsiveness to RA, which is a poorly understood phenomenon. By using Northern and Western blot analyses, we show that RA-resistant A375 and RA-responsive S91 melanoma cells express comparable levels of major components of RAR-signaling pathways. However, A375 cells have substantially higher intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels than S91 cells. Lowering ROS levels in A375 cells through hypoxic culture conditions restores RAR-dependent trans-activity, which could be further enhanced by addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. Hypoxia also enhances RAR activity in the moderately RA-responsive C32 cells, which have intermediate ROS levels. Conversely, increasing oxidative stress in highly RA-responsive S91 and B16 cells, which have low ROS levels, by treatment with H(2)O(2) impairs RAR activity. Consistent with these observations, RA more potently inhibited the proliferation of hypoxic A375 cells than that of normoxic cells. Oxidative states diminish, whereas reducing conditions enhance, DNA binding of retinoid X receptor/RAR heterodimers in vitro, providing a molecular basis for the observed inverse correlation between RAR activity and ROS levels. The redox state of melanoma cells provides a novel, epigenetic control mechanism of RAR activity and RA resistance. PMID:11356710

  17. Antimycobacterial activity generated by the amide coupling of (-)-fenchone derived aminoalcohol with cinnamic acids and analogues.

    PubMed

    Slavchev, Ivaylo; Dobrikov, Georgi M; Valcheva, Violeta; Ugrinova, Iva; Pasheva, Evdokia; Dimitrov, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    Aminoethyl substituted 2-endo-fenchol prepared from (-)-fenchone was used as scaffold for the synthesis of series of 31 amide structures by N-acylation applying cinnamic acids and analogues. The evaluation of their in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv showed for some of them promising activity-up to 0.2 μg/ml, combined with relatively low cytotoxicity of the selected active compounds.

  18. Nematicidal activity of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furoic acid against plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasuo; Tani, Satoko; Hayashi, Asami; Ohtani, Kouhei; Fujioka, Shozo; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Shimada, Atsumi

    2007-01-01

    A nematicide, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furoic acid (1), was isolated from cultures of the fungus Aspergillus sp. and its structure was identified by spectroscopic analysis. Compound 1 showed effective nematicidal activities against the pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans without inhibitory activity against plant growth, but 1 did not show any effective nematicidal activity against Pratylenchus penetrans. PMID:17542490

  19. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, N. V.; Trofymenko, S. I.; Poddubnaya, O. I.; Tsyba, M. M.; Sapsay, V. I.; Klymchuk, D. O.; Puziy, A. M.

    2012-11-01

    Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 °C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (SBET = 2081 m2/g, Vtot = 1.1 cm3/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  20. Activity and Stability of Biofilm Uricase of Lactobacillus plantarum for Uric Acid Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iswantini, Dyah; Rachmatia, Rescy; Diana, Novita Rose; Nurhidayat, Novik; Akhiruddin; Saprudin, Deden

    2016-01-01

    Research of uric acid biosensor used a Lactobacillus plantarum was successfully conducted. Lactobacillus plantarum could produce uricase that could be used as uric acid biosensor. Therefore, lifetime of bacteria were quite short that caused the bacteria could not detect uric acid for a long time. To avoid this problem, development of biofilm for uric acid biosensor is important. Biofilms is a structured community of bacterial cells, stick together and are able to maintain a bacteria in an extreme environments. The purpose of present study was to determine and compare the activity of uricase produced by L. plantarum, deposited whithin biofilm and planktonic bacteria on glassy carbon electrode (GCEb & GCE), also to determine the stability of biofilm. The optimization process was conducted by using temperature, pH, and substrate concentration as the parameters. It showed that the activity of uricase within biofilm was able to increase the oxidation current. GCEb and GCE yielded the oxidation current in the amount of 47.24 μA and 23.04 μA, respectively, under the same condition. Results indicated that the optimum condition for uric acid biosensor using biofilm were pH 10, temperature of 40 oC, and uric acid concentration of 5 mM. The stability of GCEb decreased after 10 hours used, with decreasing percentage over 86.33%. This low stability probably caused by the unprotected active site of the enzyme that the enzyme is easier to experience the denaturation.

  1. [Microflora of active ooze participating in the decomposition of sulfanilic acid].

