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Sample records for acid electrolyte solution

  1. ELECTROLYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Alter, H.W.; Barney, D.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the treatment of radioactivc waste nitric acid solutions. The nitric acid solution is neutralized with an alkali metal hydroxide in an amount sufficient to precipitate insoluble hydroxides, and after separation of the precipitate the solution is electrolyzed to convert the alkali nitrate formed, to alkali hydroxide, gaseous ammonla and oxygen. The solution is then reusable after reducing the volume by evaporating the water and dissolved ammonia.

  2. Effects of electrolytes on virus inactivation by acidic solutions.

    PubMed

    Nishide, Mitsunori; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Uozaki, Misao; Ikeda, Keiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime; Arakawa, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Acidic pH is frequently used to inactivate viruses. We have previously shown that arginine synergizes with low pH in enhancing virus inactivation. Considering a potential application of the acid inactivation of viruses for the prevention and treatment of superficial virus infection at body surfaces and fixtures, herein we have examined the effects of various electrolytes on the acid-induced inactivation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2), the influenza A virus (IAV) and the poliovirus upon their incubation at 30˚C for 5 min. Eight electrolytes, i.e., phosphate, NaCl, glutamate, aspartate, pyrrolidone carboxylate, citrate, malate and acetate were tested. No detectable inactivation of the poliovirus was observed under the conditions examined, reflecting its acid-resistance. HSV-1 and HSV-2 responded similarly to the acid-treatment and electrolytes. Some electrolytes showed a stronger virus inactivation than others at a given pH and concentration. The effects of the electrolytes were virus-dependent, as IAV responded differently from HSV-1 and HSV-2 to these electrolytes, indicating that certain combinations of the electrolytes and a low pH can exert a more effective virus inactivation than other combinations and that their effects are virus-specific. These results should be useful in designing acidic solvents for the inactivation of viruses at various surfaces.

  3. Precipitation of sodium acid urate from electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füredi-Milhofer, Helga; Babić-Ivaniĉić, Vesna; Milat, Ognjen; Brown, Walter E.; Gregory, Thomas M.

    1987-07-01

    The precipitation of soduim urate from solutions containing uric acid, soduim hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and water was investigated at constant pH (7.5±0.1) and temperature (308 K). Precipitates were observed by lights and electron microscopy and characterized by electron and X-ray diffraction. The results are presented in the form of "precipitation" and "chemical potential" diagrams, the latter giving the soduim-to-urate molar ratios of the precipitates. Two types of precipitation boundaries were observed, both of which had indicated soduim-to-urate moral ratios of 1:1. The ion activity product, (Na +)(HU -), associated with boundary I was AP I=(4.8±1.1)×10 -5 and with boundary II was with boundary II was AP II=(6.5±0.4)×10 -4. The supersaturation, S, at boundary II was S=AP II/ Ksp=12.3, in which Ksp is the solubility product of soduim acid urate monohydrate. The latter precipitated as well-formed crystals at supersaturations of 12.3 and above. The ion activity product associated with boundary I is approximately equal to the solubility product of soduim acid urate monohydrate. Small amounts of several morphologically different sodium urate crystals formed in the range of supersaturations (1≤ S≤12.3). Crystals formed in this range may include the monohydrate of sodium acid urate and possibly a higher hydrate. The findings have relevance to pathological renal stone formation and gouty arthritis.

  4. Electrolyte diodes with weak acids and bases. I. Theory and an approximate analytical solution.

    PubMed

    Iván, Kristóf; Simon, Péter L; Wittmann, Mária; Noszticzius, Zoltán

    2005-10-22

    Until now acid-base diodes and transistors applied strong mineral acids and bases exclusively. In this work properties of electrolyte diodes with weak electrolytes are studied and compared with those of diodes with strong ones to show the advantages of weak acids and bases in these applications. The theoretical model is a one dimensional piece of gel containing fixed ionizable groups and connecting reservoirs of an acid and a base. The electric current flowing through the gel is measured as a function of the applied voltage. The steady-state current-voltage characteristic (CVC) of such a gel looks like that of a diode under these conditions. Results of our theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigations are reported in two parts. In this first, theoretical part governing equations necessary to calculate the steady-state CVC of a reverse-biased electrolyte diode are presented together with an approximate analytical solution of this reaction-diffusion-ionic migration problem. The applied approximations are quasielectroneutrality and quasiequilibrium. It is shown that the gel can be divided into an alkaline and an acidic zone separated by a middle weakly acidic region. As a further approximation it is assumed that the ionization of the fixed acidic groups is complete in the alkaline zone and that it is completely suppressed in the acidic one. The general solution given here describes the CVC and the potential and ionic concentration profiles of diodes applying either strong or weak electrolytes. It is proven that previous formulas valid for a strong acid-strong base diode can be regarded as a special case of the more general formulas presented here.

  5. Platelet additive solution - electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Junichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Ikeda, Hisami

    2011-06-01

    Recent attention to solutions that replace most or all plasma in platelet concentrates, while maintaining satisfactory platelet function, is motivated by the potential of plasma reduction or depletion to mitigate various transfusion-related adverse events. This report considers the electrolytic composition of previously described platelet additive solutions, in order to draw general conclusions about what is required for platelet function and longevity. The optimal concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) are 69-115 mM. The presence of both K(+) and Mg(2+) in platelet suspension at nearly physiological concentrations (3-5mM and 1.5-3mM, respectively) is indispensable for good preservation capacity because both electrolytes are required to prevent platelet activation. In contrast to K(+) and Mg(2+), Ca(2+) may not be important because no free Ca(2+) is available in M-sol, which showed excellent platelet preservation capacity at less than 5% plasma concentration. The importance of bicarbonate (approximately 40 mM) can be recognized when the platelets are suspended in additive solution under less than 5% residual plasma concentration.

  6. Growth of thin, c-axis oriented Sr-doped LaP3O9 electrolyte membranes in condensed phosphoric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatada, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Kota; Adachi, Yoshinobu; Uda, Tetsuya

    2016-08-01

    Proton-conducting Sr-doped LaP3O9 has potential application as electrolytes in intermediate temperature fuel cells, but reduction of the electrical resistance of the electrolyte membranes is necessary for practical applications. In this study, we focused on reducing the resistance by reducing the electrolyte thickness, while maintaining a preferable microstructure for proton conduction (c-axis orientation and absence of the small-crystal layer). Thin, c-axis oriented Sr-doped LaP3O9 membranes were successfully obtained in condensed phosphoric acid solutions by a novel "two-step precipitation method". In this method, Sr-doped LaP3O9 powder was artificially deposited on the surface of the carbon paper supports as seeds, and then columnar crystals were grown "downward" in the solutions. We expect that this method will be utilized to produce LaP3O9 electrolyte membranes with lower electrical resistance.

  7. Ion conductance in electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Amalendu; Bagchi, Biman

    1999-05-01

    We develop a new theoretical formulation to study ion conductance in electrolyte solutions, based on a mode coupling theory treatment of the electrolyte friction. The new theory provides expressions for both the ion atmosphere relaxation and electrophoretic contributions to the total electrolyte friction that acts on a moving ion. While the ion atmosphere relaxation term arises from the time-dependent microscopic interaction of the moving ion with the surrounding ions in the solution, the electrophoretic term originates from the coupling of the ion's velocity to the collective current mode of the ion atmosphere. Mode coupling theory, combined with time-dependent density functional theory of ion atmosphere fluctuations, leads to self-consistent expressions for these two terms which also include the effects of self-motion of the ion under consideration. These expressions have been solved for the concentration dependence of electrolyte friction and ion conductance. It is shown that in the limit of very low ion concentration, the present theory correctly reduces to the well-known Debye-Huckel-Onsager limiting law which predicts a linear dependence of conductance on the square root of ion concentration (c). At moderate and high concentrations, the present theory predicts a significant nonlinear and weaker dependence on √c which is in very good agreement with experimental results. The present theory is self-contained and does not involve any adjustable parameter.

  8. Acid-Base and Electrolyte Status during Normovolemic Hemodilution with Succinylated Gelatin or HES-Containing Volume Replacement Solutions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Teloh, Johanna K.; Ferenz, Katja B.; Petrat, Frank; Mayer, Christian; de Groot, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Background In the past, several studies have compared different colloidal replacement solutions, whereby the focus was usually on the respective colloid. We therefore systematically studied the influence of the carrier solution’s composition of five approved colloidal volume replacement solutions (Gelafundin, Gelafusal, Geloplasma, Voluven and Volulyte) on acid-base as well as electrolyte status during and following acute severe normovolemic hemodilution. The solutions differed in the colloid used (succinylated gelatin vs. HES) and in the presence and concentration of metabolizable anions as well as in their electrolyte composition. Methods Anesthetized Wistar rats were subjected to a stepwise normovolemic hemodilution with one of the solutions until a final hematocrit of 10%. Subsequent to dilution (162 min), animals were observed for an additional period (150 min). During dilution and observation time blood gas analyses were performed eight times in total. Additionally, in the Voluven and Volulyte groups as well as in 6 Gelafundin animals, electrolyte concentrations, glucose, pH and succinylated gelatin were measured in urine and histopathological evaluation of the kidney was performed. Results All animals survived without any indications of injury. Although the employed solutions differed in their respective composition, comparable results in all plasma acid-base and electrolyte parameters studied were obtained. Plasma pH increased from approximately 7.28 to 7.39, the plasma K+ concentration decreased from circa 5.20 mM to 4.80-3.90 mM and the plasma Cl− concentration rose from approximately 105 mM to 111–120 mM. Urinary analysis revealed increased excretion of K+, H+ and Cl−. Conclusions The present data suggest that the carrier solution’s composition with regard to metabolizable anions as well as K+, Ca2+ only has a minor impact on acid-base and electrolyte status after application of succinylated gelatin or HES-containing colloidal volume

  9. High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents.

  10. High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Zhang, S.S.; Xu, K.

    1998-10-20

    This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents. 9 figs.

  11. Electro-oxidation of methanol on Pt(111) in acid solutions: effects of electrolyte anions during electrocatalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Hirohito; Ito, Masatoki

    1995-10-01

    The electro-oxidation of methanol on a Pt(111) surface in both sulfuric and perchloric acid solutions was investigated by combined apparatus under both ultra-high vacuum and electrochemical environments. In sulfuric acid solution, a strong lateral interaction was observed between adsorbed bisulfate and CO derived from methanol. Coadsorption of CO derived from methanol with bisulfate ion yielded a (√7 × √7)-R19.1°-CO-bisulfate structure. In perchloric acid solution, however, no lateral interaction between adsorbed CO and perchlorate was seen. The difference in reaction rates of methanol oxidation in both solutions was explained by these specific anion adsorption effects.

  12. Fluctuating Hydrodynamics of Electrolytes Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraud, Jean-Philippe; Nonaka, Andy; Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B.; Donev, Aleksandar; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a numerical method for multicomponent solutions featuring electrolytes, in the context of fluctuating hydrodynamics as modeled by the Landau-Lifshitz Navier Stokes equations. Starting from a previously developed numerical scheme for multicomponent low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics, we study the effect of the additional forcing terms induced by charged species. We validate our numerical approach with additional theoretical considerations and with examples involving sodium-chloride solutions, with length scales close to Debye length. In particular, we show how charged species modify the structure factors of the fluctuations, both in equilibrium and non-equilibrium (giant fluctuations) systems, and show that the former is consistent with Debye-Huckel theory. We also discuss the consistency of this approach with the electroneutral approximation in regimes where characteristic length scales are significantly larger than the Debye length. Finally, we use this method to explore a type of electrokinetic instability. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research,.

  13. Evaluation of organic acids as fuel cell electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, J.; Nguyen, T.H.; Foley, R.T.

    1981-11-01

    The electrochemical behavior of methanesulfonic acid, ethanesulfonic acid, and sulfoacetic acid as fuel cell electrolytes was studied in half-cell at various temperatures. The rate of the electro-oxidation of hydrogen at 115/degree/C was very high in methanesulfonic acid. The rate of the electro-oxidation of propane in all three acids was low even at 135/degree/C. Further, there is evidence for adsorption of these acids on the platinum electrode. It is concluded that anhydrous sulfonic acids are not good electrolytes; water solutions are required. Sulfonic acids containing unprotected carbon-hydrogen bonds are adsorbed on platinum and probably decompose during electrolysis. 9 refs.

  14. Supersaturated Electrolyte Solutions: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izmailov, Alexander F.; Myerson, Allan S.; Na, Han-Soo

    1995-01-01

    Highly supersaturated electrolyte solutions can be prepared and studied employing an electrodynamic levitator trap (ELT) technique. The ELT technique involves containerless suspension of a microdroplet thus eliminating dust, dirt, and container walls which normally cause heterogeneous nucleation. This allows very high supersaturations to be achieved. A theoretical study of the experimental results obtained for the water activity in microdroplets of various electrolyte solutions is based on the development of the Cahn-Hilliard formalism for electrolyte solutions. In the approach suggested the metastable state for electrolyte solutions is described in terms of the conserved order parameter omega(r,t) associated with fluctuations of the mean solute concentration n(sub 0). Parameters of the corresponding Ginzburg-Landau free energy functional which defines the dynamics of metastable state relaxation are determined and expressed through the experimentally measured quantities. A correspondence of 96-99 % between theory and experiment for all solutions studied was achieved and allowed the determination of an analytical expression for the spinodal concentration n(sub spin), and its calculation for various electrolyte solutions at 298 K. The assumption that subcritical solute clusters consist of the electrically neutral Bjerrum pairs has allowed both analytical and numerical investigation of the number-size N(sub c) of nucleation monomers (aggregates of the Bjerrum pairs) which are elementary units of the solute critical clusters. This has also allowed estimations for the surface tension Alpha, and equilibrium bulk energy Beta per solute molecule in the nucleation monomers. The dependence of these properties on the temperature T and on the solute concentration n(sub 0) through the entire metastable zone (from saturation concentration n(sub sat) to spinodal n(sub spin) is examined. It has been demonstrated that there are the following asymptotics: N(sub c), = I at spinodal

  15. Extraction of electrolytes from aqueous solutions and their spectrophotometric determination by use of acid-base chromoionophores in lipophylic solvents.

    PubMed

    Barberi, Paola; Giannetto, Marco; Mori, Giovanni

    2004-04-01

    The formation of non-absorbing complexes in an organic phase has been exploited for the spectrophotometric determination of ionic analytes in aqueous solutions. The method is based on liquid-liquid extraction of aqueous solution with lipophylic organic phases containing an acid-base chromoionophore, a neutral lypophilic ligand (neutral carrier) selective to the analyte and a cationic (or anionic) exchanger. The method avoids all difficulties of the preparation of the very thin membranes used in optodes, so that it can advantageously be used for the study of the role physical-chemical parameters of the system in order to optimize them and to prepare, if necessary, an optimized optode. Two lipophylic derivatives of Nile Blue and 4',5-dibromofluorescein have been synthesized, in order to ensure their permanence within organic phase. Two different neutral carriers previously characterized by us as ionophores for liquid-membrane Ion Selective Electrodes have been employed. Three different ionic exchangers have been tested. Furthermore, a model allowing the interpolation of experimental data and the determination of the thermodynamic constant of the ionic-exchange equilibrium has been developed and applied.

  16. Dielectric decrement of electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderhof, B. U.

    We calculate the dielectric decrement of ionic solutions in a continuum model. We show that apart from a familiar static contribution there are three kinetic contributions to the effect, two of which are related by a symmetry relation. The third contribution is due to frequency dispersion of the friction coefficient and for small ions reduces the total effect considerably. We find that the total effect as calculated from the continuum model is too small to account for the experimental data.

  17. Properties of SOC12 electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, M.

    1982-06-01

    A number of types of lithium secondary and primary nonaqueous batteries are under development in the power sources division at Fort Monmouth. Military applications for portable power sources range from communications to laser designators and night vision devices. For the latter two applications, the lithium-thionyl chloride battery has been identified as a highly promising system. The battery was initially shown to be capable of providing very high energy densities at various rates of discharge. Since there are virtually no detailed studies on the general physical chemistry of electrolyte solutions in SOC12, the initial phase of the program to develop new electrolytes was to determine those factors which govern both conductivities and solubilities.

  18. Abiotic reversible self-assembly of fulvic and humic acid aggregates in low electrolytic conductivity solutions by dynamic light scattering and zeta potential investigation.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Milad Rabbani; Stretz, Holly A; Wells, Martha J M

    2015-12-15

    The aggregation of humic substances and their interaction with filtration media (membranes, soils) has implications for our understanding of membrane fouling during water treatment, the facilitated transport of contaminants, and the transport of organic matter through the microbial loop. To investigate the aggregation of fulvic and humic acids in low electrolytic conductivity solutions, laboratory studies of simulated environmental water samples as well as actual environmental water samples were examined. Intensity-, volume-, and number-based particle size distributions (PSDs) were obtained by dynamic light scattering. Aggregates were categorized into three ranges, i.e., 10-100 nm, 100-1000 nm, and >1 μm. Individual biomacromolecules and the aggregates between 10 nm and 1 μm were presumed to be precursors for the formation of a large 5-μm-sized-particle. The self-assembly of the large-in-volume, few-in-number, 5-μm-sized particle was observed in real-time and occurred in unfiltered samples and in samples filtered (0.45 μm) at a nominal size one order of magnitude smaller. The supramicrometer-sized particle formed, dissipated, and spontaneously re-formed over turbulent/quiescent cycles in the presence of sodium azide indicating reversible abiotic self-assembly. Zeta potential analyses demonstrated that colloidal stability increased as concentration increased. DLS studies of the environmental water samples were comparable to those of the simulated laboratory samples. The operational range of the instrumentation used in these experiments was 0.6 nm-6 μm; therefore, aggregates larger than 6 μm may exist in these solutions.

  19. Polarization of anthracite electrodes in electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    A.N. Lopanov; E.V. Blaido; O.V. Smirnova

    2007-10-15

    The regularities of the polarization of anthractie electrodes for the liberation of hydrogen from electrolyte (potassium chloride and hydrogen chloride) solutions were found, and electrode processes occurring at the surface of coals in the Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} redox system were studied. It was found that the deviations of standard electrode potentials from the equilibrium values of redox systems depend on the exchange current densities of electrochemical processes occurring at the surface of coal matter. Low transfer coefficients (0.04-0.051) for the discharge reaction of hydrogen ions on anthracites indicate that the reaction occurs under conditions close to those of an activationless process.

  20. Optimum electrolyte composition of a dialysis solution.

    PubMed

    Rippe, Bengt; Venturoli, Daniele

    2008-06-01

    In patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) for end-stage renal failure, the optimum electrolyte composition of a dialysis solution is that which best serves the homeostatic needs of the body. Comparing the transperitoneal removal of electrolytes by conventional PD solutions (CPDSs) with that by normal kidneys, it is evident that peritoneal removal is in the lower range of what can be considered "normal." Given the electrolyte composition of CPDSs and a total dwell volume of 4 exchanges of 2 L each, approximately 90 mmol NaCl, 40 mmol K(+), 10 - 15 mmol HPO(4)(-) and 1 - 2 mmol Ca(2+) can be removed daily [plus 1 L ultrafiltration (UF)]. Na(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) are supplied in CPDSs in concentrations close to their plasma concentrations, which makes their removal almost entirely dependent on UF. In UF failure (UFF), plasma levels of the foregoing ions will tend to rise, producing a higher diffusion gradient to compensate for their defective UF removal. Peritoneal removal of HCO(3)(-), HPO(4)(-), and K(+) are usually quite efficient because of the zero CPDS concentrations of these ions. Approximately 150 mmol HCO(3)(-) is lost daily with CPDSs, compensated for by the addition of 30 - 40 mmol/L lactate, or, with the use of multi-compartment bags, bicarbonate instead. However, a mixture of bicarbonate and lactate should be preferred as a buffer, to avoid intracellular acidosis from high levels of pCO(2) in the dialysis fluid. For patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) without UFF and with some residual renal function, PD fluid concentrations of Na(+) 130 - 133 mmol/L, Ca(2+) 1.25 - 1.35 mmol/L, and Mg(2+) 0.25 - 0.3 mmol/L seem appropriate. With reduced UF after a few years of PD, the removal of fluid and electrolytes often becomes deficient. Dietary salt restriction can be prescribed, but it is hard to implement. The use of low-Na(+) solution (LNa) is a potential alternative. The reduction in osmolality resulting from Na(+) removal in LNa

  1. Ionometry in the analysis of electrolyte solutions (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Petrukhin, O.M.; Rogatinskaya, S.L.; Shipulo, E.V.

    1995-04-01

    The potential usefulness of ionometry in the analytical control of plating electrolytes, etching solutions, and waste effluents has been considered. Complete ionometric analysis of plating electrolytes and determination of metal cyanide complexes have been presented as examples. Ion-selective field-effect transistors (IEFT), semiconductor electrodes, and ISE pairs have been shown to have potential usefulness for the potentiometric titration of plating electrolytes.

  2. Wide electrochemical window solvents for use in electrochemical devices and electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery electrolyte solutions. Specifically, this invention is directed to boron-containing electrolyte solvents and boron-containing electrolyte solutions.

  3. Complex dynamical aspects of organic electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Francesca; Sassi, Paola; Paolantoni, Marco; Barontini, Chiara; Morresi, Assunta; Giorgini, Maria Grazia

    2014-01-09

    Molecular dynamics of acetone-alkali metal halide (LiBr, LiI) solutions were investigated using depolarized Rayleigh scattering (DRS) and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy in the frequency range from ~0.5 to 200 cm(-1) (~20 GHz to 6 THz). These experiments probe fast dynamical fluctuations of the polarizability anisotropy at picosecond and sub-picosecond time scales that are mainly driven by acetone orientational dynamics. Two distinct contributions were revealed: a fast process (units of picosecond, ps) related to the essentially unperturbed bulk solvent and a slow one (tens of ps) assigned to acetone molecules forming Li(+) solvation shells, decelerated by the motional constraint imposed by the cation. The increase of LiBr and LiI concentration significantly slows down the overall solvent relaxation as a consequence of the increased fraction of acetone molecules involved in the ion solvation shells. The global retardation is larger in LiI than LiBr solutions consistently with viscosity trends. This is explained in terms of ion association (at least ion pairing) more favorably promoted by Br(-) than I(-), with reduced Li(+)-acetone interactions in LiBr than LiI solutions. Anion-induced modulation of the Li(+)···O═C contacts, largely responsible for electrostriction phenomena, also affects the reduced THz-Raman spectral density, ascribed to ultrafast librational motions of acetone molecules. Overall, these findings enlighten the interplay between ion-dipole and ion-ion interactions on the fast solvation dynamics in electrolyte solutions of a typical polar aprotic solvent.

  4. Electrolyte effects on hydrogen evolution and solution resistance in microbial electrolysis cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Matthew D.; Logan, Bruce E.

    Protonated weak acids commonly used in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) solutions can affect the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) through weak acid catalysis, and by lowering solution resistance between the anode and the cathode. Weak acid catalysis of the HER with protonated phosphate, acetate, and carbonate electrolyte species improved MEC performance by lowering the cathode's overpotential by up to 0.30 V at pH 5, compared to sodium chloride electrolytes. Deprotonation of weak acids into charged species at higher pHs improved MEC performance primarily by increasing the electrolyte's conductivity and therefore decreasing the solution resistance between electrodes. The potential contributions from weak acid catalysis and solution resistance were compared to determine whether a reactor would operate more efficiently at lower pH because of the HER, or at higher pH because of solution resistance. Phosphate and acetate electrolytes allowed the MEC to operate more efficiently under more acidic conditions (pH 5). Carbonate electrolytes increased performance from pH 5 to 9 due to a relatively large increases in conductivity. These results demonstrate that specific buffers can substantially contribute to MEC performance through both reduction in cathode overpotential and solution resistance.

  5. Thermodynamic Studies of Levitated Microdroplets of Highly Supersaturated Electrolyte Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerson, Allan S.; Izmailov, Alexander F.; Na, Han-Soo

    1996-01-01

    Highly supersaturated electrolyte solutions are studied by employing an electrodynamic levitator trap (ELT) technique. The ELT technique involves containerless suspension of a microdroplet thus eliminating dust, dirt, and container walls which normally cause heterogeneous nucleation. This allows very high supersaturations to be achieved. A theoretical study of the experimental results obtained for the water activity in microdroplets of various electrolyte solutions is based on the development of the Cahn-Hilliard formalism for electrolyte solutions. A correspondence of 96-99% between the theory and experiment for the all solutions studied was achieved and allowed the determination of an analytical expression for the spinodal concentration n(sub spin) and its calculation for various electrolyte solutions at 298 K.

  6. Electrolyte Solutions and Specific Ion Effects on Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Ran

    2013-01-01

    Introductory general and physical chemistry courses often deal with colligative properties of solutions and do not discuss nonideal solutions in detail. Yet, a growing body of evidence reveals that even at physiological concentrations electrolyte solutions cannot be treated as ideal when a charged or partially charged solute (such as a protein) is…

  7. Electrical characterization of proton conducting polymer electrolyte based on bio polymer with acid dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaiselvimary, J.; Pradeepa, P.; Sowmya, G.; Edwinraj, S.; Prabhu, M. Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    This study describes the biodegradable acid doped films composed of chitosan and Perchloric acid with different ratios (2.5 wt %, 5 wt %, 7.5 wt %, 10 wt %) was prepared by the solution casting technique. The temperature dependence of the proton conductivity of complex electrolytes obeys the Arrhenius relationship. Proton conductivity of the prepared polymer electrolyte of the bio polymer with acid doped was measured to be approximately 5.90 × 10-4 Scm-1. The dielectric data were analyzed using Complex impedance Z*, Dielectric loss ɛ', Tangent loss for prepared polymer electrolyte membrane with the highest conductivity samples at various temperature.

  8. Electrified Microscopic and Conventional Interfaces between Two Immiscible Electrolyte Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-24

    2 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRIFIED LIQUID / LIQUID INTERFACES Interfaces between two immiscible solutions containing ionic species are of interest to a wide...if necessary and identify by block number) PELD I GPOUP SUB GROUP MICRODOMAINS, MICELES, LIQUID - LIQUID ELECTROCHEMISTRY, IMMISCIBLE ELECTROLYTES...between immiscible phases bridges the field of heterogeneous electrode electrochemistry and that of homogeneous solution chemistry. Early work on liquid

  9. Solubility of non-polar gases in electrolyte solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. L., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Solubility theory describes the effects of both concentration and temperature on solute activity coefficients. It predicts the salting-out effect and the decrease in solubility of non-polar gases with increased electrolyte concentration, and can be used to calculate heats of solution, entropies, and partial molal volumes of dissolved gases

  10. Perioperative Acid-Base and Electrolyte Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Beer, Kari Santoro; Waddell, Lori S

    2015-09-01

    Obtaining and interpreting blood gas and electrolyte levels is essential in the management of perioperative veterinary patients. Metabolic and electrolyte alterations are common in critically ill surgical patients, and can lead to alterations in cardiovascular function, neurologic status, respiratory function, and even response to various drug therapies. Several common perioperative conditions are discussed in this article, including metabolic disturbances, electrolyte abnormalities (hyponatremia and hypernatremia, hyperkalemia), and respiratory abnormalities.

  11. Geometry and Composition of Interstitial Fluids in Frozen Electrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J.; Colussi, A. J.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    The composition and morphology of the fluid microchannels threading polycrystaline ice affects the integrity of ice core records and the strength of ice-atmosphere interactions. These fluids owe their existence to impurities and curvature depression. Electrolyte impurities induce bulk colligative effects, but also charge ice surfaces, while screening the resulting electrostatic repulsion. A non-monotonic rather than positive dependence of channel width δ on electrolyte concentration has thus been predicted. Herein we report the first time-resolved, confocal microscopy study of freezing water and electrolyte solutions doped with 10 μM of C-SNARF-1, a fluorescent pH probe. The freezing of doped water concentrates the probe into discrete δ = (12 ± 2) μm channels embedded in pristine ice, whereas ice fronts advancing (at < 5 μm/s) into 1 mM electrolytes destabilize and engulf them into < 1 μm fluid occlusions distributed over the sample. These findings are consistent with a non-monotonic dependence of δ on ion concentration. pH increases by less than 0.4 unit within the occlusions formed in freezing NaCl solutions, and by over 1 unit upon subsequent thawing, revealing that hydroxide ion slowly produced via the dissociation of water molecule in ice seeps from ice to relieve the excess charge generated by chloride inclusion. In contrast, the preferential incorporation of the ammonium ions over the acetate anions into ice leads to the acidification of partially frozen ammonium acetate solutions.

  12. Acid and alkali doped PBI electrolyte in electrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Baozhong

    In this work the conductivity of blank PBI membrane, acid doped PBI and alkaline doped PBI was systematically studied. A new methodology for sorption kinetics study in electrolyte solution has been established by monitoring the conductivity change during the sorption process. The model of the doping process and mechanism of conductivity are proposed. The performance of PBI (doped under optimum conditions) in fuel cell as PEM was evaluated. The experimental results show that the blank PBI in acid solution is an ionic insulator. It clarified the long time confusion in this area. The acid doped PBI membrane is an ionic conductor. The conductivity increases with the concentration of the acid solution. In high concentration acid solution, the conductivity increases with the type of acid in the order: H2SO 4 > H3PO4 > HClO4 > HNO3 > HCl. The kinetics of the doping process was studied, by a continuous method. The ionic conductivity mechanism was established. The PBI membranes doped with H2SO4 and H3PO4 exhibit better performance than NafionRTM. The doped FBI has more resistance to CO poison. 3% CO in H2 has little effect on the H3PO 4 doped PBI membrane at 185°C. The conductivity of the alkali doped PBI membrane changes with the concentration of the alkaline solution and the type of the alkalis. The conductivity has a maximum in KOH and NaOH solution. The maximum conductivity in KOH is higher than in NaOH and LiOH. It is about 5 times of that of NafionRTM in alkaline solution. The two-step sorption process in alkaline solution was observed. The first step is the permeation process of the alkalis in the PBI membrane. The permeation is the results of diffusion and interaction. It is concluded that the permeation process is controlled by the rate of interaction between the alkali and PBI molecule. The second step is the relaxation process in the membrane. This step contributes more to the conductivity for the membrane than the first step. The ionic conductivity mechanism

  13. Frequency dependence of ionic conductivity of electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Amalendu; Bagchi, Biman

    2000-01-01

    A theory for the frequency dependence of ionic conductivity of an electrolyte solution is presented. In this theory contributions to the conductivity from both the ion atmosphere relaxation and the electrophoretic effects are included in a self-consistent fashion. Mode coupling theory, combined with time-dependent density functional theory of ion atmosphere fluctuations, leads to expressions for these two contributions at finite frequencies. These expressions need to be solved self-consistently for the frequency dependence of the electrolyte friction and the ion conductivity at varying ion concentrations. In the limit of low concentration, the present theory reduces exactly to the well-known Debye-Falkenhagen (DF) expression of the frequency-dependent electrolyte friction when the non-Markovian effects in the ion atmosphere relaxation are ignored and in addition the ions are considered to be pointlike. The present theory also reproduces the expressions of the frequency-dependent conductivity derived by Chandra, Wei, and Patey when appropriate limiting situations are considered. We have carried out detailed numerical solutions of the self-consistent equations for concentrated solutions of a 1:1 electrolyte by using the expressions of pair correlation functions given by Attard. Numerical results reveal that the frequency dependence of the electrolyte friction at finite concentration can be quite different from that given by the DF expression. With the increase of ion concentration, the dispersion of the friction is found to occur at a higher frequency because of faster relaxation of the ion atmosphere. At low frequency, the real part of the conductivity shows a small increase with frequency which can be attributed to the well-known Debye-Falkenhagen effect. At high frequency, the conductivity decreases as expected. The extensions of the present theory to treat frequency-dependent diffusivities of charged colloid suspensions and conductivity of a dilute

  14. Charge regulation of a surface immersed in an electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Pramod

    In this thesis, we investigate theoretically a new model of charge regulation of a single charged planar surface immersed in an aqueous electrolyte solution. Assuming that the adsorbed ions are mobile in the charged plane, we formulate a field theory of charge regulation where the numbers of adsorbed ions can be determined consistently by equating the chemical potentials of the adsorbed ions to that of the ions in the bulk. We analyze the mean-field treatment of the model for electrolyte of arbitrary valences, and then beyond, where correlation effects are systematically taken into account in a loop expansion. In particular, we compute exactly various one-loop quantities, including electrostatic potentials, ion distributions, and chemical potentials, not only for symmetric (1; 1) electrolyte but also for asymmetric (2; 1) electrolyte, and make use of these quantities to address charge regulation at the one-loop level. We find that correlation effects give rise to various phase transitions in the adsorption of ions, and present phase diagrams for (1; 1) and (2; 1) electrolytes, whose distinct behaviors suggest that charge regulation, at the one-loop level, is no longer universal but depends crucially on the valency of the ions.

  15. Cl- sensitive biosensor used electrolyte-solution-gate diamond FETs.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang-Soup; Sakai, Toshikatsu; Kanazawa, Hirofumi; Araki, Yuta; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Tachiki, Minoru; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2003-11-15

    We have investigated the electrolyte-solution-gate field effect transisitors (SGFETs) used hydrogen terminated (H-terminated) or partially oxygen terminated (O-terminated) polycrystalline diamond surface in the Cl- and Br- ionic solutions. The H-terminated channel SGFETs are insensitive to pH values in electrolyte solutions. The threshold voltages of the diamond SGFETs shift according to the density of Cl- and Br- ions about 30 mV/decade. One of the attractive biomedical applications for the Cl- sensitive SGFETs is the detection of chloride density in blood or in sweat especially in the case of cystic fibrosis. The sensitivities of Cl- and Br- ions have been lost on the partially O-terminated diamond surface. These phenomena can be explained by the polarity of surface change on the H-terminated and the O-terminated surface.

  16. Silica surfaces lubrication by hydrated cations adsorption from electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Donose, Bogdan C; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Higashitani, Ko

    2005-03-01

    Adsorption of hydrated cations on hydrophilic surfaces has been related to a variety of phenomena associated with the short-range interaction forces and mechanisms of the adhesive contact between the surfaces. Here we have investigated the effect of the adsorption of cations on the lateral interaction. Using lateral force microscopy (LFM), we have measured the friction force between a silica particle and silica wafer in pure water and in electrolyte solutions of LiCl, NaCl, and CsCl salts. A significant lubrication effect was demonstrated for solutions of high electrolyte concentrations. It was found that the adsorbed layers of smaller and more hydrated cations have a higher lubrication capacity than the layers of larger and less hydrated cations. Additionally, we have demonstrated a characteristic dependence of the friction force on the sliding velocity of surfaces. A mechanism for the observed phenomena based on the microstructures of the adsorbed layers is proposed.

  17. Ionic enhancement of silica surface nanowear in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Teramoto, Naofumi; McNamee, Cathy E; Marston, Jeremy O; Higashitani, Ko

    2012-11-20

    The nanoscale wear and friction of silica and silicon nitride surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solutions were investigated by using sharp atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tips coated with silicon nitride. Measurements were carried out in aqueous solutions of varying pH and in monovalent and divalent cation chloride and nitrate solutions. The silica surface was shown to wear strongly in solutions of high pH (≈11.0), as expected, but the presence of simple cations, such as Cs(+) and Ca(2+), was shown to dramatically effect the wear depth and friction force for the silica surface. In the case of monovalent cations, their hydration enthalpies correlated well with the wear and friction. The weakest hydrated cation of Cs(+) showed the most significant enhancement of wear and friction. In the case of divalent cations, a complex dependence on the type of cation was found, where the type of anion was also seen to play an important role. The CaCl(2) solution showed the anomalous enhancement of wear depth and friction force, although the solution of Ca(NO(3))(2) did not. The present results obtained with an AFM tip were also compared with previous nanotribology studies of silica surfaces in electrolyte solutions, and possible molecular mechanisms as to why cations enhance the wear and friction were also discussed.

  18. Electrical pulse fabrication of graphene nanopores in electrolyte solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kuan, Aaron T.; Szalay, Tamas; Lu, Bo; Xie, Ping; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2015-05-18

    Nanopores in graphene membranes can potentially offer unprecedented spatial resolution for single molecule sensing, but their fabrication has thus far been difficult, poorly scalable, and prone to contamination. We demonstrate an in-situ fabrication method that nucleates and controllably enlarges nanopores in electrolyte solution by applying ultra-short, high-voltage pulses across the graphene membrane. This method can be used to rapidly produce graphene nanopores with subnanometer size accuracy in an apparatus free of nanoscale beams or tips.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of gases dissolved in electrolyte solutions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiepel, E. W.; Gubbins, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method based on perturbation theory for mixtures is applied to the prediction of thermodynamic properties of gases dissolved in electrolyte solutions. The theory is compared with experimental data for the dependence of the solute activity coefficient on concentration, temperature, and pressure; calculations are included for partial molal enthalpy and volume of the dissolved gas. The theory is also compared with previous theories for salt effects and found to be superior. The calculations are best for salting-out systems. The qualitative feature of salting-in is predicted by the theory, but quantitative predictions are not satisfactory for such systems; this is attributed to approximations made in evaluating the perturbation terms.

  20. Proposed New Electrolytic Conductivity Primary Standards for KCl Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y. C.; Koch, W. F.; Pratt, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    An absolute determination of aqueous electrolytic conductivity has been made for 0.01 molal (m) and 0.1 m potassium cliloride solutions, over the temperature range of 0 to 50 °C in 5 degree intervals. A cell with a removable center section of accurately known length and area was used for the measurements. Values were adjusted to be in conformity with the ITS-90 temperature scale. The overall uncertainty over the entire temperature range is estimated to be 0.03%. Values at 25 °C for 0.01 and 0.1 m are 0.00140823 and 0.0128246 S/cm, respectively. It is proposed that these values be adopted as primary standards for aqueous electrolytic conductivity, replacing the demal scale. PMID:28184109

  1. Antimicrobial effects of electrolytic products of sodium chloride--comparative evaluation with sodium hypochlorite solution and efficacy in handwashing.

    PubMed

    Hitomi, S; Baba, S; Yano, H; Morisawa, Y; Kimura, S

    1998-11-01

    We examined the in vitro bactericidal effects and efficacy on handwashing of water containing electrolytic products of sodium chloride (electrolytic water). The electrolytic water, whose pH and concentration of free residual chlorine were 6.7-6.9 and 20-22 ppm, respectively, showed equal reduction of both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to dilution of commercially available sodium hypochlorite containing 60 ppm of free residual chlorine. This bactericidal effect was calculated to be due to hypochlorous acid, based on the pH and the amount of chlorine in solution. Handwashing with the electrolytic water reduced the numbers of S. aureus on hands by 1/10(2), while running water and 0.2% benzalkonium chloride with 80% ethanol gave a 1/10 and 1/10(5) reduction, respectively. We conclude that electrolytic water might be applicable for handwashing in place of running water.

  2. Fractional Walden rule for electrolytes in supercooled disaccharide aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Longinotti, M Paula; Corti, Horacio R

    2009-04-23

    The electrical conductivity of CsCl, KCl, Bu(4)NBr, and Bu(4)NI was studied in stable and supercooled (metastable) sucrose and trehalose aqueous solutions over a wide viscosity range. The results indicate that large positive deviations from the Walden rule occur in these systems due to the higher tendency of the ions to move in water-rich regions, as previously observed for NaCl and MgCl(2). The electrical molar conductivity viscosity dependence can be described with a fractional Walden rule (Lambdaeta(alpha) = constant), where alpha is a decoupling parameter which increases with ionic size and varies between 0.61 and 0.74 for all of the studied electrolytes. Using the electrical molar conductivity dependence of ion-ion interactions, an effective dielectric constant was calculated for a trehalose 39 wt% aqueous solution as a function of temperature. Above 278 K, the effective and the bulk solution dielectric constants are similar, but at lower temperatures, where the carbohydrate becomes less mobile than water, the effective dielectric constant approaches the dielectric constant of water. We also conclude that the solute-solvent dielectric friction contribution can be neglected, reinforcing the idea that the observed breakdown of the Walden rule is due to the existence of local microheterogeneities. The Walden plots for the studied ionic solutes show a decoupling similar to that found for the diffusion of water in the same solutions.

  3. A lithium ion battery using an aqueous electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Li, Chunyang; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Bingwei; Fu, Lijun; Zhu, Yusong; Zhang, Lixin; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Wei

    2016-06-22

    Energy and environmental pollution have become the two major problems in today's society. The development of green energy storage devices with good safety, high reliability, high energy density and low cost are urgently demanded. Here we report on a lithium ion battery using an aqueous electrolyte solution. It is built up by using graphite coated with gel polymer membrane and LISICON as the negative electrode, and LiFePO4 in aqueous solution as the positive electrode. Its average discharge voltage is up to 3.1 V and energy density based on the two electrode materials is 258 Wh kg(-1). It will be a promising energy storage system with good safety and efficient cooling effects.

