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Sample records for acid drug delivery

  1. Hyaluronic acid for anticancer drug and nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Dosio, Franco; Arpicco, Silvia; Stella, Barbara; Fattal, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is widely used in anticancer drug delivery, since it is biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic, and non-immunogenic; moreover, HA receptors are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Exploiting this ligand-receptor interaction, the use of HA is now a rapidly-growing platform for targeting CD44-overexpressing cells, to improve anticancer therapies. The rationale underlying approaches, chemical strategies, and recent advances in the use of HA to design drug carriers for delivering anticancer agents, are reviewed. Comprehensive descriptions are given of HA-based drug conjugates, particulate carriers (micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, microparticles), inorganic nanostructures, and hydrogels, with particular emphasis on reports of preclinical/clinical results.

  2. Targeted drug delivery to bone: pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of acidic oligopeptide-tagged drugs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yokogawa, Koichi; Tomatsu, Shunji; Nomura, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi

    2008-03-01

    Site-specific drug delivery to bone is considered to be achievable by utilizing acidic amino acid homopeptides. We found that fluorescence-labeled acidic amino acid (L-Asp or L-Glu) homopeptides containing six or more residues bound strongly to hydroxyapatite, which is a major component of bone, and were selectively delivered to and retained in bone after systemic administration. We explored the applicability of this result for drug delivery by conjugation of estradiol and levofloxacin with an L-Asp hexapeptide. We also similarly tagged an enzyme, tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, to see whether this would improve the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy. The L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs, including the enzyme, were selectively delivered to bone in comparison with the untagged drugs. It was expected that the ester linkage to the hexapeptide would be susceptible to hydrolysis in situ, releasing the drug or enzyme from the acidic oligopeptide. An in vivo experiment confirmed the efficacy of L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged estradiol and levofloxacin, although there was some loss of bioactivity of estradiol and levofloxacin in vitro, suggesting that the acidic hexapeptide was partly removed by hydrolysis in the body after delivery to bone. The adverse effect of estradiol on the uterus was greatly reduced by conjugation to the hexapeptide. These results support the usefulness of acidic oligopeptides as bone-targeting carriers for therapeutic agents. We present some pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of the L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs and enzyme.

  3. Drug delivery systems based on nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan Willem; Zhang, Feng; Herrmann, Andreas

    2013-12-10

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has progressed rapidly in recent years and hence a large variety of 1D-, 2D- and 3D DNA nanostructures with various sizes, geometries and shapes is readily accessible. DNA-based nanoobjects are fabricated by straight forward design and self-assembly processes allowing the exact positioning of functional moieties and the integration of other materials. At the same time some of these nanosystems are characterized by a low toxicity profile. As a consequence, the use of these architectures in a biomedical context has been explored. In this review the progress and possibilities of pristine nucleic acid nanostructures and DNA hybrid materials for drug delivery will be discussed. For the latter class of structures, a distinction is made between carriers with an inorganic core composed of gold or silica and amphiphilic DNA block copolymers that exhibit a soft hydrophobic interior.

  4. Folic acid-Functionalized Nanoparticles for Enhanced Oral Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Emilie; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Kirtane, Ameya; Guru, Bharath Raja; Grill, Alex E.; Whittum-Hudson, Judith; Panyam, Jayanth

    2012-01-01

    The oral absorption of drugs that have poor bioavailability can be enhanced by encapsulation in polymeric nanoparticles. Transcellular transport of nanoparticle-encapsulated drug, possibly through transcytosis, is likely the major mechanism through which nanoparticles improve drug absorption. We hypothesized that the cellular uptake and transport of nanoparticles can be further increased by targeting the folate receptors expressed on the intestinal epithelial cells. The objective of this research was to study the effect of folic acid functionalization on transcellular transport of nanoparticle-encapsulated paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic with poor oral bioavailability. Surface-functionalized poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel were prepared by the interfacial activity assisted surface functionalization technique. Transport of paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was investigated using Caco-2 cell monolayers as an in vitro model. Caco-2 cells were found to express folate receptor and the drug efflux protein, p-glycoprotein, to high levels. Encapsulation of paclitaxel in PLGA nanoparticles resulted in a 5-fold increase in apparent permeability (Papp) across Caco-2 cells. Functionalization of nanoparticles with folic acid further increased the transport (8-fold higher transport compared to free paclitaxel). Confocal microscopic studies showed that folic acid-functionalized nanoparticles were internalized by the cells and that nanoparticles did not have any gross effects on tight junction integrity. In conclusion, our studies indicate that folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have the potential to enhance the oral absorption of drugs with poor oral bioavailability. PMID:22670575

  5. Vinylpyrrolidone-co-(meth)acrylic acid inserts for ocular drug delivery: synthesis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barbu, Eugen; Sarvaiya, Indrajeetsinh; Green, Keith L; Nevell, Thomas G; Tsibouklis, John

    2005-09-15

    Copolymeric hydrogels constituting of vinylpyrrolidone and methacrylic or acrylic acid repeat units have been prepared and investigated for their ability to act as controlled release vehicles in ophthalmic drug delivery. The materials were synthesized by radical-induced polymerization in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide crosslinker, and the influences of network composition and drug solubility upon the swelling properties, adhesion behavior, and drug release characteristics were studied. In vitro release experiments showed that some of these materials could be useful vehicles for the delivery of drugs such as pilocarpine or chloramphenicol, while in vivo studies, using the rabbit model, confirmed their high potential for the controlled ocular delivery of pilocarpine hydrochloride.

  6. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid drug delivery systems through transdermal pathway: an overview.

    PubMed

    Naves, Lucas; Dhand, Chetna; Almeida, Luis; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Soares, Graça

    2017-02-06

    In past few decades, scientists have made tremendous advancement in the field of drug delivery systems (DDS), through transdermal pathway, as the skin represents a ready and large surface area for delivering drugs. Efforts are in progress to design efficient transdermal DDS that support sustained drug release at the targeted area for longer duration in the recommended therapeutic window without producing side-effects. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is one of the most promising Food and Drug Administration approved synthetic polymers in designing versatile drug delivery carriers for different drug administration routes, including transdermal drug delivery. The present review provides a brief introduction over the transdermal drug delivery and PLGA as a material in context to its role in designing drug delivery vehicles. Attempts are made to compile literatures over PLGA-based drug delivery vehicles, including microneedles, nanoparticles, and nanofibers and their role in transdermal drug delivery of different therapeutic agents. Different nanostructure evaluation techniques with their working principles are briefly explained.

  7. Recent advances in delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu; Oupický, David

    2013-12-10

    Cancer treatment that uses a combination of approaches with the ability to affect multiple disease pathways has been proven highly effective in the treatment of many cancers. Combination therapy can include multiple chemotherapeutics or combinations of chemotherapeutics with other treatment modalities like surgery or radiation. However, despite the widespread clinical use of combination therapies, relatively little attention has been given to the potential of modern nanocarrier delivery methods, like liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles, to enhance the efficacy of combination treatments. This lack of knowledge is particularly notable in the limited success of vectors for the delivery of combinations of nucleic acids with traditional small molecule drugs. The delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations is particularly challenging due to differences in the physicochemical properties of the two types of agents. This review discusses recent advances in the development of delivery methods using combinations of small molecule drugs and nucleic acid therapeutics to treat cancer. This review primarily focuses on the rationale used for selecting appropriate drug-nucleic acid combinations as well as progress in the development of nanocarriers suitable for simultaneous delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations.

  8. Amphiphilic poly(L-amino acids) - new materials for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lalatsa, Aikaterini; Schätzlein, Andreas G; Mazza, Mariarosa; Le, Thi Bich Hang; Uchegbu, Ijeoma F

    2012-07-20

    The formulation of drug compounds into medicines will increasingly rely on the use of specially tailored molecules, which fundamentally alter the drug's pharmacokinetics to enable its therapeutic activity. This is particularly true of the more challenging hydrophobic drugs or therapeutic biological molecules. The demand for such enabled medicines will translate into a demand for advanced highly functionalised drug delivery materials. Polymers have been used to formulate medicines for many decades and this is unlikely to change soon. Amphiphilic polymers based on amino acids are the subject of this review. These molecules, which present as either poly(L-amino acid) block copolymers or poly(L-amino acid) backbones with hydrophobic substituents, self assemble into micelles, vesicles, nanofibres and solid nanoparticles and such self assemblies, have drug delivery capabilities. The nature of the self-assembly depends on the chemistry of the constituent molecules, with the more hydrophilic molecules forming nanosized micellar aggregates including peptide nanofibres, molecules of intermediate hydrophobicity forming polymeric vesicles and the more hydrophobic variants forming amorphous polymeric nanoparticles of 100-1000 nm in diameter. The self-assemblies may be loaded with drugs or may present as micelle forming polymer-drug conjugates and the supramolecular aggregates have been employed as drug solubilisers, tumour targeting agents, gene delivery vectors and facilitators of intracellular drug uptake, with a more promising polymer-drug conjugate progressing to clinical testing.

  9. Folic acid-conjugated amphiphilic alternating copolymer as a new active tumor targeting drug delivery platform

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Szewczuk, Myron R; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery using polymeric nanostructures is an emerging cancer research area, engineered for safer, more efficient, and effective use of chemotherapeutic drugs. A pH-responsive, active targeting delivery system was designed using folic acid functionalized amphiphilic alternating copolymer poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (FA-DABA-SMA) via a biodegradable linker 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA). The polymeric template is pH responsive, forming amphiphilic nanostructures at pH 7, allowing the encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs on its interior. Moreover, the structure is stable only at neutral pH and collapses in the acidic tumor microenvironment, releasing drugs on-site from its core. The delivery vehicle is investigated using human pancreatic PANC-1 cancer cells and RAW-Blue™ mouse macrophage reporter cell line, both of which have overly expression of folic acid receptors. To trace the cellular uptake by both cell lines, curcumin was selected as a dye and drug mimic owing to its fluorescence nature and hydrophobic properties. Fluorescent microscopy of FA-DABA-SMA loaded with curcumin revealed a significant internalization of the dye by human pancreatic PANC-1 cancer cells compared to those with unfunctionalized polymers (SMA). Moreover, the FA-DABA-SMA polymers exhibit rodlike association specific to the cells. Both empty SMA and FA-DABA-SMA show little toxicity to PANC-1 cells as characterized by WST-1 cell proliferation assay. These results clearly indicate that FA-DABA-SMA polymers show potential as an active tumor targeting drug delivery system with the ability to internalize hydrophobic chemotherapeutics after they specifically attach to cancer cells. PMID:28008233

  10. Lyophilized wafers comprising carrageenan and pluronic acid for buccal drug delivery using model soluble and insoluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Kianfar, Farnoosh; Antonijevic, Milan; Chowdhry, Babur; Boateng, Joshua S

    2013-03-01

    Lyophilized muco-adhesive wafers with optimum drug loading for potential buccal delivery have been developed. A freeze-annealing cycle was used to obtain optimized wafers from aqueous gels containing 2% κ-carrageenan (CAR 911), 4% pluronic acid (F127), 4.4% (w/w) polyethylene glycol with 1.8% (w/w) paracetamol or 0.8% (w/w) ibuprofen. Thermogravimetric analysis showed acceptable water content between 0.9 and 1.5%. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction showed amorphous conversion for both drugs. Texture analysis showed ideal mechanical and mucoadhesion characteristics whilst both drugs remained stable over 6 months and drug dissolution at a salivary pH showed gradual release within 2h. The results show the potential of CAR 911 and F127 based wafers for buccal mucosa drug delivery.

  11. Acid-responsive PEGylated doxorubicin prodrug nanoparticles for neuropilin-1 receptor-mediated targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Huijuan; Zhang, Ju; Wang, Weiwei; Huang, Pingsheng; Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Jianfeng; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembled prodrug nanoparticles have demonstrated great promise in cancer chemotherapy. In the present study, we developed a new kind of prodrug nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. PEGylated doxorubicin conjugate with an acid-cleavable cis-aconityl spacer was prepared. Then it was functionalized with a tumor-penetrating peptide, Cys-Arg-Gly-Asp-Lys (CRGDK), providing the prodrug nanoparticles with the specific binding ability to neurophilin-1 receptor. In acid mediums, doxorubicin could be released from the prodrug nanoparticles with an accumulative release around 60% through the acid-triggered hydrolysis of cis-aconityl bond and nanoparticle disassembly. Whereas, drug release was slow under a neutral pH and the accumulative drug release was less than 16%. In the cell culture tests, our prodrug nanoparticles showed enhanced endocytosis and cytotoxicity in cancer cells including HepG2, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, but lower cytotoxicity in human cardiomyocyte H2C9. In the animal experiments, the prodrug nanoparticles were intravenously injected into Balb/c nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231 tumors. Enhanced drug penetration and accumulation in tumors, accompanying with a rapid early tumor-binding behavior, was observed after intravenous injection of the peptide modified prodrug nanoparticles. These data suggests that the acid-sensitive and tumor-targeting PEGylated doxorubicin prodrug nanoparticle may be an efficient drug delivery system for cancer chemotherapy.

  12. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  13. Electrohydrodynamic encapsulation of cisplatin in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Parhizkar, Maryam; Reardon, Philip J T; Knowles, Jonathan C; Browning, Richard J; Stride, Eleanor; Barbara, Pedley R; Harker, Anthony H; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2016-10-01

    Targeted delivery of potent, toxic chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, is a significant area of research in cancer treatment. In this study, cisplatin was successfully encapsulated with high efficiency (>70%) in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymeric nanoparticles by using electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) where applied voltage and solution flow rate as well as the concentration of cisplatin and polymer were varied to control the size of the particles. Thus, nanoparticles were produced with three different drug:polymer ratios (2.5, 5 and 10wt% cisplatin). It was shown that smaller nanoparticles were produced with 10wt% cisplatin. Furthermore, these demonstrated the best sustained release (smallest burst release). By fitting the experimental data with various kinetic models it was concluded that the release is dependent upon the particle morphology and the drug concentration. Thus, these particles have significant potential for cisplatin delivery with controlled dosage and release period that are crucial chemotherapy parameters.

  14. Progress in nanoparticulate systems for peptide, proteins and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Gosecki, Mateusz

    2011-11-01

    Progress in many therapies, in particular in the therapies based on peptides, proteins and nucleic acids used as bioactive compounds, strongly depends on development of appropriate carriers which would be suitable for controlled delivery of the intact abovementioned compounds to required tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. This review presents last ten years' achievements and problems in development and application of synthetic polymer nanoparticulate carriers for oral, pulmonary and nasal delivery routes of oligopeptides and proteins. Whereas some traditional synthetic polymer carriers are only briefly recalled the main attention is concentrated on nanoparticles produced from functional copolymers mostly with hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups, suitable for immobilization of targeting moieties and for assuring prolonged circulation of nanoparticles in blood. Formulations of various nanoparticulate systems are described, including solid particles, polymer micelles, nanovesicles and nanogels, especially systems allowing drug release induced by external stimuli. Discussed are properties of these species, in particular stability in buffers and models of body fluids, loading with drugs and with drug models, drug release processes and results of biological studies. There are also discussed systems for gene delivery with special attention devoted to polymers suitable for compacting nucleic acids into nanoparticles as well as the relations between chemical structure of polymer carriers and ability of the latter for crossing cell membranes and for endosomal escape.

  15. Skin Delivery of Kojic Acid-Loaded Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for the Treatment of Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalez, M. L.; Corrêa, M. A.; Chorilli, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aging process causes a number of changes in the skin, including oxidative stress and dyschromia. The kojic acid (KA) is iron chelator employed in treatment of skin aging, and inhibits tyrosinase, promotes depigmentation. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems, such as liquid crystalline systems (LCSs), can modulate drug permeation through the skin and improve the drug activity. This study is aimed at structurally developing and characterizing a kojic acid-loaded LCS, consists of water (W), cetostearyl isononanoate (oil—O) and PPG-5-CETETH-20 (surfactant-S) and evaluating its in vitro skin permeation and retention. Three regions of the diagram were selected for characterization: A (35% O, 50% S, 15% W), B (30% O, 50% S, 20% W) and C (20% O, 50% S, 30% W), to which 2% KA was added. The formulations were subjected to polarized light microscopy, which indicated the presence of a hexagonal mesophase. Texture and bioadhesion assay showed that formulation B is suitable for topical application. According to the results from the in vitro permeation and retention of KA, the formulations developed can modulate the permeation of KA in the skin. The in vitro cytotoxic assays showed that KA-unloaded LCS and KA-loaded LCS didn't present cytotoxicity. PPG-5-CETETH-20-based systems may be a promising platform for KA skin delivery. PMID:24369010

  16. Folic acid conjugated magnetic drug delivery system for controlled release of doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andhariya, Nidhi; Upadhyay, Ramesh; Mehta, Rasbindu; Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2013-01-01

    Targeting tumors by means of their vascular endothelium is a promising strategy, which utilizes targets that are easily accessible, stable, and do not develop resistance against therapeutic agents. Folate receptor is a highly specific tumor marker, frequently over expressed in cancer tumors. In the present study, an active drug delivery system, which can effectively target cancer cells by means of folate receptor-mediated endocytosis, have ability to escape from opsonization and capability of magnetic targeting to withstand the drag force of the body fluid have been designed and synthesized. The core of the drug delivery system is of mono-domain magnetic particles of magnetite. Magnetite nanoparticles are shielded with PEG, which prevents their phagocytosis by reticuloendothelial system. These PEG shielded magnetite nanoparticles are further decorated with an antitumor receptor—folic acid and loaded with an antineoplastic agent doxorubicin. An in vitro drug loading and release kinetics study reveals that the drug delivery system can take 52 % of drug load and can release doxorubicin over a sustained period of 7 days. The control and sustained release over a period of several days may find its practical utilities in chemotherapy where frequent dosing is not possible.

  17. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  18. pH-responsive biocompatible fluorescent polymer nanoparticles based on phenylboronic acid for intracellular imaging and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengliang; Hu, Kelei; Cao, Weipeng; Sun, Yun; Sheng, Wang; Li, Feng; Wu, Yan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-10-01

    To address current medical challenges, there is an urgent need to develop drug delivery systems with multiple functions, such as simultaneous stimuli-responsive drug release and real-time imaging. Biocompatible polymers have great potential for constructing smart multifunctional drug-delivery systems through grafting with other functional ligands. More importantly, novel biocompatible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence emission can work as theranostic nanomedicines for real-time imaging and drug delivery. Herein, we developed a highly fluorescent nanoparticle based on a phenylboronic acid-modified poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethyleneimine)(PLA-PEI) copolymer loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) for intracellular imaging and pH-responsive drug delivery. The nanoparticles exhibited superior fluorescence properties, such as fluorescence stability, no blinking and excitation-dependent fluorescence behavior. The Dox-loaded fluorescent nanoparticles showed pH-responsive drug release and were more effective in suppressing the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. In addition, the biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles could be used as a tool for intracellular imaging and drug delivery, and the process of endosomal escape was traced by real-time imaging. These pH-responsive and biocompatible fluorescent polymer nanoparticles, based on phenylboronic acid, are promising tools for intracellular imaging and drug delivery.To address current medical challenges, there is an urgent need to develop drug delivery systems with multiple functions, such as simultaneous stimuli-responsive drug release and real-time imaging. Biocompatible polymers have great potential for constructing smart multifunctional drug-delivery systems through grafting with other functional ligands. More importantly, novel biocompatible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence emission can work as theranostic nanomedicines for real-time imaging and drug delivery. Herein, we developed a highly fluorescent nanoparticle based on a

  19. Hyperbranched PEG-based supramolecular nanoparticles for acid-responsive targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofei; Yao, Xuemei; Wang, Chunran; Chen, Li; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-06-01

    Herein, hyperbranched poly(ethylene glycol)-based supramolecular nanoparticles with pH-sensitive properties were designed and used for targeted drug delivery. Via host-guest recognition between benzimidazole anchored poly(ethylene glycol)-hyperbranched polyglycerol (PEG-HPG-BM) and folic acid modified CD (FA-CD), targeted supramolecular nanoparticles (TSNs) were fabricated. At neutral aqueous conditions TSNs could load the model drug DOX. While under intracellular acidic conditions the loaded-drug would be released due to the protonation of BM. This protonation allowed the supramolecular nanoparticles to expand or even disassemble, which showes the pH-dependent property. The introduction of the active targeting FA molecule and the specific interactions with the receptor of HeLa cells means that DOX-loaded TSNs show a significantly improved anticancer efficacy. In vitro drug release assays and intracellular experiments confirmed that TSNs had an obvious pH-sensitive property and remarkably improved anticancer effects, which hold great potential for further biomedical applications such as anticancer drug delivery.

  20. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  1. Carboxymethyl chitosan-mediated synthesis of hyaluronic acid-targeted graphene oxide for cancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huihui; Bremner, David H; Tao, Lei; Li, Heyu; Hu, Juan; Zhu, Limin

    2016-01-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency and specificity of anticancer drug delivery and realize intelligently controlled release, a new drug carrier was developed. Graphene oxide (GO) was first modified with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), followed by conjugation of hyaluronic acid (HA) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI). The resulting GO-CMC-FI-HA conjugate was characterized and used as a carrier to encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to study in vitro release behavior. The drug loading capacity is as high as 95% and the drug release rate under tumor cell microenvironment of pH 5.8 is significantly higher than that under physiological conditions of pH 7.4. Cell uptake studies show that the GO-CMC-FI-HA/DOX complex can specifically target cancer cells, which are over-expressing CD44 receptors and effectively inhibit their growth. The above results suggest that the functionalized graphene-based material has potential applications for targeted delivery and controlled release of anticancer drugs.

  2. Development of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianjing; Maniglio, Devid; Chen, Jie; Chen, Bin; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Oral administration is the most convenient way of all the drug delivery routes. Orally administered bioactive compounds must resist the harsh acidic fluids or enzyme digestion in stomach, to reach their absorbed destination in small intestine. This is the case for silibinin, a drug used to protect liver cells against toxins that has also been demonstrated in vitro to possess anti-cancer effects. However, as many other drugs, silibinin can degrade in the stomach due to the action of the gastric fluid. The use of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (pH-SNEDDS) could overcome the drawback due to degradation of the drug in the stomach while enhancing its solubility and dissolution rate. In this paper we have investigated pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying formulations containing silibinin as model drug. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams have been constructed in order to identify the self-emulsification regions under different pH. Solubility of silibinin in selected formulations has been assessed and stability of the pure drug and of the silibinin loaded pH-SNEDDS formulations in simulated gastric fluid had been compared. Droplet size of the optimized pH-SNEDDS has been correlated to pH, volume of dilution medium and silibinin loading amount. TEM (transmission electron microscopy) studies have shown that emulsion droplets had spherical shape and narrow size distribution. In vitro drug release studies of the optimal pH-SNEDDS indicated substantial increase of the drug release and release rate in comparison to pure silibinin and to the commercial silibinin tablet. The results indicated that pH-SNEDDS have potential to improve the biopharmaceutics properties of acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

  3. Effect of ca2+ to salicylic acid release in pectin based controlled drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistriyani, L.; Wirawan, S. K.; Sediawan, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Wastes from orange peel are potentially be utilized to produce pectin, which are currently an import commodity. Pectin can be used in making edible film. Edible films are potentially used as a drug delivery system membrane after a tooth extraction. Drug which is used in the drug delivery system is salicylic acid. It is an antiseptic. In order to control the drug release rate, crosslinking process is added in the manufacturing of membrane with CaCl2.2H2O as crosslinker. Pectin was diluted in water and mixed with a plasticizer and CaCl2.2H2O solution at 66°C to make edible film. Then the mixture was dried in an oven at 50 °C. After edible film was formed, it was coated using plasticizer and CaCl2.2H2O solution with various concentration 0, 0.015, 0.03 and 0.05g/mL. This study showed that the more concentration of crosslinker added, the slower release of salicylic acid would be. This was indicated by the value of diffusivites were getting smaller respectively. The addition of crosslinker also caused smaller gels swelling value,which made the membrane is mechanically stronger

  4. Responsive Boronic Acid-Decorated (Co)polymers: From Glucose Sensors to Autonomous Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vancoillie, Gertjan; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Boronic acid-containing (co)polymers have fascinated researchers for decades, garnering attention for their unique responsiveness toward 1,2- and 1,3-diols, including saccharides and nucleotides. The applications of materials that exert this property are manifold including sensing, but also self-regulated drug delivery systems through responsive membranes or micelles. In this review, some of the main applications of boronic acid containing (co)polymers are discussed focusing on the role of the boronic acid group in the response mechanism. We hope that this summary, which highlights the importance and potential of boronic acid-decorated polymeric materials, will inspire further research within this interesting field of responsive polymers and polymeric materials. PMID:27775572

  5. Poly methacrylic acid modified CDHA nanocomposites as potential pH responsive drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Victor, Sunita Prem; Sharma, Chandra P

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare pH sensitive polymethacrylic acid-calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanocomposites. The CDHA nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation method. The modification of CDHA by methacrylic acid (MA) was achieved by AIBN initiated free radical polymerization with sodium bisulphite as catalyst followed by emulsion technique. These nanocomposites with a half life of 8h consisted of high aspect ratio, needle like particles and exhibited an increase in swelling behaviour with pH. The in vivo potential of the nanocomposites was evaluated in vitro by the results of cell aggregation, protein adsorption, MTT assay and haemolytic activity. The invitro loading and release studies using albumin as a model drug indicate that the nanocomposites gave better loading when compared to the CDHA nanoparticles and altered the drug release rates. The nanocomposites also exhibited good uptake on C6 glioma cells as studied by fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained suggest that these nanocomposites have great potential for oral controlled protein delivery and can be extended further for intracellular drug delivery applications.

  6. Drug delivery systems using sandwich configurations of electrospun poly(lactic acid) nanofiber membranes and ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Immich, Ana Paula Serafini; Arias, Manuel Lis; Carreras, Núria; Boemo, Rafael Luís; Tornero, José Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The primary advantages of electrospun membranes include the ability to obtain very thin fibers that are on the order of magnitude of several nanometers with a considerable superficial area and the possibility for these membranes to be manipulated and processed for many different applications. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and quantify the transport mechanisms that control the release of drugs from polymer-based sandwich membranes produced using the electrospinning processes. These electrospun membranes were composed of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) because it is one of the most promising biodegradable polymers due to its mechanical properties, thermoplastic processability and biological properties, such as its biocompatibility and biodegradability. The transport mechanism that controls the drug delivery was evaluated via the release kinetics of a bioactive agent in physiological serum, which was used as a corporal fluid simulation. To describe the delivery process, mathematical models, such as the Power Law, the classical Higuchi equation and an approach to Fick's Second Law were used. Using the applied mathematical models, it is possible to conclude that control over the release of the drug is significantly dependent on the thickness of the membrane rather than the concentration of the drug.

  7. A block copolymer of zwitterionic polyphosphoester and polylactic acid for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rong; Du, Xiao-Jiao; Sun, Chun-Yang; Shen, Song; Liu, Yang; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Bao, Yan; Zhu, Yan-Hua; Wang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles have been widely used as nano-drug delivery systems in preclinical and clinical trials for cancer therapy, and these systems usually need to be sterically stabilized by poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to maintain stability and avoid rapid clearance by the immune system. Recently, zwitterionic materials have been demonstrated to be potential alternatives to the classic PEG. Herein, we developed two drug delivery systems stabilized by zwitterionic polyphosphoesters. These nanoparticles showed favourable stability and anti-protein absorption ability in vitro. Meanwhile, as drug carriers, these zwitterionic polyphosphoester-stabilized nanoparticles significantly prolonged drug circulation half-lives and increased drug accumulation in tumors, which was comparable to PEG-stabilized nanoparticles. Systemic delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) by zwitterionic polyphosphoester-stabilized nanoparticles significantly inhibited tumor growth in a MDA-MB-231 tumor model, suggesting the potential of zwitterionic polyphosphoester-based nanoparticles in anticancer drug delivery.

  8. Poly(L-lactic acid) membranes: absence of genotoxic hazard and potential for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Nelson; Martins, Thomás Duzzi; Teixeira, Gabriella Machado; Cunha, Nayanne Larissa; Oliveira, Rogério Belle; Nassar, Eduardo José; Dos Santos, Raquel Alves

    2015-01-22

    The use of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) has been considered an important alternative for medical devices once this polyester presents biomechanical, optical and biodegradable properties. Moreover, the use of PLA results in less inflammatory reactions and more recently it has been proposed its application in drug delivery systems. Genotoxicological evaluations are considered part of the battery assays in toxicological analysis. Considering the wide applications of PLA, the present work evaluated the potential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of PLA in CHO-K1 cells, as well as its physicochemical properties. No cytotoxic effects of PLA were detected by colorimetric tetrazolium assay (XTT) analysis, and the clonogenic survival assay showed that PLA did not disrupt the replicative cell homeostasis, neither exhibited genotoxic effects as evidenced by comet and micronucleus assays. Thermogravimetric properties of PLA were not altered after contact with cells and this film exhibited ability in absorb and release Europium(III) complex. All these data suggest genotoxicological safety of PLA for further applications in drug delivery systems.

  9. Oleanolic acid liposomes with polyethylene glycol modification: promising antitumor drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dawei; Tang, Shengnan; Tong, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Background Oleanolic acid is a pentacyclic triterpene present in many fruits and vegetables, and has received much attention on account of its biological properties. However, its poor solubility and low bioavailability limit its use. The objective of this study was to encapsulate oleanolic acid into nanoliposomes using the modified ethanol injection method. Methods The liposomes contain a hydrophobic oleanolic acid core, an amphiphilic soybean lecithin monolayer, and a protective hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating. During the preparation process, the formulations described were investigated by designing 34 orthogonal experiments as well as considering the effects of different physical characteristics. The four factors were the ratios of drug to soybean phosphatidylcholine (w/w), cholesterol (w/w), PEG-2000 (w/w), and temperature of phosphate-buffered saline at three different levels. We identified the optimized formulation which showed the most satisfactory lipid stability and particle formation. The morphology of the liposomes obtained was determined by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The existence of PEG in the liposome component was validated by Fourier transform infrared spectrum analysis. Results The PEGylated liposomes dispersed individually and had diameters of around 110–200 nm. Encapsulation efficiency was more than 85%, as calculated by high-performance liquid chromatography and Sephadex® gel filtration. Furthermore, when compared with native oleanolic acid, the liposomal formulations showed better stability in vitro. Finally, the cytotoxicity of the oleanolic acid liposomes was evaluated using a microtiter tetrazolium assay. Conclusion These results suggest that PEGylated liposomes would serve as a potent delivery vehicle for oleanolic acid in future cancer therapy. PMID:22848175

  10. Biocompatible polymers coated on carboxylated nanotubes functionalized with betulinic acid for effective drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Julia M; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abd Gani, Shafinaz; Fakurazi, Sharida; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2016-02-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes are highly suitable and promising materials for potential biomedical applications like drug delivery due to their distinct physico-chemical characteristics and unique architecture. However, they are often associated with problems like insoluble in physiological environment and cytotoxicity issue due to impurities and catalyst residues contained in the nanotubes. On the other hand, surface coating agents play an essential role in preventing the nanoparticles from excessive agglomeration as well as providing good water dispersibility by replacing the hydrophobic surfaces of nanoparticles with hydrophilic moieties. Therefore, we have prepared four types of biopolymer-coated single walled carbon nanotubes systems functionalized with anticancer drug, betulinic acid in the presence of Tween 20, Tween 80, polyethylene glycol and chitosan as a comparative study. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies confirm the bonding of the coating molecules with the SWBA and these results were further supported by Raman spectroscopy. All chemically coated samples were found to release the drug in a slow, sustained and prolonged fashion compared to the uncoated ones, with the best fit to pseudo-second order kinetic model. The cytotoxic effects of the synthesized samples were evaluated in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (3T3) at 24, 48 and 72 h. The in vitro results reveal that the cytotoxicity of the samples were dependent upon the drug release profiles as well as the chemical components of the surface coating agents. In general, the initial burst, drug release pattern and cytotoxicity could be well-controlled by carefully selecting the desired materials to suit different therapeutic applications.

  11. In situ synthesis of peptide nucleic acids in porous silicon for drug delivery and biosensing.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Kelsey R; Mares, Jeremy W; Swartz, Caleb M; Zhao, Yiliang; Weiss, Sharon M; Duvall, Craig L

    2014-07-16

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are a unique class of synthetic molecules that have a peptide backbone and can hybridize with nucleic acids. Here, a versatile method has been developed for the automated, in situ synthesis of PNA from a porous silicon (PSi) substrate for applications in gene therapy and biosensing. Nondestructive optical measurements were performed to monitor single base additions of PNA initiated from (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane attached to the surface of PSi films, and mass spectrometry was conducted to verify synthesis of the desired sequence. Comparison of in situ synthesis to postsynthesis surface conjugation of the full PNA molecules showed that surface mediated, in situ PNA synthesis increased loading 8-fold. For therapeutic proof-of-concept, controlled PNA release from PSi films was characterized in phosphate buffered saline, and PSi nanoparticles fabricated from PSi films containing in situ grown PNA complementary to micro-RNA (miR) 122 generated significant anti-miR activity in a Huh7 psiCHECK-miR122 cell line. The applicability of this platform for biosensing was also demonstrated using optical measurements that indicated selective hybridization of complementary DNA target molecules to PNA synthesized in situ on PSi films. These collective data confirm that we have established a novel PNA-PSi platform with broad utility in drug delivery and biosensing.

  12. Inulin Derivatives Obtained Via Enhanced Microwave Synthesis for Nucleic Acid Based Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sardo, Carla; Craparo, Emanuela Fabiola; Fiorica, Calogero; Giammona, Gaetano; Cavallaro, Gennara

    2015-01-01

    A new class of therapeutic agents with a high potential for the treatment of different socially relevant human diseases is represented by Nucleic Acid Based Drugs (NABD), including small interfering RNAs (siRNA), decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (decoy ODN) and antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Although NABD can be engineered to be specifically directed against virtually any target, their susceptibility to nuclease degradation and the difficulty of delivery into target tissues severely limit their use in clinical practice and require the development of an appropriate nanostructured delivery system. For delivery of NABD, Inulin (Inu), a natural, water soluble and biocompatible polysaccharide, was derivatized by Spermine (Spm), a flexible molecule with four amine groups that, having pKa values in the range between 8-11, is mainly in the protonated form at pH 7.4. The synthesis of related copolymers (Inu-Spm) was performed by a two step reaction, using a method termed Enhanced Microwave Synthesis (EMS) which has the advantage, compared to conventional microwave reaction, that high amount of energy can be applied to the reaction system, by administering microwave irradiation and simultaneously controlling the temperature in the reaction vessel with cooled air. The synthesized inulin derivatives were characterized by FT-IR spectra and (1)H-NMR. INU-Spm derivatives with a degree of derivatization of about 14 % mol/mol were obtained. These polycations were tested to evaluate their ability to form non covalent complexes with genetic material (polyplexes). Agarose gel retardation assays showed that the obtained copolymers are able to electrostatically interact with DNA duplex to form polyplexes at different c/p weight ratios. Moreover, light scattering studies, performed to analyze size and z-potential of polyplexes, evidenced that copolymers are able to interact with genetic material leading to the formation of nanoscaled systems. In addition, biocompatibility of polyplexes

  13. Sublingual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Tarun; Jasti, Bhaskara; Li, Xiaoling

    2008-01-01

    The sublingual route is one of the early modes of administration for systemic drug delivery. This route avoids first-pass metabolism and affords quick drug entry into the systemic circulation. Attempts have been made to deliver various pharmacologically active agents, such as cardiovascular drugs, analgesics, and peptides, across the sublingual mucosa. In this review, the anatomical structure, blood supply, biochemical composition, transport pathways, permeation enhancement strategies, in vitro/in vivo models, and clinical investigations for the sublingual route of drug delivery is discussed.

  14. Environmentally friendly, one-pot synthesis of folic acid-decorated graphene oxide-based drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Quankui; Huang, Xiaojie; Tang, Junmei; Han, Yuemei; Chen, Hao

    2013-12-01

    A targeted drug delivery system based on graphene oxide (GO) was produced via one-pot synthesis method, taking advantages of the self-polymerization of the dopamine (DA). The polymerization of dopamine resulted in polydopamine capped GO nanocomposite. Meanwhile, the anti-tumor drug doxorubicin (DOX) can be loaded in the nanocomposite and the tumor cell targeting molecule folic acid (FA) can also been immobilized on the nanocomposite surface simultaneously. The size of the obtained FA-decorated GO-based drug delivery system (DA/GO(DOX)-FA) is about 600 nm. It renders a sustained drug release manner. The cell culture results reveal that the FA-decorated GO-based drug delivery system (DA/GO(DOX)-FA) via one-pot method shows property of targeted killing of cancer cells in vitro. This one-pot method just needs the pH adjusting to induce the self-polymerization of DA, but excludes the fussy chemical grafting process and the organic solvents, which make it an environmentally friendly method to synthesize FA-decorated GO-based drug delivery system.

  15. Preparation of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid) hybrid microparticles for local drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loca, D.; Locs, J.; Berzina-Cimdina, L.

    2013-12-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramic is well known as bioactive and biocompatible material in bone tissue regeneration applications. Apatitic CaP, especially nano sized hydroxyapatite (NHAp), is more similar to the natural apatite presented in the bone tissue than CaP bioceramics. In the current research NHAp was modified using biodegradable polymer - poly(lactic acid) (PLA) to develop composites providing bone regeneration and local drug delivery. NHAp/PLA microcapsules were prepared using solid-in-water-in-oil-in-water (s/w1/o/w2) encapsulation technology. The impact of primary and secondary emulsion stability on the emulsion droplet and microparticle properties was evaluated. The stability of final emulsion can be increased by varying the process parameters. Stable s/w1/o/w2 emulsion using 3ml of NHAp suspension, not less than 100ml of 4% PVA water solution and 10ml of 10% PLA solution in dichloromethane can be obtained. S/w1/o/w2 microencapuslation method can be effectively used for the preparation of multi-domain microcapsules achieving high NHAp encapsulation efficacy (93%).

  16. Polyglutamic Acid-Gated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Enzyme-Controlled Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tukappa, Asha; Ultimo, Amelia; de la Torre, Cristina; Pardo, Teresa; Sancenón, Félix; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2016-08-23

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are highly attractive as supports in the design of controlled delivery systems that can act as containers for the encapsulation of therapeutic agents, overcoming common issues such as poor water solubility and poor stability of some drugs and also enhancing their bioavailability. In this context, we describe herein the development of polyglutamic acid (PGA)-capped MSNs that can selectively deliver rhodamine B and doxorubicin. PGA-capped MSNs remain closed in an aqueous environment, yet they are able to deliver the cargo in the presence of pronase because of the hydrolysis of the peptide bonds in PGA. The prepared solids released less than 20% of the cargo in 1 day in water, whereas they were able to reach 90% of the maximum release of the entrapped guest in ca. 5 h in the presence of pronase. Studies of the PGA-capped nanoparticles with SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells were also undertaken. Rhodamine-loaded nanoparticles were not toxic, whereas doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles were able to efficiently kill more than 90% of the cancer cells at a concentration of 100 μg/mL.

  17. Metrology for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Peter; Klein, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    In various recently published studies, it is argued that there are underestimated risks with infusion technology, i.e., adverse incidents believed to be caused by inadequate administration of the drugs. This is particularly the case for applications involving very low-flow rates, i.e., <1 ml/h and applications involving drug delivery by means of multiple pumps. The risks in infusing are caused by a lack of awareness, incompletely understood properties of the complete drug delivery system and a lack of a proper metrological infrastructure for low-flow rates. Technical challenges such as these were the reason a European research project "Metrology for Drug Delivery" was started in 2011. In this special issue of Biomedical Engineering, the results of that project are discussed.

  18. Development of a glucose-sensitive drug delivery device: Microencapsulated liposomes and poly(2-ethylacrylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanokpanont, Sorada

    The current study is the development a self-regulated, glucose responsive drug delivery system, using dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) liposomes, a pH sensitive polymer, poly (2-ethylacrylic acid)(PEAA), and the feed back reaction of glucose with glucose oxidase enzyme (GO). The thesis investigates the use of PEAR and liposomes to work inside a microcapsule in response to the glucose level of the environment, by following the release of fluorescence probes, 8-aminonapthalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid, disodium salt/p-xylene-bis-pyridimuim bromide (ANTS/DPX) and a model protein, myoglobin. The continuing studies of PEAR and liposome interaction indicated an evidence of the previous hypothesis of two-mode release at different pHs. Differential scanning calorimetric studies of DOPC and PEAA complexes revealed the possibility of polymer adsorption to the liposomes in the pH range 5.5--7.0 and insertion in the liposome bilayer at pH < 5.2. The rate and extent of ANTS/DPX release from un-encapsulated liposomes were found to be affected by pH, PEAR concentration, presence of cholesterol in the liposomes, Ca 2+, and the concentration of sodium alginate. We have also shown possibilities of anchoring PEAR on to liposome by covalent conjugation although this led to inactivation of the polymer. It is also possible to entrap small molecular weight PEAA in liposomes. The evidence of the pH-induced protein release by the interaction of PEAA and liposomes was first demonstrated in this thesis. Kinetic parameters of GO were estimated to use as a basis for determination optimal concentration in the capsules. The pH reduction inside the capsule due to GO reaction showed positive results for the use of GO in a non-buffered system. The procedure of liquid-core alginate capsules was modified to facilitate the pH-responsive release of ANTS/DPX and myoglobin. The capsules responded to high blood glucose concentration by releasing myoglobin within 30 minutes. Although more studies are

  19. Stability, cutaneous delivery and antioxidant potential of a lipoic acid and α-tocopherol co-drug incorporated in microemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Siji; Vieira, Camila S.; Hass, Martha A.; Lopes, Luciana B.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the skin penetration, stability and antioxidant effects of a α-tocopherol-lipoic acid co-drug. To enhance penetration, we evaluated three microemulsions varying in water content and composition of the oil phase (isopropyl myristate with either monocaprylin or oleic acid). The co-drug was incorporated at 1% (w/w). Co-drug hydrolysis in the microemulsion increased with increases in time (up to 48 h) and formulation water content (10–30%, w/w). Microemulsions increased the co-drug delivery into viable layers of porcine ear skin by 2.9–7.8–fold compared to a control formulation (20% monocaprylin in isopropyl myristate) after 24 h. Penetration enhancement was influenced by the oil phase, with the formulation containing monocaprylin displaying the most pronounced effect. Antioxidant activity, assessed in skin bioequivalents using the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) assay, demonstrated that TBARS levels decreased by 39% after treatment with the co-drug-containing microemulsion compared to the unloaded formulation. In addition to the co-drug, tocopherol (8.2 ± 0.6 μg/cm2) was detected in the viable bioequivalent tissues, suggesting that the co-drug was partly hydrolyzed after 12 h. Taken together, these results support the potential of nanodispersed formulations containing a tocopherol-lipoic acid co-drug to improve skin antioxidant activity. PMID:24961388

  20. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  1. Folic acid-conjugated iron oxide porous nanorods loaded with doxorubicin for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; Xia, Xi-Ming; Wu, Ming; Cui, Can; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Lei; Wu, Bo; Wang, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Liu-Jie; Zhou, Xiang; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Huang, Shi-Wen

    2014-08-01

    Iron oxide porous nanorods (IOPNR) with lengths ranging from 40nm to 60nm and pore diameters ranging from 5nm to 10nm were prepared, and further modified with NH2-PEG-FA (FA-PEG-IOPNR) for ligand targeting and modified with NH2-PEG-OCH3 (PEG-IOPNR) as a control. Instead of chemical bonding, doxorubicin (DOX), a low water solubility anticancer drug, was loaded in the pores of the modified IOPNR because of their porous structure and high porosity. The release of DOX in acidic PBS solution (pH 5.3) was faster than that in neutral (pH 7.4) solution. The analysis results from TEM, inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and flow cytometry analyses indicated that the presence of FA on the surface of the nanorods increase the cellular uptake of nanorods in the case of HeLa cells, a folate receptor (FR)-positive cell line. In contrast, for COS 7 cells, a FR-negative cell line, FA ligand on the surface of the nanorods showed no effect on the cellular uptake. MTT assay indicated that the cytotoxicity of DOX loaded in FA-PEG-IOPNR to HeLa cells was higher than that of DOX in PEG-IOPNR. In the case of COS 7 cells, no significant difference between the cytotoxicity of DOX loaded in FA-PEG-IOPNR and PEG-IOPNR was found. These results suggested that FA-PEG-IOPNR had the potential for target delivery of chemotherapeutic into cancer cells.

  2. Preparation of Two Types of Polymeric Micelles Based on Poly(β-L-Malic Acid) for Antitumor Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tiehong; Li, Wei; Duan, Xiao; Zhu, Lin; Fan, Li; Qiao, Youbei; Wu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric micelles represent an effective delivery system for poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs. In this work, two types of CPT-conjugated polymers were synthesized based on poly(β-L-malic acid) (PMLA) derivatives. Folic acid (FA) was introduced into the polymers as tumor targeting group. The micellization behaviors of these polymers and antitumor activity of different self-assembled micelles were investigated. Results indicate that poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(β-L-malic acid)-campotothecin-I (PEG-PMLA-CPT-I, P1) is a grafted copolymer, and could form star micelles in aqueous solution with a diameter of about 97 nm, also that PEG-PMLA-CPT-II (P2) is an amphiphilic block copolymer, and could form crew cut micelles with a diameter of about 76 nm. Both P1 and P2 micelles could improve the cellular uptake of CPT, especially the FA-modified micelles, while P2 micelles showed higher stability, higher drug loading efficiency, smaller size, and slower drug release rate than that of P1 micelles. These results suggested that the P2 (crew cut) micelles possess better stability than that of the P1 (star) micelles and might be a potential drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  3. Preparation of Two Types of Polymeric Micelles Based on Poly(β-L-Malic Acid) for Antitumor Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiao; Zhu, Lin; Fan, Li; Qiao, Youbei; Wu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric micelles represent an effective delivery system for poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs. In this work, two types of CPT-conjugated polymers were synthesized based on poly(β-L-malic acid) (PMLA) derivatives. Folic acid (FA) was introduced into the polymers as tumor targeting group. The micellization behaviors of these polymers and antitumor activity of different self-assembled micelles were investigated. Results indicate that poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(β-L-malic acid)-campotothecin-I (PEG-PMLA-CPT-I, P1) is a grafted copolymer, and could form star micelles in aqueous solution with a diameter of about 97 nm, also that PEG-PMLA-CPT-II (P2) is an amphiphilic block copolymer, and could form crew cut micelles with a diameter of about 76 nm. Both P1 and P2 micelles could improve the cellular uptake of CPT, especially the FA-modified micelles, while P2 micelles showed higher stability, higher drug loading efficiency, smaller size, and slower drug release rate than that of P1 micelles. These results suggested that the P2 (crew cut) micelles possess better stability than that of the P1 (star) micelles and might be a potential drug delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:27649562

  4. Chitosan-functionalised poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) core-shell microgels as drug delivery carriers: salicylic acid loading and release.

    PubMed

    Mahattanadul, Natshisa; Sunintaboon, Panya; Sirithip, Piyawan; Tuchinda, Patoomratana

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the evaluation of chitosan-functionalised poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (CS/PHEMA) core-shell microgels as drug delivery carriers. CS/PHEMA microgels were prepared by emulsifier-free emulsion polymerisation with N,N '-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as a crosslinker. The study on drug loading, using salicylic acid (SA) as a model drug, was performed. The results showed that the encapsulation efficiency (EE) increased as drug-to-microgel ratio was increased. Higher EE can be achieved with the increase in degree of crosslinking, by increasing the amount of MBA from 0.01 g to 0.03 g. In addition, the highest EE (61.1%) was observed at pH 3. The highest release of SA (60%) was noticed at pH 2.4, while the lowest one (49.4%) was obtained at pH 7.4. Moreover, the highest release of SA was enhanced by the presence of 0.2 M NaCl. The pH- and ionic-sensitivity of CS/PHEMA could be useful as a sustained release delivery device, especially for oral delivery.

  5. Photomechanical drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, Apostolos G.; Lee, Shun

    2000-05-01

    Photomechanical waves (PW) are generated by Q-switched or mode-locked lasers. Ablation is a reliable method for generating PWs with consistent characteristics. Depending on the laser wavelength and target material, PWs with different parameters can be generated which allows the investigation of PWs with cells and tissue. PWs have been shown to permeabilize the stratum corneum (SC) in vivo and facilitate the transport of drugs into the skin. Once a drug has diffused into the dermis it can enter the vasculature, thus producing a systemic effect. Fluorescence microscopy of biopsies show that 40-kDa molecules can be delivered to a depth of > 300 micrometers into the viable skin of rats. Many important drugs such as insulin, and erythropoietin are smaller or comparable in size, making the PWs attractive for transdermal drug delivery. There are three possible pathways through the SC: Transappendageal via hair follicles or other appendages, transcellular through the corneocytes, and intercellular via the extracellular matrix. The intracellular route appears to be the most likely pathway of drug delivery through the SC.

  6. Mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Acartürk, Füsun

    2009-11-01

    Vaginal delivery is an important route of drug administration for both local and systemic diseases. The vaginal route has some advantages due to its large surface area, rich blood supply, avoidance of the first-pass effect, relatively high permeability to many drugs and self-insertion. The traditional commercial preparations, such as creams, foams, gels, irrigations and tablets, are known to reside in the vaginal cavity for a relatively short period of time owing to the self-cleaning action of the vaginal tract, and often require multiple daily doses to ensure the desired therapeutic effect. The vaginal route appears to be highly appropriate for bioadhesive drug delivery systems in order to retain drugs for treating largely local conditions, or for use in contraception. In particular, protection against sexually-transmitted diseases is critical. To prolong the residence time in the vaginal cavity, bioadhesive therapeutic systems have been developed in the form of semi-solid and solid dosage forms. The most commonly used mucoadhesive polymers that are capable of forming hydrogels are synthetic polyacrylates, polycarbophil, chitosan, cellulose derivatives (hydroxyethycellulose, hydroxy-propylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose), hyaluronic acid derivatives, pectin, tragacanth, carrageenan and sodium alginate. The present article is a comprehensive review of the patents related to mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

  7. Nanomaterials for Drugs Delivery

    DOE PAGES

    Márquez, Francisco; Morant, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized engineering, biology, chemistry, physics and medicine of today. These disciplines are evolving thanks to the ongoing development of new materials and applications. Nanomedicine, as application of nanotechnology in the field of health care, has undergone unprecedented development. Some of these changes have real applications as, for example, the use of nanoparticles in MRI imaging, in hyperthermia, in immunotherapy, or to improve the bioavailability of drugs, among others. Furthermore, when a drug is administered to a patient, the blood distributes it throughout the body. In the case of very localized diseases (i.e. tumors), only a small fraction ofmore » the drug reaches the target. Chemotherapy is one of the most aggressive treatment options used in some types of cancer, and is usually administered intravenously. The drug circulates throughout the body, reaching and destroying healthy and cancerous tissues, producing side effects throughout the body, sometimes with serious consequences for the health of the patient (nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy, anemia, etc.) in this type of therapy. Among the many applications of nanotechnology, the fabrication of nanostructures capable of safely transporting these drugs is seen as a strategy for reducing these side effects. Nanoparticles are able to carry and release the drug in the right place and with the required dose, greatly reducing the problems associated with direct treatment with these drugs. In recent years, there have been continuous improvements in the design and development of new tailor-made drug delivery systems, including hollow magnetic nanoparticles, liposomal structures, dendrimers, nanoporous silicon, etc. These structures can be obtained with different molecular weights (in the case of polymers), structures, shapes, and even with the appropriate functional groups for interaction at the desired positions. But, a great effort is still required to

  8. Nanomaterials for Drugs Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Márquez, Francisco; Morant, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized engineering, biology, chemistry, physics and medicine of today. These disciplines are evolving thanks to the ongoing development of new materials and applications. Nanomedicine, as application of nanotechnology in the field of health care, has undergone unprecedented development. Some of these changes have real applications as, for example, the use of nanoparticles in MRI imaging, in hyperthermia, in immunotherapy, or to improve the bioavailability of drugs, among others. Furthermore, when a drug is administered to a patient, the blood distributes it throughout the body. In the case of very localized diseases (i.e. tumors), only a small fraction of the drug reaches the target. Chemotherapy is one of the most aggressive treatment options used in some types of cancer, and is usually administered intravenously. The drug circulates throughout the body, reaching and destroying healthy and cancerous tissues, producing side effects throughout the body, sometimes with serious consequences for the health of the patient (nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy, anemia, etc.) in this type of therapy. Among the many applications of nanotechnology, the fabrication of nanostructures capable of safely transporting these drugs is seen as a strategy for reducing these side effects. Nanoparticles are able to carry and release the drug in the right place and with the required dose, greatly reducing the problems associated with direct treatment with these drugs. In recent years, there have been continuous improvements in the design and development of new tailor-made drug delivery systems, including hollow magnetic nanoparticles, liposomal structures, dendrimers, nanoporous silicon, etc. These structures can be obtained with different molecular weights (in the case of polymers), structures, shapes, and even with the appropriate functional groups for interaction at the desired positions. But, a great effort is still required to solve many

  9. Preparation of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles coated with gallic acid for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dorniani, Dena; Hussein, Mohd Zobir Bin; Kura, Aminu Umar; Fakurazi, Sharida; Shaari, Abdul Halim; Ahmad, Zalinah

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared using a sonochemical method under atmospheric conditions at a Fe2+ to Fe3+ molar ratio of 1:2. The iron oxide nanoparticles were subsequently coated with chitosan and gallic acid to produce a core-shell structure. Results X-ray diffraction demonstrated that the magnetic nanoparticles were pure Fe3O4 with a cubic inverse spinel structure. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles were of spherical shape with a mean diameter of 11 nm, compared with 13 nm for the iron oxide-chitosan-gallic acid (FCG) nanocarriers. Conclusion The magnetic nanocarrier enhanced the thermal stability of the drug, gallic acid. Release of the active drug from the FCG nanocarrier was found to occur in a controlled manner. The gallic acid and FCG nanoparticles were not toxic in a normal human fibroblast (3T3) line, and anticancer activity was higher in HT29 than MCF7 cell lines. PMID:23166439

  10. The delivery of poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) nanoparticles loaded with non-toxic drug to overcome drug resistance for the treatment of neuroblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhulekar, Jhilmil

    Neuroblastoma is a rare cancer of the sympathetic nervous system. A neuroblastoma tumor develops in the nerve tissue and is diagnosed in infants and children. Approximately 10.2 per million children under the age of 15 are affected in the United States and is slightly more common in boys. Neuroblastoma constitutes 6% of all childhood cancers and has a long-term survival rate of only 15%. There are approximately 700 new cases of neuroblastoma each year in the United States. With such a low rate of survival, the development of more effective treatment methods is necessary. A number of therapies are available for the treatment of these tumors; however, clinicians and their patients face the challenges of systemic side effects and drug resistance of the tumor cells. The application of nanoparticles has the potential to provide a safer and more effective method of delivery drugs to tumors. The advantage of using nanoparticles for drug delivery is the ability to specifically or passively target tumors while reducing the harmful side effects of chemotherapeutics. Drug delivery via nanoparticles can also allow for lower dosage requirements with controlled release of the drugs, which can further reduce systemic toxicity. The aim of this research was to develop a polymeric nanoparticle drug delivery system for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma. Nanoparticles composed of a poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer were formulated to deliver a non-toxic drug in combination with Temozolomide, a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of neuroblastoma. The non-toxic drug acts as an inhibitor to the DNA-repair protein present in neuroblastoma cells that is responsible for inducing drug resistance in the cells, which would potentially allow for enhanced temozolomide activity. A variety of studies were completed to prove the nanoparticles' low toxicity, loading abilities, and uptake into cells. Additionally, studies were performed to determine the

  11. Prodrug Strategies in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Barot, Megha; Bagui, Mahuya; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Poor bioavailability of topically instilled drug is the major concern in the field of ocular drug delivery. Efflux transporters, static and dynamic ocular barriers often possess rate limiting factors for ocular drug therapy. Different formulation strategies like suspension, ointment, gels, nanoparticles, implants, dendrimers and liposomes have been employed in order to improve drug permeation and retention by evading rate limiting factors at the site of absorption. Chemical modification such as prodrug targeting various nutrient transporters (amino acids, peptide and vitamin) has evolved a great deal ofintereSt to improve ocular drug delivery. In this review, we have discussed various prodrug strategies which have been widely applied for enhancing therapeutic efficacy of ophthalmic drugs. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the utilization of prodrug concept in ocular drug delivery. In addition, this review will highlight ongoing academic and industrial research and development in terms of ocular prodrug design and delivery. PMID:22530907

  12. A Dicarboxylic Fatty Acid Derivative of Paclitaxel for Albumin Assisted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Michael J.; Joolakanti, Shyamsunder; Hartranft, Megan E.; Guley, Patrick C.; Cho, Moo J.