    PubMed

    Orshanskaia, F B; Arkad'eva, A Z; Kozlova, E I

    1975-01-01

    Microflora of domestic water can be a source of active ooze adapted to sulphanilic acid. Adaptation of the microflora to sulphanilic acid at a concentration of 170-200 mg/l takes 6 to 8 days. The microflora of active ooze, immediately after adaptation, consists mainly of Pseudomonas species, Ps. denitrificans, Ps. fluorescens, Ps. striata, Ps. putida, etc., and also of Achromobacter stutzeri, Achromobacter flavum, Mycobacterium phlei, Mycobacterium mucosum, Bacillus mesentericus, Bac. cereus, saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and Rhodotorula glutinus. The number of the species decreased as a result of long cultivation of active ooze on a minimal medium with sulphanilic acid as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen; the following strains prevailed: Ps. putida, Ps. eisenbergii, strains of Mycobacterium phlei and Flavobacterium solare. The isolated strains of Ps. putida and Ps. eisenbergii decomposed sulphanilic acid by 60.0--79.5 percent, and together with Mycobacterium phlei by 100 percent during 4 to 7 days. The ability to oxidize sulphanilic acid decreased after storage. Addition to the medium of other sources of carbon, nitrogen and vitamins did not restore the lost ability of the microorganisms to decompose sulphanilic acid.

  2. Among the twenty classical L-amino acids, only glutamate directly activates metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Frauli, Mélanie; Neuville, Pascal; Vol, Claire; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prézeau, Laurent

    2006-02-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions, cellular amino acids can be profusely released from cells into the cerebral interstitial space. Because several class-C G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) display a broad natural ligand spectrum, being sensitive to more than one endogenous ligand, we wondered whether the related metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors could be modulated by various types of L-amino acids, allowing them to sense large increase in extracellular amino acid concentration. Here, the agonist, antagonist and allosteric effects of the twenty classical L-amino acids were evaluated on the eight mGlu receptor subtypes. We show that, in addition to glutamate (Glu), cysteine, aspartate and asparagine also lead to the activation of mGlu3, 4 and 5. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that the effect of these three amino acids did not result from a direct activation of the receptors, but from an indirect action involving Glu-transporters/exchangers. These data first demonstrate that mGlu receptors, unlike other class-C GPCRs, display an extremely high selectivity towards one ligand. Moreover, our results also show that Glu transport systems allow mGlu receptors to sense large increase in the extracellular concentration of some amino acids. Such a system will certainly lead to a large increase in some mGlu receptor activity under pathological conditions, such as seizure, ischemia or other brain injuries. PMID:16310227

  3. Relative activity of N-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)nicotinic acid to nicotinic acid as a niacin nutrient in rats and in Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, H; Taguchi, H; Yonezima, M; Shibata, K

    1996-02-01

    We investigated the relative activity of N-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-nicotinic acid as a niacin nutrient in rats and in Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014. N-(beta-D-Glucopyranosyl)-nicotinic acid is a detoxified product or storage form of nicotinic acid that is found in plants. The relative activity of N-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)nicotinic acid to nicotinic acid in rats was 1/2.3, 1/2.2, 1/1.0, and 1/1.7 as indices of the body weight gain, food intake, blood NAD content, and the increased urinary excretion of niacin and its metabolites, respectively. N-(beta-D-Glucopyranosyl)nicotinic acid had no niacin activity in Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014.

  4. Skin Barrier Recovery by Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Antagonist Lobaric Acid.

    PubMed

    Joo, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hyunjin; Yoon, Sohyun; Park, Jong Il; Lee, Ji Eun; Myung, Cheol Hwan; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) results from gene and environment interactions that lead to a range of immunological abnormalities and breakdown of the skin barrier. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) belongs to a family of G-protein coupled receptors and is expressed in suprabasal layers of the epidermis. PAR2 is activated by both trypsin and a specific agonist peptide, SLIGKV-NH₂ and is involved in both epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and epithelial inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lobaric acid on inflammation, keratinocyte differentiation, and recovery of the skin barrier in hairless mice. Lobaric acid blocked trypsin-induced and SLIGKV-NH2-induced PAR2 activation resulting in decreased mobilization of intracellular Ca²⁺ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid reduced expression of interleukin-8 induced by SLIGKV-NH₂ and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC) induced by tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and IFN-γ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid also blocked SLIGKV-NH₂-induced activation of ERK, which is a downstream signal of PAR2 in normal human keratinocytes (NHEKs). Treatment with SLIGKV-NH₂ downregulated expression of involucrin, a differentiation marker protein in HaCaT keratinocytes, and upregulated expression of involucrin, transglutamase1 and filaggrin in NHEKs. However, lobaric acid antagonized the effect of SLIGKV-NH₂ in HaCaT keratinocytes and NHEKs. Topical application of lobaric acid accelerated barrier recovery kinetics in a SKH-1 hairless mouse model. These results suggested that lobaric acid is a PAR2 antagonist and could be a possible therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27169822