  4. A lithium ion battery using an aqueous electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zheng; Li, Chunyang; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Bingwei; Fu, Lijun; Zhu, Yusong; Zhang, Lixin; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Energy and environmental pollution have become the two major problems in today’s society. The development of green energy storage devices with good safety, high reliability, high energy density and low cost are urgently demanded. Here we report on a lithium ion battery using an aqueous electrolyte solution. It is built up by using graphite coated with gel polymer membrane and LISICON as the negative electrode, and LiFePO4 in aqueous solution as the positive electrode. Its average discharge voltage is up to 3.1 V and energy density based on the two electrode materials is 258 Wh kg‑1. It will be a promising energy storage system with good safety and efficient cooling effects.

  5. Electrostatic interactions between charged dielectric particles in an electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, Ivan N.; Filippov, Anatoly V.; Stace, Anthony J.; Besley, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Theory is developed to address a significant problem of how two charged dielectric particles interact in the presence of a polarizable medium that is a dilute solution of a strong electrolyte. The electrostatic force is defined by characteristic parameters for the interacting particles (charge, radius, and dielectric constant) and for the medium (permittivity and Debye length), and is expressed in the form of a converging infinite series. The limiting case of weak screening and large inter-particle separation is considered, which corresponds to small (macro)ions that carry constant charge. The theory yields a solution in the limit of monopole and dipole terms that agrees exactly with existing analytical expressions, which are generally used to describe ion-ion and ion-molecular interactions in a medium. Results from the theory are compared with DLVO theory and with experimental measurements for the electrostatic force between two PMMA particles contained in a nonpolar solvent (hexadecane) with an added charge control agent.

  6. A lithium ion battery using an aqueous electrolyte solution

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zheng; Li, Chunyang; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Bingwei; Fu, Lijun; Zhu, Yusong; Zhang, Lixin; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Energy and environmental pollution have become the two major problems in today’s society. The development of green energy storage devices with good safety, high reliability, high energy density and low cost are urgently demanded. Here we report on a lithium ion battery using an aqueous electrolyte solution. It is built up by using graphite coated with gel polymer membrane and LISICON as the negative electrode, and LiFePO4 in aqueous solution as the positive electrode. Its average discharge voltage is up to 3.1 V and energy density based on the two electrode materials is 258 Wh kg−1. It will be a promising energy storage system with good safety and efficient cooling effects. PMID:27328707

  7. Hydroxyl radical production in plasma electrolysis with KOH electrolyte solution

    SciTech Connect

    Saksono, Nelson; Febiyanti, Irine Ayu Utami, Nissa; Ibrahim

    2015-12-29

    Plasma electrolysis is an effective technology for producing hydroxyl radical (•OH). This method can be used for waste degradation process. This study was conducted to obtain the influence of applied voltage, electrolyte concentration, and anode depth in the plasma electrolysis system for producing hydroxyl radical. The materials of anode and cathode, respectively, were made from tungsten and stainless steel. KOH solution was used as the solution. Determination of hydroxyl radical production was done by measuring H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount formed in plasma system using an iodometric titration method, while the electrical energy consumed was obtained by measuring the electrical current throughout the process. The highest hydroxyl radical production was 3.51 mmol reached with 237 kJ energy consumption in the power supply voltage 600 V, 0.02 M KOH, and 0.5 cm depth of anode.

  8. Hydroxyl radical production in plasma electrolysis with KOH electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksono, Nelson; Febiyanti, Irine Ayu; Utami, Nissa; Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Plasma electrolysis is an effective technology for producing hydroxyl radical (•OH). This method can be used for waste degradation process. This study was conducted to obtain the influence of applied voltage, electrolyte concentration, and anode depth in the plasma electrolysis system for producing hydroxyl radical. The materials of anode and cathode, respectively, were made from tungsten and stainless steel. KOH solution was used as the solution. Determination of hydroxyl radical production was done by measuring H2O2 amount formed in plasma system using an iodometric titration method, while the electrical energy consumed was obtained by measuring the electrical current throughout the process. The highest hydroxyl radical production was 3.51 mmol reached with 237 kJ energy consumption in the power supply voltage 600 V, 0.02 M KOH, and 0.5 cm depth of anode.

  9. Modifications in structure and interaction of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R.

    2016-05-01

    SANS experiments of three-component system of anionic silica nanoparticles, anionic BSA protein and anionic SDS surfactants have been carried out without and with electrolyte in aqueous solution. In both the cases, the interaction of surfactant with protein results in formation of bead-necklace structure of protein-surfactant complexes in solution. These protein-surfactant complexes interact very differently with nanoparticles in absence and presence of electrolyte. In absence of electrolyte, nanoparticles remain in dispersed phase in solution, whereas with the addition of electrolyte the nanoparticles fractal aggregates are formed. SANS describes the phase behavior to be governed by competition of electrostatic and depletion interactions among the components solution.

  10. An AFM study of calcite dissolution in concentrated electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2009-04-01

    Calcite-solution interactions are of a paramount importance in a range of processes such as the removal of heavy metals, carbon dioxide sequestration, landscape modeling, weathering of building stone and biomineralization. Water in contact with minerals often carries significant amounts of solutes; additionally, their concentration may vary due to evaporation and condensation. It is well known that calcite dissolution is affected dramatically by the presence of such solutes. Here we present investigations on the dissolution of calcite in the presence of different electrolytes. Both bulk (batch reactors) experiments and nanoscale (in situ AFM) techniques are used to study the dissolution of calcite in a range of solutions containing alkaly cations balanced by halide anions. Previous works have indicated that the ionic strength has little influence in calcite dissolution rates measured from bulk experiments (Pokrovsky et al. 2005; Glendhill and Morse, 2004). Contrary to these results, our quantitative analyses of AFM observations show an enhancement of the calcite dissolution rate with increasing electrolyte concentration. Such an effect is concentration-dependent and it is most evident in concentrated solutions. AFM experiments have been carried out in a fluid cell using calcite cleavage surfaces in contact with solutions of simple salts of the alkaly metals and halides at different undersaturations with respect to calcite to try to specify the effect of the ionic strength on etch pit spreading rate and calcite dissolution rate. These results show that the presence of soluble salts may critically affect the weathering of carbonate rocks in nature as well as the decay of carbonate stone in built cultural heritage. References: Pokrosky, O.S.; Golubev, S.V.; Schott, J. Dissolution kinetics of calcite, dolomite and magnesite at 25°C and 0 to 50 atm pCO2. Chemical Geology, 2005, 217 (3-4) 239-255. Glendhill, D.K.; Morse, J.W. Dissolution kinetics of calcite in Na

  11. Electrochemical characteristics of acid electrolytes for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervasio, D.; Razaq, M.; Razaq, A.; Adzic, R.; Kanamura, K.; Yeager, E. B.

    1992-01-01

    The electrochemical evaluation of new perfluorinated fuel cell electrolytes provided by GRI contractors at Clemson and Iowa shows the kinetics for O2 reduction on Pt improves with these acids compared to with phosphoric acid. The improvement is mainly due to the lesser tendency of these acids to absorb on Pt. Kinetics do not have a strong dependence on pH or O2 solubility when mass transport is not involved. Concentrated sulfonyl acids were usually found to wet Teflon resulting in the flooding of Teflon-bonded gas fed electrodes and poor performance at high current densities. These perfluorinated electrolytes were, however, found to be useful as performance enhancing additives to concentrated phosphoric acid in some cases. The alpha, omega-bis-phosphonic acid with a perfluoroethylene bridge gave superior performance compared to phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures (up to 200 C) for 500 hours. Bis-phosphonic acids with higher CF2 to PO3H2 ratios dehydrated more readily at elevated temperatures, resulting in resistive voltage losses. New perfluorinated phosphonic acid containing olefins were found to be polymerizable. This suggests that with a reasonable synthetic effort, new kinds of ionomer membrames are attainable, and these may be superior to Nafion for fuel cell applications.

  12. Investigation of low frequency electrolytic solution behavior with an accurate electrical impedance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kung-Chu; Su, Vin-Cent; Huang, Da-Yo; Lee, Ming-Lun; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the investigation of strong electrolytic solutions operated in low frequency regime through an accurate electrical impedance method realized with a specific microfluidic device and high resolution instruments. Experimental results show the better repeatability and accuracy of the proposed impedance method. Moreover, all electrolytic solutions appear the so-called relaxation frequency at each peak value of dielectric loss due to relaxing total polarization inside the device. The relaxation frequency of concentrated electrolytes becomes higher owing to the stronger total polarization behavior coming from the higher conductivity as well as the lower resistance in the electrolytic solutions.

  13. Study on Durability and Stability of an Aqueous Electrolyte Solution for Zinc Bromide Hybrid Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyeon; Jeon, Joonhyeon

    2015-01-01

    Zinc-bromine flow battery using aqueous electrolyte has advantages of cost effective and high energy density, but there still remains a problem improving stability and durability of electrolyte materials during long-time cell operation. This paper focuses on providing a homogeneous aqueous solution for durability and stability of zinc bromide electrolyte. For performance experiments of conventional and proposed electrolyte solutions, detailed cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements (at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in the range of -1.5 V~1.5 V) are carried out for 40 cycles and five kinds of electrolytes containing which has one of additives, such as (conventionally) zinc chloride, potassium chloride, (newly) lithium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate and zeolite-Y are compared with the 2.0 M ZnBr2 electrolyte, respectively. Experimental results show that using the proposed three additives provides higher anodic and cathodic peak current density of electrolytes than using other two conventional additives, and can lead to improved chemical reversibility of zinc bromide electrolyte. Especially, the solution of which the zeolite-Y added, shows enhanced electrochemical stability of zinc bromide electrolyte. Consequently, proposed electrolytes have a significant advantage in comparison with conventional electrolytes on higher stability and durability.

  14. Effect of mixed additives on lead-acid battery electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Arup; Basumallick, Indra Narayan

    This paper describes the corrosion behaviour of the positive and negative electrodes of a lead-acid battery in 5 M H 2SO 4 with binary additives such as mixtures of phosphoric acid and boric acid, phosphoric acid and tin sulphate, and phosphoric acid and picric acid. The effect of these additives is examined from the Tafel polarisation curves, double layer capacitance and percentage of inhibition efficiency. A lead salt battery has been fabricated replacing the binary mixture with an alternative electrolyte and the above electrochemical parameters have been evaluated for this lead salt battery. The results are explained in terms of H + ion transport and the morphological change of the PbSO 4 layer.

  15. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution.

  16. Generic transport coefficients of a confined electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Physical parameters characterizing electrokinetic transport in a confined electrolyte solution are reconstructed from the generic transport coefficients obtained within the classical nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework. The electro-osmotic flow, the diffusio-osmotic flow, the osmotic current, as well as the pressure-driven Poiseuille-type flow, the electric conduction, and the ion diffusion are described by this set of transport coefficients. The reconstruction is demonstrated for an aqueous NaCl solution between two parallel charged surfaces with a nanoscale gap, by using the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A Green-Kubo approach is employed to evaluate the transport coefficients in the linear-response regime, and the fluxes induced by the pressure, electric, and chemical potential fields are compared with the results of nonequilibrium MD simulations. Using this numerical scheme, the influence of the salt concentration on the transport coefficients is investigated. Anomalous reversal of diffusio-osmotic current, as well as that of electro-osmotic flow, is observed at high surface charge densities and high added-salt concentrations.

  17. PREDICTING WATER ACTIVITY IN ELECTROLYTE SOLUTIONS WITH THE CISTERNAS-LAM MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    REYNOLDS JG; GREER DA; DISSELKAMP RL

    2011-03-01

    Water activity is an important parameter needed to predict the solubility of hydrated salts in Hanford nuclear waste supernatants. A number of models available in the scientific literature predict water activity from electrolyte solution composition. The Cisternas-Lam model is one of those models and has several advantages for nuclear waste application. One advantage is that it has a single electrolyte specific parameter that is temperature independent. Thus, this parameter can be determined from very limited data and extrapolated widely. The Cisternas-Lam model has five coefficients that are used for all aqueous electrolytes. The present study aims to determine if there is a substantial improvement in making all six coefficients electrolyte specific. The Cisternas-Lam model was fit to data for six major electrolytes in Hanford nuclear waste supernatants. The model was first fit to all data to determine the five global coefficients, when they were held constant for all electrolytes it yielded a substantially better fit. Subsequently, the model was fit to each electrolyte dataset separately, where all six coefficients were allowed to be electrolyte specific. Treating all six coefficients as electrolyte specific did not make sufficient difference, given the complexity of applying the electrolyte specific parameters to multi-solute systems. Revised water specific parameters, optimized to the electrolytes relevant to Hanford waste, are also reported.

  18. Evaluated activity and osmotic coefficients for aqueous solutions: thirty-six uni-bivalent electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, R. N.

    1981-07-01

    A critical evaluation of the mean acivity and osmotic coefficients in aqueous solutions of thirty-five uni-bivalent electrolytes at 298.15 K is presented. The systems which have been treated are ammonium orthophosphate, guanadinium carbonate, 1,2-ethane disulfonic acid, m-benzene disulfonic acid, ammonium decahydroborate, and the unibivalent compounds of lithium, sodium, potasium, rubidium, and cesium. Osmotic coefficients were calculated from direct vapor pressure measurements, from isopiestic measurements and from freezing-point depression measurements. Activity coefficients were calculated from electromotive force measurements on galvanic cells without transference and from diffusion measurements. Given are empirical coefficients for three different correlating equations, obtained by a weighted least squares fit to the experimental data, and tables consisting of the activity coefficients of the compounds, the osmotic coefficients and activity of water, and the excess Gibbs energy of the solution as functions of the molality for each electrolyte system. The literature coverage is through the computerized version of Chemical Abstracts of September 1979.

  19. Elucidating the Higher Stability of Vanadium (V) Cations in Mixed Acid Based Redox Flow Battery Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-11-01

    The Vanadium (V) cation structures in mixed acid based electrolyte solution were analysed by density functional theory (DFT) based computational modelling and 51V and 35Cl Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The Vanadium (V) cation exists as di-nuclear [V2O3Cl2.6H2O]2+ compound at higher vanadium concentrations (≥1.75M). In particular, at high temperatures (>295K) this di-nuclear compound undergoes ligand exchange process with nearby solvent chlorine molecule and forms chlorine bonded [V2O3Cl2.6H2O]2+ compound. This chlorine bonded [V2O3Cl2.6H2O]2+ compound might be resistant to the de-protonation reaction which is the initial step in the precipitation reaction in Vanadium based electrolyte solutions. The combined theoretical and experimental approach reveals that formation of chlorine bonded [V2O3Cl2.6H2O]2+ compound might be central to the observed higher thermal stability of mixed acid based Vanadium (V) electrolyte solutions.

  20. Preparation of intercalation compounds of carbon fibers through electrolysis using phosphoric acid electrolyte and their exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Masahiro; Yoshinaga, Aya; Amao, Yutaka; Takagi, Hideyuki; Soneda, Yasushi; Inagaki, Michio

    2006-05-01

    Preparation of intercalation compounds using H3PO4 electrolyte solution in mesophase-pitch-based carbon fibers successfully carried out by electrolysis in less than 10 mol/dm3 of its electrolyte solution. Structural changes with preparation of intercalation compounds of carbon fibers were confirmed by a peak appeared around 2θ=8° observed after electrolysis, which corresponds to an interlayer spacing of about 0.9 nm through XRD pattern (anticathode: Cu Kα). This new peak was reasonably supposed to be due to the intercalation into interspacing of carbon layers. Suitable synthesis condition of the intercalation compounds was determined to be the concentration of electrolyte of 5 mol/dm3 at the electrolysis. It was also confirmed by morphology changes through SEM, that is carbon fibers, which treated low electrolyte concentration synthesized the intercalation compounds easily, and then it revealed markedly morphology changes such as fibrils. It could become exfoliation as well as them treated by other acid treatment through rapid heat-treatment. The formation of graphite oxide was suggested when the kind of intercalate was analyzed with elementary and TPD analysis.

  1. Phase diagram of a model of nanoparticles in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Lettieri, S; Wentzel, N; Gunton, J D

    2008-10-28

    We obtain accurate fluid-fluid coexistence curves for a recent simple model of interacting nanoparticles that includes the effects of ion-dispersion forces. It has been proposed that these ion-dispersion forces provide at least a partial explanation for the Hofmeister effect [M. Bostrom et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 168103 (2001)]. We study a model of aluminum oxide nanoparticle [Deniz et al., Colloids Surf. A 319, 98 (2008)] for three different electrolyte solutions with added salt type being sodium chloride, sodium iodide, and a nonpolarizable salt. We observe that the fluid-fluid coexistence curves depend substantially on the identity of added salt; this provides an efficient way of tuning the phase behavior of nanoparticles. The methods we employ include finite-size scaling (FSS), multicanonical histogram reweighting, and Gibbs ensemble methods. We show that, as expected, all three cases belong to the Ising universality class. The scaling fields and critical point parameters are obtained in the thermodynamic limit of infinite system size by extrapolation of our FSS results.

  2. Electrolyte-induced precipitation of graphene oxide in its aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Hu, Yun Hang

    2013-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) can easily dissolve in water to form a stable homogeneous solution due to its hydrophilic property and ionization of functional groups. However, in this paper, it is reported that a strong electrolyte (HCl, LiOH, LiCl, LiBr, KCl, or KBr) can destabilize the GO solution, causing GO precipitation. This indicates that the electrostatic repulsion plays a critical role in stabilizing aqueous GO solution. The electrolyte-induced precipitates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The oxygen-containing functional groups of GO sheets, which are carboxyl, epoxy, and hydroxyl groups, remained unchanged during acid (HCl)- and salt (LiCl)-induced precipitations. In contrast, during the GO precipitation induced by a base (LiOH), the carboxyl group of GO sheets disappeared with a remarkable increase in hydroxyl group and aromatic C=C bonds. This indicates that the LiOH-induced GO precipitation resulted in the partial reduction of GO sheets. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the HCl-induced GO precipitation is a feasible approach to deposit GO on a substrate as a Pt-free counter electrode for a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), which exhibited 1.65% power conversion efficiency.

  3. Effect of electrolyte concentration on the viscosity and voltammetry of supercritical solutions.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; Hope, Eric G; Palmer, Donna J

    2005-10-15

    The viscosity of a supercritical electrolyte solution is measured for the first time using a modified quartz crystal microbalance, and it is shown that ionic solvation leads to a significant structuring of the solvent and an appreciable increase in solution viscosity. Voltammetric investigations in the electrolyte solutions are used to confirm the magnitude of the viscosity changes, and these account for the appreciably lower than expected peak currents.

  4. Electrolytes

    MedlinePlus

    ... part of blood that doesn't contain cells. Sodium, potassium, and chloride levels can also be measured as part of ... in urine. It test the levels of calcium, chloride, potassium, sodium, and other electrolytes. References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. ...

  5. Experimental Investigation into the Transmembrane Electrical Potential of the Forward Osmosis Membrane Process in Electrolyte Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Lixia; Fang, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane electrical potential (TMEP) in a forward osmosis membrane process with a single electrolyte solution as the draw and feed solutions was investigated by experiments. The effects of membrane orientation, the electrolyte species (KCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), concentration and concentration ratio of solutions at both sides of membrane on water flux and TMEP were investigated. The results showed that the TMEPs at different membrane orientation cannot completely coincide, which confirmed the effect of membrane asymmetry. The ion diffusion coefficients significantly affected the TMEP across the membrane, with different patterns for different electrolytes and concentrations. PMID:24957177

  6. Experimental investigation into the transmembrane electrical potential of the forward osmosis membrane process in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Bian, Lixia; Fang, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaolin

    2014-06-19

    The transmembrane electrical potential (TMEP) in a forward osmosis membrane process with a single electrolyte solution as the draw and feed solutions was investigated by experiments. The effects of membrane orientation, the electrolyte species (KCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), concentration and concentration ratio of solutions at both sides of membrane on water flux and TMEP were investigated. The results showed that the TMEPs at different membrane orientation cannot completely coincide, which confirmed the effect of membrane asymmetry. The ion diffusion coefficients significantly affected the TMEP across the membrane, with different patterns for different electrolytes and concentrations.

  7. Investigations of the pore formation in the lead selenide films using glacial acetic acid- and nitric acid-based electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel synthesis of porous PbSe layers on Si substrates by anodic electrochemical treatment of PbSe/CaF2/Si(111) epitaxial structures in an electrolyte solution based on glacial acetic acid and nitric acid. Electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and local chemical microanalysis investigation results for the porous layers are presented. Average size of the synthesized mesopores with approximately 1010 cm−2 surface density was determined to be 22 nm. The observed phenomenon of the active selenium redeposition on the mesopore walls during anodic treatment is discussed. PMID:22726822

  8. Investigations of the pore formation in the lead selenide films using glacial acetic acid- and nitric acid-based electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Zimin, Sergey P; Gorlachev, Egor S; Naumov, Viktor V; Skok, Fedor O

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel synthesis of porous PbSe layers on Si substrates using anodic electrochemical treatment of PbSe/CaF2/Si(111) epitaxial structures in an electrolyte solution based on glacial acetic acid and nitric acid. Electron microscopy, x-ray diffractometry, and local chemical microanalysis investigations results for the porous layers are presented. Average size of the synthesized mesopores with ~1010 cm-2 surface density was determined to be 22 nm. The observed phenomenon of the active selenium redeposition on the mesopore walls during anodic treatment is discussed.

  9. AN INVENTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF ZINC ELECTRODEPOSITED FROM ACID ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Faltemier, J.L.; Jaksic, M.M.; Tsuda, T.; Tobias, C.W.

    1983-09-01

    Electrodeposition of zinc from acid electrolytes has been studied by several investigators in this laboratory. A large number of zinc deposits have been observed and photographs (SEM, micrographs, experimental equipment, and line drawings) have been prepared over the years 1976-1983. These photos are compiled in this LBL report to facilitate their future use by others. The tables in this report list the experimental conditions and corresponding identification numbers of photographs that are on file in the Photography Services Laboratory at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Several samples of these zinc deposits are shown.

  10. Corrosion and inhibition of copper in different electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, A.; Kálmán, E.; Telegdi, J.; Pálinkás, G.; Dóra, G.

    The inhibition action of p-chlorobenzohydroxamic acid (p-Cl-BHA) and dibenzylsulphoxide (DBSO) on copper corrosion in 0.5 M NaCl at pH 6.5 and 0.1 M Na2SO4 at pH 3, respectively, were studied. The corrosion and inhibition processes were monitored by in-situ atomic force microscopy, and morphological changes on the electrode surface were registered. The p-Cl-BHA greatly enhanced the resistance of copper to pitting corrosion in an aqueous solution containing chloride ions. This effect is attributed to the formation of a continuous protective chemisorbed layer on the corroding metallic surface through which Cu2O will be stabilized. The DBSO, because of its adsorption and conversion to a more stable, less soluble sulphide compound, greatly hindered the copper corrosion in the sulphate-containing solutions.

  11. Sensitive bridge circuit measures conductance of low-conductivity electrolyte solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, K.

    1967-01-01

    Compact bridge circuit measures sensitive and accurate conductance of low-conductivity electrolyte solutions. The bridge utilizes a phase sensitive detector to obtain a linear deflection of the null indicator relative to the measured conductance.

  12. Role of hydration forces in the properties of electrolyte solutions in the bulk and at interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-03-01

    We present a theoretical approach for modeling electrolyte solutions at interfaces that reaches into the mesoscale while retaining molecular detail. The total Hamiltonian of the system includes interactions arising from density and charge density (ion correlation) fluctuations, direct Coulomb interactions between ions, and at interfaces the image interactions, ion-solid and ion-water dispersion interactions. The model was validated against its ability to reproduce ion activity in 1:1 and 2:1 electrolyte solutions in the 0-2 M concentration range, its ability to capture the ion-specific effect in 1:1 electrolytes at the air-water interface, and solvent structure in a confined environment between hydrophobic surfaces, revealing the central role of ion hydration interactions in specific ion thermodynamic properties in the bulk solutions and at interfaces. The model is readily extensible to treat electrolyte interactions and forces across charged solid-water interfaces.

  13. Polyethylene glycol-electrolyte solution (PEG-ES)

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrolytes to prevent dehydration and other serious side effects that may be caused by fluid loss as ... PEG-ES may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: nausea stomach pain, cramps, or fullness ...

  14. Promoting solution phase discharge in Li-O2 batteries containing weakly solvating electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangwen; Chen, Yuhui; Johnson, Lee; Bruce, Peter G.

    2016-08-01

    On discharge, the Li-O2 battery can form a Li2O2 film on the cathode surface, leading to low capacities, low rates and early cell death, or it can form Li2O2 particles in solution, leading to high capacities at relatively high rates and avoiding early cell death. Achieving discharge in solution is important and may be encouraged by the use of high donor or acceptor number solvents or salts that dissolve the LiO2 intermediate involved in the formation of Li2O2. However, the characteristics that make high donor or acceptor number solvents good (for example, high polarity) result in them being unstable towards LiO2 or Li2O2. Here we demonstrate that introduction of the additive 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DBBQ) promotes solution phase formation of Li2O2 in low-polarity and weakly solvating electrolyte solutions. Importantly, it does so while simultaneously suppressing direct reduction to Li2O2 on the cathode surface, which would otherwise lead to Li2O2 film growth and premature cell death. It also halves the overpotential during discharge, increases the capacity 80- to 100-fold and enables rates >1 mA cmareal-2 for cathodes with capacities of >4 mAh cmareal-2. The DBBQ additive operates by a new mechanism that avoids the reactive LiO2 intermediate in solution.

  15. Anomalously enhanced hydration of aqueous electrolyte solution in hydrophobic carbon nanotubes to maintain stability.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Tomonori

    2014-02-24

    An understanding of the structure and behavior of electrolyte solutions in nanoenvironements is crucial not only for a wide variety of applications, but also for the development of physical, chemical, and biological processes. We demonstrate the structure and stability of electrolyte in carbon nanotubes using hybrid reverse Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray diffraction patterns. Hydrogen bonds between water are adequately formed in carbon nanotubes, although some hydrogen bonds are restricted by the interfaces of carbon nanotubes. The hydrogen bonding network of water in electrolyte in the carbon nanotubes is further weakened. On the other hand, formation of the ion hydration shell is significantly enhanced in the electrolyte in the carbon nanotubes in comparison to ion hydration in bulk electrolyte. The significant hydrogen bond and hydration shell formation are a result of gaining stability in the hydrophobic nanoenvironment.

  16. Aggregation Kinetics of Citrate and Polyvinylpyrrolidone Coated Silver Nanoparticles in Monovalent and Divalent Electrolyte Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Khanh An; Chen, Kai Loon

    2011-01-01

    The aggregation kinetics of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) that were coated with two commonly used capping agents—citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)—were investigated. Time-resolved dynamic light scattering (DLS) was employed to measure the aggregation kinetics of the AgNPs over a range of monovalent and divalent electrolyte concentrations. The aggregation behavior of citrate-coated AgNPs in NaCl was in excellent agreement with the predictions based on Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) theory, and the Hamaker constant of citrate-coated AgNPs in aqueous solutions was derived to be 3.7 × 10-20 J. Divalent electrolytes were more efficient in destabilizing the citrate-coated AgNPs, as indicated by the considerably lower critical coagulation concentrations (2.1 mM CaCl2 and 2.7 mM MgCl2 vs. 47.6 mM NaCl). The PVP-coated AgNPs were significantly more stable than citrate-coated AgNPs in both NaCl and CaCl2, which is likely due to steric repulsion imparted by the large, non-charged polymers. The addition of humic acid resulted in the adsorption of the macromolecules on both citrate- and PVP-coated AgNPs. The adsorption of humic acid induced additional electrosteric repulsion that elevated the stability of both nanoparticles in suspensions containing NaCl or low concentrations of CaCl2. Conversely, enhanced aggregation occurred for both nanoparticles at high CaCl2 concentrations due to interparticle bridging by humic acid clusters. PMID:21630686

  17. Performance of AA5052 alloy anode in alkaline ethylene glycol electrolyte with dicarboxylic acids additives for aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DaPeng; Zhang, DaQuan; Lee, KangYong; Gao, LiXin

    2015-11-01

    Dicarboxylic acid compounds, i.e. succinic acid (SUA), adipic acid (ADA) and sebacic acid (SEA), are used as electrolyte additives in the alkaline ethylene glycol solution for AA5052 aluminium-air batteries. It shows that the addition of dicarboxylic acids lowers the hydrogen gas evolution rate of commercial AA5052 aluminium alloy anode. AA5052 aluminium alloy has wide potential window for electrochemical activity and better discharge performance in alkaline ethylene glycol solution containing dicarboxylic acid additives. ADA has the best inhibition effect for the self-corrosion of AA5052 anode among the three dicarboxylic acid additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that dicarboxylic acids and aluminium ions can form coordination complexes. Quantum chemical calculations shows that ADA has a smaller energy gap (ΔE, the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied orbital and the highest occupied orbital), indicating that ADA has the strongest interaction with aluminium ions.

  18. System for absolute measurement of electrolytic conductivity in aqueous solutions based on van der Pauw's theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing; Lin, Zhen; Zhang, Xiao; Yu, Xiang; Wei, Jiali; Wang, Xiaoping

    2014-05-01

    Based on an innovative application of van der Pauw's theory, a system was developed for the absolute measurement of electrolytic conductivity in aqueous solutions. An electrolytic conductivity meter was designed that uses a four-electrode system with an axial-radial two-dimensional adjustment structure coupled to an ac voltage excitation source and signal collecting circuit. The measurement accuracy, resolution and repeatability of the measurement system were examined through a series of experiments. Moreover, the measurement system and a high-precision electrolytic conductivity meter were compared using some actual water samples.

  19. Synthesis of novel acid electrolytes for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock, James L.

    1988-11-01

    A 40 millimole per hour scale aerosol direct fluorination reactor was constructed. F-Methyl F-4-methoxybutanoate and F-4-methoxybutanoyl fluoride were synthesized by aerosol direct fluorination of methyl 4-methoxybutanoate. Basic hydrolysis of the perfluorinated derivatives produce sodium F-4 methoxybutanoate which was pyrolyzed to F-3-methoxy-1-propene. Purification and shipment of 33 grams of F-3-methoxy-1-propene followed. Syntheses by analogous methods allowed production and shipment of 5 grams of F-3-ethoxy 1-propene, 18 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy) 1-propene, and 37 grams of F-3,3-dimethyl 1-butene. Eighteen grams of F-2,2-dimethyl 1-chloropropane was produced directly and shipped. As suggested by other contractors, 5 grams of F-3-methoxy 1-iodopropane, and 5 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy) 1-iodopropane were produced by converting the respective precursor acid sodium salts produced for olefin synthesis to the silver salts and pyrolyzing them with iodine. Each of these compounds was prepared for the first time by the aerosol fluorination process during the course of the contract. These samples were provided to other Gas Research Institute (GRI) contractors for synthesis of perfluorinated sulfur (VI) and phosphorous (V) acids.

  20. Graphene-oxide stabilization in electrolyte solutions using hydroxyethyl cellulose for drug delivery application.

    PubMed

    Mianehrow, Hanieh; Moghadam, Mohamad Hasan Mohamadzadeh; Sharif, Farhad; Mazinani, Saeedeh

    2015-04-30

    Stabilization of graphene oxide (GO) in physiological solution is performed using hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) to make the resultant nanohybrid suitable for targeted drug delivery purposes. Short and long term stability of GO suspensions with different ionic strengths were assessed using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and zeta potential measurements. Results depicted that HEC effectively stabilized GO in electrolyte solutions and the mechanism of stabilization appeares to be depended on HEC content. Drug loading and release behavior of folic acid (FA) as a model drug, from GO-HEC nanohybrid were studied to assess its application in drug delivery systems. Results showed the nanohybrid could be highly loaded by folic acid. Moreover, HEC content in the nanohybrid played an important role in final application to make it applicable either as a carrier for controllable drug release or as a folate-targeted drug carrier. In addition, according to cytotoxicity results, the nanohybrid showed good biocompatibility which indeed confirms its potential application as a drug carrier.

  1. Influence of sodium chloride content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin

    PubMed Central

    Eldarrat, Aziza; High, Alec; Kale, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin by employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Materials and Methods: Dentin samples were prepared from extracted molars. Electrochemical impedance measurements were carried out over a wide frequency range (0.01Hz-10MHz). After measurements, samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Results: Electrochemical impedance measurements showed that the mean values of dentin electrical resistance were 4284, 2062, 1336, 53 and 48kΩ at different NaCl contents in electrolyte solution. One-way ANOVA test of mean values of dentin electrical resistance revealed a significant difference (P < 0.0001) as a function of NaCl content in electrolyte solution. Comparing electrical resistance values of dentin samples at 0.05% w/v and 0.9% w/v concentrations were found to be significantly different (P < 0.05 at 95% confidence level). Scanning electron microscopy revealed structure of dentin sample with intertubular dentin matrix and distribution of patent dentinal tubules. Conclusion: This in vitro study indicated, through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, that electrical resistance of dentin was affected by the concentration of NaCl in electrolyte solution. It is clear from the current study that NaCl concentration in electrolyte solution has a marked influence on dentin electrical resistance. Therefore, this baseline data need to be considered in any future study on dental samples. PMID:28348614

  2. Effect of salt identity on the phase diagram for a globularprotein in aqueous electrolyte solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bostrom, Mathias; Tavares, Frederico W.; Ninham, Barry W.; Prausnitz, John M.

    2006-02-22

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to establish the potential of mean force between two globular proteins in an aqueous electrolyte solution. This potential includes nonelectrostatic contributions arising from dispersion forces first, between the globular proteins, and second, between ions in solution and between each ion and the globular protein. These latter contributions are missing from standard models. The potential of mean force, obtained from simulation, is fitted to an analytic equation. Using our analytic potential of mean force and Barker-Henderson perturbation theory, we obtain phase diagrams for lysozyme solutions that include stable and metastable fluid-fluid and solid-fluid phases when the electrolyte is 0.2 M NaSCN or NaI or NaCl. The nature of the electrolyte has a significant effect on the phase diagram.

  3. Stannous sulfate as an electrolyte additive for lead acid battery made from a novel ultrafine leady oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Liu, Jianwen; Yang, Danni; Yuan, Xiqing; Li, Lei; Zhu, Xinfeng; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Yucheng; Sun, Xiaojuan; Liang, Sha; Hu, Jingping; Kumar, R. Vasant; Yang, Jiakuan

    2015-07-01

    The effects of SnSO4 as an electrolyte additive on the microstructure of positive plate and electrochemical performance of lead acid battery made from a novel leady oxide are investigated. The novel leady oxide is synthesized through leaching of spent lead paste in citric acid solution. The novel leady oxides are used to prepare working electrode (WE) subjected to electrochemical cyclic voltammetry (CV) tests. Moreover, the novel leady oxides are used as active materials of positive plate assembled as a testing battery of 1.85 A h capacity. In CV tests, SEM/EDX results show that the major crystalline phase of the paste in WE after CV cycles is PbSO4. The larger column-shaped PbSO4 crystals easily generate in the paste of WE without an electrolyte additive of SnSO4. However, PbSO4 crystals significantly become smaller with the addition of SnSO4 in the electrolyte. In batteries testing, SEM results show that an electrolyte additive of SnSO4 could effectively decrease PbO2 particle size in the positive active materials of the teardown battery at the end of charging procedure. It is indicated that an electrolyte additive of SnSO4 could have a positive influence on restraining larger particles of irreversible sulfation in charge/discharge cycles of battery testing.

  4. State of ions in electrolyte solutions in the ionic-plasma approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Baldanov, M.M.; Mokhosoev, M.V.

    1986-04-01

    This paper examines the state of ions in the framework of the concept of an ionic plasma. Results are presented of the evaluations of the equivalent conductivity of lithium chloride in aqueous solutions at 18 C. The Debye-Falkenhagne effect and the Wien effect are discussed. The proposed interpretation of the state of ions in electrolyte solutions gives a more natural and more systematic explanation for such factors as the Debye-Falkenhagen dispersion of the electrical conductivity, the Wien effect, and the activity coefficients of electrolytes.

  5. Fabrication of multi-non-metal-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes by anodization in mixed acid electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Lecheng Su Yaling; Zhou Minghua; Zhang Xingwang; Chen Xiuqin

    2007-12-04

    Multi-non-metal-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were fabricated by electrochemical anodization of Ti in the mixed acid electrolyte of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O and HIO{sub 3} containing NH{sub 4}F. The samples were annealed in air and characterized by FE-SEM, XRD, XPS and DRS. The results indicate non-metals of N, F and I are successfully doped into TiO{sub 2} nanotubes in aqueous solution by adjusting the electrolyte composition. The multi-non-metal-doped samples display a significant visible-light response. Additionally, the atomic concentration of non-metals is closely related with the electrolyte composition.

  6. Nano-composite polymer gel electrolytes containing ortho-nitro benzoic acid: role of dielectric constant of solvent and fumed silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, nano-composite polymer gel electrolytes containing polymethylmethacrylate, dimethylacetamide, diethyl carbonate, fumed silica and ortho-nitro benzoic acid have been synthesized. Electrical conductivity, viscosity, pH and thermal behavior of these electrolytes have been studied. The effect of acid, polymer, fumed silica concentration on conductivity, pH and viscosity has been discussed. The effect of dielectric constant of solvent on conductivity behavior of composite polymer gel electrolytes has also been studied. Two maxima in conductivity behavior have been observed with fumed silica concentration for composite polymer gel electrolytes, which have been explained on the basis of double percolation threshold model. Maximum conductivity of 3.20 × 10-4 and 2.46 × 10-6 S/cm at room temperature has been observed for nano-composite polymer gel electrolytes containing 10 wt% polymethylmethacrylate in 1 M solution of o-nitro benzoic acid in dimethylacetamide and diethyl carbonate respectively. The intensity of first maximum observed in conductivity at low concentration of fumed silica has been found to decrease with the decrease in acid concentration for composite polymer gel electrolytes, while the intensity of second maximum at higher fumed silica concentration remains unaffected. The conductivity of composite gels does not show much change in the temperature range of 20-100 °C and also remains constant with time, making them suitable for use as electrolytes in various devices like fuel cells, proton batteries, electrochromic window applications etc.

  7. A New Fe/V Redox Flow Battery Using Sulfuric/Chloric Mixed Acid Supporting Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Chen, Feng; Luo, Qingtao; Wei, Xiaoliang; Xia, Guanguang; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-04-01

    A redox flow battery using Fe2+/Fe3+ and V2+/V3+ redox couples in chloric/sulphuric mixed acid supporting electrolyte was investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.35 V with a nearly 100% utilization ratio and demonstrated stable cycling over 100 cycles with energy efficiency > 80% and no capacity fading at room temperature. A 25% improvement in the discharge energy density of the Fe/V cell was achieved compared with the previous reported Fe/V cell using pure chloride acid supporting electrolyte. Stable performance was also achieved in the temperature range between 0 C and 50 C as well as using microporous separator as the membrane. The improved electrochemical performance at room temperature makes the Fe/V redox flow battery a promising option as a stationary energy storage device to enable renewable integration and stabilization of the electrical grid.

  8. The Interplay of Al and Mg Speciation in Advanced Mg Battery Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    See, Kimberly A; Chapman, Karena W; Zhu, Lingyang; Wiaderek, Kamila M; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Barile, Christopher J; Chupas, Peter J; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Mg batteries are an attractive alternative to Li-based energy storage due to the possibility of higher volumetric capacities with the added advantage of using sustainable materials. A promising emerging electrolyte for Mg batteries is the magnesium aluminum chloride complex (MACC) which shows high Mg electrodeposition and stripping efficiencies and relatively high anodic stabilities. As prepared, MACC is inactive with respect to Mg deposition; however, efficient Mg electrodeposition can be achieved following an electrolytic conditioning process. Through the use of Raman spectroscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, (27)Al and (35)Cl nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and pair distribution function analysis, we explore the active vs inactive complexes in the MACC electrolyte and demonstrate the codependence of Al and Mg speciation. These techniques report on significant changes occurring in the bulk speciation of the conditioned electrolyte relative to the as-prepared solution. Analysis shows that the active Mg complex in conditioned MACC is very likely the [Mg2(μ-Cl)3·6THF](+) complex that is observed in the solid state structure. Additionally, conditioning creates free Cl(-) in the electrolyte solution, and we suggest the free Cl(-) adsorbs at the electrode surface to enhance Mg electrodeposition.