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a potent chemotherapy for many cancers but it suffers from very poor solubility. Consequently the TAXOL formulation uses copious amounts of the surfactant Cremophor EL to solubilize the drug for injection resulting in severe hypersensitivity and neutropenia. In contrast to Cremophor EL, presented is a way to solubilize paclitaxel (PTX) by conjugation of a dicarboxylic fatty acid for specific binding to the ubiquitous protein, serum albumin. The conjugation chemistry was simplified to a single step using the activated anhydride form of 3-pentadecylglutaric (PDG) acid which is reactive to a variety of nucleophiles. The PDG derivative is less cytotoxic than the parent compound and was found to slowly hydrolyze to PTX (~5% over 72 h) in serum, tumor cytosol, and tumor tissue homogenate. When injected intravenously to tumor bearing mice, [3H]-PTX in the TAXOL formulation was cleared rapidly with a half-life of 7 hours. In the case of the PDG derivative of PTX, the drug is quickly distributed and approximately 20% of the injected dose remained in the vasculature experiencing a 23-h half-life. These improvements from modifying PTX with the PDG fatty acid present the opportunity for PDG to become a generic modification for the improvement of many therapeutics. PMID:22674061

  13. Polymers for Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Kryscio, David R.; Slaughter, Brandon V.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have played an integral role in the advancement of drug delivery technology by providing controlled release of therapeutic agents in constant doses over long periods, cyclic dosage, and tunable release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. From early beginnings using off-the-shelf materials, the field has grown tremendously, driven in part by the innovations of chemical engineers. Modern advances in drug delivery are now predicated upon the rational design of polymers tailored for specific cargo and engineered to exert distinct biological functions. In this review, we highlight the fundamental drug delivery systems and their mathematical foundations and discuss the physiological barriers to drug delivery. We review the origins and applications of stimuli-responsive polymer systems and polymer therapeutics such as polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates. The latest developments in polymers capable of molecular recognition or directing intracellular delivery are surveyed to illustrate areas of research advancing the frontiers of drug delivery. PMID:22432577

  14. Enhanced anticancer potency using an acid-responsive ZnO-incorporated liposomal drug-delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Nirmalya; Ahmad, Rafiq; Ko, Hyun Ah; Khang, Gilson; Hahn, Yoon-Bong

    2015-02-01

    The development of stimuli-responsive nanocarriers is becoming important in chemotherapy. Liposomes, with an appropriate triggering mechanism, can efficiently deliver their encapsulated cargo in a controlled manner. We explored the use of acid-sensitive zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZNPs) as modulators of the responsive properties of liposomes. Nanocomplexes formed by the incorporation of ZNPs in liposomes (ZNP-liposomes) were designed to demonstrate the pH-responsive release of a drug (daunorubicin) without premature drug leakage and with the maintenance of the relevant therapeutic concentrations. The nanocomplexes were spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution and showed a high drug-encapsulating efficiency. Under acidic conditions, the ZNP-liposome nanocomplexes released the loaded drug more rapidly than bare liposomes. Using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and an MTT assay, we demonstrated that these nanocomplexes were readily taken up by cancer cells, resulting in significantly enhanced cytotoxicity. On exposure to the acidic conditions inside cancer cells, the ZNPs rapidly decomposed, releasing the entrapped drug molecules from the ZNP-liposome nanocomplexes, producing widespread cytotoxic effects. The incorporated ZNPs were multimodal in that they not only resulted in a pH-responsive drug-delivery system, but they also had a synergistic chemo-photodynamic anticancer action. This design provides a significant step towards the development of multimodal liposome structures.The development of stimuli-responsive nanocarriers is becoming important in chemotherapy. Liposomes, with an appropriate triggering mechanism, can efficiently deliver their encapsulated cargo in a controlled manner. We explored the use of acid-sensitive zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZNPs) as modulators of the responsive properties of liposomes. Nanocomplexes formed by the incorporation of ZNPs in liposomes (ZNP-liposomes) were designed to demonstrate the pH-responsive release of a drug

  15. Nanoconjugate Platforms Development Based in Poly(β,L-Malic Acid) Methyl Esters for Tumor Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Portilla-Arias, José; Patil, Rameshwar; Hu, Jinwei; Ding, Hui; Black, Keith L.; García-Alvarez, Montserrat; Muñoz-Guerra, Sebastián; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Holler, Eggehard

    2010-01-01

    New copolyesters derived from poly(β,L-malic acid) have been designed to serve as nanoconjugate platforms in drug delivery. 25% and 50% methylated derivatives (coPMLA-Me25H75 and coPMLA-Me50H50) with absolute molecular weights of 32 600 Da and 33 100 Da, hydrodynamic diameters of 3.0 nm and 5.2 nm and zeta potential of −15mV and −8.25mV, respectively, were found to destabilize membranes of liposomes at pH 5.0 and pH 7.5 at concentrations above 0.05mg/mL. The copolymers were soluble in PBS (half life of 40 hours) and in human plasma (half life of 15 hours) but they showed tendency to aggregate at high levels of methylation. Fluorescence-labeled copolymers were internalized into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with increased efficiency for the higher methylated copolymer. Viability of cultured brain and breast cancer cell lines indicated moderate toxicity that increased with methylation. The conclusion of the present work is that partially methylated poly(β,L-malic acid) copolyesters are suitable as nanoconjugate platforms for drug delivery. PMID:23024655

  16. Hyaluronic acid nanogels with enzyme-sensitive cross-linking group for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenchen; Wang, Xin; Yao, Xikuang; Zhang, Yajun; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-05-10

    A methacrylation strategy was employed to functionalize hyaluronic acid and prepare hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels. Dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analyzer and electron microscopy were utilized to characterize the nanogels and their enzyme-degradability in vitro. It was found that these nanogels had a spherical morphology with the diameter of about 70nm, and negative surface potential. When doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded into the nanogels, the diameter decreased to approximately 50nm with a drug loading content of 16% and encapsulation efficiency of 62%. Cellular uptake examinations showed that HA nanogels could be preferentially internalized by two-dimensional (2D) cells and three-dimensional (3D) multicellular spheroids (MCs) which both overexpress CD44 receptor. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging, biodistribution and penetration examinations in tumor tissue indicated that the HA nanogels could efficiently accumulate and penetrate the tumor matrix. In vivo antitumor evaluation found that DOX-loaded HA nanogels exhibited a significantly superior antitumor effect.

  17. Optimizing drugs for local delivery.

    PubMed

    Collingwood, S; Lock, R; Searcey, M

    2009-12-01

    An international panel of speakers together with approximately 70 delegates were brought together by The Society for Medicines Research's symposium on Optimising Drugs for Local Delivery, held on June 11, 2009 at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Horsham, UK. The focus of the conference was on the delivery of drugs direct to the site of action and the consequences of this delivery route on delivery technologies, formulation science and molecular design.

  18. Microprocessor controlled transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Subramony, J Anand; Sharma, Ashutosh; Phipps, J B

    2006-07-06

    Transdermal drug delivery via iontophoresis is reviewed with special focus on the delivery of lidocaine for local anesthesia and fentanyl for patient controlled acute therapy such as postoperative pain. The role of the microprocessor controller in achieving dosimetry, alternating/reverse polarity, pre-programmed, and sensor-based delivery is highlighted. Unique features such as the use of tactile signaling, telemetry control, and pulsatile waveforms in iontophoretic drug delivery are described briefly.

  19. Iodinated hyaluronic acid oligomer-based nanoassemblies for tumor-targeted drug delivery and cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Young; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-04-01

    Nano-sized self-assemblies based on amphiphilic iodinated hyaluronic acid (HA) were developed for use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) was conjugated to an HA oligomer as a computed tomography (CT) imaging modality and a hydrophobic residue. Nanoassembly based on HA-TIBA was fabricated for tumor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). Cellular uptake of DOX from nanoassembly, compared to a DOX solution group, was enhanced via an HA-CD44 receptor interaction, and subsequently, the in vitro antitumor efficacy of DOX-loaded nanoassembly was improved in SCC7 (CD44 receptor positive squamous cell carcinoma) cells. Cy5.5, a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye, was attached to the HA-TIBA conjugate and the in vivo tumor targetability of HA-TIBA nanoassembly, which is based on the interaction between HA and CD44 receptor, was demonstrated in a NIRF imaging study using an SCC7 tumor-xenografted mouse model. Tumor targeting and cancer diagnosis with HA-TIBA nanoassembly were verified in a CT imaging study using the SCC7 tumor-xenografted mouse model. In addition to efficient cancer diagnosis using NIRF and CT imaging modalities, improved antitumor efficacies were shown. HA and TIBA can be used to produce HA-TIBA nanoassembly that may be a promising theranostic nanosystem for cancers that express the CD44 receptor.

  20. Controlled Drug Delivery Using Microdevices

    PubMed Central

    Sanjay, Sharma T.; Dou, Maowei; Fu, Guanglei; Xu, Feng; Li, XiuJun

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic drugs administered systematically are evenly distributed to the whole body through blood circulation and have to cross many biological barriers before reaching the pathological site. Conventional drug delivery may make drugs inactive or reduce their potency as they may be hydrolyzed or degraded enzymatically and are rapidly excreted through the urinary system resulting in suboptimal concentration of drugs at the desired site. Controlled drug delivery aims to localize the pharmacological activity of the drug to the desired site at desired release rates. The advances made by micro/nanofluidic technologies have provided new opportunities for better-controlled drug delivery. Various components of a drug delivery system can be integrated within a single tiny micro/nanofluidic chip. This article reviews recent advances of controlled drug delivery made by microfluidic/nanofluidic technologies. We first discuss microreservoir-based drug delivery systems. Then we highlight different kinds of microneedles used for controlled drug delivery, followed with a brief discussion about the current limitations and the future prospects of controlled drug delivery systems. PMID:26813304

  1. Sonophoresis in transdermal drug deliverys.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Jongbum; Lee, Seunghun

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) has several significant advantages compared to oral drug delivery, including elimination of pain and sustained drug release. However, the use of TDD is limited by low skin permeability due to the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the skin. Sonophoresis is a technique that temporarily increases skin permeability such that various medications can be delivered noninvasively. For the past several decades, various studies of sonophoresis in TDD have been performed focusing on parameter optimization, delivery mechanism, transport pathway, or delivery of several drug categories including hydrophilic and high molecular weight compounds. Based on these various studies, several possible mechanisms of sonophoresis have been suggested. For example, cavitation is believed to be the predominant mechanism responsible for drug delivery in sonophoresis. This review presents details of various studies on sonophoresis including the latest trends, delivery of various therapeutic drugs, sonophoresis pathways and mechanisms, and outlook of future studies.

  2. Ursolic acid liposomes with chitosan modification: Promising antitumor drug delivery and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meili; Zhao, Tingting; Liu, Yanping; Wang, Qianqian; Xing, Shanshan; Li, Lei; Wang, Longgang; Liu, Lanxiang; Gao, Dawei

    2017-02-01

    There are tremendous challenges on antitumor and its therapeutic drugs, and preparation of highly efficient nano-vehicles represents one of the novel topics in antitumor pharmaceutical field. Herein, the novel chitosan-coated ursolic acid (UA) liposome (CS-UA-L) was efficiently prepared with highly tumor targeting, drug controlled release and low side-effect. The CS-UA-L was uniformly spherical particles with diameter of ~130nm, and the size was more easily trapped into the tumor tissues. Chitosan modification can make liposomes carrying positive charges, which were inclined to combine with the negative charges on the surface of tumor cells, and then the CS-UA-L could release UA rapidly at pH5.0 comparing with pH7.4. Meanwhile, the CS-UA-L exhibited obvious anti-proliferative effect (76.46%) on HeLa cells and significantly antitumor activity (61.26%) in mice bearing U14 cervical cancer. The tumor tissues of CS-UA-L treated mice had enhanced cell apoptosis, extensive necrosis and low cell proliferation activity. These results demonstrated that the multifunctional CS-UA-L allowed a precision treatment for localized tumor, and reducing the total drug dose and side-effect, which hold a great promise in new safe and effective tumor therapy.

  3. MRI in ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Lizak, Martin J.; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery device testing. Although the current status of the technology presents some major challenges to pharmaceutical research using MRI, it has a lot of potential. In the past decade, MRI has been used to examine ocular drug delivery via the subconjunctival route, intravitreal injection, intrascleral injection to the suprachoroidal space, episcleral and intravitreal implants, periocular injections, and ocular iontophoresis. In this review, the advantages and limitations of MRI in the study of ocular drug delivery are discussed. Different MR contrast agents and MRI techniques for ocular drug-delivery research are compared. Ocular drug-delivery studies using MRI are reviewed. PMID:18186077

  4. Platinum-Incorporating Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-poly(aspartic acid) Pseudoblock Copolymer Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xikuang; Xie, Chen; Chen, Weizhi; Yang, Chenchen; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-07-13

    Cisplatin-incorporating pseudoblock copolymer nanoparticles with high drug loading efficiency (ca. 50%) were prepared built on host-guest inclusion complexation between β-cyclodextrin end-capped poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) block and admantyl end-capped poly(aspartic acid) block, followed by the coordination between cisplatin and carboxyl groups in poly(aspartic acid). The host-guest interaction between the two polymer blocks was examined by two-dimensional nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy. The size and morphology of nanoparticles formed were characterized by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The size control of nanoparticles was carried out by varying the ratio of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) to poly(aspartic acid). The nanoparticles were stable in the aqueous medium with different pH values but disintegrated in the medium containing Cl(-) ions. The in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles were evaluated. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles in vivo was studied by noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence imaging and ion-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. It was found that cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles could effectively accumulate in the tumor site and exhibited significant superior in vivo antitumor activity to the commercially available free cisplatin by combining the tumor volume, body weight, and survival rate measurements.

  5. Folic acid-targeted disulfide-based cross-linking micelle for enhanced drug encapsulation stability and site-specific drug delivery against tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Junhui; Yang, Cuihong; Wang, Weiwei; Chu, Liping; Huang, Fan; Liu, Qiang; Deng, Liandong; Kong, Deling; Liu, Jianfeng; Liu, Jinjian

    2016-01-01

    Although the shortcomings of small molecular antitumor drugs were efficiently improved by being entrapped into nanosized vehicles, premature drug release and insufficient tumor targeting demand innovative approaches that boost the stability and tumor responsiveness of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Here, we show the use of the core cross-linking method to generate a micelle with enhanced drug encapsulation ability and sensitivity of drug release in tumor. This kind of micelle could increase curcumin (Cur) delivery to HeLa cells in vitro and improve tumor accumulation in vivo. We designed and synthesized the core cross-linked micelle (CCM) with polyethylene glycol and folic acid-polyethylene glycol as the hydrophilic units, pyridyldisulfide as the cross-linkable and hydrophobic unit, and disulfide bond as the cross-linker. CCM showed spherical shape with a diameter of 91.2 nm by the characterization of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope. Attributed to the core cross-linking, drug-loaded CCM displayed higher Nile Red or Cur-encapsulated stability and better sensitivity to glutathione than noncross-linked micelle (NCM). Cellular uptake and in vitro antitumor studies proved the enhanced endocytosis and better cytotoxicity of CCM-Cur against HeLa cells, which had a high level of glutathione. Meanwhile, the folate receptor-mediated drug delivery (FA-CCM-Cur) further enhanced the endocytosis and cytotoxicity. Ex vivo imaging studies showed that CCM-Cur and FA-CCM-Cur possessed higher tumor accumulation until 24 hours after injection. Concretely, FA-CCM-Cur exhibited the highest tumor accumulation with 1.7-fold of noncross-linked micelle Cur and 2.8-fold of free Cur. By combining cross-linking of the core with active tumor targeting of FA, we demonstrated a new and effective way to design nanocarriers for enhanced drug encapsulation, smart tumor responsiveness, and elevated tumor accumulation. PMID:27051287

  6. Injectable dopamine-modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) nanocomposite hydrogel as bioadhesive drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chu; Lu, Caicai; Li, Bingqiang; Shan, Meng; Wu, Guolin

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogel systems based on cross-linked polymeric materials with adhesive properties in wet environments have been considered as promising candidates for tissue adhesives. The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is believed to be responsible for the water-resistant adhesive characteristics of mussel adhesive proteins. Under the inspiration of DOPA containing adhesive proteins, a dopamine-modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) derivative (PDAEA) was successfully synthesized by successive ring-opening reactions of polysuccinimide (PSI) with dopamine and ethanolamine, and an injectable bioadhesive hydrogel was prepared via simply mixing PDAEA and FeCl3 solutions. The formation mechanism of the hydrogel was investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopic, Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic, visual colorimetric measurements and EDTA immersion methods. The study demonstrated that the PDAEA-Fe(3+) hydrogel is a dual cross-linking system composed of covalent and coordination crosslinks. The PDAEA-Fe(3+) hydrogel is suitable to serve as a bioadhesive agent according to the rheological behaviors and the observed significant shear adhesive strength. The slow and sustained release of the model drug curcumin from the hydrogel in vitro demonstrated the hydrogel could also be potentially used for drug delivery. Moreover, the cytotoxicity tests in vitro suggested the prepared polymer and hydrogel possessed excellent cytocompatibility. All the results indicated that the dopamine modified poly(α,β-aspartic acid) derivative based hydrogel was a promising candidate for bioadhesive drug delivery system. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1000-1008, 2017.

  7. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  8. Inorganic Nanomaterials as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Hao, Xiaohong; Liang, Xingjie; Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Cuimiao; Zhou, Guoqiang; Shen, Shigang; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2016-01-01

    For safe and effective therapy, drugs must be delivered efficiently and with minimal systemic side effects. Nanostructured drug carriers enable the delivery of small-molecule drugs as well as nucleic acids and proteins. Inorganic nanomaterials are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their unique physicochemical properties, such as facile preparation, good storage stability and biocompatibility. Many inorganic nanostructure-based drug delivery platforms have been prepared. Although there are still many obstacles to overcome, significant advances have been made in recent years. This review focuses on the status and development of inorganic nanostructures, including silica, quantum dots, gold, carbon-based and magnetic iron oxide-based nanostructures, as carriers for chemical and biological drugs. We specifically highlight the extensive use of these inorganic drug carriers for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the most important areas in the field that urgently require further study.

  9. Mucosal drug delivery: membranes, methodologies, and applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Yifan; Wang, Yiping; Thakur, Rashmi; Meidan, Victor M; Michniak, Bozena

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, extensive research into novel forms of drug delivery has suggested that mucosal approaches offer a promising therapeutic alternative, especially for systemically acting drugs. Transmucosal drug delivery offers many benefits, including noninvasive administration, convenience, rapid onset, as well as elimination of hepatic first-pass metabolism. The investigated absorptive surfaces consist of the nasal, buccal, ocular, vaginal, and rectal mucosae. Among these, the nasal and buccal routes have proved the most promising to date. The bioavailability achieved mainly depends upon the pathophysiological state of the mucosa and the properties of both the drug and delivery systems. Various agents can increase the efficacy of transmucosal drug delivery. These include cyclodextrins, bile salts, surfactants, fusidic acid derivatives, microspheres, liposomes, and bioadhesive agents. The mechanisms of action, effectiveness, and toxicity profiles of these enhancers have been investigated extensively in both animal and human models.

  10. Ultrasound mediated transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Azagury, Aharon; Khoury, Luai; Enden, Giora; Kost, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers an attractive alternative to the conventional drug delivery methods of oral administration and injections. However, the stratum corneum serves as a barrier that limits the penetration of substances to the skin. Application of ultrasound (US) irradiation to the skin increases its permeability (sonophoresis) and enables the delivery of various substances into and through the skin. This review presents the main findings in the field of sonophoresis in transdermal drug delivery as well as transdermal monitoring and the mathematical models associated with this field. Particular attention is paid to the proposed enhancement mechanisms and future trends in the fields of cutaneous vaccination and gene therapy.

  11. Modeling of hyaluronic acid containing anti-cancer drugs-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid bioconjugates for targeted delivery to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul-e-Saba, Adulphakdee, A.; Madthing, A.; Zafar, M. N.; Abdullah, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular modeling of hyaluronan (HA), polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), polyethylene glycol-bis-amine (PEG-bis-amine), Curcumin, Cisplatin and the conjugate HA-PEG-PLGA containing Curcumin/Cisplatin were performed using Discovery Studio 2.5 to better understand issues and constraints related to targeted delivery of potent anticancer drugs to cancer cells. HA, a versatile biopolymer is a ligand of cancer cell receptor, CD44 that can be particularly useful in a receptor-mediated cellular uptake of drug-incorporated nanoparticles. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymers, PLGA and PEG, serve as polymeric micelles for controlled-release of drug. Curcumin as a natural anticancer agent has poor solubility that limits its use in drug therapeutics, while platinum-based Cisplatin exhibits systemic cytotoxicity. These can be overcome via drug delivery in polymeric biocompatible vehicles. The PLGA-PEG-HA conjugate shows the total measurement of 105 bond length with average bond length of 1.274163 Å. The conjugation between PEG and HA occurs at C8-O1 atoms and can be manipulated to improve properties.

  12. [Site-specific drug delivery systems. I. Colon targeted delivery].

    PubMed

    Szente, Virág; Zelkó, Romána

    2007-01-01

    Colon specific drug delivery has gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon like Chron's disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, cancer or infections, but also for the potential it holds for the systemic delivery of proteins (e.g. insulin) and therapeutic peptides. These systems enable the protection of healthy tissues from the side effects of drugs and the drug intake of targeted cells, as well. The formulation of colon specific drug delivery systems is of great impact in the case of diseases having circadian rhythm (midnight gerd). Such circadian rhythm release drug delivery systems are designed to provide a plasma concentration--time profile, which varies according to physiological need at different times during the dosing period, i.e., mimicking the circadian rhythm and severity/manifestation of gastric acid secretion (and/or midnight gerd). In general four primary approaches have been proposed for colon targeted delivery namely pH-dependent systems, time dependent systems, colonic microflora activated systems and prodrugs.

  13. Synthesis of zinc-crosslinked thiolated alginic acid beads and their in vitro evaluation as potential enteric delivery system with folic acid as model drug.

    PubMed

    Taha, M O; Aiedeh, K M; Al-Hiari, Y; Al-Khatib, H

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the potential of synthetic modifications of alginic acid as a method to enhance the stability of its complexes with divalent cations under physiological conditions. A fraction of algin's carboxylic acid moieties was substituted with thiol groups to different substitution degrees through conjugating alginate to cysteine to produce alginate-cysteine (AC) conjugates. Infrared spectrophotometry and iodometry were used to characterize the resulting polymeric conjugates in terms of structure and degree of substitution. Moreover, zinc ions were used to crosslink the resulting AC polymers. Folic acid loaded beads were prepared from Zinc-crosslinked AC polymers (AC-Zn) of different cysteine substitution degrees. The generated beads were then investigated in vitro for their capacity to modify folic acid release. AC-Zn polymeric beads resisted drug release under acidic conditions (pH 1.0). However, upon transfer to a phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.0) they released most of their contents almost immediately. This change in drug release behavior is most probably due to the sequestering of zinc cations by phosphate ions within the buffer solution to form insoluble chelates and, to a lesser extent, the ionization of the carboxylic acid and thiol moieties. Removal of zinc ions from the polymeric matrix seems to promote polymeric disintegration and subsequent drug release. A similar behavior is expected in vivo due to the presence of natural zinc sequestering agents in the intestinal fluids. AC-Zn polymers provided a novel approach for enteric drug delivery as drug release from these matrices complied with the USP specifications for enteric dosage forms.

  14. Ultrasound-mediated transdermal drug delivery of fluorescent nanoparticles and hyaluronic acid into porcine skin in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan-Lei; Fan, Peng-Fei; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Tu, Juan; Ma, Yong; Zhang, Dong

    2016-12-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) can effectively bypass the first-pass effect. In this paper, ultrasound-facilitated TDD on fresh porcine skin was studied under various acoustic parameters, including frequency, amplitude, and exposure time. The delivery of yellow-green fluorescent nanoparticles and high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA) in the skin samples was observed by laser confocal microscopy and ultraviolet spectrometry, respectively. The results showed that, with the application of ultrasound exposures, the permeability of the skin to these markers (e.g., their penetration depth and concentration) could be raised above its passive diffusion permeability. Moreover, ultrasound-facilitated TDD was also tested with/without the presence of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). When the ultrasound was applied without UCAs, low ultrasound frequency will give a better drug delivery effect than high frequency, but the penetration depth was less likely to exceed 200 μm. However, with the help of the ultrasound-induced microbubble cavitation effect, both the penetration depth and concentration in the skin were significantly enhanced even more. The best ultrasound-facilitated TDD could be achieved with a drug penetration depth of over 600 μm, and the penetration concentrations of fluorescent nanoparticles and HA increased up to about 4-5 folds. In order to get better understanding of ultrasound-facilitated TDD, scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the surface morphology of skin samples, which showed that the skin structure changed greatly under the treatment of ultrasound and UCA. The present work suggests that, for TDD applications (e.g., nanoparticle drug carriers, transdermal patches and cosmetics), protocols and methods presented in this paper are potentially useful. Project partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 81127901, 81227004, 81473692, 81673995, 11374155, 11574156, 11274170, 11274176, 11474001

  15. Drug delivery to the ear.

    PubMed

    Hoskison, E; Daniel, M; Al-Zahid, S; Shakesheff, K M; Bayston, R; Birchall, J P

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to the ear is used to treat conditions of the middle and inner ear such as acute and chronic otitis media, Ménière's disease, sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Drugs used include antibiotics, antifungals, steroids, local anesthetics and neuroprotective agents. A literature review was conducted searching Medline (1966-2012), Embase (1988-2012), the Cochrane Library and Ovid (1966-2012), using search terms 'drug delivery', 'middle ear', 'inner ear' and 'transtympanic'. There are numerous methods of drug delivery to the middle ear, which can be categorized as topical, systemic (intravenous), transtympanic and via the Eustachian tube. Localized treatments to the ear have the advantages of targeted drug delivery allowing higher therapeutic doses and minimizing systemic side effects. The ideal scenario would be a carrier system that could cross the intact tympanic membrane loaded with drugs or biochemical agents for the treatment of middle and inner ear conditions.

  16. Transmucosal macromolecular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Prego, C; García, M; Torres, D; Alonso, M J

    2005-01-03

    Mucosal surfaces are the most common and convenient routes for delivering drugs to the body. However, macromolecular drugs such as peptides and proteins are unable to overcome the mucosal barriers and/or are degraded before reaching the blood stream. Among the approaches explored so far in order to optimize the transport of these macromolecules across mucosal barriers, the use of nanoparticulate carriers represents a challenging but promising strategy. The present paper aims to compare the characteristics and potential of nanostructures based on the mucoadhesive polysaccharide chitosan (CS). These are CS nanoparticles, CS-coated oil nanodroplets (nanocapsules) and CS-coated lipid nanoparticles. The characteristics and behavior of CS nanoparticles and CS-coated lipid nanoparticles already reported [A. Vila, A. Sanchez, M. Tobio, P. Calvo, M.J. Alonso, Design of biodegradable particles for protein delivery, J. Control. Rel. 78 (2002) 15-24; R. Fernandez-Urrusuno, P. Calvo, C. Remunan-Lopez, J.L. Vila-Jato, M.J. Alonso, Enhancement of nasal absorption of insulin using chitosan nanoparticles, Pharm. Res. 16 (1999) 1576-1581; M. Garcia-Fuentes, D. Torres, M.J. Alonso, New surface-modified lipid nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for salmon calcitonin (submitted for publication).] are compared with those of CS nanocapsules originally reported here. The three types of systems have a size in the nanometer range and a positive zeta potential that was attributed to the presence of CS on their surface. They showed an important capacity for the association of peptides such as insulin, salmon calcitonin and proteins, such as tetanus toxoid. Their mechanism of interaction with epithelia was investigated using the Caco-2 model cell line. The results showed that CS-coated systems caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the transepithelial resistance of the cell monolayer. Moreover, within the range of concentrations investigated, these systems were internalized in the

  17. Intranasal delivery of antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Katare, Yogesh K; Piazza, Justin E; Bhandari, Jayant; Daya, Ritesh P; Akilan, Kosalan; Simpson, Madeline J; Hoare, Todd; Mishra, Ram K

    2016-11-29

    Antipsychotic drugs are used to treat psychotic disorders that afflict millions globally and cause tremendous emotional, economic and healthcare burdens. However, the potential of intranasal delivery to improve brain-specific targeting remains unrealized. In this article, we review the mechanisms and methods used for brain targeting via the intranasal (IN) route as well as the potential advantages of improving this type of delivery. We extensively review experimental studies relevant to intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents for the treatment of psychosis and mental illnesses. We also review clinical studies in which intranasal delivery of peptides, like oxytocin (7 studies) and desmopressin (1), were used as an adjuvant to antipsychotic treatment with promising results. Experimental animal studies (17) investigating intranasal delivery of mainstream antipsychotic drugs have revealed successful targeting to the brain as suggested by pharmacokinetic parameters and behavioral effects. To improve delivery to the brain, nanotechnology-based carriers like nanoparticles and nanoemulsions have been used in several studies. However, human studies assessing intranasal delivery of mainstream antipsychotic drugs are lacking, and the potential toxicity of nanoformulations used in animal studies has not been explored. A brief discussion of future directions anticipates that if limitations of low aqueous solubility of antipsychotic drugs can be overcome and non-toxic formulations used, IN delivery (particularly targeting specific tissues within the brain) will gain more importance moving forward given the inherent benefits of IN delivery in comparison to other methods.

  18. Nanoencapsulation for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Avnesh; Singla, Rubbel; Guliani, Anika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of drug/small molecules in nanocarriers (NCs) is a very promising approach for development of nanomedicine. Modern drug encapsulation methods allow efficient loading of drug molecules inside the NCs thereby reducing systemic toxicity associated with drugs. Targeting of NCs can enhance the accumulation of nanonencapsulated drug at the diseased site. This article focussed on the synthesis methods, drug loading, drug release mechanism and cellular response of nanoencapsulated drugs on liposomes, micelles, carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, and magnetic NCs. Also the uses of these various NCs have been highlighted in the field of nanotechnology. PMID:26417260

  19. Development of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles-embedded hyaluronic acid-ceramide-based nanostructure for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Young; Termsarasab, Ubonvan; Yoon, In-Soo; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2014-10-01

    A hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE) nanostructure embedded with docetaxel (DCT)-loaded poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) was fabricated for tumor-targeted drug delivery. NPs with a narrow size distribution and negative zeta potential were prepared by embedding DCT-loaded PLGA NPs into a HACE nanostructure (DCT/PLGA/HACE). DCT-loaded PLGA and DCT/PLGA/HACE NPs were characterized by solid-state techniques, including Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). A sustained drug release pattern from the NPs developed was observed and negligible cytotoxicity was seen in NIH3T3 cells (normal fibroblast, CD44 receptor negative) and MDA-MB-231 cells (breast cancer cells, CD44 receptor positive). PLGA/HACE NPs containing coumarin 6, used as a fluorescent dye, exhibited improved cellular uptake efficiency, based on the HA-CD44 receptor interaction, compared to plain PLGA NPs. Cyanine 5.5 (Cy5.5)-labeled PLGA/HACE NPs were injected intravenously into a MDA-MB-231 tumor xenograft mouse model and demonstrated enhanced tumor targetability, compared with Cy5.5-PLGA NPs, according to a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging study. Considering these experimental results, the DCT/PLGA/HACE NPs developed may be useful as a tumor-targeted drug delivery system.

  20. Investigation of emulsified, acid and acid-alkali catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres for bone regeneration and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Miao, Guohou; Chen, Xiaofeng; Dong, Hua; Fang, Liming; Mao, Cong; Li, Yuli; Li, Zhengmao; Hu, Qing

    2013-10-01

    Acid-catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs-A) and acid-alkali co-catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs-B) were successfully synthesized via combination of sol-gel and water-in-oil (W/O) micro-emulsion methods. The structural, morphological and textural properties of mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs) were characterized by various techniques. Results show that both MBGMs-A and MBGMs-B exhibit regularly spherical shape but with different internal porous structures, i.e., a dense microstructure for MBGMs-A and internally porous structure for MBGMs-B. (29)Si NMR data reveal that MGBMs have low polymerization degree of silica network. The in vitro bioactivity tests indicate that the apatite formation rate of MBGMs-B was faster than that of MBGMs-A after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. Furthermore, the two kinds of MBGMs have similar storage capacity of alendronate (AL), and the release behaviors of AL could be controlled due to their unique porous structure. In conclusion, the microspheres are shown to be promising candidates as bone-related drug carriers and filling materials of composite scaffold for bone repair.

  1. Photoresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rwei, Alina Y.; Wang, Weiping; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Externally triggerable drug delivery systems provide a strategy for the delivery of therapeutic agents preferentially to a target site, presenting the ability to enhance therapeutic efficacy while reducing side effects. Light is a versatile and easily tuned external stimulus that can provide spatiotemporal control. Here we will review the use of nanoparticles in which light triggers drug release or induces particle binding to tissues (phototargeting). PMID:26644797

  2. Drug Delivery Systems for Platinum Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Vien T.; Scarano, Wei; Stenzel, Martina H.

    2013-09-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin, drugs based on platinum, have made a significant impact on the treatment of various cancers. The administration of platinum drugs is however accompanied by significant side effects. This chapter discusses the types of drug delivery systems that have been developed in order to enable the targeted delivery while maintaining controlled temporal supply of the drug. The sizes of carriers range from nanometer to micrometer sized particles. The most common types of drug carriers are micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, and dendrimers, but also a few microspheres have been developed. Most striking aspect of the delivery of platinum drugs is the possibility of physical encapsulation but also the binding of the drug to the polymer carrier coordinate covalent bond. Since platinum drugs have typically two permanent and two leaving ligands, the polymer can be part of either ligand. As the leaving ligand, the platinum drug is released often as cisplatin. If the polymer provides the functionality for the permanent ligand, a new macromolecular drug has been formed. In addition to the attachment of pt(II) drugs, recent offorts are devoted to the conjugation via the Pt((IV) prodrug.

  3. Nucleic acid delivery with microbubbles and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rychak, Joshua J.; Klibanov, Alexander L.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based therapy is a growing field of drug delivery research. Although ultrasound has been suggested to enhance transfection decades ago, it took a combination of ultrasound with nucleic acid carrier systems (microbubbles, liposomes, polyplexes, viral carriers) to achieve reasonable nucleic acid delivery efficacy. Microbubbles serve as foci for local deposition of ultrasound energy near the target cell, and greatly enhance sonoporation. Major advantage of this approach is in the minimal transfection in the non-insonated non-target tissues. Microbubbles can be simply co-administered with the nucleic acid carrier or can be modified to carry nucleic acid themselves. Liposomes with embedded gas or gas precursor particles can also be used to carry nucleic acid, release and deliver it by the ultrasound trigger. Successful testing in a wide variety of animal models (myocardium, solid tumors, skeletal muscle, pancreas) proves the potential usefulness of this technique for nucleic acid drug delivery. PMID:24486388

  4. Modified MCM-41 as a drug delivery system for acetylsalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskočilová, Eliška; Luštická, Ivana; Paterová, Iva; Machová, Libuše; Červený, Libor

    2014-12-01

    The modification of prepared MCM-41 by different groups (amino, chloro and oxo) was studied. Prepared materials were treated by acetylsalicylic acid and hybrid materials were characterized, compared from the point of view of immobilized amount of active substance. The highest amount of acetylsalicylic acid was detected using methyl-tert- butyl ether as a solvent and MCM-41 without modification after 1 h (0.35 g per 1 g of the support) or MCM modified by amino group after 5 h (0.37 g per 1 g of the support) as a support. Using amino modified MCM, the longer treatment by acetylsalicylic acid converged to the equilibrium and after 24 h the immobilized amount was 0.3 g per 1 g. A dissolution in vitro study was carried out, comparing the stability of formed interactions. The slowest dissolution was detected using non-modified MCM-41 and oxo modified material.

  5. Facile preparation of a cationic poly(amino acid) vesicle for potential drug and gene co-delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jianxun; Xiao, Chunsheng; He, Chaoliang; Li, Mingqiang; Li, Di; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2011-12-01

    A novel pH-responsive poly(amino acid) grafted with oligocation was prepared through the combination of ring-opening polymerization (ROP) and subsequent atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Firstly, poly(γ-2-chloroethyl-L-glutamate) (PCELG) with a pendent 2-chloroethyl group was synthesized through ROP of γ-2-chloroethyl-L-glutamate N-carboxyanhydride (CELG NCA) using n-hexylamine as the initiator. Then, PCELG was used to initiate the ARTP of 2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride (AMA), yielding poly(L-glutamate)-graft-oligo(2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride) (PLG-g-OAMA). The pKa of PLG-g-OAMA was 7.3 established by the acid-base titration method. The amphiphilic poly(amino acid) could directly self-assemble into a vesicle in PBS. The vesicle was characterized by TEM and DLS. Hydrophilic DOX·HCl was loaded into the hollow core of the vesicle. The in vitro release behavior of DOX·HCl from the vesicle in PBS could be adjusted by the solution pH. In vitro cell experiments revealed that the vesicle could reduce the toxicity of the DOX·HCl. In addition, the preliminary gel retardation assay displayed that PLG-g-OAMA could efficiently bind DNA at a PLG-g-OAMA/DNA weight ratio of 0.3 or above, indicating its potential use as a gene carrier. More in-depth studies of the PLG-g-OAMA vesicle for drug and gene co-delivery in vitro and in vivo are in progress.

  6. Phototriggered multifunctional drug delivery device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtner, S.; Kim, H.-C.; Hampp, N.

    2006-02-01

    Although phototriggered cleavage of chemical bonds induced by single-photon or two-photon-absorption provides attractive tools for controlled drug delivery, the choice of drugs is still limited by the linker system to which the therapeutic molecules need to be bound covalently. The use of a multifunctional linker system suitable for coupling a broad spectrum of drugs to the polymeric carrier will open a new field for drug delivery. We have developed a novel photocleavable multifunctional linker system based on coumarin dimers, whose unique photochemical behavior are well characterized. As a first example, an acrylic polymer-drug conjugate with antimetabolites is explored. The cleavage of the link between the drug and the polymer backbone is triggered by both single- as well as two-photon absorption. The release of the drug is investigated. It is possible to manufacture a polymeric drug delivery device with several drugs in different areas. In particular the two-photon-absorption induced process offers the possibility to address the drug of interest owing to the superior spatial resolution. The key to such devices is a versatile linker-system which can be adopted to work with various drug compounds.

  7. Photothermal-modulated drug delivery and magnetic relaxation based on collagen/poly(γ-glutamic acid) hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Hee; Kim, Ahreum; Shin, Woojung; Heo, Min Beom; Noh, Hyun Jong; Hong, Kwan Soo; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Lim, Yong Taik

    2017-01-01

    Injectable and stimuli-responsive hydrogels have attracted attention in molecular imaging and drug delivery because encapsulated diagnostic or therapeutic components in the hydrogel can be used to image or change the microenvironment of the injection site by controlling various stimuli such as enzymes, temperature, pH, and photonic energy. In this study, we developed a novel injectable and photoresponsive composite hydrogel composed of anticancer drugs, imaging contrast agents, bio-derived collagen, and multifaceted anionic polypeptide, poly (γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA). By the introduction of γ-PGA, the intrinsic temperature-dependent phase transition behavior of collagen was modified to a low viscous sol state at room temperature and nonflowing gel state around body temperature. The modified temperature-dependent phase transition behavior of collagen/γ-PGA hydrogels was also evaluated after loading of near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG), which could transform absorbed NIR photonic energy into thermal energy. By taking advantage of the abundant carboxylate groups in γ-PGA, cationic-charged doxorubicin (Dox) and hydrophobic MnFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles were also incorporated successfully into the collagen/γ-PGA hydrogels. By illumination of NIR light on the collagen/γ-PGA/Dox/ICG/MnFe2O4 hydrogels, the release kinetics of Dox and magnetic relaxation of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles could be modulated. The experimental results suggest that the novel injectable and NIR-responsive collagen/γ-PGA hydrogels developed in this study can be used as a theranostic platform after loading of various molecular imaging probes and therapeutic components.

  8. Drug Delivery Research: The Invention Cycle.

    PubMed

    Park, Kinam

    2016-07-05

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been successful in introducing improved formulations for better use of existing drugs and novel delivery of biologicals. The initial success of producing many oral products and some injectable depot formulations, however, reached a plateau, and the progress over the past three decades has been slow. This is likely due to the difficulties of formulating hydrophilic, high molecular weight drugs, such as proteins and nucleic acids, for targeting specific cells, month-long sustained delivery, and pulsatile release. Since the approaches that have served well for delivery of small molecules are not applicable to large molecules, it is time to develop new methods for biologicals. The process of developing future drug delivery systems, termed as the invention cycle, is proposed, and it starts with clearly defining the problems for developing certain formulations. Once the problems are well-defined, creative imagination examines all potential options and selects the best answer and alternatives. Then, innovation takes over to generate unique solutions for developing new formulations that resolve the previously identified problems. Ultimately, the new delivery systems will have to go through a translational process to produce the final formulations for clinical use. The invention cycle also emphasizes examining the reasons for success of certain formulations, not just the reasons for failure of many systems. Implementation of the new invention cycle requires new mechanisms of funding the younger generation of scientists and a new way of identifying their achievements, thereby releasing them from the burden of short-termism.

  9. Photocaging of Single and Dual (Similar or Different) Carboxylic and Amino Acids by Acetyl Carbazole and its Application as Dual Drug Delivery in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yarra; Rajesh, Y; Karthik, S; Chetan, A C; Mandal, Mahitosh; Jana, Avijit; Singh, N D Pradeep

    2016-11-18

    A new fluorescent photoremovable protecting group (FPRPG) based on acetylcarbazole framework has been explored for the first time release of single and dual (similar or different) substrates from single chromophore. Mechanistic studies of the photorelease process revealed that photorelease of two (similar or different) substrates from acetyl carbazole proceeds via a stepwise pathway. Further, we constructed photoresponsive dual drug delivery system (DDS) to release two different anticancer drugs (caffeic acid and chlorambucil, 1 equiv each). In vitro study reveals that our DDS exhibit excellent properties like biocompatibility, cellular uptake, and photoregulated dual drug release.

  10. Mathematical modeling of drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, J; Siepmann, F

    2008-12-08

    Due to the significant advances in information technology mathematical modeling of drug delivery is a field of steadily increasing academic and industrial importance with an enormous future potential. The in silico optimization of novel drug delivery systems can be expected to significantly increase in accuracy and easiness of application. Analogous to other scientific disciplines, computer simulations are likely to become an integral part of future research and development in pharmaceutical technology. Mathematical programs can be expected to be routinely used to help optimizing the design of novel dosage forms. Good estimates for the required composition, geometry, dimensions and preparation procedure of various types of delivery systems will be available, taking into account the desired administration route, drug dose and release profile. Thus, the number of required experimental studies during product development can be significantly reduced, saving time and reducing costs. In addition, the quantitative analysis of the physical, chemical and potentially biological phenomena, which are involved in the control of drug release, offers another fundamental advantage: The underlying drug release mechanisms can be elucidated, which is not only of academic interest, but a pre-requisite for an efficient improvement of the safety of the pharmaco-treatments and for effective trouble-shooting during production. This article gives an overview on the current state of the art of mathematical modeling of drug delivery, including empirical/semi-empirical and mechanistic realistic models. Analytical as well as numerical solutions are described and various practical examples are given. One of the major challenges to be addressed in the future is the combination of mechanistic theories describing drug release out of the delivery systems with mathematical models quantifying the subsequent drug transport within the human body in a realistic way. Ideally, the effects of the design

  11. BNNTs under the influence of external electric field as potential new drug delivery vehicle of Glu, Lys, Gly and Ser amino acids: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanzadeh, Davood; Ghazanfary, Samereh

    2014-11-01

    The interaction of Glu (Glutamic acid), Lys (Lysine), Gly (Glycine) and Ser (Serine) amino acids with different polarities and (9, 0) zigzag single-wall boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with various lengths in the presence and absence of external electric field (EF) in gas and solvent phases, are studied using density functional theory. It is found that interaction of Glu, Lys, Gly and Ser amino acids with BNNTs in both phases is energetically favorable. From solvation energy calculations, it can be seen that the BNNTs/amino acid complex dissolution in water is spontaneous. The adsorption energies and quantum molecular descriptors changed in the presence of external EF. Therefore, the study of BNNTs/amino acid complex under influence of external electric field is very important in proposing or designing new drug delivery systems in the presence of external EF. Results indicate that Glu, Lys, Gly and Ser amino acids can be adsorbed considerably on the BNNTs in the existence of external electric field. Our results showed that the BNNTs can act as a suitable drug delivery vehicle of Glu, Lys, Gly and Ser amino acids within biological systems and strength of adsorption and rate of drug release can be controlled by the external EF.

  12. Drug delivery and therapeutic impact of extended-release acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Bliden, Kevin P; Patrick, Jeff; Pennell, Andrew T; Tantry, Udaya S; Gurbel, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment guidelines recommend once-daily, low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; aspirin) for secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. However, the anti-thrombotic benefits of traditional ASA formulations may not extend over a 24-h period, especially in patients at high risk for a recurrent cardiovascular event. A next-generation, extended-release ASA formulation (ER-ASA) has been developed to provide 24-h anti-thrombotic coverage with once-daily dosing. The pharmacokinetics of ER-ASA indicates slower absorption and prolonged ASA release versus immediate-release ASA, with a favorable safety profile. ER-ASA minimizes systemic ASA absorption and provides sustained antiplatelet effects over a 24-h period.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Hyaluronic Acid-Polycaprolactone Copolymer Micelles for the Drug Delivery of Radioactive Iodine-131 Labeled Lipiodol

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Cheng; Yang, Ming-Hui; Chung, Tze-Wen; Jhuang, Ting-Syuan; Yang, Jean-Dean; Chen, Ko-Chin; Chen, Wan-Jou; Huang, Ying-Fong; Jong, Shiang-Bin; Tsai, Wan-Chi; Lin, Po-Chiao

    2017-01-01

    Micelles, with the structure of amphiphilic molecules including a hydrophilic head and a hydrophobic tail, are recently developed as nanocarriers for the delivery of drugs with poor solubility. In addition, micelles have shown many advantages, such as enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effects, prolonged circulation times, and increased endocytosis through surface modification. In this study, we measured the critical micelle concentrations, diameters, stability, and cytotoxicity and the cell uptake of micelles against hepatic cells with two kinds of hydrophilic materials: PEG-PCL and HA-g-PCL. We used 131I as a radioactive tracer to evaluate the stability, drug delivery, and cell uptake activity of the micelles. The results showed that HA-g-PCL micelles exhibited higher drug encapsulation efficiency and stability in aqueous solutions. In addition, the 131I-lipiodol loaded HA-g-PCL micelles had better affinity and higher cytotoxicity compared to HepG2 cells. PMID:28127555

  14. Biopolymers as transdermal drug delivery systems in dermatology therapy.

    PubMed

    Basavaraj, K H; Johnsy, George; Navya, M A; Rashmi, R; Siddaramaiah

    2010-01-01

    The skin is considered a complex organ for drug delivery because of its structure. Drug delivery systems are designed for the controlled release of drugs through the skin into the systemic circulation, maintaining consistent efficacy and reducing the dose of the drugs and their related side effects. Transdermal drug delivery represents one of the most rapidly advancing areas of novel drug delivery. The excellent impervious nature of the skin is the greatest challenge that must be overcome for successful drug delivery. Today, polymers have been proven to be successful for long-term drug delivery applications as no single polymer can satisfy all of the requirements. Biopolymers in the field of dermal application are rare and the mechanisms that affect skin absorption are almost unknown. Biopolymers are widely used as drug delivery systems, but as such the use of biopolymers as drug delivery systems in dermatologic therapy is still in progress. Commonly used biopolymers include hydrocolloids, alginates, hydrogels, polyurethane, collagen, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), chitosan, proteins and peptides, pectin, siRNAs, and hyaluronic acid. These new and exciting methods for drug delivery are already increasing the number and quality of dermal and transdermal therapies. This article reviews current research on biopolymers and focuses on their potential as drug carriers, particularly in relation to the dermatologic aspects of their use.

  15. Hyaluronic acid based hydrogel system for soft tissue regeneration and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Amit Kumar

    We have developed hyaluronic acid (HA)-based, biomimetic hydrogel matrices that are hierarchically structured, mechanically robust and biologically active. Specifically, HA-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) with controlled sizes, defined porosity, and improved stability were synthesized using different inverse emulsion systems and crosslinking chemistries. The resultant particles either contained residual functional groups or were rendered reactive by subsequent chemical modifications. HA-based doubly crosslinked networks (DXNs) were synthesized via covalent crosslinking of HA HGPs with soluble HA macromers carrying mutually reactive functional groups. These hybrid matrices are hierarchical in nature, consisting of densely crosslinked HGPs integrated in a loosely connected secondary matrix. Their mechanical properties and degradation kinetics can be readily tuned by varying the particle size, functional group density, intra- and interparticle crosslinking. To improve the biological functions of HA HGPs, perlecan domain I (PlnDI), a basement membrane proteoglycan that has strong affinity for various heparin binding growth factors (HBGFs), was successfully conjugated to the particles through the core protein via a flexible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker. The immobilized PlnDI maintains its ability to bind bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2) and modulates its in vitro release. A similar, sustained release of BMP-2 was achieved by encapsulating BMP-2-loaded HGPs within a photocrosslinked HA matrix. When encapsulated in HA DXNs, primary bovine chondrocytes were able to maintain their phenotype, proliferate readily and produce abundant glycosaminoglycan. Finally, cell-adhesive HA DXNs were fabricated by encapsulating gelatin-decorated HA HGPs in a secondary HA matrix. Human MSCs were shown to adhere to the composite matrix through the focal adhesion sites clustered on particle surface. The cell-adhesive composite matrices supported hMSC proliferation and migration into

  16. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  17. Implantable drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Blackshear, P J

    1979-12-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems are being developed to release drugs to the bloodstream continuously as well as free patients from being hospitalized to receive intravenous infusions or frequent injections. One technique is implantation of a pellet in the subcutaneous tissue so the pellet may be released by erosion. Drugs are also diffused through silicone rubber capsules but only polyacrylamide is able to release large molecules. Contraceptive rings containing progesterone and placed in the uterus or vagina and implanted silicone-rubber capsules use these principles. Disadvantages to the subcutaneous delivery of drugs include: 1) release of the drug in subcutaneous tissue rather than in the bloodstream directly; 2) entry into the circulatory system is controlled by surrounding blood supplies which vary with fat; 3) diffusion may be difficult due to dense layers of fibrous tissue; and 4) drug amounts cannot be readily regulated. The Ommaya reservoir uses a container with a self-sealing membrane implanted in the scalp and connected to a cerebral ventricle to treat forms of leukemia and fungal meningitis. Another development is an implantable disk-shaped infusion pump with 2 compartments, the outer one containing a propellant and the inner chamber containing the drug, holds 45 milliliters and releases about 1 milliliter/day. In the future these systems may release drugs in response to biochemical feedback or deliver a drug to 1 specific area.

  18. Polymeric micelles from poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(amino acid) block copolymer for drug and gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Kensuke; Christie, R. James; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    Dramatic advances in biological research have revealed the mechanisms underlying many diseases at the molecular level. However, conventional techniques may be inadequate for direct application of this new knowledge to medical treatments. Nanobiotechnology, which integrates biology with the rapidly growing field of nanotechnology, has great potential to overcome many technical problems and lead to the development of effective therapies. The use of nanobiotechnology in drug delivery systems (DDS) is attractive for advanced treatment of conditions such as cancer and genetic diseases. In this review paper for a special issue on biomaterial research in Japan, we discuss the development of DDS based on polymeric micelles mainly in our group for anti-cancer drug and gene delivery, and also address our challenges associated with developing polymeric micelles as super-functionalized nanodevices with intelligent performance. PMID:19364722

  19. Polymeric assembly of hyperbranched building blocks to establish tunable nanoplatforms for lysosome acidity-responsive gene/drug co-delivery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hui-Zhen; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xu-Li; Yang, Bin; Chen, Wei-Hai; Chen, Si; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Yi-Fang; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-07-01

    This study plans to develop a nanoparticle technology that can assemble different polymeric "building blocks" with various desired functionalities into one nanosystem in a pH-dependent manner. For this purpose, polymeric building blocks were specifically designed with hyperbranched architectures, and orthogonal pH-reversible phenylboronic acid-diols were taken as "joints" to integrate them together. To verify the idea, a corona-core dual-polymer nanoassembly was prepared as the vehicle for lysosomotropic gene/drug co-delivery. Phenylboronic acid modified hyperbranched oligoethylenimine (OEI-PBA) was arranged to cluster around the hydrophobic core composed of hyperbranched polyglycerol, just by mixing two polymers in an appropriate ratio at neutral conditions. Compared with the parent OEI-PBA, this nanoassembly demonstrated better capture of plasmid DNA, highly enhanced activity for cellular transport and gene transfection (up to 100 fold), the ability to further load hydrophobic drugs, lysosome acidity-targeting pH-dependent release of both carried cargoes, and improved cell-biocompatibility. To evaluate its potential for combinational gene/drug therapy, in vitro experiments using the therapeutic p53 gene and antitumor doxorubicin as models were carried out. This intracellular co-delivery led to apparently synergetic anti-cancer effects in cultured cancer cells. This dynamic paradigm shows interesting features including easy manipulation, reversible conjugation, lysosome-targeting pH-responsiveness, high co-delivery efficiency, and functional expandability by further accommodating other building blocks.

  20. Nanoparticles for Brain Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Masserini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system, one of the most delicate microenvironments of the body, is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulating its homeostasis. BBB is a highly complex structure that tightly regulates the movement of ions of a limited number of small molecules and of an even more restricted number of macromolecules from the blood to the brain, protecting it from injuries and diseases. However, the BBB also significantly precludes the delivery of drugs to the brain, thus, preventing the therapy of a number of neurological disorders. As a consequence, several strategies are currently being sought after to enhance the delivery of drugs across the BBB. Within this review, the recently born strategy of brain drug delivery based on the use of nanoparticles, multifunctional drug delivery systems with size in the order of one-billionth of meters, is described. The review also includes a brief description of the structural and physiological features of the barrier and of the most utilized nanoparticles for medical use. Finally, the potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles is discussed, and future technological approaches are described. The strong efforts to allow the translation from preclinical to concrete clinical applications are worth the economic investments. PMID:25937958

  1. Drug delivery by lipid cochleates.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Leila

    2005-01-01

    Drug delivery technology has brought additional benefits to pharmaceuticals such as reduction in dosing frequency and side effects, as well as the extension of patient life. To address this need, cochleates, a precipitate obtained as a result of the interaction between phosphatidylserine and calcium, have been developed and proved to have potential in encapsulating and delivering small molecule drugs. This chapter discusses the molecules that can be encapsulated in a cochleate system and describes in detail the methodology that can be used to encapsulate and characterize hydrophobic drugs such as amphotericin B, a potent antifungal agent. Some efficacy data in animal models infected with candidiasis or aspergillosis are described as well.

  2. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of novel amphiphilic copolymer stearic acid-coupled F127 nanoparticles for nano-technology based drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qihe; Liang, Qing; Yu, Fei; Xu, Jian; Zhao, Qihua; Sun, Baiwang

    2011-12-01

    Pluronic, F127, amphiphilic block copolymers, are used for several applications, including drug delivery systems. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of F127 is about 0.26-0.8 wt% so that the utility of F127 in nano-technology based drug delivery system is limited since the nano-sized micelles could dissociate upon dilution. Herein, stearic acid (SA) was simply coupled to F127 between the carboxyl group of SA and the hydroxyl group of F127, which formed a novel copolymer named as SA-coupled F127, with significantly lower CMC. Above the CMC 6.9 × 10(-5)wt%, SA-coupled F127 self-assembled stable nanoparticles with Zeta potential -36 mV. Doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded nanoparticles were made, with drug loading (DL) 5.7 wt% and Zeta potential -36 to -39 mV, and the nanoparticles exhibited distinct shape with the size distribution from 20 to 50 nm. DOX-loaded nanoparticles were relatively stable and exhibited DOX dependant cytotoxicity toward MCF-7 cells in vitro. These results suggest that SA-coupled F127 potentially could be applied as a nano-technology based drug delivery method.

  4. Hybrid polymeric hydrogels for ocular drug delivery: nanoparticulate systems from copolymers of acrylic acid-functionalized chitosan and N-isopropylacrylamide or 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Barbu, Eugen; Verestiuc, Liliana; Iancu, Mihaela; Jatariu, Anca; Lungu, Adriana; Tsibouklis, John

    2009-06-03

    Nanoparticulate hybrid polymeric hydrogels (10-70 nm) have been obtained via the radical-induced co-polymerization of acrylic acid-functionalized chitosan with either N-isopropylacrylamide or 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and the materials have been investigated for their ability to act as controlled release vehicles in ophthalmic drug delivery. Studies on the effects of network structure upon swelling properties, adhesiveness to substrates that mimic mucosal surfaces and biodegradability, coupled with in vitro drug release investigations employing ophthalmic drugs with differing aqueous solubilities, have identified nanoparticle compositions for each of the candidate drug molecules. The hybrid nanoparticles combine the temperature sensitivity of N-isopropylacrylamide or the good swelling characteristics of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate with the susceptibility of chitosan to lysozyme-induced biodegradation.

  5. Hybrid polymeric hydrogels for ocular drug delivery: nanoparticulate systems from copolymers of acrylic acid-functionalized chitosan and N-isopropylacrylamide or 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, Eugen; Verestiuc, Liliana; Iancu, Mihaela; Jatariu, Anca; Lungu, Adriana; Tsibouklis, John

    2009-06-01

    Nanoparticulate hybrid polymeric hydrogels (10-70 nm) have been obtained via the radical-induced co-polymerization of acrylic acid-functionalized chitosan with either N-isopropylacrylamide or 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and the materials have been investigated for their ability to act as controlled release vehicles in ophthalmic drug delivery. Studies on the effects of network structure upon swelling properties, adhesiveness to substrates that mimic mucosal surfaces and biodegradability, coupled with in vitro drug release investigations employing ophthalmic drugs with differing aqueous solubilities, have identified nanoparticle compositions for each of the candidate drug molecules. The hybrid nanoparticles combine the temperature sensitivity of N-isopropylacrylamide or the good swelling characteristics of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate with the susceptibility of chitosan to lysozyme-induced biodegradation.

  6. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  7. Potential new methods for antiepileptic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Ho, Jet

    2002-01-01

    Use of novel drug delivery methods could enhance the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Slow-release oral forms of medication or depot drugs such as skin patches might improve compliance and therefore seizure control. In emergency situations, administration via rectal, nasal or buccal mucosa can deliver the drug more quickly than can oral administration. Slow-release oral forms and rectal forms of AEDs are already approved for use, nasal and buccal administration is currently off-label and skin patches for AEDs are an attractive but currently hypothetical option. Therapies under development may result in the delivery of AEDs directly to the regions of the brain involved in seizures. Experimental protocols are underway to allow continuous infusion of potent excitatory amino acid antagonists into the CSF. In experiments with animal models of epilepsy, AEDs have been delivered successfully to seizure foci in the brain by programmed infusion pumps, acting in response to computerised EEG seizure detection. Inactive prodrugs can be given systemically and activated at the site of the seizure focus by locally released compounds. One such drug under development is DP-VPA (or DP16), which is cleaved to valproic acid (sodium valproate) by phospholipases at the seizure focus. Liposomes and nanoparticles are engineered micro-reservoirs of a drug, with attached antibodies or receptor-specific binding agents designed to target the particles to a specific region of the body. Liposomes in theory could deliver a high concentration of an AED to a seizure focus. Penetration of the blood-brain barrier can be accomplished by linking large particles to iron transferrin or biological toxins that can cross the barrier. In the near future, it is likely that cell transplants that generate neurotransmitters and neuromodulators will accomplish renewable endogenous drug delivery. However, the survival and viability of transplanted cells have yet to be demonstrated

  8. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems

  9. p-Hydroxy benzoic acid-conjugated dendrimer nanotherapeutics as potential carriers for targeted drug delivery to brain: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Kulhari, Hitesh; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-06-01

    Dendrimers which are discrete nanostructures/nanoparticles are emerging as promising candidates for many nanomedicine applications. Ligand-conjugated dendrimer facilitate the delivery of therapeutics in a targeted manner. Small molecules such as p-hydroxyl benzoic acid (pHBA) were found to have high affinity for sigma receptors which are prominent in most parts of central nervous system and tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize pHBA-dendrimer conjugates as colloidal carrier for site-specific delivery of practically water insoluble drug, docetaxel (DTX) to brain tumors and to determine its targeting efficiency. pHBA, a small molecule ligand was coupled to the surface amine groups of generation 4-PAMAM dendrimer via a carbodiimide reaction and loaded with DTX. The conjugation was confirmed by 1HNMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. In vitro release of drug from DTX-loaded pHBA-conjugated dendrimer was found to be less as compared to unconjugated dendrimers. The prepared drug delivery system exhibited good physico-chemical stability and decrease in hemolytic toxicity. Cell viability and cell uptake studies were performed against U87MG human glioblastoma cells and formulations exerted considerable anticancer effect than plain drug. Conjugation of dendrimer with pHBA significantly enhanced the brain uptake of DTX which was shown by the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from the brain following administration of pHBA-conjugated dendrimers compared with unconjugated dendrimer or formulation in clinical use (Taxotere®). Therefore, pHBA conjugated dendrimers could be an efficient delivery vehicle for the targeting of anticancer drugs to brain tumors.