  5. Folic acid mediates activation of the pro-oncogene STAT3 via the Folate Receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mariann F; Greibe, Eva; Skovbjerg, Signe; Rohde, Sarah; Kristensen, Anders C M; Jensen, Trine R; Stentoft, Charlotte; Kjær, Karina H; Kronborg, Camilla S; Martensen, Pia M

    2015-07-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a well-described pro-oncogene found constitutively activated in several cancer types. Folates are B vitamins that, when taken up by cells through the Reduced Folate Carrier (RFC), are essential for normal cell growth and replication. Many cancer cells overexpress a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored Folate Receptor α (FRα). The function of FRα in cancer cells is still poorly described, and it has been suggested that transport of folate is not its primary function in these cells. We show here that folic acid and folinic acid can activate STAT3 through FRα in a Janus Kinase (JAK)-dependent manner, and we demonstrate that gp130 functions as a transducing receptor for this signalling. Moreover, folic acid can promote dose dependent cell proliferation in FRα-positive HeLa cells, but not in FRα-negative HEK293 cells. After folic acid treatment of HeLa cells, up-regulation of the STAT3 responsive genes Cyclin A2 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) were verified by qRT-PCR. The identification of this FRα-STAT3 signal transduction pathway activated by folic and folinic acid contributes to the understanding of the involvement of folic acid in preventing neural tube defects as well as in tumour growth. Previously, the role of folates in these diseases has been attributed to their roles as one-carbon unit donors following endocytosis into the cell. Our finding that folic acid can activate STAT3 via FRα adds complexity to the established roles of B9 vitamins in cancer and neural tube defects.

  6. Isotherm-Based Thermodynamic Models for Solute Activities of Organic Acids with Consideration of Partial Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Lucy; Ohm, Peter B; Dutcher, Cari S

    2016-06-23

    Organic acids make up a significant fraction of the organic mass in atmospheric aerosol particles. The calculation of gas-liquid-solid equilibrium partitioning of the organic acid is therefore critical for accurate determination of atmospheric aerosol physicochemical properties and processes such as new particle formation and activation to cloud condensation nuclei. Previously, an adsorption isotherm-based statistical thermodynamic model was developed for capturing solute concentration-activity relationships for multicomponent aqueous solutions over the entire concentration range (Dutcher et al. J. Phys. Chem. C/A 2011, 2012, 2013), with model parameters for energies of adsorption successfully related to dipole-dipole electrostatic forces in solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions for both electrolytes and organics (Ohm et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015). However, careful attention is needed for weakly dissociating semivolatile organic acids. Dicarboxylic acids, such as malonic acid and glutaric acid are treated here as a mixture of nondissociated organic solute (HA) and dissociated solute (H(+) + A(-)). It was found that the apparent dissociation was greater than that predicted by known dissociation constants alone, emphasizing the effect of dissociation on osmotic and activity coefficient predictions. To avoid additional parametrization from the mixture approach, an expression was used to relate the Debye-Hückel hard-core collision diameter to the adjustable solute-solvent intermolecular distance. An improved reference state treatment for electrolyte-organic aqueous mixtures, such as that observed here with partial dissociation, has also been proposed. This work results in predictive correlations for estimation of organic acid and water activities for which there is little or no activity data.