  9. Simple electrolyte solutions: Comparison of DRISM and molecular dynamics results for alkali halide solutions

    PubMed Central

    Joung, In Suk; Luchko, Tyler; Case, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Using the dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model (DRISM) of molecular solvation, we have calculated structural and thermodynamic information of alkali-halide salts in aqueous solution, as a function of salt concentration. The impact of varying the closure relation used with DRISM is investigated using the partial series expansion of order-n (PSE-n) family of closures, which includes the commonly used hypernetted-chain equation (HNC) and Kovalenko-Hirata closures. Results are compared to explicit molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, using the same force fields, and to experiment. The mean activity coefficients of ions predicted by DRISM agree well with experimental values at concentrations below 0.5 m, especially when using the HNC closure. As individual ion activities (and the corresponding solvation free energies) are not known from experiment, only DRISM and MD results are directly compared and found to have reasonably good agreement. The activity of water directly estimated from DRISM is nearly consistent with values derived from the DRISM ion activities and the Gibbs-Duhem equation, but the changes in the computed pressure as a function of salt concentration dominate these comparisons. Good agreement with experiment is obtained if these pressure changes are ignored. Radial distribution functions of NaCl solution at three concentrations were compared between DRISM and MD simulations. DRISM shows comparable water distribution around the cation, but water structures around the anion deviate from the MD results; this may also be related to the high pressure of the system. Despite some problems, DRISM-PSE-n is an effective tool for investigating thermodynamic properties of simple electrolytes. PMID:23387564

  10. Modeling of CO2 solubility in single and mixed electrolyte solutions using statistical associating fluid theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2016-03-01

    Statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT) is used to model CO2 solubilities in single and mixed electrolyte solutions. The proposed SAFT model implements an improved mean spherical approximation in the primitive model to represent the electrostatic interactions between ions, using a parameter K to correct the excess energies ("KMSA" for short). With the KMSA formalism, the proposed model is able to describe accurately mean ionic activity coefficients and liquid densities of electrolyte solutions including Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, Br- and SO42- from 298.15 K to 473.15 K using mostly temperature independent parameters, with sole exception being the volume of anions. CO2 is modeled as a non-associating molecule, and temperature-dependent CO2-H2O and CO2-ion cross interactions are used to obtain CO2 solubilities in H2O and in single ion electrolyte solutions. Without any additional fitting parameters, CO2 solubilities in mixed electrolyte solutions and synthetic brines are predicted, in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  11. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous electrolyte solutions at high temperatures and high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    In aqueous solutions all electrolytes tend to associate at high temperatures (low dielectric constants). Ion association results in the formation of uncharged substrates, which are substantially more volatile than their precursor ions. Thus knowledge of the association constants is important in interpreting the thermodynamics of the partitioning of electrolytes to the vapor phase in a fully speciated approach. Electrical conductance measurements provide a unique window into ionic interactions of solutions at high temperatures and pressures. In this study, the electrical conductivities of dilute (<0.1 molal) aqueous solutions of NaCl (100-600{degrees}C to 300 MPa) and sodium and potassium hydroxides (0-600 and 100-600{degrees}C, respectively, and to 300 MPa) were measured. The results show that the extent of association of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} is similar to those for Na{sup +} and K{sup +} with OH{sup -} in solution from subcritical to supercritical conditions.

  12. Electrodeposition of lustrous tin-lead alloys in acidic electrolytes with organic additives

    SciTech Connect

    Selivanova, G.A.; Maksimenko, S.A.; Tyutina, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    Galvanic coatings based on tin-lead alloys are mainly used in radio-engineering and electronic industries to prepare certain products, including printed-circuit boards, for soldering. To improve ecological safety of the proces, the authors studied a new electrolyte for depositing a tin-lead alloy based on nontoxic and abundant perchloric acid, as well as electrolytes based on mono- and trichloroacetic acids.

  13. Carbohydrate-Electrolyte Solution during Military Training. Effects on Physical Performance, Mood State and Immune Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    caloric ( Aspartame ) placebo. A third group drank water. Fluid intake for all groups was ad libitum; food intake was restricted to -2600 kcal-dayŕ...intake of a colored, non-caloric sweetened ( Aspartame ) solution which contained no electrolytes (Placebo). The CHO-E beverage and the placebo solution...contributing factors. The suppressed proliferative response of the Aspartame sweetened placebo group relative to the other two groups is of

  14. On the Oxidation State of Manganese Ions in Li-Ion Battery Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anjan; Shilina, Yuliya; Ziv, Baruch; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M; Luski, Shalom; Aurbach, Doron; Halalay, Ion C

    2017-02-08

    We demonstrate herein that Mn(3+) and not Mn(2+), as commonly accepted, is the dominant dissolved manganese cation in LiPF6-based electrolyte solutions of Li-ion batteries with lithium manganate spinel positive and graphite negative electrodes chemistry. The Mn(3+) fractions in solution, derived from a combined analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy data, are ∼80% for either fully discharged (3.0 V hold) or fully charged (4.2 V hold) cells, and ∼60% for galvanostatically cycled cells. These findings agree with the average oxidation state of dissolved Mn ions determined from X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy data, as verified through a speciation diagram analysis. We also show that the fractions of Mn(3+) in the aprotic nonaqueous electrolyte solution are constant over the duration of our experiments and that disproportionation of Mn(3+) occurs at a very slow rate.

  15. Application of the quartz crystal microbalance to measurement of the concentration of electrolyte in lead-acid batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Charlesworth, J.M.; Garrard, W.N.C.

    1995-12-01

    The density of the electrolyte in a lead-acid battery may change by 10-20% during the discharge-charge cycle and the value within this range can be used as an indication of the fraction of available energy stored in the battery. We describe the application of a quartz crystal microbalance to the determination of the density of sulphuric acid solutions over a range of temperatures and during the discharge of a typical lead-acid battery. The sensor response varied linearly with temperature and in a quadratic manner with the density of the solution. Good agreement with the theoretically predicted behavior of thickness shear mode oscillators immersed in liquids was observed. The sensor performed well in the laboratory experiments using artificial conditions; however, initial studies using the sensor in a lead-acid battery operating under real conditions revealed that stray capacitances could influence the oscillator stability.

  16. Comparative study of CoFeNx/C catalyst obtained by pyrolysis of hemin and cobalt porphyrin for catalytic oxygen reduction in alkaline and acidic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rongzhong; Chu, Deryn

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies of the oxygen reduction kinetics and mechanisms of CoFeNx/C catalysts have been conducted with rotating disk electrode (RDE) and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) in aqueous acid and alkaline solutions, as well as acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The CoFeNx/C catalysts in this study were obtained by the pyrolysis of hemin and a cobalt porphyrin. In an alkaline electrolyte, a larger electron transfer coefficient (0.63) was obtained in comparison to that in an acidic electrolyte (0.44), signifying a lower free energy barrier for oxygen reduction. The kinetic rate constant (2.69 × 10-2 cm s-1) for catalytic oxygen reduction in alkaline solution at 0.6 V (versus RHE) is almost 4 times larger than that in acidic solution (7.3 × 10-3 cm s-1). A synergetic catalytic mechanism is proposed. The overall reduction is a 4-electron reduction of oxygen. The obtained CoFeNx/C catalyst was further evaluated as a cathode catalyst in single fuel cells with acidic, neutral and alkaline electrolyte membranes. The order of the single cell performances either for power density or for stability is acidic > neutral > alkaline. The different behaviors of the CoFeNx/C catalyst in half cell and single cell are discussed.

  17. A solid dielectric gated graphene nanosensor in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yibo; Wang, Cheng; Petrone, Nicholas; Yu, Jaeeun; Nuckolls, Colin; Hone, James; Lin, Qiao

    2015-03-23

    This letter presents a graphene field effect transistor (GFET) nanosensor that, with a solid gate provided by a high-κ dielectric, allows analyte detection in liquid media at low gate voltages. The gate is embedded within the sensor and thus is isolated from a sample solution, offering a high level of integration and miniaturization and eliminating errors caused by the liquid disturbance, desirable for both in vitro and in vivo applications. We demonstrate that the GFET nanosensor can be used to measure pH changes in a range of 5.3-9.3. Based on the experimental observations and quantitative analysis, the charging of an electrical double layer capacitor is found to be the major mechanism of pH sensing.

  18. Thermal and electrochemical properties of nonflammable electrolyte solutions containing fluorinated alkylphosphates for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Yanko Marinov; Aoki, Masahiro; Mimura, Hideyuki; Fujii, Kenta; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki

    2016-11-01

    Nonflammable organic electrolyte solutions containing fluorinated alkylphosphates (FAP) have been examined as safer electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries (LIB). Although the ionic conductivity of LiPF6 in neat tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)phosphate (TFEP) solvent is very low, it increases upon the addition of alkyl carbonates such as ethylene carbonate (EC) and fluoroethylene carbonate (4-fluoro-2-oxo-1,3-dioxolane, FEC). A specific conductivity of 1 mS cm-1 or higher was obtained at room temperature for the system containing proper amounts of the carbonates and 0.5 M (mol dm-3) LiPF6. A conventional mixed alkylcarbonate-based solution containing LiPF6 showed a sign of considerable exothermic reactions on the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) response below 300 °C. However, the LiPF6/TFEP solution showed no significant exothermic response up to 400 °C, even in the presence of charged LiCoO2 (LCO) positive electrode. The addition of an alkylcarbonate to the LiPF6/TFEP solution produced an exothermic response as a result of the thermal decomposition of the carbonate over the charged LCO. However, the temperature at which the exothermic reaction starts was significantly higher in the system containing FEC than that containing EC. The thermal analysis results suggested that the LiPF6/FEC + TFEP combination could work as a safer electrolyte system in LIB under severe conditions.

  19. A mechanistic study of copper electropolishing in phosphoric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansson, Andrew

    The microelectronics industry is using copper as the interconnect material for microchips. A study of copper electropolishing is important for the process development of a new, low downforce approach, which is being developed to replace chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of the copper overburden. A promising technology is a combination of electropolishing with conventional CMP. Electropolishing of copper in phosphoric acid has been studied for, more than 70 years. Previous work has shown that the polishing rate, as measured by current density is directly related to the viscosity of the electrolyte. Also, the limiting species is water. In this study, a multidimensional design of experiments was performed to develop an in-depth model of copper electropolishing. Phosphoric acid was mixed with alcohols of different molecular weight and related viscosity to investigate how the solvents' properties affected polishing. The alcohols used were methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, butanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol. The limiting current densities and electrochemical behavior of each solution was measured by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic experiments. Also, the kinematic viscosity and density were measured to determine the dynamic viscosity to investigate the relationship of current density and viscosity. Water, methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol solutions were also examined at 20°C to 60°C. Next, the relative percentage of dissociated phosphoric acid was measured by Raman spectroscopy for each polishing solution. Raman spectroscopy was also used to measure the relative dissociation of phosphoric acid inside the polishing film. Additionally, wafers were electropolished and electrochemical mechanically polished to investigate the effects of the different solvents, fluid flow, current, and potential. The results of these experiments have shown that the molecular mass and the ability of the solvent to dissociate phosphoric acid are the primary electrolyte properties that

  20. Theoretical analysis of aqueous solutions of mixed strong electrolytes by a smaller-ion shell electrostatic model

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2014-02-07

    In spite of the great importance of mixed electrolytes in science and technology, no compelling theoretical explanation has been offered yet for the thermodynamic behavior of such systems, such as their deviation from ideality and the variation of their excess functions with ionic composition and concentration. Using the newly introduced Smaller-ion Shell treatment – an extension of the Debye–Hückel theory to ions of dissimilar size (hence DH–SiS) – simple analytic mathematical expressions can be derived for the mean and single-ion activity coefficients of binary electrolyte components of ternary ionic systems. Such expressions are based on modifying the parallel DH–SiS equations for pure binary ionic systems, by adding to the three ion-size parameters – a (of counterions), b{sub +} (of positive coions), and b{sub −} (of negative coions) – a fourth parameter. For the (+ + −) system, this is “b{sub ++},” the contact distance between non-coion cations. b{sub ++} is derived from fits with experiment and, like the other b’s, is constant at varying ion concentration and combination. Four case studies are presented: (1) HCl–NaCl–H{sub 2}O, (2) HCl–NH{sub 4}Cl–H{sub 2}O, (3) (0.01 M HX)–MX–H{sub 2}O with X = Cl, Br, and with M = Li, Na, K, Cs, and (4) HCl–MCl{sub n}–H{sub 2}O with n = 2, M = Sr, Ba; and n = 3, M = Al, Ce. In all cases, theory is fully consistent with experiment when using a of the measured binary electrolyte as the sole fitting parameter. DH–SiS is thus shown to explain known “mysteries” in the behavior of ternary electrolytes, including Harned rule, and to adequately predict the pH of acid solutions in which ionized salts are present at different concentrations.

  1. Theoretical analysis of aqueous solutions of mixed strong electrolytes by a smaller-ion shell electrostatic model.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2014-02-07

    In spite of the great importance of mixed electrolytes in science and technology, no compelling theoretical explanation has been offered yet for the thermodynamic behavior of such systems, such as their deviation from ideality and the variation of their excess functions with ionic composition and concentration. Using the newly introduced Smaller-ion Shell treatment - an extension of the Debye-Hückel theory to ions of dissimilar size (hence DH-SiS) - simple analytic mathematical expressions can be derived for the mean and single-ion activity coefficients of binary electrolyte components of ternary ionic systems. Such expressions are based on modifying the parallel DH-SiS equations for pure binary ionic systems, by adding to the three ion-size parameters - a (of counterions), b+ (of positive coions), and b- (of negative coions) - a fourth parameter. For the (+ + -) system, this is "b++," the contact distance between non-coion cations. b++ is derived from fits with experiment and, like the other b's, is constant at varying ion concentration and combination. Four case studies are presented: (1) HCl-NaCl-H2O, (2) HCl-NH4Cl-H2O, (3) (0.01 M HX)-MX-H2O with X = Cl, Br, and with M = Li, Na, K, Cs, and (4) HCl-MCln-H2O with n = 2, M = Sr, Ba; and n = 3, M = Al, Ce. In all cases, theory is fully consistent with experiment when using a of the measured binary electrolyte as the sole fitting parameter. DH-SiS is thus shown to explain known "mysteries" in the behavior of ternary electrolytes, including Harned rule, and to adequately predict the pH of acid solutions in which ionized salts are present at different concentrations.

  2. Theoretical study on the sound absorption of electrolytic solutions. I. Theoretical formulation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Matsuoka, T; Koda, S

    2007-04-14

    A theory is formulated that describes the sound absorption of electrolytic solutions due to the relative motion of ions, including the formation of ion pairs. The theory is based on the Kubo-Green formula for the bulk viscosity. The time correlation function of the pressure is projected onto the bilinear product of the density modes of ions. The time development of the product of density modes is described by the diffusive limit of the generalized Langevin equation, and approximate expressions for the three- and four-body correlation functions required are given with the hypernetted-chain integral equation theory. Calculations on the aqueous solutions of model electrolytes are performed. It is demonstrated that the theory describes both the activated barrier crossing between contact and solvent-separated ion pairs and the Coulombic correlation between ions.

  3. High catalytic activity of anatase titanium dioxide for decomposition of electrolyte solution in lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; He, Yan-Bing; Lv, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Du, Hongda; Li, Baohua; Yang, Quan-Hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2014-12-01

    It has been indicated that anatase TiO2 is a promising anode material for lithium ion power battery from many previous researches. Whereas, in this work, we find that the anatase TiO2, when used as an anode for lithium ion battery, has high catalytic activity to initiate the decarboxylation reaction of electrolyte solution, resulting in the large generation of sole gaseous component, CO2. The ROLi species and the new phase of flake-like Li2TiF6 material are the main reaction products between anatase TiO2 and LiPF6 based electrolyte solution. This work provides important and urgent information that the surface chemistry of anatase TiO2 used as the anode material of lithium ion battery must be modified to suppress its catalytic activity for the decomposition of solvents.

  4. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in nonaqueous electrolyte solutions: Temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Tuhin; Gazi, Harun Al Rasid; Biswas, Ranjit

    2009-08-01

    Temperature dependence of the excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) in ethyl acetate (EA), acetonitrile (ACN), and ethanol at several concentrations of lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) has been investigated by using the steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The temperature range considered is 267-343 K. The temperature dependent spectral peak shifts and reaction driving force (-ΔGr) in electrolyte solutions of these solvents can be explained qualitatively in terms of interaction between the reactant molecule and ion-atmosphere. Time resolved studies indicate that the decay kinetics of P4C is biexponential, regardless of solvents, LiClO4 concentrations, and temperatures considered. Except at higher electrolyte concentrations in EA, reaction rates in solutions follow the Arrhenius-type temperature dependence where the estimated activation energy exhibits substantial electrolyte concentration dependence. The average of the experimentally measured activation energies in these three neat solvents is found to be in very good agreement with the predicted value based on data in room temperature solvents. While the rate constant in EA shows a electrolyte concentration induced parabolic dependence on reaction driving force (-ΔGr), the former in ethanol and ACN increases only linearly with the increase in driving force (-ΔGr). The data presented here also indicate that the step-wise increase in solvent reorganization energy via sequential addition of electrolyte induces the ICT reaction in weakly polar solvents to crossover from the Marcus inverted region to the normal region.

  5. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  6. Co/Mo bimetallic addition to electrolytic manganese dioxide for oxygen generation in acid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Dario; Minakshi, Manickam; McGinnity, Justin; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2015-10-01

    An efficient electrocatalyst comprising inexpensive and earth-abundant materials for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial for the development of water electrolysis. In this work, in-situ addition of cobalt/molybdenum ions to the electrolytic manganese dioxide has been shown to be beneficial for the OER in acid solution as its overpotential performed better (305 mV) than that of the commercial DSA® (341 mV) at 100 mA cm-2. The OER was investigated at ambient temperature in 2 M H2SO4 solution on the modified EMD (MnMoCoO) electrodes. The energy efficiency of the MnMoCoO electrodes improved significantly with the amount of Co in the plating solution. For the electrodeposited catalysts, physico-chemical and electrochemical measurements were conducted including static overpotentials. The better performance of the modified EMD was attributed to an improved charge transfer resistance (Rct; 0.290 Ω cm2), average roughness factor (rf; 429) and decrease in water content in the electrodeposited catalysts. The kinetic parameters obtained on MnMoCoO catalysts were compared and discussed according to the cobalt concentration.

  7. Implementation of equilibrium aqueous speciation and solubility (EQ3 type) calculations into Cantera for electrolyte solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry K.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2009-06-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level capability for modeling brine thermodynamic properties using the open-source code Cantera. This implementation into Cantera allows for the application of chemical thermodynamics to describe the interactions between a solid and an electrolyte solution at chemical equilibrium. The formulations to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of electrolytes are based on Pitzer's model to calculate molality-based activity coefficients using a real equation-of-state (EoS) for water. In addition, the thermodynamic properties of solutes at elevated temperature and pressures are computed using the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) EoS for ionic and neutral aqueous species. The thermodynamic data parameters for the Pitzer formulation and HKF EoS are from the thermodynamic database compilation developed for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) used with the computer code EQ3/6. We describe the adopted equations and their implementation within Cantera and also provide several validated examples relevant to the calculations of extensive properties of electrolyte solutions.

  8. Polar-solvation classical density-functional theory for electrolyte aqueous solutions near a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warshavsky, Vadim; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    A precise description of the structural and dielectric properties of liquid water is critical to understanding the physicochemical properties of solutes in electrolyte solutions. In this article, a mixture of ionic and dipolar hard spheres is considered to account for water crowding and polarization effects on ionic electrical double layers near a uniformly charged hard wall. As a unique feature, solvent hard spheres carrying a dipole at their centers were used to model water molecules at experimentally known concentration, molecule size, and dipolar moment. The equilibrium ionic and dipole density profiles of this electrolyte aqueous model were calculated using a polar-solvation classical density-functional theory (PSCDFT). These profiles were used to calculate the charge density distribution, water polarization, dielectric permittivity function, and mean electric potential profiles as well as differential capacitance, excess adsorptions, and wall-fluid surface tension. These results were compared with those corresponding to the pure dipolar model and unpolar primitive solvent model of electrolyte aqueous solutions to understand the role that water crowding and polarization effects play on the structural and thermodynamic properties of these systems. Overall, PSCDFT predictions are in agreement with available experimental data.

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Huang, Cheng; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Z.; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2010-11-15

    The vanadium (IV) electrolyte solutions with various vanadium concentrations are studied by variable temperature 1H and 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The structure and kinetics of vanadium (IV) species in the electrolyte solutions are explored with respect to vanadium concentration and temperature. It was found that the vanadium (IV) species exist as hydrated vanadyl ion, i.e. [VO(H2O)5]2+ forming an octahedral coordination with vanadyl oxygen in the axial position and the remaining positions occupied by water molecules. This hydrated vanadyl ion structure is stable in vanadium concentrations up to 3M and in the temperature range of 240 to 340 K. The sulfate anions in the electrolyte solutions are found to be weekly bound to this hydrated vanadyl ion and occupies its second coordination sphere. The possible effects of these sulfate anions in proton and water exchange between vanadyl ion and solvent molecules are discussed based on 1H and 17O NMR results.

  10. Nanostructured Fe(III) catalysts for water oxidation assembled with the aid of organic acid salt electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang; Li, Dandan; Gao, Guofeng; Yuan, Wen; Hao, Genyan; Li, Jinping

    2016-11-01

    We describe the preparation of three partially ordered iron-based catalyst films (Fe-OAc, Fe-Pro, Fe-But) with nanoporous structure by electrodeposition from organate electrolytes containing Fe2+. The anions of the organic acids assisted the partial ordering of the nanostructured Fe(III) catalysts for water oxidation. A model involving an electrical double layer is invoked to explain the role of the organate electrolyte system in their formation. Analytical results have revealed the main component of the iron-based films to be a β-FeOOH structure. The Fe-But catalyst catalyzed water oxidation in 0.1 m potassium carbonate solution with an average activity of 1.48 mA cm-2 and an overpotential of 433 mV.

  11. Modification and validation of the pyromellitic acid electrolyte for the capillary electrophoretic determination of anions.

    PubMed

    Ehmann, Thomas; Fabry, Laszlo; Rüfer, Herbert; Kotz, Ludwig; Pahlke, Siegfried; Mantler, Claus

    2003-05-02

    For the determination of inorganic and organic anions, the pyromellitic acid (PMA) electrolyte is widely used. The pH adjustment of the self-prepared electrolyte was very challenging to satisfy the pH of specification of pH 7.8 +/- 0.1. A modification was proposed to provide a more simple electrolyte by buffering the PMA electrolyte with triethanolamine (TEA) only instead of adjusting the pH by NaOH and TEA. Thus, the proposed electrolyte consisted of 2.25 mmol l(-1) PMA, 0.75 mmol 1(-1) hexamethonium hydroxide and 12 mmol 1(-1) TEA. The performance of the PMA electrolyte buffered by TEA only was compared to a commercial available PMA and statistically validated in accordance with the methodology of Taguchi. No statistically significant difference could be found for both electrolytes assessing the performance and detection limits of hydrodynamic, stacking and electrokinetic injection with transient isotachophoretic preconcentration as well as repeatability of migration times, peak resolutions and peak symmetries.

  12. Nitric acid recovery from waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A. S.

    1959-04-14

    The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

  13. Ion hydration effects in aqueous solutions of strong electrolytes, according to proton magnetic relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnichenko, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    The concentration dependences of proton magnetic relaxation (PMR) rates measured at different temperatures in aqueous electrolyte solutions and concentrated seawater (SW) in a wide range of salt concentrations and for different seawater salinities are presented, along with the concentration dependences of PMR rates determined in salts dissolved directly in seawater. The coordination numbers of the basic ions in seawater were determined from the complete solvation limits and compared with those measured in single-component water-salt solutions. The attaining of complete solvation limits was determined using the PMR data for ions of different hydration signs.

  14. Anodization of Pd in H₂SO₄ solutions: influence of potential, polarization time, and electrolyte concentration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junzhe; Zhang, Chi; Kou, Tianyi; Xu, Junling; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2012-11-01

    The anodization of Pd in H₂SO₄ solutions has been investigated by electrochemical measurements, considering the effect of the applied potential, polarization time, and electrolyte concentration. The anodization and subsequent reduction result in the formation of Pd nanostructures on the electrode surface. Compared to the bulk Pd, the anodization of Pd in H₂SO₄ solutions leads to different cyclic voltammetry (CV) behaviors including well-separated adsorption/desorption peaks in the hydrogen region and relatively larger reduction peak areas. The improvement of electrochemically active surface areas (EASAs) of the anodized Pd samples is strongly dependent upon the electrolyte concentration, and the optimum H₂SO₄ concentration is 1.0 M. Both the applied potential and polarization time have a significant influence on the anodization process of Pd. For the given electrolyte concentration, there exist desirable applied potential and polarization time to achieve greater EASAs. The EASAs of the anodized Pd obtained under the optimum polarization conditions can reach as large as 890 times compared to its geometric area. In addition, the formation mechanism of Pd nanostructures on the electrode surface has been discussed on the basis of microstructural analysis. The present findings provide a promising route to fabricate nanostructured Pd electrocatalysts with ultrahigh EASAs.

  15. Method of making a sealed lead-acid battery with a gel electrolyte and sealed lead-acid storage battery made according to this method

    SciTech Connect

    Chreitzberg, A.M.; Chiacchio, F.J.

    1987-08-18

    A method is described of making a sealed lead-acid storage battery having a plurality of electrodes and a gel electrolyte consisting substantially of sulfuric acid and a gelling agent, comprising the steps of: (a) activating a dry unformed battery by filling the battery with sulfuric acid, (b) maintaining the battery on open circuit or a period of time sufficient to chemically bond sulphuric acid as sulfate to the electrodes and lower the specific gravity of the acid to the desired gelling value, (c) dumping the free acid from the battery, (d) adding a solution of gelling agent and sulfuric acid to fill the battery to the normal formation level, (e) formation charging the battery by applying a constant charge current of 5-16 A/100 Ah for an input of 200-300 Ah/lb. positive active material whereby gelling of the electrolyte is effected, (f) when formation is complete, removing excess liquid, if any, to top of electrodes, and (g) sealing the battery with a pressure relief valve.

  16. Solution nonideality related to solute molecular characteristics of amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Keener, C R; Fullerton, G D; Cameron, I L; Xiong, J

    1995-01-01

    By measuring the freezing-point depression for dilute, aqueous solutions of all water-soluble amino acids, we test the hypothesis that nonideality in aqueous solutions is due to solute-induced water structuring near hydrophobic surfaces and solute-induced water destructuring in the dipolar electric fields generated by the solute. Nonideality is expressed with a single solute/solvent interaction parameter I, calculated from experimental measure of delta T. A related parameter, I(n), gives a method of directly relating solute characteristics to solute-induced water structuring or destructuring. I(n)-values correlate directly with hydrophobic surface area and inversely with dipolar strength. By comparing the nonideality of amino acids with progressively larger hydrophobic side chains, structuring is shown to increase with hydrophobic surface area at a rate of one perturbed water molecule per 8.8 square angstroms, implying monolayer coverage. Destructuring is attributed to dielectric realignment as described by the Debye-Hückel theory, but with a constant separation of charges in the amino-carboxyl dipole. By using dimers and trimers of glycine and alanine, this destructuring is shown to increase with increasing dipole strength using increased separation of fixed dipolar charges. The capacity to predict nonideal solution behavior on the basis of amino acid characteristics will permit prediction of free energy of transfer to water, which may help predict the energetics of folding and unfolding of proteins based on the characteristics of constituent amino acids. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:7711253

  17. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence induced by sequential hot electron and hole injection into aqueous electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Kalle; Kuosmanen, Päivi; Pusa, Matti; Kulmala, Oskari; Håkansson, Markus; Kulmala, Sakari

    2016-03-17

    Hole injection into aqueous electrolyte solution is proposed to occur when oxide-coated aluminum electrode is anodically pulse-polarized by a voltage pulse train containing sufficiently high-voltage anodic pulses. The effects of anodic pulses are studied by using an aromatic Tb(III) chelate as a probe known to produce intensive hot electron-induced electrochemiluminescence (HECL) with plain cathodic pulses and preoxidized electrodes. The presently studied system allows injection of hot electrons and holes successively into aqueous electrolyte solutions and can be utilized in detecting electrochemiluminescent labels in fully aqueous solutions, and actually, the system is suggested to be quite close to a pulse radiolysis system providing hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals as the primary radicals in aqueous solution without the problems and hazards of ionizing radiation. The analytical power of the present excitation waveforms are that they allow detection of electrochemiluminescent labels at very low detection limits in bioaffinity assays such as in immunoassays or DNA probe assays. The two important properties of the present waveforms are: (i) they provide in situ oxidation of the electrode surface resulting in the desired oxide film thickness and (ii) they can provide one-electron oxidants for the system by hole injection either via F- and F(+)-center band of the oxide or by direct hole injection to valence band of water at highly anodic pulse amplitudes.

  18. Compatibility of electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solutions on long- term implanted dialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Mishkin, G J

    2007-01-01

    More than 20% of the world's population use a catheter for dialysis, despite guidelines limiting their use. Although the structure and design of the catheters differ by manufacturer, the material used in central venous catheters and peritoneal dialysis catheters are the same across manufacturers. Given the long-term use of these catheters in the dialysis population, the good compatibility of the antiseptics and disinfectants used on the catheters is imperative to prevent failure and cracking of the catheter material. Tensile strengths of commercially available catheters were measured after exposure to commonly used disinfectants. The tensile strength was then compared between the catheters by analyzing the displacement vs. force (N) curves produced during the evaluation. A total of 44 catheter lumens were evaluated. The electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solution, Alcavis 50/ExSept Plus, was the only solution shown to be compatible with all three catheter materials resulting in a deviation of less than 10% for each of the different catheter types. Electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solutions were the only solutions in this study that did not alter the physical properties of any of the catheters after long-term exposure.

  19. Onsager’s reciprocal relations in electrolyte solutions. I. Sedimentation and electroacoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin-Bertin, S.; Bernard, O.; Jardat, M.; Chassagne, C.

    2015-08-14

    In the framework of irreversible thermodynamics, we show that the sedimentation current in electrolyte solutions is mathematically equivalent to the low frequency limit of the ionic vibration current, appearing in the presence of an acoustic wave. This non-trivial result is obtained thanks to a careful choice of the reference frame used to express the mass fluxes in the context of electroacoustics. Coupled transport phenomena in electrolyte solutions can also be investigated in a mechanical framework, with a set of Newtonian equations for the dynamics of charged solutes. Both in the context of sedimentation and of electroacoustics, we show that the results obtained in the mechanical framework, in the ideal case (i.e., without interactions between ions), do satisfy the Onsager’s reciprocal relations. We also derive the general relation between corrective forces accounting for ionic interactions which must be fulfilled so that the Onsager’s reciprocal relations are verified. Finally, we show that no additional diffusion term needs to be taken into account in the flux of solutes (far from the walls), even if local concentration gradients exist, contrarily to what was done previously in the literature.

  20. Solvent activity in electrolyte solutions from molecular simulation of the osmotic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohns, Maximilian; Reiser, Steffen; Horsch, Martin; Hasse, Hans

    2016-02-01

    A method for determining the activity of the solvent in electrolyte solutions by molecular dynamics simulations is presented. The electrolyte solution is simulated in contact with the pure solvent. Between the two phases, there is a virtual membrane, which is permeable only for the solvent. In the simulation, this is realized by an external field which acts only on the solutes and confines them to a part of the simulation volume. The osmotic pressure, i.e., the pressure difference between both phases, is obtained with high accuracy from the force on the membrane, so that reliable data on the solvent activity can be determined. The acronym of the new method is therefore OPAS (osmotic pressure for activity of solvents). The OPAS method is verified using tests of varying complexity. This includes a comparison of results from the OPAS method for aqueous NaCl solutions to results from the literature which were obtained with other molecular simulation methods. Favorable agreement is observed not only for the solvent activity but also for the activity coefficient of NaCl, which is obtained by application of the Gibbs-Duhem equation.

  1. Recovery of pyruvic acid from biotransformation solutions.

    PubMed

    Ma, C Q; Li, J C; Qiu, J H; Wang, M; Xu, P

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this investigation was to separate pyruvic acid of biotransformation solutions from lactic acid through complex extraction. For this purpose, complex extraction was investigated from model solutions. Tri-n-octanylamine (TOA) was used as the extractant. The effects of various diluents, the stoichiometry of pyruvic acid to TOA, and the initial pH of the aqueous phase on the extraction process were investigated in this study. The effects of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and trimethylamine (TMA) on the back extraction process were also studied, respectively. The optimal conditions attained from the model solutions proved efficient on the biotransformation solutions of different concentrations. A total recovery of 71-82% of pyruvic acid was obtained, whereas 89-92% of lactic acid was removed. The purity of pyruvic acid reached 97% after the removal of TMA by a simple distillation.

  2. Design of an efficient electrolyte circulation system for the lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuerk, D.

    The design and operation of an electrolyte circulation system are described. Application of lead acid batteries to electric vehicle and other repetitive deep cycle services produces a nondesirable state in the battery cells, electrolyte stratification. This stratification is the result of acid and water generation at the electrodes during cycling. With continued cycling, the extent of the stratification increases and prevents complete charging with low percentages of overcharge. Ultimately this results in extremely short life for the battery system. The stratification problem was overcome by substantially overcharging the battery. This abusive overcharge produces gassing rates sufficient to mix the electrolyte during the end portion of the charge. Overcharge, even though it is required to eliminate stratification, produces the undesirable results related to high voltage and gassing rates.

  3. Ibotenic acid lesions of the lateral hypothalamus: comparison with the electrolytic lesion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Winn, P; Tarbuck, A; Dunnett, S B

    1984-05-01

    Rats received either ibotenic acid, electrolytic or sham lesions of the lateral hypothalamic area. Compared to sham operated rats, both lesion groups showed aphagia and adipsia following the lesion; this was less severe in the ibotenic acid lesioned rats. Once recovered, the ibotenic acid lesioned rats showed residual regulatory impairments in their compensatory responses to glucoprivation and to extracellular and intracellular dehydration. However, unlike the electrolytic lesioned rats, those with ibotenic acid lesions did not show akinesia and exhibited normal responses to both d-amphetamine and apomorphine. Ibotenic acid lesions resulted in extensive loss of cell bodies within the lateral hypothalamic area while sparing ascending dopamine neurones. The results are interpreted as suggesting that the lateral hypothalamic area and ascending dopamine neurones are components of a single system involved in the regulation of food and water intake.

  4. The effect of acidity of electrolyte on the porosity and the nanostructure morphology of electrolytic manganese dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelkhani, H.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of acidity of electrolyte (pH) on the hysteresis behavior, the specific surface area, and nanostructure morphology of electrolytic manganese dioxides (EMDs) have been studied by using the Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images analysis. EMD samples are electrodeposited at a variable pH (6 to 1) and many fixed pH (2, 3, 4, 5, and 6). Results indicate that pH play key roles in the characteristics of EMD. The samples obtained at low pH (2 and 3) show multi-branched morphology and represent a H4 hysteresis loop. At pH 4 and 5, a uniform and dense structure of MnO2 is obtained without hysteresis behavior. The sample electrodeposited at pH 6 shows a regular reticulate, that its adsorption-desorption isotherm show hysteresis behavior. By electrodeposition at a variable pH, the sample shows a cauliflower-like and multi-branched form. From the viewpoint of classification of isotherm, pH strongly affects on Type of isotherm. The results show that γ-MnO2 is as main-product of electrodeposition and α-MnO2 and β-MnO2 were obtained as side-product at low and high pH, respectively.

  5. Kinetics of quartz dissolution in electrolyte solutions using a hydrothermal mixed flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, Patricia M.; Crerar, David A.

    1990-04-01

    A hydrothermal mixed flow reactor has been developed to study the reaction kinetics of a wide variety of mineral/solution systems. The reactor is constructed of commercially pure titanium to minimize corrosion and operates at temperatures of 25 to 300°C and pressures up to 124 bars. This system is used to measure the dissolution rates of quartz at near-neutral pH in 0.0 to 0.15 m solutions of NaCl, KCl, LiCl, MgCl 2 over a temperature range of 100 to 300°C. In all cases, small concentrations of electrolytes increase the rate, some by as much as 1.5 orders of magnitude above the values measured for deionized water. The effect is greatest for solutions of NaCl and KCl where reaction rates increase with increasing electrolyte concentrations up to 0.05 molal and become constant at higher molalities. Smaller rate increases are observed for LiCl and MgCl 2 solutions. The first-order rate equation for quartz dissolution in pure water at temperatures of 100 to 300°C is given by r H 4sio 4 = k +(a sio2)(a H 2o ) 2(1 - Q/K) for a standard system of 1 m 2 of surface area and 1 kg of solution. The addition of electrolytes to reacting solutions at near-neutral pH accelerates the rate according to a Langmuir adsorption model and has the form r H 4sio 4 = (k + + k adK me +/1 + k me +)(a sio2)(a H 2o ) 2(1 - Q/K). m me + Analysis of the data indicates that the observed rate increases are controlled by the identity and concentration of the cation where alkali cations coordinate with the surface to increase the reactivity of siloxane groups by disrupting the structure of the mineral-solution interface. The rate-limiting step for the dissolution mechanism is described by (Si - O - Si) + H 2O = (Si - O - Si · OH 2)† → 2(Si - O - H) where the intermediate species is probably the same in deionized water and electrolyte solutions, but the reaction frequency is higher in electrolyte solutions due to increases in the accessibility of water to the mineral surface structures

  6. Differential electrolytic potentiometric determination of some amino acids in dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghannam, Sheikha M; Abulkibash, Abdalla; Al-Olyyan, Abeer M

    2004-01-01

    The application of direct-current differential electrolytic potentiometry to the nonaqueous titration of amino acids was investigated. The basic character of amino acids in acetic acid was enhanced to permit their direct titration with perchloric acid. A pair of antimony electrodes was used as an indicating system. The shapes of the titration curves obtained were almost symmetrical with sharp peaks. The optimum current density for those titrations was found to be 1-2 microA/cm2. The procedure was applied successfully to the determination of certain amino acids in drug formulations, and the results were favorably compared statistically with those obtained by official methods.

  7. Considerations on electrical impedance measurements of electrolyte solutions in a four-electrode cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparro, C. V.; Herrera, L. V.; Meléndez, A. M.; Miranda, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    A tetrapolar probe to measure the electrical properties of electrolyte solutions was implemented with gold electrodes according to the van der Pauw method. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements of different concentrations of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution and an oral mucosal tissue sample dispersed in PBS were performed in the galvanostatic mode using a four-electrode cell (tetrapolar probe). Taking advantage of using a potentiostat/galvanostat for carrying out the electrical measurements, a simple and rapid method using a three-electrode electrochemical cell is described for: a) cleaning of electrodes, b) verification of surface chemical state of electrode material and c) choice of current supplied to electrodes for EIS measurements. Results of this research shown a depolarization effect due to the addition of oral mucosa tissue cells into the PBS solution.

  8. Studies on zinc nodules electrodeposited from acid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Tobias, C.W.

    1984-12-01

    The development of morphology of electrodeposited zinc was investigated by studying the initial stages of deposition. Zinc was deposited galvanostatically from 1.0 M ZnCl/sub 2/ electrolyte (0.7 < pH < 4.6) on rotating disc electrodes at current densities from 5 to 130 ma/cm/sup 2/. Pine glassy carbon, Union Carbide pyrolytic graphite, Gould pyrolytic graphite, Exxon graphite loaded polymer, and platinum substrates were used. The number densities of nodules (diameter greater than 1 ..mu..m), typically encountered during incipient morphological development, were measured using scanning electron microscopy and image analysis. Nodule densities up to 7 x 10/sup 4/ nodules/mm/sup 2/ were measured.

  9. In situ analysis of the interfacial reactions between MCMB electrode and organic electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morigaki, Ken-ichi

    The interfacial phenomena between graphite (mesocarbon-microbeads (MCMB)) electrode and organic electrolyte solution were analyzed by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The influence of lithium salts (anion species), LiPF 6, LiBF 4, and LiClO 4, on the interfacial reaction, including lithium intercalation into graphite, was investigated in EC+DMC solutions. In situ AFM observation disclosed that morphological changes are quite different from one another depending on the kind of lithium salt (anion). A large expansion of MCMB particle was observed particularly in LiPF 6/EC+DMC. An expansion of MCMB particle started above 1.0 V versus Li/Li + and this expansion seemed to be caused by the decomposition of ternary graphite intercalation compound (GIC) ( C nLi(sol) y), because the expansion remained after de-intercalation of lithium. IRAS spectra of each electrolyte solution showed different behaviors and different reduction products of solvents. double modulation FTIR (DMFTIR) spectra on graphite electrode, which emphasize the surface species, indicated relatively small changes after cathodic polarization. Therefore, the observed morphological changes were caused mainly by the expansion of graphene layers and not by the precipitation of reduction products.