  10. Raspberry-like poly(γ-glutamic acid) hydrogel particles for pH-dependent cell membrane passage and controlled cytosolic delivery of antitumor drugs

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Hee; Hong, Ji Hyeon; Noh, Young-Woock; Lee, Eunji; Lee, Chang-Soo; Lim, Yong Taik

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we synthesized bioderived poly(amino acid) hydrogel particles that showed pH-dependent membrane-disrupting properties and controlled cytosolic delivery of antitumor drugs. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) that has been produced extensively using bacteria, especially those of Bacillus subtilis species, was modified with cholesterol (γ-PGA/Chol), and the γ-PGA/Chol conjugates were used to form polymeric nanoparticles the size of 21.0±1.1 nm in aqueous solution. When the polymeric nanoparticles were mixed with doxorubicin (Dox), raspberry-like hydrogel particles (RBHPs) were formed by the electrostatic interaction between the cationically charged Dox and the anionically charged nanoparticles. The average size and surface charge of the RBHPs in aqueous solution were 444.9±122.5 nm and −56.44 mV, respectively. The loaded amount of Dox was approximately 63.9 μg/mg of RBHPs. The RBHPs showed controlled drug release behavior in both in vitro and ex vivo cell-based experiments. Through fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, the cellular uptake of RBHPs into human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) was analyzed. The cytotoxic effect, evaluated by the methyl tetrazolium salt assay, was dependent on both the concentration of RBHPs and the treatment time. The pH-dependent membrane-disrupting properties of the RBHPs and the subsequent cytosolic delivery of Dox were evaluated using a standard hemolysis assay. Upon an increase in hydrophobicity at the lysosomal acidic pH, RBHPs could easily interact, penetrate cell membranes, and destabilize them. Taken together, the data suggested that RBHPs could be used as drug delivery carriers after loading with other therapeutic drugs, such as proteins or small interfering RNA for cancer therapy. PMID:27822040

  11. Food, physiology and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Varum, F J O; Hatton, G B; Basit, A W

    2013-12-05

    Gastrointestinal physiology is dynamic and complex at the best of times, and a multitude of known variables can affect the overall bioavailability of drugs delivered via the oral route. Yet while the influences of food and beverage intake as just two of these variables on oral drug delivery have been extensively documented in the wider literature, specific information on their effects remains sporadic, and is not so much contextually reviewed. Food co-ingestion with oral dosage forms can mediate several changes to drug bioavailability, yet the precise mechanisms underlying this have yet to be fully elucidated. Likewise, the often detrimental effects of alcohol (ethanol) on dosage form performance have been widely observed experimentally, but knowledge of which has only moderately impacted on clinical practice. Here, we attempt to piece together the available subject matter relating to the influences of both solid and liquid foodstuffs on the gastrointestinal milieu and the implications for oral drug delivery, with particular emphasis on the behaviour of modified-release dosage forms, formulation robustness and drug absorption. Providing better insight into these influences, and exemplifying cases where formulations have been developed or modified to circumvent their associated problems, can help to appropriately direct the design of future in vitro digestive modelling systems as well as oral dosage forms resilient to these effects. Moreover, this will help to better our understanding of the impact of food and alcohol intake on normal gut behaviour and function.

  12. Characterization and evaluation of a folic acid receptor-targeted cyclodextrin complex as an anticancer drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiaojiao; Xu, Beihua; Shou, Dan; Qin, Fuhua; Xu, Yong; Hu, Ying

    2016-02-15

    To improve the water solubility and tumor targeting ability of docetaxel (DTX), and thus enhance the drug's antitumor efficacy and safety, a novel folate receptor (FR)-targeted cyclodextrin drug delivery vehicle (FA-CD) was successfully synthesized. The synthesis of the designed cyclodextrin was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The in vitro cytotoxicity was investigated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the results showed that no significant differences (p>0.05) appeared in cytotoxicity between the different cyclodextrins in the different cell lines. Besides, the DTX/FA-CD inclusion complex was prepared. The cellular uptake and competition assays were examined using the HepG2, HeLa, and KB cell lines, which have different levels of folate receptor expression. Interestingly, the Cy5.5/FA-CD complex had higher uptake in the HepG2, HeLa, and KB cells, compared with non-targeted Cy5.5/CD complex (p<0.001). The time-dependent drug uptake into KB cells observed by LSCM confirmed the drug delivery via endocytic routes. Data from the competition assays, especially in KB cells, showed that a significant inhibitory effect (p<0.001) was obtained when the concentration of FA was increased, and suggested that the Cy5.5/FA-CD was internalized through a FR-mediated mechanism. Moreover, the in vitro bioactivity assay also demonstrated efficient antitumor activity, and the order of the cell viabilities (% of control) was OB>HepG2>HeLa>KB for DTX/FA-CD (p<0.001). For DTX/CD, however, it displayed minimum antitumor behavior in all cell types. An apoptosis study by FCM and LSCM also revealed that the FA-modified complexes were more effective in inducing apoptosis in FR-expressing cells. Finally, an in vivo biodistribution study in KB-bearing healthy mice revealed that the DTX/FA-CD complex has enhanced tumor

  13. Stimuli-responsive biodegradable poly(methacrylic acid) based nanocapsules for ultrasound traced and triggered drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Li, Dian; Jin, Sha; Ding, Jing; Guo, Jia; Shi, Weibin; Wang, Changchun

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been investigated for echogenic intravenous drug delivery system. Due to the traditional UCAs with overlarge size (micro-scale), their reluctant accumulation in target organs and the instability have presented severe obstacles to the accurate response to the ultrasound and severely limited their further clinical application. Furthermore, elimination of drug carriers from the biologic system after their carrying out the diagnostic or therapeutic functions is one important aspect to be considered. The drug carriers with large sizes, avoiding renal filtration, will lead to increasing toxicity. In this present paper, we design and develop a new type of triple-stimuli responsive (ultrasound/pH/GSH) biodegradable nanocapsules, in which fill up with perfluorohexane, and the DOX-loaded PMAA with disulfide crosslinking forms the wall. These soft nanocapsules with uniform size of 300 nm can easily enter the tumor tissues via EPR effects. The PMAA shell has high DOX-loading content (36 wt%) and great drug loading efficiency (93.5%), the PFH filled can effectively enhance US imaging signal through acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), ensuring diagnostic and image-guided therapeutic applications. What is more, the disulfide-crosslinked PMAA shell is biodegradable and thus safe for normal organisms. These merits enabled us optimize the balance of diagnostic, therapeutic and biodegradable functionalities in a multifunctional theranostic nanoplatform.

  14. Superhydrophobic materials for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohe, Stefan Thomas

    Superhydrophobicity is a property of material surfaces reflecting the ability to maintain air at the solid-liquid interface when in contact with water. These surfaces have characteristically high apparent contact angles, by definition exceeding 150°, as a result of the composite material-air surface formed under an applied water droplet. Superhydrophobic surfaces were first discovered on naturally occurring substrates, and have subsequently been fabricated in the last several decades to harness these favorable surface properties for a number of emerging applications, including their use in biomedical settings. This work describes fabrication and characterization of superhydrophobic 3D materials, as well as their use as drug delivery devices. Superhydrophobic 3D materials are distinct from 2D superhydrophobic surfaces in that air is maintained not just at the surface of the material, but also within the bulk. When the superhydrophobic 3D materials are submerged in water, water infiltrates slowly and continuously as a new water-air-material interface is formed with controlled displacement of air. Electrospinning and electrospraying are used to fabricate superhydrophobic 3D materials utilizing blends of the biocompatible polymers poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and poly(caprolactone-co-glycerol monostearate) (PGC-C18). PGC-C18 is significantly more hydrophobic than PCL (contact angle of 116° versus 83° for flat materials), and further additions of PGC-C18 into electrospun meshes and electrosprayed coatings affords increased stability of the entrapped air layer. For example, PCL meshes alone (500 mum thick) take 10 days to fully wet, and with 10% or 30% PGC-C18 addition wetting rates are dramatically slowed to 60% wetted by 77 days and 4% by 75 days, respectively. Stability of the superhydrophobic materials can be further probed with a variety of physio-chemical techniques, including pressure, surfactant containing solutions, and solvents of varying surface tension

  15. Diatomite silica nanoparticles for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Immacolata; Terracciano, Monica; Martucci, Nicola M.; De Stefano, Luca; Migliaccio, Nunzia; Tatè, Rosarita; Rendina, Ivo; Arcari, Paolo; Lamberti, Annalisa; Rea, Ilaria

    2014-07-01

    Diatomite is a natural fossil material of sedimentary origin, constituted by fragments of diatom siliceous skeletons. In this preliminary work, the properties of diatomite nanoparticles as potential system for the delivery of drugs in cancer cells were exploited. A purification procedure, based on thermal treatments in strong acid solutions, was used to remove inorganic and organic impurities from diatomite and to make them a safe material for medical applications. The micrometric diatomite powder was reduced in nanoparticles by mechanical crushing, sonication, and filtering. Morphological analysis performed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy reveals a particles size included between 100 and 300 nm. Diatomite nanoparticles were functionalized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and labeled by tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate. Different concentrations of chemically modified nanoparticles were incubated with cancer cells and confocal microscopy was performed. Imaging analysis showed an efficient cellular uptake and homogeneous distribution of nanoparticles in cytoplasm and nucleus, thus suggesting their potentiality as nanocarriers for drug delivery.

  16. Thermosensitive polymers for drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowska, A.; Kim, Sung Wan

    1996-12-31

    Thermosensitive polymers (TSP) demonstrating temperature-dependent temperature-dependent swelling in water have been extensively studied in recent years. Their molecular and physical properties have been tailored for a variety of biomedical and engineering uses. This presentation will discuss TSP based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its crosslinked networks modified with hydrophobic or hydrophilic components by copolymerization blending and formation of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs). TSP designed for three different areas of drug delivery will be presented. First, heparin releasing temperature-sensitive polymers for the prevention of surface induced thrombosis will be presented as an example of a local macromolecular delivery from a surface of a medical device. Second, a new oral delivery device based on a novel mechanical squeezing concept, utilizing specific swelling-deswelling characteristics of temperature- and temperature/pH-sensitive hydrogels will be described. These hydrogels were synthesized to exhibit a controlled swelling-deswelling kinetics, hence a variety of release profiles may be generated: a delayed, a zero-order or an {open_quotes}on-off{close_quotes} release profile. Finally, thermally reversible polymeric gels as an extracellular matrix for the entrapment of pancreatic islet cells in biohybrid artificial pancreas for insulin delivery will be discussed.

  17. ATP-triggered anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Disanto, Rocco; Tai, Wanyi; Gu, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to promote physiological specificity and on-demand therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we utilize adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a trigger for the controlled release of anticancer drugs. We demonstrate that polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with an ATP-binding aptamer-incorporated DNA motif can selectively release the intercalating doxorubicin via a conformational switch when in an ATP-rich environment. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP-responsive nanovehicles is 0.24 μM in MDA-MB-231 cells, a 3.6-fold increase in the cytotoxicity compared with that of non-ATP-responsive nanovehicles. Equipped with an outer shell crosslinked by hyaluronic acid, a specific tumour-targeting ligand, the ATP-responsive nanocarriers present an improvement in the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumour growth using xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumour-bearing mice. This ATP-triggered drug release system provides a more sophisticated drug delivery system, which can differentiate ATP levels to facilitate the selective release of drugs.

  18. Microspheres and Nanotechnology for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jóhannesson, Gauti; Stefánsson, Einar; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2016-01-01

    Ocular drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye can be accomplished by invasive drug injections into different tissues of the eye and noninvasive topical treatment. Invasive treatment involves the risks of surgical trauma and infection, and conventional topical treatments are ineffective in delivering drugs to the posterior segment of the eye. In recent years, nanotechnology has become an ever-increasing part of ocular drug delivery. In the following, we briefly review microspheres and nanotechnology for drug delivery to the eye, including different forms of nanotechnology such as nanoparticles, microparticles, liposomes, microemulsions and micromachines. The permeation barriers and anatomical considerations linked to ocular drug delivery are discussed and a theoretical overview on drug delivery through biological membranes is given. Finally, in vitro, in vivo and human studies of x03B3;-cyclodextrin nanoparticle eyedrop suspensions are discussed as an example of nanotechnology used for drug delivery to the eye.

  19. In Vitro Co-Delivery Evaluation of Novel Pegylated Nano-Liposomal Herbal Drugs of Silibinin and Glycyrrhizic Acid (Nano-Phytosome) to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Mohammad Mahdi; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Akbarzadeh, Azim; Ebrahimi, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate a co-encapsulated pegylated nano-liposome system based on two herbal anti-tumor drugs, silibinin and glycyrrhizic acid, for delivery to a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line (HepG2). Materials and Methods In this experimental study, co-encapsulated nano-liposomes by the thin layer film hydration method with HEPES buffer and sonication at 60% amplitude. Liposomes that co-encapsulated silibinin and glycyrrhizic acid were prepared with a specified molar ratio of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol (CHOL), and methoxy-polyethylene glycol 2000 (PEG2000)–derived distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (mPEG2000-DSPE). We used the MTT technique to assess cytotoxicity for various concentrations of co-encapsulated nano-liposomes, free silibinin (25% w/v) and glycyrrhizic acid (75% w/v) on HepG2 and fibroblast cell lines over a 48-hour period. Results Formulation of pegylated nano-liposomes showed a narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 46.3 nm. The encapsulation efficiency (EE) for silibinin was 24.37%, whereas for glycyrrhizic acid it was 68.78%. Results of in vitro cytotoxicity showed significantly greater co-encapsulated nano-liposomes on the HepG2 cell line compared to the fibroblast cell line. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) for co-encapsulated pegylated nanoliposomal herbal drugs was 48.68 µg/ml and free silibinin with glycyrrhizic acid was 485.45 µg/ml on the HepG2 cell line. Conclusion This in vitro study showed that nano-liposome encapsulation of silibinin with glycyrrhizic acid increased the biological activity of free drugs, increased the stability of silibinin, and synergized the therapeutic effect of silibinin with glycyrrhizic acid. The IC50 of the co-encapsulated nano-liposomes was lower than the combination of free silibinin and glycyrrhizic acid on the HepG2 cell line. PMID:27540518

  20. Oral Drug Delivery with Polymeric Nanoparticles: The Gastrointestinal Mucus Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, Laura M.; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery is the most common method for drug administration. However, poor solubility, stability, and bioavailability of many drugs make achieving therapeutic levels via the gastrointestinal (GI) tract challenging. Drug delivery must overcome numerous hurdles, including the acidic gastric environment and the continuous secretion of mucus that protects the GI tract. Nanoparticle drug carriers that can shield drugs from degradation and deliver them to intended sites within the GI tract may enable more efficient and sustained drug delivery. However, the rapid secretion and shedding of GI tract mucus can significantly limit the effectiveness of nanoparticle drug delivery systems. Many types of nanoparticles are efficiently trapped in and rapidly removed by mucus, making controlled release in the GI tract difficult. This review addresses the protective barrier properties of mucus secretions, how mucus affects the fate of orally administered nanoparticles, and recent developments in nanoparticles engineered to penetrate the mucus barrier. PMID:22212900

  1. Drug delivery systems from nose to brain.

    PubMed

    Misra, Ambikanandan; Kher, Gitanjali

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of brain disorders is particularly challenging due to the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles to deliver drugs selectively and effectively to the brain. Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) constitutes the major obstacle to the uptake of drugs into the brain following systemic administration. Intranasal delivery offers a non-invasive and convenient method to bypass the BBB and delivery of therapeutics directly to the brain. The review discusses the potential of intranasal route to deliver drugs to the brain, the mechanisms and pathways of direct nose to brain drug transport, the various factors influencing transnasal drug absorption, the conventional and novel intranasal drug delivery systems, the various intranasal drug delivery techniques and devices, and examples of brain drug transport that have been feasible in treating various brain disorders. Moreover, products on the market, investigational drugs, and the author's perceptions about the prospect of intranasal delivery for treating brain disorders are also been discussed.

  2. Ocular drug delivery systems: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge faced by today’s pharmacologist and formulation scientist is ocular drug delivery. Topical eye drop is the most convenient and patient compliant route of drug administration, especially for the treatment of anterior segment diseases. Delivery of drugs to the targeted ocular tissues is restricted by various precorneal, dynamic and static ocular barriers. Also, therapeutic drug levels are not maintained for longer duration in target tissues. In the past two decades, ocular drug delivery research acceleratedly advanced towards developing a novel, safe and patient compliant formulation and drug delivery devices/techniques, which may surpass these barriers and maintain drug levels in tissues. Anterior segment drug delivery advances are witnessed by modulation of conventional topical solutions with permeation and viscosity enhancers. Also, it includes development of conventional topical formulations such as suspensions, emulsions and ointments. Various nanoformulations have also been introduced for anterior segment ocular drug delivery. On the other hand, for posterior ocular delivery, research has been immensely focused towards development of drug releasing devices and nanoformulations for treating chronic vitreoretinal diseases. These novel devices and/or formulations may help to surpass ocular barriers and associated side effects with conventional topical drops. Also, these novel devices and/or formulations are easy to formulate, no/negligibly irritating, possess high precorneal residence time, sustain the drug release, and enhance ocular bioavailability of therapeutics. An update of current research advancement in ocular drug delivery necessitates and helps drug delivery scientists to modulate their think process and develop novel and safe drug delivery strategies. Current review intends to summarize the existing conventional formulations for ocular delivery and their advancements followed by current nanotechnology based formulation developments

  3. Integrated microsystems for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Razzacki, S Zafar; Thwar, Prasanna K; Yang, Ming; Ugaz, Victor M; Burns, Mark A

    2004-02-10

    Efficient drug delivery and administration are needed to realize the full potential of molecular therapeutics. Integrated microsystems that incorporate extremely fast sensory and actuation capabilities can fulfill this need for efficient drug delivery tools. Photolithographic technologies borrowed from the semiconductor industry enable mass production of such microsystems. Rapid prototyping allows for the quick development of customized devices that would accommodate for diverse therapeutic requirements. This paper reviews the capabilities of existing microfabrication and their applications in controlled drug delivery microsystems. The next generation of drug delivery systems--fully integrated and self-regulating--would not only improve drug administration, but also revolutionize the health-care industry.

  4. Colloidal drug delivery systems in vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Beg, Sarwar; Samad, Abdus; Nazish, Iram; Sultana, Ruksar; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Md Zaki; Akbar, Md

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines play a vital role in the field of community medicine to combat against several diseases of human existence. Vaccines primarily trigger the acquired immune system to develop long-lasting immunity against pathogens. Conventional approaches for vaccine delivery lacks potential to target a particular antigen to develop acquired immunity by specific antibodies. Recent advancements in vaccine delivery showed that inclusion of adjuvants in vaccine formulations or delivery of them in a carrier helps in achieving desired targeting ability, reducing the immunogenicity and significant augmentation in the immune response. Colloidal carriers (liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, proteosomes, virosomes and virus like particles (VLPs), antigen cochleates, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) have been widely explored for vaccine delivery. Further, surface engineering of these carriers with ligands, functional moieties and monoclonal antibodies tend to enhance the immune recognition potential of vaccines by differentiation of antigen specific memory T-cells. The current review, therefore, provides an updated account on the recent advancements in various colloidal delivery systems in vaccine delivery, outlining the mechanism of immune response initiated by them along with potential applications and marketed instances in an explicit manner.

  5. Ungual and transungual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, H N; Juluri, Abhishek; Desai, B G; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2012-08-01

    Topical therapy is desirable in treatment of nail diseases like onychomycosis (fungal infection of nail) and psoriasis. The topical treatment avoids the adverse effects associated with systemic therapy, thereby enhancing the patient compliance and reducing the treatment cost. However the effectiveness of the topical therapies has been limited due to the poor permeability of the nail plate to topically applied therapeutic agents. Research over the past one decade has been focused on improving the transungual permeability by means of chemical treatment, penetration enhancers, mechanical and physical methods. The present review is an attempt to discuss the different physical and chemical methods employed to increase the permeability of the nail plate. Minimally invasive electrically mediated techniques such as iontophoresis have gained success in facilitating the transungual delivery of actives. In addition drug transport across the nail plate has been improved by filing the dorsal surface of the nail plate prior to application of topical formulation. But attempts to improve the trans-nail permeation using transdermal chemical enhancers have failed so far. Attempts are on to search suitable physical enhancement techniques and chemical transungual enhancers in view to maximize the drug delivery across the nail plate.

  6. Polymeric conjugates for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nate; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    The field of polymer therapeutics has evolved over the past decade and has resulted in the development of polymer-drug conjugates with a wide variety of architectures and chemical properties. Whereas traditional non-degradable polymeric carriers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylamide) (HPMA) copolymers have been translated to use in the clinic, functionalized polymer-drug conjugates are increasingly being utilized to obtain biodegradable, stimuli-sensitive, and targeted systems in an attempt to further enhance localized drug delivery and ease of elimination. In addition, the study of conjugates bearing both therapeutic and diagnostic agents has resulted in multifunctional carriers with the potential to both “see and treat” patients. In this paper, the rational design of polymer-drug conjugates will be discussed followed by a review of different classes of conjugates currently under investigation. The design and chemistry used for the synthesis of various conjugates will be presented with additional comments on their potential applications and current developmental status. PMID:22707853

  7. Concanavalin A-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles for intranasal drug delivery to the cervical lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiayan; Liu, Qingfeng; Zhang, Chi; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Chen, Jie; Zha, Yuan; Qian, Yong; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2013-01-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA)-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles (ConA-NPs) were prepared for targeted drug delivery to the cervical lymph nodes after intranasal administration. ConA, a lectin specifically binding to α-mannose and α-glucose, was covalently conjugated on NPs without loss of its carbohydrates binding bioactivity. In vitro cellular uptake experiment demonstrated that NPs could be uptaken by Calu-3 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and conjugation of ConA on NPs could significantly increase the rate and amount of cellular uptake. ConA-NP showed no obvious toxicity to Calu-3 cells in vitro or to the nasal cilia of rats in vivo. Compared with NPs without ConA, ConA-NP is more effective in targeting drugs to the deep cervical lymph nodes, as evidenced by 1.36-2.52 times increase of targeting efficiency, demonstrating that ConA-NP is a potential carrier for targeted drug delivery to the cervical lymph nodes via nasal route.

  8. Folic acid-functionalized drug delivery platform of resveratrol based on Pluronic 127/D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate mixed micelles

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jifu; Tong, Tiantian; Jin, Kai; Zhuang, Qiannan; Han, Te; Bi, Yanping; Wang, Jianzhu; Wang, Xiaodan

    2017-01-01

    A folic acid (FA)-functionalized drug vehicle platform based on Pluronic 127 (P127)/D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) mixed micelles was orchestrated for an effective delivery of the model drug resveratrol in order to address the problem of poor water solubility and rapid metabolism of resveratrol and improve its targeted accumulation at tumor site. The FA-decorated mixed micelles were prepared using thin-film hydration method and optimized by central composite design approach. The micelles were also characterized in terms of size and morphology, drug entrapment efficiency and in vitro release profile. In addition, the cytotoxicity and cell uptake of the micelles were evaluated in folate receptor-overexpressing MCF-7 cell line. In vivo pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies were also performed. The average size of the micelles was ~20 nm with a spherical shape and high encapsulation efficiency (99.67%). The results of fluorescence microscopy confirmed the targeting capability of FA-conjugated micelles in MCF-7 cells. FA-modified micelles exhibited superior pharmacokinetics in comparison with that of solution. Further, the low accumulation of resveratrol-loaded FA micelles formulation in the heart and kidney avoided toxicity of these vital organs. It could be concluded that folate-modified P127/TPGS mixed micelles might serve as a potential delivery platform for resveratrol. PMID:28392687

  9. Block copolymer micelles with acid-labile ortho ester side-chains: Synthesis, characterization, and enhanced drug delivery to human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rupei; Ji, Weihang; Panus, David; Palumbo, R Noelle; Wang, Chun

    2011-04-10

    A new type of block copolymer micelles for pH-triggered delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs has been synthesized and characterized. The micelles were formed by the self-assembly of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer consisting of a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) block and a hydrophobic polymethacrylate block (PEYM) bearing acid-labile ortho ester side-chains. The diblock copolymer was synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) from a PEG macro-initiator to obtain well-defined polymer chain-length. The PEG-b-PEYM micelles assumed a stable core-shell structure in aqueous buffer at physiological pH with a low critical micelle concentration as determined by proton NMR and pyrene fluorescence spectroscopy. The hydrolysis of the ortho ester side-chain at physiological pH was minimal yet much accelerated at mildly acidic pHs. Doxorubicin (Dox) was successfully loaded into the micelles at pH 7.4 and was released at a much higher rate in response to slight acidification to pH 5. Interestingly, the release of Dox at pH 5 followed apparently a biphasic profile, consisting of an initial fast phase of several hours followed by a sustained release period of several days. Dox loaded in the micelles was rapidly taken up by human glioma (T98G) cells in vitro, accumulating in the endolysosome and subsequently in the nucleus in a few hours, in contrast to the very low uptake of free drug at the same dose. The dose-dependent cytotoxicity of the Dox-loaded micelles was determined by the MTT assay and compared with that of the free Dox. While the empty micelles themselves were not toxic, the IC(50) values of the Dox-loaded micelles were approximately ten-times (by 24h) and three-times (by 48h) lower than the free drug. The much enhanced potency in killing the multi-drug-resistant human glioma cells by Dox loaded in the micelles could be attributed to high intracellular drug concentration and the subsequent pH-triggered drug release. These results

  10. In Situ Forming Polymeric Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Madan, M.; Bajaj, A.; Lewis, S.; Udupa, N.; Baig, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In situ forming polymeric formulations are drug delivery systems that are in sol form before administration in the body, but once administered, undergo gelation in situ, to form a gel. The formation of gels depends on factors like temperature modulation, pH change, presence of ions and ultra violet irradiation, from which the drug gets released in a sustained and controlled manner. Various polymers that are used for the formulation of in situ gels include gellan gum, alginic acid, xyloglucan, pectin, chitosan, poly(DL-lactic acid), poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and poly-caprolactone. The choice of solvents like water, dimethylsulphoxide, N-methyl pyrrolidone, triacetin and 2-pyrrolidone for these formulations depends on the solubility of polymer used. Mainly in situ gels are administered by oral, ocular, rectal, vaginal, injectable and intraperitoneal routes. The in situ gel forming polymeric formulations offer several advantages like sustained and prolonged action in comparison to conventional drug delivery systems. The article presents a detailed review of these types of polymeric systems, their evaluation, advancements and their commercial formulations. From a manufacturing point of view, the production of such devices is less complex and thus lowers the investment and manufacturing cost. PMID:20490289

  11. Intelligent hydrogels for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    He, Liumin; Zuo, Qinhua; Xie, Shasha; Huang, Yuexin; Xue, Wei

    2011-09-01

    Intelligent hydrogel, also known as smart hydrogels, are materials with great potential for development in drug delivery system. Intelligent hydrogel also has the ability to perceive as a signal structure change and stimulation. The review introduces the temperature-, pH-, electric signal-, biochemical molecule-, light- and pressure- sensitive hydrogels. Finally, we described the application of intelligent hydrogel in drug delivery system and the recent patents involved for hydrogel in drug delivery.

  12. Drug Delivery for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    hydrogels. The shortcomings of current devices in terms of burst effect , nonuniform dosage, and uneven drug delivery, necessitates a new approach to...Specific Aim 2 -- To evaluate the effectiveness of the conduit- drug delivery device to enhance nerve regeneration across a 15mm nerve gap in a rat sciatic...main tasks of Aim 1. Specific Aim 2 -- To evaluate the effectiveness of the conduit- drug delivery device to enhance nerve regeneration across a

  13. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases.

  14. A microneedle roller for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Seong-O; Seo, Soonmin; Choy, Young Bin; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-10-01

    Microneedle rollers have been used to treat large areas of skin for cosmetic purposes and to increase skin permeability for drug delivery. In this study, we introduce a polymer microneedle roller fabricated by inclined rotational UV lithography, replicated by micromolding hydrophobic polylactic acid and hydrophilic carboxy-methyl-cellulose. These microneedles created micron-scale holes in human and porcine cadaver skin that permitted entry of acetylsalicylic acid, Trypan blue and nanoparticles measuring 50nm and 200nm in diameter. The amount of acetylsalicylic acid delivered increased with the number of holes made in the skin and was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than in untreated skin. Lateral diffusion in the skin between holes made by microneedles followed expected diffusional kinetics, with effective diffusivity values that were 23-160 times smaller than in water. Compared to inserting microneedles on a flat patch, the sequential insertion of microneedles row by row on a roller required less insertion force in full-thickness porcine skin. Overall, polymer microneedle rollers, prepared from replicated polymer films, offer a simple way to increase skin permeability for drug delivery.

  15. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Andrew S; Partanen, Ari; Yarmolenko, Pavel; Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Wood, Bradford J

    2015-11-01

    The use of clinical imaging modalities for the guidance of targeted drug delivery systems, known as image-guided drug delivery (IGDD), has emerged as a promising strategy for enhancing antitumor efficacy. MR imaging is particularly well suited for IGDD applications because of its ability to acquire images and quantitative measurements with high spatiotemporal resolution. The goal of IGDD strategies is to improve treatment outcomes by facilitating planning, real-time guidance, and personalization of pharmacologic interventions. This article reviews basic principles of targeted drug delivery and highlights the current status, emerging applications, and future paradigms of MR-guided drug delivery.

  16. Breathable Medicine: Pulmonary Mode of Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gandhimathi, Chinnasamy; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Tay, Samuel Sam Wah; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kumar, Srinivasan Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds require different modes of drug delivery systems to accomplish therapeutic activity without loss of its activity and lead to exhibit no adverse effects. Originating from ancient days, pulmonary mode of drug delivery is gaining much importance compared to other modes of drug delivery systems with respect to specific diseases. Pulmonary drug delivery is a non-invasive route for local and systemic therapies together with more patient convenience, compliance and is a needleless system. In this review, we addressed the vaccine delivery via non- or minimally invasive routes. Polymeric nanoparticles are preferred for use in the pulmonary delivery devices owing to a prolonged retention in lungs. Small site for absorption, mucociliary clearance, short residence time and low bioavailability are some of the limitations in pulmonary drug delivery have been resolved by generating micro- and nano-sized aerosol particles. We have classified the breathable medicine on the basis of available devices for inhalation and also prominent diseases treated through pulmonary mode of drug delivery. Owing to increasing toxicity of pharmacological drugs, the use of natural medicines has been rapidly gaining importance recently. The review article describes breathability of medicines or the pulmonary mode of drug delivery system and their drug release profile, absorption, distribution and efficacy to cure asthma and diabetes.

  17. Reversibly crosslinked hyaluronic acid nanoparticles for active targeting and intelligent delivery of doxorubicin to drug resistant CD44+ human breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yinan; Zhang, Jian; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Xie, Fang; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-05-10

    The existence of drug resistance poses a major obstacle for the treatment of various malignant human cancers. Here, we report on reduction-sensitive reversibly crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) nanoparticles based on HA-Lys-LA conjugates (Lys: l-lysine methyl ester, LA: lipoic acid) for active targeting delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) to CD44+ breast cancers in vitro and in vivo, effectively overcoming drug resistance (ADR). HA-Lys-LA with degrees of substitution of 5, 10 and 28% formed robust nano-sized nanoparticles (152-219nm) following auto-crosslinking. DOX-loaded crosslinked nanoparticles revealed inhibited DOX release under physiological conditions while fast drug release in the presence of 10mM glutathione (GSH). Notably, MTT assays showed that DOX-loaded crosslinked HA-Lys-LA10 nanoparticles possessed an apparent targetability and a superior antitumor activity toward CD44 receptor overexpressing DOX-resistant MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR). The in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies in MCF-7/ADR tumor xenografts in nude mice showed that DOX-loaded crosslinked HA-Lys-LA10 nanoparticles had a prolonged circulation time and a remarkably high accumulation in the tumor (12.71%ID/g). Notably, DOX-loaded crosslinked HA-Lys-LA10 nanoparticles exhibited effective inhibition of tumor growth while continuous tumor growth was observed for mice treated with free drug. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that in contrast to control groups, all mice treated with DOX-loaded crosslinked HA-Lys-LA10 nanoparticles survived over an experimental period of 44days. Importantly, DOX-loaded crosslinked HA nanoparticles caused low side effects. The reversibly crosslinked hyaluronic acid nanoparticles with excellent biocompatibility, CD44-targetability, and effective reversal of drug resistance have a great potential in cancer therapy.

  18. Drug delivery systems: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Sriwastawa, Birendra; Bhati, L; Pandey, S; Pandey, P; Bannerjee, Saurabh K

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. For the treatment of human diseases, nasal and pulmonary routes of drug delivery are gaining increasing importance. These routes provide promising alternatives to parenteral drug delivery particularly for peptide and protein therapeutics. For this purpose, several drug delivery systems have been formulated and are being investigated for nasal and pulmonary delivery. These include liposomes, proliposomes, microspheres, gels, prodrugs, cyclodextrins, among others. Nanoparticles composed of biodegradable polymers show assurance in fulfilling the stringent requirements placed on these delivery systems, such as ability to be transferred into an aerosol, stability against forces generated during aerosolization, biocompatibility, targeting of specific sites or cell populations in the lung, release of the drug in a predetermined manner, and degradation within an acceptable period of time. PMID:23071954

  19. Refilling drug delivery depots through the blood.

    PubMed

    Brudno, Yevgeny; Silva, Eduardo A; Kearney, Cathal J; Lewin, Sarah A; Miller, Alex; Martinick, Kathleen D; Aizenberg, Michael; Mooney, David J

    2014-09-02

    Local drug delivery depots have significant clinical utility, but there is currently no noninvasive technique to refill these systems once their payload is exhausted. Inspired by the ability of nanotherapeutics to target specific tissues, we hypothesized that blood-borne drug payloads could be modified to home to and refill hydrogel drug delivery systems. To address this possibility, hydrogels were modified with oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) that provide a target for drug payloads in the form of free alginate strands carrying complementary ODNs. Coupling ODNs to alginate strands led to specific binding to complementary-ODN-carrying alginate gels in vitro and to injected gels in vivo. When coupled to a drug payload, sequence-targeted refilling of a delivery depot consisting of intratumor hydrogels completely abrogated tumor growth. These results suggest a new paradigm for nanotherapeutic drug delivery, and this concept is expected to have applications in refilling drug depots in cancer therapy, wound healing, and drug-eluting vascular grafts and stents.

  20. Implantable Devices for Sustained, Intravesical Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In clinical settings, intravesical instillation of a drug bolus is often performed for the treatment of bladder diseases. However, it requires repeated instillations to extend drug efficacy, which may result in poor patient compliance. To alleviate this challenge, implantable devices have been developed for the purpose of sustained, intravesical drug delivery. In this review, we briefly summarize the current trend in the development of intravesical drug-delivery devices. We also introduce the most recently developed devices with strong potential for intravesical drug-delivery applications. PMID:27377941

  1. Designing polymeric microparticulate drug delivery system for hydrophobic drug quercetin

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Moumita; Dasgupta Mandal, Dalia; Mandal, Tamal; Bhuniya, Saikat; Ghosh, Mallika

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate pharmaceutical potentialities of a polymeric microparticulate drug delivery system for modulating the drug profile of poorly water-soluble quercetin. In this research work two cost effective polymers sodium alginate and chitosan were used for entrapping the model drug quercetin through ionic cross linking method. In vitro drug release, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency, Fourier Transforms Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC) studies were also done for physicochemical characterization of the formulations. Swelling index and drug release study were done at a pH of 1.2, 6.8 and 7.4 to evaluate the GI mimetic action which entails that the swelling and release of the all the Formulation1 (F1), Formulation2 (F2) and Formulation3 (F3) at pH 1.2 were minimal confirming the prevention of drug release in the acidic environment of stomach. Comparatively more sustained release was seen from the formulations F2 & F3 at pH 6.8 and pH 7.4 after 7 h of drug release profiling. Drug entrapment efficiency of the formulations shows in F1 (D:C:A = 2:5:30) was approximately 70% whereas the increase in chitosan concentration in F2 (D:C:A = 2:10:30) has shown an entrapment efficiency of 81%. But the comparative further increase of chitosan concentration in F3 (D:C:A = 2:15:30) has shown a entrapment of 80% which is not having any remarkable difference from F2. The FTIR analysis of drug, polymers and the formulations indicated the compatibility of the drug with the polymers. The smoothness of microspheres in F2 & F3 was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). However F1 microsphere has shown more irregular shape comparatively. The DSC studies indicated the absence of drug-polymer interaction in the microspheres. Our XRD studies have revealed that when pure drug exhibits crystalline structure with less dissolution profile

  2. Permeation enhancer strategies in transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Marwah, Harneet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Today, ∼74% of drugs are taken orally and are not found to be as effective as desired. To improve such characteristics, transdermal drug delivery was brought to existence. This delivery system is capable of transporting the drug or macromolecules painlessly through skin into the blood circulation at fixed rate. Topical administration of therapeutic agents offers many advantages over conventional oral and invasive techniques of drug delivery. Several important advantages of transdermal drug delivery are prevention from hepatic first pass metabolism, enhancement of therapeutic efficiency and maintenance of steady plasma level of the drug. Human skin surface, as a site of drug application for both local and systemic effects, is the most eligible candidate available. New controlled transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) technologies (electrically-based, structure-based and velocity-based) have been developed and commercialized for the transdermal delivery of troublesome drugs. This review article covers most of the new active transport technologies involved in enhancing the transdermal permeation via effective drug delivery system.

  3. Effect of a controlled-release drug delivery system made of oleanolic acid formulated into multivesicular liposomes on hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuling; Liu, Zhongbing; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Huang, Juan; Yu, Xin; Li, Jinwei; Xiong, Dan; Sun, Xiaoduan; Zhong, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel dosage form of multivesicular liposomes for oleanolic acid (OA) to overcome its poor solubility, prolong therapeutic drug levels in the blood, and enhance the antitumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma. OA-encapsulated multivesicular liposomes (OA-MVLs) were prepared by a double-emulsion method, and the formulation was optimized by the central composite design. The morphology, particle size, and drug-loading efficiency of OA-MVLs were investigated. Furthermore, OA-MVLs were also characterized both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that OA-MVLs were spherical particles with an average particle size of 11.57 μm and an encapsulation efficiency of 82.3%±0.61%. OA-MVLs exhibited a sustained-release pattern in vitro, which was fitted to Ritger-Peppas equation. OA-MVLs inhibited the growth of human HepG2 cells which was confirmed by the MTT assay and fluorescence microscopy detection. The in vivo release of OA from OA-MVLs exhibited a sustained manner, indicating a longer circulation time compared to OA solution. The in vivo toxicity study indicated that medium-dose OA-MVLs exerted no toxic effect on the hosts. Importantly, OA-MVLs suppressed the growth of murine H22 hepatoma and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, the poorly soluble OA could be encapsulated into MVLs to form a novel controlled-release drug delivery system. The present study may hold promise for OA-MVLs as a new dosage form for sustained-release drug delivery in cancer therapy.

  4. Temperature-sensitive polymers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Scott D; Fitzpatrick, Lindsay E; Thakur, Ajit; Mazumder, Mohammad A Jafar; Sheardown, Heather

    2012-07-01

    The ability to undergo rapid changes in response to subtle environmental cues make stimuli- responsive materials attractive candidates for minimally invasive, targeted and personalized drug delivery applications. This special report aims to highlight and provide a brief description of several of the significant natural and synthetic temperature-responsive materials that have clinical relevance for drug delivery applications. This report examines the advantages and disadvantages of natural versus synthetic materials and outlines various scaffold architectures that can be utilized with temperature-sensitive drug delivery materials. The authors provide a commentary on the current state of the field and provide their insight into future expectations for temperature-sensitive drug delivery, emphasizing the importance of the emergence of dual and multiresponsive systems capable of responding precisely to an expanding set of stimuli, thereby allowing the development of disease-specific drug delivery vehicles.

  5. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  6. Mechanisms Underlying Drug Delivery to Peripheral Arteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Tzafriri, Rami; Patel, Sandeep M; Parikh, Sahil A

    2017-04-01

    Delivery of drugs onto arterial targets via endovascular devices commands several principles: dissolution, diffusion, convection, drug binding, barriers to absorption, and interaction between the drug, delivery vehicle, and accepting arterial wall. The understanding of drug delivery in the coronary vasculature is vast; there is ongoing work needed in the peripheral arteries. There are differences that account for some failures of application of coronary technology into the peripheral vascular space. Breakthroughs in peripheral vascular interventional techniques building on current technologies require investigators willing to acknowledge the similarities and differences between these different vascular territories, while developing technologies adapted for peripheral arteries.

  7. Sustained release of anticancer agent phytic acid from its chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles for drug-delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Dorniani, Dena; Saifullah, Bullo; Gothai, Sivapragasam; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Norhaizan, Mohd Esa

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with phytic acid (PTA) to form phytic acid-chitosan-iron oxide nanocomposite (PTA-CS-MNP). The obtained nanocomposite and nanocarrier were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, transmission electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analyses. Fourier transform infrared spectra and thermal analysis of MNPs and PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite confirmed the binding of CS on the surface of MNPs and the loading of PTA in the PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite. The coating process enhanced the thermal stability of the anticancer nanocomposite obtained. X-ray diffraction results showed that the MNPs and PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite are pure magnetite. Drug loading was estimated using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and showing a 12.9% in the designed nanocomposite. Magnetization curves demonstrated that the synthesized MNPs and nanocomposite were superparamagnetic with saturation magnetizations of 53.25 emu/g and 42.15 emu/g, respectively. The release study showed that around 86% and 93% of PTA from PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite could be released within 127 and 56 hours by a phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4 and 4.8, respectively, in a sustained manner and governed by pseudo-second order kinetic model. The cytotoxicity of the compounds on HT-29 colon cancer cells was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The HT-29 cell line was more sensitive against PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite than PTA alone. No cytotoxic effect was observed on normal cells (3T3 fibroblast cells). This result indicates that PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite can inhibit the proliferation of colon cancer cells without causing any harm to normal cell. PMID:28392693

  8. Polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, V R; Kumria, R

    2001-08-14

    Natural polysaccharides are now extensively used for the development of solid dosage forms for delivery of drug to the colon. The rationale for the development of a polysaccharide based delivery system for colon is the presence of large amounts of polysaccharidases in the human colon as the colon is inhabited by a large number and variety of bacteria which secrete many enzymes e.g. beta-D-glucosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, amylase, pectinase, xylanase, beta-D-xylosidase, dextranase, etc. Various major approaches utilizing polysaccharides for colon-specific delivery are fermentable coating of the drug core, embedding of the drug in biodegradable matrix, formulation of drug-saccharide conjugate (prodrugs). A large number of polysaccharides have already been studied for their potential as colon-specific drug carrier systems, such as chitosan, pectin, chondroitin sulphate, cyclodextrin, dextrans, guar gum, inulin, amylose and locust bean gum. Recent efforts and approaches exploiting these polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery are discussed.

  9. Colloidal microgels in drug delivery applications

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei V.

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal microgels have recently received attention as environmentally responsive systems and now are increasingly used in applications as carriers for therapeutic drugs and diagnostic agents. Synthetic microgels consist of a crosslinked polymer network that provides a depot for loaded drugs, protection against environmental hazards and template for post-synthetic modification or vectorization of the drug carriers. The aim of this manuscript is to review recent attempts to develop new microgel formulations for oral drug delivery, to design metal-containing microgels for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and to advance approaches including the systemic administration of microgels. Novel nanogel drug delivery systems developed in the authors’ laboratory are discussed in details including aspects of their synthesis, vectorization and recent applications for encapsulation of low molecular weight drugs or formulation of biological macromolecules. The findings reviewed here are encouraging for further development of the nanogels as intelligent drug carriers with such features as targeted delivery and triggered drug release. PMID:17168773

  10. Intravenous drug delivery in neonates: lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Medlicott, Natalie J; Reith, David M; Broadbent, Roland S

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous drug administration presents a series of challenges that relate to the pathophysiology of the neonate and intravenous infusion systems in neonates. These challenges arise from slow intravenous flow rates, small drug volume, dead space volume and limitations on the flush volume in neonates. While there is a reasonable understanding of newborn pharmacokinetics, an appreciation of the substantial delay and variability in the rate of drug delivery from the intravenous line is often lacking. This can lead to difficulties in accurately determining the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship of drugs in the smallest patients. The physical variables that affect the passage of drugs through neonatal lines need to be further explored in order to improve our understanding of their impact on the delivery of drugs by this route in neonates. Through careful investigation, the underlying causes of delayed drug delivery may be identified and administration protocols can then be modified to ensure predictable, appropriate drug input kinetics.

  11. Conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles improves ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Aimee; Vega, Estefania; Pérez, Yolanda; Gómara, María J; García, María Luisa; Haro, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a peptide for ocular delivery (POD) and human immunodeficiency virus transactivator were conjugated with biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PGLA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-nanoparticles (NPs) in an attempt to improve ocular drug bioavailability. The NPs were prepared by the solvent displacement method following two different pathways. One involved preparation of PLGA NPs followed by PEG and peptide conjugation (PLGA-NPs-PEG-peptide); the other involved self-assembly of PLGA-PEG and the PLGA-PEG-peptide copolymer followed by NP formulation. The conjugation of the PEG and the peptide was confirmed by a colorimetric test and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Flurbiprofen was used as an example of an anti-inflammatory drug. The physicochemical properties of the resulting NPs (morphology, in vitro release, cell viability, and ocular tolerance) were studied. In vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was assessed in rabbit eyes after topical instillation of sodium arachidonate. Of the formulations developed, the PLGA-PEG-POD NPs were the smaller particles and exhibited greater entrapment efficiency and more sustained release. The positive charge on the surface of these NPs, due to the conjugation with the positively charged peptide, facilitated penetration into the corneal epithelium, resulting in more effective prevention of ocular inflammation. The in vitro toxicity of the NPs developed was very low; no ocular irritation in vitro (hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane assay) or in vivo (Draize test) was detected. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PLGA-PEG-POD NPs are promising vehicles for ocular drug delivery.

  12. Conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles improves ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Aimee; Vega, Estefania; Pérez, Yolanda; Gómara, María J; García, María Luisa; Haro, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a peptide for ocular delivery (POD) and human immunodeficiency virus transactivator were conjugated with biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PGLA)–polyethylene glycol (PEG)-nanoparticles (NPs) in an attempt to improve ocular drug bioavailability. The NPs were prepared by the solvent displacement method following two different pathways. One involved preparation of PLGA NPs followed by PEG and peptide conjugation (PLGA-NPs-PEG-peptide); the other involved self-assembly of PLGA-PEG and the PLGA-PEG-peptide copolymer followed by NP formulation. The conjugation of the PEG and the peptide was confirmed by a colorimetric test and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Flurbiprofen was used as an example of an anti-inflammatory drug. The physicochemical properties of the resulting NPs (morphology, in vitro release, cell viability, and ocular tolerance) were studied. In vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was assessed in rabbit eyes after topical instillation of sodium arachidonate. Of the formulations developed, the PLGA-PEG-POD NPs were the smaller particles and exhibited greater entrapment efficiency and more sustained release. The positive charge on the surface of these NPs, due to the conjugation with the positively charged peptide, facilitated penetration into the corneal epithelium, resulting in more effective prevention of ocular inflammation. The in vitro toxicity of the NPs developed was very low; no ocular irritation in vitro (hen’s egg test–chorioallantoic membrane assay) or in vivo (Draize test) was detected. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PLGA-PEG-POD NPs are promising vehicles for ocular drug delivery. PMID:25670897

  13. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including Elastin-like peptides for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics,Heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery,Carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery,Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates. Coacervates present advantages in their simple assembly and easy incorporation into tissue engineering scaffolds or as adjuncts to cell therapies. They are also amenable to functionalization such as for targeting or for enhancing the bioactivity of their cargo. These new drug carriers are anticipated to have broad applications and noteworthy impact in the near future. PMID:25138695

  14. Porous calcium phosphate-poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid composite bone cement: A viable tunable drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Roy, Abhijit; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Bayer, Emily; Fedorchak, Morgan; Little, Steve R; Kumta, Prashant N

    2016-02-01

    Calcium phosphate based cements (CPCs) are frequently used as bone void fillers for non-load bearing segmental bone defects due to their clinically relevant handling characteristics and ability to promote natural bone growth. Macroporous CPC scaffolds with interconnected pores are preferred for their ability to degrade faster and enable accelerated bone regeneration. Herein, a composite CPC scaffold is developed using newly developed resorbable calcium phosphate cement (ReCaPP) formulation containing degradable microspheres of bio-compatible poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) serving as porogen. The present study is aimed at characterizing the effect of in-vitro degradation of PLGA microspheres on the physical, chemical and structural characteristics of the composite cements. The porosity measurements results reveal the formation of highly interconnected macroporous scaffolds after degradation of PLGA microspheres. The in-vitro characterizations also suggest that the degradation by products of PLGA reduces the pH of the local environment thereby increasing the dissolution rate of the cement. In addition, the in-vitro vancomycin release from the composite CPC scaffold suggests that the drug association with the composite scaffolds can be tuned to achieve control release kinetics. Further, the study demonstrates control release lasting for longer than 10weeks from the composite cements in which vancomycin is encapsulated in PLGA microspheres.

  15. Nanomedicine and drug delivery: a mini review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Agha Zeeshan; Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed

    2014-02-01

    The field of nanotechnology now has pivotal roles in electronics, biology and medicine. Its application can be appraised, as it involves the materials to be designed at atomic and molecular level. Due to the advantage of their size, nanospheres have been shown to be robust drug delivery systems and may be useful for encapsulating drugs and enabling more precise targeting with a controlled release. In this review specifically, we highlight the recent advances of this technology for medicine and drug delivery systems.

  16. Carbon nanotubes: a potential concept for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Dhanawat, Meenakshi; Kumar, Sudhir; Singh, Brahma N; Pandit, Jayant K; Sinha, Vivek R

    2014-04-01

    The unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them a highly interesting and demandable nanocarrier in the field of nanoscience. CNTs facilitate efficient delivery of therapeutics like drugs, proteins, genes, nucleic acids, vitamins and lot more. Even though highly beneficial, the biocompatibility of CNTs is a major issue in their questioning their potential application in targeting drug delivery. Studies confirmed subdued toxicity of CNTs following slight modifications like functionalization, controlled dimensions, purification etc. A well-established mechanism for cellular internalization is an insistent need to attain a more efficient and targeted delivery. Recent patents have been thoroughly discussed in the text below.

  17. Smart Polymers in Nasal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chonkar, Ankita; Nayak, Usha; Udupa, N.

    2015-01-01

    Nasal drug delivery has now been recognized as a promising route for drug delivery due to its capability of transporting a drug to systemic circulation and central nervous system. Though nasal mucosa offers improved bioavailability and quick onset of action of the drug, main disadvantage associated with nasal drug delivery is mucocilliary clearance due to which drug particles get cleared from the nose before complete absorption through nasal mucosa. Therefore, mucoadhesive polymeric approach can be successfully used to enhance the retention of the drug on nasal mucosal surface. Here, some of the aspects of the stimuli responsive polymers have been discussed which possess liquid state at the room temperature and in response to nasal temperature, pH and ions present in mucous, can undergo in situ gelation in nasal cavity. In this review, several temperature responsive, pH responsive and ion responsive polymers used in nasal delivery, their gelling mechanisms have been discussed. Smart polymers not only able to enhance the retention of the drug in nasal cavity but also provide controlled release, ease of administration, enhanced permeation of the drug and protection of the drug from mucosal enzymes. Thus smart polymeric approach can be effectively used for nasal delivery of peptide drugs, central nervous system dugs and hormones. PMID:26664051

  18. Ethosomes® and transfersomes® containing linoleic acid: physicochemical and technological features of topical drug delivery carriers for the potential treatment of melasma disorders.

    PubMed

    Celia, Christian; Cilurzo, Felisa; Trapasso, Elena; Cosco, Donato; Fresta, Massimo; Paolino, Donatella

    2012-02-01

    Two vesicular colloidal carriers, ethosomes® and transfersomes® were proposed for the topical delivery of linoleic acid, an active compound used in the therapeutic treatment of hyperpigmentation disorders, i.e. melasma, which is characterized by an increase of the melanin production in the epidermis. Dynamic light scattering was used for the physicochemical characterization of vesicles and mean size, size distribution and zeta potential were evaluated. The stability of formulations was also evaluated using the Turbiscan Lab® Expert based on the analysis of sample transmittance and photon backscattering. Ethosomes® and transfersomes® were prepared using Phospholipon 100 G®, as the lecithin component, and ethanol and sodium cholate, as edge activator agents, respectively. Linoleic acid at 0.05% and 0.1% (w/v) was used as the active ingredient and entrapped in colloidal vesicles. Technological parameters, i.e. entrapment efficacy, drug release and permeation profiles, were also investigated. Experimental findings showed that physicochemical and technological features of ethosomes® and transfersomes® were influenced by the lipid composition of the carriers. The percutaneous permeation experiments of linoleic acid-loaded ethosomes® and transfersomes® through human stratum corneum-epidermidis membranes showed that both carriers are accumulated in the skin membrane model as a function of their lipid compositions. The findings reported in this investigation showed that both vesicular carriers could represent a potential system for the topical treatment of hyperpigmentation disorders.

  19. Thiolated polymers as mucoadhesive drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sarah; Cummins, Wayne; O' Donovan, Orla; Hughes, Helen; Owens, Eleanor

    2017-03-30

    Mucoadhesion is the process of binding a material to the mucosal layer of the body. Utilising both natural and synthetic polymers, mucoadhesive drug delivery is a method of controlled drug release which allows for intimate contact between the polymer and a target tissue. It has the potential to increase bioavailability, decrease potential side effects and offer protection to more sensitive drugs such as proteins and peptide based drugs. The thiolation of polymers has, in the last number of years, come to the fore of mucoadhesive drug delivery, markedly improving mucoadhesion due to the introduction of free thiol groups onto the polymer backbone while also offering a more cohesive polymeric matrix for the slower and more controlled release of drug. This review explores the concept of mucoadhesion and the recent advances in both the polymers and the methods of thiolation used in the synthesis of mucoadhesive drug delivery devices.

  20. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Abuhanoğlu, Gürhan; Ozer, A Yekta

    2014-06-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (γ) and beta (β) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by γ irradiation.

  1. Perspectives on transdermal ultrasound mediated drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2007-01-01

    The use of needles for multiple injection of drugs, such as insulin for diabetes, can be painful. As a result, prescribed drug noncompliance can result in severe medical complications. Several noninvasive methods exist for transdermal drug delivery. These include chemical mediation using liposomes and chemical enhancers or physical mechanisms such as microneedles, iontophoresis, electroporation, and ultrasound. Ultrasound enhanced transdermal drug delivery offers advantages over traditional drug delivery methods which are often invasive and painful. A broad review of the transdermal ultrasound drug delivery literature has shown that this technology offers promising potential for noninvasive drug administration. From a clinical perspective, few drugs, proteins or peptides have been successfully administered transdermally because of the low skin permeability to these relatively large molecules, although much work is underway to resolve this problem. The proposed mechanism of ultrasound has been suggested to be the result of cavitation, which is discussed along with the bioeffects from therapeutic ultrasound. For low frequencies, potential transducers which can be used for drug delivery are discussed, along with cautions regarding ultrasound safety versus efficacy. PMID:18203426

  2. Recent advances in ophthalmic drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kompella, Uday B; Kadam, Rajendra S; Lee, Vincent HL

    2011-01-01

    Topical ocular drug bioavailability is notoriously poor, in the order of 5% or less. This is a consequence of effective multiple barriers to drug entry, comprising nasolacrimal drainage, epithelial drug transport barriers and clearance from the vasculature in the conjunctiva. While sustained drug delivery to the back of the eye is now feasible with intravitreal implants such as Vitrasert™ (~6 months), Retisert™ (~3 years) and Iluvien™ (~3 years), currently there are no marketed delivery systems for long-term drug delivery to the anterior segment of the eye. The purpose of this article is to summarize the resurgence in interest to prolong and improve drug entry from topical administration. These approaches include mucoadhesives, viscous polymer vehicles, transporter-targeted prodrug design, receptor-targeted functionalized nanoparticles, iontophoresis, punctal plug and contact lens delivery systems. A few of these delivery systems might be useful in treating diseases affecting the back of the eye. Their effectiveness will be compared against intravitreal implants (upper bound of effectiveness) and trans-scleral systems (lower bound of effectiveness). Refining the animal model by incorporating the latest advances in microdialysis and imaging technology is key to expanding the knowledge central to the design, testing and evaluation of the next generation of innovative ocular drug delivery systems. PMID:21399724

  3. Chitosan Microspheres in Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Analava; Dey, Baishakhi

    2011-01-01

    The main aim in the drug therapy of any disease is to attain the desired therapeutic concentration of the drug in plasma or at the site of action and maintain it for the entire duration of treatment. A drug on being used in conventional dosage forms leads to unavoidable fluctuations in the drug concentration leading to under medication or overmedication and increased frequency of dose administration as well as poor patient compliance. To minimize drug degradation and loss, to prevent harmful side effects and to increase drug bioavailability various drug delivery and drug targeting systems are currently under development. Handling the treatment of severe disease conditions has necessitated the development of innovative ideas to modify drug delivery techniques. Drug targeting means delivery of the drug-loaded system to the site of interest. Drug carrier systems include polymers, micelles, microcapsules, liposomes and lipoproteins to name some. Different polymer carriers exert different effects on drug delivery. Synthetic polymers are usually non-biocompatible, non-biodegradable and expensive. Natural polymers such as chitin and chitosan are devoid of such problems. Chitosan comes from the deacetylation of chitin, a natural biopolymer originating from crustacean shells. Chitosan is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic natural polymer with excellent film-forming ability. Being of cationic character, chitosan is able to react with polyanions giving rise to polyelectrolyte complexes. Hence chitosan has become a promising natural polymer for the preparation of microspheres/nanospheres and microcapsules. The techniques employed to microencapsulate with chitosan include ionotropic gelation, spray drying, emulsion phase separation, simple and complex coacervation. This review focuses on the preparation, characterization of chitosan microspheres and their role in novel drug delivery systems. PMID:22707817

  4. Vesicular carriers for dermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Chiara; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2009-08-01

    The skin can offer several advantages as a route of drug administration although its barrier nature makes it difficult for most drugs to penetrate into and permeate through it. During the past decades there has been a lot of interest in lipid vesicles as a tool to improve drug topical delivery. Vesicular systems such as liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes and elastic, deformable vesicles provide an alternative for improved skin drug delivery. The function of vesicles as topical delivery systems is controversial with variable effects being reported in relation to the type of vesicles and their composition. In fact, vesicles can act as drug carriers controlling active release; they can provide a localized depot in the skin for dermally active compounds and enhance transdermal drug delivery. A wide variety of lipids and surfactants can be used to prepare vesicles, which are commonly composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or non-ionic surfactants (niosomes). Vesicle composition and preparation method influence their physicochemical properties (size, charge, lamellarity, thermodynamic state, deformability) and therefore their efficacy as drug delivery systems. A review of vesicle value in localizing drugs within the skin at the site of action will be provided with emphasis on their potential mechanism of action.