  7. Antioxidant, antimicrobial activities and fatty acid components of flower, leaf, stem and seed of Hypericum scabrum.

    PubMed

    Shafaghat, Ali

    2011-11-01

    The hexane extracts of flower, leaf, stem, and seed of Hypericum scabrum, which were collected from northwestern Iran, were obtained by extraction in a Soxhlet apparatus. The fatty acids were converted to methyl esters and determined by gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) systems. The hexane extract from the flower, leaf, stem, and seed contained 39.1%, 43.2%, 29.0%, and 37.6% of omega-3 fatty acids, respectively. The other main components of the flower extract were tetracosane (12.2%) and palmitic acid (9.3%), and that of the leaf extract was palmitic acid (7.4%). The stem and seed extracts contained bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (18.7% and 35.7%), nonacosane (11.7% and 3.9%) and linoleic acid (6.5% and 6.9%) as major components. The hexane extracts of different parts from H. scabrum represent an important source of omega-3 fatty acids in several Hypericum species. The antioxidant activity of all hexane extracts was evaluated by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging method. The results indicate that hexane extracts from different parts of H. scabrum possess considerable antioxidant activity. The highest radical scavenging activity was detected in seed, which had an IC50 = 165 microg/mL. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts of those samples were determined against seven Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae), as well as three fungi (Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Aspergillus niger). The bioassay showed that the oil exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity. This study reveals that the all parts of this plant are attractive sources of fatty acid components, especially the essential ones, as well as of effective natural antioxidants. PMID:22224301

  8. Skin Barrier Recovery by Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Antagonist Lobaric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hyunjin; Yoon, Sohyun; Park, Jong Il; Lee, Ji Eun; Myung, Cheol Hwan; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) results from gene and environment interactions that lead to a range of immunological abnormalities and breakdown of the skin barrier. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) belongs to a family of G-protein coupled receptors and is expressed in suprabasal layers of the epidermis. PAR2 is activated by both trypsin and a specific agonist peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 and is involved in both epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and epithelial inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lobaric acid on inflammation, keratinocyte differentiation, and recovery of the skin barrier in hairless mice. Lobaric acid blocked trypsin-induced and SLIGKV-NH2-induced PAR2 activation resulting in decreased mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid reduced expression of interleukin-8 induced by SLIGKV-NH2 and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC) induced by tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and IFN-γ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid also blocked SLIGKV-NH2-induced activation of ERK, which is a downstream signal of PAR2 in normal human keratinocytes (NHEKs). Treatment with SLIGKV-NH2 downregulated expression of involucrin, a differentiation marker protein in HaCaT keratinocytes, and upregulated expression of involucrin, transglutamase1 and filaggrin in NHEKs. However, lobaric acid antagonized the effect of SLIGKV-NH2 in HaCaT keratinocytes and NHEKs. Topical application of lobaric acid accelerated barrier recovery kinetics in a SKH-1 hairless mouse model. These results suggested that lobaric acid is a PAR2 antagonist and could be a possible therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27169822

  9. Isotherm-Based Thermodynamic Models for Solute Activities of Organic Acids with Consideration of Partial Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Lucy; Ohm, Peter B; Dutcher, Cari S

    2016-06-23

    Organic acids make up a significant fraction of the organic mass in atmospheric aerosol particles. The calculation of gas-liquid-solid equilibrium partitioning of the organic acid is therefore critical for accurate determination of atmospheric aerosol physicochemical properties and processes such as new particle formation and activation to cloud condensation nuclei. Previously, an adsorption isotherm-based statistical thermodynamic model was developed for capturing solute concentration-activity relationships for multicomponent aqueous solutions over the entire concentration range (Dutcher et al. J. Phys. Chem. C/A 2011, 2012, 2013), with model parameters for energies of adsorption successfully related to dipole-dipole electrostatic forces in solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions for both electrolytes and organics (Ohm et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015). However, careful attention is needed for weakly dissociating semivolatile organic acids. Dicarboxylic acids, such as malonic acid and glutaric acid are treated here as a mixture of nondissociated organic solute (HA) and dissociated solute (H(+) + A(-)). It was found that the apparent dissociation was greater than that predicted by known dissociation constants alone, emphasizing the effect of dissociation on osmotic and activity coefficient predictions. To avoid additional parametrization from the mixture approach, an expression was used to relate the Debye-Hückel hard-core collision diameter to the adjustable solute-solvent intermolecular distance. An improved reference state treatment for electrolyte-organic aqueous mixtures, such as that observed here with partial dissociation, has also been proposed. This work results in predictive correlations for estimation of organic acid and water activities for which there is little or no activity data. PMID:27222917

  10. Antifungal hydroxy fatty acids produced during sourdough fermentation: microbial and enzymatic pathways, and antifungal activity in bread.