  10. Electrolytic arsenic removal for recycling of washing solutions in a remediation process of CCA-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Nanseu-Njiki, Charles-Péguy; Alonzo, Véronique; Bartak, Duane; Ngameni, Emmanuel; Darchen, André

    2007-10-01

    The remediation of chromated copper arsenate or CCA-treated wood is a challenging problem in many countries. In a wet remediation, the recycling of the washing solutions is the key step for a successful process. Within this goal, owing to its solubility and its toxicity, the removal of arsenic from washing solution is the most difficult process. The efficiency of arsenic removal from As(III) solutions by electrolysis was investigated in view of the recycling of acidic washing solutions usable in the remediation of CCA-treated wood. Electrochemical reduction of As(III) is irreversible and thus difficult to perform at carbon electrodes. However the electrolytic extraction of arsenic can be performed by the concomitant reduction of the cupric cation and arsenite anion. The cathodic deposits obtained by controlled potential electrolysis were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. XRD diffraction data indicated that these deposits were mixtures of copper and copper arsenides Cu(3)As and Cu(5)As(2). Electrolysis was carried out in an undivided cell with graphite cathode and copper anode, under a controlled nitrogen atmosphere. The evolution of arsine gas AsH(3) was not observed under these conditions.

  11. An amino acid-electrolyte beverage may increase cellular rehydration relative to carbohydrate-electrolyte and flavored water beverages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In cases of dehydration exceeding a 2% loss of body weight, athletic performance can be significantly compromised. Carbohydrate and/or electrolyte containing beverages have been effective for rehydration and recovery of performance, yet amino acid containing beverages remain unexamined. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to compare the rehydration capabilities of an electrolyte-carbohydrate (EC), electrolyte-branched chain amino acid (EA), and flavored water (FW) beverages. Methods Twenty men (n = 10; 26.7 ± 4.8 years; 174.3 ± 6.4 cm; 74.2 ± 10.9 kg) and women (n = 10; 27.1 ± 4.7 years; 175.3 ± 7.9 cm; 71.0 ± 6.5 kg) participated in this crossover study. For each trial, subjects were dehydrated, provided one of three random beverages, and monitored for the following three hours. Measurements were collected prior to and immediately after dehydration and 4 hours after dehydration (3 hours after rehydration) (AE = −2.5 ± 0.55%; CE = −2.2 ± 0.43%; FW = −2.5 ± 0.62%). Measurements collected at each time point were urine volume, urine specific gravity, drink volume, and fluid retention. Results No significant differences (p > 0.05) existed between beverages for urine volume, drink volume, or fluid retention for any time-point. Treatment x time interactions existed for urine specific gravity (USG) (p < 0.05). Post hoc analysis revealed differences occurred between the FW and EA beverages (p = 0.003) and between the EC and EA beverages (p = 0.007) at 4 hours after rehydration. Wherein, EA USG returned to baseline at 4 hours post-dehydration (mean difference from pre to 4 hours post-dehydration = -0.0002; p > 0.05) while both EC (-0.0067) and FW (-0.0051) continued to produce dilute urine and failed to return to baseline at the same time-point (p < 0.05). Conclusion Because no differences existed for fluid retention, urine or drink volume at any time point, yet USG returned to

  12. Electric fields in an electrolyte solution near a strip of fixed potential.

    PubMed

    Khripin, Constantine; Jagota, A; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2005-10-01

    Electrostatic fields produced by flat electrodes are often used to manipulate particles in solution. To study the field produced by such an electrode, we consider the problem of an infinite strip of width 2a with imposed constant potential immersed in an electrolyte solution. Sufficiently close to the edge of the strip, the solution is determined by classical electrostatics and results in a field singularity. We examine two limiting cases, (a) when strip width a<1k, the Debye screening length, and (b) when strip width is much greater than the Debye screening length, a>1k. We present exact results for the two cases in the limit of small potentials where the Poisson-Boltzmann equation can be linearized. By drawing on an analogy with antiplane shear deformations of solids, and by employing the path-independent J integral of solid mechanics, we present a new method for determining the strength of the edge singularity. The strength of the singularity defines an exact near-field solution. In the far field the solution goes to that of a line of charge. The accuracy of the solution is demonstrated by comparison with the numerical solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation using the finite element method.

  13. Influence of phosphoric acid on the electrochemistry of lead electrodes in sulfuric acid electrolyte containing antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, S.

    The influence of phosphoric acid (0 to 40 g 1 -1) on the Pb/PbSO 4 reaction and the kinetics of hydrogen evolution on pure, smooth lead and lead alloy electrodes is studied via galvanostatic polarization in the linear and Tafel domains with and without antimony (0 to 10 mg 1 -1) addition to the H 2SO 4 (3 to 10 M) electrolyte. Phosphoric acid is found to offset significantly the adverse effect of antimony. H 3PO 4 is also found to increase the hydrogen overpotential without affecting the Pb/PbSO 4 reaction. This implies that the open-circuit corrosion of lead and the consequent hydrogen evolution rate on lead are reduced in the presence of H 3PO 4. The beneficial effects of H 3PO 4 additive are found to be optimum at around 20 g 1 -1. Suppression of hydrogen evolution on the negative electrode, a crucial criterion for sealed cell operation, can be achieved using a H 3PO 4 additive.

  14. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1991-06-18

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

  15. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  16. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1989-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  17. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1989-11-07

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

  18. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  19. Revised Model for the Thermal Conductivity of Multicomponent Electrolyte Solutions and Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peiming; Anderko, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    A previously developed model for calculating the thermal conductivity of electrolyte solutions has been revised. The model represents the effect of electrolytes by introducing two terms in addition to the thermal conductivity of the solvent, i.e., a contribution of individual species expressed using modified Riedel coefficients and an ionic strength-dependent term that accounts for interactions between species. The revision improves and simplifies the ionic strength dependence of the species interaction term. The model has been parameterized based on extensive data for binary, ternary, and quaternary aqueous solutions containing the , and ions at temperatures ranging from 273 K to 573 K and pressures up to at least 1000 bar. Good agreement between the calculations and experimental data has been obtained with an overall average deviation of 0.44 %. Further, the model has been used to predict the thermal conductivity of seawater and to evaluate the consistency and accuracy of experimental seawater data in view of those for its key components. While older seawater data suffer from significant discrepancies and are not in satisfactory agreement with the model, the predictions are in an excellent agreement with the recent data of Sharqawy. Finally, a much simplified yet accurate model has been formulated specifically for seawater by recasting the complete model in terms of salinity (rather than concentrations of individual components), temperature, and pressure.

  20. Effects of surfactants and electrolyte solutions on the properties of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junboum; Vipulanandan, Cumaraswamy; Kim, Jee Woong; Oh, Myoung Hak

    2006-04-01

    Biosurfactants are frequently used in petroleum hydrocarbon and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) remediation. The applicability of biosurfactant use in clayey soils requires an understanding and characterization of their interaction. Comprehensive effects of surfactants and electrolyte solutions on kaolinite clay soil were investigated for index properties, compaction, strength characteristics, hydraulic conductivities, and adsorption characteristics. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and NaPO3 decreased the liquid limit and plasticity index of the test soil. Maximum dry unit weights were increased and optimum moisture contents were decreased as SDS and biosurfactant were added for the compaction tests for mixtures of 30% kaolinite and 70% sand. The addition of non-ionic surfactant, biosurfactant, and CaCl2 increased the initial elastic modulus and undrained shear strength of the kaolinite-sand mixture soils. Hydraulic conductivities were measured by fixed-wall double-ring permeameters. Results showed that the hydraulic conductivity was not significantly affected, but slightly decreased from 1×10-7 cm/s (water) to 0.3×10-7 cm/s for Triton X-100 and SDS. The adsorption characteristics of the chemicals onto kaolinite were also investigated by developing isotherm curves. SDS adsorbed onto soil particles with the strongest bonding strength of the fluids tested. Correlations among parameters were developed for surfactants, electrolyte solutions, and clayey soils.

  1. NIR spectroscopic properties of aqueous acids solutions.

    PubMed

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; Atan, Hanafi; Matjafri, Mohd Zubir

    2012-06-15

    Acid content is one of the important quality attributes in determining the maturity index of agricultural product, particularly fruits. Despite the fact that much research on the measurement of acidity in fruits through non-destructive spectroscopy analysis at NIR wavelengths between 700 to 1,000 nm has been conducted, the same response towards individual acids is not well known. This paper presents NIR spectroscopy analysis on aqueous citric, tartaric, malic and oxalic solutions through quantitative analysis by selecting a set of wavelengths that can best be used to measure the pH of the solutions. The aquaphotomics study of the acid solutions has generated R² above 0.9 for the measurement of all acids. The most important wavelengths for pH are located at 918-925 nm and 990-996 nm, while at 975 nm for water.

  2. Acid-base and electrolyte disorders in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sotirakopoulos, Nikolaos; Kalogiannidou, Irini; Tersi, Maria; Armentzioiou, Karmen; Sivridis, Dimitrios; Mavromatidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder in the community. The diabetics may suffer from acid-base and electrolyte disorders due to complications of diabetes mellitus and the medication they receive. In this study, acid-base and electrolyte disorders were evaluated among outpatient diabetics in our hospital. The study consisted of patients with diabetes mellitus who visited the hospital as outpatients between the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2006. The patients' medical history, age and type of diabetes were noted, including whether they were taking diuretics and calcium channel blockers or not. Serum creatinine, proteins, sodium, potassium and chloride and blood gases were measured in all patients. Proteinuria was measured by 24-h urine collection. Two hundred and ten patients were divided in three groups based on the serum creatinine. Group A consisted of 114 patients that had serum creatinine < 1.2 mg/dL, group B consisted of 69 patients that had serum creatinine ranging from 1.3 to 3 mg/dL and group C consisted of 27 patients with serum creatinine > 3.1 mg/dL. Of the 210 patients, 176 had an acid-base disorder. The most common disorder noted in group A was metabolic alkalosis. In groups B and C, the common disorders were metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, and metabolic acidosis, respectively. The most common electrolyte disorders were hypernatremia (especially in groups A and B), hyponatremia (group C) and hyperkalemia (especially in groups B and C). It is concluded that: (a) in diabetic outpatients, acid-base and electrolyte disorders occurred often even if the renal function is normal, (b) the most common disorders are metabolic alkalosis and metabolic acidosis (the frequency increases with the deterioration of the renal function) and (c) the common electrolyte disorders are hypernatremia and hypokalemia.

  3. Evaluation of the tapered PMMA fiber sensor response due to the ionic interaction within electrolytic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batumalay, M.; Rahman, H. A.; Kam, W.; Ong, Y. S.; Ahmad, F.; Zakaria, R.; Harun, S. W.; Ahmad, H.

    2014-01-01

    A tapered plastic multimode fiber (PMMA) optical sensor is proposed and demonstrated for continuous monitoring of solutions based on different concentration of sodium chloride and glucose in deionized water The tapered PMMA fiber was fabricated using an etching method involving deionized water and acetone to achieve a waist diameter and length of 0.45 mm and 10 mm, respectively, and was used to investigate the effect of straight, U-shape, and knot shape against concentration for both sodium chloride and glucose. The results show that there is a strong dependence of the electrolytic and non-electrolytic nature of the chemical solutions on the sensor output. It is found that the sensitivity of the sodium chloride concentration sensor with the straight tapered fiber probe was 0.0023 mV/%, which was better than the other probe arrangements of U-shape and knot. Meanwhile, the glucose sensor performs with the highest sensitivity of 0.0026 mV/wt % with the knot-shaped tapered fiber probe. In addition, a tapered PMMA probe which was coated by silver film was fabricated and demonstrated using calcium hypochlorite (G70) solution. The working mechanism of such a device is based on the observed increment in the transmission of the sensor that is immersed in solutions of higher concentration. As the concentration varies from 0 ppm to 6 ppm, the output voltage of the sensor increases linearly from 3.61 mV to 4.28 mV with a sensitivity of 0.1154 mV/ppm and a linearity of more than 99.47%. The silver film coating increases the sensitivity of the proposed sensor due to the effective cladding refractive index, which increases with the coating and thus allows more light to be transmitted from the tapered fiber.

  4. To Measure and Characterize Metal Corrosion in Electrolyte Solutions by Exploiting the Properties of Superconducting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-30

    electrochemical reactions. Investigation of BeSO 4 ( 3 1), KC1, butyric acid, isobutyric acid aqueous solutions( 3 2) have detected conductivity fluctuations with...Langevin, P., C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris , 141, 530 (1908) 18) Uhlenbeck, G. E., and Ornstein, L. S., Phys. Rev., 3, 823 (1930) 165 19) Tyagai, V. A., and

  5. Novel, electrolyte solutions comprising fully inorganic salts with high anodic stability for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, RE; Han, R; Hwang, J; Gmitter, AJ; Shterenberg, I; Yoo, HD; Pour, N; Aurbach, D

    2014-01-01

    Herein the first inorganic magnesium salt solution capable of highly reversible magnesium electrodeposition is presented. Synthesized by acid-base reaction of MgCl2 and Lewis acidic compounds such as AlCl3, this salt class demonstrates upwards of 99% Coulombic efficiency, deposition overpotential of <200 mV, and anodic stability of 3.1 V.

  6. Enhanced Performance of PbS-quantum-dot-sensitized Solar Cells via Optimizing Precursor Solution and Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jianjun; Shen, Ting; Liu, Xiaoguang; Fei, Chengbin; Lv, Lili; Cao, Guozhong

    2016-01-01

    This work reports a PbS-quantum-dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSC) with power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4%. PbS quantum dots (QDs) were grown on mesoporous TiO2 film using a successive ion layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The growth of QDs was found to be profoundly affected by the concentration of the precursor solution. At low concentrations, the rate-limiting factor of the crystal growth was the adsorption of the precursor ions, and the surface growth of the crystal became the limiting factor in the high concentration solution. The optimal concentration of precursor solution with respect to the quantity and size of synthesized QDs was 0.06 M. To further increase the performance of QDSCs, the 30% deionized water of polysulfide electrolyte was replaced with methanol to improve the wettability and permeability of electrolytes in the TiO2 film, which accelerated the redox couple diffusion in the electrolyte solution and improved charge transfer at the interfaces between photoanodes and electrolytes. The stability of PbS QDs in the electrolyte was also improved by methanol to reduce the charge recombination and prolong the electron lifetime. As a result, the PCE of QDSC was increased to 4.01%. PMID:26975216

  7. The Solvation Structure of Lithium Ions in an Ether Based Electrolyte Solution from First-Principles Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Callsen, Martin; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Futera, Zdeněk; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Hamada, Ikutaro

    2017-01-12

    The solvation and desolvation of the Li ion play a crucial role in the electrolytes of Li based secondary batteries, and their understanding at the microscopic level is of great importance. Oligoether (glyme) based electrolytes have attracted much attention as electrolytes used in Li based secondary batteries, such as Li-ion, Li-S, and Li-O2 batteries. However, the solvation structure of the Li ion in glyme based electrolytes has not been fully clarified yet. We present a computational study on the solvation structure of lithium ions in the mixture of triglyme and lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-amide (LiTFSA) by means of molecular orbital and molecular dynamics calculations based on density functional theory. We found that, in the electrolyte solution composed of the equimolar mixture of triglyme and LiTFSA, lithium ions are solvated mainly by crown-ether-like curled triglyme molecules and in direct contact with an TFSA anion. We also found the aggregate formed with Li ion and TFSA anions and/or triglyme molecule(s) is equally stable, which has not been reported in the previous classical molecular dynamics simulations, suggesting that in reality a small fraction of Li ions form aggregates and they might have a significant impact on the Li ion transport. Our results demonstrate the importance of performing electronic structure based molecular dynamics of electrolyte solution to clarify the detailed solvation structure of the Li ion.

  8. Lead, cadmium and aluminum in Canadian infant formulae, oral electrolytes and glucose solutions.

    PubMed

    Dabeka, Robert; Fouquet, Andre; Belisle, Stephane; Turcotte, Stephane

    2011-06-01

    Lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and aluminum (Al) were determined in 437 individual samples of infant formulae, oral electrolytes and 5% glucose solutions available in Canada. In the electrolytes, Cd and Pb concentrations were all below 0.01 and 0.041 ng g(-1), respectively. In the 5% glucose solutions, Pb and Cd levels averaged 0.01 and 0.09 ng g(-1), respectively. Reported on an as-consumed basis, Pb levels in milk- and soya-based formulae averaged 0.90 and 1.45 ng g(-1), respectively, while Cd levels averaged 0.23 and 1.18 ng g(-1), respectively Average Al levels on an as-consumed basis were 440 ng g(-1) (range 10-3400 ng g(-1)) in milk-based formulae and 730 ng g(-1) (range 230-1100 ng g(-1)) in soy-based formulae. Al concentrations increased in the following order: plain formula < low-iron formula < iron-supplemented formula < casein hydrolysate formula ≈ premature formula ≤ soy formula. For example, in the powdered formulae, average Al concentrations were 18 ng g(-1) for plain milk-based, 37 ng g(-1) for low-iron, 128 ng g(-1) for iron supplemented, 462 ng g(-1) for lactose-free, 518 ng g(-1) for hypoallergenic and 619 ng g(-1) for soy-based formula. Al concentrations, as-consumed, increased with decreasing levels of concentration: powder < concentrated liquid < ready-to-use. Formulae stored in glass bottles contained between 100 and 300 ng g(-1) more Al than the same formulae stored in cans. The source of the increased Al did not appear to be the glass itself, because most electrolytes and glucose solutions, also stored in glass, contained less than 8 ng g(-1) Al. Corresponding differences in Pb and Cd levels were not observed. Al concentrations varied substantially among manufacturers; however, all manufacturers were able to produce plain milk-based formulae containing less than 50 ng g(-1) Al, i.e. within the range of Al concentrations found in human milk. Next to soya-based and hypoallergenic formulae, premature formulae contained among the highest

  9. Lead, cadmium and aluminum in Canadian infant formulae, oral electrolytes and glucose solutions

    PubMed Central

    Dabeka, Robert; Fouquet, Andre; Belisle, Stephane; Turcotte, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and aluminum (Al) were determined in 437 individual samples of infant formulae, oral electrolytes and 5% glucose solutions available in Canada. In the electrolytes, Cd and Pb concentrations were all below 0.01 and 0.041 ng g−1, respectively. In the 5% glucose solutions, Pb and Cd levels averaged 0.01 and 0.09 ng g−1, respectively. Reported on an as-consumed basis, Pb levels in milk- and soya-based formulae averaged 0.90 and 1.45 ng g−1, respectively, while Cd levels averaged 0.23 and 1.18 ng g−1, respectively Average Al levels on an as-consumed basis were 440 ng g−1 (range 10–3400 ng g−1) in milk-based formulae and 730 ng g−1 (range 230–1100 ng g−1) in soy-based formulae. Al concentrations increased in the following order: plain formula < low-iron formula < iron-supplemented formula < casein hydrolysate formula ≈ premature formula ≤ soy formula. For example, in the powdered formulae, average Al concentrations were 18 ng g−1 for plain milk-based, 37 ng g−1 for low-iron, 128 ng g−1 for iron supplemented, 462 ng g−1 for lactose-free, 518 ng g−1 for hypoallergenic and 619 ng g−1 for soy-based formula. Al concentrations, as-consumed, increased with decreasing levels of concentration: powder < concentrated liquid < ready-to-use. Formulae stored in glass bottles contained between 100 and 300 ng g−1 more Al than the same formulae stored in cans. The source of the increased Al did not appear to be the glass itself, because most electrolytes and glucose solutions, also stored in glass, contained less than 8 ng g−1 Al. Corresponding differences in Pb and Cd levels were not observed. Al concentrations varied substantially among manufacturers; however, all manufacturers were able to produce plain milk-based formulae containing less than 50 ng g−1 Al, i.e. within the range of Al concentrations found in human milk. Next to soya-based and hypoallergenic formulae, premature formulae contained among the highest

  10. Effect of fulvic acids on the electrolytes physiology in vertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, O. Y.; Navarrete, J. M.; Gracia, I.; Macias, L.; Rivera, M.; Sanchez, F.

    2011-10-01

    Fulvic acids are the active principle in humus fertilizers which are the cause of better absorption of mineral ions from soil to plant tissues. Tested in mice by making use of radioactive labeled ions, they showed their action of enhancing by a factor greater than two the filtration through liver of PO 43- and Ca 2+ from digestive tract to blood serum as well as through kidney from blood serum to urine. Following this research, Fe 3+ and I 1- ions labeled with 59Fe and 131I have been tested and reported in the present paper. Results showed that iron ions are completely fixed in red cells, with no residue eliminated by urine, while iodine ions are fixed in thyroid gland, with some residue eliminated by urine. Both ions were fixed in said tissues by factors larger than two when they are escorted by fulvic acids. A general distribution of these ions in blood, urine, feces, liver, kidney and thyroid gland has been surveyed, trying to find the earliest effect of fulvic acids in the physiology of vertebrates.

  11. Successful stabilization of graphene oxide in electrolyte solutions: enhancement of biofunctionalization and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bong Jin; Compton, Owen C; An, Zhi; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Nguyen, SonBinh T

    2012-01-24

    Aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide are inherently unstable in the presence of electrolytes, which screen the electrostatic surface charge on these nanosheets and induce irreversible aggregation. Two complementary strategies, utilizing either electrostatic or steric stabilization, have been developed to enhance the stability of graphene oxide in electrolyte solutions, allowing it to stay dispersed in cell culture media and serum. The electrostatic stabilization approach entails further oxidation of graphene oxide to low C/O ratio (~1.1) and increases ionic tolerance of these nanosheets. The steric stabilization technique employs an amphiphilic block copolymer that serves as a noncovalently bound surfactant to minimize the aggregate-inducing nanosheet-nanosheet interactions. Both strategies can stabilize graphene oxide nanosheets with large dimensions (>300 nm) in biological media, allowing for an enhancement of >250% in the bioconjugation efficiency of streptavidin in comparison to untreated nanosheets. Notably, both strategies allow the stabilized nanosheets to be readily taken up by cells, demonstrating their excellent performance as potential drug-delivery vehicles.

  12. Dynamic response of AFM cantilevers to dissimilar functionalized silica surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Misra, Sambit; Karacor, M Basar; Prakash, Shaurya; Shannon, Mark A

    2010-11-16

    The dynamic response of an oscillating microcantilever with a gold-coated tip interacting with dissimilar functionalized silica surfaces was studied in electrolyte solutions with pH ranging from 4 to 9. Silica surfaces were chemically modified, yielding dissimilar surfaces with -Br, -NH(2), and -CH(3) functional group terminations. The relative hydrophobicity of the surfaces was characterized by contact angle measurements. The surface charge of the functionalized surfaces was first probed with commonly used static AFM measurements and serves as a reference to the dynamic response data. The amplitude and phase of the cantilever oscillation were monitored and used to calculate the effective interaction stiffness and damping coefficient, which relate to the electrical double layer interactions and also to distance-dependent hydrodynamic damping at the solid/water interface. The data for the dynamic response of the AFM over silica surfaces as a function of chemical functionalization and electrolyte pH show that the effective stiffness has a distinctive dependence on the surface charge of functionalized silica surfaces. The hydrodynamic damping also correlates strongly with the relative hydrophobicity of the surface. The data reported here indicate that interfacial properties can be strongly affected by changing the chemical composition of surfaces.

  13. Reference electrode for strong oxidizing acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Rigdon, Lester P.; Harrar, Jackson E.; Bullock, Sr., Jack C.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    1990-01-01

    A reference electrode for the measurement of the oxidation-reduction potentials of solutions is especially suitable for oxidizing solutions such as highly concentrated and fuming nitric acids, the solutions of nitrogen oxides, N.sub.2 O.sub.4 and N.sub.2 O.sub.5, in nitric acids. The reference electrode is fabricated of entirely inert materials, has a half cell of Pt/Ce(IV)/Ce(III)/70 wt. % HNO.sub.3, and includes a double-junction design with an intermediate solution of 70 wt. % HNO.sub.3. The liquid junctions are made from Corning No. 7930 glass for low resistance and negligible solution leakage.

  14. a Molecular Approach to Electrolyte Solutions: Predicting Phase Behavior and Thermodynamic Properties of Single and Binary-Solvent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gering, Kevin Leslie

    A molecular formulation based on modern liquid state theory is applied to the properties and phase behavior of electrolyte systems containing volatile species. An electrolyte model based on the exponential modification of the Mean Spherical Approximation (EXP-MSA) is used to describe the cation-cation, cation-anion, and anion-anion distributions of the ionic species. This theory represents an improvement over the nonmodified MSA approach, and goes beyond the usual Debye-Huckel theory and Pitzer correlation for treating concentrated solutions. Electrolyte solutions such as water-salt, ammonia-salt, mixed salts, and mixed -solvent systems are investigated over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and compositions. The usual salt properties, such as osmotic and mean activity coefficients and other thermodynamic properties (enthalpies), are calculated. The predictions are accurate to saturation limits. In addition, an iterative method is presented that is used to predict vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) and thermodynamic properties of single-salt multisolvent electrolytes of the form solvent-cosolvent-salt. In this method, a local composition model (LCM) and EXP-MSA theory are combined with traditional phase equilibria relations to estimate the pressures and compositions of a vapor phase in equilibrium with a binary-solvent electrolyte. Also, a pseudo-solvent model is proposed as a means of obtaining a variety of averaged liquid phase electrolyte properties. To predict preferential solvation in mixed solvents, a general framework is developed that is based on predicted solvation numbers of each solvent. Preferential solvation will be shown to influence VLE. Results show that phase equilibria is accurately predicted by the above iterative method. Three mixed-solvent electrolyte systems are investigated: water -ethylene glycol-LiBr, ammonia-water-LiBr, and methanol -water-LiCl. Finally, the above electrolyte model is utilized in predicting design criteria for a single

  15. New design of electric double layer capacitors with aqueous LiOH electrolyte as alternative to capacitor with KOH solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepniak, Izabela; Ciszewski, Aleksander

    Activated carbon (AC) fiber cloths and a hydrophobic microporous polypropylene (PP) membrane, both modified with lithiated acetone oligomers, were used as electrodes and a separator in electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) with aqueous lithium hydroxide (LiOH) as the electrolyte. Electrochemical characteristics of EDLCs were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge cycle tests and impedance spectroscopy (EIS), compared with a case of the capacitor with aqueous potassium hydroxide (KOH) as an electrolyte. As a result, the capacitor with LiOH aqueous solution and a modified separator and electrodes was found to exhibit higher specific capacitance, maximum energy stored and maximum power than that with KOH aqueous solution.

  16. Sulfuric acid-methanol electrolytes as an alternative to sulfuric-hydrofluoric acid mixtures for electropolishing of niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Corcoran, Sean G.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2011-06-01

    Attainment of the greatest possible interior surface smoothness is critical to meeting the performance demands placed upon niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities by next generation projects. Electropolishing with HF-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolytes yields cavities that meet SRF performance goals, but a less-hazardous, more environmentally-friendly process is desirable. Reported studies of EP on chemically-similar tantalum describe the use of sulfuric acid-methanol electrolytes as an HF-free alternative. Reported here are the results of experiments on niobium samples with this electrolyte. Voltammetry experiments indicate a current plateau whose voltage range expands with increasing acid concentration and decreasing temperature. Impedance spectroscopy indicates that a compact salt film is responsible for the current plateau. Equivalent findings in electropolishing chemically-similar tantalum with this electrolyte were interpreted due to as mass transfer limitation by diffusion of Ta ions away from the anode surface. We infer that a similar mechanism is at work here. Conditions were found that yield leveling and brightening comparable to that obtained with HF-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mixtures.

  17. Electrolytic regeneration of acid cupric chloride printed circuit board etchant. Final report, August 1, 1995--October 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, J.E.; Smialek, R.J.

    1997-04-18

    The overall objective of this ERIP program was to make substantial progress in further developing a process for electrolytic regeneration of acid cupric chloride etchant - a process which was initially demonstrated in in-house studies and EPA Phase I and Phase II SBIRs. Specific objectives of the work were: (1) to define optimum system operating conditions by conducting a systematic study of process parameters, (2) to develop or find a superior electrolyic cell separator material, (3) to determine an optimum activation procedure for the flow-through carbon/graphite felt electrodes which are so critical to process performance, (4) to demonstrate - on the pre-prototype scale - electrolytic compensation for oxygen ingress - which causes etchant solution growth, and (5) to begin engineering design work on a prototype-scale regeneration unit. Parametric studies looked at the effect that key plating parameters have on copper deposit quality. Parameters tested included (a) velocity past the plating cathodes, (b) copper concentration in the catholyte solution from which the copper is being plated, (c) plating current density, and (d) catholyte cupric ion concentration. The most significant effects were obtained for velocity changes. The work showed that catholyte velocities above 0.5 ft/sec were needed to get adequate plating at 77.5 mA/cm{sup 2} and higher currents, and that even higher flow was better.

  18. Plasma osmotic and electrolyte concentrations of largemouth bass from some acidic Florida lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, D.E. Jr.; Maceina, M.J.; Nordlie, F.G.; Shireman, J.V.

    1985-05-01

    Five acidic clear (pH 3.7-4.9), three acidic colored (pH 4.1-4.6), and three neutral (pH 6.9-7.3) north-central Florida lakes were surveyed in 1983 to determine plasma osmotic and electrolyte concentrations, growth, and coefficients of condition for largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides floridanus. Plasma osmotic concentrations averaged greater than 273 milliosmoles/kg in fish from acidic colored and circumneutral lakes, but averaged less than 269 milliosmoles/kg in four of the acidic clear lakes. Growth and coefficients of condition of largemouth bass > 305 mm total length in the acidic lakes were significantly lower than in the neutral lakes. Reductions in fish growth and condition, however, could be related to either acidic conditions or lake trophic status. 29 references, 3 tables.

  19. Improvement of sensitivity of electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury using acetic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, R

    2012-05-15

    A method has been developed to improve the sensitivity of the electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury determination. Effects of various low molecular weight organic solvents at different volume percentages as well as at different acid molarities on the mercury signal were investigated using ELCAD-AES. The addition of few percent of organic solvent, acetic acid produced significant enhancement in mercury signal. Acetic acid of 5% (v/v) with the 0.2M acidity has been found to give 500% enhancement for mercury signal in flow injection mode. Under the optimized parameters the repeatability, expressed as the percentage relative standard deviation of spectral peak area for mercury with 5% acetic acid was found to be 10% for acid blank solution and 5% for 20 ng/mL mercury standard based on multiple measurements with a multiple sample loading in flow injection mode. Limit of detection of this method was determined to be 2 ng/mL for inorganic mercury. The proposed method has been validated by determining mercury in certified reference materials, Tuna fish (IAEA-350) and Aquatic plant (BCR-060). Accuracy of the method for the mercury determination in the reference materials has been found to be between 3.5% and 5.9%. This study enhances the utility of ELCAD-AES for various types of biological and environmental materials to quantify total mercury at very low levels.

  20. Adhesion between Silica Particle and Mica Surfaces in Water and Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski; Ishimura; Higashitani

    2000-07-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to study the adhesion between a silica sphere and a mica plate in pure water and solutions of monovalent cations (LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl). It is found that the adhesive force depends not only on the electrolyte concentration but also on the hydration enthalpy of cations and the contact time of the particle on the surface. Possible mechanisms by which the observed phenomena can be explained consistently are discussed extensively. It is suggested that the adhesive force is closely related to the structure of the layer of cations and water molecules adsorbed on the surfaces: the strong adhesive force is obtained when highly hydrated cations (Li(+), Na(+)) are adsorbed to form a thick but weakly adsorbed layer, while the weak adhesive force is observed when poorly hydrated cations (Cs(+), K(+)) are adsorbed to form a thin but strongly adsorbed layer. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. Atomically resolved three-dimensional structures of electrolyte aqueous solutions near a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Chacon, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-07-15

    Interfacial liquid layers play a central role in a variety of phenomena ranging from friction to molecular recognition. Liquids near a solid surface form an interfacial layer where the molecular structure is different from that of the bulk. Here we report atomic resolution three-dimensional images of electrolyte solutions near a mica surface that demonstrate the existence of three types of interfacial structures. At low concentrations (0.01-1 M), cations are adsorbed onto the mica. The cation layer is topped by a few hydration layers. At higher concentrations, the interfacial layer extends several nanometres into the liquid. It involves the alternation of cation and anion planes. Fluid Density Functional calculations show that water molecules are a critical factor for stabilizing the structure of the interfacial layer. The interfacial layer stabilizes a crystal-like structure compatible with liquid-like ion and solvent mobilities. At saturation, some ions precipitate and small crystals are formed on the mica.

  2. Atomically resolved three-dimensional structures of electrolyte aqueous solutions near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Chacon, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial liquid layers play a central role in a variety of phenomena ranging from friction to molecular recognition. Liquids near a solid surface form an interfacial layer where the molecular structure is different from that of the bulk. Here we report atomic resolution three-dimensional images of electrolyte solutions near a mica surface that demonstrate the existence of three types of interfacial structures. At low concentrations (0.01-1 M), cations are adsorbed onto the mica. The cation layer is topped by a few hydration layers. At higher concentrations, the interfacial layer extends several nanometres into the liquid. It involves the alternation of cation and anion planes. Fluid Density Functional calculations show that water molecules are a critical factor for stabilizing the structure of the interfacial layer. The interfacial layer stabilizes a crystal-like structure compatible with liquid-like ion and solvent mobilities. At saturation, some ions precipitate and small crystals are formed on the mica.

  3. [Electrolyte solution with polyethylene glycol to cleanse the colon for colonoscopy or enema].

    PubMed

    Valdovinos, M A; Male, R; Gil, S; Gallo, S; Tielve, M; Ferral, H

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of an electrolyte-polyethylene glycol solution (SE-PEG) for colonic lavage, was compared with standard bowel preparation (SBP) in a randomized blinded study of volunteers and patients undergoing colonoscopy and barium enema examination. Side effects, biochemical and hematologic changes and quality of examinations were monitored. Colonoscopy and barium enema was scored by colonic segment for type of residual stool and percentage of bowel wall visualized. For colonoscopy and barium enema, preparation with SE-PEG allowed better visualization and produced more optimal exams (8 vs 3; p less than 0.03) and (6 vs 4; p = NS) respectively. We conclude that colonic lavage with SE-PEG is an alternative bowel preparation method and is cheaper, more safe and effective than SBP procedure.

  4. Electrolytic dissolver

    DOEpatents

    Wheelwright, E.J.; Fox, R.D.

    1975-08-26

    This patent related to an electrolytic dissolver wherein dissolution occurs by solution contact including a vessel of electrically insulative material, a fixed first electrode, a movable second electrode, means for insulating the electrodes from the material to be dissolved while permitting a free flow of electrolyte therebetween, means for passing a direct current between the electrodes and means for circulating electrolyte through the dissolver. (auth)

  5. NMR spectroscopy of some electrolyte solutions to 1.9 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Gerardo; Colla, Christopher A.; Klavins, Peter; Augustine, Matthew P.; Casey, William H.

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of CsCl and LaCl3 in D2O/H2O solutions were collected up to pressures of 1.9 GPa using a new NMR probe design that considerably extends the pressure range available for geochemical experiments. The longitudinal-relaxation times (T1) for 2H compare well with those reported in the previous studies of Lee et al. (1974), who examined lower pressures, and indicate that the probe functions properly. In some experiments, 133Cs and 1H NMR spectra could be taken on solutions to pressures well beyond the nominal freezing pressure of D2O or H2O to form Ice VI (near 0.9 GPa). Freezing to form the high-pressure ice is kinetically slow on an experimental time scale (minutes to hours). The data indicate that the electrolyte concentrations increase the freezing pressure of the solution. This result means that solution NMR spectra can be collected at pressures that are nearly twice the nominal freezing pressure of pure D2O or H2O. Pulsed-magnetic-field-gradient NMR methods are used to independently measure the self-diffusion coefficient of H2O in these solutions, which yields estimates of solution viscosity via the Stokes-Einstein relation. The increased viscosity accounts for the pressure variation of T1 values as rates of molecular tumbling are affected. Accounting for such changes is essential if NMR spectral line widths are used to infer pressure-enhanced rates of geochemical reactions, such as interconversion of aqueous complexes.

  6. Nonequilibrium 2-Hydroxyoctadecanoic Acid Monolayers: Effect of Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lendrum, Conrad D.; Ingham, Bridget; Lin, Binhua; Meron, Mati; Toney, Michael F.; McGrath, Kathryn M.

    2012-02-06

    2-Hydroxyacids display complex monolayer phase behavior due to the additional hydrogen bonding afforded by the presence of the second hydroxy group. The placement of this group at the position {alpha} to the carboxylic acid functionality also introduces the possibility of chelation, a utility important in crystallization including biomineralization. Biomineralization, like many biological processes, is inherently a nonequilibrium process. The nonequilibrium monolayer phase behavior of 2-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid was investigated on each of pure water, calcium chloride, sodium bicarbonate and calcium carbonate crystallizing subphases as a precursor study to a model calcium carbonate biomineralizing system, each at a pH of {approx}6. The role of the bicarbonate co-ion in manipulating the monolayer structure was determined by comparison with monolayer phase behavior on a sodium chloride subphase. Monolayer phase behavior was probed using surface pressure/area isotherms, surface potential, Brewster angle microscopy, and synchrotron-based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity. Complex phase behavior was observed for all but the sodium chloride subphase with hydrogen bonding, electrostatic and steric effects defining the symmetry of the monolayer. On a pure water subphase hydrogen bonding dominates with three phases coexisting at low pressures. Introduction of calcium ions into the aqueous subphase ensures strong cation binding to the surfactant head groups through chelation. The monolayer becomes very unstable in the presence of bicarbonate ions within the subphase due to short-range hydrogen bonding interactions between the monolayer and bicarbonate ions facilitated by the sodium cation enhancing surfactant solubility. The combined effects of electrostatics and hydrogen bonding are observed on the calcium carbonate crystallizing subphase.

  7. A statistical associating fluid theory for electrolyte solutions (SAFT-VRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Villegas, A.; Galindo, A.; Jackson, G.

    A general theory for electrolyte solutions is examined within the framework of the statistical associating fluid theory for potentials of variable range (SAFT-VR). A first extension of the theory (SAFT-VRE) has already been used to describe the thermodynamics and phase equilibria of aqueous solutions of alkali-halide salts [GALINDO,A.,GIL-VILLEGAS,A.,JACKSON, G. and BURGESS, A. N., 1999, J. phys. Chem. , 103, 10272]. The approach incorporates separate contributions describing the monomer, associating and ionic interactions. In the spirit of the SAFT-VR approach the monomer contribution is written as a high-temperature perturbation expansion up to second order; the separate effects of solvent-solvent, solvent-ion and ion-ion interactions on the phase equilibria are studied. Water is taken to be the solvent throughout the study, with the same four-site model and parameters as in the previous work. The association contribution is essential to account for the hydrogen bonding interactions present in water. The effects of ion pairing and solvent-ion association are also examined. For the ionic contribution several levels of approximation are discussed. The effect of the different molecular parameters on the phase behaviour of a model aqueous solution is examined for the different choices.

  8. Microbial fuel cells: the effects of configurations, electrolyte solutions, and electrode materials on power generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengxiang; Sharma, Yogesh; Lei, Yu; Li, Baikun; Zhou, Qixing

    2010-01-01

    This objective of this study is to conduct a systematic investigation of the effects of configurations, electrolyte solutions, and electrode materials on the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFC). A comparison of voltage generation, power density, and acclimation period of electrogenic bacteria was performed for a variety of MFCs. In terms of MFC configuration, membrane-less two-chamber MFCs (ML-2CMFC) had lower internal resistance, shorter acclimation period, and higher voltage generation than the conventional two-chamber MFCs (2CMFC). In terms of anode solutions (as electron donors), the two-chamber MFCs fed with anaerobic treated wastewater (AF-2CMFCs) had the power density 19 times as the two-chamber MFCs fed with acetate (NO(3)(-)2CMFCs). In terms of cathode solutions (as electron acceptors), AF-2CMFCs with ferricyanide had higher voltage generation than that of ML-2CMFCs with nitrate (NO(3)(-)ML-2CMFCs). In terms of electrode materials, ML-2CMFCs with granular-activated carbon as the electrode (GAC-ML-2CMFCs) had a power density 2.5 times as ML-2CMFCs with carbon cloth as the electrode. GAC-ML-2CMFCs had the highest columbic efficiency and power output among all the MFCs tested, indicating that the high surface area of GAC facilitate the biofilm formation, accelerate the degradation of organic substrates, and improve power generation.

  9. Balancing Osmotic Pressure of Electrolytes for Nanoporous Membrane Vanadium Redox Flow Battery with a Draw Solute.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ligen; Li, Dan; Li, Shuaiqiang; Xu, Zhi; Dong, Junhang; Jing, Wenheng; Xing, Weihong

    2016-12-28

    Vanadium redox flow batteries with nanoporous membranes (VRFBNM) have been demonstrated to be good energy storage devices. Yet the capacity decay due to permeation of vanadium and water makes their commercialization very difficult. Inspired by the forward osmosis (FO) mechanism, the VRFBNM battery capacity decrease was alleviated by adding a soluble draw solute (e.g., 2-methylimidazole) into the catholyte, which can counterbalance the osmotic pressure between the positive and negative half-cell. No change of the electrolyte volume has been observed after VRFBNM being operated for 55 h, revealing that the permeation of water and vanadium ions was effectively limited. Consequently, the Coulombic efficiency (CE) of nanoporous TiO2 vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) was enhanced from 93.5% to 95.3%, meanwhile, its capacity decay was significantly suppressed from 60.7% to 27.5% upon the addition of soluble draw solute. Moreover, the energy capacity of the VRFBNM was noticeably improved from 297.0 to 406.4 mAh remarkably. These results indicate balancing the osmotic pressure via the addition of draw solute can restrict pressure-dependent vanadium permeation and it can be established as a promising method for up-scaling VRFBNM application.