  5. Colloidal polymeric nanoparticles and brain drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Najeh Maissar; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara

    2009-07-01

    The blood brain barrier protects the brain from harmful substances in the blood stream and has stopped the development of many powerful and interesting drugs candidates for central nervous system due to the low poor distribution and by efflux mechanisms. Many different approaches have been developed in order to overcome this barrier and the drug gain access to the brain. The polymeric nanoparticles are efficient colloidal systems that have been investigated to the brain drug delivery. This review will focus on the current strategies for brain drug delivery emphasizing the properties and characteristics of polymeric nanoparticles for this purpose.

  6. Magnetic nanoparticle-based drug delivery for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Rainer; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Lyer, Stefan; Friedrich, Ralf P; Janko, Christina; Pöttler, Marina; Dürr, Stephan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-12-18

    Nanoparticles have belonged to various fields of biomedical research for quite some time. A promising site-directed application in the field of nanomedicine is drug targeting using magnetic nanoparticles which are directed at the target tissue by means of an external magnetic field. Materials most commonly used for magnetic drug delivery contain metal or metal oxide nanoparticles, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). SPIONs consist of an iron oxide core, often coated with organic materials such as fatty acids, polysaccharides or polymers to improve colloidal stability and to prevent separation into particles and carrier medium [1]. In general, magnetite and maghemite particles are those most commonly used in medicine and are, as a rule, well-tolerated. The magnetic properties of SPIONs allow the remote control of their accumulation by means of an external magnetic field. Conjugation of SPIONs with drugs, in combination with an external magnetic field to target the nanoparticles (so-called "magnetic drug targeting", MDT), has additionally emerged as a promising strategy of drug delivery. Magnetic nanoparticle-based drug delivery is a sophisticated overall concept and a multitude of magnetic delivery vehicles have been developed. Targeting mechanism-exploiting, tumor-specific attributes are becoming more and more sophisticated. The same is true for controlled-release strategies for the diseased site. As it is nearly impossible to record every magnetic nanoparticle system developed so far, this review summarizes interesting approaches which have recently emerged in the field of targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy based on magnetic nanoparticles.

  7. Nuclear drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sui, Meihua; Liu, Wenwen; Shen, Youqing

    2011-10-30

    Nanosystems with unique physical and biological properties have been extensively explored for cancer targeted intracellular delivery of small-molecular chemotherapeutic drugs to increase their therapeutic efficacies and to minimize their side effects. A large number of anticancer drugs are DNA-toxins that bind nuclear DNA or its associated enzymes to exert their cytotoxicity to cancer cells. After entering tumor cells, they need to be further delivered to the nucleus for actions. Herein, we discuss the biological barriers and summarize recent progress of nuclear drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy, emphasizing strategies that appear useful for design of vehicles capable of delivering drugs to the nucleus, particularly for in vivo applications. The existing obstacles or problems that need to be overcome before successful applications of nuclear drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy are also discussed.

  8. Molecular imprinted polymers as drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Shabi Abbas

    2016-09-01

    This review is aimed to discuss the molecular imprinted polymer (MIP)-based drug delivery systems (DDS). Molecular imprinted polymers have proved to possess the potential and also as a suitable material in several areas over a long period of time. However, only recently it has been employed for pharmaceuticals and biomedical applications, particularly as drug delivery vehicles due to properties including selective recognition generated from imprinting the desired analyte, favorable in harsh experimental conditions, and feedback-controlled recognitive drug release. Hence, this review will discuss their synthesis, the reason they are selected as drug delivery vehicles and for their applications in several drug administration routes (i.e. transdermal, ocular and gastrointestinal or stimuli-reactive routes).

  9. Preparation, Characterization, and Optimization of Folic Acid-Chitosan-Methotrexate Core-Shell Nanoparticles by Box-Behnken Design for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Naghibi Beidokhti, Hamid Reza; Ghaffarzadegan, Reza; Mirzakhanlouei, Sasan; Ghazizadeh, Leila; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the combined influence of independent variables in the preparation of folic acid-chitosan-methotrexate nanoparticles (FA-Chi-MTX NPs). These NPs were designed and prepared for targeted drug delivery in tumor. The NPs of each batch were prepared by coaxial electrospray atomization method and evaluated for particle size (PS) and particle size distribution (PSD). The independent variables were selected to be concentration of FA-chitosan, ratio of shell solution flow rate to core solution flow rate, and applied voltage. The process design of experiments (DOE) was obtained with three factors in three levels by Design expert software. Box-Behnken design was used to select 15 batches of experiments randomly. The chemical structure of FA-chitosan was examined by FTIR. The NPs of each batch were collected separately, and morphologies of NPs were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The captured pictures of all batches were analyzed by ImageJ software. Mean PS and PSD were calculated for each batch. Polynomial equation was produced for each response. The FE-SEM results showed the mean diameter of the core-shell NPs was around 304 nm, and nearly 30% of the produced NPs are in the desirable range. Optimum formulations were selected. The validation of DOE optimization results showed errors around 2.5 and 2.3% for PS and PSD, respectively. Moreover, the feasibility of using prepared NPs to target tumor extracellular pH was shown, as drug release was greater in the pH of endosome (acidic medium). Finally, our results proved that FA-Chi-MTX NPs were active against the human epithelial cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide mediated transvaginal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fatakdawala, Hussain; Uhland, Scott A

    2011-05-16

    Simple, safe and effective permeability enhancers are crucial for successful non-invasive drug delivery methods. We seek local permeability augmentation mechanisms for integration into passive or active architectures in order to enable novel therapeutic delivery routes of the target drug while minimizing drug formulation challenges. This study explores the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide (HP) as a permeability enhancer for transmucosal delivery of macromolecules. HP at low concentrations (2–8 mM) is an effective permeability enhancer that is locally metabolized and safe. HP improves drug permeation through mucosa by altering tight junctions (TJ) between cells and oxidizing enzymes that function to degrade the foreign species. Results from trans-epithelial electrical resistance measurements and cell viability assay show reversible disassembly of TJ with minimal cell damage demonstrating the feasibility of HP as a safe permeability enhancer for drug delivery. Permeation studies show that HP treatment of cell cultured vaginal mucosa significantly enhances the permeability to insulin by more than an order of magnitude. This work lays foundation for the development of a drug delivery platform that administers drug doses by enhancing the permeability of local epithelial tissue via a separate HP treatment step.

  11. Progress in antiretroviral drug delivery using nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mallipeddi, Rama; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2010-01-01

    There are currently a number of antiretroviral drugs that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). More recently, antiretrovirals are being evaluated in the clinic for prevention of HIV infection. Due to the challenging nature of treatment and prevention of this disease, the use of nanocarriers to achieve more efficient delivery of antiretroviral drugs has been studied. Various forms of nanocarriers, such as nanoparticles (polymeric, inorganic, and solid lipid), liposomes, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, cyclodextrins, and cell-based nanoformulations have been studied for delivery of drugs intended for HIV prevention or therapy. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the application of nanocarrier systems to the delivery of anti-HIV drugs, specifically antiretrovirals. For anti-HIV drugs to be effective, adequate distribution to specific sites in the body must be achieved, and effective drug concentrations must be maintained at those sites for the required period of time. Nanocarriers provide a means to overcome cellular and anatomical barriers to drug delivery. Their application in the area of HIV prevention and therapy may lead to the development of more effective drug products for combating this pandemic disease. PMID:20957115

  12. Microneedles for drug and vaccine delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Microneedles were first conceptualized for drug delivery many decades ago, but only became the subject of significant research starting in the mid-1990’s when microfabrication technology enabled their manufacture as (i) solid microneedles for skin pretreatment to increase skin permeability, (ii) microneedles coated with drug that dissolves off in the skin, (iii) polymer microneedles that encapsulate drug and fully dissolve in the skin and (iv) hollow microneedles for drug infusion into the skin. As shown in more than 350 papers now published in the field, microneedles have been used to deliver a broad range of different low molecular weight drugs, biotherapeutics and vaccines, including published human studies with a number of small-molecule and protein drugs and vaccines. Influenza vaccination using a hollow microneedle is in widespread clinical use and a number of solid microneedle products are sold for cosmetic purposes. In addition to applications in the skin, microneedles have also been adapted for delivery of bioactives into the eye and into cells. Successful application of microneedles depends on device function that facilitates microneedle insertion and possible infusion into skin, skin recovery after microneedle removal, and drug stability during manufacturing, storage and delivery, and on patient outcomes, including lack of pain, skin irritation and skin infection, in addition to drug efficacy and safety. Building off a strong technology base and multiple demonstrations of successful drug delivery, microneedles are poised to advance further into clinical practice to enable better pharmaceutical therapies, vaccination and other applications. PMID:22575858

  13. Designing hydrogels for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianyu; Mooney, David J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogel delivery systems can leverage therapeutically beneficial outcomes of drug delivery and have found clinical use. Hydrogels can provide spatial and temporal control over the release of various therapeutic agents, including small-molecule drugs, macromolecular drugs and cells. Owing to their tunable physical properties, controllable degradability and capability to protect labile drugs from degradation, hydrogels serve as a platform on which various physiochemical interactions with the encapsulated drugs occur to control drug release. In this Review, we cover multiscale mechanisms underlying the design of hydrogel drug delivery systems, focusing on physical and chemical properties of the hydrogel network and the hydrogel-drug interactions across the network, mesh and molecular (or atomistic) scales. We discuss how different mechanisms interact and can be integrated to exert fine control in time and space over drug presentation. We also collect experimental release data from the literature, review clinical translation to date of these systems and present quantitative comparisons between different systems to provide guidelines for the rational design of hydrogel delivery systems.

  14. Transpapillary Drug Delivery to the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Kaushalkumar; Averineni, Ranjith; Sahdev, Preety; Perumal, Omathanu

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating localized topical drug delivery to the breast via mammary papilla (nipple). 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and estradiol (EST) were used as model hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds respectively. Porcine and human nipple were used for in-vitro penetration studies. The removal of keratin plug enhanced the drug transport through the nipple. The drug penetration was significantly higher through the nipple compared to breast skin. The drug’s lipophilicity had a significant influence on drug penetration through nipple. The ducts in the nipple served as a major transport pathway to the underlying breast tissue. Results showed that porcine nipple could be a potential model for human nipple. The topical application of 5-FU on the rat nipple resulted in high drug concentration in the breast and minimal drug levels in plasma and other organs. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate the feasibility of localized drug delivery to the breast through nipple. PMID:25545150

  15. Intelligent, self-powered, drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Patra, Debabrata; Sengupta, Samudra; Duan, Wentao; Zhang, Hua; Pavlick, Ryan; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-02-21

    Self-propelled nano/micromotors and pumps are considered to be next generation drug delivery systems since the carriers can either propel themselves ("motor"-based drug delivery) or be delivered ("pump"-based drug delivery) to the target in response to specific biomarkers. Recently, there has been significant advancement towards developing nano/microtransporters into proof-of-concept tools for biomedical applications. This review encompasses the progress made to date on the design of synthetic nano/micromotors and pumps with respect to transportation and delivery of cargo at specific locations. Looking ahead, it is possible to imagine a day when intelligent machines navigate through the human body and perform challenging tasks.

  16. Novel biodegradable nanocarriers for enhanced drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina

    2016-12-01

    With the refinement of functional properties, the interest around biodegradable materials, in biorelated applications and, in particular, in their use as controlled drug-delivery systems, increased in the last decades. Biodegradable materials are an ideal platform to obtain nanoparticles for spatiotemporal controlled drug delivery for the in vivo administration, thanks to their biocompatibility, functionalizability, the control exerted on delivery rates and the complete degradation. Their application in systems for cancer treatment, brain and cardiovascular diseases is already a consolidated practice in research, while the bench-to-bedside translation is still late. This review aims at summarizing reported applications of biodegradable materials to obtain drug-delivery nanoparticles in the last few years, giving a complete overview of pros and cons related to degradable nanomedicaments.

  17. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  18. Electroresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devleena; Hosseini-Nassab, Niloufar; Zare, Richard N.

    2016-04-01

    The potential of electroresponsive conducting polymer nanoparticles to be used as general drug delivery systems that allow electrically pulsed, linearly scalable, and on demand release of incorporated drugs is demonstrated. As examples, facile release from polypyrrole nanoparticles is shown for fluorescein, a highly water-soluble model compound, piroxicam, a lipophilic small molecule drug, and insulin, a large hydrophilic peptide hormone. The drug loading is about 13 wt% and release is accomplished in a few seconds by applying a weak constant current or voltage. To identify the parameters that should be finely tuned to tailor the carrier system for the release of the therapeutic molecule of interest, a systematic study of the factors that affect drug delivery is performed, using fluorescein as a model compound. The parameters studied include current, time, voltage, pH, temperature, particle concentration, and ionic strength. Results indicate that there are several degrees of freedom that can be optimized for efficient drug delivery. The ability to modulate linearly drug release from conducting polymers with the applied stimulus can be utilized to design programmable and minimally invasive drug delivery devices.

  19. Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Hina; Bala, Rajni; Arora, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    The principle objective of formulation of lipid-based drugs is to enhance their bioavailability. The use of lipids in drug delivery is no more a new trend now but is still the promising concept. Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) are one of the emerging technologies designed to address challenges like the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipid-based formulations can be tailored to meet a wide range of product requirements dictated by disease indication, route of administration, cost consideration, product stability, toxicity, and efficacy. These formulations are also a commercially viable strategy to formulate pharmaceuticals, for topical, oral, pulmonary, or parenteral delivery. In addition, lipid-based formulations have been shown to reduce the toxicity of various drugs by changing the biodistribution of the drug away from sensitive organs. However, the number of applications for lipid-based formulations has expanded as the nature and type of active drugs under investigation have become more varied. This paper mainly focuses on novel lipid-based formulations, namely, emulsions, vesicular systems, and lipid particulate systems and their subcategories as well as on their prominent applications in pharmaceutical drug delivery. PMID:26556202

  20. A pulsed mode electrolytic drug delivery device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ying; Buttner, Ulrich; Carreno, Armando A. A.; Conchouso, David; Foulds, Ian G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the design of a proof-of-concept drug delivery device that is actuated using the bubbles formed during electrolysis. The device uses a platinum (Pt) coated nickel (Ni) metal foam and a solid drug in reservoir (SDR) approach to improve the device’s performance. This electrochemically-driven pump has many features that are unlike conventional drug delivery devices: it is capable of pumping periodically and being refilled automatically; it features drug release control; and it enables targeted delivery. Pt-coated metal foam is used as a catalytic reforming element, which reduces the period of each delivery cycle. Two methods were used for fabricating the Pt-coated metal: sputtering and electroplating. Of these two methods, the sputtered Pt-coated metal foam has a higher pumping rate; it also has a comparable recombination rate when compared to the electroplated Pt-coated metal foam. The only drawback of this catalytic reformer is that it consumes nickel scaffold. Considering long-term applications, the electroplated Pt metal foam was selected for drug delivery, where a controlled drug release rate of 2.2 μg  ±  0.3 μg per actuation pulse was achieved using 4 mW of power.

  1. Microfabrication Technologies for Oral Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Shilpa; Tao, Sarah L.; Fisher, Omar; Xu, Qiaobing; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Micro-/nanoscale technologies such as lithographic techniques and microfluidics offer promising avenues to revolutionalize the fields of tissue engineering, drug discovery, diagnostics and personalized medicine. Microfabrication techniques are being explored for drug delivery applications due to their ability to combine several features such as precise shape and size into a single drug delivery vehicle. They also offer to create unique asymmetrical features incorporated into single or multiple reservoir systems maximizing contact area with the intestinal lining. Combined with intelligent materials, such microfabricated platforms can be designed to be bioadhesive and stimuli-responsive. Apart from drug delivery devices, microfabrication technologies offer exciting opportunities to create biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models incorporating physiological cell types, flow patterns and brush-border like structures. Here we review the recent developments in this field with a focus on the applications of microfabrication in the development of oral drug delivery devices and biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models that can be used to evaluate the drug delivery efficacy. PMID:22166590

  2. Nanotech approaches to drug delivery and imaging.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sanjeeb K; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2003-12-15

    Nanotechnology, a multidisciplinary scientific undertaking, involves creation and utilization of materials, devices or systems on the nanometer scale. The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to create innovations and play a critical role in various biomedical applications, not only in drug delivery, but also in molecular imaging, biomarkers and biosensors. Target-specific drug therapy and methods for early diagnosis of pathologies are the priority research areas where nanotechnology would play a vital role. This review considers different nanotechnology-based drug delivery and imaging approaches, and their economic impact on pharmaceutical and biomedical industries.

  3. Hydrazone linkages in pH responsive drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Sandeep J; Kalhapure, Rahul S; Govender, Thirumala

    2017-03-01

    Stimuli-responsive polymeric drug delivery systems using various triggers to release the drug at the sites have become a major focus area. Among various stimuli-responsive materials, pH-responsiveness has been studied extensively. The materials used for fabricating pH-responsive drug delivery systems include a specific chemical functionality in their structure that can respond to changes in the pH of the surrounding environment. Various chemical functionalities, for example, acetal, amine, ortho ester, amine and hydrazone, have been used to design materials that are capable of releasing their payload at the acidic pH conditions of the tumor or infection sites. Hydrazone linkages are significant synthons for numerous transformations and have gained importance in pharmaceutical sciences due to their various biological and clinical applications. These linkages have been employed in various drug delivery vehicles, such as linear polymers, star shaped polymers, dendrimers, micelles, liposomes and inorganic nanoparticles, for pH-responsive drug delivery. This review paper focuses on the synthesis and characterization methods of hydrazone bond containing materials and their applications in pH-responsive drug delivery systems. It provides detailed suggestions as guidelines to materials and formulation scientists for designing biocompatible pH-responsive materials with hydrazone linkages and identifying future studies.

  4. Liposome-like Nanostructures for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Zhang, Liangfang

    2013-01-01

    Liposomes are a class of well-established drug carriers that have found numerous therapeutic applications. The success of liposomes, together with recent advancements in nanotechnology, has motivated the development of various novel liposome-like nanostructures with improved drug delivery performance. These nanostructures can be categorized into five major varieties, namely: (1) polymer-stabilized liposomes, (2) nanoparticle-stabilized liposomes, (3) core-shell lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, (4) natural membrane-derived vesicles, and (5) natural membrane coated nanoparticles. They have received significant attention and have become popular drug delivery platforms. Herein, we discuss the unique strengths of these liposome-like platforms in drug delivery, with a particular emphasis on how liposome-inspired novel designs have led to improved therapeutic efficacy, and review recent progress made by each platform in advancing healthcare. PMID:24392221

  5. Brain drug delivery systems for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2012-09-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (NDs) are rapidly increasing as population ages. However, successful treatments for NDs have so far been limited and drug delivery to the brain remains one of the major challenges to overcome. There has recently been growing interest in the development of drug delivery systems (DDS) for local or systemic brain administration. DDS are able to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and reduce their side effects. The present review provides a concise overview of the recent advances made in the field of brain drug delivery for treating neurodegenerative disorders. Examples include polymeric micro and nanoparticles, lipidic nanoparticles, pegylated liposomes, microemulsions and nanogels that have been tested in experimental models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Overall, the results reviewed here show that DDS have great potential for NDs treatment.

  6. Characterization of particulate drug delivery systems for oral delivery of Peptide and protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Fano, Mathias; Saaby, Lasse; Yang, Mingshi; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Mu, Huiling

    2015-01-01

    Oral drug delivery is a preferred route because of good patient compliance. However, most peptide/ protein drugs are delivered via parenteral routes because of the absorption barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as enzymatic degradation by proteases and low permeability acrossthe biological membranes. To overcome these barriers, different formulation strategies for oral delivery of biomacromolecules have been proposed, including lipid based formulations and polymer-based particulate drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge about oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs and to provide an overview of formulationand characterization strategies. For a better understanding of the challenges in oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs, the composition of GI fluids and the digestion processes of different kinds of excipients in the GI tract are summarized. Additionally, the paper provides an overview of recent studies on characterization of solid drug carriers for peptide/protein drugs, drug distribution in particles, drug release and stability in simulated GI fluids, as well as the absorption of peptide/protein drugs in cell-based models. The use of biorelevant media when applicable can increase the knowledge about the quality of DDS for oral protein delivery. Hopefully, the knowledge provided in this review will aid the establishment of improved biorelevant models capable of forecasting the performance of particulate DDS for oral peptide/protein delivery.

  7. Emulsion forming drug delivery system for lipophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Jyoti; Nair, Anroop; Kumria, Rachna

    2012-01-01

    In the recent years, there is a growing interest in the lipid-based formulations for delivery of lipophilic drugs. Due to their potential as therapeutic agents, preferably these lipid soluble drugs are incorporated into inert lipid carriers such as oils, surfactant dispersions, emulsions, liposomes etc. Among them, emulsion forming drug delivery systems appear to be a unique and industrially feasible approach to overcome the problem of low oral bioavailability associated with the BCS class II drugs. Self-emulsifying formulations are ideally isotropic mixtures of oils, surfactants and co-solvents that emulsify to form fine oil in water emulsions when introduced in aqueous media. Fine oil droplets would pass rapidly from stomach and promote wide distribution of drug throughout the GI tract, thereby overcome the slow dissolution step typically observed with solid dosage forms. Recent advances in drug carrier technologies have promulgated the development of novel drug carriers such as control release self-emulsifying pellets, microspheres, tablets, capsules etc. that have boosted the use of "self-emulsification" in drug delivery. This article reviews the different types of formulations and excipients used in emulsion forming drug delivery system to enhance the bioavailability of lipophilic drugs.

  8. Nanoparticles of alkylglyceryl-dextran-graft-poly(lactic acid) for drug delivery to the brain: Preparation and in vitro investigation.

    PubMed

    Toman, Petr; Lien, Chun-Fu; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Dietrich, Susanne; Smith, James R; An, Qian; Molnár, Éva; Pilkington, Geoffrey J; Górecki, Darek C; Tsibouklis, John; Barbu, Eugen

    2015-09-01

    Poly(lactic acid), which has an inherent tendency to form colloidal systems of low polydispersity, and alkylglyceryl-modified dextran - a material designed to combine the non-immunogenic and stabilising properties of dextran with the demonstrated permeation enhancing ability of alkylglycerols - have been combined for the development of nanoparticulate, blood-brain barrier-permeating, non-viral vectors. To this end, dextran, that had been functionalised via treatment with epoxide precursors of alkylglycerol, was covalently linked to poly(lactic acid) using a carbodiimide cross-linker to form alkylglyceryl-modified dextran-graft-poly(lactic acid). Solvent displacement and electrospray methods allowed the formulation of these materials into nanoparticles having a unimodal size distribution profile of about 100-200nm and good stability at physiologically relevant pH (7.4). The nanoparticles were characterised in terms of hydrodynamic size (by Dynamic Light Scattering and Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis), morphology (by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy) and zeta potential, and their toxicity was evaluated using MTT and PrestoBlue assays. Cellular uptake was evidenced by confocal microscopy employing nanoparticles that had been loaded with the easy-to-detect Rhodamine B fluorescent marker. Transwell-model experiments employing mouse (bEnd3) and human (hCMEC/D3) brain endothelial cells revealed enhanced permeation (statistically significant for hCMEC/D3) of the fluorescent markers in the presence of the nanoparticles. Results of studies using Electric Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing suggested a transient decrease of the barrier function in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model following incubation with these nanoformulations. An in ovo study using 3-day chicken embryos indicated the absence of whole-organism acute toxicity effects. The collective in vitro data suggest that these alkylglyceryl-modified dextran-graft-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles

  9. Drug delivery systems for brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Rautioa, Jarkko; Chikhale, Prashant J

    2004-01-01

    Brain tumors are one of the most lethal forms of cancer. They are extremely difficult to treat. Although, the rate of brain tumor incidence is relatively low, the field clearly lacks therapeutic strategies capable of overcoming barriers for effective delivery of drugs to brain tumors. Clinical failure of many potentially effective therapeutics for the treatment of brain tumors is usually not due to a lack of drug potency, but rather can be attributed to shortcomings in the methods by which a drug is delivered to the brain and into brain tumors. In response to the lack of efficacy of conventional drug delivery methods, extensive efforts have been made to develop novel strategies to overcome the obstacles for brain tumor drug delivery. The challenge is to design therapeutic strategies that deliver drugs to brain tumors in a safe and effective manner. This review provides some insight into several potential techniques that have been developed to improve drug delivery to brain tumors, and it should be helpful to clinicians and research scientists as well.

  10. Silicon-polymer hybrid materials for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Steven J P; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2009-09-01

    Silicon and its oxides are widely used in biomaterials research, tissue engineering and drug delivery. These materials are highly biocompatible, easily surface functionalized, degrade into nontoxic silicic acid and can be processed into various forms such as micro- and nano-particles, monoliths, membranes and micromachined structures. The large surface area of porous forms of silicon and silica (up to 1200 m2/g) permits high drug loadings. The degradation kinetics of silicon- and silica-based materials can be tailored by coating or grafting with polymers. Incorporation of polymers also improves control over drug-release kinetics. The use of stimuli-responsive polymers has enabled environmental stimuli-triggered drug release. Simultaneously, silicon microfabrication techniques have facilitated the development of sophisticated implantable drug-delivery microdevices. This paper reviews the synthesis, novel properties and biomedical applications of silicon-polymer hybrid materials with particular emphasis on drug delivery. The biocompatible and bioresorptive properties of mesoporous silica and porous silicon make these materials attractive candidates for use in biomedical applications. The combination of polymers with silicon-based materials has generated a large range of novel hybrid materials tailored to applications in localized and systemic drug delivery.

  11. Functional Cyclodextrin Polyrotaxanes for Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Nobuhiko; Katoono, Ryo; Yamashita, Atsushi

    The mobility of cyclodextrins (CDs) threaded onto a linear polymeric chain and the dethreading of the CDs from the chain are the most fascinating features seen in polyrotaxanes. These structural characteristics are very promising for their possible applications in drug delivery. Enhanced multivalent interaction between ligand-receptor systems by using ligand-conjugated polyrotaxanes would be just one of the excellent properties related to the CD mobility. Gene delivery using cytocleavable polyrotaxanes is a more practical but highly crucial issue in drug delivery. Complexation of the polyrotaxanes with DNA and its intracellular DNA release ingeniously utilizes both CD mobility and polyrotaxane dissociation to achieve effective gene delivery. Such a supramolecular approach using CD-containing polyrotaxanes is expected to exploit a new paradigm of biomaterials.

  12. Fabrication and spectroscopic studies of folic acid-conjugated Fe3O4@Au core-shell for targeted drug delivery application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamipour, Sh.; Sadjadi, M. S.; Farhadyar, N.

    2015-09-01

    Gold coated magnetite core shell is a kind of nanoparticle that include magnetic iron oxide core with a thin layer nanogold. Fe3O4-gold core-shell nanostructure can be used in biomedical applications such as magnetic bioseparation, bioimaging, targeting drug delivery and cancer treatment. In this study, the synthesis and characterization of gold coated magnetite nanoparticles were discussed. Magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 6 nm in diameter were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method and gold-coated Fe3O4 core-shell nanostructures were produced with an average size of 11.5 nm in diameter by reduction of Au3+ with citrate ion in the presence of Fe3O4. Folate-conjugated gold coated magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized to targeting folate receptor that is overexpressed on the surface of cancerous cells. For this purpose, we used L-cysteine, as a bi-functional linker for attachment to gold surface and it was linked to the gold nanoparticles surface through its thiol group. Then, we conjugated amino-terminated nanoparticles to folic acid with an amide-linkage formation. These gold magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by various techniques such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. The magnetic and optical properties of Fe3O4 nanostructure were changed by gold coating and attachment of L-cysteine and folic acid to Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles.

  13. Trojan Microparticles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Nicolas; Jakhmola, Anshuman; Vandamme, Thierry F.

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have regulated a wide range of products, (foods, cosmetics, drugs, devices, veterinary, and tobacco) which may utilize micro and nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials. Nanotechnology allows scientists to create, explore, and manipulate materials in nano-regime. Such materials have chemical, physical, and biological properties that are quite different from their bulk counterparts. For pharmaceutical applications and in order to improve their administration (oral, pulmonary and dermal), the nanocarriers can be spread into microparticles. These supramolecular associations can also modulate the kinetic releases of drugs entrapped in the nanoparticles. Different strategies to produce these hybrid particles and to optimize the release kinetics of encapsulated drugs are discussed in this review. PMID:24300177

  14. Experimental and simulation studies on focused ultrasound triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Choi, Yongjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2017-01-01

    To improve drug delivery efficiency in cancer therapy, many researchers have recently concentrated on drug delivery systems that use anticancer drug loaded micro- or nanoparticles. In addition, induction methods, such as ultrasound, magnetic field, and infrared light, have been considered as active induction methods for drug delivery. Among these, focused ultrasound has been regarded as a promising candidate for the active induction method of drug delivery system because it can penetrate a deep site in soft tissue, and its energy can be focused on the targeted lesion. In this research, we employed focused ultrasound as an active induction method. For an anticancer drug loaded microparticles, we fabricated poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid docetaxel (PLGA-DTX) nanoparticle encapsulated alginate microbeads using the single-emulsion technique and the aeration method. To select the appropriate operating parameter for the focused ultrasound, we measured the pressure and temperature induced by the focused ultrasound at the focal area using a needle-type hydrophone and a digital thermal detector, respectively. Additionally, we conducted a simulation of focused ultrasound using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3a. The experimental measurement results were compared with the simulation results. In addition, the drug release rates of the PLGA-DTX-encapsulated alginate microbeads induced by the focused ultrasound were tested. Through these experiments, we determined that the appropriate focused ultrasound parameter was peak pressure of 1 MPa, 10 cycle/burst, and burst period of 20 μSec. Finally, we performed the cell cytotoxicity and drug uptake test with focused ultrasound induction and found that the antitumor effect and drug uptake efficiency were significantly enhanced by the focused ultrasound induction. Thus, we confirmed that focused ultrasound can be an effective induction method for an anticancer drug delivery system.

  15. Liposomal drug delivery systems: from concept to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Allen, Theresa M; Cullis, Pieter R

    2013-01-01

    The first closed bilayer phospholipid systems, called liposomes, were described in 1965 and soon were proposed as drug delivery systems. The pioneering work of countless liposome researchers over almost 5 decades led to the development of important technical advances such as remote drug loading, extrusion for homogeneous size, long-circulating (PEGylated) liposomes, triggered release liposomes, liposomes containing nucleic acid polymers, ligand-targeted liposomes and liposomes containing combinations of drugs. These advances have led to numerous clinical trials in such diverse areas as the delivery of anti-cancer, anti-fungal and antibiotic drugs, the delivery of gene medicines, and the delivery of anesthetics and anti-inflammatory drugs. A number of liposomes (lipidic nanoparticles) are on the market, and many more are in the pipeline. Lipidic nanoparticles are the first nanomedicine delivery system to make the transition from concept to clinical application, and they are now an established technology platform with considerable clinical acceptance. We can look forward to many more clinical products in the future.

  16. Engineered polymers for advanced drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Jeon, Oju; Kwon, Ick Chan; Park, Kinam

    2009-03-01

    Engineered polymers have been utilized for developing advanced drug delivery systems. The development of such polymers has caused advances in polymer chemistry, which, in turn, has resulted in smart polymers that can respond to changes in environmental condition such as temperature, pH, and biomolecules. The responses vary widely from swelling/deswelling to degradation. Drug-polymer conjugates and drug-containing nano/micro-particles have been used for drug targeting. Engineered polymers and polymeric systems have also been used in new areas, such as molecular imaging as well as in nanotechnology. This review examines the engineered polymers that have been used as traditional drug delivery systems and as more recent applications in nanotechnology.

  17. Nanoparticles and nanofibers for topical drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ritu; Macri, Lauren K.; Kaplan, Hilton M.; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    This review provides the first comprehensive overview of the use of both nanoparticles and nanofibers for topical drug delivery. Researchers have explored the use of nanotechnology, specifically nanoparticles and nanofibers, as drug delivery systems for topical and transdermal applications. This approach employs increased drug concentration in the carrier, in order to increase drug flux into and through the skin. Both nanoparticles and nanofibers can be used to deliver hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and are capable of controlled release for a prolonged period of time. The examples presented provide significant evidence that this area of research has—and will continue to have — a profound impact on both clinical outcomes and the development of new products. PMID:26518723

  18. Engineered Polymers for Advanced Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungwon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Jeon, Oju; Kwon, Ick Chan; Park, Kinam

    2009-01-01

    Engineered polymers have been utilized for developing advanced drug delivery systems. The development of such polymers has caused advances in polymer chemistry, which, in turn, has resulted in smart polymers that can respond to changes in environmental condition, such as temperature, pH, and biomolecules. The responses vary widely from swelling/deswelling to degradation. Drug-polymer conjugates and drug-containing nano/micro-particles have been used for drug targeting. Engineered polymers and polymeric systems have also been used in new areas, such as molecular imaging as well as in nanotechnology. This review examines the engineered polymers that have been used as traditional drug delivery and as more recent applications in nanotechnology. PMID:18977434

  19. Genetically engineered nanocarriers for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Pu; Gustafson, Joshua A; MacKay, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxicity, low water solubility, rapid clearance from circulation, and off-target side-effects are common drawbacks of conventional small-molecule drugs. To overcome these shortcomings, many multifunctional nanocarriers have been proposed to enhance drug delivery. In concept, multifunctional nanoparticles might carry multiple agents, control release rate, biodegrade, and utilize target-mediated drug delivery; however, the design of these particles presents many challenges at the stage of pharmaceutical development. An emerging solution to improve control over these particles is to turn to genetic engineering. Genetically engineered nanocarriers are precisely controlled in size and structure and can provide specific control over sites for chemical attachment of drugs. Genetically engineered drug carriers that assemble nanostructures including nanoparticles and nanofibers can be polymeric or non-polymeric. This review summarizes the recent development of applications in drug and gene delivery utilizing nanostructures of polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polypeptides, and silk-elastin-like protein polymers, and non-polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as vault proteins and viral proteins. PMID:24741309

  20. Nanoparticles in the ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yan; Hao, Ji-Long; Wang, Shuang; Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Wen-Song

    2013-01-01

    Ocular drug transport barriers pose a challenge for drug delivery comprising the ocular surface epithelium, the tear film and internal barriers of the blood-aqueous and blood-retina barriers. Ocular drug delivery efficiency depends on the barriers and the clearance from the choroidal, conjunctival vessels and lymphatic. Traditional drug administration reduces the clinical efficacy especially for poor water soluble molecules and for the posterior segment of the eye. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been designed to overcome the barriers, increase the drug penetration at the target site and prolong the drug levels by few internals of drug administrations in lower doses without any toxicity compared to the conventional eye drops. With the aid of high specificity and multifunctionality, DNA NPs can be resulted in higher transfection efficiency for gene therapy. NPs could target at cornea, retina and choroid by surficial applications and intravitreal injection. This review is concerned with recent findings and applications of NPs drug delivery systems for the treatment of different eye diseases. PMID:23826539

  1. Collagen-coated microparticles in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Praveen Kumar; Srinivasan, Aishwarya

    2009-07-01

    Advantages of drug-incorporated collagen particles have been described for the controlled delivery system for therapeutic actions. The attractiveness of collagen lies in its low immunogenicity and high biocompatibility. It is also recognized by the body as a natural constituent rather than a foreign body. Our research and development efforts are focused towards addressing some of the limitations of collagen, like the high viscosity of an aqueous phase, nondissolution in neutral pH buffers, thermal instability (denaturation) and biodegradability, to make it an ideal material for drug delivery with particular reference to microparticles. These limitations could be overcome by making collagen conjugates with other biomaterials or chemically modifying collagen monomer without affecting its triple helical conformation and maintaining its native properties. This article highlights collagen microparticles' present status as a carrier in drug delivery.

  2. Barriers to drug delivery in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sriraman, Shravan Kumar; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in the field of drug delivery. The advent of engineered nanoparticles has allowed us to circumvent the initial limitations to drug delivery such as pharmacokinetics and solubility. However, in spite of significant advances to tumor targeting, an effective treatment strategy for malignant tumors still remains elusive. Tumors possess distinct physiological features which allow them to resist traditional treatment approaches. This combined with the complexity of the biological system presents significant hurdles to the site-specific delivery of therapeutic drugs. One of the key features of engineered nanoparticles is that these can be tailored to execute specific functions. With this review, we hope to provide the reader with a clear understanding and knowledge of biological barriers and the methods to exploit these characteristics to design multifunctional nanocarriers, effect useful dosing regimens and subsequently improve therapeutic outcomes in the clinic. PMID:25068098

  3. Electrospun membranes of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) used as scaffold in drug delivery of extract of Sedum dendroideum.

    PubMed

    Santos, Larissa G; Oliveira, Daniel C; Santos, Michele S L; Neves, Lia Mara G; de Gaspi, Fernanda O G; Mendonça, Fernanda A S; Esquisatto, Marcelo A M; Santos, Gláucia M T; d'Avila, M A; Mei, Lucia H Innocentini

    2013-07-01

    Biomaterials nanofibrous electrospun with biodegradable polymers have the advantage of the similarity to natural extracellular matrices, showing promising as scaffolds for application in tissue engineering. Sedum dendroideum is a phytotherapic drug that stands out for its healing properties and anti-inflammatory. This study presents the efficacy of PLA electrospun membranes used as support S. dendroideum extract releasing on excisional skin lesions of Wistar rats. The PLA porous membranes, which are nonwoven fibrous mats, were obtained by electrospinning using a conventional apparatus with a flat collector. The animals were randomly divided into nine groups: control (C), animals treated with electrospun membranes of PLA (M), animals treated with extract of S. dendroideum dissolved in saline (F), animals treated with membranes of PLA with 10% S. dendroideum (MF10), animals treated with membranes of PLA with 25% S. dendroideum (MF25). Tissue samples were taken after 2, 6 and 10 days after surgery and were subjected to structural analysis and morphology. The experimental observations showed the application of the phytotherapic incorporated in the membrane promoted a significant response regarding the number of inflammatory cells, percentage of mature collagen fibers and epithelium birrefringent in thickness excisional skin lesions in Wistar rats. It was also demonstrated that the application of the PLA membranes without the extract promoted similar responses tissues.

  4. Ultrasound-mediated gastrointestinal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Schoellhammer, Carl M; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Yves; Swiston, Albert; Zervas, Michael; Barman, Ross; DiCiccio, Angela M; Brugge, William R; Anderson, Daniel G; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-10-21

    There is a significant clinical need for rapid and efficient delivery of drugs directly to the site of diseased tissues for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, in particular, Crohn's and ulcerative colitis. However, complex therapeutic molecules cannot easily be delivered through the GI tract because of physiologic and structural barriers. We report the use of ultrasound as a modality for enhanced drug delivery to the GI tract, with an emphasis on rectal delivery. Ultrasound increased the absorption of model therapeutics inulin, hydrocortisone, and mesalamine two- to tenfold in ex vivo tissue, depending on location in the GI tract. In pigs, ultrasound induced transient cavitation with negligible heating, leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the delivery of mesalamine, as well as successful systemic delivery of a macromolecule, insulin, with the expected hypoglycemic response. In a rodent model of chemically induced acute colitis, the addition of ultrasound to a daily mesalamine enema (compared to enema alone) resulted in superior clinical and histological scores of disease activity. In both animal models, ultrasound treatment was well tolerated and resulted in minimal tissue disruption, and in mice, there was no significant effect on histology, fecal score, or tissue inflammatory cytokine levels. The use of ultrasound to enhance GI drug delivery is safe in animals and could augment the efficacy of GI therapies and broaden the scope of agents that could be delivered locally and systemically through the GI tract for chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Ultrasound-mediated gastrointestinal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Yves; Swiston, Albert; Zervas, Michael; Barman, Ross; DiCiccio, Angela M.; Brugge, William R.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant clinical need for rapid and efficient delivery of drugs directly to the site of diseased tissues for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, in particular, Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. However, complex therapeutic molecules cannot easily be delivered through the GI tract because of physiologic and structural barriers. We report the use of ultrasound as a modality for enhanced drug delivery to the GI tract, with an emphasis on rectal delivery. Ultrasound increased the absorption of model therapeutics inulin, hydrocortisone, and mesalamine two- to tenfold in ex vivo tissue, depending on location in the GI tract. In pigs, ultrasound induced transient cavitation with negligible heating, leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the delivery of mesalamine, as well as successful systemic delivery of a macromolecule, insulin, with the expected hypoglycemic response. In a rodent model of chemically induced acute colitis, the addition of ultrasound to a daily mesalamine enema (compared to enema alone) resulted in superior clinical and histological scores of disease activity. In both animal models, ultrasound treatment was well tolerated and resulted in minimal tissue disruption, and in mice, there was no significant effect on histology, fecal score, or tissue inflammatory cytokine levels. The use of ultrasound to enhance GI drug delivery is safe in animals and could augment the efficacy of GI therapies and broaden the scope of agents that could be delivered locally and systemically through the GI tract for chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26491078

  6. Liposomes as delivery systems for antineoplastic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Luis Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Liposome drug formulations are defined as pharmaceutical products containing active drug substances encapsulated within the lipid bilayer or in the interior aqueous space of the liposomes. The main importance of this drug delivery system is based on its drastic reduction in systemic dose and concomitant systemic toxicity that in comparison with the free drug, results in an improvement of patient compliance and in a more effective treatment. There are several therapeutic drugs that are potential candidates to be encapsulated into liposomes; particular interest has been focused in therapeutic and antineoplastic drugs, which are characterized for its low therapeutic index and high systemic toxicity. The use of liposomes as drug carriers has been extensively justified and the importance of the development of different formulations or techniques to encapsulate therapeutic drugs has an enormous value in benefit of patients affected by neoplastic diseases.

  7. Light induced drug delivery into cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Adar, Lily; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2011-02-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargoes, including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. However, the cationic nature of all CPP sequences, and thus lack of cell specificity, limits their in vivo use for drug delivery applications. Here, we have devised and tested a strategy for site-specific delivery of dyes and drugs into cancer cells by using polymers bearing a light activated caged CPP (cCPP). The positive charge of Lys residues on the minimum sequence of the CPP penetratin ((52)RRMKWKK(58)) was masked with photo-cleavable groups to minimize non-specific adsorption and cellular uptake. Once illuminated by UV light, these protecting groups were cleaved, the positively charged CPP regained its activity and facilitated rapid intracellular delivery of the polymer-dye or polymer-drug conjugates into cancer cells. We have found that a 10-min light illumination time was sufficient to enhance the penetration of the polymer-CPP conjugates bearing the proapoptotic peptide, (D)(KLAKLAK)(2), into 80% of the target cells, and to promote a 'switch' like cytotoxic activity resulting a shift from 100% to 10% in cell viability after 2 h. This report provides an example for tumor targeting by means of light activation of cell-penetrating peptides for intracellular drug delivery.

  8. Somatostatin receptor-mediated tumor-targeting drug delivery using octreotide-PEG-deoxycholic acid conjugate-modified N-deoxycholic acid-O, N-hydroxyethylation chitosan micelles.

    PubMed

    Huo, Meirong; Zou, Aifeng; Yao, Chengli; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianping; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Qinnv; Li, Jing; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-09-01

    In this study, a ligand-PEG-lipid conjugate, octreotide-polyethene glycol-deoxycholic acid (OCT(Phe)-PEG-DOCA, or OPD) was successfully synthesized and used as a targeting molecule for N-deoxycholic acid-O, N-hydroxyethylation chitosan (DAHC) micelles for efficient cancer therapy. DAHC micelles exhibited good loading capacities for doxorubicin (DOX), a model anti-cancer drug, and the modification of OPD showed no significant effect on drug load while slightly increasing the particle size and partly shielding the positive charges on the surface of micelles. Accelerated release rate of DOX from micelles were also observed after OPD modification and the release profile exhibited pH-sensitive properties. Compared with DAHC-DOX micelles, OPD-DAHC-DOX micelles exhibited significantly stronger cytotoxicity to MCF-7 cells (SSTRs overexpression) but with hardly any difference from WI-38 cells (no SSTRs expression). The results of flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy further revealed that OPD-DAHC-DOX micelles could be selectively taken into tumor cells by SSTRs-mediated endocytosis. In vivo investigation of micelles on nude mice bearing MCF-7 cancer xenografts confirmed that OPD-DAHC micelles possessed much higher tumor-targeting capacity than the DAHC control and exhibited enhanced anti-tumor efficacy and decreased systemic toxicity. These results suggest that OPD-DAHC micelles might be a promising anti-cancer drug delivery carrier for targeted cancer therapy.

  9. Zwitterionic drug nanocarriers: a biomimetic strategy for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiao; Chen, Yangjun; Wang, Yin; Ji, Jian

    2014-12-01

    Nanomaterials self-assembled from amphiphilic functional copolymers have emerged as safe and efficient nanocarriers for delivery of therapeutics. Surface engineering of the nanocarriers is extremely important for the design of drug delivery systems. Bioinspired zwitterions are considered as novel nonfouling materials to construct biocompatible and bioinert nanocarriers. As an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), zwitterions exhibit some unique properties that PEG do not have. In this review, we highlight recent progress of the design of drug nanocarriers using a zwitterionic strategy. The possible mechanism of stealth properties of zwitterions was proposed. The advantages of zwitterionic drug nanocarriers deriving from phosphorylcholine (PC), carboxybetaine (CB), and sulfobetaine (SB) are also discussed.

  10. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as Efficient Drug and Gene Delivery Systems: Recent Breakthroughs

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati Nazhad Dolatabadi, Jafar; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nanomaterials have been widely applied as advanced drug and gene delivery nanosystems. Among them, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have attracted great attention as colloidal drug delivery systems for incorporating hydrophilic or lipophilic drugs and various macromolecules as well as proteins and nucleic acids. Therefore, SLNs offer great promise for controlled and site specific drug and gene delivery. This article includes general information about SLN structures and properties, production procedures, characterization. In addition, recent progress on development of drug and gene delivery systems using SLNs was reviewed. PMID:26236652

  11. Transungual drug delivery: current status.

    PubMed

    Elkeeb, Rania; AliKhan, Ali; Elkeeb, Laila; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2010-01-15

    Topical therapy is highly desirable in treating nail disorders due to its localized effects, which results in minimal adverse systemic events and possibly improved adherence. However, the effectiveness of topical therapies is limited by minimal drug permeability through the nail plate. Current research on nail permeation that focuses on altering the nail plate barrier by means of chemical treatments, penetration enhancers as well as physical and mechanical methods is reviewed. A new method of nail sampling is examined. Finally limitations of current ungual drug permeability studies are briefly discussed.

  12. Plasmon resonant liposomes for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knights-Mitchell, Shellie S.; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Nanotechnology use in drug delivery promotes a reduction in systemic toxicity, improved pharmacokinetics, and better drug bioavailability. Liposomes continue to be extensively researched as drug delivery systems (DDS) with formulations such as Doxil® and Ambisome® approved by FDA and successfully marketed in the United States. However, the limited ability to precisely control release of active ingredients from these vesicles continues to challenge the broad implementation of this technology. Moreover, the full potential of the carrier to sequester drugs until it can reach its intended target has yet to be realized. Here, we describe a liposomal DDS that releases therapeutic doses of an anticancer drug in response to external stimulus. Earlier, we introduced degradable plasmon resonant liposomes. These constructs, obtained by reducing gold on the liposome surface, facilitate spatial and temporal release of drugs upon laser light illumination that ultimately induces an increase in temperature. In this work, plasmon resonant liposomes have been developed to stably encapsulate and retain doxorubicin at physiological conditions represented by isotonic saline at 37o C and pH 7.4. Subsequently, they are stimulated to release contents either by a 5o C increase in temperature or by laser illumination (760 nm and 88 mW/cm2 power density). Successful development of degradable plasmon resonant liposomes responsive to near-infrared light or moderate hyperthermia can provide a new delivery method for multiple lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs with pharmacokinetic profiles that limit clinical utility.

  13. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  14. Tuberculosis chemotherapy: current drug delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    du Toit, Lisa Claire; Pillay, Viness; Danckwerts, Michael Paul

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading killer of young adults worldwide and the global scourge of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is reaching epidemic proportions. It is endemic in most developing countries and resurgent in developed and developing countries with high rates of human immunodeficiency virus infection. This article reviews the current situation in terms of drug delivery approaches for tuberculosis chemotherapy. A number of novel implant-, microparticulate-, and various other carrier-based drug delivery systems incorporating the principal anti-tuberculosis agents have been fabricated that either target the site of tuberculosis infection or reduce the dosing frequency with the aim of improving patient outcomes. These developments in drug delivery represent attractive options with significant merit, however, there is a requisite to manufacture an oral system, which directly addresses issues of unacceptable rifampicin bioavailability in fixed-dose combinations. This is fostered by the need to deliver medications to patients more efficiently and with fewer side effects, especially in developing countries. The fabrication of a polymeric once-daily oral multiparticulate fixed-dose combination of the principal anti-tuberculosis drugs, which attains segregated delivery of rifampicin and isoniazid for improved rifampicin bioavailability, could be a step in the right direction in addressing issues of treatment failure due to patient non-compliance. PMID:16984627

  15. Liposomal drug delivery systems--clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Parveen; Goyal, Kumud; Vijaya Kumar, Sengodan Gurusamy; Singh, Ajit; Katare, Om Prakash; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2005-03-01

    Liposomes have been widely investigated since 1970 as drug carriers for improving the delivery of therapeutic agents to specific sites in the body. As a result, numerous improvements have been made, thus making this technology potentially useful for the treatment of certain diseases in the clinics. The success of liposomes as drug carriers has been reflected in a number of liposome-based formulations, which are commercially available or are currently undergoing clinical trials. The current pharmaceutical preparations of liposome-based therapeutic systems mainly result from our understanding of lipid-drug interactions and liposome disposition mechanisms. The insight gained from clinical use of liposome drug delivery systems can now be integrated to design liposomes that can be targeted on tissues, cells or intracellular compartments with or without expression of target recognition molecules on liposome membranes. This review is mainly focused on the diseases that have attracted most attention with respect to liposomal drug delivery and have therefore yielded most progress, namely cancer, antibacterial and antifungal disorders. In addition, increased gene transfer efficiencies could be obtained by appropriate selection of the gene transfer vector and mode of delivery.

  16. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  17. Dendrimers as Nanovectors for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Qi; Peng, Ling

    2013-09-01

    Nucleic acid based gene therapy holds great promise in the treatment of various diseases. However, the success of both DNA- and siRNAbased gene therapies depends critically on safe and efficient nucleic acid delivery systems. Owing to their well-defined structure and multivalent cooperativity, dendrimers have attracted particular attention as ideal nanocarriers for nucleic acid delivery. The present chapter highlights the current status of dendrimers as non-viral nanovectors for both DNA and siRNA delivery, focusing on the different dendrimers investigated for their delivery efficiency with respect to structural alterations in the view to developing safe and efficient nanovectors for gene therapy application.

  18. Characterization of Release Mechanism in Polymeric Drug Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laplante, Arthur James; Plachy, Robin Marie; Aou, Kaoru; Ferguson, Jake; Hsu, Shaw Ling

    2006-03-01

    Our polymeric drug delivery system is based on our understanding of phase behavior of polymers [e.g poly(lactic acid)], low molecular drugs and various solvents used in processing. Clearly the different morphologies achieved, based on different phase separation kinetics, can affect drug release rates. Release of drugs, in most cases, involves the exchange between the extraction media and drug. We have characterized the transport behavior using a number of unique techniques. Reflectance infrared spectroscopy has given us a detailed description of the release rate of drugs into the extraction media. Surface plasmon resonance has shown the overall mass loss. UV-visible spectroscopy has yielded the concentration of drug in the solution. These measurements are compared to the release mechanism based on Fickian diffusion. The two step release rates observed can only be explained by taking into account differences in the morphological features of the phase separated films.

  19. Biodegradable Hybrid Stomatocyte Nanomotors for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report the self-assembly of a biodegradable platinum nanoparticle-loaded stomatocyte nanomotor containing both PEG-b-PCL and PEG-b-PS as a potential candidate for anticancer drug delivery. Well-defined stomatocyte structures could be formed even after incorporation of 50% PEG-b-PCL polymer. Demixing of the two polymers was expected at high percentage of semicrystalline poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), resulting in PCL domain formation onto the membrane due to different properties of two polymers. The biodegradable motor system was further shown to move directionally with speeds up to 39 μm/s by converting chemical fuel, hydrogen peroxide, into mechanical motion as well as rapidly delivering the drug to the targeted cancer cell. Uptake by cancer cells and fast doxorubicin drug release was demonstrated during the degradation of the motor system. Such biodegradable nanomotors provide a convenient and efficient platform for the delivery and controlled release of therapeutic drugs. PMID:28187254

  20. Biodegradable Hybrid Stomatocyte Nanomotors for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yingfeng; Peng, Fei; André, Alain A M; Men, Yongjun; Srinivas, Mangala; Wilson, Daniela A

    2017-02-28

    We report the self-assembly of a biodegradable platinum nanoparticle-loaded stomatocyte nanomotor containing both PEG-b-PCL and PEG-b-PS as a potential candidate for anticancer drug delivery. Well-defined stomatocyte structures could be formed even after incorporation of 50% PEG-b-PCL polymer. Demixing of the two polymers was expected at high percentage of semicrystalline poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), resulting in PCL domain formation onto the membrane due to different properties of two polymers. The biodegradable motor system was further shown to move directionally with speeds up to 39 μm/s by converting chemical fuel, hydrogen peroxide, into mechanical motion as well as rapidly delivering the drug to the targeted cancer cell. Uptake by cancer cells and fast doxorubicin drug release was demonstrated during the degradation of the motor system. Such biodegradable nanomotors provide a convenient and efficient platform for the delivery and controlled release of therapeutic drugs.

  1. Intracranial drug delivery for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Robert Loch; Leung, Ming; Tice, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Tice and colleagues pioneered site-specific, sustained-release drug delivery to the brain almost 30 years ago. Currently there is one drug approved for use in this manner. Clinical trials in subarachnoid hemorrhage have led to approval of nimodipine for oral and intravenous use, but other drugs, such as clazosentan, hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and magnesium, have not shown consistent clinical efficacy. We propose that intracranial delivery of drugs such as nimodipine, formulated in sustained-release preparations, are good candidates for improving outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage because they can be administered to patients that are already undergoing surgery and who have a self-limited condition from which full recovery is possible.

  2. Ingestion of drugs by "parachuting": a unique drug delivery technique.

    PubMed

    Kenerson, Katherine L; Lear-Kaul, Kelly C

    2012-06-01

    "Parachuting" is a technique of drug delivery where medications or illicit drugs are ingested by wrapping the drug of choice in a covering, which then will dissolve or unravel in the gastrointestinal tract, thereby releasing the drug for absorption. Parachuting of drugs can entail crushing of a pill prior to packaging to theoretically increase the surface area for absorption or may involve the packaging of a higher than usual dose of a drug in attempts to attain a sustained-release effect as the "parachute" dissolves or unravels. A case is presented in which a prescription drug abuser known to parachute his medications dies from obstruction of his airway by the inhaled packet. Risks of parachuting any drug would include overdose and fatal toxic effect from the drug itself and adverse effects from the packaging including bowel obstruction or perforation, or airway obstruction.

  3. Drug delivery applications with ethosomes.

    PubMed

    Ainbinder, D; Paolino, D; Fresta, M; Touitou, E

    2010-10-01

    Ethosomes are specially tailored vesicular carriers able to efficiently deliver various molecules with different physicochemical properties into deep skin layers and across the skin. This paper reviews the unique characteristics of the ethosomal carriers, focusing on work carried out with drug containing ethosomal systems in animal models and in clinical studies. The paper concludes with a discussion on the safety of the ethosomal system applications.