    PubMed

    Black, Brenna A; Zannini, Emanuele; Curtis, Jonathan M; Gänzle, Michael G

    2013-03-01

    Lactobacilli convert linoleic acid to hydroxy fatty acids; however, this conversion has not been demonstrated in food fermentations and it remains unknown whether hydroxy fatty acids produced by lactobacilli have antifungal activity. This study aimed to determine whether lactobacilli convert linoleic acid to metabolites with antifungal activity and to assess whether this conversion can be employed to delay fungal growth on bread. Aqueous and organic extracts from seven strains of lactobacilli grown in modified De Man Rogosa Sharpe medium or sourdough were assayed for antifungal activity. Lactobacillus hammesii exhibited increased antifungal activity upon the addition of linoleic acid as a substrate. Bioassay-guided fractionation attributed the antifungal activity of L. hammesii to a monohydroxy C(18:1) fatty acid. Comparison of its antifungal activity to those of other hydroxy fatty acids revealed that the monohydroxy fraction from L. hammesii and coriolic (13-hydroxy-9,11-octadecadienoic) acid were the most active, with MICs of 0.1 to 0.7 g liter(-1). Ricinoleic (12-hydroxy-9-octadecenoic) acid was active at a MIC of 2.4 g liter(-1). L. hammesii accumulated the monohydroxy C(18:1) fatty acid in sourdough to a concentration of 0.73 ± 0.03 g liter(-1) (mean ± standard deviation). Generation of hydroxy fatty acids in sourdough also occurred through enzymatic oxidation of linoleic acid to coriolic acid. The use of 20% sourdough fermented with L. hammesii or the use of 0.15% coriolic acid in bread making increased the mold-free shelf life by 2 to 3 days or from 2 to more than 6 days, respectively. In conclusion, L. hammesii converts linoleic acid in sourdough and the resulting monohydroxy octadecenoic acid exerts antifungal activity in bread.

  11. Characterization of phytochemicals and antioxidant activities of red radish brines during lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Pu; Song, Li-Hua; Shen, Shan-Qi; Zhao, Shu-Juan; Pang, Jie; Qian, Bing-Jun

    2014-07-07

    Red radish (Raphanus L.) pickles are popular appetizers or spices in Asian-style cuisine. However, tons of radish brines are generated as wastes from industrial radish pickle production. In this study, we evaluated the dynamic changes in colour properties, phenolics, anthocyanin profiles, phenolic acid composition, flavonoids, and antioxidant properties in radish brines during lactic acid fermentation. The results showed that five flavonoids detected were four anthocyanins and one kaempferol derivative, including pelargonidin-3-digluoside-5-glucoside derivatives acylated with p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, p-coumaric and manolic acids, or ferulic and malonic acids. Amounts ranged from 15.5-19.3 µg/mL in total monomeric anthocyanins, and kaempferol-3,7-diglycoside (15-30 µg/mL). 4-Hydroxy-benzoic, gentisic, vanillic, syringic, p-coumaric, ferulic, sinapic and salicylic acids were detected in amounts that varied from 70.2-92.2 µg/mL, whereas the total phenolic content was 206-220 µg/mL. The change in colour of the brine was associated with the accumulation of lactic acid and anthocyanins. The ORAC and Fe2+ chelation capacity of radish brines generally decreased, whereas the reducing power measured as FRAP values was increased during the fermentation from day 5 to day 14. This study provided information on the phytochemicals and the antioxidative activities of red radish fermentation waste that might lead to further utilization as nutraceuticals or natural colorants.

  12. Nanoencapsulation of gallic acid and evaluation of its cytotoxicity and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    de Cristo Soares Alves, Aline; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Khalil, Najeh Maissar

    2016-03-01

    Gallic acid is an important polyphenol compound presenting various biological activities. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize and evaluate poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles coated or not with polysorbate 80 (PS80) containing gallic acid. Nanoparticles coated or not with PS80 were produced by emulsion solvent evaporation method and presented a mean size of around 225 nm, gallic acid encapsulation efficiency of around 26% and zeta potential of -22 mV. Nanoparticle formulations were stable during storage, except nanoparticles coated with PS80 stored at room temperature. In vitro release profile demonstrated a quite sustained gallic acid release from nanoparticles and PS80-coating decreased drug release. Cytotoxicity over red blood cells was assessed and gallic acid-loaded PLGA nanoparticles at all analyzed concentrations demonstrated lack of hemolysis, while PS80-nanoparticles containing gallic acid were cytotoxic only in higher concentrations. Antioxidant potential of nanoparticles containing gallic acid was assessed and PLGA uncoated nanoparticles presented greater efficacy than PS80-coated PLGA nanoparticles.