  10. Intravenous infusion of electrolyte solution changes pharmacokinetics of drugs: pharmacokinetics of ampicillin.

    PubMed

    Britzi, M; Mazon, Y; Lavy, E; Soback, S

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ampicillin in dogs was determined after intravenous (i.v.) bolus and constant rate infusion. Ampicillin was administered to six beagle dogs as an i.v. bolus at 20 mg/kg and as a constant rate i.v. infusion (CRI) at 20 mg/kg during 8 h (0.042 mL/min/kg) in Ringer's lactate (Hartmann's) solution. The concentrations were determined by an LC/MS/MS method. After i.v. bolus, ampicillin total body clearance, apparent volume of distribution at steady-state, mean residence time (MRT), and half-life were 4.53 ± 0.70 mL/min/kg, 0.275 ± 0.044 L/kg, 61 ± 13 min, and 111 (85-169) min, respectively. The corresponding parameters calculated after CRI were 13.5 ± 1.06 mL/min/kg, 0.993 ± 0.415 L/kg, 73 ± 27 min, and 49 (31-69) min. Ampicillin concentration decreased by 30% in the Ringer's lactate infusion solution mostly during the first hour after preparation of the solution. Constant rate infusion of Ringer's lactate solution during 8 h caused significant changes in ampicillin pharmacokinetics. The results suggested that special attention should be given to drug pharmacokinetics when co-administered intravenously with electrolyte solutions.

  11. Combinatorial search for improved metal oxide oxygen evolution electrocatalysts in acidic electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Seley, David; Ayers, Katherine; Parkinson, B A

    2013-02-11

    A library of electrocatalysts for water electrolysis under acidic conditions was created by ink jet printing metal oxide precursors followed by pyrolysis in air to produce mixed metal oxides. The compositions were then screened in acidic electrolytes using a pH sensitive fluorescence indicator that became fluorescent due to the pH change at the electrode surface because of the release of protons from water oxidation. The most promising materials were further characterized by measuring polarization curves and Tafel slopes as anodes for water oxidation. Mixed metal oxides that perform better than the iridium oxide standard were identified.

  12. Dynamic contact angles on PTFE surface by aqueous surfactant solution in the absence and presence of electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rajib Ghosh; Paria, Santanu

    2009-09-15

    This study presents the experimental results on dynamic contact angles of pure surfactants and surfactants with electrolyte solutions on PTFE (Teflon) surface. Dynamic advancing (theta(A)) and receding (theta(R)) contact angles measurements by the Wilhelmy plate technique were carried out for aqueous solution of three different surfactants Triton X-100 (TX-100), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The same measurements in the presence of different electrolytes NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), and CaCl(2) for ionic surfactants (SDBS and CTAB) were also carried out to see the change in contact angle and wetting behavior. The presence of electrolytes changes the advancing contact angle as well as wetting properties of hydrophobic solid surface significantly even at very low surfactant concentration. Counter ion valency of the electrolyte is more important in reducing advancing contact angle on hydrophobic PTFE surface at very low concentration of ionic surfactants from CMC. Pure surfactants and ionic surfactants in the presence of electrolytes show a linear relationship between the adhesional tension and surface tension at air-water interface with different slope and intercept.

  13. Electrical conductivity of acidic chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroshi; Peters, Ernest; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Park, Sung Kook; Aoki, Masami

    1988-02-01

    The electrical conductivities of aqueous solutions in the system HCl-MCln (where M = K, Na, Mg, Ni, or Cd) were measured at different temperatures. The equivalent electrical conductivity of H+ was calculated on the basis of simple assumptions for these solutions, and show an inverse relationship with water activity in these solutions. The results obtained by varying temperatures, solute ratios, and ionic strength on the electrical conductivity were found to be consistent with a proton jump mechanism for the H+ ion, where the activity of water is the most significant parameter affecting its equivalent conductance, and a viscous (Stokes’ law) drag mechanism (i.e., Walden’s rule is obeyed) for other ions found in acidic solutions.

  14. Capillary zone electrophoresis in non-aqueous solutions: pH of the background electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Porras, Simo P; Kenndler, Ernst

    2004-05-28

    Although the establishment of a pH scale and the determination of the pH in water is not problematic, it is not a straightforward task in non-aqueous solvents. As capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) in organic solvents has gained increasing interest, it seems to be valuable to re-discuss the concept of the pH in such media, especially pointing to those aspects, which make pH measurement uncertain in non-aqueous solvents. In this review, the relevant aspects when dealing with primary standard (PS) and secondary standard (SS) as recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), and the usage of the operational pH are discussed with special emphasis to non-aqueous solvents. Here, different liquid junction potentials, incomplete dissociation of the electrolytes (especially in solvents with low or moderate relative permittivity) and the occurrence of homo- and heteroconjugation must be taken into account. Problems arising in capillary zone electrophoresis practice are addressed, e.g. when the background electrolyte (BGE) consists of organic solvents, but the measuring electrode (normally the glass electrode) is calibrated with aqueous buffers, and the liquid junction potentials between the solvents do not cancel each other. The alternative concept of establishing a certain pH is described, using mixtures of reference acids or bases with known pKa in the organic solvent, and their respective salts, at a certain concentration ratio, relying to the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Special discussion is directed to those organic solvents most common in capillary zone electrophoresis, methanol (MeOH) and acetonitrile (ACN), but other solvents are included as well. The potential significance of small amounts of water present in the organic solvent on changes in pKa values, and thus on the pH of the buffering components is pointed out.

  15. Novel Proton Conducting Solid Bio-polymer Electrolytes Based on Carboxymethyl Cellulose Doped with Oleic Acid and Plasticized with Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Chai, M. N.; Isa, M. I. N.

    2016-01-01

    The plasticized solid bio-polymer electrolytes (SBEs) system has been formed by introducing glycerol (Gly) as the plasticizer into the carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) doped with oleic acid (OA) via solution casting techniques. The ionic conductivity of the plasticized SBEs has been studied using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy. The highest conductivity achieved is 1.64 × 10−4 S cm−1 for system containing 40 wt. % of glycerol. FTIR deconvolution technique had shown that the conductivity of CMC-OA-Gly SBEs is primarily influenced by the number density of mobile ions. Transference number measurement has shown that the cation diffusion coefficient and ionic mobility is higher than anion which proved the plasticized polymer system is a proton conductor. PMID:27265642

  16. Novel Proton Conducting Solid Bio-polymer Electrolytes Based on Carboxymethyl Cellulose Doped with Oleic Acid and Plasticized with Glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, M. N.; Isa, M. I. N.

    2016-06-01

    The plasticized solid bio-polymer electrolytes (SBEs) system has been formed by introducing glycerol (Gly) as the plasticizer into the carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) doped with oleic acid (OA) via solution casting techniques. The ionic conductivity of the plasticized SBEs has been studied using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy. The highest conductivity achieved is 1.64 × 10‑4 S cm‑1 for system containing 40 wt. % of glycerol. FTIR deconvolution technique had shown that the conductivity of CMC-OA-Gly SBEs is primarily influenced by the number density of mobile ions. Transference number measurement has shown that the cation diffusion coefficient and ionic mobility is higher than anion which proved the plasticized polymer system is a proton conductor.

  17. Corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.M.; Gupta, A.

    2000-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of mild steel in acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH) solutions was studied by weight loss and potentiostatic polarization techniques. The variation in corrosion rate of mild steel with concentrations of CH{sub 3}COOH, evaluated by weight loss and electrochemical techniques, showed marked resemblance. From both techniques, the maximum corrosion rate was observed for 20% CH{sub 3}COOH solution at all three experimental temperatures (25, 35, and 45 C). Anodic polarization curves showed active-passive behavior at each concentration, except at 80% CH{sub 3}COOH. Critical current density (i{sub c}) passive current density (I{sub n}), primary passivation potential (E{sub pp}), and potential for passivity (E{sub p}) had their highest values in 20% CH{sub 3}COOH solution. With an increase in temperature, while the anodic polarization curves shifted toward higher current density region at each concentration, the passive region became progressively less distinguishable. With the addition of sodium acetate (NaCOOCH{sub 3}) as a supporting electrolyte, the passive range was enlarged substantially. However, the transpassive region commenced at more or less the same potential. Cathodic polarization curves were almost identical irrespective of the concentration of CH{sub 3}COOH or temperature.

  18. Equilibrium, Kinetics, and Spectroscopic Studies of SF6 Hydrate in NaCl Electrolyte Solution.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngrok; Moon, Donghyun; Lee, Changho; Park, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Gang-Woo; Dotel, Pratik; Lee, Jong-Won; Cha, Minjun; Yoon, Ji-Ho

    2015-05-19

    Many studies have focused on desalination via hydrate formation; however, for their potential application, knowledge pertaining to thermodynamic stability, formation kinetics, and guest occupation behavior in clathrate hydrates needs to be determined. Herein, the phase equilibria of SF6 hydrates in the presence of NaCl solutions (0, 2, 4, and 10 wt %) were monitored in the temperature range of 277-286 K and under pressures of up to 1.4 MPa. The formation kinetics of SF6 hydrates in the presence of NaCl solutions (0, 2, and 4 wt %) was also investigated. Gas consumption curves of SF6 hydrates showed that a pure SF6 hydrate system allowed fast hydrate growth as well as high conversion yield, whereas SF6 hydrate in the presence of NaCl solutions showed retarded hydrate growth rate as well as low conversion yield. In addition, structural identification of SF6 hydrates with and without NaCl solutions was performed using spectroscopic tools such as Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Raman spectrometer was also used to evaluate the temperature-dependent release behavior of guest molecules in SF6 and SF6 + 4 wt % NaCl hydrates. The results indicate that whereas SF6 hydrate starts to decompose at around 240 K, the escape of SF6 molecules in SF6 + 4 wt % NaCl hydrate is initiated rapidly at around 205 K. The results of this study can provide a better understanding of guest-host interaction in electrolyte-containing systems.

  19. Electrolyte pore/solution partitioning by expanded grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moucka, Filip; Bratko, Dusan; Luzar, Alenka

    2015-03-01

    Using a newly developed grand canonical Monte Carlo approach based on fractional exchanges of dissolved ions and water molecules, we studied equilibrium partitioning of both components between laterally extended apolar confinements and surrounding electrolyte solution. Accurate calculations of the Hamiltonian and tensorial pressure components at anisotropic conditions in the pore required the development of a novel algorithm for a self-consistent correction of nonelectrostatic cut-off effects. At pore widths above the kinetic threshold to capillary evaporation, the molality of the salt inside the confinement grows in parallel with that of the bulk phase, but presents a nonuniform width-dependence, being depleted at some and elevated at other separations. The presence of the salt enhances the layered structure in the slit and lengthens the range of inter-wall pressure exerted by the metastable liquid. Solvation pressure becomes increasingly repulsive with growing salt molality in the surrounding bath. Depending on the sign of the excess molality in the pore, the wetting free energy of pore walls is either increased or decreased by the presence of the salt. Because of simultaneous rise in the solution surface tension, which increases the free-energy cost of vapor nucleation, the rise in the apparent hydrophobicity of the walls has not been shown to enhance the volatility of the metastable liquid in the pores.

  20. Electrolyte pore/solution partitioning by expanded grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Moucka, Filip; Bratko, Dusan Luzar, Alenka

    2015-03-28

    Using a newly developed grand canonical Monte Carlo approach based on fractional exchanges of dissolved ions and water molecules, we studied equilibrium partitioning of both components between laterally extended apolar confinements and surrounding electrolyte solution. Accurate calculations of the Hamiltonian and tensorial pressure components at anisotropic conditions in the pore required the development of a novel algorithm for a self-consistent correction of nonelectrostatic cut-off effects. At pore widths above the kinetic threshold to capillary evaporation, the molality of the salt inside the confinement grows in parallel with that of the bulk phase, but presents a nonuniform width-dependence, being depleted at some and elevated at other separations. The presence of the salt enhances the layered structure in the slit and lengthens the range of inter-wall pressure exerted by the metastable liquid. Solvation pressure becomes increasingly repulsive with growing salt molality in the surrounding bath. Depending on the sign of the excess molality in the pore, the wetting free energy of pore walls is either increased or decreased by the presence of the salt. Because of simultaneous rise in the solution surface tension, which increases the free-energy cost of vapor nucleation, the rise in the apparent hydrophobicity of the walls has not been shown to enhance the volatility of the metastable liquid in the pores.

  1. Phosphoric acid impurities in phosphoric acid fuel cell electrolytes. 2: Effects on the oxygen reduction reaction at platinum electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sugishima, Noboru; Hinatsu, J.T.; Foulkes, F.R. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry)

    1994-12-01

    The effects of phosphorus acid additions on the oxygen reduction reaction at platinum electrodes in concentrated phosphoric acid were studied. The oxygen reduction currents decreased, and the Tafel slopes became more negative upon the addition of small concentrations of phosphorus acid. In addition,the phosphorus acid oxidation current tended to complete with the oxygen reduction current. These effects became more pronounced at higher phosphorus acid concentrations and at higher temperatures. Upon the addition of phosphorus acid the number of electrons involved in the oxygen reduction reaction decreased from a value close to four to a value approaching two, suggesting promotion of a two-electron reduction to peroxide. Therefore, in studies of the electrochemical reduction of oxygen in hot concentrated phosphoric acid or in fuel cell systems using hot concentrated phosphoric acid as electrolyte, it is recommended that precautions be taken against the inadvertent formation of the phosphorus acid. The removal of phosphorus acid from concentrated phosphoric acid by repeated potential cycling at 100 mV/s between + 0.5 and +1.50 V (vs. dynamic hydrogen electrode) was demonstrated.

  2. Studies on electrolyte formulations to improve life of lead acid batteries working under partial state of charge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, J. C.; Soria, M. L.; González, M.; García-Quismondo, E.; Muñoz, A.; Trinidad, F.

    For decades, valve regulated lead acid batteries with gel electrolyte have proved their excellent performance in deep cycling applications. However, their higher cost, when compared with flooded batteries, has limited their use in cost sensitive applications, such as automotive or PV installations. The use of flooded batteries in deep or partial state of charge working conditions leads to limited life due to premature capacity loss provoked by electrolyte stratification. Different electrolyte formulations have been tested, in order to achieve the best compromise between cost and life performance. Work carried out included electrochemical studies in order to determine the electrolyte stability and diffusional properties, and kinetic studies to check the processability of the electrolyte formulation. Finally, several 12 V batteries have been assembled and tested according to different ageing profiles.

  3. Probing the degradation mechanisms in electrolyte solutions for Li-ion batteries by in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abellan, Patricia; Mehdi, B Layla; Parent, Lucas R; Gu, Meng; Park, Chiwoo; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Yaohui; Arslan, Ilke; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chong-Min; Evans, James E; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-03-12

    Development of novel electrolytes with increased electrochemical stability is critical for the next generation battery technologies. In situ electrochemical fluid cells provide the ability to rapidly and directly characterize electrode/electrolyte interfacial reactions under conditions directly relevant to the operation of practical batteries. In this paper, we have studied the breakdown of a range of inorganic/salt complexes relevant to state-of-the-art Li-ion battery systems by in situ (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). In these experiments, the electron beam itself caused the localized electrochemical reaction that allowed us to observe electrolyte breakdown in real-time. The results of the in situ (S)TEM experiments matches with previous stability tests performed during battery operation and the breakdown products and mechanisms are also consistent with known mechanisms. This analysis indicates that in situ liquid stage (S)TEM observations could be used to directly test new electrolyte designs and identify a smaller library of candidate solutions deserving of more detailed characterization. A systematic study of electrolyte degradation is also a necessary first step for any future controlled in operando liquid (S)TEM experiments intent on visualizing working batteries at the nanoscale.

  4. Nanocomposite polymer electrolyte based on Poly(ethylene oxide) and solid super acid for lithium polymer battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Jingyu; Tang, Xiaozhen

    2004-07-01

    This Letter reports a novel PEO-based nanocomposite polymer electrolyte by using solid super acid SO 42-/ZrO 2 as filler. XRD, DSC, and FT-IR results prove the strong Lewis acid-base interactions between SO 42-/ZrO 2 and PEO chains. The addition of SO 42-/ZrO 2 can enhance the ionic conductivity and the lithium ion transference number of the electrolyte. The highest room temperature ionic conductivity of 2.1 × 10 -5 S cm -1 is obtained for the sample PEO 12-LiClO 4-7%SO 42-/ZrO 2. The excellent performances such as good compatibility with lithium electrode, and broad electrochemical stability window suggest that PEO-LiClO 4-SO 42-/ZrO 2 nanocomposite electrolyte can be used as electrolyte materials for lithium polymer batteries.

  5. Speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Hlushak, S; Simonin, J P; De Sio, S; Bernard, O; Ruas, A; Pochon, P; Jan, S; Moisy, P

    2013-02-28

    In this study, speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid at 25 °C was assessed in two independent ways. First, Raman experiments were carried out and interpreted in terms of free nitrate ions, ion pairs and neutral HNO(3) molecules. In parallel, a model was developed to account for the formation of these two kinds of pairs. It was based on an extension of the binding mean spherical approximation (BiMSA), or associative MSA (AMSA), in which the size and the charge of the ions in the chemical pair may differ from those of the free ions. A simultaneous fit of the osmotic coefficient and of the proportion of free ions (obtained from Raman spectroscopy experiments) led to an estimation of the speciation in nitric acid solutions. The result obtained using this procedure was compared with the estimation obtained from the Raman experiments.

  6. A hybrid Li-air battery with buckypaper air cathode and sulfuric acid electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Li, YF; Huang, K; Xing, YC

    2012-10-30

    We demonstrate a type of carbon nanotube based buckypaper cathode in a hybrid electrolyte Li-air battery (HyLAB) that showed outstanding discharging performances. The HyLAB has sulfuric acid as the catholyte and a large active electrode area (10 cm(2)). The active cathode layer was made from a buckypaper with 5 wt.% Pt supported on carbon nanotubes (Pt/CNTs) for oxygen reduction and evolution. A similar cathode was constructed with a catalyst of 5 wt.% Pt supported on carbon black (Pt/CB). It is demonstrated that sulfuric acid can achieve high discharging current densities while maintaining relatively high cell potentials. The cell with Pt/CNTs showed a much better performance than with Pt/CB at high current densities. The HyLAB with Pt/CNTs achieved a discharging capacity of 306 mAh/g and a cell voltage of 3.15 V at 0.2 mA/cm(2). The corresponding specific energy is 1067 Wh/kg based on the total weight of the sulfuric acid. Slow decrease in performance was observed, but it can be recovered by refilling the cell with new electrolyte after continuous discharging of more than 75 h. A charge-discharge experiment at 0.2 mA/cm(2) showed that the cell was rechargeable with a capacity of more than 300 mAh/g. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Atomically resolved three-dimensional structures of electrolyte aqueous solutions near a solid surface

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Chacon, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial liquid layers play a central role in a variety of phenomena ranging from friction to molecular recognition. Liquids near a solid surface form an interfacial layer where the molecular structure is different from that of the bulk. Here we report atomic resolution three-dimensional images of electrolyte solutions near a mica surface that demonstrate the existence of three types of interfacial structures. At low concentrations (0.01–1 M), cations are adsorbed onto the mica. The cation layer is topped by a few hydration layers. At higher concentrations, the interfacial layer extends several nanometres into the liquid. It involves the alternation of cation and anion planes. Fluid Density Functional calculations show that water molecules are a critical factor for stabilizing the structure of the interfacial layer. The interfacial layer stabilizes a crystal-like structure compatible with liquid-like ion and solvent mobilities. At saturation, some ions precipitate and small crystals are formed on the mica. PMID:27416784

  8. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  9. Wet oxidation of salicylic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2010-11-15

    Salicylic acid is a frequent pollutant in several industrial wastewaters. Uncatalyzed wet air oxidation, which is a promising technique for the treatment of phenolic effluents, has not been analyzed yet for the removal of salicylic acid. The effect of different conditions of pH (1.3-12.3), pressure (1.0-4.1 MPa), temperature (413-443 K), and initial concentrations (1.45-14.50 mM) on the wet oxidation of salicylate/salicylic acid solutions have here been investigated. The pH value of the reaction media was found to be a key parameter for the rate of the oxidation process with an optimum at pH 3.1, when the concentrations of salicylic acid and salicylate were similar. The oxidation reaction followed pseudofirst-order kinetics with respect to salicylic acid and 0.82 order with respect to dissolved oxygen. Additionally, the evolution of the color during the wet oxidation was analyzed and discussed in relation with the formation of intermediate compounds. Then, a reaction pathway for the noncatalytic wet oxidation of the salicylic acid was proposed.

  10. Investigation of the salting out of methane from aqueous electrolyte solutions using computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Docherty, H; Galindo, A; Sanz, E; Vega, C

    2007-08-02

    We calculate the excess chemical potential of methane in aqueous electrolyte solutions of NaCl using Monte Carlo computer simulations. In a recent work [Docherty et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 125, 074510], we presented a new potential model for methane in water which is capable of describing accurately the excess chemical potential of methane in pure water over a range of temperatures, a quantity that can be related to the solubility and which is commonly used to study the hydrophobic effect. Here, we use the same potential model for the water-methane interactions and investigate the effect of added salt on the chemical potential of methane in the solution. The methane molecules are modeled as single Lennard-Jones (LJ) interaction sites, and the water molecules are modeled with the TIP4P/2005 model. A correcting factor of chi = 1.07 for the energetic Berthelot (geometric) combining rule of the methane-water interaction is also used, which mimics the polarization of methane in water. We consider NaCl as the salt and treat the ions with the Smith and Dang model (i.e., as charged LJ interaction sites). Ion-water, ion-ion, and ion-methane interactions are treated using Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules. In addition, the Coulombic potential is used to model charge-charge interactions which are calculated using the Ewald sum. We have carried out isobaric-isothermal (NpT) simulations to determine the equilibrium densities of the solutions. The simulation data is in excellent agreement with experimental densities of aqueous NaCl solutions of different concentration. Hydration numbers are also obtained and found to be in agreement with reported data. Canonical (NVT) simulations at the averaged densities are then performed using the Widom test-particle insertion method to obtain the excess chemical potential of methane in the saline solutions. An increase in the chemical potential of methane, corresponding to a salting out effect, is observed when salt is added to the solution

  11. Structural and transport properties of Nafion in hydrobromic-acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kusoglu, A; Cho, KT; Prato, RA; Weber, AZ

    2013-12-01

    Proton-exchange membranes are key solid-state ion carriers in many relevant energy technologies including flow batteries, fuel cells, and solar-fuel generators. In many of these systems, the membranes are in contact with electrolyte solutions. In this paper, we focus on the impact of different HBr, a flow-battery and exemplary acid electrolyte, external concentrations on the conductivity of Nafion, a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane that is commonly used in many energy-related applications. The peak and then decrease in conductivity is correlated with measured changes in the water and HBr content within the membrane. In addition, small-angle x-ray scattering is used to probe the nanostructure to correlate how the interactions of the bromide ion with the fixed sulfonic-acid sites impact conductivity and hydrophilic domain distance. It is also shown that membrane pretreatment has a large impact on the underlying structure/function relationship. The obtained data and results are useful for delineation of optimal operating regimes for flow batteries and similar technologies as well as in understanding underlying structure/function relationships of ionomers in electrolyte solutions. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Small volume isosmotic polyethylene glycol electrolyte balanced solution (PMF-100) in treatment of chronic nonorganic constipation.

    PubMed

    Corazziari, E; Badiali, D; Habib, F I; Reboa, G; Pitto, G; Mazzacca, G; Sabbatini, F; Galeazzi, R; Cilluffo, T; Vantini, I; Bardelli, E; Baldi, F

    1996-08-01

    The present multicenter double-blind placebo-controlled trial evaluates the therapeutic effectiveness of small-volume daily doses of an isosmotic polyethylene glycol (PEG) electrolyte solution in the treatment of chronic nonorganic constipation. After a complete diagnostic investigation, patients still constipated at the end of a four-week placebo-treatment run-in period were enrolled and randomized to receive either placebo or PEG solution 250 ml twice a day for the following eight weeks. Patients were assessed at four and eight weeks of treatment, and they reported frequency and modality of evacuation, use of laxatives, and relevant symptoms daily on a diary card. Oroanal and segmental large-bowel transit times were assessed with radiopaque markers during the fourth week of the run-in period and the last week of the treatment period. During the study period, dietary fiber and liquids were standardized and laxatives were allowed only after five consecutive days without a bowel movement. Of the 55 patients enrolled, five dropped out, three because of adverse events and two for reasons unrelated to therapy; another two were excluded from the efficacy analysis because of protocol violation. Of the remaining 48 patients (37 women, age 42 +/- 15 years, mean +/- SD), 23 were assigned to placebo and 25 to PEG treatment. In comparison to placebo, PEG solution induced a statistically significant increase in weekly bowel frequency at four weeks and at the end of the study (PEG: 4.8 +/- 2.3 vs placebo: 2.8 +/- 1.6; P < 0.002) and a significant decrease in straining at defecation (P < 0.01), stool consistency (P < 0.02), and use of laxatives (P < 0.03). Oroanal, left colon, and rectal transit times were significantly shortened by PEG treatment. There was no difference between controls and PEG-treated patients as far as abdominal symptoms and side effects were concerned. In conclusion, PEG solution at 250 ml twice a day is effective in increasing bowel frequency, accelerating

  13. Lysozyme net charge and ion binding in concentrated aqueous electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehner, Daniel E.; Engmann, Jan; Fergg, Florian; Wernick, Meredith; Blanch, Harvey W.; Prausnitz, John M.

    1999-02-01

    Hydrogen-ion titrations were conducted for hen-egg-white lysozyme in solutions of potassium chloride over the range pH 2.5--11.5 and for ionic strengths to 2.0 M. The dependence of lysozyme`s net proton charge, z{sub p}, on pH and ionic strength in potassium chloride solution is measured. From the ionic-strength dependence of z{sub p}, interactions of lysozyme with potassium and chloride ions are calculated using the molecular-thermodynamic theory of Fraaije and Lyklema. Lysozyme interacts preferentially with up to 12 chloride ions at pH 2.5. The observed dependence of ion-protein interactions on pH and ionic strength is explained in terms of electric-double-layer theory. New experimental pK{sub a} data are reported for 11 amino acids in potassium chloride solutions of ionic strength to 3.0 M.

  14. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  15. Table 3.1. Electrode potentials of zero charge of metal electrodes in contact with electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holze, R.

    This document is part of Volume 9 `Electrochemistry', Subvolume A, of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. This document lists potentials of the following metal electrodes in contact with different electrolyte solutions, where no charge transfer takes place: silver (Ag), aluminium (Al), arsenic (As), gold (Au), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), bismuth (Bi), carbon (C), calcium (Ca), cadmium (Cd), cerium (Ce), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), cesium (Cs), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), gallium (Ga), germanium (Ge), mercury (Hg), indium (In), iridium (Ir), potassium (K), lithium (Li), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), natrium (Na), niobium (Nb), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), rubidium (Rb), rhodium (Rh), antimony (Sb), silicon (Si), tin (Sn), strontium (Sr), tantalum (Ta), tellurium (Te), Titanium (Ti), thallium (Tl), tungsten (W), zinc (Zn). The electrolyte solutions are specified, and the methods of determination of the potentials are given.

  16. American Society of Nephrology quiz and questionnaire 2014: acid-base and electrolyte disorders.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell H; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2015-03-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, in 2014 the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases from each of these categories along with single-best-answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions using an Internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the acid-base and electrolyte disorders portion of the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  17. Failure mechanism of layered lithium-rich oxide/graphite cell and its solution by using electrolyte additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunmin; Luo, Xueyi; Xu, Mengqing; Zhang, Liping; Yu, Le; Fan, Weizhen; Li, Weishan

    2016-06-01

    We report a failure mechanism of layered lithium-rich oxide/graphite cell and a solution to this failure. Charge/discharge tests demonstrate that Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2/graphite full cell fails when it is performed with cycling and this issue can be solved effectively by using an electrolyte additive, tris (trimethylsilyl) phosphite (TMSPi). Further cycling tests on Li/Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 and Li/graphite half-cells and physical characterizations on the cycled cathode indicate that this failure involves the increased HF concentration and the subsequent corrosion for aluminum current collector of cathode due to the electrolyte decomposition during cycling. TMSPi contributes to the formation of a protective interphase on cathode due to its preferential oxidation compared with the base electrolyte, which suppresses the electrolyte decomposition and the HF formation, preventing aluminum current collector from corrosion.

  18. The effect of solution electrolytes on the uptake of photosensitizers by liposomal membranes: a salting-out effect.

    PubMed

    Minnes, Refael; Ytzhak, Shany; Weitman, Hana; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2008-09-01

    In this study we investigated, spectroscopically, the effect of electrolytes on the partitioning of hematoporphyrin IX (HP) and hypericin (Hy) into non-charged lipid vesicles. Our aim was to assess the salting-out effect of electrolytes on membrane-partitioning. We titrated aqueous solutions of HP and Hy with lecithin liposomes, at different concentrations of several monovalent and divalent electrolytes in the suspension. The partitioning constant of HP to lecithin liposomes increased from 3.3 (mL/mg) in water containing only 5mM buffer to 8.7 (mL/mg) at 0.36M KCl. KF had a similar effect. NaCl caused a 3-fold increase in the partitioning of Hy to liposomes. MgSO(4) and MgCl(2) also increased the partitioning of HP, by a factor of more than 4 and this occurred already at 0.03M concentration. We analyze the comparative effects of the electrolytes in relation to the Hofmeister series. The salting-out effect could be utilized to enhance the uptake of HP and Hy, and possibly other photosensitizers as well, by artificial and natural membranes.

  19. Investigation of electrolyte wetting in lithium ion batteries: Effects of electrode pore structures and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yangping

    Beside natural source energy carriers such as petroleum, coal and natural gas, the lithium ion battery is a promising man-made energy carrier for the future. This is a similar process evolved from horse-powered era to engine driven age. There are still a lot of challenges ahead like low energy density, low rate performance, aging problems, high cost and safety etc. In lithium ion batteries, investigation about manufacturing process is as important as the development of material. The manufacturing of lithium ion battery, including production process (slurry making, coating, drying etc.), and post-production (slitting, calendering etc.) is also complicated and critical to the overall performance of the battery. It includes matching the capacity of anode and cathode materials, trial-and-error investigation of thickness, porosity, active material and additive loading, detailed microscopic models to understand, optimize, and design these systems by changing one or a few parameters at a time. In the manufacturing, one of the most important principles is to ensure good wetting properties between porous solid electrodes and liquid electrolyte. Besides the material surface properties, it is the process of electrolyte transporting to fill the pores in the electrode after injection is less noticed in academic, where only 2-3 drops of electrolyte are needed for lab coin cell level. In industry, the importance of electrolyte transport is well known and it is considered as part of electrolyte wetting (or initial wetting in some situations). In consideration of practical usage term, electrolyte wetting is adopted to use in this dissertation for electrolyte transporting process, although the surface chemistry about wetting is not covered. An in-depth investigation about electrolyte wetting is still missing, although it has significant effects in manufacturing. The electrolyte wetting is determined by properties of electrolyte and electrode microstructure. Currently, only viscosity

  20. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Michelle

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  1. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  2. Copper-Sulfate Pentahydrate as a Product of the Waste Sulfuric Acid Solution Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, Radmila; Stevanović, Jasmina; Avramović, Ljiljana; Nedeljković, Dragutin; Jugović, Branimir; Stajić-Trošić, Jasna; Gvozdenović, Milica

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is synthesis of copper-sulfate pentahydrate from the waste sulfuric acid solution-mother liquor generated during the regeneration process of copper bleed solution. Copper is removed from the mother liquor solution in the process of the electrolytic treatment using the insoluble lead anodes alloyed with 6 mass pct of antimony on the industrial-scale equipment. As the result of the decopperization process, copper is removed in the form of the cathode sludge and is precipitated at the bottom of the electrolytic cell. By this procedure, the content of copper could be reduced to the 20 mass pct of the initial value. Chemical characterization of the sludge has shown that it contains about 90 mass pct of copper. During the decopperization process, the very strong poison, arsine, can be formed, and the process is in that case terminated. The copper leaching degree of 82 mass pct is obtained using H2SO4 aqueous solution with the oxygen addition during the cathode sludge chemical treatment at 80 °C ± 5 °C. Obtained copper salt satisfies the requirements of the Serbian Standard for Pesticide, SRPS H.P1. 058. Therefore, the treatment of waste sulfuric acid solutions is of great economic and environmental interest.

  3. Bio-electrolytic sensor for rapid monitoring of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangdan; Li, Xiaohu; Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-03-15

    This study presents an innovative biosensor that was developed on the basis of a microbial electrolysis cell for fast and reliable measurement of volatile fatty acids (VFA) during anaerobic digestion (AD) process. The bio-electrolytic sensor was first tested with synthetic wastewater containing varying concentrations of VFA. A linear correlation (R(2) = 0.99) between current densities (0.03 ± 0.01 to 2.43 ± 0.12 A/m(2)) and VFA concentrations (5-100 mM) was found. The sensor performance was then investigated under different affecting parameters such as the external voltage, VFA composition ratio, and ionic strength. Linear relationship between the current density and VFA concentrations was always observed. Furthermore, the bio-electrolytic sensor proved ability to handle interruptions such as the presence of complex organic matter, anode exposure to oxygen and low pH. Finally, the sensor was applied to monitor VFA concentrations in a lab-scale AD reactor for a month. The VFA measurements from the sensor correlated well with those from GC analysis which proved the accuracy of the system. Since hydrogen was produced in the cathode as byproduct during monitoring, the system could be energy self-sufficient. Considering the high accuracy, short response time, long-term stability and additional benefit of H2 production, this bio-electrolytic sensor could be a simple and cost-effective method for VFA monitoring during AD and other anaerobic processes.

  4. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  5. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  6. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  7. The influence of a 6.5% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution on performance of prolonged intermittent high-intensity running at 30 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Morris, John G; Nevill, Mary E; Thompson, Dylan; Collie, Jason; Williams, Clyde

    2003-05-01

    Nine male student games players consumed either flavoured water (0.1 g carbohydrate, Na+ 6 mmol x l(-1)), a solution containing 6.5% carbohydrate-electrolytes (6.5 g carbohydrate, Na+ 21 mmol x l(-1)) or a taste placebo (Na+ 2 mmol x l(-1)) during an intermittent shuttle test performed on three separate occasions at an ambient temperature of 30 degrees C (dry bulb). The test involved five 15-min sets of repeated cycles of walking and variable speed running, each separated by a 4-min rest (part A of the test), followed by 60 s run/60 s rest until exhaustion (part B of the test). The participants drank 6.5 ml x kg(-1) of fluid as a bolus just before exercise and thereafter 4.5 ml x kg(-1) during every exercise set and rest period (19 min). There was a trial order effect. The total distance completed by the participants was greater in trial 3 (8441 +/- 873 m) than in trial 1 (6839 +/- 512, P < 0.05). This represented a 19% improvement in exercise capacity. However, the trials were performed in a random counterbalanced order and the participants completed 8634 +/- 653 m, 7786 +/- 741 m and 7099 +/- 647 m in the flavoured water (FW), placebo (P) and carbohydrate-electrolyte (CE) trials, respectively (P = 0.08). Sprint performance was not different between the trials but was impaired over time (FW vs P vs CE: set 1, 2.41 +/- 0.02 vs 2.39 +/- 0.03 vs 2.39 +/- 0.03 s; end set, 2.46 +/- 0.03 vs 2.47 +/- 0.03 vs 2.47 +/- 0.02 s; main effect time, P < 0.01). The rate of rise in rectal temperature was greater in the carbohydrate-electrolyte trial (rise in rectal temperature/duration of trial, degrees C x h(-1); FW vs CE, P < 0.05; P vs CE, N.S.). Blood glucose concentrations were higher in the carbohydrate-electrolyte than in the other two trials (FW vs P vs CE:rest, 4.4 +/- 0.1 vs 4.3 +/- 0.1 vs 4.2 +/- 0.1 mmol x l(-1); end of exercise, 5.4 +/- 0.3 vs 6.4 +/- 0.6 vs 7.2 +/- 0.5 mmol x l(-1); main effect trial, P < 0.05; main effect time, P < 0.01). Plasma free fatty acid

  8. Improved fabrication of electrolytic capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamari, F. J.; Moresi, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    After processing parts for assembly, insulative cup is fitted to bottom of can, then electrolytic solution consisting of white sulfuric acid gel is inserted into can. Pellet is put in can and is fitted tightly into cup. Finally, bead weld is formed between can and header plug.

  9. Non-aqueous electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil

    2015-11-12

    The present invention is generally related to electrolytes containing anion receptor additives to enhance the power capability of lithium-ion batteries. The anion receptor of the present invention is a Lewis acid that can help to dissolve LiF in the passivation films of lithium-ion batteries. Accordingly, one aspect the invention provides electrolytes comprising a lithium salt; a polar aprotic solvent; and an anion receptor additive; and wherein the electrolyte solution is substantially non-aqueous. Further there are provided electrochemical devices employing the electrolyte and methods of making the electrolyte.

  10. Effects of background electrolytes and ionic strength on enrichment of Cd(II) ions with magnetic graphene oxide-supported sulfanilic acid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-jiang; Liu, Yun-guo; Zeng, Guang-ming; You, Shao-hong; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xi; Guo, Yi-ming; Tan, Xiao-fei; Guo, Fang-ying

    2014-12-01

    To elucidate the influence mechanisms of background electrolytes and ionic strength on Cd(II) removal, the adsorption of Cd(II) onto magnetic graphene oxide-supported sulfanilic acid (MGO-SA) in aqueous solutions containing different types and concentrations of background electrolytes was studied. The results indicate that Cd(II) adsorption was strongly dependent on pH and could be strongly affected by background electrolytes and ionic strength. The Cd(II) removal was decreased with the presence of background electrolyte cations (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), and Ni(2+)), and the divalent cations exerted more obvious influences on the Cd(II) uptake than the monovalent cations at pH 6. Both Cl(-) and NO3(-) had negative effects on Cd(II) adsorption because they can form water-soluble metal-anion complexes with Cd(II) ions. The presence of 0.01molL(-1) Na3PO4 reduced the removal percentage of Cd(II) at pH<5 but extremely enhanced the Cd(II) removal when the pH>5. The Cd(II) adsorption was sensitive to changes in the concentration of NaCl, NaNO3, NaClO4, and Na3PO4. Besides, the adsorption isotherm of Cd(II) onto MGO-SA could be well described by the Freundlich model and was also influenced by the type of background electrolyte ions and the ionic strength.

  11. Blood acid-base and serum electrolyte values in red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed Central

    Bouda, J; Dávalos-Flores, J L; Núñez-Ochoa, L; Paasch-Martínez, L; Quiroz-Rocha, G F

    2000-01-01

    Acid-base, serum electrolyte, plasma protein, and packed cell volume (PCV) values were determined in venous blood samples from 30 red deer (Cervus elaphus) of both sexes showing no clinical signs of disease. The animals were 5 months of age and kept on pasture in the Valley of Mexico, at an altitude of 2450 m. Blood samples were collected without sedation. Mean blood values were: pH 7.411 +/- 0.041, pCO2 37.7 +/- 4.4 mmHg, base excess 0.7 +/- 3.2 mmol/L, actual bicarbonate 24.3 +/- 3.1 mmol/L, total CO2 25.3 +/- 3.2 mmol/L and anion gap 23.5 +/- 5.5 mmol/L. Mean serum electrolyte levels were: Na+ 142.3 +/- 2.5 mmol/L, Cl- 100.5 +/- 2.3 mmol/L, and K+ 7.03 +/- 1.03 mmol/L. Plasma protein and PCV values were 60.0 +/- 6.6 g/L and 0.47 +/- 0.05 L/L, respectively. Blood values determined in this study can be considered reference data for health control and disease diagnosis. PMID:11041499

  12. Effect of aluminum anodizing in phosphoric acid electrolyte on adhesion strength and thermal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sulki; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Yonghwan; Jung, Uoochang; Chung, Wonsub

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the adhesive bond strength and thermal performance of the anodized aluminum 6061 in phosphoric acid electrolyte to improve the adhesive bond strength and thermal performance for use in metal core printed circuit boards (MCPCB). The electrolyte temperature and applied voltage were altered to generate varied pore structures. The thickness, porosity and pore diameter of the anodized layer were measured. The pore morphologies were affected most by temperature, which was the driving force for ion transportation. The mechanism of adhesive bond was penetration of the epoxy into the pores. The optimal anodization conditions for maximum adhesive bond strength, 27 MPa, were 293 K and 100V. The maximum thermal conductivity of the epoxy-treated anodized layer was 1.6 W/m·K at 273 K. Compared with the epoxy-treated Al layer used for conventional MCPCBs, the epoxy-treated anodized layer showed advanced thermal performance due to a low difference of thermal resistance and high heat dissipation.