  4. Hollow Pollen Shells to Enhance Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Diego-Taboada, Alberto; Beckett, Stephen T.; Atkin, Stephen L.; Mackenzie, Grahame

    2014-01-01

    Pollen grain and spore shells are natural microcapsules designed to protect the genetic material of the plant from external damage. The shell is made up of two layers, the inner layer (intine), made largely of cellulose, and the outer layer (exine), composed mainly of sporopollenin. The relative proportion of each varies according to the plant species. The structure of sporopollenin has not been fully characterised but different studies suggest the presence of conjugated phenols, which provide antioxidant properties to the microcapsule and UV (ultraviolet) protection to the material inside it. These microcapsule shells have many advantageous properties, such as homogeneity in size, resilience to both alkalis and acids, and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 250 °C. These hollow microcapsules have the ability to encapsulate and release actives in a controlled manner. Their mucoadhesion to intestinal tissues may contribute to the extended contact of the sporopollenin with the intestinal mucosa leading to an increased efficiency of delivery of nutraceuticals and drugs. The hollow microcapsules can be filled with a solution of the active or active in a liquid form by simply mixing both together, and in some cases operating a vacuum. The active payload can be released in the human body depending on pressure on the microcapsule, solubility and/or pH factors. Active release can be controlled by adding a coating on the shell, or co-encapsulation with the active inside the shell. PMID:24638098

  5. Applications of polymers in intraocular drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Alhalafi, Ali Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    We are entering a new era of ophthalmic pharmacology where new drugs are rapidly being developed for the treatment of anterior and posterior segment of the eye disease. The pharmacokinetics of drug delivery to the eye remains a very active area of ophthalmic research. Intraocular drug delivery systems allow the release of the drug, bypassing the blood-ocular barrier. The main advantage of these preparations is that they can release the drug over a long time with one single administration. These pharmaceutical systems are of great important in the treatment of the posterior segment diseases, and they can be prepared from biodegradable or nonbiodegradable polymers. Biodegradable polymers have the advantage of disappearing from the site of action after releasing the drug. The majority of intraocular devices are prepared from nonbiodegradable polymers, and they can release controlled amounts of drugs for months. Nonbiodegradable polymers include silicone, polyvinyl alcohol, and ethylene-vinyl acetate. The polymers usually employed to prepare nanoparticles for the topical ophthalmic route are poly (acrylic acid) derivatives (polyalquilcyanocrylates), albumin, poly-ε-caprolactone, and chitosan. Dendrimers are a recent class of polymeric materials with unique nanostructure which has been studied to discover their role in the delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Hydrogels are polymers that can swell in aqueous solvent system, and they hold the solvents in a swollen cross-linked gel for delivery. This review exhibits the current literature regarding applications of polymers in ophthalmic drug delivery systems including pharmacokinetics, advantages, disadvantages, and indications aimed to obtain successful eye therapy. Method of Literature Search: A systematic literature review was performed using PubMed databases into two steps. The first step was oriented to classification of intraocular polymers implants focusing on their advantages and disadvantages. The second

  6. Optically generated ultrasound for enhanced drug delivery

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Campbell, Heather L.; Da Silva, Luiz

    2002-01-01

    High frequency acoustic waves, analogous to ultrasound, can enhance the delivery of therapeutic compounds into cells. The compounds delivered may be chemotherapeutic drugs, antibiotics, photodynamic drugs or gene therapies. The therapeutic compounds are administered systemically, or preferably locally to the targeted site. Local delivery can be accomplished through a needle, cannula, or through a variety of vascular catheters, depending on the location of routes of access. To enhance the systemic or local delivery of the therapeutic compounds, high frequency acoustic waves are generated locally near the target site, and preferably near the site of compound administration. The acoustic waves are produced via laser radiation interaction with an absorbing media and can be produced via thermoelastic expansion, thermodynamic vaporization, material ablation, or plasma formation. Acoustic waves have the effect of temporarily permeabilizing the membranes of local cells, increasing the diffusion of the therapeutic compound into the cells, allowing for decreased total body dosages, decreased side effects, and enabling new therapies.

  7. Recent Perspectives in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gaudana, Ripal; Jwala, J.; Boddu, Sai H. S.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy and physiology of the eye makes it a highly protected organ. Designing an effective therapy for ocular diseases, especially for the posterior segment, has been considered as a formidable task. Limitations of topical and intravitreal route of administration have challenged scientists to find alternative mode of administration like periocular routes. Transporter targeted drug delivery has generated a great deal of interest in the field because of its potential to overcome many barriers associated with current therapy. Application of nanotechnology has been very promising in the treatment of a gamut of diseases. In this review, we have briefly discussed several ocular drug delivery systems such as microemulsions, nanosuspensions, nanoparticles, liposomes, niosomes, dendrimers, implants, and hydrogels. Potential for ocular gene therapy has also been described in this article. In near future, a great deal of attention will be paid to develop non-invasive sustained drug release for both anterior and posterior segment eye disorders. A better understanding of nature of ocular diseases, barriers and factors affecting in vivo performance, would greatly drive the development of new delivery systems. Current momentum in the invention of new drug delivery systems hold a promise towards much improved therapies for the treatment of vision threatening disorders. PMID:18758924

  8. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  9. Functionalized mesoporous silicon for targeted-drug-delivery.

    PubMed

    Tabasi, Ozra; Falamaki, Cavus; Khalaj, Zahra

    2012-10-01

    The present work concerns a preliminary step in the production of anticancer drug loaded porous silicon (PSi) for targeted-drug-delivery applications. A successful procedure for the covalent attachment of folic acid, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and doxorubicin to hydrophilic mesoporous silicon layers is presented. A systematic approach has been followed to obtain the optimal composition of the N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC)/N-hydroxysuccimide (NHS) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution for the surface activation process of the undecylenic acid (UD) grafted molecules to take place with minimal undesired byproduct formation. The effect of reactant concentration and kind of solvent (aqueous or DMSO) on the attachment of folic acid to the activated PSi layer has been investigated. The covalent attachment of the doxorubicin molecules to the PSi layer functionalized with folic acid and PEG is discussed. The drug release kinetics as a function of pH has been studied. The functionalized PSi particles show a high cytotoxicity compared to the equivalent amount of free drug. Cell toxicity tests show clearly that the incorporation of folate molecules increases substantially the toxicity of the loaded PSi particles. Accordingly this new functionalized PSi may be considered a proper candidate for targeted drug delivery.

  10. Mucoadhesive drug delivery system: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Boddupalli, Bindu M.; Mohammed, Zulkar N. K.; Nath, Ravinder A.; Banji, David

    2010-01-01

    Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems interact with the mucus layer covering the mucosal epithelial surface, and mucin molecules and increase the residence time of the dosage form at the site of absorption. The drugs which have local action or those which have maximum absorption in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) require increased duration of stay in GIT. Thus, mucoadhesive dosage forms are advantageous in increasing the drug plasma concentrations and also therapeutic activity. In this regard, this review covers the areas of mechanisms and theories of mucoadhesion, factors influencing the mucoadhesive devices and also various mucoadhesive dosage forms. PMID:22247877

  11. Advanced materials and nanotechnology for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Wenjun; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-08-20

    Many biological barriers are of great importance. For example, stratum corneum, the outmost layer of skin, effectively protects people from being invaded by external microorganisms such as bacteria and viruses. Cell membranes help organisms maintain homeostasis by controlling substances to enter and leave cells. However, on the other hand, these biological barriers seriously restrict drug delivery. For instance, stratum corneum has a very dense structure and only allows very small molecules with a molecular weight of below 500 Da to permeate whereas most drug molecules are much larger than that. A wide variety of drugs including genes needs to enter cells for proper functioning but cell membranes are not permeable to them. To overcome these biological barriers, many drug-delivery routes are being actively researched and developed. In this research news, we will focus on two advanced materials and nanotechnology approaches for delivering vaccines through the skin for painless and efficient immunization and transporting drug molecules to cross cell membranes for high-throughput intracellular delivery.

  12. Oral transmucosal drug delivery for pediatric use.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jenny K W; Xu, Yingying; Worsley, Alan; Wong, Ian C K

    2014-06-01

    The formulation of medicines for children remains a challenge. An ideal pediatric formulation must allow accurate dose administration and be in a dosage form that can be handled by the target age group. It is also important to consider the choices and the amount of excipients used in the formulation for this vulnerable age group. Although oral formulations are generally acceptable to most pediatric patients, they are not suitable for drugs with poor oral bioavailability or when a rapid clinical effect is required. In recent years, oral transmucosal delivery has emerged as an attractive route of administration for pediatric patients. With this route of administration, a drug is absorbed through the oral mucosa, therefore bypassing hepatic first pass metabolism and thus avoiding drug degradation or metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract. The high blood flow and relatively high permeability of the oral mucosa allow a quick onset of action to be achieved. It is a simple and non-invasive route of drug administration. However, there are several barriers that need to be overcome in the development of oral transmucosal products. This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of the current development of oral transmucosal delivery specifically for the pediatric population in order to achieve systemic drug delivery. The anatomical and physiological properties of the oral mucosa of infants and young children are carefully examined. The different dosage forms and formulation strategies that are suitable for young patients are discussed.

  13. Chitosan magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Assa, Farnaz; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Ajamein, Hossein; Vaghari, Hamideh; Anarjan, Navideh; Ahmadi, Omid; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-06-01

    The potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in drug delivery systems (DDSs) is mainly related to its magnetic core and surface coating. These coatings can eliminate or minimize their aggregation under physiological conditions. Also, they can provide functional groups for bioconjugation to anticancer drugs and/or targeted ligands. Chitosan, as a derivative of chitin, is an attractive natural biopolymer from renewable resources with the presence of reactive amino and hydroxyl functional groups in its structure. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs), due to their huge surface to volume ratio as compared to the chitosan in its bulk form, have outstanding physico-chemical, antimicrobial and biological properties. These unique properties make chitosan NPs a promising biopolymer for the application of DDSs. In this review, the current state and challenges for the application magnetic chitosan NPs in drug delivery systems were investigated. The present review also revisits the limitations and commercial impediments to provide insight for future works.

  14. Multifunctional magnetic silica nanotubes for MR imaging and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Ao, Lijiao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Su, Wu

    2015-03-04

    A multifunctional drug delivery vehicle consisting of a tubular shaped silica host, a compact superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle layer and a hyaluronic acid surface coating was developed as a theranostic platform, for in vivo MR imaging and magnetically guided/cancer targeted drug delivery.

  15. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Cellular Uptake, Biodistribution and Applications in Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixian; de Barros, Andre Luis Branco; Soares, Daniel Cristian Ferreira; Moss, Sara Nicole; Alisaraie, Laleh

    2017-03-11

    The unique properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) enable them to play important roles in many fields. One of their functional roles is to transport cargo into the cell. SWNTs are able to traverse amphipathic cell membranes due to their large surface area, flexible interactions with cargo, customizable dimensions, and surface chemistry. The cargoes delivered by SWNTs include peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, as well as drug molecules for therapeutic purpose. The drug delivery functions of SWNTs have been explored over the past decade. Many breakthrough studies have shown the high specificity and potency of functionalized SWNT-based drug delivery systems for the treatment of cancers and other diseases. In this review, we discuss different aspects of drug delivery by functionalized SWNT carriers, diving into the cellular uptake mechanisms, biodistribution of the delivery system, and safety concerns on degradation of the carriers. We emphasize the delivery of several common drugs to highlight the recent achievements of SWNT-based drug delivery.

  16. A new brain drug delivery strategy: focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Chen, Cherry C; Acosta, Camilo; Wu, Shih-Ying; Sun, Tao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases are difficult to treat because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which prevents most drugs from entering into the brain. Intranasal (i.n.) administration is a promising approach for drug delivery to the brain, bypassing the BBB; however, its application has been restricted to particularly potent substances and it does not offer localized delivery to specific brain sites. Focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with microbubbles can deliver drugs to the brain at targeted locations. The present study proposed to combine these two different platform techniques (FUS+i.n.) for enhancing the delivery efficiency of intranasally administered drugs at a targeted location. After i.n. administration of 40 kDa fluorescently-labeled dextran as the model drug, FUS targeted at one region within the caudate putamen of mouse brains was applied in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles. To compare with the conventional FUS technique, in which intravenous (i.v.) drug injection is employed, FUS was also applied after i.v. injection of the same amount of dextran in another group of mice. Dextran delivery outcomes were evaluated using fluorescence imaging of brain slices. The results showed that FUS+i.n. enhanced drug delivery within the targeted region compared with that achieved by i.n. only. Despite the fact that the i.n. route has limited drug absorption across the nasal mucosa, the delivery efficiency of FUS+i.n. was not significantly different from that of FUS+i.v.. As a new drug delivery platform, the FUS+i.n. technique is potentially useful for treating CNS diseases.

  17. A New Brain Drug Delivery Strategy: Focused Ultrasound-Enhanced Intranasal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Chen, Cherry C.; Acosta, Camilo; Wu, Shih-Ying; Sun, Tao; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases are difficult to treat because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which prevents most drugs from entering into the brain. Intranasal (IN) administration is a promising approach for drug delivery to the brain, bypassing the BBB; however, its application has been restricted to particularly potent substances and it does not offer localized delivery to specific brain sites. Focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with microbubbles can deliver drugs to the brain at targeted locations. The present study proposed to combine these two different platform techniques (FUS+IN) for enhancing the delivery efficiency of intranasally administered drugs at a targeted location. After IN administration of 40 kDa fluorescently-labeled dextran as the model drug, FUS targeted at one region within the caudate putamen of mouse brains was applied in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles. To compare with the conventional FUS technique, in which intravenous (IV) drug injection is employed, FUS was also applied after IV injection of the same amount of dextran in another group of mice. Dextran delivery outcomes were evaluated using fluorescence imaging of brain slices. The results showed that FUS+IN enhanced drug delivery within the targeted region compared with that achieved by IN only. Despite the fact that the IN route has limited drug absorption across the nasal mucosa, the delivery efficiency of FUS+IN was not significantly different from that of FUS+IV. As a new drug delivery platform, the FUS+IN technique is potentially useful for treating CNS diseases. PMID:25279463

  18. Ultrasound-Mediated Polymeric Micelle Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hesheng; Zhao, Yue; Tong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of multi-functional nanocarriers and the design of new stimuli-responsive means are equally important for drug delivery. Ultrasound can be used as a remote, non-invasive and controllable trigger for the stimuli-responsive release of nanocarriers. Polymeric micelles are one kind of potential drug nanocarrier. By combining ultrasound and polymeric micelles, a new modality (i.e., ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery) has been developed and has recently received increasing attention. A major challenge remaining in developing ultrasound-responsive polymeric micelles is the improvement of the sensitivity or responsiveness of polymeric micelles to ultrasound. This chapter reviews the recent advance in this field. In order to understand the interaction mechanism between ultrasound stimulus and polymeric micelles, ultrasound effects, such as thermal effect, cavitation effect, ultrasound sonochemistry (including ultrasonic degradation, ultrasound-initiated polymerization, ultrasonic in-situ polymerization and ultrasound site-specific degradation), as well as basic micellar knowledge are introduced. Ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery has been classified into two main streams based on the different interaction mechanism between ultrasound and polymeric micelles; one is based on the ultrasound-induced physical disruption of the micelle and reversible release of payload. The other is based on micellar ultrasound mechanochemical disruption and irreversible release of payload.

  19. Drug Delivery Nanoparticles in Skin Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dianzani, Chiara; Zara, Gian Paolo; Maina, Giovanni; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Rossi, Federica; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Ciamporcero, Eric Stefano; Daga, Martina; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves the engineering of functional systems at nanoscale, thus being attractive for disciplines ranging from materials science to biomedicine. One of the most active research areas of the nanotechnology is nanomedicine, which applies nanotechnology to highly specific medical interventions for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases, including cancer disease. Over the past two decades, the rapid developments in nanotechnology have allowed the incorporation of multiple therapeutic, sensing, and targeting agents into nanoparticles, for detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer diseases. Nanoparticles offer many advantages as drug carrier systems since they can improve the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs, modify pharmacokinetics, increase drug half-life by reducing immunogenicity, improve bioavailability, and diminish drug metabolism. They can also enable a tunable release of therapeutic compounds and the simultaneous delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the use of different types of nanoparticles for systemic and topical drug delivery in the treatment of skin cancer. In particular, the progress in the treatment with nanocarriers of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma has been reported. PMID:25101298

  20. Transdermal drug delivery: from micro to nano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegoraro, Carla; MacNeil, Sheila; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    Delivery across skin offers many advantages compared to oral or intravenous routes of drug administration. Skin however is highly impermeable to most molecules on the basis of size, hydrophilicity, lipophilicity and charge. For this reason it is often necessary to temporarily alter the barrier properties of skin for effective administration. This can be done by applying chemical enhancers, which alter the lipid structure of the top layer of skin (the stratum corneum, SC), by applying external forces such as electric currents and ultrasounds, by bypassing the stratum corneum via minimally invasive microneedles or by using nano-delivery vehicles that can cross and deliver their payload to the deeper layers of skin. Here we present a critical summary of the latest technologies used to increase transdermal delivery.

  1. Intracarotid Delivery of Drugs: The Potential and the Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shailendra; Meyers, Phillip M.; Ornstein, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    The major efforts to selectively deliver drugs to the brain in the last decade have relied on smart molecular techniques to penetrate the blood brain barrier while intraarterial drug delivery has drawn relatively little attention. In the last decade there have been rapid advances in endovascular techniques. Modern endovascular procedures can permit highly targeted drug delivery by intracarotid route. Intracarotid drug delivery can be the primary route of drug delivery or it could be used to facilitate the delivery of smart-neuropharmaceuticals. There have been few attempts to systematically understand the kinetics of intracarotid drugs. Anecdotal data suggests that intracarotid drug delivery is effective in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm, thromboembolic strokes, and neoplasms. Neuroanesthesiologists are frequently involved in the care of such high-risk patients. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the applications of intracarotid drug delivery and the unusual kinetics of intracarotid drugs. PMID:18719453

  2. Biomimetics in drug delivery systems: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Sheikhpour, Mojgan; Barani, Leila; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh

    2017-03-18

    Today, the advanced drug delivery systems have been focused on targeted drug delivery fields. The novel drug delivery is involved with the improvement of the capacity of drug loading in drug carriers, cellular uptake of drug carriers, and the sustained release of drugs within target cells. In this review, six groups of therapeutic drug carriers including biomimetic hydrogels, biomimetic micelles, biomimetic liposomes, biomimetic dendrimers, biomimetic polymeric carriers and biomimetic nanostructures, are studied. The subject takes advantage of the biomimetic methods of productions or the biomimetic techniques for the surface modifications, similar to what accrues in natural cells. Moreover, the effects of these biomimetic approaches for promoting the drug efficiency in targeted drug delivery are visible. The study demonstrates that the fabrication of biomimetic nanocomposite drug carriers could noticeably promote the efficiency of drugs in targeted drug delivery systems.

  3. Nanotechnology Approaches for Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingguo; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2013-01-01

    Blindness is a major health concern worldwide that has a powerful impact on afflicted individuals and their families, and is associated with enormous socio-economical consequences. The Middle East is heavily impacted by blindness, and the problem there is augmented by an increasing incidence of diabetes in the population. An appropriate drug/gene delivery system that can sustain and deliver therapeutics to the target tissues and cells is a key need for ocular therapies. The application of nanotechnology in medicine is undergoing rapid progress, and the recent developments in nanomedicine-based therapeutic approaches may bring significant benefits to address the leading causes of blindness associated with cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal degeneration. In this brief review, we highlight some promising nanomedicine-based therapeutic approaches for drug and gene delivery to the anterior and posterior segments. PMID:23580849

  4. Inhalation drug delivery devices: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mariam; Verma, Rahul; Garcia-Contreras, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary route of administration has proven to be effective in local and systemic delivery of miscellaneous drugs and biopharmaceuticals to treat pulmonary and non-pulmonary diseases. A successful pulmonary administration requires a harmonic interaction between the drug formulation, the inhaler device, and the patient. However, the biggest single problem that accounts for the lack of desired effect or adverse outcomes is the incorrect use of the device due to lack of training in how to use the device or how to coordinate actuation and aerosol inhalation. This review summarizes the structural and mechanical features of aerosol delivery devices with respect to mechanisms of aerosol generation, their use with different formulations, and their advantages and limitations. A technological update of the current state-of-the-art designs proposed to overcome current challenges of existing devices is also provided. PMID:25709510

  5. Advanced drug delivery approaches against periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deeksha; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of gums involving the degeneration of periodontal ligaments, creation of periodontal pocket and resorption of alveolar bone, resulting in the disruption of the support structure of teeth. According to WHO, 10-15% of the global population suffers from severe periodontitis. The disease results from the growth of a diverse microflora (especially anaerobes) in the pockets and release of toxins, enzymes and stimulation of body's immune response. Various local or systemic approaches were used for an effective treatment of periodontitis. Currently, controlled local drug delivery approach is more favorable as compared to systemic approach because it mainly focuses on improving the therapeutic outcomes by achieving factors like site-specific delivery, low dose requirement, bypass of first-pass metabolism, reduction in gastrointestinal side effects and decrease in dosing frequency. Overall it provides a safe and effective mode of treatment, which enhances patient compliance. Complete eradication of the organisms from the sites was not achieved by using various surgical and mechanical treatments. So a number of polymer-based delivery systems like fibers, films, chips, strips, microparticles, nanoparticles and nanofibers made from a variety of natural and synthetic materials have been successfully tested to deliver a variety of drugs. These systems are biocompatible and biodegradable, completely fill the pockets, and have strong retention on the target site due to excellent mucoadhesion properties. The review summarizes various available and recently developing targeted delivery devices for the treatment of periodontitis.

  6. Microneedle Coating Techniques for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Haj-Ahmad, Rita; Khan, Hashim; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Rasekh, Manoochehr; Hussain, Amjad; Walsh, Susannah; Li, Xiang; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2015-01-01

    Drug administration via the transdermal route is an evolving field that provides an alternative to oral and parenteral routes of therapy. Several microneedle (MN) based approaches have been developed. Among these, coated MNs (typically where drug is deposited on MN tips) are a minimally invasive method to deliver drugs and vaccines through the skin. In this review, we describe several processes to coat MNs. These include dip coating, gas jet drying, spray coating, electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) based processes and piezoelectric inkjet printing. Examples of process mechanisms, conditions and tested formulations are provided. As these processes are independent techniques, modifications to facilitate MN coatings are elucidated. In summary, the outcomes and potential value for each technique provides opportunities to overcome formulation or dosage form limitations. While there are significant developments in solid degradable MNs, coated MNs (through the various techniques described) have potential to be utilized in personalized drug delivery via controlled deposition onto MN templates. PMID:26556364

  7. Microneedle Coating Techniques for Transdermal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Haj-Ahmad, Rita; Khan, Hashim; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Rasekh, Manoochehr; Hussain, Amjad; Walsh, Susannah; Li, Xiang; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2015-11-05

    Drug administration via the transdermal route is an evolving field that provides an alternative to oral and parenteral routes of therapy. Several microneedle (MN) based approaches have been developed. Among these, coated MNs (typically where drug is deposited on MN tips) are a minimally invasive method to deliver drugs and vaccines through the skin. In this review, we describe several processes to coat MNs. These include dip coating, gas jet drying, spray coating, electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) based processes and piezoelectric inkjet printing. Examples of process mechanisms, conditions and tested formulations are provided. As these processes are independent techniques, modifications to facilitate MN coatings are elucidated. In summary, the outcomes and potential value for each technique provides opportunities to overcome formulation or dosage form limitations. While there are significant developments in solid degradable MNs, coated MNs (through the various techniques described) have potential to be utilized in personalized drug delivery via controlled deposition onto MN templates.

  8. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, D. M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A.; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanogel drug carrier design. In particular, we highlight published studies of nanogel design, descriptions of nanogel functional characteristics and their behavior in biological models. These studies form a compendium of information that supports the scientific and clinical rationale for development of this carrier for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25485112

  9. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Li, Ye; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies. PMID:27006893

  10. Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: Oral Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shaji, Jessy; Patole, V.

    2008-01-01

    Till recent, injections remained the most common means for administering therapeutic proteins and peptides because of their poor oral bioavailability. However, oral route would be preferred to any other route because of its high levels of patient acceptance and long term compliance, which increases the therapeutic value of the drug. Designing and formulating a polypeptide drug delivery through the gastro intestinal tract has been a persistent challenge because of their unfavorable physicochemical properties, which includes enzymatic degradation, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. The main challenge is to improve the oral bioavailability from less than 1% to at least 30-50%. Consequently, efforts have intensified over the past few decades, where every oral dosage form used for the conventional small molecule drugs has been used to explore oral protein and peptide delivery. Various strategies currently under investigation include chemical modification, formulation vehicles and use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers and mucoadhesive polymers. This review summarizes different pharmaceutical approaches which overcome various physiological barriers that help to improve oral bioavailability that ultimately achieve formulation goals for oral delivery. PMID:20046732

  11. Controlled Ocular Drug Delivery with Nanomicelles

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Ravi D.; Khurana, Varun; Patel, Sulabh; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Many vision threatening ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and proliferative vitreoretinopathy may result in blindness. Ocular drug delivery specifically to the intraocular tissues remains a challenging task due to the presence of various physiological barriers. Nonetheless, recent advancements in the field of nanomicelle based novel drug delivery system could fulfil these unmet needs. Nanomicelles consists of amphiphilic molecules that self-assemble in aqueous media to form organized supramolecular structures. Micelles can be prepared in various sizes (10 to 1000nm) and shapes depending on the molecular weights of the core and corona forming blocks. Nanomicelles have been an attractive carriers for their potential to solubilize hydrophobic molecules in aqueous solution. In addition, small size in nanometer range and highly modifiable surface properties have been reported to be advantageous in ocular drug delivery. In the present review various factors influencing rationale design of nanomicelles formulation and disposition are discussed along with case studies. Despite the progress in the field, influence of various properties of nanomicelles such as size, shape, surface charge, rigidity of structure on ocular disposition need to be studied in further details to develop an efficient nanocarrier system. PMID:24888969

  12. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative.

  13. A model of axonal transport drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper a model of targeted drug delivery by means of active (motor-driven) axonal transport is developed. The model is motivated by recent experimental research by Filler et al. (A.G. Filler, G.T. Whiteside, M. Bacon, M. Frederickson, F.A. Howe, M.D. Rabinowitz, A.J. Sokoloff, T.W. Deacon, C. Abell, R. Munglani, J.R. Griffiths, B.A. Bell, A.M.L. Lever, Tri-partite complex for axonal transport drug delivery achieves pharmacological effect, Bmc Neuroscience 11 (2010) 8) that reported synthesis and pharmacological efficiency tests of a tri-partite complex designed for axonal transport drug delivery. The developed model accounts for two populations of pharmaceutical agent complexes (PACs): PACs that are transported retrogradely by dynein motors and PACs that are accumulated in the axon at the Nodes of Ranvier. The transitions between these two populations of PACs are described by first-order reactions. An analytical solution of the coupled system of transient equations describing conservations of these two populations of PACs is obtained by using Laplace transform. Numerical results for various combinations of parameter values are presented and their physical significance is discussed.

  14. Biodegradable block copolymers as injectable drug-delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Byeongmoon; Bae, You Han; Lee, Doo Sung; Kim, Sung Wan

    1997-08-01

    Polymers that display a physicochemical response to stimuli are widely explored as potential drug-delivery systems. Stimuli studied to date include chemical substances and changes in temperature, pH and electric field. Homopolymers or copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide, and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (known as poloxamers) are typical examples of thermosensitive polymers, but their use in drug delivery is problematic because they are toxic and non-biodegradable. Biodegradable polymers used for drug delivery to date have mostly been in the form of injectable microspheres or implant systems, which require complicated fabrication processes using organic solvents. Such systems have the disadvantage that the use of organic solvents can cause denaturation when protein drugs are to be encapsulated. Furthermore, the solid form requires surgical insertion, which often results in tissue irritation and damage. Here we report the synthesis of a thermosensitive, biodegradable hydrogel consisting of blocks of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(L-lactic acid). Aqueous solutions of these copolymers exhibit temperature-dependent reversible gel-sol transitions. The hydrogel can be loaded with bioactive molecules in an aqueous phase at an elevated temperature (around 45 °C), where they form a sol. In this form, the polymer is injectable. On subcutaneous injection and subsequent rapid cooling to body temperature, the loaded copolymer forms a gel that can act as a sustained-release matrix for drugs.

  15. Prostate Cancer Relevant Antigens and Enzymes for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Barve, Ashutosh; Jin, Wei; Cheng, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the most widely used approaches in combating advanced prostate cancer, but its therapeutic efficacy is usually insufficient due to lack of specificity and associated toxicity. Lack of targeted delivery to prostate cancer cells is also the primary obstacles in achieving feasible therapeutic effect of other promising agents including peptide, protein, and nucleic acid. Consequently, there remains a critical need for strategies to increase the selectivity of anti-prostate cancer agents. This review will focus on various prostate cancer-specific antigens and enzymes that could be exploited for prostate cancer targeted drug delivery. Among various targeting strategies, active targeting is the most advanced approach to specifically deliver drugs to their designated cancer cells. In this approach, drug carriers are modified with targeting ligands that can specifically bind to prostate cancer-specific antigens. Moreover, there are several specific enzymes in the tumor microenvironment of prostate cancer that can be exploited for stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems. These systems can specifically release the active drug in the tumor microenvironment of prostate cancer, leading to enhanced tumor penetration efficiency. PMID:24878184

  16. Breast Cancer-Targeted Nuclear Drug Delivery Overcoming Drug Resistance for Breast Cancer Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    finished the task 1 - To synthesize and optimize folic-acid- or LHRHfunctionalized charge reversal nanoparticles . The cationic polymer PEI and its block...proposal is to develop nuclear localizing nanoparticles to delivery DNA-toxins breast cancer cell nuclei to effectively overcoming the drug resistance. We...copolymer. This polymer was used to fabricate the nanoparticles . The ideal nanoparticles with optimal sizes and acid-triggered negative-to-positive

  17. pH-responsive drug delivery system based on luminescent CaF(2):Ce(3+)/Tb(3+)-poly(acrylic acid) hybrid microspheres.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunlu; Zhang, Cuimiao; Cheng, Ziyong; Ma, Ping'an; Li, Chunxia; Kang, Xiaojiao; Yang, Dongmei; Lin, Jun

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we design a controlled release system based on CaF(2):Ce(3+)/Tb(3+)-poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) composite microspheres, which were fabricated by filling the pH-responsive PAA inside CaF(2):Ce(3+)/Tb(3+) hollow spheres via photopolymerization route. The CaF(2):Ce(3+)/Tb(3+) hollow spheres prepared by hydrothermal route possess mesoporous structure and show strong green fluorescence from Tb(3+) under UV excitation. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a widely used anti-cancer drug, was used as a model drug to evaluate the loading and controlled release behaviors of the composite microspheres due to the good biocompatibility of the samples using MTT assay. The composite carriers provide a strongly pH-dependent drug release behavior owing to the intrinsic property of PAA and its interactions with DOX. The endocytosis process of drug-loaded microspheres was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and the in vitro cytotoxic effect against SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells of the DOX-loaded carriers was investigated. In addition, the extent of drug release could be monitored by the altering of photoluminescence (PL) intensity of CaF(2):Ce(3+)/Tb(3+). Considering the good biocompatibility, high drug loading content and pH-dependent drug release of the materials, these hybrid luminescent microspheres have potential applications in drug controlled release and disease therapy.

  18. Drug Delivery to CNS: Challenges and Opportunities with Emphasis on Biomaterials Based Drug Delivery Strategies.

    PubMed

    Khambhla, Ekta; Shah, Viral; Baviskar, Kalpesh

    2016-01-01

    The current epoch has witnessed a lifestyle impregnated with stress, which is a major cause of several neurological disorders. High morbidity and mortality rate due to neurological diseases and disorders have generated a huge social impact. Despite voluminous research, patients suffering from fatal and/or debilitating CNS diseases such as brain tumors, HIV, encephalopathy, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, Parkinson's, migraine and multiple sclerosis outnumbered those suffering from systemic cancer or heart diseases. The brain being a highly sensitive neuronal organ, has evolved with vasculature barriers, which regulates the efflux and influx of substances to CNS. Treatment of CNS diseases/disorders is challenging because of physiologic, metabolic and biochemical obstacles created by these barriers which comprise mainly of BBB and BCFB. The inability of achieving therapeutically active concentration has become the bottleneck level difficulty, hampering the therapeutic efficiency of several promising drug candidates for CNS related disorders. Parallel maturation of an effective CNS drug delivery strategy with CNS drug discovery is the need of the hour. Recently, the focus of the pharmaceutical community has aggravated in the direction of developing novel and more efficient drug delivery systems, giving the potential of more effective and safer CNS therapies. The present review outlines several hurdles in drug delivery to the CNS along with ideal physicochemical properties desired in drug substance/formulation for CNS delivery. The review also focuses on different conventional and novel strategies for drug delivery to the CNS. The article also assesses and emphasizes on possible benefits of biomaterial based formulations for drug delivery to the CNS.

  19. Novel drug delivery strategies for porphyrins and porphyrin precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, D. I. J.; Donnelly, R. F.

    2009-06-01

    superficial lesions, such as actinic keratosis. In addition, photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is attracting increasing interest for the treatment of infection. However, delivery strategies for topical PDT and PACT are still based on application of rather simplistic cream and solution formulations, with little consideration given to thermodynamics, targeting or the physicochemical properties of the active agent. Purpose-designed dosage forms for topical delivery of aminolevulinic acid or its esters include creams containing penetration enhancers and/or iron chelators, pressure sensitive patches and bioadhesive patches. Such systems aim to enhance drug delivery across the stratum corneum and keratinised debris overlying neoplastic lesions and improve subsequent protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) production. The alternative to using porphyrin precursors is the use of pre-formed photosensitisers. However, owing to their relatively high molecular weights, conventional topical application is not appropriate. Innovative strategies, such as the use of needle-free injections and microneedle arrays, bypass the stratum corneum, enabling rapid and targeted delivery not only porphyrin precursors but also pre-formed photosensitisers. This presentation will review drug delivery work published to date in the fields of PDT and PACT. In addition, the benefits of employing the latest advances in pharmaceutical technology will be highlighted.

  20. Sulfonate-modified phenylboronic acid-rich nanoparticles as a novel mucoadhesive drug delivery system for vaginal administration of protein therapeutics: improved stability, mucin-dependent release and effective intravaginal placement.

    PubMed

    Li, ChunYan; Huang, ZhiGang; Liu, ZheShuo; Ci, LiQian; Liu, ZhePeng; Liu, Yu; Yan, XueYing; Lu, WeiYue

    Effective interaction between mucoadhesive drug delivery systems and mucin is the basis of effective local placement of drugs to play its therapeutic role after mucosal administration including vaginal use, which especially requires prolonged drug presence for the treatment of gynecological infectious diseases. Our previous report on phenylboronic acid-rich nanoparticles (PBNPs) demonstrated their strong interaction with mucin and mucin-sensitive release profiles of the model protein therapeutics interferon (IFN) in vitro, but their poor stability and obvious tendency to aggregate over time severely limited future application. In this study, sulfonate-modified PBNPs (PBNP-S) were designed as a stable mucoadhesive drug delivery system where the negative charges conferred by sulfonate groups prevented aggregation of nanoparticles and the phenylboronic acid groups ensured effective interaction with mucin over a wide pH range. Results suggested that PBNP-S were of spherical morphology with narrow size distribution (123.5 nm, polydispersity index 0.050), good stability over a wide pH range and 3-month storage and considerable in vitro mucoadhesion capability at vaginal pH as shown by mucin adsorption determination. IFN could be loaded to PBNP-S by physical adsorption with high encapsulation efficiency and released in a mucin-dependent manner in vitro. In vivo near-infrared fluorescent whole animal imaging and quantitative vaginal lavage followed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay of IFN demonstrated that PBNP-S could stay in the vagina and maintain intravaginal IFN level for much longer time than IFN solution (24 hours vs several hours) without obvious histological irritation to vaginal mucosa after vaginal administration to mice. In summary, good stability, easy loading and controllable release of protein therapeutics, in vitro and in vivo mucoadhesive properties and local safety of PBNP-S suggested it as a promising nanoscale mucoadhesive drug delivery

  1. Sulfonate-modified phenylboronic acid-rich nanoparticles as a novel mucoadhesive drug delivery system for vaginal administration of protein therapeutics: improved stability, mucin-dependent release and effective intravaginal placement

    PubMed Central

    Li, ChunYan; Huang, ZhiGang; Liu, ZheShuo; Ci, LiQian; Liu, ZhePeng; Liu, Yu; Yan, XueYing; Lu, WeiYue

    2016-01-01

    Effective interaction between mucoadhesive drug delivery systems and mucin is the basis of effective local placement of drugs to play its therapeutic role after mucosal administration including vaginal use, which especially requires prolonged drug presence for the treatment of gynecological infectious diseases. Our previous report on phenylboronic acid-rich nanoparticles (PBNPs) demonstrated their strong interaction with mucin and mucin-sensitive release profiles of the model protein therapeutics interferon (IFN) in vitro, but their poor stability and obvious tendency to aggregate over time severely limited future application. In this study, sulfonate-modified PBNPs (PBNP-S) were designed as a stable mucoadhesive drug delivery system where the negative charges conferred by sulfonate groups prevented aggregation of nanoparticles and the phenylboronic acid groups ensured effective interaction with mucin over a wide pH range. Results suggested that PBNP-S were of spherical morphology with narrow size distribution (123.5 nm, polydispersity index 0.050), good stability over a wide pH range and 3-month storage and considerable in vitro mucoadhesion capability at vaginal pH as shown by mucin adsorption determination. IFN could be loaded to PBNP-S by physical adsorption with high encapsulation efficiency and released in a mucin-dependent manner in vitro. In vivo near-infrared fluorescent whole animal imaging and quantitative vaginal lavage followed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay of IFN demonstrated that PBNP-S could stay in the vagina and maintain intravaginal IFN level for much longer time than IFN solution (24 hours vs several hours) without obvious histological irritation to vaginal mucosa after vaginal administration to mice. In summary, good stability, easy loading and controllable release of protein therapeutics, in vitro and in vivo mucoadhesive properties and local safety of PBNP-S suggested it as a promising nanoscale mucoadhesive drug delivery

  2. Drug Delivery to the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Brandon J.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia occurs when blood flow to the brain is insufficient to meet metabolic demand. This can result from cerebral artery occlusion that interrupts blood flow, limits CNS supply of oxygen and glucose, and causes an infarction/ischemic stroke. Ischemia initiates a cascade of molecular events inneurons and cerebrovascular endothelial cells including energy depletion, dissipation of ion gradients, calcium overload, excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, and accumulation of ions and fluid. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with cerebral ischemia and leads to vasogenic edema, a primary cause of stroke-associated mortality. To date, only a single drug has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for acute ischemic stroke treatment, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). While rt-PA therapy restores perfusion to ischemic brain, considerable tissue damage occurs when cerebral blood flow is re-established. Therefore, there is a critical need for novel therapeutic approaches that can “rescue” salvageable brain tissue and/or protect BBB integrity during ischemic stroke. One class of drugs that may enable neural cell rescue following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e., statins). Understanding potential CNS drug delivery pathways for statins is critical to their utility in ischemic stroke. Here, we review molecular pathways associated with cerebral ischemia and novel approaches for delivering drugs to treat ischemic disease. Specifically, we discuss utility of endogenous BBB drug uptake transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs/Oatps) and nanotechnology-based carriers for optimization of CNS drug delivery. Overall, this chapter highlights state-of-the-art technologies that may improve pharmacotherapy of cerebral ischemia. PMID:25307217

  3. Insight to drug delivery aspects for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gulbake, Arvind; Jain, Aviral; Jain, Ashish; Jain, Ankit; Jain, Sanjay K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed worldwide in human beings. Surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies are the conventional four approaches which are currently used for the treatment of CRC. The site specific delivery of chemotherapeutics to their site of action would increase effectiveness with reducing side effects. Targeted oral drug delivery systems based on polysaccharides are being investigated to target and deliver chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents directly to colon and rectum. Site-specific drug delivery to colon increases its concentration at the target site, and thus requires a lower dose and hence abridged side effects. Some novel therapies are also briefly discussed in article such as receptor (epidermal growth factor receptor, folate receptor, wheat germ agglutinin, VEGF receptor, hyaluronic acid receptor) based targeting therapy; colon targeted proapoptotic anticancer drug delivery system, gene therapy. Even though good treatment options are available for CRC, the ultimate therapeutic approach is to avert the incidence of CRC. It was also found that CRCs could be prevented by diet and nutrition such as calcium, vitamin D, curcumin, quercetin and fish oil supplements. Immunotherapy and vaccination are used nowadays which are showing better results against CRC. PMID:26811609

  4. Exosome mimetics: a novel class of drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kooijmans, Sander A A; Vader, Pieter; van Dommelen, Susan M; van Solinge, Wouter W; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2012-01-01

    The identification of extracellular phospholipid vesicles as conveyors of cellular information has created excitement in the field of drug delivery. Biological therapeutics, including short interfering RNA and recombinant proteins, are prone to degradation, have limited ability to cross biological membranes, and may elicit immune responses. Therefore, delivery systems for such drugs are under intensive investigation. Exploiting extracellular vesicles as carriers for biological therapeutics is a promising strategy to overcome these issues and to achieve efficient delivery to the cytosol of target cells. Exosomes are a well studied class of extracellular vesicles known to carry proteins and nucleic acids, making them especially suitable for such strategies. However, the considerable complexity and the related high chance of off-target effects of these carriers are major barriers for translation to the clinic. Given that it is well possible that not all components of exosomes are required for their proper functioning, an alternative strategy would be to mimic these vesicles synthetically. By assembly of liposomes harboring only crucial components of natural exosomes, functional exosome mimetics may be created. The low complexity and use of well characterized components strongly increase the pharmaceutical acceptability of such systems. However, exosomal components that would be required for the assembly of functional exosome mimetics remain to be identified. This review provides insights into the composition and functional properties of exosomes, and focuses on components which could be used to enhance the drug delivery properties of exosome mimetics.

  5. Oral Delivery of Protein Drugs Bioencapsulated in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Plants cells are now approved by the FDA for cost-effective production of protein drugs (PDs) in large-scale current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) hydroponic growth facilities. In lyophilized plant cells, PDs are stable at ambient temperature for several years, maintaining their folding and efficacy. Upon oral delivery, PDs bioencapsulated in plant cells are protected in the stomach from acids and enzymes but are subsequently released into the gut lumen by microbes that digest the plant cell wall. The large mucosal area of the human intestine offers an ideal system for oral drug delivery. When tags (receptor-binding proteins or cell-penetrating peptides) are fused to PDs, they efficiently cross the intestinal epithelium and are delivered to the circulatory or immune system. Unique tags to deliver PDs to human immune or nonimmune cells have been developed recently. After crossing the epithelium, ubiquitous proteases cleave off tags at engineered sites. PDs are also delivered to the brain or retina by crossing the blood–brain or retinal barriers. This review highlights recent advances in PD delivery to treat Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, hypertension, Gaucher's or ocular diseases, as well as the development of affordable drugs by eliminating prohibitively expensive purification, cold chain and sterile delivery. PMID:27378236

  6. Protein-Based Nanomedicine Platforms for Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Ham, Aihui; Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-08-03

    Drug delivery systems have been developed for many years, however some limitations still hurdle the pace of going to clinical phase, for example, poor biodistribution, drug molecule cytotoxicity, tissue damage, quick clearance from the circulation system, solubility and stability of drug molecules. To overcome the limitations of drug delivery, biomaterials have to be developed and applied to drug delivery to protect the drug molecules and to enhance the drug’s efficacy. Protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery are platforms comprised of naturally self-assembled protein subunits of the same protein or a combination of proteins making up a complete system. They are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability coupled with low toxicity. A variety of proteins have been used and characterized for drug delivery systems including the ferritin/apoferritin protein cage, plant derived viral capsids, the small Heat shock protein (sHsp) cage, albumin, soy and whey protein, collagen, and gelatin. There are many different types and shapes that have been prepared to deliver drug molecules using protein-based platforms including the various protein cages, microspheres, nanoparticles, hydrogels, films, minirods and minipellets. There are over 30 therapeutic compounds that have been investigated with protein-based drug delivery platforms for the potential treatment of various cancers, infectious diseases, chronic diseases, autoimmune diseases. In protein-based drug delivery platforms, protein cage is the most newly developed biomaterials for drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Their uniform sizes, multifunctions, and biodegradability push them to the frontier for drug delivery. In this review, the recent strategic development of drug delivery has been discussed with a special emphasis upon the polymer based, especially protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery. The advantages and disadvantages are also

  7. Phospholipid nanodisc engineering for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Biocompatible mesoscale nanoparticles (5-100 nm in diameter) are attractive tools for drug delivery. Among them are several types of liposomes and polymer micelles already in clinical trial or use. Generally, biocompatibility of such particles is achieved by coating them with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Without PEG coating, particles are quickly trapped in the reticuloendothelial system when intravenously administered. However, recent studies have revealed several potential problems with PEG coating, including antigenicity and restriction of cellular uptake. This has motivated the development of alternative drug and gene delivery vehicles, including chemically and genetically engineered high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-like nanodiscs or "bicelles". HDL is a naturally occurring mesoscale nanoparticle that normally ferries cholesterol around in the body. Its initial "nascent" form is thought to be a simple 10 nm disc of phospholipids in a bilayer, and can be easily synthesized in vitro by mixing recombinant apoA-I proteins with various phospholipids. In this review, the use of synthetic HDL-like phospholipid nanodiscs as biocompatible drug carriers is summarized, focussing on manufacturing, size-control, drug loading and cell targeting.

  8. Silk Electrogel Based Gastroretentive Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianrui

    Gastric cancer has become a global pandemic and there is imperative to develop efficient therapies. Oral dosing strategy is the preferred route to deliver drugs for treating the disease. Recent studies suggested silk electro hydrogel, which is pH sensitive and reversible, has potential as a vehicle to deliver the drug in the stomach environment. The aim of this study is to establish in vitro electrogelation e-gel based silk gel as a gastroretentive drug delivery system. We successfully extended the duration of silk e-gel in artificial gastric juice by mixing silk solution with glycerol at different ratios before the electrogelation. Structural analysis indicated the extended duration was due to the change of beta sheet content. The glycerol mixed silk e-gel had good doxorubicin loading capability and could release doxorubicin in a sustained-release profile. Doxorubicin loaded silk e-gels were applied to human gastric cancer cells. Significant cell viability decrease was observed. We believe that with further characterization as well as functional analysis, the silk e-gel system has the potential to become an effective vehicle for gastric drug delivery applications.

  9. Microemulsions based transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Harini C; Narendran, Hyndavi; Nagaswaram, Tejeswari; Yaga, Gowri; Thanniru, Jyotsna; Yalavarthi, Prasanna R

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of microemulsions by Jack H Schulman, there has been huge progress made in applying microemulsion systems in plethora of research and industrial process. Microemulsions are optically isotropic systems consisting of water, oil and amphiphile. These systems are beneficial due to their thermodynamic stability, optical clarity, ease of preparation, higher diffusion and absorption rates. Moreover, it has been reported that the ingredients of microemulsion can effectively overcome the diffusion barrier and penetrate through the stratum corneum of the skin. Hence it becomes promising for both transdermal and dermal drug delivery. However, low viscosity of microemulsion restrains its applicability in pharmaceutical industry. To overcome the above drawback, the low viscous microemulsions were added to viscous gel bases to potentiate its applications as topical drug delivery systems so that various drug related toxic effects and erratic drug absorption can be avoided. The present review deals with the microemulsions, various techniques involved in the development of organic nanoparticles. The review emphasized on microemulsion based systems such as hydrogels and organogels. The physicochemical characteristics, mechanical properties, rheological and stability principles involved in microemulsion based viscous gels were also explored.

  10. Iontophoretic delivery of lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs from lipid nanoparticles across human skin.

    PubMed

    Charoenputtakun, Ponwanit; Li, S Kevin; Ngawhirunpat, Tanansait

    2015-11-10

    The combined effects of iontophoresis and lipid nanoparticles on drug delivery across human epidermal membrane (HEM) were investigated. The delivery of lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs, all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), salicylate (SA), and acyclovir (ACV), across HEM from lipid nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), was compared in passive and iontophoresis experiments in vitro. Iontophoresis experiments were also performed with synthetic Nuclepore membrane for comparison. Drug distribution in the skin after iontophoretic delivery with the lipid nanoparticles was examined using a model probe rhodamine B base (RhoB). The drug-loaded lipid nanoparticles had average sizes of ∼ 118-169 nm and a negative zeta potential. Iontophoresis did not enhance the delivery of ATRA across HEM from SLN and NLC. However, HEM distribution study of RhoB suggested that lipophilic drugs could be delivered into the deeper layer of the skin following iontophoretic delivery of the drugs from the lipid nanoparticles. Iontophoresis enhanced the delivery of hydrophilic drug SA with the lipid nanoparticles. Similarly, iontophoresis enhanced the delivery of ACV when it was loaded in SLN. These results suggest that lipid nanoparticles are a promising drug delivery method that can be combined with iontophoresis to improve skin delivery of hydrophilic drugs.

  11. Light induced cytosolic drug delivery from liposomes with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Tatu; Viitala, Lauri; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Laaksonen, Timo; Liang, Huamin; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina; Viitala, Tapani; Le Guével, Xavier; Yliperttula, Marjo; Murtomäki, Lasse; Urtti, Arto

    2015-04-10

    Externally triggered drug release at defined targets allows site- and time-controlled drug treatment regimens. We have developed liposomal drug carriers with encapsulated gold nanoparticles for triggered drug release. Light energy is converted to heat in the gold nanoparticles and released to the lipid bilayers. Localized temperature increase renders liposomal bilayers to be leaky and triggers drug release. The aim of this study was to develop a drug releasing system capable of releasing its cargo to cell cytosol upon triggering with visible and near infrared light signals. The liposomes were formulated using either heat-sensitive or heat- and pH-sensitive lipid compositions with star or rod shaped gold nanoparticles. Encapsulated fluorescent probe, calcein, was released from the liposomes after exposure to the light. In addition, the pH-sensitive formulations showed a faster drug release in acidic conditions than in neutral conditions. The liposomes were internalized into human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and did not show any cellular toxicity. The light induced cytosolic delivery of calcein from the gold nanoparticle containing liposomes was shown, whereas no cytosolic release was seen without light induction or without gold nanoparticles in the liposomes. The light activated liposome formulations showed a controlled content release to the cellular cytosol at a specific location and time. Triggering with visual and near infrared light allows good tissue penetration and safety, and the pH-sensitive liposomes may enable selective drug release in the intracellular acidic compartments (endosomes, lysosomes). Thus, light activated liposomes with gold nanoparticles are an attractive option for time- and site-specific drug delivery into the target cells.

  12. Recent advances in chitosan-based nanoparticulate pulmonary drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nazrul; Ferro, Vito

    2016-07-01

    The advent of biodegradable polymer-encapsulated drug nanoparticles has made the pulmonary route of administration an exciting area of drug delivery research. Chitosan, a natural biodegradable and biocompatible polysaccharide has received enormous attention as a carrier for drug delivery. Recently, nanoparticles of chitosan (CS) and its synthetic derivatives have been investigated for the encapsulation and delivery of many drugs with improved targeting and controlled release. Herein, recent advances in the preparation and use of micro-/nanoparticles of chitosan and its derivatives for pulmonary delivery of various therapeutic agents (drugs, genes, vaccines) are reviewed. Although chitosan has wide applications in terms of formulations and routes of drug delivery, this review is focused on pulmonary delivery of drug-encapsulated nanoparticles of chitosan and its derivatives. In addition, the controversial toxicological effects of chitosan nanoparticles for lung delivery will also be discussed.

  13. Porous Hydroxyapatite Bioceramic Scaffolds for Drug Delivery and Bone Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loca, Dagnija; Locs, Janis; Salma, Kristine; Gulbis, Juris; Salma, Ilze; Berzina-Cimdina, Liga

    2011-10-01

    The conventional methods of supplying a patient with pharmacologic active substances suffer from being very poorly selective, so that damage can occurs to the healthy tissues and organs, different from the intended target. In addition, high drug doses can be required to achieve the desired effect. An alternative approach is based on the use of implantable delivery tools, able to release the active substance in a controlled way. In the current research local drug delivery devices containing 8mg of gentamicin sulphate were prepared using custom developed vacuum impregnation technique. In vitro dissolution tests showed that gentamicin release was sustained for 12h. In order to decrease gentamicin release rate, biopolymer coatings were applied and coating structure investigated. The results showed that gentamicin release can be sustained for more than 70h for poly(epsilon-caprolactone) coated calcium phosphate scaffolds. From poly lactic acid and polyvinyl alcohol coated scaffolds gentamicin was released within 20h and 50h, respectively.

  14. Topical Drug Delivery for Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jonathan; Lane, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis is a multifactorial disorder that may be heterogeneous in presentation and clinical course. While the introduction of endoscopic sinus surgery revolutionized surgical management and has led to significantly improved patient outcomes, medical therapy remains the foundation of long-term care of chronic rhinosinusitis, particularly in surgically recalcitrant cases. A variety of devices and pharmaceutical agents have been developed to apply topical medical therapy to the sinuses, taking advantage of the access provided by endoscopic surgery. The goal of topical therapy is to address the inflammation, infection, and mucociliary dysfunction that underlies the disease. Major factors that impact success include the patient’s sinus anatomy and the dynamics of the delivery device. Despite a growing number of topical treatment options, the evidence-based literature to support their use is limited. In this article, we comprehensively review current delivery methods and the available topical agents. We also discuss biotechnological advances that promise enhanced delivery in the future, and evolving pharmacotherapeutical compounds that may be added to rhinologist’s armamentarium. A complete understand of topical drug delivery is increasingly essential to the management of chronic rhinosinusitis when traditional forms of medical therapy and surgery have failed. PMID:23525506

  15. Modulating the properties of sunflower oil based novel emulgels using castor oil fatty acid ester: prospects for topical antimicrobial drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Behera, B; Biswal, D; Uvanesh, K; Srivastava, A K; Bhattacharya, Mrinal K; Paramanik, K; Pal, K

    2015-04-01

    The current study describes the effect of polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) on the properties of sunflower oil and span-40 based emulgels. The prepared emulgels contained PGPR in varied concentrations. The microstructure of the emulgels was characterized by bright-field microscopy. The molecular interactions amongst the components of the emulgels were studied using FTIR spectroscopy. The flow and mechanical behaviors of the emulgels were studied using cone-and-plate viscometer and static mechanical tester, respectively. The efficiency of the metronidazole-loaded emulgels as antimicrobial formulations was tested in vitro. E. coli was used as the model microorganism for the antimicrobial study. The emulgels were also explored for iontophoretic delivery applications. The biocompatibility of the emulgels was tested using human keratinocytes (HaCaT). The microscopic evaluation of the emulgels indicated formation of biphasic formulations. FTIR studies suggested a decrease in the hydrogen bonding amongst the components of the emulgels as the concentration of the PGPR was increased. Viscosity studies indicated shear-thinning property of the emulgels. An increase in the PGPR concentration resulted in the reduction in the mechanical properties of the emulgels. Incorporation of PGPR resulted in the decrease in the drug released (both passive and iontophoresis) from the emulgels. The emulgels were found to be cytocompatible in the presence of keratinocytes. The drug loaded emulgels showed good antimicrobial activity against E. coli. In gist, the developed emulgels can be tried for controlled delivery of antimicrobial drugs. The physical and the release properties of the emulgels can be modulated by incorporating PGPR in varied proportions.

  16. Drug delivery's quest for polymers: Where are the frontiers?

    PubMed

    Merkle, Hans P

    2015-11-01

    Since the legendary 1964 article of Folkman and Long entitled "The use of silicone rubber as a carrier for prolonged drug therapy" the role of polymers in controlled drug delivery has come a long way. Today it is evident that polymers play a crucial if not the prime role in this field. The latest boost owes to the interest in drug delivery for the purpose of tissue engineering in regenerative medicine. The focus of this commentary is on a selection of general and personal observations that are characteristic for the current state of polymer therapeutics and carriers. It briefly highlights selected examples for the long march of synthetic polymer-drug conjugates from bench to bedside, comments on the ambivalence of selected polymers as inert excipients versus biological response modifiers, and on the yet unsolved dilemma of cationic polymers for the delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics. Further subjects are the complex design of multifunctional polymeric carriers including recent concepts towards functional supramolecular polymers, as well as observations on stimuli-sensitive polymers and the currently ongoing trend towards natural and naturally-derived biopolymers. The final topic is the discovery and early development of a novel type of biodegradable polyesters for parenteral use. Altogether, it is not the basic and applied research in polymer therapeutics and carriers, but the translational process that is the key hurdle to proceed towards an authoritative approval of new polymer therapeutics and carriers.

  17. Oral Drug Delivery Systems Comprising Altered Geometric Configurations for Controlled Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E.; du Toit, Lisa C.; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix® multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise®, which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix® as well as “release modules assemblage”, which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments. PMID:22312236

  18. Spatiotemporal drug delivery using laser-generated-focused ultrasound system

    PubMed Central

    Di, Jin; Kim, Jinwook; Hu, Quanyin; Jiang, Xiaoning; Gu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Laser-generated-focused ultrasound (LGFU) holds promise for the high-precision ultrasound therapy owing to its tight focal spot, broad frequency band, and stable excitation with minimal ultrasound-induced heating. We here report the development of the LGFU as a stimulus for promoted drug release from microgels integrated with drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles. The pulsed waves of ultrasound, generated by a carbon black/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-photoacoustic lens, were introduced to trigger the drug release from alginate microgels encapsulated with drug-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. We demonstrated the antibacterial capability of this drug delivery system against Escherichia coli by the disk diffusion method, and antitumor efficacy toward the HeLa cell-derived tumor spheroids in vitro. This novel LGFU-responsive drug delivery system provides a simple and remote approach to precisely control the release of therapeutics in a spatiotemporal manner and potentially suppress detrimental effects to the surrounding tissue, such as thermal ablation. PMID:26299506

  19. Formulation and evaluation of transdermal drug delivery of topiramate

    PubMed Central

    Cherukuri, Suneetha; Batchu, Uma Rajeswari; Mandava, Kiranmai; Cherukuri, Vidhyullatha; Ganapuram, Koteswara Rao

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) was designed to sustain the release and improve the bioavailability of drug and patient compliance. Among the various types of transdermal patches, matrix dispersion type systems disperse the drug in the solvent along with the polymers and solvent is allowed to evaporate forming a homogeneous drug-polymer matrix. The objective of the present study was to design and formulate TDDS of topiramate (TPM) and to evaluate their extended release in vitro and ex vivo. Materials and Methods: In the present study, an attempt has been made to develop a matrix-type transdermal therapeutic system comprising TPM with different ratios of hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymeric combinations using solvent casting technique. Results: The physicochemical compatibility of the drug and the polymers was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results obtained showed no physical-chemical incompatibility between the drug and the polymers. The patches were further subjected to various physical evaluations along with the ex vivo permeation studies using pig ear skin. Conclusions: On the basis of results obtained from the physical evaluation and ex vivo studies the patches containing the polymers, that is, Eudragit L 100 and polyvinylpyrrolidone, with oleic acid as the penetration enhancer were considered as the best formulations for the transdermal delivery of TPM.