  13. Preparation, characterization and antioxidant activity of phenolic acids grafted carboxymethyl chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Lu, Jian-feng; Kan, Juan; Tang, Ying-qing; Jin, Chang-hai

    2013-11-01

    In this study, three phenolic acids including gallic acid (GA), caffeic acid (CA) and ferulic acid (FA) were grafted onto N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan (NOCC) by a free radical mediated grafting method. The grafted copolymers obtained were all water-soluble samples. UV-vis absorption peaks of the grafted copolymers shifted toward longer wavelengths. FT-IR spectroscopy of the grafted copolymers exhibited additional phenolic characteristics of the aromatic ring CC stretching within 1450-1650 cm(-1). NMR spectroscopy of the grafted copolymers showed new peaks at 6.2-7.6 ppm assigned to the phenyl protons of phenolic acids. These results all confirmed the successful grafting of three phenolic acids to NOCC. The conjugation probably occurred at amine of NOCC and carboxyl groups of phenolic acids. The grafted copolymers exhibited decreased crystallinity as compared to NOCC and chitosan. Moreover, antioxidant activity in vitro assays showed that the antioxidant property decreased in the order of GA-g-NOCC>CA-g-NOCC>FA-g-NOCC>NOCC>chitosan. Our results suggested the potential of phenolic acids grafted NOCC for the development of effective antioxidant agents.

  14. Prostatic and dietary omega-3 fatty acids and prostate cancer progression during active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Moreel, Xavier; Allaire, Janie; Léger, Caroline; Caron, André; Labonté, Marie-Ève; Lamarche, Benoît; Julien, Pierre; Desmeules, Patrice; Têtu, Bernard; Fradet, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    The association between omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids and prostate cancer has been widely studied. However, little is known about the impact of prostate tissue fatty acid content on prostate cancer progression. We hypothesized that compared with the estimated dietary ω-3 fatty acids intake and the ω-3 fatty acids levels measured in red blood cells (RBC), the prostate tissue ω-3 fatty acid content is more strongly related to prostate cancer progression. We present the initial observations from baseline data of a phase II clinical trial conducted in a cohort of 48 untreated men affected with low-risk prostate cancer, managed under active surveillance. These men underwent a first repeat biopsy session within 6 months after the initial diagnosis of low-risk prostate cancer, at which time 29% of the men had progressed from a Gleason score of 6 to a Gleason score of 7. At the first repeat biopsy session, fatty acid levels were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire, and determined in the RBC and in the prostate tissue biopsy. We found that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer progression when measured directly in the prostate tissue. Thus, this initial interim study analysis suggests that prostate tissue ω-3 fatty acids, especially EPA, may be protective against prostate cancer progression in men with low-risk prostate cancer.

  15. Bioconversion of volatile fatty acids derived from waste activated sludge into lipids by Cryptococcus curvatus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Jia-Nan; Yuan, Ming; Shen, Zi-Heng; Peng, Kai-Ming; Lu, Li-Jun; Huang, Xiang-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Pure volatile fatty acid (VFA) solution derived from waste activated sludge (WAS) was used to produce microbial lipids as culture medium in this study, which aimed to realize the resource recovery of WAS and provide low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production simultaneously. Cryptococcus curvatus was selected among three oleaginous yeast to produce lipids with VFAs derived from WAS. In batch cultivation, lipid contents increased from 10.2% to 16.8% when carbon to nitrogen ratio increased from about 3.5 to 165 after removal of ammonia nitrogen by struvite precipitation. The lipid content further increased to 39.6% and the biomass increased from 1.56g/L to 4.53g/L after cultivation for five cycles using sequencing batch culture (SBC) strategy. The lipids produced from WAS-derived VFA solution contained nearly 50% of monounsaturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, heptadecanoic acid, ginkgolic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid, which showed the adequacy of biodiesel production. PMID:27038264

  16. Retinoic acid modulation of ultraviolet light-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, N.J.; Breeding, J.