  13. Phase volume changes accompanying water extraction from aqueous electrolyte solutions by 1-octanol

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Moyer, B.A.

    1995-03-01

    The extraction of water by 1-octanol was calculated as a function of aqueous electrolyte concentration and initial O/A volume ratio for a series of representative salts, including LiCl, NaCl, KCl, NaNO{sub 3}, NaClO{sub 4}, MgCl{sub 2}, and CaCl{sub 2}. These results were then used to calculate the resultant phase-volume changes and aqueous-electrolyte-concentration changes. Such corrections are necessitated for precise extraction measurements employing 1-octanol as a diluent, especially as the O/A phase ratio exceeds unity. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Enhancing Cation Diffusion and Suppressing Anion Diffusion via Lewis-Acidic Polymer Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Brett M; Webb, Michael A; Miller, Thomas F

    2017-02-02

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have the potential to increase both the energy density and stability of lithium-based batteries, but low Li(+) conductivity remains a barrier to technological viability. SPEs are designed to maximize Li(+) diffusivity relative to the anion while maintaining sufficient salt solubility. It is thus remarkable that poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), the most widely used SPE, exhibits Li(+) diffusivity that is an order of magnitude smaller than that of typical counterions at moderate salt concentrations. We show that Lewis-basic polymers like PEO favor slow cation and rapid anion diffusion, while this relationship can be reversed in Lewis-acidic polymers. Using molecular dynamics, polyboranes are identified that achieve up to 10-fold increases in Li(+) diffusivities and significant decreases in anion diffusivities, relative to PEO in the dilute-ion regime. These results illustrate a general principle for increasing Li(+) diffusivity and transference number with chemistries that exhibit weaker cation and stronger anion coordination.

  15. Electrolyte depletion control laws for lead-acid battery discharge optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenno, R.; Nefedov, E.

    2014-12-01

    The technique described in this paper balances the power and energy withdrawn from a battery in galvanostatic discharge control that aims for stabilisation of the electrolyte concentration above the depletion level. This aim is achieved with relatively simple proportional feedback controls that are exponentially stabilising controls for a simple diffusion process that is the core part of battery processes. Although the full mapping of the proposed controls to state is rather complex, it has shown that the transformation works. In practice, these controls can be approximated either with the integrated past controls or with a simple exponential function that depends on a few parameters adjusted to the electrochemical processes in a battery under consideration. The battery control is tested in simulation on a detailed model developed for a lead-acid electrochemical cell.

  16. A cerium-lead redox flow battery system employing supporting electrolyte of methanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Zhaolin; Xu, Shengnan; Yin, Dongming; Wang, Limin

    2015-11-01

    A novel cerium-lead redox flow battery (RFB) employing Ce(IV)/Ce(III) and Pb(II)/Pb redox couples in the supporting electrolyte of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is developed and preliminarily investigated. The RFB requires no additional catalyst and uses kinetically favorable reactions between low-cost reactants, and provides a desirable discharge voltage of approximately 1.7 V, with high average coulombic efficiency (CE) of 92% and energy efficiency (EE) of 86% over 800 cycles at 298 K. Stable cycling with an acceptable performance is achieved for a board operating temperature range of 253 K-313 K. The excellent performance obtained from the preliminary study suggests that the cerium-lead RFB promises to be applicable to large-scale energy storage for electricity grids.

  17. Excellent stability of a lithium-ion-conducting solid electrolyte upon reversible Li+/H+ exchange in aqueous solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Cheng; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Liang, Chengdu; ...

    2014-10-21

    Batteries with an aqueous catholyte and a Li metal anode have attracted interest owing to their exceptional energy density and high charge/discharge rate. The long-term operation of such batteries requires that the solid electrolyte separator between the anode and aqueous solutions must be compatible with Li and stable over a wide pH range. Unfortunately, no such compound has yet been reported. In this study, an excellent stability in neutral and strongly basic solutions was observed when using the cubic Li7La3Zr2O12 garnet as a Li-stable solid electrolyte. The material underwent a Li+/H+ exchange in aqueous solutions. Nevertheless, its structure remained unchangedmore » even under a high exchange rate of 63.6%. When treated with a 2 M LiOH solution, the Li+/H+ exchange was reversed without any structural change. Furthermore, these observations suggest that cubic Li7La3Zr2O12 is a promising candidate for the separator in aqueous lithium batteries.« less

  18. Diagnostic strategies in disorders of fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Narins, R G; Jones, E R; Stom, M C; Rudnick, M R; Bastl, C P

    1982-03-01

    Our understanding of the physiology and biochemistry of acid-base and fluid-electrolyte regulations has greatly expanded in recent years. Key physiologic principles have emerged that now permit rational diagnosis and therapy of clinical disorders of serum electrolyte concentration. This paper describes diagnostic strategies based upon these principles. The etiology of the myriad factors in hyponatremia is best derived by first measuring serum tonicity and then assessing extracellular fluid volume. The hyper-, iso- and hypotonic hyponatremia are defined, and the hypotonic group is subclassified into hypo-, iso- and hyper volemic forms. The hypernatremias are best categorized by their state of volume expansion. Classification into the hypo-, hyper- and isovolemic hypernatremias simplifies their diagnosis. Metabolic acidoses are classified in terms of the anion gap. Clinical and chemical aspects of increased and normal anion gap acidoses are described. Metabolic alkaloses require a source of new bicarbonate and its retention by the kidney. The means by which new alkali is synthesized and urinary loss prevented serve to effectively classify the alkaloses. Hypokalemic syndromes are defined in terms of associated changes in body potassium. The potassium-depleted states are further subclassified by whether normotension or hypertension is associated. Hyperkalemia is produced by redistribution of cellular and extracellular potassium or by increased body potassium. Defects in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-distal renal tubule effector arm usually underlie hyperkalemic states, which are than classified in terms of this regulatory hormonal cascade. Classifications for disordered serum concentrations of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and uric acid are presented. Hormonal, metabolic and renal regulatory factors form the basis for an organized approach to these disorders.

  19. Electrolytic etching process provides effective bonding surface on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Electrolytic etching process prepares surfaces of a stainless steel shell for reliable, high strength adhesive bonding to dielectric materials. The process uses a 25 percent aqueous solution of phosphoric acid.

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Multimedia e-Learning Resource for Electrolyte and Acid-Base Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davids, Mogamat Razeen; Chikte, Usuf M. E.; Halperin, Mitchell L.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the development and evaluation of a Web-based application that provides instruction and hands-on practice in managing electrolyte and acid-base disorders. Our teaching approach, which focuses on concepts rather than details, encourages quantitative analysis and a logical problem-solving approach. Identifying any dangers to…

  1. Extremely thin bilayer electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) fabricated by chemical solution deposition (CSD).

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun-Ok; Whang, Chin-Myung; Lee, Yu-Ri; Park, Sun-Young; Prasad, Dasari Hari; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Hae-Weon

    2012-07-03

    An extremely thin bilayer electrolyte consisting of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) is successfully fabricated on a sintered NiO-YSZ substrate. Major processing flaws are effectively eliminated by applying local constraints to YSZ nanoparticles, and excellent open circuit voltage and cell performance are demonstrated in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) at intermediate operating temperatures.

  2. Sonolysis of Short-Chain Organic Dicarboxylic Acid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruke, Yukio; Harada, Hisashi

    2011-07-01

    Sonolyses of C4 (carbon number 4) dicarboxylic acids (succinic acid, maleic acid, and fumaric acid) were performed in aqueous solution. They changed one into the other during sonication, affording carbon-number-conserving transformations. Maleic acid and fumaric acid were produced from saccinic acid by dehydrogenation. Furthermore, malic acid and tartaric acid were obtained by hydroxylation. The sonochemical reaction processes are discussed in terms of the time dependences of products and the addition of radical scavengers. In addition, mutual isomerization of fumaric acid and maleic acid was observed during sonication without the use of mediators.

  3. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-08-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 {+-} 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO{sub 4} at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. Studies on the effect of added LiNO{sub 3} or Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF{sub 6} content of WF{sub 6} gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF{sub 6}.

  4. Development of thermodynamic properties of electrolyte solutions with the help of RISM-calculations at the Born-Oppenheimer level.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Georg; Maurer, Alexander

    2010-03-14

    We derived a formula of the chemical excess potential mu of electrolytes in solutions (NaCl, NaNO(3), Me(4)NCl) within the framework of the RISM model of liquid systems as a partial derivative of the Helmholtz energy with respect to the amount n(i) of the compound i. Since it is possible to perform RISM-calculations at very small electrolyte concentrations we compared the concentration dependence of the chemical excess potential with the Debye-Hückel limiting law. In general the concentration dependence of the chemical excess potential of the electrolytes follows the square-root law of Debye-Hückel. The slopes of these functions, however, need a very individual discussion. The HNC-closure relation yields a much too large slope due to the overwhelming electrostatic interaction, whereas the closure relation of Kovalenko and Hirata gives very promising results for atomic ions. According to the deficiencies of the RISM model of the SSOZ-theory the slope furnishes only a dielectric constant of water according to this model. Molecular ions, however, show larger deviations from the postulated concentration dependence.

  5. The development of BCB-sealed galvanic cells. Case study: aluminum-platinum cells activated with sodium hypochlorite electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlutowski, J.; Biver, C. J.; Wang, W.; Knighton, S.; Bumgarner, J.; Langebrake, L.; Moreno, W.; Cardenas-Valencia, A. M.

    2007-08-01

    Energy on demand is an important concept in remote sensor development. The fabrication process for silicon-wafer-based, totally enclosed galvanic cells is presented herein. Benzocyclyobutene (BCB), a photo-patternable material, is used as the adhesive layer between the silicon wafers on which metal electrodes are patterned to form the cells' electrolyte cavity. As a case study, and since aluminum is an anode material with thermodynamic high energy density, this metal is evaporated onto a wafer and used as an anode. A sputtered platinum film collects the charge and provides a catalytic surface in the cell cathode. The metal film patterning process and wafer-to-wafer bonding with BCB is detailed. The difficulties encountered, and design modifications to overcome these, are presented. Cells of the mentioned design were activated with sodium hypochlorite solution electrolyte. Typical potential outputs for the cells, as a function of operational time, are also presented. With a 5 kΩ load, a potential of 1.4 V was maintained for over 240 min, until depletion of the electrolyte occurred. Average cell energy outputs under electrical loads between 100 Ω and 5 kΩ were in the range of 4-10 J with columbic densities ranging from 45 to 83 Ah L-1.

  6. Preparation of Li2S-P2S5 solid electrolyte from N-methylformamide solution and application for all-solid-state lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teragawa, Shingo; Aso, Keigo; Tadanaga, Kiyoharu; Hayashi, Akitoshi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro

    2014-02-01

    Electrode-solid electrolyte composite materials for all-solid-state lithium batteries were prepared by coating of the Li2S-P2S5 solid electrolyte onto LiCoO2 particles using a N-methylformamide (NMF) solution of 80Li2S·20P2S5 (mol%) solid electrolyte. SEM and EDX analysis showed that the Li2S-P2S5 solid electrolyte was uniformly coated on LiCoO2 particles. The all-solid-state cell using the LiCoO2 particles coated with the solid electrolyte showed higher charge-discharge capacity than the cells using uncoated LiCoO2 particles.

  7. A simple and efficient method to characterize bonded water molecules in aqueous solutions of electrolytes: Application to sodium sulphate decahydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargeot, Carole; Bebon, C.; Colson, D.; Klein, J.-P.; Blandin, A.-F.; Bossoutrot, J.-M.

    2007-09-01

    During a study on crystallization in viscous media, an unexpected relevant theoretical and experimental result about the organization of water molecules in salt solutions has been obtained. Experimental results obtained during measurement of viscosity of saccharose and water solutions demonstrate that the salt dissolved in saccharose solution has the capacity to catch the solvent, namely water, from the solvated substance, here saccharose, which induces a quite large viscosity gap. There is a certain mutual electrolyte-water attraction; it may be pushed on by stronger water-salt than water-saccharose interactions. Determination of the binding of water with the salt in the solution can be done directly from measured viscosity. The number of water molecules withdrawn by Na 2SO 4 in solution is computable from viscosity values. Significance of the results obtained is a relevant demonstration that the 10 water molecules of Na 2SO 4·10H 2O are already organised around the solute before the crystallization. The phenomenon observed here questions theoretical predictions that rely on solvent organization and salt effect in solution. Novelty of this study may thus encourage further experimental work in order to elucidate and test the validity of such investigational method to determine the number of water molecules withdrawn by salt in solution.

  8. A general treatment for the conductivity of electrolytes in the whole concentration range in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Villullas, H Mercedes; Gonzalez, Ernesto R

    2005-05-12

    Despite the great importance of ion transport, most of the widely accepted models and theories are valid only in the not very practical limit of low concentrations. Aiming to extend the range of applicability to moderate concentrations, a number of modified models and equations (some approximate, some fundamented on different assumptions, and some just empirical) have been reported. In this work, a general treatment for the electrical conductivity of ionic solutions has been developed, considering the electrical conductivity as a transport phenomenon governed by dissipation and feedback. A general expression for the dependence of the specific conductivity on the solution viscosity (and indirectly on concentration), from which the whole conductivity curve can be obtained, has been derived. The validity of this general approach is demonstrated with experimental results taken from the literature for aqueous and nonaqueous solutions of electrolytes.

  9. Direct measurement of interaction forces between bovine serum albumin and poly(ethylene oxide) in water and electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Sergio M; Bastías, José M; Toledo, Pedro G

    2017-01-01

    The net interaction between a probe tip coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein and a flat substrate coated with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) polymer was measured directly on approach in water and electrolyte solutions using AFM. The approach force curve between the two surfaces was monotonically repulsive in water and in electrolyte solutions. At pH ~5, slightly above the isoelectric point (pI) of BSA, and at large distances, the force was dominated by electrostatic repulsion between the oxygen atoms of the incoming protein with those belonging to the ether groups of PEO. Such repulsive force and range decreased in NaCl. Under physiological conditions, pH 6, BSA is definitely charged and the electrostatic repulsion with ether groups in PEO appears at larger separation distances. Interestingly, at pH 4, below the pI of BSA, the repulsion decreased because of an attractive, although weak, electrostatic force that appeared between the ether groups in PEO and the positively charged amino groups of BSA. However, for all solution conditions, once compression of PEO begun, the net repulsion was always dominated by short-range polymeric steric repulsion and repulsive enthalpy penalties for breaking PEO-water bonds. Results suggest that PEO in mushroom conformation may also be effective in reducing biofouling.

  10. Direct measurement of interaction forces between bovine serum albumin and poly(ethylene oxide) in water and electrolyte solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bastías, José M.; Toledo, Pedro G.

    2017-01-01

    The net interaction between a probe tip coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein and a flat substrate coated with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) polymer was measured directly on approach in water and electrolyte solutions using AFM. The approach force curve between the two surfaces was monotonically repulsive in water and in electrolyte solutions. At pH ~5, slightly above the isoelectric point (pI) of BSA, and at large distances, the force was dominated by electrostatic repulsion between the oxygen atoms of the incoming protein with those belonging to the ether groups of PEO. Such repulsive force and range decreased in NaCl. Under physiological conditions, pH 6, BSA is definitely charged and the electrostatic repulsion with ether groups in PEO appears at larger separation distances. Interestingly, at pH 4, below the pI of BSA, the repulsion decreased because of an attractive, although weak, electrostatic force that appeared between the ether groups in PEO and the positively charged amino groups of BSA. However, for all solution conditions, once compression of PEO begun, the net repulsion was always dominated by short-range polymeric steric repulsion and repulsive enthalpy penalties for breaking PEO-water bonds. Results suggest that PEO in mushroom conformation may also be effective in reducing biofouling. PMID:28296940

  11. Coulometric determination of americium in acetonitrile solution of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, S.A.; Kulyakov, Yu.M.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-10-20

    A procedure was developed for the coulometric determination of americium using the electrochemical couple Am(IV)-Am(III). An acetonitrile solution of 0.3-0.2 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was used as the electrolyte. Americium can be determined in the presence of large amounts of Cm, Pu, Ce, and other impurities; limit of detection approx. 10 ..mu..g.

  12. Improvement of electrochemical characteristics of natural graphite negative electrode coated with polyacrylic acid in pure propylene carbonate electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ui, Koichi; Kikuchi, Shinei; Mikami, Fuminobu; Kadoma, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Naoaki

    In order to improve the negative electrode characteristics of a graphite electrode in a propylene carbonate (PC)-containing electrolyte, we have prepared a graphite negative electrode coated with a water-soluble anionic polymer as a binder for composite graphite electrodes. The electrochemical characteristics of the coated graphite were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge cycle tests. The coated graphite negative electrode showed a stable Li + ion intercalation/deintercalation reaction without the exfoliation of the graphene layers caused by the co-intercalation of the PC solvent in the LiClO 4/PC solution. The charge-discharge characteristic of the coated graphite negative electrode in a PC-containing electrolyte was almost the same as that in ethylene carbonate-based electrolyte.

  13. Nitric acid uptake by sulfuric acid solutions under stratospheric conditions - Determination of Henry's Law solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reihs, Christa M.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of nitric acid by sulfuric acid solutions representative of stratospheric particulate at low temperatures was measured to determine the solubility of nitric acid in sulfuric acid solutions as a function of H2SO4 concentration and solution temperature. Solubilities are reported for sulfuric acid solutions ranging from 58 to 87 wt pct H2SO4 over a temperature range from 188 to 240 K, showing that, in general, the solubility of nitric acid increases with decreasing sulfuric acid concentration and with decreasing temperature. The measured solubilities indicate that nitric acid in the global stratosphere will be found predominantly in the gas phase.

  14. Crystalline Li(sub 3)PO(sub 4)/SiO(sub 4) solid solutions as an electrolyte for film batteries using sputtered cathode layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitacre, J. F.; West, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    Crystalline solid solutions of 1:1 Li3PO4/SiO4 were synthesized and tested electrochemically using thin film, physical vapor deposited electrodes. After cathode deposition, the electrolyte/cathode structures were annealed at 700 degrees Celsius for 2 hours, a process that resulted in cathode crystallization without encouraging deleterious interfacial reactions. Results indicate that the electrolyte functioned well in this configuration.

  15. Drastic change of the intrusion-extrusion behavior of electrolyte solutions in pure silica *BEA-type zeolite.

    PubMed

    Ryzhikov, A; Khay, I; Nouali, H; Daou, T J; Patarin, J

    2014-09-07

    High pressure water and electrolyte solutions intrusion-extrusion experiments in pure-silica *BEA-type zeolite (zeosil β) were performed in order to study the performances of these systems in energy absorption and storage. The "zeosil β-water" system displays a bumper behavior with an intrusion pressure of 53 MPa and an absorbed energy of 8.3 J g(-1). For the "zeosil β-LiCl aqueous solutions" systems the intrusion pressure increases with the LiCl concentration to 95, 111 and 115 MPa for 10, 15 and 20 M solution, respectively. However, for concentrations above 10 M, a transformation of the system behavior from bumper to shock-absorber is observed. The zeolite samples were characterized by several structural and physicochemical methods (XRD, TGA, solid-state NMR, N2 physisorption, ICP-OES) before and after intrusion-extrusion experiments in order to understand the influence of the LiCl concentration on the intrusion-extrusion behavior. It is shown that the intrusion of water and LiCl solutions with low concentration leads to the formation of Si-(OSi)3OH groups, whereas no defects are observed under intrusion of concentrated LiCl solutions. A possible mechanism of LiCl solution intrusion based on separate intrusion of H2O molecules and Li(H2O)x(+) ions is proposed.

  16. Ionic conductivity of dual-phase polymer electrolytes comprised of NBR/SBR latex films swollen with lithium salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Morihiko; Ichino, Toshihiro; Rutt, J.S.; Nishi, Shiro . NTT Interdisciplinary Research Lab.)

    1994-08-01

    Dual-phase polymer electrolytes (DPE) with high ionic conductivity and good mechanical strength were prepared by swelling poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene) rubber (NBR) and poly(styrene-co-butadiene) rubber (SBR) mixed latex films with lithium salt solutions (e.g., 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-butyrolactone). The latex films retain particle morphology in the solid state. The NBR phase (formed from fused NBR latex particles) is polar and is impregnated selectively with polar lithium salt solutions, yielding ion-conductive channels, whereas the SBR phase (formed from fused SBR latex particles) is nonpolar and is not impregnated, providing a mechanically supportive matrix. The ionic conductivity of the DPE increased dramatically with increasing content of lithium salt solution, and higher amounts of solution were imbibed with increasing content of NBR relative to SBR. Several factors which affect the ionic conductivity of this system were examined, and the highest ionic conductivity (>10[sup [minus]3] S/cm) was obtained when either an NBR/SBR 70/30 (w/w) or a 50/50 (w/w) latex film was saturated with 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-BL solution or 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-BL/DME solution. Ion-conductive behavior changed critically with increasing lithium salt solution uptake. At low levels of lithium salt solution uptake, evidence suggested that ionic conductivity of the absorbed lithium salt solution was strongly influenced by the presence of the NBR in the ion-conductive channel, but at higher levels, the effects of the NBR were reduced and free'' lithium salt solution was present.

  17. Frequency and Temperature Characteristics of an Ultrasonic Method for Measuring the Specific Gravity of Lead-Acid Battery Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaxin; Li, Guofeng

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present an ultrasonic method for measuring the specific gravity of lead-acid battery electrolyte and study its frequency and temperature characteristics. This method uses an improved frequency scanning ultrasonic pulse echo reflectometer with a two-transducer configuration. The velocity and attenuation coefficient (1 to 30 MHz) of electrolytes with different specific gravities (1.05 to 1.30) are obtained at 25 °C. It has been shown that the ultrasonic velocity changes little with frequency, and there is low attenuation at approximately 5 MHz. The velocities of several electrolytes with different specific gravities are measured in the temperature range from 10 to 50 °C. The thermal transient of the measurement cell is analyzed, showing 0.1% accuracy in specific gravity measurement for a steady temperature and 0.5% accuracy under thermal gradient conditions after temperature compensation. This method is suitable for the on-line, rapid, and accurate measurement of the specific gravity of a lead-acid battery electrolyte.

  18. Anodic stripping voltammetry at in situ bismuth-plated carbon and gold microdisc electrodes in variable electrolyte content unstirred solutions.

    PubMed

    Baldrianova, L; Svancara, I; Economou, A; Sotiropoulos, S

    2006-10-27

    Carbon and gold microdisc electrodes (30 and 10 microm, respectively) have been tested as substrates for in situ bismuth film plating from unstirred solutions of variable acetate buffer content and were subsequently used in the anodic stripping voltammetry determination of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions. The effects of Bi(III) concentration, analyte accumulation time, stirring as well as supporting electrolyte content have been studied. Under optimal conditions good voltammetric responses were obtained by means of square wave anodic stripping voltammetry in unstirred analyte solutions of 5 x 10(-8) to 10(-6)M, even in the absence of added buffer. In an indicative application, Pb(II) ion levels were determined in tap water using bismuth-plated carbon microdisc electrodes.

  19. Compositional analysis of passivating surface film formed on carbon electrode in organic electrolytic solution using in-situ spectroelectrochemical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyun, Su-Il

    1999-02-01

    In-situ spectroelectrochemical technique has been applied to investigate passivating surface film on porous carbon electrode and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) carbon film electrode in organic electrolytic solution consisting of ethylene carbonate (EC) and diethyl carbonate (DEC) solvent, and 1 M LiPF6 and LiAsF6. Water impurity with the concentration of 0 M, 0.02 M, 0.05 M, and 0.1 M H20 was added to 1 M LiPF6-EC/DEC solution. In-situ Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectra of the surface film on both electrodes with the constituents of ROCO2Li, Li2CO3, and LixPFy suggested that the reduction of EC to ROCO2Li runs via a one-electron transfer pathway as a result of diffusion of water through the surface film, and then Li2CO3 formation proceeds simultaneously by the chemical reaction of ROCO2Li with water. From the measured potential dependence of the amount of the salt reduction products, it is suggested that the surface film formed in 1 M LiPF6EC/DEC solution gives a poorer passivity as compared with that formed in 1 M LiAsF6-EC/DEC solution, which is due to the considerable interference of LiPE6 salt reduction with the compact sedimentation of ROCO2Li on the electrode. In-situ FFIR spectra of the surface film showed that all the peak intensities of the three constituents significantly increase with increasing water content under application of the negative potentials with respect to open circuit potential (OCP). From these experimental results, the dependence of the passivity of the surface film on the carbon electrode on the water concentration of the electrolyte, as well as on the lithium salt type, was discussed in view of the salt and solvent reactivities.

  20. Swelling and collapse of polyelectrolyte gels in equilibrium with monovalent and divalent electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, De-Wei; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2009-11-01

    The swelling of polyelectrolyte (PE) gels by 1:1 and 2:1 salts is studied via osmotic ensemble Monte Carlo simulations at constant osmotic pressure and electrolyte chemical potential of a reservoir phase in equilibrium with a model PE network. Large molecular weight gels exhibit a remarkable swelling response to small changes in 2:1 salt concentration. Gel collapse is accompanied by the formation of a previously unknown heterogeneous nanostructure, predicted by theory and observed in simulations, consisting of regions dense in monomers coexisting with regions rich in mono- and divalent ions.

  1. Acid-base balance and selected hematologic, electrolyte, and blood chemical variables in calves: milk-fed vs conventionally fed.

    PubMed

    Reece, W O

    1980-01-01

    Several hematologic, acid-base, and electrolyte variables were chacterized for newborn milk-fed calves and conventionally fed calves at weekly intervals for 15 weeks. Definition was given to the iron deficiency, microcytic, hypochromic anemia which developed in milk-fed calves. Acid-base variables in milk-fed calves differed from variables in conventionally fed calves only in having a greater value for base excess. Acid-base variables responded with decreasing magnitude by weeks for both feeding treatments, and responses associated with ambient temperature were suggested. Responses of the other variables and their comparisons between the feeding treatments also were analyzed.

  2. Osmotic diuresis-induced hypernatremia: better explained by solute-free water clearance or electrolyte-free water clearance?

    PubMed

    Popli, Subhash; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Ing, Todd S

    2014-01-01

    Hypernatremia may result from inadequate water intake, excessive water loss or a combination of the two. Osmotic diuresis leads to losses of both solute and water. The relationship between solute and water losses determines the resulting changes in serum osmolality and sodium concentration. Total solute loss is routinely higher than loss of water in osmotic diuresis. Theoretically, then, decreases in serum osmolality (and serum sodium concentration) should follow. In clinical situations of osmotic diuresis, however, reduction in osmolality can take place, but not reduction in serum sodium concentration. It is of note that serum sodium concentration changes are related to urinary losses of sodium and potassium but not to the loss of total solute. In osmotic diuresis, the combined loss of sodium and potassium per liter of urine is lower than the concurrent serum sodium level. Consequently, hypernatremia can ensue. A patient who presented with osmotic diuresis and hypernatremia is described here. In this patient, we have shown that electrolyte-free water clearance is a better index of the effect of osmotic diuresis on serum sodium concentration than the classic solute-free water clearance.

  3. Kidney injury, fluid, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities in alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Adewale, Adebayo; Ifudu, Onyekachi

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century, alcoholism and the consequences of ethyl alcohol abuse are major public health concerns in the United States, affecting approximately 14 million people. Pertinent to the global impact of alcoholism is the World Health Organisation estimate that 140 million people worldwide suffer from alcohol dependence. Alcoholism and alcohol abuse are the third leading causes of preventable death in the United States. Alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse cost the United State an estimated US$220 billion in 2005, eclipsing the expense associated with cancer (US$196 billion) or obesity (US$133 billion). Orally ingested ethyl alcohol is absorbed rapidly without chemical change from the stomach and intestine, reaching maximum blood concentration in about an hour. Alcohol crosses capillary membranes by simple diffusion, affecting almost every organ system in the body by impacting a wide range of cellular functions. Alcohol causes metabolic derangements either directly, via its chemical by-product or secondarily through alcohol-induced disorders. Many of these alcohol-related metabolic disturbances are increased in severity by the malnutrition that is common in those with chronic alcoholism. This review focuses on the acute and chronic injurious consequences of alcohol ingestion on the kidney, as well as the fluid, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities associated with acute and chronic ingestion of alcohol. PMID:24791039

  4. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2013: electrolyte and acid-base.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2014-06-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQ&Q) remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. As in past years, the conference hall was overflowing with interested audience members. Topics covered by expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single-best-answer questions were prepared by a panel of experts. Prior to the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs answered questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. A new addition to the NQ&Q was participation in the questionnaire by nephrology fellows. To review the process, members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. Their answers are compared in real time using audience response devices with the answers of nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers are then briefly discussed after the audience responses, and the results of the questionnaire are displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of CJASN. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  5. Water, electrolytes, and acid-base alterations in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Carlos G; Belloso, Waldo H; Glassock, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated disease has changed significantly over the past decade, mainly due to the wide availability and improvement of combination antiretroviral therapy regiments. Serious complications associated with profound immunodeficiency are nowadays fortunately rare in patients with adequate access to care and treatment. However, HIV infected patients, and particularly those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, are predisposed to a host of different water, electrolyte, and acid-base disorders (sometimes with opposite characteristics), since they have a modified renal physiology (reduced free water clearance, and relatively increased fractional excretion of calcium and magnesium) and they are also exposed to infectious, inflammatory, endocrinological, oncological variables which promote clinical conditions (such as fever, tachypnea, vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria, and delirium), and may require a variety of medical interventions (antiviral medication, antibiotics, antineoplastic agents), whose combination predispose them to undermine their homeostatic capability. As many of these disturbances may remain clinically silent until reaching an advanced condition, high awareness is advisable, particularly in patients with late diagnosis, concomitant inflammatory conditions and opportunistic diseases. These disorders contribute to both morbidity and mortality in HIV infected patients. PMID:26788462

  6. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Electrolytes and Acid-Base Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell H; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-04-07

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual Kidney Week meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. During the 2015 meeting the conference hall was once again overflowing with eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the experts included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, end-stage renal disease and dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories together with single-best-answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows in the United States answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on the same series of case-oriented questions in a quiz. The audience compared their answers in real time using a cell-phone app containing the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The results of the online questionnaire were displayed, and then the quiz answers were discussed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces selected content of educational value for theClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrologyreaders. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation of direct current (DC) plasma electrolytic oxidation of zirconium in citric acid.

    PubMed

    Stojadinović, Stevan; Radić-Perić, Jelena; Vasilić, Rastko; Perić, Miljenko

    2014-01-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation of zirconium in citric acid was investigated using optical spectroscopy. A rich emission spectrum consisting of about 360 zirconium and 170 oxygen atomic and ionic lines was identified in the spectral regions 313-320, 340-516, and 626-640 nm. It was shown that the remaining features observed in the spectrum could be ascribed to various molecular species, which involve zirconium, oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon. The temperature of the plasma core (T = 7500 ± 1000 K) was determined using measured Zr line intensities, and the temperature of peripheral plasma zone (T = 2800 ± 500 K) was estimated from the intensity distribution within a part of an OH spectrum. The composition of the plasma containing zirconium, oxygen, and hydrogen, under assumption of local thermal equilibrium, was calculated in the temperature range up to 12,000 K and for pressure of 10(5) and 10(7) Pa, in order to explain the appearance of the observed spectral features.

  8. Performance/design formulation for a solid polymer based acid electrolyte hydrogen/air fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, S. S.; Fellner, J. P.

    Mathematical development of preliminary performance/design equations for a hydrogen/air, solid polymer acid electrolyte based fuel cell is presented. The development is based on the principles of transport phenomena, intrinsic electrochemical kinetics, and classical thermodynamics. The developed formulation is intended to quantitatively describe the mass fraction profiles of the chemical species, hydrogen and oxygen, in the cell anode and cathode diffusion and electrocatalytic reaction layers as a function of the distance in the proton transport direction at an axial distance parallel to the cell anode or cathode channel flow. Given the cell geometry, chemical species and charge transport, and intrinsic electrochemical kinetic parameters, the developed formulation can be employed to compute the species local mass fluxes and predict the cell anode and cathode cell overvoltages for a desired geometric current density. The presented single cell performance predictive formulation has also been linked to the formulation needed to predict the performance of a stack of a number of identical PEMFCs connected in series.

  9. General electrokinetic model for concentrated suspensions in aqueous electrolyte solutions: Electrophoretic mobility and electrical conductivity in static electric fields.

    PubMed

    Carrique, Félix; Ruiz-Reina, Emilio; Roa, Rafael; Arroyo, Francisco J; Delgado, Ángel V

    2015-10-01

    In recent years different electrokinetic cell models for concentrated colloidal suspensions in aqueous electrolyte solutions have been developed. They share some of its premises with the standard electrokinetic model for dilute colloidal suspensions, in particular, neglecting both the specific role of the so-called added counterions (i.e., those released by the particles to the solution as they get charged), and the realistic chemistry of the aqueous solution on such electrokinetic phenomena as electrophoresis and electrical conductivity. These assumptions, while having been accepted for dilute conditions (volume fractions of solids well below 1%, say), are now questioned when dealing with concentrated suspensions. In this work, we present a general electrokinetic cell model for such kind of systems, including the mentioned effects, and we also carry out a comparative study with the standard treatment (the standard solution only contains the ions that one purposely adds, without ionic contributions from particle charging or water chemistry). We also consider an intermediate model that neglects the realistic aqueous chemistry of the solution but accounts for the correct contribution of the added counterions. The results show the limits of applicability of the classical assumptions and allow one to better understand the relative role of the added counterions and ions stemming from the electrolyte in a realistic aqueous solution, on electrokinetic properties. For example, at low salt concentrations the realistic effects of the aqueous solution are the dominant ones, while as salt concentration is increased, it is this that progressively takes the control of the electrokinetic response for low to moderate volume fractions. As expected, if the solids concentration is high enough the added counterions will play the dominant role (more important the higher the particle surface charge), no matter the salt concentration if it is not too high. We hope this work can help in

  10. Electrode kinetics at a platinum anode in chloroacetic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lotvin, B.M.; Vasil'ev, Yu.B.

    1987-02-01

    It was shown by direct comparison of kinetic and adsorption data that at platinum in solutions of mono- and trichloroacetic acid, the anodic processes are entirely analogous in character to the processes occurring in acetate solutions. The lack of Kolbe electrosynthesis products in the electrolysis of chloroacetic acids is to the special reaction features of the secondary chloroalkyl radicals.

  11. Some Lewis acid-base adducts involving boron trifluoride as electrolyte additives for lithium ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Mengyun; Madec, L.; Xia, J.; Hall, D. S.; Dahn, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Three complexes with boron trifluoride (BF3) as the Lewis acid and different Lewis bases were synthesized and used as electrolyte additives in Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2/graphite and Li[Ni0.42Mn0.42Co0.16]O2/graphite pouch cells. Lewis acid-base adducts with a boron-oxygen (Bsbnd O) bond were trimethyl phosphate boron trifluoride (TMP-BF) and triphenyl phosphine oxide boron trifluoride (TPPO-BF). These were compared to pyridine boron trifluoride (PBF) which has a boron-nitrogen (Bsbnd N) bond. The experimental results showed that cells with PBF had the least voltage drop during storage at 4.2 V, 4.4 V and 4.7 V at 40 °C and the best capacity retention during long-term cycling at 55 °C compared to cells with the other additives. Charge-hold-discharge cycling combined with simultaneous electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that impedance growth in TMP-BF and TPPO-BF containing cells was faster than cells containing 2%PBF, suggesting that PBF is useful for impedance control at high voltages (>4.4 V). XPS analysis of the SEI films highlighted a specific reactivity of the PBF-derived SEI species that apparently hinders the degradation of both LiPF6 and solvent during formation and charge-hold-discharge cycling. The modified SEI films may explain the improved impedance, the smaller voltage drop during storage and the improved capacity retention during cycling of cells containing the PBF additive.

  12. The key to success: Gelled-electrolyte and optimized separators for stationary lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toniazzo, Valérie

    The lead acid technology is nowadays considered one of the best suited for stationary applications. Both gel and AGM batteries are complementary technologies and can provide reliability and efficiency due to the constant optimization of the battery design and components. However, gelled-electrolyte batteries remain the preferred technology due to a better manufacturing background and show better performance mainly at low and moderate discharge rates. Especially, using the gel technology allows to get rid of the numerous problems encountered in most AGM batteries: drainage, stratification, short circuits due to dendrites, and mostly premature capacity loss due to the release of internal cell compression. These limitations are the result of the evident lack of an optimal separation system. In gel batteries, on the contrary, highly efficient polymeric separators are nowadays available. Especially, microporous separators based on PVC and silica have shown the best efficiency for nearly 30 years all over the world, and especially in Europe, where the gel technology was born. The improved performance of these separators is explained by the unique extrusion process, which leads to excellent wettability, and optimized physical properties. Because they are the key for the battery success, continuous research and development on separators have led to improved properties, which render the separator even better adapted to the more recent gel technology: the pore size distribution has been optimized to allow good oxygen transfer while avoiding dendrite growth, the pore volume has been increased, the electrical resistance and acid displacement reduced to such an extent that the electrical output of batteries has been raised both in terms of higher capacity and longer cycle life.

  13. The impact of solution chemistry of electrolyte on the sorption of pentachlorophenol and phenanthrene by natural hematite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanfeng; He, Yan; Lian, Zhenghua; Xu, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    Hematite nanoparticles (NPs) were studied as a sorbent for hydrophobic organic contaminants (OCs) under natural ambient conditions through specially designed contrasting solution chemistry of electrolyte. Ionizable pentachlorophenol (PCP) and non-ionizable phenanthrene (PHE) were selected as representative OCs. The sorption capacities of PCP and PHE were pH-dependent, and a larger amount of PCP was sorbed at pH values below its pKa (4.75). However, the PHE sorption capacity was higher at relatively high or low pHs (e.g. below 4.0 and above 10.0), possibly due to the larger available surface area of the hematite NPs, caused by the higher values of net charges and charge density. Changes in pH might thus affect the sorption of OCs by hematite NPs, through modification of the surface characteristics of the sorbent and the electronic properties of the sorbate molecules. The influence of different ionic strengths indicated that the amounts of PCP and PHE sorbed by hematite NPs decreased as a concentration function of different types of ions (e.g. Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)), with the underlying mechanism possibly being due to four interactions i.e. hydrogen-bonding, competitive sorption by ions in the ambient solution, screening effects and aggregation effects. The results confirmed that the surface chemistry of hematite NPs, the chemical properties of PCP and PHE, and solution chemistry (e.g. pH and ionic strength) of the electrolyte all played an important role in PCP and PHE sorption by hematite NPs. By comparison of both sorption capacity and ecologic advantages, our results suggested that natural hematite NPs would be more competitive and efficient for PCP and PHE sorption than engineered NPs. This finding increases our knowledge regarding the environmental function of natural NPs (such as hematite NPs) for OC remediation through manipulating their interfacial behavior.

  14. Coadsorption of Cd(II) and oxalate ions at the TiO2/electrolyte solution interface.

    PubMed

    Janusz, W; Matysek, M

    2006-04-01

    The study of the adsorptions of cadmium and oxalate ions at the titania/electrolyte interface and the changes of the electrical double layer (edl) structure in this system are presented. The adsorption of cadmium or oxalate ions was calculated from an uptake of their concentration from the solution. The concentration of Cd(II) or oxalate ions in the solution was determined by radiotracer method. For labeling the solution 14C and 115Cd isotopes were used. Coadsorption of Cd(II) and oxalic ions was determined simultaneously. Besides, the main properties of the edl, i.e., surface charge density and zeta potential were determined by potentiometer titration and electrophoresis measurements, respectively. The adsorption of cadmium ions increases with pH increase and shifts with an increase of the initial concentration of Cd(II) ions towards higher pH values. The adsorption process causes an increase of negatively charged sites on anatase and a decrease of the zeta potential with an increase of initial concentration of these ions. The adsorption of oxalate anions at the titania/electrolyte interface proceeds through the exchange with hydroxyl groups. A decrease of pH produces an increase of adsorption of oxalate ions. The processes of anion adsorption lead to increase the number of the positively charged sites at the titania surface. However, specific adsorption of bidenate ligand as oxalate on one surface hydroxyl group may form inner sphere complexes on the metal oxide surface and may overcharge the compact part of the edl. The presence of oxalate ions in the system affects the adsorption of Cd(II) ions on TiO2, increasing the adsorption at low pH range and decreasing the adsorption at high pH range. Using adsorption as a function of pH data, some characteristic parameters of adsorption envelope were calculated.