  20. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Caskey, Charles F

    2017-03-02

    Ultrasound is a rapidly advancing field with many emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications. For diagnostics, new vascular targets are routinely identified and mature technologies are being translated to humans, while other recent innovations may bring about the creation of acoustic reporter genes and micron-scale resolution with ultrasound. As a cancer therapy, ultrasound is being explored as an adjuvant to immune therapies and to deliver acoustically or thermally active drugs to tumor regions. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) could potentially be very impactful for brain cancers and neurodegenerative diseases where the BBB often impedes the delivery of therapeutic molecules. In this minireview, we provide an overview of these topics in the field of ultrasound that are especially relevant to the interests of World Molecular Imaging Society.

  1. Mechanical properties and dual drug delivery application of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds fabricated with a poly(β-amino ester) porogen.

    PubMed

    Clark, Amanda; Milbrandt, Todd A; Hilt, J Zach; Puleo, David A

    2014-05-01

    Polymeric scaffolds that are biocompatible and biodegradable are widely used for tissue engineering applications. Scaffolds can be further enhanced by enabling the release of one or more drugs to stimulate regeneration or for the treatment of a specific disease or condition. In this study, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres were mixed with poly(β-amino ester) (PBAE) particles to create novel hybrid scaffolds capable of dual release of drug and growth factor. Fast-degrading PBAE particles loaded with the drug ketoprofen acted as porogens that provided a rapid 12h release. The PLGA microspheres were loaded with a growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein 2, and fused together around the porogens to create a slow-degrading matrix that provided sustained release lasting 70days. Drug release was further tailored by varying the amount of porogen added to the scaffold. Bioactivity measurements demonstrated that the scaffold fabrication technique did not damage the drug or protein. The compressive modulus was affected by the amount of porogen added, extending from 50 to 111MPa for loadings from 60 to 40% PBAE, and after 5days of degradation, it decreased to 0.6 to 1.1kPa when the porogen was gone. PLGA containing a quick-degrading porogen can be used to release two drugs while developing a porous microarchitecture for cell ingrowth with in a matrix capable of maintaining a compressive modulus applicable for soft tissue implants.

  2. Overview on gastroretentive drug delivery systems for improving drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla M; Bettencourt, Catarina; Rossi, Alessandra; Buttini, Francesca; Barata, Pedro

    2016-08-20

    In recent decades, many efforts have been made in order to improve drug bioavailability after oral administration. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems are a good example; they emerged to enhance the bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs with a narrow absorption window in the upper gastrointestinal tract and/or to promote local activity in the stomach and duodenum. Several strategies are used to increase the gastric residence time, namely bioadhesive or mucoadhesive systems, expandable systems, high-density systems, floating systems, superporous hydrogels and magnetic systems. The present review highlights some of the drugs that can benefit from gastroretentive strategies, such as the factors that influence gastric retention time and the mechanism of action of gastroretentive systems, as well as their classification into single and multiple unit systems.

  3. A new approach in gastroretentive drug delivery system using cholestyramine.

    PubMed

    Umamaheshwari, R B; Jain, Subheet; Jain, N K

    2003-01-01

    We prepared cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)-coated cholestyramine microcapsules as a intragastric floating drug delivery system endowed with floating ability due to the carbon dioxide generation when exposed to the gastric fluid. The microcapsules also have a mucoadhesive property. Ion-exchange resin particles can be loaded with bicarbonate followed by acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) and coated with CAB by emulsion solvent evaporation method. The drug concentration was monitored to maintain the floating property and minimum effective concentration. The effect of CAB: drug-resin ratio (2:1, 4:1, 6:1 w/w) on the particle size, floating time, and drug release was determined. Cholestyramine microcapsules were characterized for shape, surface characteristics, and size distribution; cholestyramine/acetohydroxamic acid interactions inside microcapsules were investigated by X-ray diffractometry. The buoyancy time of CAB-coated formulations was better than that of uncoated resin particles. Also, a longer floating time was observed with a higher polymer:drug resin complex ratio (6:1). With increasing coating thickness the particle size was increased but drug release rate was decreased. The drug release rate was higher in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) than in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). The in vivo mucoadhesion studies were performed with rhodamine-isothiocyanate (RITC) by fluorescent probe method. The amount of CAB-coated cholestyramine microcapsules that remained in the stomach was slightly lower than that of uncoated resin particles. Cholestyramine microcapsules were distributed throughout the stomach and exhibited prolonged gastric residence via mucoadhesion. These results suggest that CAB-coated microcapsules could be a floating as well as a mucoadhesive drug delivery system. Thus, it has promise in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

  4. Drug transport and drug delivery--the Midnight Sun meeting.

    PubMed

    Uchegbu, Ijeoma F

    2004-08-01

    The Midnight Sun Meeting on Drug Transport and Drug Delivery was held on the island of Tromso in northern Norway, where the sun does not set for 2 months during the summer. The meeting was hosted by the University of Tromso's newly established Institute of Pharmacy and the Controlled Release Society (Nordic Chapter). The meeting, attended by approximately 80 delegates from across Europe, showcased recent advances in drug transport through biological barriers, solid-state pharmaceuticals and particulate drug delivery systems. This report will focus on the particulate and solid-state pharmaceuticals sessions, in which lectures were given to demonstrate the benefits in cognitive function associated with omega-3 fish oils, the increase in drug release rates observed on the processing-induced deformation of tablet granules, and the size of polymeric particulates being directly and linearly related to the molecular weight of a polymer. The meeting was held as a single-session event, giving delegates the opportunity to attend all presentations. There was a small poster and exhibitor display, and the meeting attracted sponsorship from a number of companies, namely Polypure AS, Weifa AS, ProBioNeutraceuticals AS, Lipoid GmbH, Clavis Pharma AS and Thermometric AB.

  5. [Studies on market of drug delivery system product and drug delivery system of compound Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Xu, De-Sheng; Hong, Yan-Long; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Yue-Ming

    2006-10-01

    Based on the progress in the world market of drug delivery system (DDS) product and the research profile of DDS of compound Chinese Medicine, The article puts forward a new method of studies on DDS of compound Chinese Medicine. It is expected that the theory of compatibility of compound Chinese Medicine can be shown and its role can be exerted to the largest extent with the application of pharmaceutics technology to change the mode of drug delivery of activated components of compound Chinese Medicine.

  6. Transdermal patch drug delivery interactions with exercise.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Thomas L; Gillespie, Nicole

    2011-03-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems, such as the transdermal patch, continue to be a popular and convenient way to administer medications. There are currently several medications that use a transdermal patch drug delivery system. This article describes the potential untoward side effects of increased drug absorption through the use of a transdermal patch in individuals who exercise or participate in sporting events. Four studies have been reported that demonstrate a significant increase in the plasma concentration of nitroglycerin when individuals exercise compared with rest. Likewise, several case reports and two studies have been conducted that demonstrate nicotine toxicity and increased plasma nicotine while wearing a nicotine patch in individuals who exercise or participate in sporting events compared with rest. Healthcare providers, trainers and coaches should be aware of proper transdermal patch use, especially while exercising, in order to provide needed information to their respective patients and athletes to avoid potential untoward side effects. Particular caution should be given to individuals who participate in an extreme sporting event of long duration. Further research that includes more medications is needed in this area.

  7. Nanoparticle carriers based on copolymers of poly( l-aspartic acid co- l-lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Siyuan; Wang, Huan; Liang, Xingjie; Hu, Liming; Li, Min; Wu, Yan

    2011-09-01

    A novel poly( l-aspartic) derivative (PAL-DPPE) containing polylactide and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE) segments has been successfully synthesized. The chemical structures of the copolymers were confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), NMR (1H NMR, 13C NMR, 31P NMR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the formation of micelles of the PAL-DPPE copolymers. In order to estimate the feasibility as novel drug carriers, an anti-tumor model drug doxorubicin (DOX) was incorporated into polymeric micelles by double emulsion and nanoprecipitation method. The DOX-loaded micelle size, size distribution, and encapsulation efficiency (EE) were influenced by the feed weight ratio of the copolymer to DOX. In addition, in vitro release experiments of the DOX-loaded PAL-DPPE micelles exhibited that faster release in pH 5.0 than their release in pH 7.4 buffer. The poly( l-aspartic) derivative copolymer was proved to be an available carrier for the preparation of micelles for anti-tumor drug delivery.

  8. Dendrimer based nanotherapeutics for ocular drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambhampati, Siva Pramodh

    PAMAM dendrimers are a class of well-defined, hyperbranched polymeric nanocarriers that are being investigated for ocular drug and gene delivery. Their favorable properties such as small size, multivalency and water solubility can provide significant opportunities for many biologically unstable drugs and allows potentially favorable ocular biodistribution. This work exploits hydroxyl terminated dendrimers (G4-OH) as drug/gene delivery vehicles that can target retinal microglia and pigment epithelium via systemic delivery with improved efficacy at much lower concentrations without any side effects. Two different drugs Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) and N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) conjugated to G4-OH dendrimers showed tailorable sustained release in physiological relevant solutions and were evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Dendrimer-TA conjugates enhanced the solubility of TA and were 100 fold more effective at lower concentrations than free TA in its anti-inflammatory activity in activated microglia and in suppressing VEGF production in hypoxic RPE cells. Dendrimers targeted activated microglia/macrophages and RPE and retained for a period of 21 days in I/R mice model. The relative retention of intravitreal and intravenous dendrimers was comparable, if a 30-fold intravenous dose is used; suggesting intravenous route targeting retinal diseases are possible with dendrimers. D-NAC when injected intravenously attenuated retinal and choroidal inflammation, significantly reduced (˜73%) CNV growth at early stage of AMD in rat model of CNV. A combination therapy of D-NAC + D-TA significantly suppressed microglial activation and promoted CNV regression in late stages of AMD without causing side-effects. G4-OH was modified with linker having minimal amine groups and incorporation of TA as a nuclear localization enhancer resulted in compact gene vectors with favorable safety profile and achieved high levels of transgene expression in hard to transfect human retinal pigment

  9. Laser assisted Drug Delivery: Grundlagen und Praxis.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stephan Alexander; Schrumpf, Holger; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Homey, Bernhard; Gerber, Peter Arne

    2016-05-01

    Die topische Applikation von Wirkstoffen ist eine zentrale Therapieoption der Dermatologie. Allerdings mindert die effektive Barrierefunktion der Haut die Bioverfügbarkeit der meisten Externa. Fraktionierte ablative Laser stellen ein innovatives Verfahren dar, um die epidermale Barriere standardisiert, kontaktfrei zu überwinden. Die Bioverfügbarkeit im Anschluss applizierter Externa wird im Sinne einer laser assisted drug delivery (LADD) signifikant gesteigert. Das Prinzip der LADD wird bereits in einigen Bereichen der Dermatologie erfolgreich eingesetzt. Die vorliegende Übersichtsarbeit soll einen Überblick über die aktuellen aber auch perspektivischen Einsatzmöglichkeiten der LADD bieten.

  10. Biomedical Imaging in Implantable Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haoyan; Hernandez, Christopher; Goss, Monika; Gawlik, Anna; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery systems (DDS) provide a platform for sustained release of therapeutic agents over a period of weeks to months and sometimes years. Such strategies are typically used clinically to increase patient compliance by replacing frequent administration of drugs such as contraceptives and hormones to maintain plasma concentration within the therapeutic window. Implantable or injectable systems have also been investigated as a means of local drug administration which favors high drug concentration at a site of interest, such as a tumor, while reducing systemic drug exposure to minimize unwanted side effects. Significant advances in the field of local DDS have led to increasingly sophisticated technology with new challenges including quantification of local and systemic pharmacokinetics and implant-body interactions. Because many of these sought-after parameters are highly dependent on the tissue properties at the implantation site, and rarely represented adequately with in vitro models, new nondestructive techniques that can be used to study implants in situ are highly desirable. Versatile imaging tools can meet this need and provide quantitative data on morphological and functional aspects of implantable systems. The focus of this review article is an overview of current biomedical imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, X-ray and computed tomography (CT), and their application in evaluation of implantable DDS. PMID:25418857

  11. Light activated liposomes: Functionality and prospects in ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Tatu; Nurmi, Riikka; Kontturi, Leena; Viitala, Lauri; Yliperttula, Marjo; Murtomäki, Lasse; Urtti, Arto

    2016-12-28

    Ocular drug delivery, especially to the retina and choroid, is a major challenge in drug development. Liposome technology may be useful in ophthalmology in enabling new routes of delivery, prolongation of drug action and intracellular drug delivery, but drug release from the liposomes should be controlled. For that purpose, light activation may be an approach to release drug at specified time and site in the eye. Technical advances have been made in the field of light activated drug release, particularly indocyanine green loaded liposomes are a promising approach with safe materials and effective light triggered release of small and large molecules. This review discusses the liposomal drug delivery with light activated systems in the context of ophthalmic drug delivery challenges.

  12. Fabrication of coated polymer microneedles for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Chen, Bo Zhi; Wang, Qi Lei; Jin, Xuan; Guo, Xin Dong

    2017-03-23

    As an alternative to hypodermic needles, coated polymer microneedles (MNs) are able to deliver drugs to subcutaneous tissues after being inserted into the skin. The dip-coating process is a versatile, rapid fabricating method that can form coated MNs in a short time. However, it is still a challenge to fabricate coated MNs with homogeneous and precise drug doses in the dip-coating process. In this study, to fabricate coated polymer microneedles with controlled drug loading, an adjustable apparatus that can be lifted and lowered was designed to immerse a polylactic acid (PLA) MN patch in the coating solutions. Using the coating solution containing 0.5% (w/w) sulforhodamine B, the drug loadings were up to 12ng, 14ng, and 18ng per needle for the MNs with heights of 550μm, 650μm, and 750μm, respectively. Moreover, for the MNs with a 650-μm height, when increasing the viscosity of the coating solutions from 150mPa·s to 1360mPa·s, 2850mPa·s, and 8200mPa·s, the drug loading increased from 2.5ng to 5ng, 14ng, and 22ng per needle, respectively. Meanwhile, the drug delivery efficiencies of these MNs were approximately 90%. In the insertion experiments, the MNs could successfully penetrate the skin and deliver the coated drug with approximately 90% efficiency when the MN tips were exposed to the outer environment. In vivo studies in mice indicated that the coated polymer MNs continuously delivered drugs, and the skin recovered without any injuries. These results demonstrated that the coated polymer MN was a safe and effective method for transdermal drug delivery.

  13. The role of alkyl chain length of monothiol-terminated alkyl carboxylic acid in the synthesis, characterization, and application of gelatin-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) carriers for antiglaucoma drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li-Jyuan; Lai, Jui-Yang

    2017-02-01

    To improve ocular bioavailability and extend pharmacological response, this study aims to investigate the role of alkyl chain length of monothiol-terminated alkyl carboxylic acids in the synthesis, characterization, and application of gelatin-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (GN) biodegradable in situ gelling carriers for antiglaucoma drug delivery. In the presence of mercaptoacetic acid (MAA), mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), mercaptobutyric acid (MBA), or mercaptohexanoic acid (MHA) as a chain transfer agent, the carboxylic end-capped poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) samples were prepared by free radical polymerization technique. Our results showed that with increasing alkyl chain length, the hydrophobicity of thermo-responsive polymer segments significantly increased, mainly due to an increase in CH stretching frequencies. In addition, the greater hydrophobic association favored the decrease in both phase transition temperature and weight loss of GN copolymers, thereby accelerating their temperature-triggered gelation process and retarding the degradation progress under physiological conditions. The benefits from these features allowed the pilocarpine carriers to increase drug payload and extend drug release. Irrespective of carbon number of monothiol-terminated alkyl carboxylic acid, the synthesized GN materials exhibited high tolerance to corneal endothelial cells without any evidence of inhibited proliferation, viability loss, inflammatory stimulation, and functional abnormality, indicating good biocompatibility. Results of clinical observations and histological examinations demonstrated that the therapeutic efficacies in treating glaucomatous damage are in response to in vivo drug release profiles from various intracamerally injected GN carriers. The research findings suggest the influence of alkyl chain length of chain transfer agent-mediated polymer hydrophobicity and degradability on pharmacological bioavailability and action of pilocarpine in a glaucomatous rabbit

  14. Implantable microchip: the futuristic controlled drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Kumar Bishwajit; Sumi, Chandra Datta

    2016-01-01

    There is no doubt that controlled and pulsatile drug delivery system is an important challenge in medicine over the conventional drug delivery system in case of therapeutic efficacy. However, the conventional drug delivery systems often offer a limited by their inability to drug delivery which consists of systemic toxicity, narrow therapeutic window, complex dosing schedule for long term treatment etc. Therefore, there has been a search for the drug delivery system that exhibit broad enhancing activity for more drugs with less complication. More recently, some elegant study has noted that, a new type of micro-electrochemical system or MEMS-based drug delivery systems called microchip has been improved to overcome the problems related to conventional drug delivery. Moreover, micro-fabrication technology has enabled to develop the implantable controlled released microchip devices with improved drug administration and patient compliance. In this article, we have presented an overview of the investigations on the feasibility and application of microchip as an advanced drug delivery system. Commercial manufacturing materials and methods, related other research works and current advancement of the microchips for controlled drug delivery have also been summarized.

  15. Exploiting EPR in polymer drug conjugate delivery for tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sweta; Prakash Jain, Jay; Domb, A J; Kumar, Neeraj

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of tumor tissue without affecting normal cells has always been formidable task for drug delivery scientists and this task is effectively executed by polymer drug conjugate (PDC) delivery. The novelty of this concept lies in the utilization of a physical mechanism called enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) for targeting tumors. EPR is a physiological phenomenon that is customary for fast growing tumor and solves the problem of targeting the miscreant tissue. PDCs offer added advantages of reduced deleterious effects of anticancer drugs and augmentation of its formulation capability (e.g. Solubility). There are now at least eleven PDCs that have entered phase I/II/III clinical trial as anticancer drugs. PDCs once entered into the tumor tissue, taking advantage of EPR, are endocytosed into the cell either by simple or receptor mediated endocytosis. Various polymeric carriers have been used with hydrolyzable linker arm for conjugation with bioactive moiety. The hydrolyzable linkages of PDC are broken down by acid hydrolyses of lysosomes and releases the drug. High concentrations of the chemotherapeutic agent are maintained near the nucleus, the target site. Passive targeting by PDCs is due to the physiological event of EPR, which is becoming one of the major thrust areas for targeting solid tumors.

  16. Injectable biopolymer based hydrogels for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Atta, Sadia; Khaliq, Shaista; Islam, Atif; Javeria, Irtaza; Jamil, Tahir; Athar, Muhammad Makshoof; Shafiq, Muhammad Imtiaz; Ghaffar, Abdul

    2015-09-01

    Biopolymer based pH-sensitive hydrogels were prepared using chitosan (CS) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) of different molecular weights in the presence of silane crosslinker. The incorporated components remain undissolved in different swelling media as they are connected by siloxane linkage which was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The swelling in water was enhanced by the addition of higher molecular weight PEG. The swelling behaviour of the hydrogels against pH showed high swelling in acidic and basic pH, whereas, low swelling was examined at pH 6 and 7. This characteristic pH responsive behaviour at neutral pH made them suitable for injectable controlled drug delivery. The controlled release analysis of Cefixime (CFX) (model drug) loaded CS/PEG hydrogel exhibited that the entire drug was released in 30 min in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) while in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), 85% of drug was released in controlled manner within 80 min. This inferred that the developed hydrogels can be an attractive biomaterial for injectable drug delivery with physiological pH and other biomedical applications.

  17. Ultrasound-Propelled Nanocups for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, James J; Myers, Rachel; Coviello, Christian M; Graham, Susan M; Shah, Apurva R; Stride, Eleanor; Carlisle, Robert C; Coussios, Constantin C

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-induced bubble activity (cavitation) has been recently shown to actively transport and improve the distribution of therapeutic agents in tumors. However, existing cavitation-promoting agents are micron-sized and cannot sustain cavitation activity over prolonged time periods because they are rapidly destroyed upon ultrasound exposure. A novel ultrasound-responsive single-cavity polymeric nanoparticle (nanocup) capable of trapping and stabilizing gas against dissolution in the bloodstream is reported. Upon ultrasound exposure at frequencies and intensities achievable with existing diagnostic and therapeutic systems, nanocups initiate and sustain readily detectable cavitation activity for at least four times longer than existing microbubble constructs in an in vivo tumor model. As a proof-of-concept of their ability to enhance the delivery of unmodified therapeutics, intravenously injected nanocups are also found to improve the distribution of a freely circulating IgG mouse antibody when the tumor is exposed to ultrasound. Quantification of the delivery distance and concentration of both the nanocups and coadministered model therapeutic in an in vitro flow phantom shows that the ultrasound-propelled nanocups travel further than the model therapeutic, which is itself delivered to hundreds of microns from the vessel wall. Thus nanocups offer considerable potential for enhanced drug delivery and treatment monitoring in oncological and other biomedical applications. PMID:26296985

  18. Convection-enhanced drug delivery for gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Andrew T.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of aggressive multi-modality treatments, patients diagnosed with anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma continue to display poor median survival. The success of our current conventional and targeted chemotherapies are largely hindered by systemic- and neurotoxicity, as well as poor central nervous system (CNS) penetration. Interstitial drug administration via convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an alternative that potentially overcomes systemic toxicities and CNS delivery issues by directly bypassing the blood–brain barrier (BBB). This novel approach not only allows for directed administration, but also allows for newer, tumor-selective agents, which would normally be excluded from the CNS due to molecular size alone. To date, randomized trials of CED therapy have yet to definitely show survival advantage as compared with today's standard of care, however, early studies appear to have been limited by “first generation” delivery techniques. Taking into consideration lessons learned from early trials along with decades of research, newer CED technologies and therapeutic agents are emerging, which are reviewed herein. PMID:25722934

  19. Microphase Separation and Gelation of Methylcellulose in the Presence of Gallic Acid and NaCl as an In Situ Gel-Forming Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Sangfai, Tanatchaporn; Tantishaiyakul, Vimon; Hirun, Namon; Li, Lin

    2016-05-11

    Novel hydrogels of methylcellulose (MC) with gallic acid (GA) and NaCl were developed for an in situ gel-forming delivery system. Plain MC and GA/NaCl/MC were characterized using micro-differential scanning calorimetry (micro-DSC), rheological and turbidity methods. The gelation temperatures of MC were reduced to body temperature with adding GA/NaCl. GA and NaCl caused slightly different effects on the gelation/degelation temperatures during heating/cooling, respectively, based on the different sensitivities of these three techniques. The gelation mechanism was investigated by UV spectrophotometry, and the hydrophobic interaction between the aromatic ring of GA and MC was verified. The NaCl/MC hydrogel had smaller micropores than GA/MC and MC, indicating a greater cross-linked density. Doxycycline (DX) was loaded into the systems and demonstrated a synergistic effect of DX/GA. Both GA and DX exhibited a sustained release. The hydrogel of GA/4NaCl/MC could be potentially used for the in situ delivery of DX for deep wound healing.

  20. Stimulus-responsive "smart" hydrogels as novel drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Soppimath, K S; Aminabhavi, T M; Dave, A M; Kumbar, S G; Rudzinski, W E

    2002-09-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of research activity in the development of stimulus-responsive polymeric hydrogels. These hydrogels are responsive to external or internal stimuli and the response can be observed through abrupt changes in the physical nature of the network. This property can be favorable in many drug delivery applications. The external stimuli can be temperature, pH, ionic strength, ultrasonic sound, electric current, etc. A majority of the literature related to the development of stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems deals with temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (pNIPAAm) and its various derivatives. However, acrylic-based pH-sensitive systems with weakly acidic/basic functional groups have also been widely studied. Quite recently, glucose-sensitive hydrogels that are responsive to glucose concentration have been developed to monitor the release of insulin. The present article provides a brief introduction and recent developments in the area of stimulus-responsive hydrogels, particularly those that respond to temperature and pH, and their applications in drug delivery.

  1. Challenges in modelling nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Amanda S

    2016-01-20

    Although there have been significant advances in the fields of theoretical condensed matter and computational physics, when confronted with the complexity and diversity of nanoparticles available in conventional laboratories a number of modeling challenges remain. These challenges are generally shared among application domains, but the impacts of the limitations and approximations we make to overcome them (or circumvent them) can be more significant one area than another. In the case of nanoparticles for drug delivery applications some immediate challenges include the incompatibility of length-scales, our ability to model weak interactions and solvation, the complexity of the thermochemical environment surrounding the nanoparticles, and the role of polydispersivity in determining properties and performance. Some of these challenges can be met with existing technologies, others with emerging technologies including the data-driven sciences; some others require new methods to be developed. In this article we will briefly review some simple methods and techniques that can be applied to these (and other) challenges, and demonstrate some results using nanodiamond-based drug delivery platforms as an exemplar.

  2. Light-sensitive intelligent drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Bromberg, Lev; Concheiro, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDS) capable of releasing an active molecule at the appropriate site and at a rate that adjusts in response to the progression of the disease or to certain functions/biorhythms of the organism are particularly appealing. Biocompatible materials sensitive to certain physiological variables or external physicochemical stimuli (intelligent materials) can be used for achieving this aim. Light-responsiveness is receiving increasing attention owing to the possibility of developing materials sensitive to innocuous electromagnetic radiation (mainly in the UV, visible and near-infrared range), which can be applied on demand at well delimited sites of the body. Some light-responsive DDS are of a single use (i.e. the light triggers an irreversible structural change that provokes the delivery of the entire dose) while others able to undergo reversible structural changes when cycles of light/dark are applied, behave as multi-switchable carriers (releasing the drug in a pulsatile manner). In this review, the mechanisms used to develop polymeric micelles, gels, liposomes and nanocomposites with light-sensitiveness are analyzed. Examples of the capability of some polymeric, lipidic and inorganic structures to regulate the release of small solutes and biomacromolecules are presented and the potential of light-sensitive carriers as functional components of intelligent DDS is discussed.

  3. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery.

  4. Challenges in modelling nanoparticles for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Amanda S.

    2016-01-01

    Although there have been significant advances in the fields of theoretical condensed matter and computational physics, when confronted with the complexity and diversity of nanoparticles available in conventional laboratories a number of modeling challenges remain. These challenges are generally shared among application domains, but the impacts of the limitations and approximations we make to overcome them (or circumvent them) can be more significant one area than another. In the case of nanoparticles for drug delivery applications some immediate challenges include the incompatibility of length-scales, our ability to model weak interactions and solvation, the complexity of the thermochemical environment surrounding the nanoparticles, and the role of polydispersivity in determining properties and performance. Some of these challenges can be met with existing technologies, others with emerging technologies including the data-driven sciences; some others require new methods to be developed. In this article we will briefly review some simple methods and techniques that can be applied to these (and other) challenges, and demonstrate some results using nanodiamond-based drug delivery platforms as an exemplar.

  5. Polymeric micelles for acyclovir drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sawdon, Alicia J; Peng, Ching-An

    2014-10-01

    Polymeric prodrug micelles for delivery of acyclovir (ACV) were synthesized. First, ACV was used directly to initiate ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactone to form ACV-polycaprolactone (ACV-PCL). Through conjugation of hydrophobic ACV-PCL with hydrophilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG) or chitosan, polymeric micelles for drug delivery were formed. (1)H NMR, FTIR, and gel permeation chromatography were employed to show successful conjugation of MPEG or chitosan to hydrophobic ACV-PCL. Through dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and critical micelle concentration (CMC), the synthesized ACV-tagged polymeric micelles were characterized. It was found that the average size of the polymeric micelles was under 200nm and the CMCs of ACV-PCL-MPEG and ACV-PCL-chitosan were 2.0mgL(-1) and 6.6mgL(-1), respectively. The drug release kinetics of ACV was investigated and cytotoxicity assay demonstrates that ACV-tagged polymeric micelles were non-toxic.

  6. Smart Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery: Boundaries and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Kook; Yun, Yeon Hee; Park, Kinam

    2014-01-01

    Various pharmaceutical particles have been used in developing different drug delivery systems ranging from traditional tablets to state-of-the-art nanoparticle formulations. Nanoparticle formulations are unique in that the small size with huge surface area sometimes provides unique properties that larger particles and bulk materials do not have. Nanoparticle formulations have been used in improving the bioavailability of various drugs, in particular, poorly soluble drugs. Nanoparticle drug delivery systems have found their unique applications in targeted drug delivery to tumors. While nanoparticle formulations have been successful in small animal xenograft models, their translation to clinical applications has been very rare. Developing nanoparticle systems designed for targeted drug delivery, e.g., treating tumors in humans, requires clear understanding of the uniqueness of nanoparticles, as well as limitations and causes of failures in clinical applications. It also requires designing novel smart nanoparticle delivery systems that can increase the drug bioavailability and at the same time reduce the drug's side effects. PMID:25684780

  7. Antibody Drug Conjugate Bioinformatics: Drug Delivery through the Letterbox

    PubMed Central

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies appear to be the first line of defence in the adaptive immune response of vertebrates and thereby are involved in a multitude of biochemical mechanisms, such as regulation of infection, autoimmunity, and cancer. It goes without saying that a full understanding of antibody function is required for the development of novel antibody-interacting drugs. These drugs are the Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs), which are a new type of targeted therapy, used for example for cancer. They consist of an antibody (or antibody fragment such as a single-chain variable fragment [scFv]) linked to a payload drug (often cytotoxic). Because of the targeting, the side effects should be lower and give a wider therapeutic window. Overall, the underlying principle of ADCs is to discern the delivery of a drug that is cytotoxic to a target that is cancerous, hoping to increase the antitumoural potency of the original drug by reducing adverse effects and side effects, such as toxicity of the cancer target. This is a pioneering field that employs state-of-the-art computational and molecular biology methods in the fight against cancer using ADCs. PMID:23853668

  8. Nanoscale coordination polymers for anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rachel Huxford

    This dissertation reports the synthesis and characterization of nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs) for anticancer drug delivery. Nanoparticles have been explored in order to address the limitations of small molecule chemotherapeutics. NCPs have been investigated as drug delivery vehicles as they can exhibit the same beneficial properties as the bulk metal-organic frameworks as well as interesting characteristics that are unique to nanomaterials. Gd-MTX (MTX = methotrexate) NCPs with a MTX loading of 71.6 wt% were synthesized and stabilized by encapsulation within a lipid bilayer containing anisamide (AA), a small molecule that targets sigma receptors which are overexpressed in many cancer tissues. Functionalization with AA allows for targeted delivery and controlled release to cancer cells, as shown by enhanced efficacy against leukemia cells. The NCPs were doped with Ru(bpy)32+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), and this formulation was utilized as an optical imaging agent by confocal microscopy. NCPs containing the chemotherapeutic pemetrexed (PMX) were synthesized using different binding metals. Zr-based materials could not be stabilized by encapsulation with a lipid bilayer, and Gd-based materials showed that PMX had degraded during synthesis. However, Hf-based NCPs containing 19.7 wt% PMX were stabilized by a lipid coating and showed in vitro efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Enhanced efficacy was observed for formulations containing AA. Additionally, NCP formulations containing the cisplatin prodrug disuccinatocisplatin were prepared; one of these formulations could be stabilized by encapsulation within a lipid layer. Coating with a lipid layer doped with AA rendered this formulation an active targeting agent. The resulting formulation proved more potent than free cisplatin in NSCLC cell lines. Improved NCP uptake was demonstrated by confocal microscopy and competitive binding assays. Finally, a Pt(IV) oxaliplatin prodrug was

  9. PEG-based degradable networks for drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroha, Jamie L.

    The controlled delivery of therapeutic agents by biodegradable hydrogels has become a popular mechanism for drug administration in recent years. Hydrogels are three-dimensional networks of polymer chains held together by crosslinks. Although the changes which the hydrogel undergoes in solution are important to a wide range of experimental studies, they have not been investigated systematically and the factors which influence the degree of swelling have not been adequately described. Hydrogels made of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) will generally resist degradation in aqueous conditions, while a hydrogel made from a copolymer of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and PEG will degrade via hydrolysis of the lactic acid group. This ability to degrade makes these hydrogels promising candidates for controlled release drug delivery systems. The goal of this research was to characterize the swelling and degradation of both degradable and non-degradable gels and to evaluate the release of different drugs from these hydrogels, where the key variable is the molecular weight of the PEG segment. These hydrogels were formed by the addition and subsequent chemically crosslinking of methacrylate end groups. During crosslinking, both PEG and LA-PEG-LA hydrogels of varied PEG molecular weight were loaded with Vitamin B12, Insulin, Haloperidol, and Dextran. It was shown that increasing PEG molecular weight produces a hydrogel with larger pores, thus increasing water uptake and degradation rate. While many environmental factors do not affect the swelling behavior, they do significantly impact the degradation of the hydrogel, and thus the release of incorporated therapeutic agents.

  10. [Research on intelligent controlled drug delivery with polymer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhibin; Tang, Changwei; Chen, Huiqing; Shan, Lianhai; Wan, Changxiu

    2006-02-01

    The intelligent controlled drug delivery systems are a series of the preparations including microcapsules or nanocapsules composed of intelligent polymers and medication. The properties of preparations can change with the external stimuli such as pH value, temperature, chemical substance, light, electricity and magnetism. According to this properties, the drug delivery can be intelligently controlled. This paper has reviewed research on syntheses and applications of intelligent controlled drug delivery systems with polymers.

  11. Dendrimeric micelles for controlled drug release and targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Ashootosh V.; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Thayumanavan, S.

    2008-01-01

    This review highlights the developments in dendrimer-based micelles for drug delivery. Dendrimers, the perfectly branched monodisperse macromolecules, have certain structural advantages that make them attractive candidates as drug carriers for controlled release or targeted delivery. As polymeric micelle-based approaches precede the work in dendrimers, these are also discussed briefly. The review concludes with a perspective on possible applications of biaryl-based dendrimeric micelles that exhibit environment-dependent conformations, in drug delivery. PMID:16053329

  12. Engineering bioceramic microstructure for customized drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco Gomez, Hernando Jose

    One of the most efficient approaches to treat cancer and infection is to use biomaterials as a drug delivery system (DDS). The goal is for the material to provide a sustained release of therapeutic drug dose locally to target the ill tissue without affecting other organs. Silica Calcium Phosphate nano composite (SCPC) is a drug delivery platform that successfully demonstrated the ability to bind and release several therapeutics including antibiotics, anticancer drugs, and growth factors. The aim of the present work is to analyze the role of SCPC microstructure on drug binding and release kinetics. The main crystalline phases of SCPC are alpha-cristobalite (SiO2, Cris) and beta-rhenanite (NaCaPO4, Rhe); therefore, these two phases were prepared and characterized separately. Structural and compositional features of Cris, Rhe and SCPC bioceramics demonstrated a significant influence on the loading capacity and release kinetics profile of Vancomycin (Vanc) and Cisplatin (Cis). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the P-O functional group in Rhe and SCPC has high affinity to the (C=O and N-H) of Vanc and (N-H and O-H) of Cis. By contrast, a weak chemical interaction between the Si-O functional group in Cris and SCPC and the two drugs was observed. Vanc loading per unit surface area increased in the order 8.00 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe > 4.49 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC>3.01 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris (p<0.05). Cis loading capacity increased in the order 8.59 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris, 17.8 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe and 6.03 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC (p<0.05). Drug release kinetics was dependent on the carrier as well as on the kind of drug. Different burst release and sustained release rates were measured for Vanc and Cis from the same carrier. The percentages of drug amount released from Cris, Rhe and SCPC during the burst stage (the first 2h) were: 50%, 50%, and 46% of Vanc; and 53.4%, 36.6%, and 30.6 % of Cis, respectively. Burst release was

  13. Polymeric carriers: role of geometry in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric A; Dziubla, Thomas D; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2009-01-01

    The unique properties of synthetic nanostructures promise a diverse set of applications as carriers for drug delivery, which are advantageous in terms of biocompatibility, pharmacokinetics, targeting and controlled drug release. Historically, more traditional drug delivery systems have focused on spherical carriers. However, there is a growing interest in pursuing non-spherical carriers, such as elongated or filamentous morphologies, now available due to novel formulation strategies. Unique physiochemical properties of these supramolecular structures offer distinct advantages as drug delivery systems. In particular, results of recent studies in cell cultures and lab animals indicate that rational design of carriers of a given geometry (size and shape) offers an unprecedented control of their longevity in circulation and targeting to selected cellular and subcellular locations. This article reviews drug delivery aspects of non-spherical drug delivery systems, including material selection and formulation, drug loading and release, biocompatibility, circulation behavior, targeting and subcellular addressing. PMID:19040392

  14. Lipoidal Soft Hybrid Biocarriers of Supramolecular Construction for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dinesh; Sharma, Deepak; Singh, Gurmeet; Singh, Mankaran; Rathore, Mahendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-based innovations have achieved new heights during the last few years as an essential component of drug development. The current challenge of drug delivery is liberation of drug agents at the right time in a safe and reproducible manner to a specific target site. A number of novel drug delivery systems has emerged encompassing various routes of administration, to achieve controlled and targeted drug delivery. Microparticulate lipoidal vesicular system represents a unique technology platform suitable for the oral and systemic administration of a wide variety of molecules with important therapeutic biological activities, including drugs, genes, and vaccine antigens. The success of liposomes as drug carriers has been reflected in a number of liposome-based formulations, which are commercially available or are currently undergoing clinical trials. Also, novel lipid carrier-mediated vesicular systems are originated. This paper has focused on the lipid-based supramolecular vesicular carriers that are used in various drug delivery and drug targeting systems. PMID:22888455

  15. Carbohydrate Polymers for Nonviral Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M.; Srinivasachari, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  16. Cytotoxicity assessment of porous silicon microparticles for ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Eveliina; Rönkkö, Seppo; Hillebrand, Satu; Riikonen, Joakim; Xu, Wujun; Järvinen, Kristiina; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Kauppinen, Anu

    2016-03-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) is a promising material for the delivery and sustained release of therapeutic molecules in various tissues. Due to the constant rinsing of cornea by tear solution as well as the short half-life of intravitreal drugs, the eye is an attractive target for controlled drug delivery systems, such as PSi microparticles. Inherent barriers ensure that PSi particles are retained in the eye, releasing drugs at the desired speed until they slowly break down into harmless silicic acid. Here, we have examined the in vitro cytotoxicity of positively and negatively charged thermally oxidized (TOPSi) and thermally carbonized (TCPSi) porous silicon microparticles on human corneal epithelial (HCE) and retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. In addition to ocular assessment under an inverted microscope, cellular viability was evaluated using the CellTiter Blue™, CellTiter Fluor™, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. CellTiter Fluor proved to be a suitable assay but due to non-specific and interfering responses, neither CellTiter Blue nor LDH assays should be used when evaluating PSi particles. Our results suggest that the toxicity of PSi particles is concentration-dependent, but at least at concentrations less than 200μg/ml, both positively and negatively charged PSi particles are well tolerated by human corneal and retinal epithelial cells and therefore applicable for delivering drug molecules into ocular tissues.

  17. Biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS): Revolution in drug delivery and analytical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jivani, Rishad R.; Lakhtaria, Gaurang J.; Patadiya, Dhaval D.; Patel, Laxman D.; Jivani, Nurrudin P.; Jhala, Bhagyesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Advancement in microelectromechanical system has facilitated the microfabrication of polymeric substrates and the development of the novel class of controlled drug delivery devices. These vehicles have specifically tailored three dimensional physical and chemical features which together, provide the capacity to target cell, stimulate unidirectional controlled release of therapeutics and augment permeation across the barriers. Apart from drug delivery devices microfabrication technology’s offer exciting prospects to generate biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models. BioMEMS are capable of analysing biochemical liquid sample like solution of metabolites, macromolecules, proteins, nucleic acid, cells and viruses. This review summarized multidisciplinary application of biomedical microelectromechanical systems in drug delivery and its potential in analytical procedures. PMID:26903763

  18. Polymeric Microgels as Potential Drug Delivery Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Ryan; Streletzky, Kiril; Bayachou, Mekki; Peiris, Pubudu

    2010-03-01

    The temperature dependent volume phase change of cross-linked amphiphilic molecules (microgels) suggests their use as drug delivery vesicles. Drug particles aggregate in the slightly hydrophobic microgel interior. They are stored in equilibrium until the critical temperature (Tv) is reached where the volume phase change limits available space, thus expelling the drugs. This loading property of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) microgels was tested using amperometric analytical techniques. Small molecules inside microgels do not approach the electrode surface, which decreases current signal. A room temperature (Troom) flow amperometric measurement comparing microgel/paracetamol solution with control paracetamol samples yielded about 20 percent concentration reduction in the microgel sample. Results from the steady-state electrochemical experiment confirm the 20 percent concentration drop in the microgel sample compared to the control sample at Troom. Using the steady-state experiment with a cyclic temperature ramp from Troom to beyond Tv showed that the paracetamol concentration change between the temperature extremes was greater for the microgels than for the controls. An evolving aspect of the study is the characterization of microgel shrinkage from in situ, temperature controlled liquid AFM images as compared to previously completed DLS characterization of the same microgel sample.

  19. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Laird, Forrest M.

    2011-09-10

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed.

  20. Microencapsulation: A promising technique for controlled drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M.N.; Hemant, K.S.Y.; Ram, M.; Shivakumar, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    Microparticles offer various significant advantages as drug delivery systems, including: (i) an effective protection of the encapsulated active agent against (e.g. enzymatic) degradation, (ii) the possibility to accurately control the release rate of the incorporated drug over periods of hours to months, (iii) an easy administration (compared to alternative parenteral controlled release dosage forms, such as macro-sized implants), and (iv) Desired, pre-programmed drug release profiles can be provided which match the therapeutic needs of the patient. This article gives an overview on the general aspects and recent advances in drug-loaded microparticles to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. An appropriately designed controlled release drug delivery system can be a foot ahead towards solving problems concerning to the targeting of drug to a specific organ or tissue, and controlling the rate of drug delivery to the target site. The development of oral controlled release systems has been a challenge to formulation scientist due to their inability to restrain and localize the system at targeted areas of gastrointestinal tract. Microparticulate drug delivery systems are an interesting and promising option when developing an oral controlled release system. The objective of this paper is to take a closer look at microparticles as drug delivery devices for increasing efficiency of drug delivery, improving the release profile and drug targeting. In order to appreciate the application possibilities of microcapsules in drug delivery, some fundamental aspects are briefly reviewed. PMID:21589795

  1. Development of polymer-polysaccharide hydrogels for controlling drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Aaron David

    Michael type addition of thiol derivatives to N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) undergoes retro and exchange reactions in the presence of other thiol compounds at physiological pH and temperature. Model studies of NEM conjugated to various thiols (4-mercaptophenylacetic acid (MPA), N-acetylcysteine, or 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP)), incubated with a naturally occurring reducing agent, glutathione, showed half-lives from 20-80 hrs with extents of conversion from 20-90% for MPA and N-acetylcysteine conjugates. The kinetics of the retro reactions and extent of exchange can be modulated by the Michael donor's reactivity; therefore the degradation of maleimide-thiol adducts could be tuned for controlled release of drugs or degradation of materials at timescales different than those currently possible via disulfide-mediated release. The reduction sensitive maleimide-thiol chemistry was then investigated as a crosslinking mechanism for LMWH hydrogels. Crosslinking maleimide functionalized LMWH with PEG functionalized with thiophenyl functionalities imparted glutathione sensitivity. 4-mercaptophenylpropionic acid and 2,2-dimethyl-3-(4-mercaptophenyl)propionic acid, induced sensitivity to glutathione as shown by a decrease in degradation time of 4x and 5x respectively. The pseudo-first order retro reaction constants were approximately an order of magnitude slower than hydrogels crosslinked via disulfide linkages, indicating the potential use of the retro succinimide-thioether covalent bonds for reduction mediated release and/or degradation with increased blood stability and prolonged drug delivery timescales compared to disulfide chemistries. In summary, this work highlights the use of polymer-polysaccharide hydrogels composed of LMWH and PEG as investigated for drug delivery and as a tool for elucidating a novel reduction sensitive controlled release mechanism.

  2. Surface-functionalized diatom microcapsules for drug delivery of water-insoluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Aw, Moom Sinn; Bariana, Manpreet; Yu, Yang; Addai-Mensah, Jonas; Losic, Dusan

    2013-08-01

    Naturally available and biocompatible materials are potential substitutes for synthetic mesoporous materials as suitable drug carriers for the development of cost-effective drug delivery systems. This work investigates the application of a porous silica material derived from diatoms, also known as diatomaceous earth. The aim is to explore the surface functionalization of diatom microcapsules and their impact on the drug loading and release characteristics of water-insoluble drugs. Indomethacin was used as the model for poorly soluble drug. The surface modification on diatoms was performed with two organosilanes; 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane and N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl) ethylene diamine and phosphonic acids (2-carboxyethyl-phosphonic acid and 16-phosphono-hexadecanoic acid) providing organic surface hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties. Extensive characterizations using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry was performed to confirm covalent grafting of monolayer aminosilane and phosphonic acid on the diatom surfaces. Differences in loading capacity of diatoms (15-24%) and release time (6-15 days) were observed which is due to the presence of different functional groups on the surface. It was found that 2-carboxyethyl-phosphonic acid, 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane and N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl) ethylene diamine render diatom surfaces hydrophilic, due to polar carboxyl functional group (COOH) and active amine species (NH and NH2) that favor drug adsorption; better encapsulation efficiency and prolonged release of drugs, over the hydrophobic surface created by 16-phosphono-hexadecanoic acid. This work demonstrates diatom porous silica as a promising drug carrier, with possibility to further improve their performances by tailoring their surface functionalities to achieve the required drug loading and release characteristics for different therapeutic conditions.

  3. Transdermal delivery of relatively high molecular weight drugs using novel self-dissolving microneedle arrays fabricated from hyaluronic acid and their characteristics and safety after application to the skin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu; Jin, Mei-na; Quan, Ying-shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Kusamori, Kosuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel dissolving microneedle arrays fabricated from hyaluronic acid (HA) as a material and to improve the transdermal permeability of relatively high molecular weight drugs. In this study, fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran with an average molecular weight of 4kDa (FD4) was used as a model drug with a relatively high molecular weight. The microneedle arrays significantly increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and reduced transcutaneous electrical resistance (TER), indicating that they could puncture the skin and create drug permeation pathways successfully. Both TEWL and TER almost recovered to baseline levels in the microneedle array group, and relatively small pathways created by the microneedles rapidly recovered as compared with those created by a tape stripping treatment. These findings confirmed that the microneedle arrays were quite safe. Furthermore, we found that the transdermal permeability of FD4 using the microneedle arrays was much higher than that of the FD4 solution. Furthermore, we found that the microneedle arrays were much more effective for increasing the amount of FD4 accumulated in the skin. These findings indicated that using novel microneedle arrays fabricated from HA is a very useful and effective strategy to improve the transdermal delivery of drugs, especially relatively high molecular weight drugs without seriously damaging the skin.

  4. Biodegradable levofloxacin nanoparticles for sustained ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Himanshu; Aqil, M; Khar, R K; Ali, Asgar; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav

    2011-07-01

    Drug delivery to ocular region is a challenging task. Only 1-2% of drug is available in eye for therapeutic action, rest of the drug is drained out through nasolachrymal drainage system and other ocular physiological barriers. To overcome these problems of conventional dosage form, novel drug delivery systems are explored like nanoparticles. In our present work, levofloxacin encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles were developed and evaluated for various parameters like particle size, ζ potential, in vitro drug release and ex vivo transcorneal permeation. Microbiological efficacy was tested against Staphylococcus aureus using cup-plate method. Precorneal residence time was studied on albino rabbits by γ scintigraphy after radiolabeling of levofloxacin by Tc-99m. Ocular tolerance was evaluated using hen's egg chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM) test. The developed nanoparticles were of spherical shape with a mean particle size of 190-195 nm with a ζ potential of -25 mV. The drug entrapment efficiency was found to be near 85%. In vitro drug release profile shows initial burst release followed by extended release up to 24 h. Microbiological assay showed equivalent zone of inhibition compared to marketed formulation. γ Scintigraphy images of developed formulation, suggested a good spread and good retention over precorneal area. The nanosuspension thus developed was retained for the longer time and drained out from the eye very slowly compared to marketed formulation as significant radioactivity was recorded in later in kidney and bladder. The developed nanosuspension with a mean score of 0.33 up to 24 h in HET-CAM assay, showed the nonirritant efficacy of developed formulation. The stability studies yielded a degradation constant less then 5 × 10(-4), proving a stable formulation with an arbitrary shelf life of 2 years.

  5. Lipid formulation as a drug carrier for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tomii, Yoshifumi

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, a Drug Delivery System (DDS), a preparative approach attracts the attention in the development of new drugs. DDS focuses on the regulation of the in vivo dynamics, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination, thereby improving the effectiveness and the safety of the drugs by an applicable use of drug preparation technologies. A conventional intravenous dosage form of Amphotericin B (AmB), Fungizone, is the most effective clinically available for treating fungal infections. However, the clinical efficacy of AmB is limited by its adverse effects. Several lipid formulations, such as Liposomal AmB (L-AmB), AmB lipid complex (ABLC), and AmB colloidal dispersion (ABCD), with reduced side effects have been developed. These formulations are reported to have excellent safety and efficacy. However, comparable efficacy can be achieved only when they are administered at high doses than AmB. One of the problems of using these formulations is that they are easily taken up by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). An artificial lipoprotein-like particles, a novel drug carrier Lipid Nano-Sphere (LNS), which is 25 - 50 nm in size and is composed of phospholipids and simple lipid. LNS show a higher plasma concentration of drugs and lower uptake by RES-tissue different forms other lipid base drug carriers. In vitro and in vivo, LNS incorporating AmB, NS-718, shows reduced toxicity, while maintaining activity against fungi. LNS have a unique characteristic as an effective carrier of AmB for treatment of fungal infection.

  6. Supramolecular hydrogels as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Saboktakin, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaei, Roya Mahdavi

    2015-04-01

    Drug delivery from a hydrogel carrier implanted under the kidney capsule is an innovative way to induce kidney tissue regeneration and/or prevent kidney inflammation or fibrosis. We report here on the development of supramolecular hydrogels for this application. Chain-extended hydrogelators containing hydrogen bonding units in the main chain, and bifunctional hydrogelators end-functionalized with hydrogen bonding moieties, were made. The influence of these hydrogels on the renal cortex when implanted under the kidney capsule was studied. The overall tissue response to these hydrogels was found to be mild, and minimal damage to the cortex was observed, using the infiltration of macrophages, formation of myofibroblasts, and the deposition of collagen III as relevant read-out parameters. Differences in tissue response to these hydrogels could be related to the different physico-chemical properties of the three hydrogels.

  7. Herbal Excipients in Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shirwaikar, A.; Shirwaikar, Annie; Prabu, S. Lakshmana; Kumar, G. Aravind

    2008-01-01

    The use of natural excipients to deliver the bioactive agents has been hampered by the synthetic materials. However advantages offered by these natural excipients are their being non-toxic, less expensive and freely available. The performance of the excipients partly determines the quality of the medicines. The traditional concept of the excipients as any component other than the active substance has undergone a substantial evolution from an inert and cheap vehicle to an essential constituent of the formulation. Excipients are any component other than the active substance(s) intentionally added to formulation of a dosage form. This article gives an overview of herbal excipients which are used in conventional dosage forms as well as novel drug delivery systems. PMID:20046764

  8. Ocular Drug Delivery for Glaucoma Management

    PubMed Central

    Gooch, Nathan; Molokhia, Sarah A.; Condie, Russell; Burr, Randon Michael; Archer, Bonnie; Ambati, Balamurali K.; Wirostko, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Current glaucoma management modalities are hindered by low patient compliance and adherence. This can be due to highly complex treatment strategies or poor patient understanding. Treatments focus on the management or reduction of intraocular pressure. This is most commonly done through the use of daily topical eye drops. Unfortunately, despite effective therapies, glaucoma continues to progress, possibly due to patients not adhering to their treatments. In order to mitigate these patient compliance issues, many sustained release treatments are being researched and are entering the clinic. Conjunctival, subconjunctival, and intravitreal inserts, punctal plugs, and drug depots are currently in clinical development. Each delivery system has hurdles, yet shows promise and could potentially mitigate the current problems associated with poor patient compliance. PMID:24300188

  9. Drug delivery by organ-specific immunoliposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Kazuo; Mori, Atsuhide; Hunag, Leaf . Dept. of Biochemistry); Kennel, S.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies highly specific to the mouse pulmonary endothelial cells were conjugated to liposomes. The resulting immunoliposomes showed high levels of lung accumulation when injected intravenously into mice. Optimal target binding and retention were achieved if the lipid composition included ganglioside GM{sub 1} to reduce the uptake of immunoliposomes by the reticuloendothelial system. Details of the construction and optimization of these organ-specific immunoliposomes are reviewed. The drug delivery potential of this novel liposome system was demonstrated in an experimental pulmonary metastasis model. Immunoliposomes containing a lipophilic prodrug of deoxyfluorouridine effectively prolonged the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice. This and other therapeutic applications of the immunoliposomes are discussed. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Preactivated hyaluronic acid: A potential mucoadhesive polymer for vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jessika; Laffleur, Flavia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-01-15

    The objective of this study was to develop mucoadhesive polymeric excipients for vaginal drug delivery systems. Hyaluronic acid was thiolated and subsequently preactivated with 6-mercaptonicotinamide (HA-CYS-MNA) to enhance stability and mucoadhesive properties on vaginal mucosa. After determination of the thiol group content, disintegration studies and in vitro mucoadhesion studies (rotating cylinder and tensile) were performed. Furthermore, swelling behavior and cytotoxicity studies were performed in comparison with corresponding polymers. Both, disintegration and in vitro mucoadhesive studies revealed that modifying HA-CYS with MNA resulted in higher stability (3.6-fold prolonged disintegration time compared to unmodified hyaluronic acid) and prolonged mucoadhesion time. MTT assay and LDH revealed no toxicity for the polymeric excipients and safe for their use. Disintegration and swelling results conducted more pronounced stability of the preactivated thiomers compared to corresponding unmodified ones. According to these results preactivated hyaluronic acid might be a useful tool for vaginal delivery systems.

  11. Biomimetic transport and rational drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ranney, D F

    2000-01-15

    Medicine and pharmaceutics are encountering critical needs and opportunities for transvascular drug delivery that improves site targeting and tissue permeation by mimicking natural tissue addressing and transport mechanisms. This is driven by the accelerated development of genomic agents requiring targeted controlled release. Although rationally designed for in vitro activity, such agents are not highly effective in vivo, due to opsonization and degradation by plasma constituents, and failure to transport across the local vascular endothelium and tissue matrix. A growing knowledge of the addresses of the body can be applied to engineer "Bio-Logically" staged delivery systems with sequential bioaddressins complementary to the discontinuous compartments encountered--termed discontinuum pharmaceutics. Effective tissue targeting is accomplished by leukocytes, bacteria, and viruses. We are increasingly able to mimic their bioaddressins by genomic means. Approaches described in this commentary include: (a) endothelial-directed adhesion mediated by oligosaccharides and carbohydrates (e.g. dermatan sulfate as a mimic of sulfated CD44) and peptidomimetics interacting with adhesins, selectins, integrins, hyaluronans, and locally induced growth factors (e.g. vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) and coagulation factors (e.g. factor VIII antigen); (b) improved tissue permeation conferred by hydrophilically "cloaked" carrier systems; (c) "uncloaking" by matrix dilution or selective triggering near the target cells; and (d) target binding-internalization by terminally exposed hydrophobic moieties, cationic polymers, and receptor-binding lectins, peptides, or carbohydrates. This commentary also describes intermediate technology solutions (e.g. "hybrid drugs"), and highlights the high-resolution, dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and radiopharmaceutical imaging technologies plus the groups and organizations capable of accelerating these important initiatives.

  12. Developing a Dissociative Nanocontainer for Peptide Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Patrick; Anand, Prachi; Uvaydov, Alexander; Chakravartula, Srinivas; Sherpa, Chhime; Pires, Elena; O’Neil, Alison; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-01-01

    The potency, selectivity, and decreased side effects of bioactive peptides have propelled these agents to the forefront of pharmacological research. Peptides are especially promising for the treatment of neurological disorders and pain. However, delivery of peptide therapeutics often requires invasive techniques, which is a major obstacle to their widespread application. We have developed a tailored peptide drug delivery system in which the viral capsid of P22 bacteriophage is modified to serve as a tunable nanocontainer for the packaging and controlled release of bioactive peptides. Recent efforts have demonstrated that P22 nanocontainers can effectively encapsulate analgesic peptides and translocate them across blood-brain-barrier (BBB) models. However, release of encapsulated peptides at their target site remains a challenge. Here a Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) reaction is applied to trigger P22 nanocontainer disassembly under physiological conditions. Specifically, the ROMP substrate norbornene (5-Norbornene-2-carboxylic acid) is conjugated to the exterior of a loaded P22 nanocontainer and Grubbs II Catalyst is used to trigger the polymerization reaction leading to nanocontainer disassembly. Our results demonstrate initial attempts to characterize the ROMP-triggered release of cargo peptides from P22 nanocontainers. This work provides proof-of-concept for the construction of a triggerable peptide drug delivery system using viral nanocontainers. PMID:26473893

  13. In Vitro Sustained Release Study of Gallic Acid Coated with Magnetite-PEG and Magnetite-PVA for Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Kura, Aminu Umar; Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer Hasan; Bin Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Fakurazi, Sharida; Shaari, Abdul Halim; Ahmad, Zalinah

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of two nanocarriers polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl alcohol magnetic nanoparticles coated with gallic acid (GA) was accomplished via X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, thermal analysis, and TEM. X-ray diffraction and TEM results showed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles were pure iron oxide having spherical shape with the average diameter of 9 nm, compared with 31 nm and 35 nm after coating with polyethylene glycol-GA (FPEGG) and polyvinyl alcohol-GA (FPVAG), respectively. Thermogravimetric analyses proved that after coating the thermal stability was markedly enhanced. Magnetic measurements and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) revealed that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles could be successfully coated with two polymers (PEG and PVA) and gallic acid as an active drug. Release behavior of gallic acid from two nanocomposites showed that FPEGG and FPVAG nanocomposites were found to be sustained and governed by pseudo-second-order kinetics. Anticancer activity of the two nanocomposites shows that the FPEGG demonstrated higher anticancer effect on the breast cancer cell lines in almost all concentrations tested compared to FPVAG. PMID:24737969

  14. Chitosan in nasal delivery systems for therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Casettari, Luca; Illum, Lisbeth

    2014-09-28

    There is an obvious need for efficient and safe nasal absorption enhancers for the development of therapeutically efficacious nasal products for small hydrophilic drugs, peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and polysaccharides, which do not easily cross mucosal membranes, including the nasal. Recent years have seen the development of a range of nasal absorption enhancer systems such as CriticalSorb (based on Solutol HS15) (Critical Pharmaceuticals Ltd), Chisys based on chitosan (Archimedes Pharma Ltd) and Intravail based on alkylsaccharides (Aegis Therapeutics Inc.), that is presently being tested in clinical trials for a range of drugs. So far, none of these absorption enhancers have been used in a marketed nasal product. The present review discusses the evaluation of chitosan and chitosan derivatives as nasal absorption enhancers, for a range of drugs and in a range of formulations such as solutions, gels and nanoparticles and finds that chitosan and its derivatives are able to efficiently improve the nasal bioavailability. The revirtew also questions whether chitosan nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery provide any real improvement over simpler chitosan formulations. Furthermore, the review also evaluates the use of chitosan formulations for the improvement of transport of drugs directly from the nasal cavity to the brain, based on its mucoadhesive characteristics and its ability to open tight junctions in the olfactory and respiratory epithelia. It is found that the use of chitosan nanoparticles greatly increases the transport of drugs from nose to brain over and above the effect of simpler chitosan formulations.