    1982-02-01

    Irradiation of skin with ultraviolet light of sunburn range (UVB) leads to a large and rapid induction of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase in the epidermis. Induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase also occurs following application of the tumor promoting agent 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate and topical retinoic acid is able to block both this ornithine decarboxylase induction and skin tumor promotion. In the studies described below, topical application of retinoic acid to hairless mouse skin leads to a significant inhibition of UVB-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity. The degree of this inhibition was dependent on the dose, timing, and frequency of the application of retinoic acid. To show significant inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase the retinoic acid had to be applied within 5 hr of UVB irradiation. If retinoic acid treatment was delayed beyond 7 hr following UVB, then no inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase was observed. The quantities of retinoic acid used (1.7 nmol and 3.4 nmol) have been shown effective at inhibiting 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13 acetate induced ornithine decarboxylase. The results show that these concentrations of topical retinoic acid applied either before or immediately following UVB irradiation reduces the UVB induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase. The effect of retinoic acid in these regimens on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis is currently under study.

  17. Structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids and T cell cycle blockade.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; DeLoose, Annick; Valentine, Jimmie L; Fifer, E Kim

    2006-04-01

    This study was designed to examine the potential structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids, histone acetylation and T cell cycle blockade. Toward this goal a series of structural homologues of the short-chain carboxylic acid n-butyrate were studied for their ability to block the IL-2-stimulated proliferation of cloned CD4+ T cells. The carboxylic acids were also tested for their ability to inhibit histone deacetylation. In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the relative capacity of the carboxlic acids to upregulate the cyclin kinase-dependent inhibitor p21cip1 in T cells. As shown earlier n-butyrate effectively inhibited histone deacetylation. The increased acetylation induced by n-butyrate was associated with the upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1 and the cell cycle blockade of CD4+ T cells. Of the other carboxylic acids studied, the short chain acids, C3-C5, without branching were the best inhibitors of histone deacetylase. This inhibition correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle blocker p21cip1, and the associated suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation. The branched-chain carboxylic acids tested were ineffective in all the assays. These results underline the relationship between the ability of a carboxylic acid to inhibit histone deacetylation, and their ability to block T cell proliferation, and suggests that branching inhibits these effects.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of acid-hydrolyzed Citrus unshiu peel extract in milk.

    PubMed

    Min, Keun Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Kyoung Ah; Kim, Kee-Tae; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Citrus fruit (Citrus unshiu) peels were extracted with hot water and then acid-hydrolyzed using hydrochloric acid. Antimicrobial activities of acid-hydrolyzed Citrus unshiu peel extract were evaluated against pathogenic bacteria, including Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes. Antilisterial effect was also determined by adding extracts at 1, 2, and 4% to whole, low-fat, and skim milk. The cell numbers of B. cereus, Staph. aureus, and L. monocytogenes cultures treated with acid-hydrolyzed extract for 12h at 35°C were reduced from about 8log cfu/mL to <1log cfu/mL. Bacillus cereus was more sensitive to acid-hydrolyzed Citrus unshiu peel extract than were the other bacteria. The addition of 4% acid-hydrolyzed Citrus unshiu extracts to all types of milk inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes within 1d of storage at 4°C. The results indicated that Citrus unshiu peel extracts, after acid hydrolysis, effectively inhibited the growth of pathogenic bacteria. These findings indicate that acid hydrolysis of Citrus unshiu peel facilitates its use as a natural antimicrobial agent for food products.

  19. Differential effects of prenatal cocaine and retinoic acid on activity level throughout day and night.

    PubMed

    Church, M W; Tilak, J P

    1996-12-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure is associated with disrupted state control and lowered activity levels. Prenatal retinoic acid excess also influences activity levels in laboratory rats. Activity level is usually monitored during a brief period in young offspring. The effects of these drugs on pup activity levels throughout the day is unknown. There is also little information on the long-lasting effects of these teratogens in adult animals. We compared the daily activity of rats which were prenatally exposed to cocaine or retinoic acid (RA). Appropriate control groups were also used. The offspring were evaluated for activity levels in a neophobic situation and for a 22-h period in same-sex groups of 3 littermates. As both pups and adults, the cocaine groups were hypoactive while the RA group was hyperactive when first placed into the testing cage (neophobic situation). Similarly, during the remainder of the 22-h testing period, the pup and adult cocaine animals exhibited reduced activity levels while the RA animals exhibited elevated activity levels. Thus, prenatal cocaine and retinoic acid exposures affected offspring activity levels differently, both drugs have long-lasting neurobehavioral effects that persist into adulthood, and effects are influenced by time-of-day. Strain-dependent differences and mechanisms of action are discussed.