  15. Influence of the active mass particle suspension in electrolyte upon corrosion of negative electrode of a lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, Yu.; Shtompel, G.; Ostapenko, E.; Leonov, V.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of the suspension of positive active mass particles in the electrolyte on the performance of the negative electrode in a lead-acid battery is studied. A significant increase in the rate of corrosion of the lead electrode is shown when slime particles get in contact with its surface, which may result in the rise of macro-defects on the lugs of the negative electrodes.

  16. Improved electrolytes for fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gard, G.L.; Roe, D.K.

    1991-06-01

    Present day fuel cells based upon hydrogen and oxygen have limited performance due to the use of phosphoric acid as an electrolyte. Improved performance is desirable in electrolyte conductivity, electrolyte management, oxygen solubility, and the kinetics of the reduction of oxygen. Attention has turned to fluorosulfonic acids as additives or substitute electrolytes to improve fuel cell performance. The purpose of this project is to synthesize and electrochemically evaluate new fluorosulfonic acids as superior alternatives to phosphoric acid in fuel cells. (VC)

  17. Effect of plasma electrolytic oxidation in the solutions containing Ca, P, Si, Na on the properties of titanium.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Danuta; Baszkiewicz, Jacek; Zdunek, Joanna; Sobczak, Janusz W; Lisowski, Wojciech; Smolik, Jerzy; Słomka, Zbigniew

    2012-11-01

    The surface layers were formed on titanium by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in the solutions which contain various amounts of Na(2)SiO(3)x5H(2)O, Na(3)PO(4) x12H(2)O and Ca(CH(3)COO)(2) xH(2)O. The layers were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The titanium/oxide surface layer interface was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adhesive strength of the oxide layers was evaluated by the scratch-test. The bioactivity of the surface was determined by soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 and 30 days. The corrosion resistance was determined by electrochemical methods after 13, 181, and 733 h exposure in SBF at a temperature of 37°C. The oxide layers obtained were rough and porous and enriched with Ca, P, Si, and Na and their properties depended on the concentration of the components of the electrolyte. The results of the electrochemical examinations, after a 13 h exposure in SBF, show that the surface modification by PEO improves the corrosion resistance of titanium and it is not degraded after a long-term exposure in SBF. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results indicate that the surface layers have a complex structure.

  18. Radiolysis as a solution for accelerated ageing studies of electrolytes in Lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Daniel; Steinmetz, Vincent; Durand, Delphine; Legand, Solène; Dauvois, Vincent; Maître, Philippe; Le Caër, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Diethyl carbonate and dimethyl carbonate are prototype examples of eco-friendly solvents used in lithium-ion batteries. Nevertheless, their degradation products affect both the battery performance and its safety. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the reaction mechanisms involved in the ageing processes. Among those, redox processes are likely to play a critical role. Here we show that radiolysis is an ideal tool to generate the electrolytes degradation products. The major gases detected after irradiation (H2, CH4, C2H6, CO and CO2) are identified and quantified. Moreover, the chemical compounds formed in the liquid phase are characterized by different mass spectrometry techniques. Reaction mechanisms are then proposed. The detected products are consistent with those of the cycling of Li-based cells. This demonstrates that radiolysis is a versatile and very helpful tool to better understand the phenomena occurring in lithium-ion batteries. PMID:25907411

  19. Radiolysis as a solution for accelerated ageing studies of electrolytes in Lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Daniel; Steinmetz, Vincent; Durand, Delphine; Legand, Solène; Dauvois, Vincent; Maître, Philippe; Le Caër, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Diethyl carbonate and dimethyl carbonate are prototype examples of eco-friendly solvents used in lithium-ion batteries. Nevertheless, their degradation products affect both the battery performance and its safety. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the reaction mechanisms involved in the ageing processes. Among those, redox processes are likely to play a critical role. Here we show that radiolysis is an ideal tool to generate the electrolytes degradation products. The major gases detected after irradiation (H2, CH4, C2H6, CO and CO2) are identified and quantified. Moreover, the chemical compounds formed in the liquid phase are characterized by different mass spectrometry techniques. Reaction mechanisms are then proposed. The detected products are consistent with those of the cycling of Li-based cells. This demonstrates that radiolysis is a versatile and very helpful tool to better understand the phenomena occurring in lithium-ion batteries.

  20. Radiolysis as a solution for accelerated ageing studies of electrolytes in Lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Daniel; Steinmetz, Vincent; Durand, Delphine; Legand, Solène; Dauvois, Vincent; Maître, Philippe; Le Caër, Sophie

    2015-04-24

    Diethyl carbonate and dimethyl carbonate are prototype examples of eco-friendly solvents used in lithium-ion batteries. Nevertheless, their degradation products affect both the battery performance and its safety. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the reaction mechanisms involved in the ageing processes. Among those, redox processes are likely to play a critical role. Here we show that radiolysis is an ideal tool to generate the electrolytes degradation products. The major gases detected after irradiation (H2, CH4, C2H6, CO and CO2) are identified and quantified. Moreover, the chemical compounds formed in the liquid phase are characterized by different mass spectrometry techniques. Reaction mechanisms are then proposed. The detected products are consistent with those of the cycling of Li-based cells. This demonstrates that radiolysis is a versatile and very helpful tool to better understand the phenomena occurring in lithium-ion batteries.

  1. Electrolytic treatment of methyl orange in aqueous solution using three-dimensional electrode reactor coupling ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    He, Pingting; Wang, Ling; Xue, Jianjun; Cao, Zhibin

    2010-04-01

    The treatment of wastewater containing methyl orange was investigated experimentally using a three-dimensional electrode reactor coupling ultrasonics and the effect of ultrasonics on the degradation was studied. The effects of cell voltage, original concentration of methyl orange, pH value and the concentration of electrolyte on the removal efficiency were considered. The experimental results indicated that the removal rate of methyl orange exceeded 99% and the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD(Cr)) approached 84% under the optimum conditions. Using ultraviolet-visible spectrum analysis, a general degradation pathway for methyl orange was proposed based on the analysis of intermediate compounds. According to the ultraviolet-visible spectral changes during degradation of methyl orange, it can be presumed that the removal of COD(Cr) lags behind the removal of methyl orange because the structure of the benzene ring was more difficult to destroy compared with the azo double bonds.

  2. Impact of particle size on interaction forces between ettringite and dispersing comb-polymers in various electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Lucia; Kaufmann, Josef; Winnefeld, Frank; Plank, Johann

    2014-04-01

    The inter-particle forces play a fundamental role for the flow properties of a particle suspension in response to shear stresses. In concrete applications, cement admixtures based on comb-polymers like polycarboxylate-ether-based superplasticizer (PCE) are used to control the rheological behavior of the fresh mixtures, as it is negatively impacted by certain early hydration products, like the mineral ettringite. In this work, dispersion forces due to PCE were measured directly at the surface of ettringite crystals in different electrolyte solutions by the means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) applying spherical and sharp silicon dioxide tips. Results show an effective repulsion between ettringite surface and AFM tips for solutions above the IEP of ettringite (pH∼12) and significant attraction in solution at lower pH. The addition of polyelectrolytes in solution provides dispersion forces exclusively between the sharp tips (radius ≈ 10 nm) and the ettringite surface, whereas the polymer layer at the ettringite surface results to be unable to disperse large colloidal probes (radius ≈ 10 μm). A simple modeling of the inter-particle forces explains that, for large particles, the steric hindrance of the studied PCE molecules is not high enough to compensate for the Van der Waals and the attractive electrostatic contributions. Therefore, in cement suspensions the impact of ettringite on rheology is probably not only related to the particle charge, but also related to the involved particle sizes.

  3. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  4. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  5. Anomalous pH dependent stability behavior of surfactant-free nonpolar oil drops in aqueous electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Clasohm, Lucy Y; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2007-08-28

    Recent advances in atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurement techniques have allowed the direct measurement and theoretical interpretation of the interaction between a liquid droplet and a solid surface or between two liquid droplets. In this study, we investigated the interaction across an aqueous thin film between fluorocarbon (perfluoropentane) droplets, hydrocarbon (tetradecane) droplets, and a droplet and a flat mica surface in the absence of stabilizers. It was found that even at a relatively elevated electrolyte concentration of 0.1 M NaNO3, depending on the solution pH, interactions between two identical droplets or a droplet and a mica surface could be repulsive. A simple theoretical analysis of the magnitude and range of these interactive forces suggests that the DLVO theory cannot explain the observed behavior. The measured force behavior is discussed in the context of ion adsorption, and the arising charging effects, at the bare oil-water interface.

  6. ZrB2-HfB2 solid solutions as electrode materials for hydrogen reaction in acidic and basic solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Sitler, Steven J.; Raja, Krishnan S.; Charit, Indrajit

    2016-11-09

    Spark plasma sintered transition metal diborides such as HfB2, ZrB2 and their solid solutions were investigated as electrode materials for electrochemical hydrogen evolutions reactions (HER) in 1 M H2SO4 and 1 M NaOH electrolytes. HfB2 and ZrB2 formed complete solid solutions when mixed in 1:1, 1:4, and 4:1 ratios and they were stable in both electrolytes. The HER kinetics of the diborides were slower in the basic solution than in the acidic solutions. The Tafel slopes in 1 M H2SO4 were in the range of 0.15 - 0.18 V/decade except for pure HfB2 which showed a Tafel slope of 0.38more » V/decade. In 1 M NaOH the Tafel slopes were in the range of 0.12 - 0.27 V/decade. The composition of HfxZr1-xB2 solid solutions with x = 0.2 - 0.8, influenced the exchange current densities, overpotentials and Tafel slopes of the HER. As a result, the EIS data were fitted with a porous film equivalent circuit model in order to better understand the HER behavior. In addition, modeling calculations, using density functional theory approach, were carried out to estimate the density of states and band structure of the boride solid solutions.« less

  7. Quantifying phosphoric acid in high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell components by X-ray tomographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, S H; Marone, F; Stampanoni, M; Büchi, F N; Schmidt, T J

    2014-11-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy is investigated for imaging the local distribution and concentration of phosphoric acid in high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Phosphoric acid fills the pores of the macro- and microporous fuel cell components. Its concentration in the fuel cell varies over a wide range (40-100 wt% H3PO4). This renders the quantification and concentration determination challenging. The problem is solved by using propagation-based phase contrast imaging and a referencing method. Fuel cell components with known acid concentrations were used to correlate greyscale values and acid concentrations. Thus calibration curves were established for the gas diffusion layer, catalyst layer and membrane in a non-operating fuel cell. The non-destructive imaging methodology was verified by comparing image-based values for acid content and concentration in the gas diffusion layer with those from chemical analysis.

  8. Protective efficacy of ellagic acid on glycoproteins, hematological parameters, biochemical changes, and electrolytes in myocardial infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Kannan, M Mari; Quine, S Darlin; Sangeetha, T

    2012-07-01

    The cardioprotective property of ellagic acid in rats has been reported previously. The present study reveals the protective role of ellagic acid in biochemical parameters including serum iron, plasma iron binding capacity, uric acid, glycoprotein, and electrolytes along with hematological parameters. Rats were subcutaneously injected with isoproterenol (ISO) (100 mg/kg) for 2 days to induce myocardial infarction. ISO-induced rats showed a significant increase in their levels of serum iron, serum uric acid, and blood glucose, and a significant decrease in their levels of plasma iron binding capacity, serum total protein, albumin/globulin ratio, and heart glycogen, when compared with normal control rats. The altered hematological parameters were also observed in ISO-induced rats when compared with normal control rats. Pretreatment with ellagic acid at doses of 7.5 and 15 mg/kg produced significant beneficial effect by returning all the above-mentioned biochemical and hematological parameters to near normal levels.

  9. A Multi-Point Sensor Based on Optical Fiber for the Measurement of Electrolyte Density in Lead-Acid Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Cao-Paz, Ana M.; Marcos-Acevedo, Jorge; del Río-Vázquez, Alfredo; Martínez-Peñalver, Carlos; Lago-Ferreiro, Alfonso; Nogueiras-Meléndez, Andrés A.; Doval-Gandoy, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a multi-point optical fiber-based sensor for the measurement of electrolyte density in lead-acid batteries. It is known that the battery charging process creates stratification, due to the different densities of sulphuric acid and water. In order to study this process, density measurements should be obtained at different depths. The sensor we describe in this paper, unlike traditional sensors, consists of several measurement points, allowing density measurements at different depths inside the battery. The obtained set of measurements helps in determining the charge (SoC) and state of health (SoH) of the battery. PMID:22319262

  10. Electrodeposited Films from Aqueous Tungstic Acid-Hydrogen Peroxide Solutions for Electrochromic Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Kazusuke

    1987-11-01

    Electrodeposited tungsten oxide films from aqueous tungstic acid-hydrogen peroxide solutions were investigated for applications to electrochromic devices. These films exhibited electrochromism in aprotic electrolyte solutions containing Li-salts. When the films were heat-treated for an hour at temperatures between 100 and 200°C, the electrochromic reactions were rich in reversibility. The coloring efficiency and response rate for the films were favorable and comparable to those for tungsten trioxide evaporated films. A cell life-test was performed on several clock-size cells by applying a 1.2-V, 1-Hz, continuous square wave. The typical amount of charge required for coloration was about 50 C / m2 and remained unchanged even after 107 coloration-bleaching cycles.

  11. REDUCTION OF ACIDITY OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS BY USE OF FORMALDEHYDE

    DOEpatents

    Healy, T.V.

    1958-05-20

    A continuous method is described of concentrating by evaporation and reducing the nitrate ion content of an aqueous solution of metallic salts containing nitric acid not in excess of 8N. It consists of heating the solution and then passing formaldehyde into the heated solution to bring about decomposition of the nitric acid. The evolved gases containing NO are contacted countercurrently with an aqueous metal salt solution containing nitric acid in excess of 8N so as to bring about decomposition of the nitric acid and lower the normality to at least 8N, whereupon it is passed into the body of heated solution.

  12. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  13. Studies on the effect of acid treated TiO{sub 2} on the electrical and tensile properties of hexanoyl chitosan-polystyrene-LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} composite polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hanif, Nur Shazlinda Muhammad; Shahril, Nur Syuhada Mohd; Azmar, Amisha; Winie, Tan

    2015-08-28

    Composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs) comprised of hexanoyl chitosan:polystyrene (90:10) blend, lithium triflouromethanesulfonate (LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}) salt and titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) filler were prepared by solution casting technique. The TiO{sub 2} fillers were treated with 2% sulphuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) aqueous solution. The effect of acid treated TiO{sub 2} on the electrical and tensile properties of the electrolytes were investigated. Acid treated TiO{sub 2} decreased the electrolyte conductivity. Both the dielectric constant and dielectric loss decrease with increasing frequency and increases with increasing temperature. Relaxation times for ionic carriers were extracted from the loss tangent maximum peak at various temperatures. A distribution of relaxation time implied the non-Debye response. At all frequencies, ac conductivity increases with increasing temperature. An enhancement in the Young’s modulus was observed with the addition of TiO{sub 2}. The Young’s modulus increases with increasing TiO{sub 2} content. This is discussed using the percolation concept.

  14. Multi-electrolyte-step anodic aluminum oxide method for the fabrication of self-organized nanochannel arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nanochannel arrays were fabricated by the self-organized multi-electrolyte-step anodic aluminum oxide [AAO] method in this study. The anodization conditions used in the multi-electrolyte-step AAO method included a phosphoric acid solution as the electrolyte and an applied high voltage. There was a change in the phosphoric acid by the oxalic acid solution as the electrolyte and the applied low voltage. This method was used to produce self-organized nanochannel arrays with good regularity and circularity, meaning less power loss and processing time than with the multi-step AAO method. PMID:22333268

  15. Substrate Selection for Fundamental Studies of Electrocatalysts and Photoelectrodes: Inert Potential Windows in Acidic, Neutral, and Basic Electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Gorlin, Yelena; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    The selection of an appropriate substrate is an important initial step for many studies of electrochemically active materials. In order to help researchers with the substrate selection process, we employ a consistent experimental methodology to evaluate the electrochemical reactivity and stability of seven potential substrate materials for electrocatalyst and photoelectrode evaluation. Using cyclic voltammetry with a progressively increased scan range, we characterize three transparent conducting oxides (indium tin oxide, fluorine-doped tin oxide, and aluminum-doped zinc oxide) and four opaque conductors (gold, stainless steel 304, glassy carbon, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) in three different electrolytes (sulfuric acid, sodium acetate, and sodium hydroxide). We determine the inert potential window for each substrate/electrolyte combination and make recommendations about which materials may be most suitable for application under different experimental conditions. Furthermore, the testing methodology provides a framework for other researchers to evaluate and report the baseline activity of other substrates of interest to the broader community. PMID:25357131

  16. Substrate selection for fundamental studies of electrocatalysts and photoelectrodes: inert potential windows in acidic, neutral, and basic electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Benck, Jesse D; Pinaud, Blaise A; Gorlin, Yelena; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    The selection of an appropriate substrate is an important initial step for many studies of electrochemically active materials. In order to help researchers with the substrate selection process, we employ a consistent experimental methodology to evaluate the electrochemical reactivity and stability of seven potential substrate materials for electrocatalyst and photoelectrode evaluation. Using cyclic voltammetry with a progressively increased scan range, we characterize three transparent conducting oxides (indium tin oxide, fluorine-doped tin oxide, and aluminum-doped zinc oxide) and four opaque conductors (gold, stainless steel 304, glassy carbon, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) in three different electrolytes (sulfuric acid, sodium acetate, and sodium hydroxide). We determine the inert potential window for each substrate/electrolyte combination and make recommendations about which materials may be most suitable for application under different experimental conditions. Furthermore, the testing methodology provides a framework for other researchers to evaluate and report the baseline activity of other substrates of interest to the broader community.

  17. Vapor Pressure of Aqueous Solutions of Electrolytes Reproduced with Coarse-Grained Models without Electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Perez Sirkin, Yamila A; Factorovich, Matías H; Molinero, Valeria; Scherlis, Damian A

    2016-06-14

    The vapor pressure of water is a key property in a large class of applications from the design of membranes for fuel cells and separations to the prediction of the mixing state of atmospheric aerosols. Molecular simulations have been used to compute vapor pressures, and a few studies on liquid mixtures and solutions have been reported on the basis of the Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo method in combination with atomistic force fields. These simulations are costly, making them impractical for the prediction of the vapor pressure of complex materials. The goal of the present work is twofold: (1) to demonstrate the use of the grand canonical screening approach ( Factorovich , M. H. J. Chem. Phys. 2014 , 140 , 064111 ) to compute the vapor pressure of solutions and to extend the methodology for the treatment of systems without a liquid-vapor interface and (2) to investigate the ability of computationally efficient high-resolution coarse-grained models based on the mW monatomic water potential and ions described exclusively with short-range interactions to reproduce the relative vapor pressure of aqueous solutions. We find that coarse-grained models of LiCl and NaCl solutions faithfully reproduce the experimental relative pressures up to high salt concentrations, despite the inability of these models to predict cohesive energies of the solutions or the salts. A thermodynamic analysis reveals that the coarse-grained models achieve the experimental activity coefficients of water in solution through a compensation of severely underestimated hydration and vaporization free energies of the salts. Our results suggest that coarse-grained models developed to replicate the hydration structure and the effective ion-ion attraction in solution may lead to this compensation. Moreover, they suggest an avenue for the design of coarse-grained models that accurately reproduce the activity coefficients of solutions.

  18. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  19. Toward a Molecular-Based Understanding of High-Temperature Solvation Phenomena in Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, A.A.; Cummings, P.T.; Kusalik, P.G.; Simonson, J.M.

    1999-10-30

    The theoretical treatment of the solvation phenomenon of simple ions in aqueous solutions has been rather difficult, despite the apparent simplicity of the system. Long-range solvent-screened electrostatic interactions, coupled to the large variation (with state conditions) of the dielectric permittivity of water, give rise to a variety of rather complex solvation phenomena including dielectric saturation, electrostriction, and ion association. Notably, ion solvation in high-temperature/pressure aqueous solutions plays a leading role in hydrothermal chemistry, such as in the natural formation of ore deposits, the corrosion in boilers and reactors, and in high-temperature microbiology. Tremendous effort has been invested in the study of hydrothermal solutions to determine their thermodynamic, transport, and spectroscopic properties with the goal of elucidating the solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions over a wide range of state conditions. It is precisely at these conditions where our understanding and predictive capabilities are most precarious, in part, as a result of the coexistence of processes with two rather different length scales, i.e., short-ranged (solvation) and long-ranged (compressibility-driven) phenomena (Chialvo and Cummings 1994a). The latter feature makes hydrothermal systems extremely challenging to model, unless we are able to isolate the (compressibility-driven) propagation of the density perturbation from the (solvation-related) finite-density perturbation phenomena (Chialvo and Cummings 1995a).

  20. Effect of milk protein addition to a carbohydrate-electrolyte rehydration solution ingested after exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis J; Clayton, David; Evans, Gethin H

    2011-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of milk protein on rehydration after exercise in the heat, via the comparison of energy- and electrolyte content-matched carbohydrate and carbohydrate-milk protein solutions. Eight male subjects lost 1·9 (SD 0·2) % of their body mass by intermittent exercise in the heat and rehydrated with 150% of their body mass loss with either a 65 g/l carbohydrate solution (trial C) or a 40 g/l carbohydrate, 25 g/l milk protein solution (trial CP). Urine samples were collected before and after exercise and for 4 h after rehydration. Total cumulative urine output after rehydration was greater for trial C (1212 (SD 310) ml) than for trial CP (931 (SD 254) ml) (P < 0·05), and total fluid retention over the study was greater after ingestion of drink CP (55 (SD 12) %) than that after ingestion of drink C (43 (SD 15) %) (P < 0·05). At the end of the study period, whole body net fluid balance (P < 0·05) was less negative for trial CP (-0·26 (SD 0·27) litres) than for trial C (-0·52 (SD 0·30) litres), and although net negative for both the trials, it was only significantly negative after ingestion of drink C (P < 0·05). The results of the present study suggest that when matched for energy density and fat content, as well as for Na and K concentration, and when ingested after exercise-induced dehydration, a carbohydrate-milk protein solution is better retained than a carbohydrate solution. These results suggest that gram-for-gram, milk protein is more effective at augmenting fluid retention than carbohydrate.

  1. Modelling of the thermodynamic and solvation properties of electrolyte solutions with the statistical associating fluid theory for potentials of variable range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreckenberg, Jens M. A.; Dufal, Simon; Haslam, Andrew J.; Adjiman, Claire S.; Jackson, George; Galindo, Amparo

    2014-09-01

    An improved formulation of the extension of the statistical associating fluid theory for potentials of variable range to electrolytes (SAFT-VRE) is presented, incorporating a representation for the dielectric constant of the solution that takes into account the temperature, density and composition of the solvent. The proposed approach provides an excellent correlation of the dielectric-constant data available for a number of solvents including water, representative alcohols and carbon dioxide, and it is shown that the methodology can be used to treat mixed-solvent electrolyte solutions. Models for strong electrolytes of the metal-halide family are considered here. The salts are treated as fully dissociated and ion-specific interaction parameters are presented. Vapour pressure, density, and mean ionic activity coefficient data are used to determine the ion-ion and solvent-ion parameters, and mixed-salt electrolyte solutions (brines) are then treated predictively. We find that the resulting intermolecular potential models follow physical trends in terms of energies and ion sizes with a close relationship observed with well-established ionic diameters. A good description is obtained for the densities, mean ionic activity coefficients, and vapour pressures of the electrolyte solutions studied. The theory is also seen to provide excellent predictions of the osmotic coefficient and of the depression of the freezing temperature, and provides a qualitative estimate of the solvation free energy. The vapour pressure of aqueous brines is predicted accurately, as is the density of these solutions, although not at the highest pressures considered. Calculations for the vapour-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibria of salts in water+methanol and water+n-butan-1-ol are presented. In addition, it is shown that the salting-out of carbon dioxide in sodium chloride solutions is captured well using a predictive model.

  2. ELECTROLYTIC PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Lofthouse, E.

    1954-08-31

    This patent relates to electrolytic methods for the production of uranium tetrafluoride. According to the present invention a process for the production of uranium tetrafluoride comprises submitting to electrolysis an aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride containing free hydrofluoric acid. Advantageously the aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride is obtained by dissolving uranium hexafluoride in water. On electrolysis, the uranyl ions are reduced to uranous tons at the cathode and immediately combine with the fluoride ions in solution to form the insoluble uranium tetrafluoride which is precipitated.

  3. Electro-oxidation of methanol in sulfuric acid electrolyte on platinized-carbon electrodes with several functional-group characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, A.K.; Ravikumar, M.K.; Roy, A.; Barman, S.R.; Sarma, D.D. . Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit)

    1994-06-01

    The effect of acid/base functional-groups associated with platinized-carbon electrodes on their catalytic activity toward electro-oxidation of methanol in sulfuric acid electrolyte at 60 C is studied. Platinized-carbon electrodes with small amounts of functional groups exhibit higher catalytic activity compared to those with large concentration of acidic/basic surface functionalities. The overpotential for methanol oxidation is minimum on electrodes of platinized carbons with pHzpc values between 6 and 7. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of various platinized carbons suggests that the acid/base surface function-groups produce ample amounts of surface Pt-oxides and a consequent decrease in activity toward methanol oxidation.

  4. Translocation of single stranded DNA through the α-hemolysin protein nanopore in acidic solutions

    PubMed Central

    de Zoysa, Ranulu Samanthi S.; Krishantha, D.M. Milan; Zhao, Qitao; Gupta, Jyoti; Guan, Xiyun

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acidic pH on the translocation of single-stranded DNA through the α-hemolysin pore is investigated. Two significantly different types of events, i.e., deep blockades and shallow blockades, are observed at low pH. The residence times of the shallow blockades are not significantly different from those of the DNA translocation events obtained at or near physiological pH, while the deep blockades have much larger residence times and blockage amplitudes. With a decrease in the pH of the electrolyte solution, the percentage of the deep blockades in the total events increases. Furthermore, the mean residence time of these long-lived events is dependent on the length of DNA, and also varies with the nucleotide base, suggesting that they are appropriate for use in DNA analysis. In addition to be used as an effective approach to affect DNA translocation in the nanopore, manipulation of the pH of the electrolyte solution provides a potential means to greatly enhance the sensitivity of nanopore stochastic sensing. PMID:21997574

  5. Acid rain: Engineering solutions, regulatory aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Schwieger, R.G.; Elliott, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Keeping up with efforts to control acid rain, this reference presents current scientific aspects associated with the problem of political and legislative concerns and ideas for developing effective mitigation programs at reasonable cost. The contributors are the authorities in attendance at the Second International Conference on Acid Rain - and this work represents the first time engineers and managers with firsthand knowledge of systems and equipment to reduce SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions gathered in one place. Throughout the book, some 200 tables, charts, diagrams, and photographs augment the textual material.

  6. Titratable macroions in multivalent electrolyte solutions: Strong coupling dressed ion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adžić, Nataša; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical description of the effect of polyvalent ions on the interaction between titratable macroions. The model system consists of two point-like macroions with dissociable sites, immersed in an asymmetric ionic mixture of monovalent and polyvalent salts. We formulate a dressed ion strong coupling theory, based on the decomposition of the asymmetric ionic mixture into a weakly electrostatically coupled monovalent salt and into polyvalent ions that are strongly electrostatically coupled to the titratable macro-ions. The charge of the macroions is not considered as fixed, but is allowed to respond to local bathing solution parameters (electrostatic potential, pH of the solution, and salt concentration) through a simple charge regulation model. The approach presented, yielding an effective polyvalent-ion mediated interaction between charge-regulated macroions at various solution conditions, describes the strong coupling equivalent of the Kirkwood-Schumaker interaction.

  7. Electrolytic removal of Rhodamine B from aqueous solution by peroxicoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Nidheesh, Puthiya Veetil; Gandhimathi, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Peroxicoagulation treatment of aqueous solution containing hazardous dye, Rhodamine B, with commercially available graphite as cathode and iron as anode has been studied. The effect of various operational parameters such as solution pH, applied voltage, electrode area, other ions, etc. on the dye removal was investigated. The experimental result showed that pH-regulated peroxicoagulation system is an efficient process for the dye removal. Ninety-five percent of the dye was removed after 180 min of electrolysis. Anions such as carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride and sulphate negatively affected the efficiency of peroxicoagulation system. From the present study, it can be concluded that peroxicoagulation process is an efficient tool for dye removal from aqueous solution.

  8. Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Peterson, R. A.

    1997-02-11

    This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

  9. Capillary electrophoresis of some free fatty acids using partially aqueous electrolyte systems and indirect UV detection. Application to the analysis of oleic and linoleic acids in peanut breeding lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study has shown for the first time the suitability of CE with a partially aqueous electrolyte system for the analysis of free fatty acids (FFA's) in small portions of single peanut seeds. The partially aqueous electrolyte system consisted of 40 mM Tris, 2.5 mM adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) ...

  10. Testing of the GROMOS Force-Field Parameter Set 54A8: Structural Properties of Electrolyte Solutions, Lipid Bilayers, and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Reif, Maria M; Winger, Moritz; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2013-02-12

    The GROMOS 54A8 force field [Reif et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput.2012, 8, 3705-3723] is the first of its kind to contain nonbonded parameters for charged amino acid side chains that are derived in a rigorously thermodynamic fashion, namely a calibration against single-ion hydration free energies. Considering charged moieties in solution, the most decisive signature of the GROMOS 54A8 force field in comparison to its predecessor 54A7 can probably be found in the thermodynamic equilibrium between salt-bridged ion pair formation and hydration. Possible shifts in this equilibrium might crucially affect the properties of electrolyte solutions or/and the stability of (bio)molecules. It is therefore important to investigate the consequences of the altered description of charged oligoatomic species in the GROMOS 54A8 force field. The present study focuses on examining the ability of the GROMOS 54A8 force field to accurately model the structural properties of electrolyte solutions, lipid bilayers, and proteins. It is found that (i) aqueous electrolytes involving oligoatomic species (sodium acetate, methylammonium chloride, guanidinium chloride) reproduce experimental salt activity derivatives for concentrations up to 1.0 m (1.0-molal) very well, and good agreement between simulated and experimental data is also reached for sodium acetate and methylammonium chloride at 2.0 m concentration, while not even qualitative agreement is found for sodium chloride throughout the whole range of examined concentrations, indicating a failure of the GROMOS 54A7 and 54A8 force-field parameter sets to correctly account for the balance between ion-ion and ion-water binding propensities of sodium and chloride ions; (ii) the GROMOS 54A8 force field reproduces the liquid crystalline-like phase of a hydrated DPPC bilayer at a pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 323 K, the area per lipid being in agreement with experimental data, whereas other structural properties (volume per lipid, bilayer

  11. Effect of alpha-cyclodextrin on drug distribution studied by electrochemistry at interfaces between immiscible electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Deryabina, Maria A; Hansen, Steen H; Østergaard, Jesper; Jensen, Henrik

    2009-05-21

    The description and understanding of noncovalent interactions and distribution of potential new drug compounds in an organism is of paramount importance for the successful development of new drugs. In this work, a new procedure based on electrochemistry at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES) for addressing and discriminating between drug compound/ligand interactions in aqueous solution and nonspecific ligand effects on oil-water distribution behavior has been developed. The procedure is demonstrated using five drug compounds with different physical chemical parameters and alpha-cyclodextrin as the aqueous phase ligand. Alpha-cyclodextrin was chosen as an aqueous phase ligand, as it is frequently used in drug formulations to enhance solubility and bioavailability of drug compounds. Supplementary capillary electrophoresis experiments provided more detailed information on alpha-cyclodextrin drug complexation and, in combination with the electrochemical studies, provided information on solvation effects affecting the oil-water distribution of the drug compounds. The use of ligand shift ion partition diagrams for data presentation is a convenient format for the visualization of ligand effects on distribution behavior of related drug compounds.

  12. Ion Association versus Ion Interaction Models in Examining Electrolyte Solutions: Application to Calcium Hydroxide Solubility Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menéndez, M. Isabel; Borge, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The heterogeneous equilibrium of the solubility of calcium hydroxide in water is used to predict both its solubility product from solubility and solubility values from solubility product when inert salts, in any concentration, are present. Accepting the necessity of including activity coefficients to treat the saturated solution of calcium…

  13. A study on lithium/air secondary batteries-Stability of NASICON-type glass ceramics in acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimonishi, Y.; Zhang, T.; Johnson, P.; Imanishi, N.; Hirano, A.; Takeda, Y.; Yamamoto, O.; Sammes, N.

    The stability of a NASICON-type lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte, Li 1+ x+ yTi 2- xAl xP 3- ySi yO 12 (LTAP), in acetic acid and formic acid solutions was examined. XRD patterns of the LTAP powders immersed in 100% acetic acid and formic acid at 50 °C for 4 months showed no change as compared to the pristine LTAP. However, the electrical conductivity of LTAP drastically decreased. On the other hand, no significant electrical conductivity change of LTAP immersed in lithium formate saturated formic acid-water solution was observed, and the electrical conductivity of LTAP immersed in lithium acetate saturated acetic acid-water increased. Cyclic voltammogram tests suggested that acetic acid was stable up to a high potential, but formic acid decomposed under the decomposition potential of water. The acetic acid solution was considered to be a candidate for the active material in the air electrode of lithium-air rechargeable batteries. The cell reaction was considered as 2Li + 2 CH 3COOH + 1/2O 2 = 2CH 3COOLi + H 2O. The energy density of this lithium-air system is calculated to be 1477 Wh kg -1 from the weights of Li and CH 3COOH, and an observed open-circuit voltage of 3.69 V.

  14. Aluminum contamination of parenteral nutrition additives, amino acid solutions, and lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Popińska, K; Kierkuś, J; Lyszkowska, M; Socha, J; Pietraszek, E; Kmiotek, W; Ksiazyk, J

    1999-09-01

    Contamination of parenteral nutrition solutions with aluminum may result in accumulation of this element in bones and, in premature infants, may inhibit bone calcium uptake and induce cholestasis. We measured the aluminum concentration of small-volume parenterals, amino acid solutions, lipid emulsions, and special solutions containing glucose, amino acids, electrolytes, and trace elements (standard I for children with a body weight of 3-5 kg, standard II for children with a body weight of 5-10 kg). The method used was graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry GTA-AAS (SpectrAA-400 Plus, Varian, PtY Ltd., Mulgrave, Australia). Quality control was run with the use of control serum (Seronorm, Nycomed, Oslo, Norway). The aluminum contents of parenterally administered solutions were: pediatric trace elements, 130 micrograms/L, and pediatric trace elements, 3000 micrograms/L; phosphorus salts: K-phosphates, 9800 micrograms/L, and Na/K phosphates, 13,000 micrograms/L; 10% calcium gluconate, 4400 micrograms/L; 6.5% amino acids, 30 micrograms/L; 10% amino acids, 120 micrograms/L; 12.5% amino acids, 121 micrograms/L; 20% lipid emulsion, 30 micrograms/L; 20% lipid emulsion, 180 micrograms/L; water-soluble vitamins, 12 micrograms/L; lipid soluble vitamins, 360 micrograms/L; standard I, 55 micrograms/L; standard II, 90 micrograms/L; The aluminum intake from parenteral nutrition was 6.6-10.8 micrograms.kg-1.d-1--a dose exceeding the safety limit of 2 micrograms.kg-1.d-1. The possible association of aluminum not only with metabolic bone disease, but also with encephalopathy, dictates caution when dealing with the pediatric population on long-term parenteral nutrition. In the absence of reliable label information, it seems proper to monitor the aluminum concentration in parenteral nutrition products and to report it in professional journals.

  15. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  16. Decomposition of pertoluic acid in chlorobenzene solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ariko, N.G.; Kornilova, N.N.; Mitskevich, N.I.

    1985-09-01

    The kinetics and composition of the decomposition products of pertoluic acid in chlorobenzene at 353-403 K were studied. The activation energy of the gross decomposition is 82.4 is identical to 6 kJ/mole; the main products are pertoluic acid and CO/sub 2/. On the basis of the dependence of the yields of CO/sub 2/ on the concentration of the peracid (0.01-0.05 M), it was concluded that the peracid undergoes radical breakdown, and induced breakdown with abstraction of a H atom from OOH group occurs. The formation of toluence (conversion product of the CH/sub 3/-C/sub 6/H/sub 4/. radical) and O/sub 2/ was demonstrated.

  17. Anhydrous proton-conducting electrolyte membranes based on hyperbranched polymer with phosphonic acid groups for high-temperature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takahito; Hirai, Keita; Tamura, Masashi; Uno, Takahiro; Kubo, Masataka; Aihara, Yuichi

    The two different molecular weight hyperbranched polymers (HBP(L)-PA-Ac and HBP(H)-PA-Ac) with both phosphonic acid group as a functional group and acryloyl group as a cross-linker at the chain ends were successfully synthesized as a new thermally stable proton-conducting electrolyte. The cross-linked electrolyte membranes (CL-HBP-PA) were prepared by their thermal polymerizations using benzoyl peroxide and their ionic conductivities under dry condition and thermal properties were investigated. The ionic conductivities of the low molecular weight CL-HBP(L)-PA membrane and the high molecular weight CL-HBP(H)-PA membrane were found to be 1.2 × 10 -5 and 2.6 × 10 -6 S cm -1, respectively, at 150 °C under dry condition, and showed the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher (VTF) type temperature dependence. Both membranes were thermally stable up to 300 °C, and they had suitable thermal stability as electrolyte membranes for the high-temperature fuel cells under dry condition. Fuel cell measurements using a single membrane electrode assembly cell with both cross-linked membranes were successfully performed.

  18. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  19. Polymerization of beta-amino acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged alpha- and beta-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. alpha-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. beta-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an alpha- and beta-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  20. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, G.A.; Smith, J.W.; Ihle, N.C.

    1982-07-08

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with Portland cement to form concrete.

  1. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Jeffrey W [Lancaster, OH; Ihle, Nathan C [Walla Walla, WA

    1984-01-01

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with portland cement to form concrete.

  2. Solubility of NaCl in aqueous electrolyte solutions from 10 to 100°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, M.A.; Potter, R.W.; Haas, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The solubilities of NaCl in aqueous KCl, MgCl2, CaCl2, and mixed CaCl2-KCl solutions have been determined from 10 to 100??C. The data were fit to an equation, and the equation was used to calculate values of the change in solubility of NaCl, ???[NaCl]/???T. These values are required for calculations of the rate of migration of fluids in a thermal gradient in rock salt. The data obtained here indicate that the values of ???[NaCl]/???T are 36-73% greater for solutions containing divalent ions than for the NaCl-H2O system.

  3. Cloud-point temperatures of lysozyme in electrolyte solutions by thermooptical analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Park, Eung Jo; Bae, Young Chan

    2004-04-01

    Liquid-liquid phase-separation data are obtained for aqueous solutions of lysozyme. Thermooptical analysis (TOA) technique overcomes many defects of the light scattering method, which is most commonly used for this purpose, and provides a simple, rapid and reliable experimental method to determine cloud-point temperatures (CPTs) of aqueous protein solution systems. The TOA apparatus described here needs very small amount of samples (0.02 ml), and CPT can easily be determined in a very short time. The CPTs are measured as a function of salt type and concentration at pH 4.0 and 7.0. Salts used include those from mono and divalent cations and anions, and the modified Perturbed-Hard-Sphere-Chain (PHSC) model that takes into account the shape of protein is used to interpret the effect of salts.