  15. Detection and drug delivery from superhydrophobic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falde, Eric John

    The wetting of a rough material is controlled by surface chemistry and morphology, the liquid phase, solutes, and surfactants that affect the surface tension with the gas phase, and environmental conditions such as temperature and pressure. Materials with high (>150°) apparent contact angles are known as superhydrophobic and are very resistant to wetting. However, in complex biological mixtures eventually protein adsorbs, fouling the surface and facilitating wetting on time scales from seconds to months. The work here uses the partially-wetted (Cassie-Baxter) to fully-wetted (Wenzel) state transition to control drug delivery and to perform surfactant detection via surface tension using hydrophobic and superhydrophobic materials. First there is an overview of the physics of the non-wetting state and the transition to wetting. Then there is a review of how wetting can be controlled by outside stimuli and applications of these materials. Next there is work presented on controlling drug release using superhydrophobic materials with controlled wetting rates, with both in vitro and in vivo results. Then there is work on developing a sensor based on this wetting state transition and its applications toward detecting solute levels in biological fluids for point-of-care diagnosis. Finally, there is work presented on using these sensors for detecting the alcohol content in wine and spirits.

  16. Programmable biomaterials for dynamic and responsive drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Stejskalová, Anna; Kiani, Mehrdad T

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials are continually being designed that enable new methods for interacting dynamically with cell and tissues, in turn unlocking new capabilities in areas ranging from drug delivery to regenerative medicine. In this review, we explore some of the recent advances being made in regards to programming biomaterials for improved drug delivery, with a focus on cancer and infection. We begin by explaining several of the underlying concepts that are being used to design this new wave of drug delivery vehicles, followed by examining recent materials systems that are able to coordinate the temporal delivery of multiple therapeutics, dynamically respond to changing tissue environments, and reprogram their bioactivity over time. PMID:27190245

  17. Drug Delivery Approaches for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ordikhani, Farideh; Erdem Arslan, Mustafa; Marcelo, Raymundo; Sahin, Ilyas; Grigsby, Perry; Schwarz, Julie K.; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent research in systematic and localized drug delivery systems and compared the advantages and disadvantages of these methods. PMID:27447664

  18. Clinical applications of biomedical microdevices for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gurman, Pablo; Miranda, Oscar R; Clayton, Kevin; Rosen, Yitzhak; Elman, Noel M

    2015-01-01

    Miniaturization of devices to micrometer and nanometer scales, combined with the use of biocompatible and functional materials, has created new opportunities for the implementation of drug delivery systems. Advances in biomedical microdevices for controlled drug delivery platforms promise a new generation of capabilities for the treatment of acute conditions and chronic illnesses, which require high adherence to treatment, in which temporal control over the pharmacokinetic profiles is critical. In addition, clinical conditions that require a combination of drugs with specific pharmacodynamic profiles and local delivery will benefit from drug delivery microdevices. This review provides a summary of various clinical applications for state-of-the-art controlled drug delivery microdevices, including cancer, endocrine and ocular disorders, and acute conditions such as hemorrhagic shock. Regulatory considerations for clinical translation of drug delivery microdevices are also discussed. Drug delivery microdevices promise a remarkable gain in clinical outcomes and a substantial social impact. A review of articles covering the field of microdevices for drug delivery was performed between January 1, 1990, and January 1, 2014, using PubMed as a search engine.

  19. Hydrogels for ocular drug delivery and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Marzieh; Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Omidi, Yadollah

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels, as crosslinked polymeric three dimensional networks, possess unique structure and behavior in response to the internal and/or external stimuli. As a result, they offer great prospective applications in drug delivery, cell therapy and human tissue engineering. Here, we highlight the potential of hydrogels in prolonged intraocular drug delivery and ocular surface therapy using stem cells incorporated hydrogels. PMID:26929918

  20. Clinical Considerations of Focal Drug Delivery In Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jamie; Chiu, Bill

    2017-02-24

    According to the US Center for Disease Control, cancer deaths are the second most common cause of mortality in both adults and children. Definitive treatment of solid tumors involves surgical resection with or without systemic chemotherapy and radiation. The advent of local drug delivery presents a unique treatment modality that can offer substantial benefits in cancer management. Local drug delivery offers targeted drug delivery to cancer tissues while minimizing side effects of the medications. Three main phases in solid tumor management exist for the treating physician: initial diagnosis with tissue biopsy, surgical resection with or without chemotherapy, and management of metastatic disease. Image guided studies, using modalities such as MRI, computerized tomography, and ultrasound to sample tumors have been described. The initial diagnosis phase offers a treatment window for local drug delivery with the aid of image guidance. After the diagnosis of malignancy is made, surgical resection can become an important part of tumor management. Currently, FDA approved local drug delivery systems are being used in concert with resection for intracranial glioma. Many other applications of implantation of local drug delivery at the time of surgery in other tumors, including breast and neuroblastoma, are being investigated. Finally, for patients who present with or progress to single sites of metastatic disease, such as brain or liver metastasis, studies have shown potential applications for local drug delivery as well. This review will discuss the current state of local drug delivery in the treatment of solid tumors and possible future directions.

  1. Synthetic Tumor Networks for Screening Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B.; Garson, Charles J.; Mills, Ivy R.; Matar, Majed M.; Fewell, Jason G.; Pant, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Tumor drug delivery is a complex phenomenon affected by several elements in addition to drug or delivery vehicle’s physico-chemical properties. A key factor is tumor microvasculature with complex effects including convective transport, high interstitial pressure and enhanced vascular permeability due to the presence of “leaky vessels”. Current in vitro models of the tumor microenvironment for evaluating drug delivery are oversimplified and, as a result, show poor correlation with in vivo performance. In this study, we report on the development of a novel microfluidic platform that models the tumor microenvironment more accurately, with physiologically and morphologically realistic microvasculature including endothelial cell lined leaky capillary vessels along with 3D solid tumors. Endothelial cells and 3D spheroids of cervical tumor cells were co-cultured in the networks. Drug vehicle screening was demonstrated using GFP gene delivery by different formulations of nanopolymers. The synthetic tumor network was successful in predicting in vivo delivery efficiencies of the drug vehicles. The developed assay will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery where it can be used to study drug transport and delivery efficacy in realistic tumor microenvironment, thereby enabling drug compound and/or delivery vehicle screening. PMID:25599856

  2. The Benefits and Challenges Associated with the Use of Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cukierman, Edna; Khan, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of Drug Delivery Systems as nanocarriers for chemotherapeutic agents can improve the pharmacological properties of drugs by altering drug pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Among the many drug delivery systems available, both micelles and liposomes have gained the most attention in recent years due to their clinical success. There are several formulations of these nanocarrier systems in various stages of clinical trials, as well as currently clinically approved liposomal-based drugs. In this review, we discuss these drug carrier systems, as well as current efforts that are being made in order to further improve their delivery efficacy through the incorporation of targeting ligands. In addition, this review discusses aspects of drug resistance attributed to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix that occurs during tumor development and progression, as well as to the acidic, hypoxic, and glucose deprived tumor microenvironment. Finally, we address future prospective approaches to overcoming drug resistance by further modifications made to these drug delivery systems, as well as the possibility of coencapsulation/coadministration of various drugs aimed to surmount some of these microenvironmental-influenced obstacles for efficacious drug delivery in chemotherapy. PMID:20417189

  3. Applications of unnatural oligosaccharide biosynthesis to selective drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, K.J.; Mahal, L.K.; Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    Cell surface antigens are attractive targets for the selective delivery of toxins to diseased cells. Most efforts toward the development of cell-specific drug targeting agents have focused on the use of monoclonal antibodies that recognize a particular antigen, an approach that suffers from severe limitations. We have recently demonstrated that unnatural epitopes can be displayed on cells using the biosynthetic pathways for cell-surface oligosaccharides. This discovery has now been extended to the development of a novel strategy for selective drug targeting. We installed ketone groups on cells through unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis, and selectively modified the cells with biotinamidocaproyl hydrazide under physiological conditions. Synthetic ricin-avidin conjugates killed the biotinylated cells with remarkable selectivity. Applications of this and related approaches to anti-cancer therapy will be presented.

  4. Bionanocomposites based on layered double hydroxides as drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, Pilar; Alcântara, Ana C. S.; Ribeiro, Ligia N. M.; Darder, Margarita; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biopolymers to produce bionanocomposites, able to act as effective drug delivery systems (DDS). Ibuprofen (IBU) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) have been chosen as model drugs, being intercalated in a Mg-Al LDH matrix. On the one side, the LDHIBU intercalation compound prepared by ion-exchange reaction was blended with the biopolymers zein, a highly hydrophobic protein, and alginate, a polysaccharide widely applied for encapsulating drugs. On the other side, the LDH- 5-ASA intercalation compound prepared by co-precipitation was assembled to the polysaccharides chitosan and pectin, which show mucoadhesive properties and resistance to acid pH values, respectively. Characterization of the intercalation compounds and the resulting bionanocomposites was carried out by means of different experimental techniques: X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, chemical and thermal analysis, as well as optical and scanning electron microscopies. Data on the swelling behavior and drug release under different pH conditions are also reported.

  5. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery to the vagina: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, Laura M.; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal drug administration can improve prophylaxis and treatment of many conditions affecting the female reproductive tract, including sexually transmitted diseases, fungal and bacterial infections, and cancer. However, achieving sustained local drug concentrations in the vagina can be challenging, due to the high permeability of the vaginal epithelium and expulsion of conventional soluble drug dosage forms. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery platforms have received considerable attention for vaginal drug delivery, as nanoparticles can provide sustained release, cellular targeting, and even intrinsic antimicrobial or adjuvant properties that can improve the potency and/or efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic modalities. Here, we review the use of polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, dendrimers, and inorganic nanoparticles for vaginal drug delivery. Although most of the work toward nanoparticle-based drug delivery in the vagina has been focused on HIV prevention, strategies for treatment and prevention of other sexually transmitted infections, treatment for reproductive tract cancer, and treatment of fungal and bacterial infections are also highlighted. PMID:24830303

  6. Potential of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems by intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Ali, Javed; Ali, Mushir; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahani, Jasjeet Kaur; Ramassamy, Charles; Dao, Lé; Bhavna

    2010-05-01

    Due to number of problems related with oral, parenteral, rectal and other routes of drug administration, the interest of pharmaceutical scientists has increased towards exploring the possibilities of intranasal delivery of various drugs. Nasal drug delivery system is commonly known for the treatment of local ailments like cold, cough, rhinitis, etc. Efforts have been made to deliver various drugs, especially peptides and proteins, through nasal route for systemic use; utilizing the principles and concepts of various nanoparticulate drug delivery systems using various polymers and absorption promoters. The incorporation of drugs into nanoparticles might be a promising approach, since colloidal formulations have been shown to protect them from the degrading milieu in the nasal cavity and facilitate their transport across the mucosal barriers. The use of nanoparticles for vaccine delivery provides beneficial effect, by achieving good immune responses. This could be due to the fact that small particles can be transported preferentially by the lymphoid tissue of the nasal cavity (NALT). The brain gets benefited through the intranasal delivery as direct olfactory transport bypasses the blood brain barrier and nanoparticles are taken up and conveyed along cell processes of olfactory neurons through the cribriform plate to synaptic junctions with neurons of the olfactory bulb. The intranasal delivery is aimed at optimizing drug bioavailability for systemic drugs, as absorption decreases with increasing molecular weight, and for drugs, which are susceptible to enzymatic degradation such as proteins and polypeptides. This review discusses the potential benefits of using nanoparticles for nasal delivery of drugs and vaccines for brain, systemic and topical delivery. The article aims at giving an insight into nasal cavity, consideration of factors affecting and strategies to improve drug absorption through nasal route, pharmaceutical dosage forms and delivery systems with

  7. Improved Therapeutic Efficacy in Bone and Joint Disorders by Targeted Drug Delivery to Bone.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

     Site-specific drug delivery to bone is considered achievable using acidic amino acid (L-Asp or L-Glu) homopeptides known as acidic oligopeptides. We found that fluorescence-labeled acidic oligopeptides containing six or more residues bound strongly to hydroxyapatite, which is a major component of bone, and were selectively delivered to and retained in bone after systemic administration. We explored the applicability of this result for drug delivery by conjugation of estradiol and levofloxacin with an L-Asp hexapeptide. We also similarly tagged enzymes (tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, β-glucuronidase, and N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase) and decoy receptors (endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products and etanercept) to assess whether these would improve therapeutic efficacy. The L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs, including enzymes and decoy receptors, were efficiently delivered to bone in comparison with the untagged drugs. An in vivo experiment confirmed the efficacy of L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs on bone and joint disorders, although there was some loss of bioactivity of estradiol and levofloxacin in vitro, suggesting that the acidic hexapeptide was partly removed by hydrolysis in the body after delivery to bone. It was expected that the ester linkage to the hexapeptide would be susceptible to hydrolysis in situ, releasing the drug from the acidic oligopeptide. These results support the usefulness of acidic oligopeptides as bone-targeting carriers for therapeutic agents. We present some pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of the L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs.

  8. Different concepts of drug delivery in disease entities.

    PubMed

    Serafin, A; Stańczak, A

    2009-04-01

    This is a review of classical and novel concepts of drug delivery in particular diseases such as central nervous system disease, ophthalmic disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer and others. Nowadays, scientists are trying to propose efficient and selective drugs for the site of action, with best acceptance of patients, that can be metabolized to non-toxic derivatives. Prodrugs, soft drugs, codrugs are designed to maximize the amount of active drugs that reaches the site of action, through changing the physicochemical, biopharmaceutical or pharmacokinetic properties of the parent drugs. For last years different concepts of drug delivery have been developed to achieve the best patients' tolerance of a drug that has no undesirable properties. It is established that future studies will ameliorate drug properties so as to achieve the best drug delivery system.

  9. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  10. The impact of ageing on the barriers to drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Perrie, Yvonne; Badhan, Raj K Singh; Kirby, Daniel J; Lowry, Deborah; Mohammed, Afzal R; Ouyang, Defang

    2012-07-20

    Generally, we like to see ageing as a process that is happening to people older than ourselves. However the process of ageing impacts on a wide range of functions within the human body. Whilst many of the outcomes of ageing can now be delayed or reduced, age-related changes in cellular, molecular and physiological functionality of tissues and organs can also influence how drugs enter, distribute and are eliminated from the body. Therefore, the changing profile of barriers to drug delivery should be considered if we are to develop more age-appropriate medicines. Changes in the drug dissolution and absorption in older patients may require the formulation of oral delivery systems that offer enhanced retention at absorption sites to improve drug delivery. Alternatively, liquid and fast-melt dosage systems may address the need of patients who have difficulties in swallowing medication. Ageing-induced changes in the lung can also result in slower drug absorption, which is further compounded by disease factors, common in an ageing population, that reduce lung capacity. In terms of barriers to drug delivery to the eye, the main consideration is the tear film, which like other barriers to drug delivery, changes with normal ageing and can impact on the bioavailability of drugs delivery using eye drops and suspensions. In contrast, whilst the skin as a barrier changes with age, no significant difference in absorption of drugs from transdermal drug delivery is observed in different age groups. However, due to the age-related pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, dose adaptation should still be considered for drug delivery across the skin. Overall it is clear that the increasing age demographic of most populations, presents new (or should that be older) barriers to effective drug delivery.

  11. Pharmacosomes: An Emerging Novel Vesicular Drug Delivery System for Poorly Soluble Synthetic and Herbal Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the arena of solubility enhancement, several problems are encountered. A novel approach based on lipid drug delivery system has evolved, pharmacosomes. Pharmacosomes are colloidal, nanometric size micelles, vesicles or may be in the form of hexagonal assembly of colloidal drug dispersions attached covalently to the phospholipid. They act as befitting carrier for delivery of drugs quite precisely owing to their unique properties like small size, amphiphilicity, active drug loading, high entrapment efficiency, and stability. They help in controlled release of drug at the site of action as well as in reduction in cost of therapy, drug leakage and toxicity, increased bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs, and restorative effects. There has been advancement in the scope of this delivery system for a number of drugs used for inflammation, heart diseases, cancer, and protein delivery along with a large number of herbal drugs. Hence, pharmacosomes open new challenges and opportunities for improved novel vesicular drug delivery system. PMID:24106615

  12. Alternating current electrospinning for preparation of fibrous drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Attila; Cselkó, Richárd; Démuth, Balázs; Verreck, Geert; Mensch, Jürgen; Marosi, György; Nagy, Zsombor Kristóf

    2015-11-10

    Alternating current electrospinning (ACES) was compared to direct current electrospinning (DCES) for the preparation of drug-loaded nanofibrous mats. It is generally considered that DCES is the solely technique to produce nanofibers using the electrostatic force from polymer solutions, however, less studied and also capable ACES provides further advantages such as increased specific productivities. A poorly water-soluble drug (carvedilol) was incorporated into the fibers based on three different polymeric matrices (an acid-soluble terpolymer (Eudragit(®) E), a base-soluble copolymer (Eudragit(®) L 100-55) and a nonionic homopolymer (polyvinylpyrrolidone K90)) to improve the dissolution of the weak base drug under different pH conditions. Morphology and fiber diameter evaluation showed similar electrospun fibers regardless the type of the high voltage and the major differences in feeding rates. The amorphous ACES and DCES fibers provided fast and total drug dissolutions in all cases. The presented results show that ACES can be a more feasible novel alternative to formulate fibers for drug delivery purposes.

  13. The use of gelatin in a multiple drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Abby W.

    The use of gelatin for growth factor delivery was investigated. Protein-gelatin interactions were characterized using the Biomolecular Interaction Detection (BIND) system. Acidic gelatin sheets and basic gelatin microspheres were fabricated and optimized for delivering transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. The two delivery vehicles were then combined to produce two distinct release sequences and the effect of sequence on bone healing was determined. Using the BIND system, TGF-beta1 was found to interact more strongly with acidic gelatin than basic gelatin whereas BMP-2 only slightly favors basic gelatin over acidic gelatin. Acidic gelatin sheets were fabricated by a casting technique. These sheets successfully delivered TGF-beta1 to a rabbit ulna defect to encourage new bone formation. Basic gelatin microspheres were fabricated by the precision particle fabrication (PPF) method. Uniform drug distribution within the microspheres lead to controlled release of BMP-2 that induced bone formation within the thigh muscle of mice. The sheets and microspheres were combined to deliver both drugs either simultaneously or with a four-day delay to a rabbit calvarial defect. Both sequences encouraged more bone regeneration than empty defects by 8 weeks. Protein-gelatin interactions improved protein stability and lead to release through enzymatic degradation of the gelatin. Growth factors released either singly or in a dual system from gelatin successfully produced bone in vivo. However, single release systems require higher dosages to achieve similar healing results as observed in the dual release systems. No difference was observed between the dual release systems investigated.

  14. Drug Delivery Systems and Combination Therapy by Using Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  15. Role of Monocarboxylate Transporters in Drug Delivery to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Nisha; Morris, Marilyn E.

    2014-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are known to mediate the transport of short chain monocarboxylates such as lactate, pyruvate and butyrate. Currently, fourteen members of this transporter family have been identified by sequence homology, of which only the first four members (MCT1- MCT4) have been shown to mediate the proton-linked transport of monocarboxylates. Another transporter family involved in the transport of endogenous monocarboxylates is the sodium coupled MCTs (SMCTs). These act as a symporter and are dependent on a sodium gradient for their functional activity. MCT1 is the predominant transporter among the MCT isoforms and is present in almost all tissues including kidney, intestine, liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain. The various isoforms differ in terms of their substrate specificity and tissue localization. Due to the expression of these transporters in the kidney, intestine, and brain, they may play an important role in influencing drug disposition. Apart from endogenous short chain monocarboxylates, they also mediate the transport of exogenous drugs such as salicylic acid, valproic acid, and simvastatin acid. The influence of MCTs on drug pharmacokinetics has been extensively studied for γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) including distribution of this drug of abuse into the brain and the results will be summarized in this review. The physiological role of these transporters in the brain and their specific cellular localization within the brain will also be discussed. This review will also focus on utilization of MCTs as potential targets for drug delivery into the brain including their role in the treatment of malignant brain tumors. PMID:23789956

  16. Nanofibers based antibacterial drug design, delivery and applications.

    PubMed

    Ulubayram, Kezban; Calamak, Semih; Shahbazi, Reza; Eroglu, Ipek

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by microorganisms like bacteria, fungi, etc. are the main obstacle in healing processes. Conventional antibacterial administration routes can be listed as oral, intravenous/intramuscular, topical and inhalation. These kinds of drug administrations are faced with critical vital issues such as; more rapid delivery of the drug than intended which can result in bacterial resistance, dose related systemic toxicity, tissue irritation and finally delayed healing process that need to be tackled. Recently, studies have been focused on new drug delivery systems, overcoming resistance and toxicological problems and finally localizing the molecules at the site of action in a proper dose. In this regard, many nanotechnological approaches such as nanoparticulate therapeutic systems have been developed to address accompanying problems mentioned above. Among them, drug loaded electrospun nanofibers propose main advantages like controlled drug delivery, high drug loading capacity, high encapsulation efficiency, simultaneous delivery of multiple drugs, ease of production and cost effectiveness for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. Therefore, some particular attention has been devoted to the design of electrospun nanofibers as promising antibacterial drug carrier systems. A variety of antibacterials e.g., biocides, antibiotics, quaternary ammonium salts, triclosan, metallic nanoparticles (silver, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide) and antibacterial polymers (chitosan, polyethyleneimine, etc.) have been impregnated by various techniques into nanofibers that exhibit strong antibacterial activity in standard assays. This review highlights the design and delivery of antibacterial drug loaded nanofibers with particular focus on their function in the fields of drug delivery, wound healing, tissue engineering, cosmetics and other biomedical applications.

  17. Novel Approaches in Formulation and Drug Delivery using Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kishan; Nair, Anroop B; Kumar, Ashok; Kumria, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    The success of ocular delivery relies on the potential to enhance the drug bioavailability by controlled and extended release of drug on the eye surface. Several new approaches have been attempted to augment the competence and diminish the intrinsic side effects of existing ocular drug delivery systems. In this contest, progress has been made to develop drug-eluting contact lens using different techniques, which have the potential to control and sustain the delivery of drug. Further, the availability of novel polymers have facilitated and promoted the utility of contact lenses in ocular drug delivery. Several research groups have already explored the feasibility and potential of contact lens using conventional drugs for the treatment of periocular and intraocular diseases. Contact lenses formulated using modern technology exhibits high loading, controlled drug release, apposite thickness, water content, superior mechanical and optical properties as compared to commercial lenses. In general, this review discus various factors and approaches designed and explored for the successful delivery of ophthalmic drugs using contact lenses as drug delivery device PMID:24826007

  18. Microemulsion: New Insights into the Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Rahul Rama; Verma, Anurag; Ghosh, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of drugs into eyes using conventional drug delivery systems, such as solutions, is a considerable challenge to the treatment of ocular diseases. Drug loss from the ocular surface by lachrymal fluid secretion, lachrymal fluid-eye barriers, and blood-ocular barriers are main obstacles. A number of ophthalmic drug delivery carriers have been made to improve the bioavailability and to prolong the residence time of drugs applied topically onto the eye. The potential use of microemulsions as an ocular drug delivery carrier offers several favorable pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical properties such as their excellent thermodynamic stability, phase transition to liquid-crystal state, very low surface tension, and small droplet size, which may result in improved ocular drug retention, extended duration of action, high ocular absorption, and permeation of loaded drugs. Further, both lipophilic and hydrophilic characteristics are present in microemulsions, so that the loaded drugs can diffuse passively as well get significantly partitioned in the variable lipophilic-hydrophilic corneal barrier. This review will provide an insight into previous studies on microemulsions for ocular delivery of drugs using various nonionic surfactants, cosurfactants, and associated irritation potential on the ocular surface. The reported in vivo experiments have shown a delayed effect of drug incorporated in microemulsion and an increase in the corneal permeation of the drug. PMID:23936681

  19. Facing the Truth about Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kinam

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology in drug delivery has been manifested into nanoparticles that can have unique properties both in vitro and in vivo, especially in targeted drug delivery to tumors. Numerous nanoparticle formulations have been designed and tested to great effect in small animal models, but the translation of the small animal results to clinical success has been limited. Successful translation requires revisiting the meaning of nanotechnology in drug delivery, understanding the limitations of nanoparticles, identifying the misconceptions pervasive in the field, and facing inconvenient truths. Nanoparticle approaches can have real impact in improving drug delivery by focusing on the problems at hand, such as enhancing their drug loading capacity, affinity to target cells, and spatiotemporal control of drug release. PMID:24490875

  20. NanoART, neuroAIDS and CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nowacek, Ari; Gendelman, Howard E

    2009-01-01

    A broad range of nanomedicines is being developed to improve drug delivery for CNS disorders. The structure of the blood–brain barrier (BBB), the presence of efflux pumps and the expression of metabolic enzymes pose hurdles for drug-brain entry. Nanoformulations can circumvent the BBB to improve CNS-directed drug delivery by affecting such pumps and enzymes. Alternatively, they can be optimized to affect their size, shape, and protein and lipid coatings to facilitate drug uptake, release and ingress across the barrier. This is important as the brain is a sanctuary for a broad range of pathogens including HIV-1. Improved drug delivery to the CNS would affect pharmacokinetic and drug biodistribution properties. This article focuses on how nanotechnology can serve to improve the delivery of antiretroviral medicines, termed nanoART, across the BBB and affect the biodistribution and clinical benefit for HIV-1 disease. PMID:19572821

  1. Matrix embedded microspherules containing indomethacin as controlled drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Swamy, K M Lokamatha; Satyanath, B; Shantakumar, S M; Manjula, D; Mohammedi, Hafsa; Farhana, Ayesha

    2008-10-01

    This work is focused on the development of controlled drug delivery systems using different wax/fat embedded indomethacin (IM). Discrete wax/fat embedded microspherules containing indomethacin were prepared by using cetostearyl alcohol, paraffin wax and stearic acid by employing emulsification-phase separation method. These matrices have been used as barrier coatings due to their hydrophobic nature. Chemically inert and tasteless nature of wax/fats promotes their use as taste masking agents for bitter drugs. Various waxes and fats are available having different physicochemical properties to suit the needs of formulation. Methyl cellulose (MC) 1% w/v, sodium alginate (SA) 0.5% w/v and Tween-80 (TW) 1% w/v were used as emulgents. The resulting microspherules were discrete, large, spherical and also free flowing. It is revealed from the literature that natures of wax/fat emulgents were found to influence the rate of drug release. In the present work the drug content in all the batches of microspherules were found to be uniform. The rate of drug release corresponded best to first order kinetics, followed by Higuchi and zero-order equations. The release of the model drug from these wax/fat microspherules was prolonged over an extended period of time and the drug release mechanism followed anomalous (non-Fickian) diffusion controlled as well as Super Case II transport. Among the three matrix materials used, paraffin wax retarded the drug release more than the other two. Surface characteristics of microspherules have been studied by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). A fair degree rank of correlation was found to exist between the size and release retardation in all the three-wax/fat emulgent combinations.

  2. Silk-Based Biomaterials for Sustained Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, Tuna; Lovett, Michael L.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Silk presents a rare combination of desirable properties for sustained drug delivery, including aqueous-based purification and processing options without chemical cross-linkers, compatibility with common sterilization methods, controllable and surface-mediated biodegradation into non-inflammatory by-products, biocompatibility, utility in drug stabilization, and robust mechanical properties. A versatile silk-based toolkit is currently available for sustained drug delivery formulations of small molecule through macromolecular drugs, with a promise to mitigate several drawbacks associated with other degradable sustained delivery technologies in the market. Silk-based formulations utilize silk’s well-defined nano- through microscale structural hierarchy, stimuli-responsive self-assembly pathways and crystal polymorphism, as well as sequence and genetic modification options towards targeted pharmaceutical outcomes. Furthermore, by manipulating the interactions between silk and drug molecules, near-zero order sustained release may be achieved through diffusion- and degradation-based release mechanisms. Because of these desirable properties, there has been increasing industrial interest in silk-based drug delivery systems currently at various stages of the developmental pipeline from pre-clinical to FDA-approved products. Here, we discuss the unique aspects of silk technology as a sustained drug delivery platform and highlight the current state of the art in silk-based drug delivery. We also offer a potential early development pathway for silk-based sustained delivery products. PMID:24910193

  3. Controlled release for local delivery of drugs: barriers and models.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Jennifer R; Saltzman, W Mark

    2014-09-28

    Controlled release systems are an effective means for local drug delivery. In local drug delivery, the major goal is to supply therapeutic levels of a drug agent at a physical site in the body for a prolonged period. A second goal is to reduce systemic toxicities, by avoiding the delivery of agents to non-target tissues remote from the site. Understanding the dynamics of drug transport in the vicinity of a local drug delivery device is helpful in achieving both of these goals. Here, we provide an overview of controlled release systems for local delivery and we review mathematical models of drug transport in tissue, which describe the local penetration of drugs into tissue and illustrate the factors - such as diffusion, convection, and elimination - that control drug dispersion and its ultimate fate. This review highlights the important role of controlled release science in development of reliable methods for local delivery, as well as the barriers to accomplishing effective delivery in the brain, blood vessels, mucosal epithelia, and the skin.

  4. Computational simulation of drug delivery at molecular level.

    PubMed

    Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2010-01-01

    The field of drug delivery is advancing rapidly. By controlling the precise level and/or location of a given drug in the body, side effects are reduced, doses are lowered, and new therapies are possible. Nonetheless, substantial challenges remain for delivering specific drugs into specific cells. Computational methods to predict the binding and dynamics between drug molecule and its carrier are increasingly desirable to minimize the investment in drug design and development. Significant progress in computational simulation is making it possible to understand the mechanism of drug delivery. This review summarizes the computational methods and progress of four categories of drug delivery systems: dendrimers, polymer micelle, liposome and carbon nanotubes. Computational simulations are particularly valuable in designing better drug carriers and addressing issues that are difficult to be explored by laboratory experiments, such as diffusion, dynamics, etc.

  5. Prodrug-based nanoparticulate drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; Sun, Jin; Sun, Bingjun; He, Zhonggui

    2014-11-01

    Despite the rapid developments in nanotechnology and biomaterials, the efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is still challenging. Prodrug-based nanoassemblies have many advantages as a potent platform for anticancer drug delivery, such as improved drug availability, high drug loading efficiency, resistance to recrystallization upon encapsulation, and spatially and temporally controllable drug release. In this review, we discuss prodrug-based nanocarriers for cancer therapy, including nanosystems based on polymer-drug conjugates, self-assembling small molecular weight prodrugs and prodrug-encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs). In addition, we discuss new trends in the field of prodrug-based nanoassemblies that enhance the delivery efficiency of anticancer drugs, with special emphasis on smart stimuli-triggered drug release, hybrid nanoassemblies, and combination drug therapy.

  6. Advances and Challenges of Liposome Assisted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sercombe, Lisa; Veerati, Tejaswi; Moheimani, Fatemeh; Wu, Sherry Y.; Sood, Anil K.; Hua, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The application of liposomes to assist drug delivery has already had a major impact on many biomedical areas. They have been shown to be beneficial for stabilizing therapeutic compounds, overcoming obstacles to cellular and tissue uptake, and improving biodistribution of compounds to target sites in vivo. This enables effective delivery of encapsulated compounds to target sites while minimizing systemic toxicity. Liposomes present as an attractive delivery system due to their flexible physicochemical and biophysical properties, which allow easy manipulation to address different delivery considerations. Despite considerable research in the last 50 years and the plethora of positive results in preclinical studies, the clinical translation of liposome assisted drug delivery platforms has progressed incrementally. In this review, we will discuss the advances in liposome assisted drug delivery, biological challenges that still remain, and current clinical and experimental use of liposomes for biomedical applications. The translational obstacles of liposomal technology will also be presented. PMID:26648870

  7. Exosomes: Nanoparticulate tools for RNA interference and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shahabipour, Fahimeh; Barati, Nastaran; Johnston, Thomas P; Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-07-01

    Exosomes are naturally occurring extracellular vesicles released by most mammalian cells in all body fluids. Exosomes are known as key mediators in cell-cell communication and facilitate the transfer of genetic and biochemical information between distant cells. Structurally, exosomes are composed of lipids, proteins, and also several types of RNAs which enable these vesicles to serve as important disease biomarkers. Moreover, exosomes have emerged as novel drug and gene delivery tools owing to their multiple advantages over conventional delivery systems. Recently, increasing attention has been focused on exosomes for the delivery of drugs, including therapeutic recombinant proteins, to various target tissues. Exosomes are also promising vehicles for the delivery of microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, which is usually hampered by rapid degradation of these RNAs, as well as inefficient tissue specificity of currently available delivery strategies. This review highlights the most recent accomplishments and trends in the use of exosomes for the delivery of drugs and therapeutic RNA molecules.

  8. Synthesis of three-arm block copolymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)–poly(ethylene glycol) with oxalyl chloride and its application in hydrophobic drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Liu, Chao; Duan, Jianwei; Liang, Xiaoyu; Li, Xuanling; Sun, Hongfan; Kong, Deling; Yang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Synthesis of star-shaped block copolymer with oxalyl chloride and preparation of micelles to assess the prospect for drug-carrier applications. Materials and methods Three-arm star block copolymers of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (3S-PLGA)–polyethylene glycol (PEG) were synthesized by ring-opening polymerization, then PEG as the hydrophilic block was linked to the terminal hydroxyl of 3S-PLGA with oxalyl chloride. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, gel-permeation chromatography (GPC), hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectra, and differential scanning calorimetry were employed to identify the structure and properties of 3S-PLGA-PEG. Rapamycin (RPM)-loaded micelles were prepared by solvent evaporation, and pyrene was used as the fluorescence probe to detect the critical micelle concentration of the copolymer. The particle size, distribution, and ζ-potential of the micelles were determined by dynamic light scattering, and the morphology of the RPM-loaded micelles was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. High-performance liquid chromatography was conducted to analyze encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading capacity, as well as the release behavior of RPM-loaded micelles. The biocompatibility of material and the cytostatic effect of RPM-loaded micelles were investigated by Cell Counting Kit 8 assay. Results FT-IR, GPC, and 1H-NMR suggested that 3S-PLGA-PEG was successfully synthesized. The RPM-loaded micelles prepared with the 3S-PLGA-PEG possessed good properties. The micelles had good average diameter and encapsulation efficiency. For in vitro release, RPM was released slowly from 3S-PLGA-PEG micelles, showing that 3S-PLGA-PEG-RPM exhibited a better and longer antiproliferative effect than free RPM. Conclusion In this study, we first used oxalyl chloride as the linker to synthesize 3S-PLGA-PEG successfully, and compared with reported literature, this method shortened the reaction procedure and improved the reaction

  9. Intraperiodontal pocket: An ideal route for local antimicrobial drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sreeja C.; Anoop, K. R.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal pockets act as a natural reservoir filled with gingival crevicular fluid for the controlled release delivery of antimicrobials directly. This article reflects the present status of nonsurgical controlled local intrapocket delivery of antimicrobials in the treatment of periodontitis. These sites have specialty in terms of anatomy, permeability, and their ability to retain a delivery system for a desired length of time. A number of antimicrobial products and the composition of the delivery systems, its use, clinical results, and their release are summarized. The goal in using an intrapocket device for the delivery of an antimicrobial agent is the achievement and maintenance of therapeutic drug concentration for the desired period of time. Novel controlled drug delivery system are capable of improving patient compliance as well as therapeutic efficacy with precise control of the rate by which a particular drug dosage is released from a delivery system without the need for frequent administration. These are considered superior drug delivery system because of low cost, greater stability, non-toxicity, biocompatibility, non-immunogenicity, and are biodegradable in nature. This review also focus on the importance and ideal features of periodontal pockets as a drug delivery platform for designing a suitable dosage form along with its potential advantage and limitations. The microbes in the periodontal pocket could destroy periodontal tissues, and a complete knowledge of these as well as an ideal treatment strategy could be helpful in treating this disease. PMID:22470888

  10. Marine Origin Polysaccharides in Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Matias J.; Costa, Rui R.; Mano, João F.

    2016-01-01

    Oceans are a vast source of natural substances. In them, we find various compounds with wide biotechnological and biomedical applicabilities. The exploitation of the sea as a renewable source of biocompounds can have a positive impact on the development of new systems and devices for biomedical applications. Marine polysaccharides are among the most abundant materials in the seas, which contributes to a decrease of the extraction costs, besides their solubility behavior in aqueous solvents and extraction media, and their interaction with other biocompounds. Polysaccharides such as alginate, carrageenan and fucoidan can be extracted from algae, whereas chitosan and hyaluronan can be obtained from animal sources. Most marine polysaccharides have important biological properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and anti-inflammatory activity, as well as adhesive and antimicrobial actions. Moreover, they can be modified in order to allow processing them into various shapes and sizes and may exhibit response dependence to external stimuli, such as pH and temperature. Due to these properties, these biomaterials have been studied as raw material for the construction of carrier devices for drugs, including particles, capsules and hydrogels. The devices are designed to achieve a controlled release of therapeutic agents in an attempt to fight against serious diseases, and to be used in advanced therapies, such as gene delivery or regenerative medicine. PMID:26861358

  11. Drug delivery and nanodetection in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Badrzadeh, Fariba; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Badrzadeh, Kazem; Valizadeh, Alireza; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Lung carcinoma is the most widespread type of cancer worldwide, and is responsible for more deaths than other types of cancer. Lung cancer remains the chief cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women worldwide, and is increasingly common in women. Each year, the number of deaths from lung cancer is greater than the number due to breast and colorectal cancer combined. Lung cancer accounted for 13% (1.6 million) of the total cases and 18% (1.4 million) of the deaths in 2008. In Iran, lung cancer is one of the five leading tumors. Among females, it was the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer, and the second leading cause of cancer death. Nanotechnology can be defined as the science and engineering involved in the design, characterization, and application of materials and devices whose smallest functional organization in at least one dimension is on the nanometer scale, i.e. one billionth of a meter. It is an exciting multidisciplinary field that involves the design and engineering of nano objects or nanotools with diameters less than 500 nanometers (nm), and it is one of the most interesting fields of the 21st century. Nanotechnology also offers the ability to detect diseases, such as tumors, much earlier than ever imaginable. This article presents nano devices for lung cancer detection and drug delivery systems.

  12. Marine Origin Polysaccharides in Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Matias J; Costa, Rui R; Mano, João F

    2016-02-05

    Oceans are a vast source of natural substances. In them, we find various compounds with wide biotechnological and biomedical applicabilities. The exploitation of the sea as a renewable source of biocompounds can have a positive impact on the development of new systems and devices for biomedical applications. Marine polysaccharides are among the most abundant materials in the seas, which contributes to a decrease of the extraction costs, besides their solubility behavior in aqueous solvents and extraction media, and their interaction with other biocompounds. Polysaccharides such as alginate, carrageenan and fucoidan can be extracted from algae, whereas chitosan and hyaluronan can be obtained from animal sources. Most marine polysaccharides have important biological properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and anti-inflammatory activity, as well as adhesive and antimicrobial actions. Moreover, they can be modified in order to allow processing them into various shapes and sizes and may exhibit response dependence to external stimuli, such as pH and temperature. Due to these properties, these biomaterials have been studied as raw material for the construction of carrier devices for drugs, including particles, capsules and hydrogels. The devices are designed to achieve a controlled release of therapeutic agents in an attempt to fight against serious diseases, and to be used in advanced therapies, such as gene delivery or regenerative medicine.

  13. Polymer nanogels: a versatile nanoscopic drug delivery platform

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Reuben T.; Ventura, Judy; Zhuang, Jiaming; Thayumanavan, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this review we put the spotlight on crosslinked polymer nanogels, a promising platform that has the characteristics of an “ideal” drug delivery vehicle. Some of the key aspects of drug delivery vehicle design like stability, response to biologically relevant stimuli, passive targeting, active targeting, toxicity and ease of synthesis are discussed. We discuss several delivery systems in this light and highlight some examples of systems, which satisfy some or all of these design requirements. In particular, we point to the advantages that crosslinked polymeric systems bring to drug delivery. We review some of the synthetic methods of nanogel synthesis and conclude with the diverse applications in drug delivery where nanogels have been fruitfully employed. PMID:22342438

  14. Reservoir-Based Drug Delivery Systems Utilizing Microtechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Cynthia L.; Santini, John T.; Langer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This review covers reservoir-based drug delivery systems that incorporate microtechnology, with an emphasis on oral, dermal, and implantable systems. Key features of each technology are highlighted such as working principles, fabrication methods, dimensional constraints, and performance criteria. Reservoir-based systems include a subset of microfabricated drug delivery systems and provide unique advantages. Reservoirs, whether external to the body or implanted, provide a well-controlled environment for a drug formulation, allowing increased drug stability and prolonged delivery times. Reservoir systems have the flexibility to accommodate various delivery schemes, including zero order, pulsatile, and on demand dosing, as opposed to a standard sustained release profile. Furthermore, the development of reservoir-based systems for targeted delivery for difficult to treat applications (e.g., ocular) has resulted in potential platforms for patient therapy. PMID:22465783

  15. Nanoparticles made from novel starch derivatives for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Santander-Ortega, M J; Stauner, T; Loretz, B; Ortega-Vinuesa, J L; Bastos-González, D; Wenz, G; Schaefer, U F; Lehr, C M

    2010-01-04

    The goal of this paper was aimed to the formulation of nanoparticles by using two different propyl-starch derivatives - referred to as PS-1 and PS-1.45 - with high degrees of substitution: 1.05 and 1.45 respectively. A simple o/w emulsion diffusion technique, avoiding the use of hazardous solvents such as dichloromethane or dimethyl sulfoxide, was chosen to formulate nanoparticles with both polymers, producing the PS-1 and PS-1.45 nanoparticles. Once the nanoparticles were prepared, a deep physicochemical characterization was carried out, including the evaluation of nanoparticles stability and applicability for lyophilization. Depending on this information, rules on the formation of PS-1 and PS-1.45 nanoparticles could be developed. Encapsulation and release properties of these nanoparticles were studied, showing high encapsulation efficiency for three tested drugs (flufenamic acid, testosterone and caffeine); in addition a close to linear release profile was observed for hydrophobic drugs with a null initial burst effect. Finally, the potential use of these nanoparticles as transdermal drug delivery systems was also tested, displaying a clear enhancer effect for flufenamic acid.

  16. Block ionomer complex micelles based on the self-assembly of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(acrylic acid) and CdCl₂ for anti-tumor drug delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Liping; Wang, Yapei; Liu, Xiaomei; Ma, Ning; Du, Haiying; Jin, Minghua; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Long; Xu, Yanling; Huang, Peili; Sun, Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    A novel block ionomer complex micelles as drug carrier is developed utilizing self-assemble of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PEG-b-PAA) and cadmium chloride. This micelles are characterized to be have good bio-compatibility, hydrophilicity, passive targeting and sustained slow release property which shows great potential for liver cancer therapy. Block ionomer complex micelles based on PEG-b-PAA and cadmium chloride can self-assemble in distilled water, and Cd(²+) agent is entrapped into the core stabilized by PEG shells. Results showed the block ionomer complex micelles to be spherically shaped. Cadmium was incorporated easily into the ionic core with remarkably high efficiency (34.25% weight (wt)/wt). The cadmium-loaded polymeric micelles exhibited sustained and slow release behavior of cadmium and a potent cytotoxicity against SMMC-7721 in vitro. This novel block ionomer complex micelles with cores of metal antitumor drug indicates to be potential carriers for effective drug delivery.

  17. Improving the pH-response of pHLIP insertion at tumor acidity for targeted drug delivery against cancer: Biophysical studies in model membranes and evaluations in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onyango, Joab Otieno

    pH (Low) Insertion Peptide (pHLIP) possesses unique qualities that can be applied in cancer biology. It is a peptide that lives in three worlds: In State I, pHLIP exists as an unstructured monomer in solution at neutral pH; In State II, pHLIP partitions to the surface of a lipid bilayer at neutral pH; In State III, pHLIP inserts across the lipid bilayer by forming a transmembrane (TM) alpha helix under slightly acidic conditions (pH 6). These properties allow pHLIP to target acidosis (pH 6.5-7.0), a ubiquitous feature of solid tumors. Although pHLIP shows promise as a drug delivery vehicle, insertion properties such as pH50 (i.e. the pH at which 50% of pHLIP are inserted) and Hill coefficient must be tuned to improve tumor targeting and drug delivery in vivo. When TM region D14 and D25 residues were replaced with two glutamic acid residues as well as noncanonical amino acids such as alpha amino adipic acid (Aad) and gamma carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), we discovered pHLIP variants that possess a pH50 that can match tumor extracellular pH. pHLIP variants D25EE, Asp25Aad, and Asp14Gla/Asp25Aad, insert with pH50 of 6.60, 6.74, and 6.79, respectively. We also tuned pH-response (cooperativity of insertion) and we found that the Asp14Gla variant can insert into membrane with the sharpest transition observed so far for a pHLIP (i.e. over half pH unit vs. one pH unit for WT). Furthermore, we used turn-on fluorescence to evaluate the new variants in cancer cells. The most promising Asp25Aad pHLIP gave near theoretical maximum level of dequenching in cancerous A549 cells at pH 6.2 and 6.4, indicating a high level of plasma-membrane insertion. Under the same conditions, the `WT' and D25E pHLIP variants have low levels of plasma-membrane insertion in cells. Dequenching levels were low in non-cancerous HK2 cell line.

  18. Thiopyrazole preactivated chitosan: combining mucoadhesion and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christiane; Ma, Benjamin N; Gust, Ronald; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a preactivated chitosan derivative by the introduction of thioglycolic acid followed by 3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazole-5-thiol (MPPT) coupling via disulfide bond formation. The newly synthesized conjugate was characterized in terms of water-absorbing capacity, cohesive properties, mucoadhesion and drug release kinetics. Further in vitro characterization was conducted regarding permeation enhancement of the model compound fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FD4) and cytotoxic effects on Caco-2 cells. Based on the attachment of the hydrophobic residue, chitosan-S-S-MPPT test discs showed increased stability of the polymer matrix as well as improved water uptake and liberation of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FD4) compared to chitosan only. The mucoadhesive qualities on porcine intestinal mucosa could be improved 38-fold based on the enhanced bonding between chitosan-S-S-MPPT and mucus through the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction of polymer and mucosal cysteine-rich domains supported by MPPT as the leaving group. This novel biomaterial presents a disulfide conjugation-based delivery system that releases the antibacterial thiopyrazole when the polymer comes into contact with the intestinal mucosa. These properties, together with the safe toxicological profile, make chitosan-S-S-MPPT a valuable carrier for mucoadhesive drug delivery systems and a promising matrix for the development of antimicrobial excipients.

  19. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for therapeutic management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Kumar, Animesh; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    A peptic ulcer, stomach ulcer, or gastric ulcer, also known as peptic ulcer disease (PUD), is a very common chronic disorder of the stomach which is mainly caused by damage or impairment of the stomach lining. Various factors such as pepsin, gastric acid, H. pylori, NSAIDs, prostaglandins, mucus, bicarbonate, and blood flow to mucosa play an important role in causing peptic ulcers. In this review article, our main focus is on some important gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS) (floating, bioadhesive, high density, swellable, raft forming, superporous hydrogel, and magnetic systems) which will be helpful in gastroretention of different dosage forms for treatment of peptic ulcer. GRDDS provides a mean for controlled release of compounds that are absorbed by active transport in the upper intestine. It also enables controlled delivery for paracellularly absorbed drugs without a decrease in bioavailability. The above approaches are specific for targeting and leading to a marked improvement in the quality of life for a large number of patients. In the future, it is expected that they will become of growing significance, finally leading to improved efficiencies of various types of pharmacotherapies.

  20. Advances in chitosan-based drug delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liming; Sun, Yun; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    Within the past few years, chitosan-based drug delivery vehicles have become some of the most attractive to be studied. In contrast to all other polysaccharides, chitosan has demonstrated its unique characteristics for drug delivery platforms, including its active primary amino groups for chemical modification, simple and mild preparation methods for the encapsulation of biomolecules or drugs, mucoadhesion to facilitate transport across mucosal barriers and so on. In this review, an overview of the various types of chitosan-based drug delivery systems is provided, with special focus on polymeric drug conjugates and drug nanocarriers. The first part of the review is concerned with the development and applications of polymeric chitosan-drug conjugates. Then the chitosan-based nanocarrier systems as well as their preparation methods and applications are further discussed.

  1. Layered Double Hydroxide-Based Nanocarriers for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xue; Zhang, Hui; Dou, Liguang

    2014-01-01

    Biocompatible clay materials have attracted particular attention as the efficient drug delivery systems (DDS). In this article, we review developments in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) for controlled drug release and delivery. We show how advances in the ability to synthesize intercalated structures have a significant influence on the development of new applications of these materials. We also show how modification and/or functionalization can lead to new biotechnological and biomedical applications. This review highlights the most recent progresses in research on LDH-based controlled drug delivery systems, focusing mainly on: (i) DDS with cardiovascular drugs as guests; (ii) DDS with anti-inflammatory drugs as guests; and (iii) DDS with anti-cancer drugs as guests. Finally, future prospects for LDH-based drug carriers are also discussed. PMID:24940733

  2. Mechanisms and biomaterials in pH-responsive tumour targeted drug delivery: A review.

    PubMed

    Kanamala, Manju; Wilson, William R; Yang, Mimi; Palmer, Brian D; Wu, Zimei

    2016-04-01

    As the mainstay in the treatment of various cancers, chemotherapy plays a vital role, but still faces many challenges, such as poor tumour selectivity and multidrug resistance (MDR). Targeted drug delivery using nanotechnology has provided a new strategy for addressing the limitations of the conventional chemotherapy. In the last decade, the volume of research published in this area has increased tremendously, especially with functional nano drug delivery systems (nanocarriers). Coupling a specific stimuli-triggered drug release mechanism with these delivery systems is one of the most prevalent approaches for improving therapeutic outcomes. Among the various stimuli, pH triggered delivery is regarded as the most general strategy, targeting the acidic extracellular microenvironment and intracellular organelles of solid tumours. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the development of pH-sensitive nanocarriers for tumour-targeted drug delivery. The review focuses on the chemical design of pH-sensitive biomaterials, which are used to fabricate nanocarriers for extracellular and/or intracellular tumour site-specific drug release. The pH-responsive biomaterials bring forth conformational changes in these nanocarriers through various mechanisms such as protonation, charge reversal or cleavage of a chemical bond, facilitating tumour specific cell uptake or drug release. A greater understanding of these mechanisms will help to design more efficient drug delivery systems to address the challenges encountered in conventional chemotherapy.

  3. Recent advances of cocktail chemotherapy by combination drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Gu, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Combination chemotherapy is widely exploited for enhanced cancer treatment in the clinic. However, the traditional cocktail administration of combination regimens often suffers from varying pharmacokinetics among different drugs. The emergence of nanotechnology offers an unparalleled opportunity for developing advanced combination drug delivery strategies with the ability to encapsulate various drugs simultaneously and unify the pharmacokinetics of each drug. This review surveys the most recent advances in combination delivery of multiple small molecule chemotherapeutics using nanocarriers. The mechanisms underlying combination chemotherapy, including the synergistic, additive and potentiation effects, are also discussed with typical examples. We further highlight the sequential and site-specific co-delivery strategies, which provide new guidelines for development of programmable combination drug delivery systems. Clinical outlook and challenges are also discussed in the end.

  4. Recent Advances of Cocktail Chemotherapy by Combination Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Gu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy is widely exploited for enhanced cancer treatment in clinic. However, the traditional cocktail administration of combination regimens often suffers from varying pharmacokinetics among different drugs. The emergence of nanotechnology offers an unparalleled opportunity for developing advanced combination drug delivery strategies with the ability to encapsulate various drugs simultaneously and unify the pharmacokinetics of each drug. This review surveys the most recent advances in combination delivery of multiple small molecule chemotherapeutics using nanocarriers. The mechanisms underlying combination chemotherapy, including the synergistic, additive and potentiation effects, are also discussed with typical examples. We further highlight the sequential and site-specific co-delivery strategies, which provide new guidelines for development of programmable combination drug delivery systems. Clinical outlook and challenges are also discussed in the end. PMID:26546751

  5. Acoustic behavior of microbubbles and implications for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kooiman, Klazina; Vos, Hendrik J; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are valuable in diagnostic ultrasound imaging, and they increasingly show potential for drug delivery. This review focuses on the acoustic behavior of flexible-coated microbubbles and rigid-coated microcapsules and their contribution to enhanced drug delivery. Phenomena relevant to drug delivery, such as non-spherical oscillations, shear stress, microstreaming, and jetting will be reviewed from both a theoretical and experimental perspective. Further, the two systems for drug delivery, co-administration and the microbubble as drug carrier system, are reviewed in relation to the microbubble behavior. Finally, future prospects are discussed that need to be addressed for ultrasound contrast agents to move from a pre-clinical tool into a clinical setting.

  6. Recent developments in silicones for topical and transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Aliyar, Hyder; Schalau, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    Silicones have been used in medicines, cosmetics and medical devices for over 60 years. Polydimethylsiloxanes are polymers that are typically used either as an active in oral drug products or as excipients in topical and transdermal drug products. Inherent characteristics like hydrophobicity, adhesion and aesthetics allow silicones to offer function and performance to drug products. Recent technologies like swollen crosslinked silicone elastomer blend networks, sugar siloxanes, amphiphilic resin linear polymers and silicone hybrid pressure sensitive adhesives promise potential performance advantages and improved drug delivery efficacy. This article presents a review of recent silicone material developments focusing on their function as excipients influencing drug delivery in topical and transdermal systems.

  7. Niosomes: a controlled and novel drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Rajera, Rampal; Nagpal, Kalpana; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade formulation of vesicles as a tool to improve drug delivery, has created a lot of interest amongst the scientist working in the area of drug delivery systems. Vesicular system such as liposomes, niosomes, transferosomes, pharmacosomes and ethosomes provide an alternative to improve the drug delivery. Niosomes play an important role owing to their nonionic properties, in such drug delivery system. Design and development of novel drug delivery system (NDDS) has two prerequisites. First, it should deliver the drug in accordance with a predetermined rate and second it should release therapeutically effective amount of drug at the site of action. Conventional dosage forms are unable to meet these requisites. Niosomes are essentially non-ionic surfactant based multilamellar or unilamellar vesicles in which an aqueous solution of solute is entirely enclosed by a membrane resulting from the organization of surfactant macromolecules as bilayer. Niosomes are formed on hydration of non-ionic surfactant film which eventually hydrates imbibing or encapsulating the hydrating aqueous solution. The main aim of development of niosomes is to control the release of drug in a sustained way, modification of distribution profile of drug and for targeting the drug to the specific body site. This paper deals with composition, characterization/evaluation, merits, demerits and applications of niosomes.

  8. Dendrimeric Systems and Their Applications in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Burçin; Bozdağ Pehlivan, Sibel; Ünlü, Nurşen

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most attractive and challenging research area for pharmaceutical scientists and ophthalmologists. Absorption of an ophthalmic drug in conventional dosage forms is seriously limited by physiological conditions. The use of nonionic or ionic biodegradable polymers in aqueous solutions and colloidal dosage forms such as liposomes, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, microspheres, microcapsules, microemulsions, and dendrimers has been studied to overcome the problems mentioned above. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials. The unique nanostructured architecture of dendrimers has been studied to examine their role in delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Dendrimers can enhance drug's water solubility, bioavailability, and biocompatibility and can be applied for different routes of drug administration successfully. Permeability enhancer properties of dendrimers were also reported. The use of dendrimers can also reduce toxicity versus activity and following an appropriate application route they allow the delivery of the drug to the targeted site and provide desired pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, dendrimeric drug delivery systems are of interest in ocular drug delivery. In this review, the limitations related to eye's unique structure, the advantages of dendrimers, and the potential applications of dendrimeric systems to ophthalmology including imaging, drug, peptide, and gene delivery will be discussed. PMID:24396306

  9. Cyclodextrin nanoassemblies: a promising tool for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Véronique; Gervaise, Cédric; Djedaïni-Pilard, Florence; Furlan, Aurélien; Sarazin, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    Among the biodegradable and nontoxic compounds that can form nanoparticles for drug delivery, amphiphilic cyclodextrins are very promising. Apart from ionic cyclodextrins, which have been extensively studied and reviewed because of their application in gene delivery, our purpose is to provide a clear description of the supramolecular assemblies of nonionic amphiphilic cyclodextrins, which can form nanoassemblies for controlled drug release. Moreover, we focus on the relationship between their structure and physicochemical characteristics, which is crucial for self assembly and drug delivery. We also highlight the importance of the nanoparticle technology preparation for the stability and application of this nanodevice.

  10. Nanotechnology controlled drug delivery for treating bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-08-01

    Rapid developments at the intersection of nanotechnology and controlled drug delivery have triggered exceptional growth in treating various bone diseases. As a result, over the past decade, nanotechnology has contributed tremendously to controlling drug delivery for treating various bone diseases, and in many cases, has led to increased bone regeneration. In this review paper, the recent experimental progress towards using nanotechnology to treat bone-specific diseases is reviewed. Novel applications of different types of nanomaterials (from nanoparticles to 3D nanostructured scaffolds) for treating bone diseases are summarized. In addition, fundamental principles for utilizing nanomaterials to create better drug delivery systems, especially for treating bone diseases and regenerating bone, are emphasized.