  20. Rh(III)-catalyzed synthesis of sultones through C-H activation directed by a sulfonic acid group.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zisong; Wang, Mei; Li, Xingwei

    2014-09-01

    A new rhodium-catalyzed synthesis of sultones via the oxidative coupling of sulfonic acids with internal alkynes is described. The reaction proceeds via aryl C-H activation assisted by a sulfonic acid group.

  1. Synthesis, activity, and docking study of phenylthiazole acids as potential agonists of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Taijin; Shi, Min; Ye, Haoyu

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-mediated transcription factor playing key roles in glucose and lipid homeostasis, and PPARγ ligands possess therapeutic potential in these as well as other areas. In this study, a series of phenylthiazole acids have been synthesized and evaluated for agonistic activity by a convenient fluorescence polarization-based PPARγ ligand screening assay. Compound 4t, as a potential PPARγ agonist with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) 0.75±0.20 μM, exhibited in vitro potency comparable with a 0.83±0.14 μM of the positive control rosiglitazone. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicated that phenylthiazole acid 4t interacted with the amino acid residues of the active site of the PPARγ complex in a stable manner, consistent with the result of the in vitro ligand assay. PMID:27313447

  2. Synthesis and Cytotoxic Activity on Human Cancer Cells of Novel Isoquinolinequinone-Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Jaime A; Delgado, Virginia; Sepúlveda, Sandra; Benites, Julio; Theoduloz, Cristina; Buc Calderon, Pedro; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2016-09-08

    A variety of aminoisoquinoline-5,8-quinones bearing α-amino acids moieties were synthesized from 3-methyl-4-methoxycarbonylisoquinoline-5,8-quinone and diverse l- and d-α-amino acid methyl esters. The members of the series were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against normal and cancer cell lines by using the (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. From the current investigation, structure-activity relationships demonstrate that the location and structure of the amino acid fragment plays a significant role in the cytotoxic effects. Moderate to high cytotoxic activity was observed and four members, derived from l-alanine, l-leucine, l-phenylalanine, and d-phenylalanine, were selected as promising compounds by their IC50 ranging from 0.5 to 6.25 μM and also by their good selectivity indexes (≥2.24).

  3. Facile synthesis of PtAu alloy nanoparticles with high activity for formic acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-02-15

    We report the facile synthesis of carbon supported PtAu alloy nanoparticles with high electrocatalytic activity as the anode catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). PtAu alloy nanopaticles are synthesized by co-reducing HAuCl4 and H2PtCl6 with NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate and then the nanoparticles are deposited on Vulcan XC-72R carbon support (PtAu/C). The obtained catalysts are characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), which reveal PtAu alloy formation with an average diameter of 4.6 nm. PtAu/C exhibits 8 times higher catalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation than Pt/C. The enhanced activity of PtAu/C catalyst is attributed to noncontinuous Pt sites formed in the presence of the neighbored Au sites, which promotes direct oxidation of formic acid by avoiding poison CO.

  4. Synthesis and Cytotoxic Activity on Human Cancer Cells of Novel Isoquinolinequinone-Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Jaime A; Delgado, Virginia; Sepúlveda, Sandra; Benites, Julio; Theoduloz, Cristina; Buc Calderon, Pedro; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2016-01-01

    A variety of aminoisoquinoline-5,8-quinones bearing α-amino acids moieties were synthesized from 3-methyl-4-methoxycarbonylisoquinoline-5,8-quinone and diverse l- and d-α-amino acid methyl esters. The members of the series were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against normal and cancer cell lines by using the (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. From the current investigation, structure-activity relationships demonstrate that the location and structure of the amino acid fragment plays a significant role in the cytotoxic effects. Moderate to high cytotoxic activity was observed and four members, derived from l-alanine, l-leucine, l-phenylalanine, and d-phenylalanine, were selected as promising compounds by their IC50 ranging from 0.5 to 6.25 μM and also by their good selectivity indexes (≥2.24). PMID:27617997

  5. The amino acid sensor GCN2 controls gut inflammation by inhibiting inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Helder I; Khan, Nooruddin; Ma, Hualing; Gama, Leonardo; Machiah, Deepa K; Lawson, Benton; Hakimpour, Paul; Wang, Yi-chong; Li, Shuzhao; Sharma, Prachi; Kaufman, Randal J; Martinez, Jennifer; Pulendran, Bali