  11. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s

    PubMed Central

    Shelate, Pragna; Dave, Divyang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients. PMID:27610247

  12. A Controlled Drug-Delivery Experiment Using Alginate Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Stephanie; Vernengo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, cost-effective experiment which introduces students to drug delivery and modeling using alginate beads. Students produce calcium alginate beads loaded with drug and measure the rate of release from the beads for systems having different stir rates, geometries, extents of cross-linking, and drug molecular weight.…

  13. Nasal Drug Delivery in Traditional Persian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi; Zargaran, Arman; Müller, Johannes; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2013-01-01

    Background Over one hundred different pharmaceutical dosage forms have been recorded in literatures of Traditional Persian Medicine among which nasal forms are considerable. Objectives This study designed to derive the most often applied nasal dosage forms together with those brief clinical administrations. Materials and Methods In the current study remaining pharmaceutical manuscripts of Persia during 9th to 18th century AD have been studied and different dosage forms related to nasal application of herbal medicines and their therapeutic effects were derived. Results By searching through pharmaceutical manuscripts of medieval Persia, different nasal dosage forms involving eleven types related to three main groups are found. These types could be derived from powder, solution or liquid and gaseous forms. Gaseous form were classified into fumigation (Bakhoor), vapor bath (Enkebab), inhalation (Lakhlakheh), aroma agents (Ghalieh) and olfaction or smell (Shomoom). Nasal solutions were as drops (Ghatoor), nasal snuffing drops (Saoot) and liquid snuff formulations (Noshoogh). Powders were as nasal insufflation or snorting agents (Nofookh) and errhine or sternutator medicine (Otoos). Nasal forms were not applied only for local purposes. Rather systemic disorders and specially CNS complications were said to be a target for these dosage forms. Discussion While this novel type of drug delivery is known as a suitable substitute for oral and parenteral administration, it was well accepted and extensively mentioned in Persian medical and pharmaceutical manuscripts and other traditional systems of medicine as well. Accordingly, medieval pharmaceutical standpoints on nasal dosage forms could still be an interesting subject of study. Therefore, the current work can briefly show the pharmaceutical knowledge on nasal formulations in medieval Persia and clarify a part of history of traditional Persian pharmacy. PMID:24624204

  14. Cartilage-targeting drug delivery: can electrostatic interactions help?

    PubMed

    Bajpayee, Ambika G; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2017-03-01

    Current intra-articular drug delivery methods do not guarantee sufficient drug penetration into cartilage tissue to reach cell and matrix targets at the concentrations necessary to elicit the desired biological response. Here, we provide our perspective on the utilization of charge-charge (electrostatic) interactions to enhance drug penetration and transport into cartilage, and to enable sustained binding of drugs within the tissue's highly negatively charged extracellular matrix. By coupling drugs to positively charged nanocarriers that have optimal size and charge, cartilage can be converted from a drug barrier into a drug reservoir for sustained intra-tissue delivery. Alternatively, a wide variety of drugs themselves can be made cartilage-penetrating by functionalizing them with specialized positively charged protein domains. Finally, we emphasize that appropriate animal models, with cartilage thickness similar to that of humans, must be used for the study of drug transport and retention in cartilage.

  15. Biophysics of cell membrane lipids in cancer drug resistance: Implications for drug transport and drug delivery with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcome drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance.

  16. Atopic Dermatitis: Drug Delivery Approaches in Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Lalan, Manisha; Baweja, Jitendra; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe the very basic of atopic dermatitis (AD), the established management strategies, and the advances in drug delivery approaches for successful therapeutic outcomes. The multifactorial pathophysiology of AD has given rise to the clinician's paradigm of topical and systemic therapy and potential combinations. However, incomplete remission of skin disorders like AD is a major challenge to be overcome. Recurrence is thought to be due to genetic and immunological etiologies and shortcomings in drug delivery. This difficulty has sparked research in nanocarrier-based delivery approaches as well as molecular biology-inspired stratagems to deal with the immunological imbalance and to address insufficiencies of delivery propositions. In this review, we assess various novel drug delivery strategies in terms of their success and utility. We present a brief compilation and assessment of management modalities to sensitize the readers to therapeutic scenario in AD.

  17. Nanoparticles for direct nose-to-brain delivery of drugs.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Alpesh; Stolnik, Snjezana; Illum, Lisbeth

    2009-09-08

    This review aims to evaluate the evidence for the existence of a direct nose-to-brain delivery route for nanoparticles administered to the nasal cavity and transported via the olfactory epithelium and/or via the trigeminal nerves directly to the CNS. This is relevant in the field of drug delivery as well as for new developments in nanotechnology. Experiments in animal models have shown that nano-sized drug delivery systems can enhance nose-to-brain delivery of drugs compared to equivalent drug solutions formulations. Protection of the drug from degradation and/or efflux back into the nasal cavity may partly be the reason for this effect of nanoparticles. It is uncertain, however, whether drug from the nanoparticles is being released in the nasal cavity or the nanoparticles carrying the drug are transported via the olfactory system or the trigeminal nerves into the CNS where the drug is released. Furthermore, toxicity of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems in the nasal cavity and/or in the CNS has not been extensively studied and needs to be considered carefully.

  18. PLGA-loaded nanomedicines in melanoma treatment: Future prospect for efficient drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sreemanti; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment methods for melanoma have some limitations such as less target-specific action, severe side effects and resistance to drugs. Significant progress has been made in exploring novel drug delivery systems based on suitable biochemical mechanisms using nanoparticles ranging from 10 to 400 nm for drug delivery and imaging, utilizing their enhanced penetration and retention properties. Poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA), a copolymer of poly-lactic acid and poly-glycolic acid, provides an ideally suited performance-based design for better penetration into skin cells, thereby having a greater potential for the treatment of melanoma. Moreover, encapsulation protects the drug from deactivation by biological reactions and interactions with biomolecules, ensuring successful delivery and bioavailability for effective treatment. Controlled and sustained delivery of drugs across the skin barrier that otherwise prohibits entry of larger molecules can be successfully made with adequately stable biocompatible nanocarriers such as PLGA for taking drugs through the small cutaneous pores permitting targeted deposition and prolonged drug action. PLGA is now being extensively used in photodynamic therapy and targeted therapy through modulation of signal proteins and drug-DNA interactions. Recent advances made on these nanomedicines and their advantages in the treatment of skin melanoma are highlighted and discussed in this review. PMID:27934796

  19. Recent advancement of gelatin nanoparticles in drug and vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Nityananda; Sahoo, Ranjan Ku; Biswas, Nikhil; Guha, Arijit; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo

    2015-11-01

    Novel drug delivery system using nanoscale materials with a broad spectrum of applications provides a new therapeutic foundation for technological integration and innovation. Nanoparticles are suitable drug carrier for various routes of administration as well as rapid recognition by the immune system. Gelatin, the biological macromolecule is a versatile drug/vaccine delivery carrier in pharmaceutical field due to its biodegradable, biocompatible, non-antigenicity and low cost with easy availability. The surface of gelatin nanoparticles can be modified with site-specific ligands, cationized with amine derivatives or, coated with polyethyl glycols to achieve targeted and sustained release drug delivery. Compared to other colloidal carriers, gelatin nanoparticles are better stable in biological fluids to provide the desired controlled and sustained release of entrapped drug molecules. The current review highlights the different formulation aspects of gelatin nanoparticles which affect the particle characteristics like zeta potential, polydispersity index, entrapment efficacy and drug release properties. It has also given emphasis on the major applications of gelatin nanoparticles in drug and vaccine delivery, gene delivery to target tissues and nutraceutical delivery for improving the poor bioavailabity of bioactive phytonutrients.

  20. Microneedles: a valuable physical enhancer to increase transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Chávez, José Juan; Bonilla-Martínez, Dalia; Villegas-González, Martha Angélica; Molina-Trinidad, Eva; Casas-Alancaster, Norma; Revilla-Vázquez, Alma Luisa

    2011-07-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers an attractive alternative to the conventional drug delivery methods of oral administration and injection. However, the stratum corneum acts as a barrier that limits the penetration of substances through the skin. Recently, the use of micron-scale needles in increasing skin permeability has been proposed and shown to dramatically increase transdermal delivery. Microneedles have been fabricated with a range of sizes, shapes, and materials. Most in vitro drug delivery studies have shown these needles to increase skin permeability to a broad range of drugs that differ in molecular size and weight. In vivo studies have demonstrated satisfactory release of oligonucleotides and insulin and the induction of immune responses from protein and DNA vaccines. Microneedles inserted into the skin of human subjects were reported to be painless. For all these reasons, microneedles are a promising technology to deliver drugs into the skin. This review presents the main findings concerning the use of microneedles in transdermal drug delivery. It also covers types of microneedles, their advantages and disadvantages, enhancement mechanisms, and trends in transdermal drug delivery.

  1. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:28243062

  2. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations.

  3. Preparation of drug delivery systems using supercritical fluid technology.

    PubMed

    Kompella, U B; Koushik, K

    2001-01-01

    Small changes in temperature and pressure near the critical region induce dramatic changes in the density and solubility of supercritical fluids, thereby facilitating the use of environmentally benign agents such as CO2 for their solvent and antisolvent properties in processing a wide variety of materials. While supercritical fluid technologies have been in commercial use in the food and chromatography industries for several years, only recently has this technology made inroads in the formulation of drug delivery systems. This review summarizes some of the recent applications of supercritical fluid technology in the preparation of drug delivery systems. Drugs containing polymeric particles, plain drug particles, solute-containing liposomes, and inclusion complexes of drug and carrier have been formulated using this technology. Also, polymer separation using this technology is enabling the selection of a pure fraction of a polymer, thereby allowing a more precise control of drug release from polymeric delivery systems.

  4. Penetration enhancers in proniosomes as a new strategy for enhanced transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    El Maghraby, Gamal M.; Ahmed, Amal A.; Osman, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate penetration enhancers in proniosomes as a transdermal delivery system for nisoldipine. This was performed with the goal of optimising the composition of proniosomes as transdermal drug delivery systems. Plain proniosomes comprising sorbitan monostearate, cholesterol, ethanol and a small quantity of water were initially prepared. Subsequently, proniosomes containing lecithin or skin penetration enhancers were prepared and evaluated for transdermal delivery of nisoldipine. The plain proniosomes significantly enhanced the transdermal flux of nisoldipine to reach 12.18 μg cm−2 h−1 compared with a saturated aqueous drug solution which delivered the drug at a rate of 0.46 μg cm−2 h−1. Incorporation of lecithin into such proniosomes increased the drug flux to reach a value of 28.51 μg cm−2 h−1. This increase can be attributed to the penetration enhancing effect of lecithin fatty acid components. Replacing lecithin oleic acid (OA) produced proniosomes of comparable efficacy to the lecithin containing system. The transdermal drug flux increased further after incorporation of propylene glycol into the OA based proniosomes. Similarly, incorporation of isopropyl myristate into plain proniosomes increased drug flux. The study introduced enhanced proniosomes as a promising transdermal delivery carrier and highlighted the role of penetration enhancing mechanisms in enhanced proniosomal skin delivery. The study opened the way for another line of optimisation of niosome proconcentrates. PMID:25685045

  5. Dissipative Particle Dynamics Method on PH-Responsive Polymeric Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yingying

    2013-03-01

    The self-assembled morphologies formed by polymer in selective solvent could be potentially used as drug-delivery vehicles and has attracted great attention recently. In our work, the drug release mechanism of polymeric delivery vehicle (polymeric microsphere) is investigated with Dissipative particle dynamics simulation. Poly (Lactic Acid)-b-polyethylene glycol (PLA-b-PEG) diblock copolymer is the carrier while IBU is selected as the model drug. A core-shell spherical micelle with drug encapsulated in the core is obtained in our simulation. By changing the medium from neutral to acid, the drugs release via a diffuse mechanism. Both the formation mechanism of the encapsulant and the release mechanism for the drugs are studied in our work. For the formation process, it can be ascribed as the coalesce of the small clusters and the disperse of the drugs; while for the drug release behavior, the process can be divided for three stages: (1) swell of the polymeric carrier, (2) drug diffuse in the carrier and some acid molecules disperse into the carrier, (3) drug release towards the acid medium. Our results might provide a mesoscopic methodology for the evaluation and prediction for polymeric self-assemblies as a carrier for pharmaceutical interest.

  6. Microneedle-based drug delivery systems: Microfabrication, drug delivery, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F.; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Woolfson, A. David

    2010-01-01

    Many promising therapeutic agents are limited by their inability to reach the systemic circulation, due to the excellent barrier properties of biological membranes, such as the stratum corneum (SC) of the skin or the sclera/cornea of the eye and others. The outermost layer of the skin, the SC, is the principal barrier to topically-applied medications. The intact SC thus provides the main barrier to exogenous substances, including drugs. Only drugs with very specific physicochemical properties (molecular weight < 500 Da, adequate lipophilicity, and low melting point) can be successfully administered transdermally. Transdermal delivery of hydrophilic drugs and macromolecular agents of interest, including peptides, DNA, and small interfering RNA is problematic. Therefore, facilitation of drug penetration through the SC may involve by-pass or reversible disruption of SC molecular architecture. Microneedles (MNs), when used to puncture skin, will by-pass the SC and create transient aqueous transport pathways of micron dimensions and enhance the transdermal permeability. These micropores are orders of magnitude larger than molecular dimensions, and, therefore, should readily permit the transport of hydrophilic macromolecules. Various strategies have been employed by many research groups and pharmaceutical companies worldwide, for the fabrication of MNs. This review details various types of MNs, fabrication methods and, importantly, investigations of clinical safety of MN. PMID:20297904

  7. Polymer functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes mediated drug delivery of gliotoxin in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Ira; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Kiml, Se-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    During recent years, significant development has been achieved in carbon nanotube conjugated with polymer system for drug delivery system (DDS). In the present study, we have prepared functionalized single walled carbon nanotube conjugated with chitooligosaccharide (f-SWNT-COS) as a Drug Delivery System. In addition, drug Gliotoxin (GTX) and targeting molecules (Lysozyme, p53 and Folic acid) have been incorporated into f-SWNT-COS. f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-p53, f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-lysozyme, f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-FA have been physiochemically characterized for DDS. FT-IR, SEM and TEM analysis confirmed the formation of chemical interaction and polymer coating. FT-IR result clearly confirmed the interaction between f-SWNT and COS. The effective drug release was monitored against cervical cancer (HeLa) cells and Breast Cancer (MCF-7) cells and it was found that all the three drug delivery systems showed significant cytotoxicity. f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-p53 delivery vehicle and its effective cytotoxicity on HeLa cells was further checked with fluorescent activated cell sorter analysis. Our results suggest that the f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-p53 is the most effective delivery vehicle with a controlled release and enhanced cytotoxicity rendered through apoptosis in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. These systems can further be used for the delivery of other commercially available anti cancer drugs as well.

  8. Drug Delivery via Cell Membrane Fusion Using Lipopeptide Modified Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Efficient delivery of drugs to living cells is still a major challenge. Currently, most methods rely on the endocytotic pathway resulting in low delivery efficiency due to limited endosomal escape and/or degradation in lysosomes. Here, we report a new method for direct drug delivery into the cytosol of live cells in vitro and invivo utilizing targeted membrane fusion between liposomes and live cells. A pair of complementary coiled-coil lipopeptides was embedded in the lipid bilayer of liposomes and cell membranes respectively, resulting in targeted membrane fusion with concomitant release of liposome encapsulated cargo including fluorescent dyes and the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin. Using a wide spectrum of endocytosis inhibitors and endosome trackers, we demonstrate that the major site of cargo release is at the plasma membrane. This method thus allows for the quick and efficient delivery of drugs and is expected to have many invitro, ex vivo, and invivo applications. PMID:27725960

  9. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-01

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials.Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02324f

  10. Carbon nanotubes for delivery of small molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bin Sheng; Yoong, Sia Lee; Jagusiak, Anna; Panczyk, Tomasz; Ho, Han Kiat; Ang, Wee Han; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2013-12-01

    In the realm of drug delivery, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have gained tremendous attention as promising nanocarriers, owing to their distinct characteristics, such as high surface area, enhanced cellular uptake and the possibility to be easily conjugated with many therapeutics, including both small molecules and biologics, displaying superior efficacy, enhanced specificity and diminished side effects. While most CNT-based drug delivery system (DDS) had been engineered to combat cancers, there are also emerging reports that employ CNTs as either the main carrier or adjunct material for the delivery of various non-anticancer drugs. In this review, the delivery of small molecule drugs is expounded, with special attention paid to the current progress of in vitro and in vivo research involving CNT-based DDSs, before finally concluding with some consideration on inevitable complications that hamper successful disease intervention with CNTs.

  11. pH-triggered drug release from biodegradable microwells for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Nagstrup, Johan; Gordon, Sarah; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Østergaard, Jesper; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette; Boisen, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Microwells fabricated from poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) were evaluated for their application as an oral drug delivery system using the amorphous sodium salt of furosemide (ASSF) as a model drug. Hot embossing of PLLA resulted in fabrication of microwells with an inner diameter of 240 μm and a height of 100 μm. The microwells were filled with ASSF using a modified screen printing technique, followed by coating of the microwell cavities with a gastro-resistant lid of Eudragit® L100. The release behavior of ASSF from the coated microwells was investigated using a μ-Diss profiler and a UV imaging system, and under conditions simulating the changing environment of the gastrointestinal tract. Biorelevant gastric medium (pH 1.6) was employed, after which a change to biorelevant intestinal release medium (pH 6.5) was carried out. Both μ-Diss profiler and UV imaging release experiments showed that sealing of microwell cavities with an Eudragit® layer prevented drug release in biorelevant gastric medium. An immediate release of the ASSF from coated microwells was observed in the intestinal medium. This pH-triggered release behavior demonstrates the future potential of PLLA microwells as a site-specific oral drug delivery system.

  12. Development of Systems for Delivery of Antiviral Drugs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-31

    synthesis of CNS-targeted prodrug esters of ribavirin and selenazole, pharmacokinetic studies of drug distribution and sustained delivery of drug in the brain...The scope of the research program involves the synthesis of CNS-targeted prodrug esters of ribavirin and selenazole, pharmaco- kinetic, studies of...blood-brain barrier. Our initial efforts have been directed toward the synthesis of ribavirin prodrugs. Based upon the brain-specific delivery of, for

  13. Natural polymers, gums and mucilages as excipients in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shobhit; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Use of natural polymers, gums and mucilages in drug delivery systems has been weighed down by the synthetic materials. Natural based excipients offered advantages such as non-toxicity, less cost and abundantly availablity. Aqueous solubility of natural excipients plays an important role in their selection for designing immediate, controlled or sustained release formulations. This review article provide an overview of natural gum, polymers and mucilages as excipients in dosage forms as well as novel drug delivery systems.

  14. Porous Inorganic Drug Delivery Systems-a Review.

    PubMed

    Sayed, E; Haj-Ahmad, R; Ruparelia, K; Arshad, M S; Chang, M-W; Ahmad, Z

    2017-02-28

    Innovative methods and materials have been developed to overcome limitations associated with current drug delivery systems. Significant developments have led to the use of a variety of materials (as excipients) such as inorganic and metallic structures, marking a transition from conventional polymers. Inorganic materials, especially those possessing significant porosity, are emerging as good candidates for the delivery of a range of drugs (antibiotics, anticancer and anti-inflammatories), providing several advantages in formulation and engineering (encapsulation of drug in amorphous form, controlled delivery and improved targeting). This review focuses on key selected developments in porous drug delivery systems. The review provides a short broad overview of porous polymeric materials for drug delivery before focusing on porous inorganic materials (e.g. Santa Barbara Amorphous (SBA) and Mobil Composition of Matter (MCM)) and their utilisation in drug dosage form development. Methods for their preparation and drug loading thereafter are detailed. Several examples of porous inorganic materials, drugs used and outcomes are discussed providing the reader with an understanding of advances in the field and realistic opportunities.

  15. Nanoparticle hardness controls the internalization pathway for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Xianren; Cao, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery systems offer fundamental advantages over current therapeutic agents that commonly display a longer circulation time, lower toxicity, specific targeted release, and greater bioavailability. For successful NP-based drug delivery it is essential that the drug-carrying nanocarriers can be internalized by the target cells and transported to specific sites, and the inefficient internalization of nanocarriers is often one of the major sources for drug resistance. In this work, we use the dissipative particle dynamics simulation to investigate the effect of NP hardness on their internalization efficiency. Three simplified models of NP platforms for drug delivery, including polymeric NP, liposome and solid NP, are designed here to represent increasing nanocarrier hardness. Simulation results indicate that NP hardness controls the internalization pathway for drug delivery. Rigid NPs can enter the cell by a pathway of endocytosis, whereas for soft NPs the endocytosis process can be inhibited or frustrated due to wrapping-induced shape deformation and non-uniform ligand distribution. Instead, soft NPs tend to find one of three penetration pathways to enter the cell membrane via rearranging their hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. Finally, we show that the interaction between nanocarriers and drug molecules is also essential for effective drug delivery.

  16. Nanoparticle hardness controls the internalization pathway for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Xianren; Cao, Dapeng

    2015-02-14

    Nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery systems offer fundamental advantages over current therapeutic agents that commonly display a longer circulation time, lower toxicity, specific targeted release, and greater bioavailability. For successful NP-based drug delivery it is essential that the drug-carrying nanocarriers can be internalized by the target cells and transported to specific sites, and the inefficient internalization of nanocarriers is often one of the major sources for drug resistance. In this work, we use the dissipative particle dynamics simulation to investigate the effect of NP hardness on their internalization efficiency. Three simplified models of NP platforms for drug delivery, including polymeric NP, liposome and solid NP, are designed here to represent increasing nanocarrier hardness. Simulation results indicate that NP hardness controls the internalization pathway for drug delivery. Rigid NPs can enter the cell by a pathway of endocytosis, whereas for soft NPs the endocytosis process can be inhibited or frustrated due to wrapping-induced shape deformation and non-uniform ligand distribution. Instead, soft NPs tend to find one of three penetration pathways to enter the cell membrane via rearranging their hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. Finally, we show that the interaction between nanocarriers and drug molecules is also essential for effective drug delivery.

  17. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-07-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world's population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections.

  18. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:25071326

  19. Amphiphilically modified chitosan cationic nanoparticles for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jie; Li, Wenfeng; Yu, Chang; Zhao, Chengguang; Jin, Langping; Zhou, Yili; Xu, Xuzhong; Dong, Siyang; Lu, Xincheng; Wang, Ouchen

    2013-12-01

    A series of amphiphilic N-(2-hydroxy)propyl-3-trimethylammonium-chitosan-cholic acid (HPTA-CHI-CA) polymers were synthesized by grafting cholic acid (CA) and glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride onto chitosan. The self-assembly behavior of HPTA-CHI-CA was studied by fluorescence technique. The polymers were able to self-assemble into NPs in phosphate buffered saline with a critical aggregation concentration (CAC) in the range of 66-26 mg/L and the CAC decreased with the increasing of the degree of substitution (DS) of CA. The size of cationic HPTA-CHI-CA NPs ranges from 170 to 220 nm (PDI < 0.2). It was found that doxorubicin (DOX) could be encapsulated into HPTA-CHI-CA NPs based on self-assembly. The drug loading content and efficiency varies depending on the DS of CA and feeding ratio of DOX to polymer. In vitro release studies suggested that DOX released slowly from HPTA-CHI-CA NPs without any burst initial release. Besides, the confocal microscopic measurements indicated that DOX-HPTA-CHI-CA NPs could easily be uptaken by breast cancer (MCF-7) cells and release DOX in cytoplasm. Anti-tumor efficacy results showed that DOX-HPTA-CHI-CA NPs have a significant activity of inhibition MCF-7 cells growth. These results suggest cationic HPTA-CHI-CA may have great potential for anticancer drug delivery.

  20. Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT): a potential target for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-06-01

    Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems.

  1. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign-Hodges, Laura

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. Here, we investigate the use of muco-inert mucus-penetrating nanoparticles (MPP) for improving vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery. Conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles strongly adhere to mucus, facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that mucoadhesive polystyrene nanoparticles (conventional nanoparticles, CP) become mucus-penetrating in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) after pretreatment with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large MPP did not change in F127 pretreated CVM, implying there is no affect on the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for one week. Importantly, HSV virus remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM. Mucosal epithelia use osmotic gradients for fluid absorption and secretion. We hypothesized that hypotonically-induced fluid uptake could be advantageous for rapidly delivering drugs through mucus to the vaginal epithelium. We evaluated hypotonic formulations for delivering water-soluble drugs and for drug delivery with MPP. Hypotonic formulations markedly increased the rate at which drugs and MPP reached the epithelial surface. Additionally, hypotonic formulations greatly enhanced drug and MPP delivery to the entire epithelial surface, including deep into the vaginal folds (rugae) that isotonic formulations

  2. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Reshmy; Jose, Shoma; Mukund, V. P. Biju; Vasudevan, Deepa T.

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era. PMID:22171309

  3. Nanoformulation for anticancer drug delivery: Enhanced pharmacokinetics and circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Gaurav

    layers of the LbL shell are assembled at acidic pH 3, and the final layers (2-3) are assembled at a slightly basic pH of 7.4. These LbL-encapsulated nanocores are not stable and immediately aggregate in water or the serum. A final layer of 5 kDa PEG was assembled to improve circulation time. It showed higher colloidal stability in PBS, high drug loading concentration of 0.5 mg/mL, and an improved drug chemical stability in Fetal Bovine Serum with high lactone fraction of 99%. It also showed 3 times improved cytotoxicity against glioblastoma cancer cells. For the first time we applied a new method of the LbL capsule assembly at different pH values, the first 4 bilayers at pH 3, and the following 3 bilayers at pH 7.4. In the second study (CHAPTER 5), the developed LbL assembly for low solubility drug encapsulation was extended for the delivery of PTX loaded in nanomicelle cores. PTX, as a nanomicelle core, is encapsulated with fewer layers of LbL assembly, followed by an extra layer of PEG (PEGylation). A significant improvement was seen in reducing the process steps through reduction in the number of LbL layers, while smaller nano-colloids, ~100 nm, were produced with improved drug loading capacity, higher cytotoxicity, and high mice survival rate. In the third study (CHAPTER 6), we have applied the concepts learned and the techniques developed from the previous two studies to modify the surface of the nanostructured solid lipid carriers (NLC) with LbL architecture, plus extra PEGylation. The NLC are co-loaded with DOX and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). This study is an attempt to further increase drug circulation time in the blood. We improved the colloidal stability with a narrow distribution size, 128 nm, polydispersity of 0.098, a higher longevity in the blood, a 1.5 times lower accumulation in the liver, a 2.25 times higher accumulation in tumors, and a significant ~3.5 times greater tumor growth inhibition in 4T1 murine tumor model in mice. In conclusion, we developed

  4. Polysaccharides-based polyelectrolyte nanoparticles as protein drugs delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shujun; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinge; Wu, Zhongming; Wang, Zhen; Li, Chaoxing

    2011-09-01

    Polysaccharides-based nanoparticles were prepared by synthesized quaternized chitosan and dextran sulfate through simple ionic-gelation self-assembled method. Introduction of quaternized groups was intended to increase water solubility of chitosan and make the nanoparticles have broader pH sensitive range which can remain more stable in physiological pH and decrease the loss of protein drugs caused by the gastric cavity. The load of BSA was affected by molecular parameter, i.e., degree of substitution, and average molecular weight of quaternized chitosan, as well as concentration of BSA. Fast release occurred in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) while the release was slow in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.4). The drug release mechanism is Fickian diffusion through release kinetics analysis. Cell uptake demonstrated nanoparicles can internalize into Caco-2 cells, which suggested that nanoparticles had good biocompatibility. No significant conformation change was noted for the released BSA in comparison with native BSA using circular dichroism spectroscopy. This kind of novel composite nanoparticles may be a promising delivery system for oral protein and peptide drugs.

  5. Iontophoresis: A Potential Emergence of a Transdermal Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Dhote, Vinod; Bhatnagar, Punit; Mishra, Pradyumna K.; Mahajan, Suresh C.; Mishra, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of drugs into systemic circulation via skin has generated much attention during the last decade. Transdermal therapeutic systems propound controlled release of active ingredients through the skin and into the systemic circulation in a predictive manner. Drugs administered through these systems escape first-pass metabolism and maintain a steady state scenario similar to a continuous intravenous infusion for up to several days. However, the excellent impervious nature of the skin offers the greatest challenge for successful delivery of drug molecules by utilizing the concepts of iontophoresis. The present review deals with the principles and the recent innovations in the field of iontophoretic drug delivery system together with factors affecting the system. This delivery system utilizes electric current as a driving force for permeation of ionic and non-ionic medications. The rationale behind using this technique is to reversibly alter the barrier properties of skin, which could possibly improve the penetration of drugs such as proteins, peptides and other macromolecules to increase the systemic delivery of high molecular weight compounds with controlled input kinetics and minimum inter-subject variability. Although iontophoresis seems to be an ideal candidate to overcome the limitations associated with the delivery of ionic drugs, further extrapolation of this technique is imperative for translational utility and mass human application. PMID:22396901

  6. Molecularly imprinted polymers as the future drug delivery devices.

    PubMed

    Luliński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the investigations of new drug delivery systems have been directed on the development of some "intelligent" drug delivery devices that are able to directly respond to the patient's individual needs. New drug delivery systems should maximize the efficiency of administrated therapeutic agents and improve the patient's quality of life. Introduction of the new drug delivery devices is an important scientific goal, which could be achieved by combining new technologies and intelligent biomaterials. Molecular imprinting technology has a high potential for the preparation of optimized drug delivery forms. Here, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are promising new materials for such purposes, but their application in this field is nowadays at a developing stage. In this review, the principles of molecular imprinting and the recognition-release mechanisms of polymeric matrices are discussed. The potential application of molecularly imprinted materials as the future drug delivery systems with various administering routes (transdermal, ocular or oral) are presented, and some future prospects for the imprinted polymers are outlined.

  7. Synergistic effect of enhancers for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mitragotri, S

    2000-11-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers a non-invasive route of drug administration, although its applications are limited by low skin permeability. Various enhancers including iontophoresis, chemicals, ultrasound, and electroporation have been shown to enhance transdermal drug transport. Although all these methods have been individually shown to enhance transdermal drug transport, their combinations have often been found to enhance transdermal transport more effectively than each of them alone. This paper summarizes literature studies on these combinations with respect to their efficacy and mechanisms.

  8. Stimuli sensitive hydrogels for ophthalmic drug delivery: A review.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Swatantra Ks; Saxena, Prachi; Rai, Ak

    2012-04-01

    Amongst the various routes of drug delivery, the field of ocular drug delivery is one of the most interesting and challenging endeavors facing the pharmaceutical scientist for past 10-20 years. As an isolated organ, eye is very difficult to study from a drug delivery point of view. Despite this limitation, improvements have been made with the objective of maintaining the drug in the biophase for an extended period. A major problem in ocular therapeutics is the attainment of an optimal drug concentration at the site of action. To achieve effective ophthalmic therapy, an adequate amount of active ingredient must be delivered and maintained within the eye. The most frequently used dosage forms, i.e., eye solution, eye ointments, eye gels, and eye suspensions are compromised in their effectiveness by several limitations leading to poor ocular bioavailability. Ophthalmic use of viscosity-enhancing agents, penetration enhancers, cyclodextrins, prodrug approaches, and ocular inserts, and the ready existing drug carrier systems along with their application to ophthalmic drug delivery are common to improve ocular bioavailability. Amongst these hydrogel (stimuli sensitive) systems are important, which undergo reversible volume and/or sol-gel phase transitions in response to physiological (temperature, pH and present of ions in organism fluids, enzyme substrate) or other external (electric current, light) stimuli. They help to increase in precorneal residence time of drug to a sufficient extent that an ocularly delivered drug can exhibit its maximum biological action. The concept of this innovative ophthalmic delivery approach is to decrease the systemic side effects and to create a more pronounced effect with lower doses of the drug. The present article describes the advantages and use stimuli sensitive of hydrogel systems in ophthalmic drug delivery.

  9. Stimuli sensitive hydrogels for ophthalmic drug delivery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Swatantra KS; Saxena, Prachi; Rai, AK

    2012-01-01

    Amongst the various routes of drug delivery, the field of ocular drug delivery is one of the most interesting and challenging endeavors facing the pharmaceutical scientist for past 10-20 years. As an isolated organ, eye is very difficult to study from a drug delivery point of view. Despite this limitation, improvements have been made with the objective of maintaining the drug in the biophase for an extended period. A major problem in ocular therapeutics is the attainment of an optimal drug concentration at the site of action. To achieve effective ophthalmic therapy, an adequate amount of active ingredient must be delivered and maintained within the eye. The most frequently used dosage forms, i.e., eye solution, eye ointments, eye gels, and eye suspensions are compromised in their effectiveness by several limitations leading to poor ocular bioavailability. Ophthalmic use of viscosity-enhancing agents, penetration enhancers, cyclodextrins, prodrug approaches, and ocular inserts, and the ready existing drug carrier systems along with their application to ophthalmic drug delivery are common to improve ocular bioavailability. Amongst these hydrogel (stimuli sensitive) systems are important, which undergo reversible volume and/or sol-gel phase transitions in response to physiological (temperature, pH and present of ions in organism fluids, enzyme substrate) or other external (electric current, light) stimuli. They help to increase in precorneal residence time of drug to a sufficient extent that an ocularly delivered drug can exhibit its maximum biological action. The concept of this innovative ophthalmic delivery approach is to decrease the systemic side effects and to create a more pronounced effect with lower doses of the drug. The present article describes the advantages and use stimuli sensitive of hydrogel systems in ophthalmic drug delivery. PMID:23119233

  10. Fatty acid vesicles acting as expanding horizon for transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lalit; Verma, Shivani; Kumar, Sanjeev; Prasad, Deo Nandan; Jain, Amit Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The body is protected against the external environment by the skin due to its physical barrier nature. Stratum corneum composed of corneocytes surrounded by lipid region performs a major barrier function as it lies in the uppermost area of skin. Alteration in barrier function, increase in permeability, and disorganization of stratum corneum represent diseased skin. Drugs applied to the diseased skin should induce a local effect at the site of application or area close to it along with cutaneous absorption rather than percutaneous absorption. Conventional formulations like ointments, gels, and creams suffer from the drawback of limited local activity. For the enhancement of drug penetration and localization of the drug at the site of action approaches explored are liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes microparticles, and solid lipid nanoparticles. Vesicles composed of fatty acids like oleic acid and linoleic acid represent the new approach used for transdermal penetration and localization. In this review article, our major aim was to explore the applications of fatty acid vesicles for transdermal delivery of various bioactives.

  11. Nerve guidance channels as drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Alexandra; Shoichet, Molly S

    2006-03-01

    Nerve guidance channels (NGCs) have been shown to facilitate regeneration after transection injury to the peripheral nerve or spinal cord. Various therapeutic molecules, including neurotrophic factors, have improved regeneration and functional recovery after injury when combined with NGCs; however, their impact has not been maximized partly due to the lack of an appropriate drug delivery system. To address this limitation, nerve growth factor (NGF) was incorporated into NGCs of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate), P(HEMA-co-MMA). The NGCs were synthesized by a liquid-liquid centrifugal casting process and three different methods of protein incorporation were compared in terms of protein distribution and NGF release profile: (1) NGF was encapsulated (with BSA) in biodegradable poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) 85/15 microspheres, which were combined with a PHEMA polymerization formulation and coated on the inside of pre-formed NGCs by a second liquid-liquid centrifugal casting technique; (2) pre-formed NGCs were imbibed with a solution of NGF/BSA and (3) NGF/BSA alone was combined with a PHEMA formulation and coated on the inside of pre-formed NGCs by a second liquid-liquid centrifugal casting technique. Using a fluorescently labelled model protein, the distribution of proteins in NGCs prepared with a coating of either protein-loaded microspheres or protein alone was found to be confined to the inner PHEMA layer. Sustained release of NGF was achieved from NGCs with either NGF-loaded microspheres or NGF alone incorporated into the inner layer, but not from channels imbibed with NGF. By day 28, NGCs with microspheres released a total of 220 pg NGF/cm of channel whereas those NGCs imbibed with NGF released 1040 pg/cm and those NGCs with NGF incorporated directly in a PHEMA layer released 8624 pg/cm. The release of NGF from NGCs with microspheres was limited by a slow-degrading microsphere formulation and by the maximum amount of microspheres that

  12. Planar bioadhesive microdevices: a new technology for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fox, Cade B; Chirra, Hariharasudhan D; Desai, Tejal A

    2014-01-01

    The oral route is the most convenient and least expensive route of drug administration. Yet, it is accompanied by many physiological barriers to drug uptake including low stomach pH, intestinal enzymes and transporters, mucosal barriers, and high intestinal fluid shear. While many drug delivery systems have been developed for oral drug administration, the physiological components of the gastro intestinal tract remain formidable barriers to drug uptake. Recently, microfabrication techniques have been applied to create micron-scale devices for oral drug delivery with a high degree of control over microdevice size, shape, chemical composition, drug release profile, and targeting ability. With precise control over device properties, microdevices can be fabricated with characteristics that provide increased adhesion for prolonged drug exposure, unidirectional release which serves to avoid luminal drug loss and enhance drug permeation, and protection of a drug payload from the harsh environment of the intestinal tract. Here we review the recent developments in microdevice technology and discuss the potential of these devices to overcome unsolved challenges in oral drug delivery.

  13. Planar bioadhesive microdevices: a new technology for oral drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Cade B.; Chirra, Hariharasudhan D.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2014-01-01

    The oral route is the most convenient and least expensive route of drug administration. Yet, it is accompanied by many physiological barriers to drug uptake including low stomach pH, intestinal enzymes and transporters, mucosal barriers, and high intestinal fluid shear. While many drug delivery systems have been developed for oral drug administration, the physiological components of the gastro intestinal tract remain formidable barriers to drug uptake. Recently, microfabrication techniques have been applied to create micron-scale devices for oral drug delivery with a high degree of control over microdevice size, shape, chemical composition, drug release profile, and targeting ability. With precise control over device properties, microdevices can be fabricated with characteristics that provide increased adhesion for prolonged drug exposure, unidirectional release which serves to avoid luminal drug loss and enhance drug permeation, and protection of a drug payload from the harsh environment of the intestinal tract. Here we review the recent developments in microdevice technology and discuss the potential of these devices to overcome unsolved challenges in oral drug delivery. PMID:25219863

  14. Drug delivery systems: polymers and drugs monitored by capillary electromigration methods.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Gallardo, Alberto

    2003-11-25

    In this paper, different electromigration methods used to monitor drugs and polymers released from drug delivery systems are reviewed. First, an introduction to the most typical arrangements used as drug delivery systems (e.g., polymer-drug covalent conjugates, membrane or matrix-based devices) is presented. Next, the principles of different capillary electromigration procedures are discussed, followed by a revision on the different procedures employed to monitor the release of drugs and the degradation or solubilization of the polymeric matrices from drug delivery systems during both in vitro and in vivo assays. A critical comparison between these capillary electrophoretic methods and the more common chromatographic methods employed to analyze drugs and polymers from drug delivery systems is presented. Finally, future outlooks of these electromigration procedures in the controlled release field are discussed.

  15. Nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering*

    PubMed Central

    GOLDBERG, MICHAEL; LANGER, ROBERT; JIA, XINQIAO

    2010-01-01

    Research in the areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering has witnessed tremendous progress in recent years due to their unlimited potential to improve human health. Meanwhile, the development of nanotechnology provides opportunities to characterize, manipulate and organize matter systematically at the nanometer scale. Biomaterials with nano-scale organizations have been used as controlled release reservoirs for drug delivery and artificial matrices for tissue engineering. Drug-delivery systems can be synthesized with controlled composition, shape, size and morphology. Their surface properties can be manipulated to increase solubility, immunocompatibility and cellular uptake. The limitations of current drug delivery systems include suboptimal bioavailability, limited effective targeting and potential cytotoxicity. Promising and versatile nano-scale drug-delivery systems include nanoparticles, nanocapsules, nanotubes, nanogels and dendrimers. They can be used to deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of biomacromolecules, such as peptides, proteins, plasmid DNA and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Whereas traditional tissue-engineering scaffolds were based on hydrolytically degradable macroporous materials, current approaches emphasize the control over cell behaviors and tissue formation by nano-scale topography that closely mimics the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). The understanding that the natural ECM is a multifunctional nanocomposite motivated researchers to develop nanofibrous scaffolds through electrospinning or self-assembly. Nanocomposites containing nanocrystals have been shown to elicit active bone growth. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely related fields. In fact, tissue engineering can be viewed as a special case of drug delivery where the goal is to accomplish controlled delivery of mammalian cells. Controlled release of therapeutic factors in turn will enhance the efficacy of tissue engineering. From a materials

  16. Oral Dispersible System: A New Approach in Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, P. A.; Khan, J. A.; Khan, A.; Safiullah, S.

    2016-01-01

    Dosage form is a mean used for the delivery of drug to a living body. In order to get the desired effect the drug should be delivered to its site of action at such rate and concentration to achieve the maximum therapeutic effect and minimum adverse effect. Since oral route is still widely accepted route but having a common drawback of difficulty in swallowing of tablets and capsules. Therefore a lot of research has been done on novel drug delivery systems. This review is about oral dispersible tablets a novel approach in drug delivery systems that are now a day's more focused in formulation world, and laid a new path that, helped the patients to build their compliance level with the therapy, also reduced the cost and ease the administration especially in case of pediatrics and geriatrics. Quick absorption, rapid onset of action and reduction in drug loss properties are the basic advantages of this dosage form. PMID:27168675

  17. Using exosomes, naturally-equipped nanocarriers, for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Batrakova, Elena V; Kim, Myung Soo

    2015-12-10

    Exosomes offer distinct advantages that uniquely position them as highly effective drug carriers. Comprised of cellular membranes with multiple adhesive proteins on their surface, exosomes are known to specialize in cell-cell communications and provide an exclusive approach for the delivery of various therapeutic agents to target cells. In addition, exosomes can be amended through their parental cells to express a targeting moiety on their surface, or supplemented with desired biological activity. Development and validation of exosome-based drug delivery systems are the focus of this review. Different techniques of exosome isolation, characterization, drug loading, and applications in experimental disease models and clinic are discussed. Exosome-based drug formulations may be applied to a wide variety of disorders such as cancer, various infectious, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, exosomes combine benefits of both synthetic nanocarriers and cell-mediated drug delivery systems while avoiding their limitations.

  18. A Review on Composite Liposomal Technologies for Specialized Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mufamadi, Maluta S.; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E.; Du Toit, Lisa C.; Modi, Girish; Naidoo, Dinesh; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.

    2011-01-01

    The combination of liposomes with polymeric scaffolds could revolutionize the current state of drug delivery technology. Although liposomes have been extensively studied as a promising drug delivery model for bioactive compounds, there still remain major drawbacks for widespread pharmaceutical application. Two approaches for overcoming the factors related to the suboptimal efficacy of liposomes in drug delivery have been suggested. The first entails modifying the liposome surface with functional moieties, while the second involves integration of pre-encapsulated drug-loaded liposomes within depot polymeric scaffolds. This attempts to provide ingenious solutions to the limitations of conventional liposomes such as short plasma half-lives, toxicity, stability, and poor control of drug release over prolonged periods. This review delineates the key advances in composite technologies that merge the concepts of depot polymeric scaffolds with liposome technology to overcome the limitations of conventional liposomes for pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21490759

  19. 3-dimensional (3D) fabricated polymer based drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Simon E; Wallace, Gordon G

    2014-11-10

    Drug delivery from 3-dimensional (3D) structures is a rapidly growing area of research. It is essential to achieve structures wherein drug stability is ensured, the drug loading capacity is appropriate and the desired controlled release profile can be attained. Attention must also be paid to the development of appropriate fabrication machinery that allows 3D drug delivery systems (DDS) to be produced in a simple, reliable and reproducible manner. The range of fabrication methods currently being used to form 3D DDSs include electrospinning (solution and melt), wet-spinning and printing (3-dimensional). The use of these techniques enables production of DDSs from the macro-scale down to the nano-scale. This article reviews progress in these fabrication techniques to form DDSs that possess desirable drug delivery kinetics for a wide range of applications.

  20. Electrohydrodynamics: A facile technique to fabricate drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Syandan; Liao, I-Chien; Adler, Andrew; Leong, Kam W.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning and electrospraying are facile electrohydrodynamic fabrication methods that can generate drug delivery systems (DDS) through a one-step process. The nano-structured fiber and particle morphologies produced by these techniques offer tunable release kinetics applicable to diverse biomedical applications. Coaxial-electrospinning/electrospraying, a relatively new technique of fabricating core-shell fibers/particles have added to the versatility of these DDS by affording a near zero-order drug release kinetics, dampening of burst release, and applicability to a wider range of bioactive agents. Controllable electrospinning/spraying of fibers and particles and subsequent drug release from these chiefly polymeric vehicles depends on well-defined solution and process parameters. The additional drug delivery capability from electrospun fibers can further enhance the material’s functionality in tissue engineering applications. This review discusses the state-of-the-art of using electrohydrodynamic technique to generate nano-fiber/particles as drug delivery devices. PMID:19651167

  1. A review of nebulized drug delivery in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Tashkin, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend inhaled pharmacologic therapy as the preferred route of administration for treating COPD. Bronchodilators (β2-agonists and antimuscarinics) are the mainstay of pharmacologic therapy in patients with COPD, with long-acting agents recommended for patients with moderate to severe symptoms or those who are at a higher risk for COPD exacerbations. Dry powder inhalers and pressurized metered dose inhalers are the most commonly used drug delivery devices, but they may be inadequate in various clinical scenarios (eg, the elderly, the cognitively impaired, and hospitalized patients). As more drugs become available in solution formulations, patients with COPD and their caregivers are becoming increasingly satisfied with nebulized drug delivery, which provides benefits similar to drugs delivered by handheld inhalers in both symptom relief and improved quality of life. This article reviews recent innovations in nebulized drug delivery and the important role of nebulized therapy in the treatment of COPD. PMID:27799757

  2. Using exosomes, naturally-equipped nanocarriers, for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Kim, Myung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes offer distinct advantages that uniquely position them as highly effective drug carriers. Comprised of cellular membranes with multiple adhesive proteins on their surface, exosomes are known to specialize in cell–cell communications and provide an exclusive approach for the delivery of various therapeutic agents to target cells. In addition, exosomes can be amended through their parental cells to express a targeting moiety on their surface, or supplemented with desired biological activity. Development and validation of exosome-based drug delivery systems are the focus of this review. Different techniques of exosome isolation, characterization, drug loading, and applications in experimental disease models and clinic are discussed. Exosome-based drug formulations may be applied to a wide variety of disorders such as cancer, various infectious, cardiovascular, and neuro-degenerative disorders. Overall, exosomes combine benefits of both synthetic nanocarriers and cell-mediated drug delivery systems while avoiding their limitations. PMID:26241750

  3. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  4. Current HPLC Methods for Assay of Nano Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Tekkeli, Serife Evrim Kepekci; Kiziltas, Mustafa Volkan

    2016-12-22

    In nano drug formulations the mechanism of release is a critical process to recognize controlled and targeted drug delivery systems. In order to gain high bioavailability and specificity from the drug to reach its therapeutic goal, the active substance must be loaded into the nanoparticles efficiently. Therefore, the amount in biological fluids or tissues and the remaining amount in nano carriers are very important parameters to understand the potential of the nano drug delivery systems. For this aim, suitable and validated quantitation methods are required to determine released drug concentrations from nano pharmaceutical formulations. HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) is one of the most common techniques used for determination of released drug content out of nano drug formulations, in different physical conditions, over different periods of time. Since there are many types of HPLC methods depending on detector and column types, it is a challenge for the researchers to choose a suitable method that is simple, fast and validated HPLC techniques for their nano drug delivery systems. This review's goal is to compare HPLC methods that are currently used in different nano drug delivery systems in order to provide detailed and useful information for researchers.

  5. Interactive mixture as a rapid drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chin Chiat; Ong, Charlene Li Ching; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah; Wong, Tin Wui

    2008-02-01

    The effectiveness of an interactive mixture as a rapid drug delivery system is compared with that of a solid dispersion. The influences of drug load, particle size, and crystallinity of these test systems are investigated. The interactive mixtures and solid dispersions were prepared from polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydrophobic nifedipine drug by means of physical mixing and melting methods, respectively. The formed products were subjected to drug particle size and crystallinity analyses, and dissolution tests. In comparison with the interactive mixtures, the solid dispersions with low drug load were more effective as a rapid drug delivery system, as the size of a given batch of drug particles was markedly reduced by the molten PEG 3350. The rate and extent of drug dissolution were mainly promoted by decreasing effective drug particle size. However, these were lower in the solid dispersions than in the interactive mixtures when a high load of fine drug particles was used as the starting material. This was attributed to drug coarsening during the preparation of the solid dispersion. Unlike solid dispersions, the interactive mixtures could accommodate a high load of fine drug particles without compromising its capacity to enhance the rate and extent of drug dissolution. The interactive mixture is appropriate for use to deliver a fine hydrophobic drug in a formulation requiring a high drug load.

  6. Microsystems Technologies for Drug Delivery to the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Leary Pararas, Erin E.; Borkholder, David A.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    The inner ear represents one of the most technologically challenging targets for local drug delivery, but its clinical significance is rapidly increasing. The prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss and other auditory diseases, along with balance disorders and tinnitus, has spurred broad efforts to develop therapeutic compounds and regenerative approaches to treat these conditions, necessitating advances in systems capable of targeted and sustained drug delivery. The delicate nature of hearing structures combined with the relative inaccessibility of the cochlea by means of conventional delivery routes together necessitate significant advancements in both the precision and miniaturization of delivery systems, and the nature of the molecular and cellular targets for these therapies suggests that multiple compounds may need to be delivered in a time-sequenced fashion over an extended duration. Here we address the various approaches being developed for inner ear drug delivery, including micropump-based devices, reciprocating systems, and cochlear prosthesis-mediated delivery, concluding with an analysis of emerging challenges and opportunities for the first generation of technologies suitable for human clinical use. These developments represent exciting advances that have the potential to repair and regenerate hearing structures in millions of patients for whom no currently available medical treatments exist, a situation that requires them to function with electronic hearing augmentation devices or to live with severely impaired auditory function. These advances also have the potential for broader clinical applications that share similar requirements and challenges with the inner ear, such as drug delivery to the central nervous system. PMID:22386561

  7. Two Photon Polymerization of Microneedles for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gittard, Shaun D.; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Chichkov, Boris N.; Doraiswamy, Anand; Narayan, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Microneedles are small-scale devices that are finding use for transdermal delivery of protein-based pharmacologic agents and nucleic acid-based pharmacologic agents; however, microneedles prepared using conventional microelectronics-based technologies have several shortcomings, which have limited translation of these devices into widespread clinical use. Areas covered in this review Two photon polymerization is a laser-based rapid prototyping technique that has been recently used for direct fabrication of hollow microneedles with a wide variety of geometries. In addition, an indirect rapid prototyping method that involves two photon polymerization and polydimethyl siloxane micromolding has been used for fabrication of solid microneedles with exceptional mechanical properties. What the reader will gain In this review, the use of two photon polymerization for fabricating in-plane and out-of-plane hollow microneedle arrays is described. The use of two photon polymerization-micromolding for fabrication of solid microneedles is also reviewed. In addition, fabrication of microneedles with antimicrobial properties is discussed; antimicrobial microneedles may reduce the risk of infection associated with formation of channels through the stratum corneum. Take home message It is anticipated that the use of two photon polymerization as well as two photon polymerization-micromolding for fabrication of microneedles and other microstructured drug delivery devices will increase over the coming years. PMID:20205601

  8. Drug delivery system based on chronobiology--A review.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Asim Sattwa; Biswas, Nikhil; Karim, Kazi Masud; Guha, Arijit; Chatterjee, Sugata; Behera, Mamata; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo

    2010-11-01

    With the advancement in the field of chronobiology, modern drug delivery approaches have been elevated to a new concept of chronopharmacology i.e. the ability to deliver the therapeutic agent to a patient in a staggered profile. However the major drawback in the development of such delivery system that matches the circadian rhythm requires the availability of precise technology (pulsatile drug delivery). The increasing research interest surrounding this delivery system has widened the areas of pharmaceutics in particular with many more sub-disciplines expected to coexist in the near future. This review on chronopharmaceutics gives a comprehensive emphasis on potential disease targets, revisits the existing technologies in hand and also addresses the theoretical approaches to emerging discipline such as genetic engineering and target based specific molecules. With the biological prospective approaches in delivering drugs it is well understood that safer and more realistic approaches in the therapy of diseases will be achieved in the days to come.

  9. Membrane-targeting liquid crystal nanoparticles (LCNPs) for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Okhil K.; Naciri, Jawad; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    In addition to maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, the plasma membrane regulates multiple important cellular processes, such as endocytosis and trafficking, apoptotic pathways and drug transport. The modulation or tracking of such cellular processes by means of controlled delivery of drugs or imaging agents via nanoscale delivery systems is very attractive. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery systems that mediate long-term residence (e.g., days) and controlled release of the cargoes in the plasma membrane while simultaneously not interfering with regular cellular physiology would be ideal for this purpose. Our laboratory has developed a plasma membrane-targeted liquid crystal nanoparticle (LCNP) formulation that can be loaded with dyes or drugs which can be slowly released from the particle over time. Here we highlight the utility of these nanopreparations for membrane delivery and imaging.

  10. Ultrasonic-Activated Micellar Drug Delivery for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Pitt, William G.

    2008-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles and ultrasound in medicine continues to evolve. Great strides have been made in the areas of producing micelles, nanoemulsions and solid nanoparticles that can be used in drug delivery. An effective nanocarrier allows for the delivery of a high concentration of potent medications to targeted tissue while minimizing the side effect of the agent to the rest of the body. Polymeric micelles have been shown to encapsulate therapeutic agents and maintain their structural integrity at lower concentrations. Ultrasound is currently being used in drug delivery as well as diagnostics, and has many advantages that elevate its importance in drug delivery. The technique is non-invasive, thus no surgery is needed; the ultrasonic waves can be easily controlled by advanced electronic technology so that they can be focused on the desired target volume. Additionally, the physics of ultrasound are widely used and well understood; thus ultrasonic application can be tailored towards a particular drug delivery system. In this article, we review the recent progress made in research that utilizes both polymeric micelles and ultrasonic power in drug delivery. PMID:18506804

  11. Discovery and Delivery of Synergistic Chemotherapy Drug Combinations to Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Kathryn Militar

    Chemotherapy combinations for cancer treatments harbor immense therapeutic potentials which have largely been untapped. Of all diseases, clinical studies of drug combinations are the most prevalent in oncology, yet their effectiveness is disputable, as complete tumor regressions are rare. Our research has been devoted towards developing delivery vehicles for combinations of chemotherapy drugs which elicit significant tumor reduction yet limit toxicity in healthy tissue. Current administration methods assume that chemotherapy combinations at maximum tolerable doses will provide the greatest therapeutic effect -- a presumption which often leads to unprecedented side effects. Contrary to traditional administration, we have found that drug ratios rather than total cumulative doses govern combination therapeutic efficacy. In this thesis, we have developed nanoparticles to incorporate synergistic ratios of chemotherapy combinations which significantly inhibit cancer cell growth at lower doses than would be required for their single drug counterparts. The advantages of multi-drug incorporation in nano-vehicles are many: improved accumulation in tumor tissue via the enhanced permeation and retention effect, limited uptake in healthy tissue, and controlled exposure of tumor tissue to optimal synergistic drug ratios. To exploit these advantages for polychemotherapy delivery, two prominent nanoparticles were investigated: liposomes and polymer-drug conjugates. Liposomes represent the oldest class of nanoparticles, with high drug loading capacities and excellent biocompatibility. Polymer-drug conjugates offer controlled drug incorporations through reaction stoichiometry, and potentially allow for delivery of precise ratios. Here, we show that both vehicles, when armed with synergistic ratios of chemotherapy drugs, significantly inhibit tumor growth in an aggressive mouse breast carcinoma model. Furthermore, versatile drug incorporation methods investigated here can be broadly

  12. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  13. Bioadhesive Drug Delivery System for Enhancing the Permeability of a BCS Class III Drug via Hot-Melt Extrusion Technology.

    PubMed

    Mendonsa, Nicole S; Thipsay, Priyanka; Kim, Dong Wuk; Martin, Scott T; Repka, Michael A

    2017-02-28

    As the buccal route of administration has the ability to avoid the GI tract and first-pass effect by directing the absorption toward the cheek area, the bioavailability of BCS class III drugs can be increased through this route. Only a handful of studies have been conducted using oleic acid as a permeation enhancer in any transbuccal drug delivery system. Therefore, the objectives of this novel study were to develop a buccal tablet using two concentrations of oleic acid for a model BCS class III drug via hot-melt extrusion technology and to investigate the effects of oleic acid on the physicochemical properties of the tablet. The model drug selected was ondansetron hydrochloride. Formulations consisting of polymers (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and polyethylene oxide) and two concentrations of oleic acid were prepared by hot-melt extrusion techniques. A melting point depression of the drug was obtained in the extruded granules as seen by the DSC thermograms. The ex vivo permeation studies showed a greater permeation of the drug in the formulation containing 10% oleic acid (F2) as compared to the formulation containing 20% oleic acid (F1), although not statistically significant. The in vitro bioadhesion studies, swelling studies, and surface pH measurements of the tablets were also conducted. In conclusion, permeation studies exhibited the potential of oleic acid as a buccal permeation enhancer as a significant permeation of the drug was obtained in the formulations. Hot-melt extrusion technology was successfully employed to formulate buccal tablets of ondansetron hydrochloride.

  14. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  15. Hollow spherical mesoporous phosphosilicate nanoparticles as a delivery vehicle for an antibiotic drug.

    PubMed

    Das, Swapan K; Bhunia, Manas K; Chakraborty, Debrup; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman; Bhaumik, Asim

    2012-03-18

    Mesoporous phosphosilicate nanoparticles of hollow sphere architecture have been prepared hydrothermally for the first time under acidic pH conditions and this material is found to be efficient in encapsulating an antibiotic drug and its controlled release at physiological pH for possible cargo delivery applications.

  16. Basics and recent advances in peptide and protein drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Benjamin J; Miller, Geoffrey D; Lim, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    While the peptide and protein therapeutic market has developed significantly in the past decades, delivery has limited their use. Although oral delivery is preferred, most are currently delivered intravenously or subcutaneously due to degradation and limited absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, absorption enhancers, enzyme inhibitors, carrier systems and stability enhancers are being studied to facilitate oral peptide delivery. Additionally, transdermal peptide delivery avoids the issues of the gastrointestinal tract, but also faces absorption limitations. Due to proteases, opsonization and agglutination, free peptides are not systemi