  4. Interactions and aggregation of apoferritin molecules in solution: effects of added electrolytes.

    PubMed Central

    Petsev, D N; Thomas, B R; Yau, S; Vekilov, P G

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the structure of the protein species and the protein-protein interactions in solutions containing two apoferritin molecular forms, monomers and dimers, in the presence of Na(+) and Cd(2+) ions. We used chromatographic, and static and dynamic light scattering techniques, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Size-exclusion chromatography was used to isolate these two protein fractions. The sizes and shapes of the monomers and dimers were determined by dynamic light scattering and AFM. Although the monomer is an apparent sphere with a diameter corresponding to previous x-ray crystallography determinations, the dimer shape corresponds to two, bound monomer spheres. Static light scattering was applied to characterize the interactions between solute molecules of monomers and dimers in terms of the second osmotic virial coefficients. The results for the monomers indicate that Na(+) ions cause strong intermolecular repulsion even at concentrations higher than 0.15 M, contrary to the predictions of the commonly applied Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory. We argue that the reason for such behavior is hydration force due to the formation of a water shell around the protein molecules with the help of the sodium ions. The addition of even small amounts of Cd(2+) changes the repulsive interactions to attractive but does not lead to oligomer formation, at least at the protein concentrations used. Thus, the two ions provide examples of strong specificity of their interactions with the protein molecules. In solutions of the apoferritin dimer, the molecules attract even in the presence of Na(+) only, indicating a change in the surface of the apoferritin molecule. In view of the strong repulsion between the monomers, this indicates that the dimers and higher oligomers form only after partial denaturation of some of the apoferritin monomers. These observations suggest that aggregation and self-assembly of protein molecules or molecular subunits may be driven by

  5. A comparison of traditional and quantitative analysis of acid-base and electrolyte imbalances in horses with gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marga; Monreal, Luis; Segura, Dídac; Armengou, Lara; Añor, Sònia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare traditional and quantitative approaches in analysis of the acid-base and electrolyte imbalances in horses with acute gastrointestinal disorders. Venous blood samples were collected from 115 colic horses, and from 45 control animals. Horses with colic were grouped according to the clinical diagnosis into 4 categories: obstructive, ischemic, inflammatory, and diarrheic problems. Plasma electrolytes, total protein, albumin, pH, pCO2, tCO2, HCO3-, base excess, anion gap, measured strong ion difference (SIDm), nonvolatile weak buffers (A(tot)), and strong ion gap were determined in all samples. All colic horses revealed a mild but statistically significant decrease in iCa2+ concentration. Potassium levels were mildly but significantly decreased in horses with colic, except in those within the inflammatory group. Additionally, the diarrheic group revealed a mild but significant decrease in Na+, tCa, tMg, total protein, albumin, SIDm, and A(tot). Although pH was not severely altered in any colic group, 26% of the horses in the obstructive group, 74% in the ischemic group, 87% in the inflammatory group, and 22% in the diarrheic group had a metabolic imbalance. In contrast, when using the quantitative approach, 78% of the diarrheic horses revealed a metabolic imbalance consisting mainly of a strong ion acidosis and nonvolatile buffer ion alkalosis. In conclusion, mild acid-base and electrolyte disturbances were observed in horses with gastrointestinal disorders. However, the quantitative approach should be used in these animals, especially when strong ion imbalances and hypoproteinemia are detected, so that abnormalities in acid-base status are evident.

  6. Electrokinetic potential and stability of SiC suspensions in electrolyte solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eremenko, B. V.; Kolesnik, V. O.

    1984-01-01

    The dependence of zeta potential on pH of an aqueous Si carbide suspension was studied by an electroosmosis method. The effect of pH on the Si carbide electrical double layer is attributed to the participation of H and OH ions in the surface dissociation reactions of weak acid OH groups on an oxidized carbide surface. Maximum stability of the suspensions was observed at maximum negative zeta potentials.

  7. Phosphorylation of glyceric acid in aqueous solution using trimetaphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-02-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%.

  8. Phosphorylation of Glyceric Acid in Aqueous Solution Using Trimetaphosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%.

  9. Estimating adsorption enthalpies and affinity sequences of monovalent electrolyte ions on oxide surfaces in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, N.

    2000-11-01

    A new expression is developed for estimating the adsorption enthalpy of aqueous, monovalent ions on charged surfaces of solid oxides up to about 70°C. For sorption of the M-th cation and L-th anion represented as: > SO- + M+ = > SO- - - M+and > SOH2+ + L- = > SOH2+ -- L-the enthalpy at 25°C is given by: ΔH i,k0=ΔΩ iT[ 1/ɛ k2( ∂ɛ k/∂T)- 1/ɛ w2( ∂ɛ w/∂T)]+ΔG i,k0, where i = M+ or L-, > SO- and > SOH2+ are charged surface sites, ΔΩ i is the interfacial Born solvation coefficient of the i-th monovalent ion, ɛ k and ɛ w are the dielectric constants of the k-th solid and of bulk water, respectively, T is the absolute temperature, and Δ Gi, k0 is the free energy of ion adsorption. The small values predicted for enthalpies suggest weak temperature dependence for electrolyte affinities. The reaction enthalpy is negative for all oxides considered, and is the major contribution to the free energy of adsorption. Reactions are less exothermic for solids with smaller dielectric constants. Ion-specific trends are also noted, with exothermicity of enthalpy decreasing as Li + > Na + > K + > Rb + = NH 4+ > Cs + > TMA + (tetramethylammonium) for all oxides except quartz and amorphous SiO 2 where the reverse trend is predicted. Similarly, exothermicity decreases as F - > Cl - > Br - > I - for all oxides excluding quartz and amorphous SiO 2. The entropic contribution to free energy is small, and is negative for all the oxides considered including quartz, but is positive for amorphous SiO 2, suggesting an intriguing difference between the surfaces of quartz and amorphous SiO 2. In order to determine the temperature dependence of surface-complexation, Δ HM+, k0 and Δ HL-, k0 are combined with the enthalpies for deprotonation and protonation of the neutral surface site (-Δ HH+,20, ΔH H+,10), respectively, yielding Δ HM+, k0∗ and Δ HL-, k0∗ which correspond to the reactions: > SOH + M+ = > SO- - - M+ + H+and > SOH + H+ + L- = > SOH2+ - - L- Positive values

  10. Reduction of Plutonium in Acidic Solutions by Mesoporous Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Jones, Stephen; Wang, Jinxiu; Wu, Zhangxiong; Uribe, Eva; Zhao, Dongyuan; Nitsche, Heino

    2015-12-19

    Batch contact experiments with several porous carbon materials showed that carbon solids spontaneously reduce the oxidation state of plutonium in 1-1.5 M acid solutions, without significant adsorption. The final oxidation state and rate of Pu reduction varies with the solution matrix, and also depends on the surface chemistry and surface area of the carbon. It was demonstrated that acidic Pu(VI) solutions can be reduced to Pu(III) by passing through a column of porous carbon particles, offering an easy alternative to electrolysis with a potentiostat.

  11. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM ACIDIC SOLUTIONS USING NO2

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A; Robert Pierce, R; James Laurinat, J

    2006-08-22

    Chloride (Cl{sup -}) salt processing in strong acids is used to recycle plutonium (Pu) from pyrochemical residues. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is studying the potential application of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) gas to effectively convert dissolved pyrochemical salt solutions to chloride-free solutions and improve recovery operations. An NO{sub 2} sparge has been shown to effectively remove Cl{sup -} from solutions containing 6-8 M acid (H{sup +}) and up to 5 M Cl{sup -}. Chloride removal occurs as a result of the competition of at least two reactions, one which is acid-dependent. Below 4 M H+, NO2 reacts with Cl- to produce nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). Between 6 M and 8 M H{sup +}, the reaction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), facilitated by the presence of NO{sub 2}, strongly affects the rate of Cl{sup -} removal. The effect of heating the acidic Cl{sup -} salt solution without pre-heating the NO{sub 2} gas has minimal effect on Cl{sup -} removal rates when the contact times between NO{sub 2} and the salt solution are on the order of seconds.

  12. Differential reactivity of Cu(111) and Cu(100) during nitrate reduction in acid electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sang-Eun; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    The interactions of nitrate with Cu(100) and Cu(111) in acidic solution are studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM). CV results show that reduction of nitrate on Cu(111) commences at 0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl while the corresponding potential is -0.3 V on Cu(100). EC-STM images show that the terrace of both Cu(111) and Cu(100) are atomically flat at potentials more negative than -0.7 V. The Cu(100) surface exhibits flat terraces throughout the entire cathodic potential range. Close to OCP, step edges start to corrode. In contrast to Cu(100), the first layer of Cu(111) is converted to an atomically rough and defected surface-associated with nascent surface oxidation at potentials positive of -0.7 V. This surface oxidation is correlated with nitrate reduction.

  13. Improvements of conductivity measurements of electrolyte solutions using a new conductometric cell design.

    PubMed

    Merclin, Nadia; Beronius, Per

    2002-06-20

    A new conductometric cell design, for precise conductance measurements, has been developed and tested using aqueous lidocaine hydrochloride as a model system. A small portion of a stock solution in the conductivity cell is diluted stepwise by pure solvent. The resistance of the cell is measured by means of a precision conductance bridge. Contrary to conventional technique in precision conductometry, the temperature is allowed to change during the measurements and corrected to the desired standard temperature. The temperature is determined using a thermistor immersed in the cell solution, which is agitated during the entire experiment. Using this new approach, significant improvements over conventional conductivity technique were observed. The time required for the measurements was considerably reduced, by a factor of at least ten. The amounts, especially of costly drugs, required in the measurements are also reduced. The pK(a) value obtained, 7.28, is close to the previously reported conductometrically determined average, 7.18. The precision of the single conductivity value is equally high, if not higher, as that obtained using conventional conductivity technique.

  14. Water Density in the Electric Double Layer at the Insulator/Electrolyte Solution Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonov,A.

    2006-01-01

    I studied the spatial structure of the thick transition region between n-hexane and a colloidal solution of 7-nm silica particles by X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence small-angle scattering. The interfacial structure is discussed in terms of a semiquantitative interface model wherein the potential gradient at the n-hexane/sol interface reflects the difference in the potentials of 'image forces' between the cationic Na{sup +} and anions (nanoparticles) and the specific adsorption of surface charge at the interface between the adsorbed layer and the solution, as well as at the interface between the adsorbed layer and n-hexane. The X-ray scattering data revealed that the average density of water in the field {approx}10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} V/m of the electrical double layer at the hexane/silica sol interface is the same as, or only few percent higher (1-7%) than, its density under normal conditions.

  15. Asymmetric behavior in electrowetting of electrolyte solutions on graphene at the nanoscale: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherian Tabasi, Fereshte; van der Vegt, Nico

    2015-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, electrowetting of aqueous solutions on graphene are studied. By doping the surface with the positive or negative charges, the counter-ions are adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface, and the co-ions are repelled from the interface, leading to the decrease of the solid-liquid surface tension and therefore the contact angle (known as electrowetting). Our simulation results show that at zero surface charge density, water molecules at the interface (located between the surface and first ionic layer) are mainly oriented parallel to the surface. However due to the smaller size of the hydrogen than the oxygen, there is a slight tendency of the water dipole moment to orient into the surface. On the charged surfaces, the orientation polarization of the interfacial water molecules are shown to be stronger on the negative surfaces than the positive ones. Such asymmetric orientation polarization of water leads to different screening of the graphene surface charge and therefore different contact angles of the solution on surfaces with opposite charges. Simulations results show more spreading of the liquid on the positively charged surfaces than the negative ones.

  16. Solid polymer electrolyte from phosphorylated chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Fauzi, Iqbal Arcana, I Made

    2014-03-24

    Recently, the need of secondary battery application continues to increase. The secondary battery which using a liquid electrolyte was indicated had some weakness. A solid polymer electrolyte is an alternative electrolytes membrane which developed in order to replace the liquid electrolyte type. In the present study, the effect of phosphorylation on to polymer electrolyte membrane which synthesized from chitosan and lithium perchlorate salts was investigated. The effect of the component’s composition respectively on the properties of polymer electrolyte, was carried out by analyzed of it’s characterization such as functional groups, ion conductivity, and thermal properties. The mechanical properties i.e tensile resistance and the morphology structure of membrane surface were determined. The phosphorylation processing of polymer electrolyte membrane of chitosan and lithium perchlorate was conducted by immersing with phosphoric acid for 2 hours, and then irradiated on a microwave for 60 seconds. The degree of deacetylation of chitosan derived from shrimp shells was obtained around 75.4%. Relative molecular mass of chitosan was obtained by viscometry method is 796,792 g/mol. The ionic conductivity of chitosan membrane was increase from 6.33 × 10{sup −6} S/cm up to 6.01 × 10{sup −4} S/cm after adding by 15 % solution of lithium perchlorate. After phosphorylation, the ionic conductivity of phosphorylated lithium chitosan membrane was observed 1.37 × 10{sup −3} S/cm, while the tensile resistance of 40.2 MPa with a better thermal resistance. On the strength of electrolyte membrane properties, this polymer electrolyte membrane was suggested had one potential used for polymer electrolyte in field of lithium battery applications.

  17. Gas evolution in aluminum electrolytic capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Albella, J.M.; Martinez-Duart, J.M.

    1984-03-01

    Gas evolution in aluminum electrolytic capacitors constitutes one of their main drawbacks in comparison to other types of capacitors lacking a liquid electrolyte. In this respect, one of the most common causes of failure shown by liquid electrolyte capacitors is electrolyte leakage through the seal or even explosions produced by internal pressure buildup. In order to prevent these hazards, some substances, known as depolarizers, are usually added to the capacitor electrolyte with the purpose of absorbing the hydrogen evolved at the cathode (1, 2). Although the gas evolution problem in electrolytic capacitors has been known for a long time, there is a lack of literature on both direct measurements of the gas evolved and assessments of the amount of depolarizer active for the hydrogen absorption process. Aluminum electrolytic capacitors of 100..mu..F and 40V nominal voltage, miniature type (diam 8 mm, height 18.5 mm), were manufactured under standard specifications. The capacitors were filled with about 0.5 ml of an electrolyte consisting essentially of a solution of boric, adipic, and phosphoric acids in ethylene glycol. Picric acid and p-benzoquinone in molar concentrations of 0.01M and 0.05M, respectively, were added as depolarizers, yielding an electrolyte with a resistivity of about 80 ..cap omega..-cm and a pH of 5.1. The pressure inside the capacitors was monitored by a conventional Ushaped manometer made from a capillary glass tube filled with distilled water. The number of mols of gas generated in the capacitor (/eta/ /SUB g/ ) was calculated from the measured pressure (sensitivity 0.1 mm Hg) and the value of the internal volume of the manometercapacitor system.

  18. Miniaturized diamond field-effect transistors for application in biosensors in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kwang-Soup; Hiraki, Takahiro; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The authors fabricated diamond solution-gate field-effect transistors (SGFETs) with miniaturization of the channel length to 5μm by photolithography. The channel surface was directly functionalized with amine by ultraviolet irradiation in an ammonia gas for 4h and aminated diamond SGFETs were sensitive to pH by 40mV /pH. Urease was immobilized on the amine-modified channel surface, which was sensitive to urea by 27μA/decade from 10-5M to 10-2M. The authors fabricated submicron-sized (500nm) diamond SGFETs using electron-beam lithography. The transconductance (gm) was 56mS/mm, which was 930-fold greater than that of the 500μm channel length.

  19. Influence of diaphragm configuration on DC diaphragm discharge breakdown in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavatá, L.; Hlochová, L.; Kozáková, Z.; Krčma, F.; Guaitella, O.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with generation of diaphragm discharge in water solutions of sodium chloride with fixed conductivity of 275 μS. The photos were recorded by high-speed iCCD camera at defined times synchronized by the current passing through the system. Three different phases in the current-voltage curve were recognized under all conditions. Only electrolysis proceeds during the first phase at the lowest applied voltage (300 - 1200 V depending on the orifice dimensions), while bubbles were created thanks to the intense Joule heating inside the orifice during the second phase. Finally, the discharge was ignited at applied voltages over 1600 V. These facts were confirmed by iCCD images taken during all three phases. We concluded, by comparing current-voltage characteristics of different orifice diameter sizes, that this parameter had an important influence on the bubbles generation phase. On the contrary, the diaphragm thickness played an important role at the discharge breakdown.

  20. Nanofiltration of Electrolyte Solutions by Sub-2nm Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Kim, S; In, J B; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-13

    Both MD simulations and experimental studies have shown that liquid and gas flow through carbon nanotubes with nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast. For applications in separation technology, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In this work, we use pressure-driven filtration experiments to study ion exclusion in silicon nitride/sub-2-nm CNT composite membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion at low salt concentration. Our results support a rejection mechanism dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  1. Coulometric determination of berkelium in sulfuric acid and nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, G.A.; Chistyakov, V.M.; Erin, E.A.

    1987-03-01

    Results are reported on the study and quantitative determination of berkelium by the coulometric method in 1 M sulfuric acid, in solutions of nitric acid, and in mixtures of these acids. The best results in the determination of berkelium were obtained in solutions of a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids. In 1 M HNO/sub 3/ + 0.1 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions, berkelium can be determined with an accuracy within approx. +/- 2%, when its content is 10 ..mu..g/ml.

  2. Population and size distribution of solute-rich mesospecies within mesostructured aqueous amino acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Jawor-Baczynska, Anna; Moore, Barry D; Lee, Han Seung; McCormick, Alon V; Sefcik, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of highly soluble substances such as small amino acids are usually assumed to be essentially homogenous systems with some degree of short range local structuring due to specific interactions on the sub-nanometre scale (e.g. molecular clusters, hydration shells), usually not exceeding several solute molecules. However, recent theoretical and experimental studies have indicated the presence of much larger supramolecular assemblies or mesospecies in solutions of small organic and inorganic molecules as well as proteins. We investigated both supersaturated and undersaturated aqueous solutions of two simple amino acids (glycine and DL-alanine) using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Brownian Microscopy/Nanoparticles Tracking Analysis (NTA) and Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM). Colloidal scale mesospecies (nanodroplets) were previously reported in supersaturated solutions of these amino acids and were implicated as intermediate species on non-classical crystallization pathways. Surprisingly, we have found that the mesospecies are also present in significant numbers in undersaturated solutions even when the solute concentration is well below the solid-liquid equilibrium concentration (saturation limit). Thus, mesopecies can be observed with mean diameters ranging from 100 to 300 nm and a size distribution that broadens towards larger size with increasing solute concentration. We note that the mesospecies are not a separate phase and the system is better described as a thermodynamically stable mesostructured liquid containing solute-rich domains dispersed within bulk solute solution. At a given temperature, solute molecules in such a mesostructured liquid phase are subject to equilibrium distribution between solute-rich mesospecies and the surrounding bulk solution.

  3. Electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from dissolved oxygen in acidic solutions.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Zhimin; Chang, Jih-Hsing; Huang, Chin-Pao

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was electro-generated in a parallel-plate electrolyzer by reduction of dissolved oxygen (DO) in acidic solutions containing dilute supporting electrolyte. Operational parameters such as cathodic potential, oxygen purity and mass flow rate, cathode surface area. pH, temperature, and inert supporting electrolyte concentration were systematically investigated as to improve the Faradic current efficiency of H2O2 generation. Results indicate that significant self-decomposition of H2O2 only occurs at high pH (> 9) and elevated temperatures (> 23 degrees C). Results also indicate that the optimal conditions for H2O2 generation are cathodic potential of -0.5 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE), oxygen mass flow rate of 8.2 x 10(-2) mol/min, and pH 2. Under the optimal conditions, the average current density and average current efficiency are 6.4A/m2 and 81%, respectively. However, when air is applied at the optimal flow rate of oxygen, the average current density markedly decreases to 2.1 A/m2, while the average current efficiency slightly increases to 90%. The limiting current density is 6.4 A/m2, which is independent of cathode geometry and surface area. H2O2 generation is favored at low temperatures. In the concentration range studied (0.01-0.25 M), the inert supporting electrolyte (NaClO4) affects the total potential drop of the electrolyzer, but does not affect the net generation rate of H2O2.

  4. Blood acid-base and plasma electrolyte values in healthy ostriches: the effect of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Bouda, J; Núñez-Ochoa, L; Avila-González, E; Doubek, J; Fuente-Martínez, B; Aguilar-Bobadilla, J

    2009-08-01

    The effect of age and sex on blood acid-base and plasma electrolyte values was determined in venous blood samples from 45 clinically healthy ostriches (Struthio camelus) from 26 days to 6 years of age. Animals were divided by age into four groups and the group of adults was divided by sex into two subgroups. Blood samples were collected without sedation. There was a significant (P<0.05) age difference in blood values of base excess (BE), plasma HCO(3)(-), total CO(2) (TCO(2)), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) and anion gap (AG). The highest plasma concentrations of Na(+), Cl(-) and value of AG were found in adult ostriches with a steady decrease to chicks. A significant (P<0.05) sex difference in adult animals with higher blood pH, lower blood values of pCO(2), BE, plasma concentrations of HCO(3)(-), TCO(2) and K(+) was found in females. We concluded that blood acid-base values and plasma electrolyte concentrations in ostriches are affected by age and sex.

  5. Interactions of lysozyme in concentrated electrolyte solutions from dynamic light-scattering measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Kuehner, D E; Heyer, C; Rämsch, C; Fornefeld, U M; Blanch, H W; Prausnitz, J M

    1997-01-01

    The diffusion of hen egg-white lysozyme has been studied by dynamic light scattering in aqueous solutions of ammonium sulfate as a function of protein concentration to 30 g/liter. Experiments were conducted under the following conditions: pH 4-7 and ionic strength 0.05-5.0 M. Diffusivity data for ionic strengths up to 0.5 M were interpreted in the context of a two-body interaction model for monomers. From this analysis, two potential-of-mean-force parameters, the effective monomer charge, and the Hamaker constant were obtained. At higher ionic strength, the data were analyzed using a model that describes the diffusion coefficient of a polydisperse system of interacting protein aggregates in terms of an isodesmic, indefinite aggregation equilibrium constant. Data analysis incorporated multicomponent virial and hydrodynamic effects. The resulting equilibrium constants indicate that lysozyme does not aggregate significantly as ionic strength increases, even at salt concentrations near the point of salting-out precipitation. PMID:9414232

  6. The effect of porosity on performance of phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Muhammet; Genc, Gamze; Elden, Gulsah; Yapici, Huseyin

    2016-03-01

    A polybenzimidazole (PBI) based polymer electrolyte fuel cells, which called high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells (HT-PEMS), operate at higher temperatures (120-200°C) than conventional PEM fuel cells. Although it is known that HT-PEMS have some of the significant advantages as non-humidification requirements for membrane and the lack of liquid water at high temperature in the fuel cell, the generated water as a result of oxygen reduction reaction causes in the degradation of these systems. The generated water absorbed into membrane side interacts with the hydrophilic PBI matrix and it can cause swelling of membrane, so water transport mechanism in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) needs to be well understood and water balance must be calculated in MEA. Therefore, the water diffusion transport across the electrolyte should be determined. In this study, various porosity values of gas diffusion layers are considered in order to investigate the effects of porosity on the water management for two phase flow in fuel cell. Two-dimensional fuel cell with interdigitated flow-field is modelled using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2a software. The operating temperature and doping level is selected as 160°C and 6.75mol H3PO4/PBI, respectively.

  7. Dephosphorization of Steelmaking Slag by Leaching with Acidic Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yong; Diao, Jiang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Xiaosa; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Bing

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, dephosphorization of steelmaking slag by leaching with acidic aqueous solution composed of citric acid, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ion-exchanged water was investigated. The buffer solution of C6H8O7-NaOH-HCl system prevented changes in the pH values. Kinetic parameters including leaching temperature, slag particle size and pH values of the solution were optimized. The results showed that temperature has no obvious effect on the dissolution ratio of phosphorus. However, it has a significant effect on the dissolution ratio of iron. The dephosphorization rate increases with the decrease of slag particle size and the pH value of the solution. Over 90% of the phosphorus can be dissolved in the solution while the corresponding leaching ratio of iron was only 30% below the optimal condition. Leaching kinetics of dephosphorization follow the unreacted shrinking core model with a rate controlled step by the solid diffusion layer, the corresponding apparent activation energy being 1.233 kJ mol-1. A semiempirical kinetic equation was established. After leaching, most of the nC2S-C3P solid solution in the steelmaking slag was selectively dissolved in the aqueous solution and the iron content in the solid residue was correspondingly enriched.

  8. Coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McTaggart, D.R.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The factors affecting successful coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid media were studied. Variables considered in this work were H/sup +/ concentration, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, duration of contact, and rate of feed solution addition. In all experiments, stock solutions of Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ and UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ were fed at a controlled rate into H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ solutions with constant stirring. Samples were taken as a function of time to follow the H/sup +/ concentration of the solution, uranium precipitation, thorium precipitation, precipitant weight/volume of solution, and crystalline structure and growth. The optimum conditions for maximum coprecipitation are low H/sup +/ concentration, high H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, and extended contact time between the solutions.

  9. Improved electrocatalytic ethanol oxidation activity in acidic and alkaline electrolytes using size-controlled Pt-Sn nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    St John, Samuel; Boolchand, Punit; Angelopoulos, Anastasios P

    2013-12-31

    The promotion of the electrocatalytic ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) on extended single-crystal Pt surfaces and dispersed Pt nanoparticles by Sn under acidic conditions is well known. However, the correlation of Sn coverage on Pt nanoparticle electrocatalysts to their size has proven difficult. The reason is that previous investigations have typically relied on commercially difficult to reproduce electrochemical treatments of prepared macroscopic electrodes to adsorb Sn onto exposed Pt surfaces. We demonstrate here how independent control over both Sn coverage and particle size can yield a significant enhancement in EOR activity in an acidic electrolyte relative to previously reported electrocatalysts. Our novel approach uses electroless nanoparticle synthesis where surface-adsorbed Sn is intrinsic to Pt particle formation. Sn serves as both a reducing agent and stabilizing ligand, producing particles with a narrow particle size distribution in a size range where the mass-specific electrocatalytic activity can be maximized (ca. 1-4 nm) as a result of the formation of a fully developed Sn shell. The extent of fractional Sn surface coverage on carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles can be systematically varied through wet-chemical treatment subsequent to nanoparticle formation but prior to incorporation into macroscopic electrodes. EOR activity for Pt nanoparticles is found to be optimum at a fractional Sn surface coverage of ca. 0.6. Furthermore, the EOR activity is shown to increase with Pt particle size and correlate with the active area of available Pt (110) surface sites for the corresponding Sn-free nanoparticles. The maximum area- and mass-specific EOR activities for the most active catalyst investigated were 17.9 μA/cm(2)Pt and 12.5 A/gPt, respectively, after 1 h of use at 0.42 V versus RHE in an acidic electrolyte. Such activity is a substantial improvement over that of commercially available Pt, Pt-Sn, and Pt-Ru alloy catalysts under either acidic or alkaline

  10. Preparation and electrochemical properties of gel polymer electrolytes using triethylene glycol diacetate-2-propenoic acid butyl ester copolymer for high energy density lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Huanhuan; Li, Hongxiao; Fan, Li-Zhen; Shi, Qiao

    2014-03-01

    Gel polymer electrolytes (GPE) composed of triethylene glycol diacetate (TEGDA)-2-propenoic acid butyl ester (BA) copolymer and commercial used liquid organic electrolyte are prepared via in situ polymerization. The ionic conductivity of the as-prepared GPE can reach 5.5 × 10-3 S cm-1 with 6 wt% monomers and 94 wt% liquid electrolyte at 25 °C. Additionally, the temperature dependence of the ionic conductivity is consistent with an Arrhenius temperature behavior in a temperature range of 20-90 °C. Furthermore, the electrochemical stability window of the GPE is 5 V at 25 °C. A Li|GPE|(Li[Li1/6Ni1/4Mn7/12]O2) cell has been fabricated, which shows good charge-discharge properties and stable cycle performance compared to liquid electrolyte under the same test conditions.

  11. γ-Irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Graff, Rebecca L.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1980-12-01

    The γ-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the non-volatile products. Thin layer chromotography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the γ-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  12. Fluorinated Alkoxide-Based Magnesium-Ion Battery Electrolytes that Demonstrate Li-Ion-Battery-Like High Anodic Stability and Solution Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Adam J; Stringham, Kyle K; Bartlett, Bart M

    2016-09-07

    Based on DFT predictions, a series of highly soluble fluorinated alkoxide-based electrolytes were prepared, examined electrochemically, and reversibly cycled. The alcohols react with ethylmagnesium chloride to generate a fluoroalkoxy-magnesium chloride intermediate, which subsequently reacts with aluminum chloride to generate the electrolyte. Solutions starting from a 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-methylpropan-2-ol precursor exhibit high anodic stability, 3.2 V vs Mg(2+/0), and a record 3.5 mS/cm solution conductivity. Excellent galvanostatic cycling and capacity retention (94%) is observed with more than 300 h of cycle time while employing the standard Chevrel phase-Mo6S8 cathode material.

  13. Highly accurate boronimeter assay of concentrated boric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Random-Walk Boronimeter has successfully been used as an on-line indicator of boric acid concentration in an operating commercial pressurized water reactor. The principle has been adapted for measurement of discrete samples to high accuracy and to concentrations up to 6000 ppm natural boron in light water. Boric acid concentration in an aqueous solution is a necessary measurement in many nuclear power plants, particularly those that use boric acid dissolved in the reactor coolant as a reactivity control system. Other nuclear plants use a high-concentration boric acid solution as a backup shutdown system. Such a shutdown system depends on rapid injection of the solution and frequent surveillance of the fluid to ensure the presence of the neutron absorber. The two methods typically used to measure boric acid are the chemical and the physical methods. The chemical method uses titration to determine the ionic concentration of the BO[sub 3] ions and infers the boron concentration. The physical method uses the attenuation of neutrons by the solution and infers the boron concentration from the neutron absorption properties. This paper describes the Random-Walk Boronimeter configured to measure discrete samples to high accuracy and high concentration.

  14. Polymerization of Pu(IV) in aqueous nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Friedman, H.A.; Osborne, M.M.

    1980-10-01

    The polymerization of Pu(IV) in aqueous nitric acid solutions has been studied spectrophotometrically both to establish the influence of large UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} concentrations on the polymerization rates and, more generally, to review the influence of the major parameters on the polymer reaction. Typically, experiments have been performed at 50{sup 0}C and with 0.05 M Pu in nitric acid solutions that vary in acidity from 0.07 to 0.4 M. An induction period usually precedes the polymer growth stage during which time nucleation of primary hydrolysis products occurs. Uranyl nitrate retards the polymerization reaction by approximately 35% in spite of the counteracting influence of the nitrate ions associated with this solute. The rate of polymer formation, expressed as d(percent polymer)/dt, has been shown to depend on the total plutonium concentration in reactions where the Pu(IV) concentration remained constant; and it is therefore suggested that the polymer reaction rate is not first order with respect to the concentration of plutonium as was previously thought. It has been shown further that accurate acid determinations on stock reagents are essential in order to obtain reliable polymerization experiments. Satisfactory procedures for these analyses did not exist, so appropriate modifications to the iodate precipitation methods were developed. The most ideal plutonium reagent material has been shown to be crystalline Pu(IV) nitrate because it can be added directly to acid solutions without the occurrence of unintentional hydrolysis reactions.

  15. [Sorption of amino acids from aqueous solutions on activated charcoal].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Tsibanov, V V

    1985-03-01

    Various methods for quantitative description of amino acid sorption from solutions for parenteral nutrition on activated charcoal were studied under dynamic and static conditions. With the use of the well-known Freindlich and Langmuir absorption isotherms it was shown to be possible to describe in a simplified way the complex multicomponent process of sorption of the amino acids and to estimate their loss at the filtration stage.

  16. Lowering the platinum loading of high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells with acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Li, Q.; Jensen, J. O.

    2015-10-01

    Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultra-low Pt loading electrodes were prepared for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) based on acid doped polybenzimidazole. With no electrode binders or ionomers, the triple phase boundary of the catalyst layer was established by the acid transfer from the acid doped membrane to the electrodes and can therefore be tailored by using catalysts with varied Pt to C ratios. With a loading of ca. 0.1 mgPtcm-2 on each electrode the best performance was obtained with electrodes prepared from 10 wt.% Pt/C due to the improved Pt dispersion, extended triple phase boundary upon the acid transfer and the alleviated acid flooding of the catalytic layer. The MEA delivered a peak power density of 482 mW cm-2 for H2/O2 and 321 mW cm-2 for H2/air, corresponding to an overall Pt utilization of 2.5 and 1.7 kW gPt-1, respectively. The durability test revealed no net voltage decay during more than 1700 h of uninterrupted operation at 200 mA cm-2 and 160 °C.

  17. Titania nanotubes from weak organic acid electrolyte: fabrication, characterization and oxide film properties.

    PubMed

    Munirathinam, Balakrishnan; Neelakantan, Lakshman

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanotubes were fabricated using anodic oxidation in fluoride containing weak organic acid for different durations (0.5h, 1h, 2h and 3h). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs reveal that the morphology of titanium oxide varies with anodization time. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that the as-formed oxide nanotubes were amorphous in nature, yet transform into crystalline phases (anatase and rutile) upon annealing at 600°C. Wettability measurements show that both as-formed and annealed nanotubes exhibited hydrophilic behavior. The electrochemical behavior was ascertained by DC polarization and AC electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in 0.9% NaCl solution. The results suggest that the annealed nanotubes showed higher impedance (10(5)-10(6)Ωcm(2)) and lower passive current density (10(-7)Acm(-2)) than the as-formed nanotubes. In addition, we investigated the influence of post heat treatment on the semiconducting properties of the oxides by capacitance measurements. In vitro bioactivity test in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that precipitation of Ca/P is easier in crystallized nanotubes than the amorphous structure. Our study uses a simple strategy to prepare nano-structured titania films and hints the feasibility of tailoring the oxide properties by thermal treatment, producing surfaces with better bioactivity.

  18. Electrochemical degradation of Acid Blue and Basic Brown dyes on Pb/PbO2 electrode in the presence of different conductive electrolyte and effect of various operating factors.

    PubMed

    Awad, H S; Galwa, N Abo

    2005-12-01

    Electrocatalytic degradation of Acid Blue and Basic Brown dyes from simulated wastewater on lead dioxide anode was investigated in different conductive electrolytes. It was shown that complete degradation of these dyes is dependent primarily on type and concentration of the conductive electrolyte. The highest electrocatalytic activity was achieved in the presence of NaCl (2g/l) and could be attributed to indirect oxidation of the investigated dyes by the electrogenerated hypochlorite ions formed from the chloride oxidation. In addition, contribution from direct oxidation could also be possible via reaction of these organic compounds with the electrogenerated hydroxyl radicals adsorbed on the lead dioxide surface. In the presence of NaOH, the electrocatalytic activity of the employed anode was not comparable to that in NaCl due primarily to the absence of chloride. This indicates that dyes degradation in NaOH occurs exclusively via direct electrochemical process. However, in H2SO4, the electrode performance was poor due partially to the absence of chloride from the conductive solution. The possibility of electrode poisoning as a result of growth of adherent film on the anode surface or production of stable intermediates not easily further oxidized by direct electrolysis in H2SO4 might also be accountable for the poor performance observed in this conductive electrolyte. Optimizing the conditions that ensure effective electrochemical degradation of Acid Blue and Basic Brown dyes on lead dioxide electrode necessitates the control of all the operating factors.

  19. Study of a Li-air battery having an electrolyte solution formed by a mixture of an ether-based aprotic solvent and an ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchetto, Laura; Salomon, Mark; Scrosati, Bruno; Croce, Fausto

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that cyclic and linear carbonates are unstable when used in rechargeable Li-air batteries employing aprotic solvents mostly due to the cathodic formation of superoxide during the oxygen reduction reaction. In particular, it has been ascertained that nucleophilic attack by superoxide anion radical, O2-rad , at O-alkyl carbon is a common mechanism of decomposition of organic carbonates. Moreover, theoretical calculations showed that ether chemical functionalities are stable against nucleophilic substitution induced by superoxide. Aim of this study is to report on a new electrolyte solution for Li-air battery formed by a mixture of an ether-based aprotic solvent with an ionic liquid (IL). The IL-based electrolyte was obtained by mixing the pure ionic liquid N-methyl-(n-butyl) pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl) imide (here denoted as PYR14TFSI) to a 0.91 M solution of lithium triflate (LiCF3SO3) in tetra ethylene glycol dimethyl etcher (TEGDME). We observed that the presence of IL beneficially affects the kinetics and the reversibility of the oxygen reactions involved at the cathode. The most significant result being a lower overvoltage for the charge reaction, compared to a Li/air cell containing the same electrolyte solution without IL.

  20. A general strategy to facilely design ratiometric electrochemical sensors in electrolyte solution by directly using a bare electrode for dual-signal sensing of analytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianbo; Jin, Hui; Gui, Rijun; Wang, Zonghua; Ge, Feng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have described a general strategy to facilely design ratiometric electrochemical sensors in electrolyte solutions, directly using a bare electrode for dual-signal sensing of analytes. Two types of substances (methylene blue/MB, doxorubicin/DOX) with different electrochemical signal peaks were added into electrolyte solutions (phosphate buffered saline, NaCl), where one was the analyte (DOX) and the other was used as a reference (MB). A linear plotting of DOX concentration [DOX] versus ratiometric electrochemical signal peak intensity (IDOX/IMB) was achieved, with a good linear coefficient and low detection limit of DOX (0.4nM). Experimental results implied that this ratiometric electrochemical sensor (ECS) of DOX enabled highly selective and sensitive detection of DOX in real samples, with high detection recoveries. In comparison with previous reports about ratiometric ECS, this as-proposed strategy can directly fabricate a ratiometric ECS in electrolyte solution (not on electrode), only using a bare electrode for dual- signal sensing of analytes. This strategy is not only novel and facile, but also flexible and general, as adequately confirmed in experiments, which would facilitate a further development in the facile fabrication and efficient applications of electrochemical sensors.

  1. ZrB2-HfB2 solid solutions as electrode materials for hydrogen reaction in acidic and basic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sitler, Steven J.; Raja, Krishnan S.; Charit, Indrajit

    2016-11-09

    Spark plasma sintered transition metal diborides such as HfB2, ZrB2 and their solid solutions were investigated as electrode materials for electrochemical hydrogen evolutions reactions (HER) in 1 M H2SO4 and 1 M NaOH electrolytes. HfB2 and ZrB2 formed complete solid solutions when mixed in 1:1, 1:4, and 4:1 ratios and they were stable in both electrolytes. The HER kinetics of the diborides were slower in the basic solution than in the acidic solutions. The Tafel slopes in 1 M H2SO4 were in the range of 0.15 - 0.18 V/decade except for pure HfB2 which showed a Tafel slope of 0.38 V/decade. In 1 M NaOH the Tafel slopes were in the range of 0.12 - 0.27 V/decade. The composition of HfxZr1-xB2 solid solutions with x = 0.2 - 0.8, influenced the exchange current densities, overpotentials and Tafel slopes of the HER. As a result, the EIS data were fitted with a porous film equivalent circuit model in order to better understand the HER behavior. In addition, modeling calculations, using density functional theory approach, were carried out to estimate the density of states and band structure of the boride solid solutions.

  2. Maintaining hydration with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution improves performance, thermoregulation, and fatigue during an ice hockey scrimmage.

    PubMed

    Linseman, Mark E; Palmer, Matthew S; Sprenger, Heather M; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    Research in "stop-and-go" sports has demonstrated that carbohydrate ingestion improves performance and fatigue, and that dehydration of ∼1.5%-2% body mass (BM) loss results in decreased performance, increased fatigue, and increased core temperature. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the physiological, performance, and fatigue-related effects of maintaining hydration with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) versus dehydrating by ∼2% BM (no fluid; NF) during a 70-min ice hockey scrimmage. Skilled male hockey players (n = 14; age, 21.3 ± 0.2 years; BM, 80.1 ± 2.5 kg; height, 182.0 ± 1.2 cm) volunteered for the study. Subjects lost 1.94% ± 0.1% BM in NF, and 0.12% ± 0.1% BM in CES. Core temperature (Tc) throughout the scrimmage (10-50 min) and peak Tc (CES: 38.69 ± 0.10 vs. NF: 38.92 ± 0.11 °C; p < 0.05) were significantly reduced in CES compared with NF. Players in CES had increased mean skating speed and time at high effort between 30-50 min of the scrimmage. They also committed fewer puck turnovers and completed a higher percentage of passes in the last 20 min of play compared with NF. Postscrimmage shuttle skating performance was improved in CES versus NF and fatigue was lower following the CES trial. The results indicated that ingesting a CES to maintain BM throughout a 70-min hockey scrimmage resulted in improved hockey performance and thermoregulation, and decreased fatigue as compared with drinking no fluid and dehydrating by ∼2%.

  3. Effect of alumina on triethylene glycol diacetate-2-propenoic acid butyl ester composite polymer electrolytes for flexible lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiujun; Song, Wei-Li; Fan, Li-Zhen; Shi, Qiao

    2015-04-01

    Triethylene glycol diacetate-2-propenoic acid butyl ester (TEGDA-BA) based composite polymer electrolytes (CPE) are fabricated by incorporating alumina (Al2O3) nanoparticles (average particle size 10-20 nm) as inorganic filler via in situ polymerization. Effects of Al2O3 concentration on ionic conductivities, Li+ transfer numbers and charge/discharge properties are studied in details. Due to the uniformly dispersed Al2O3 nanoparticles, significant improvements in the mechanical flexibility and bendability are presented in the resulting polymer electrolytes. The CPE with 5 wt% Al2O3 nanoparticles exhibits the highest ionic conductivity up to 6.02 × 10-3 S cm-1 at 25 °C and the highest Li+ transference number (0.675), coupled with the most stable electrochemical window (>4.5 V vs. Li/Li+). With the presence of Al2O3, the growth of interface resistance is retarded, which increases the interface stability. The Li|CPE|Li4Ti5O12 and Li|CPE|LiFePO4 cells demonstrate remarkably stable charge/discharge performance and excellent capacity retention during cycling test. The results suggest that the CPE holds great application potential in flexible lithium ion batteries.

  4. Influence of experimental Eimeria zuernii infection in calves on electrolyte concentrations, acid-base balance and blood gases.

    PubMed

    Bangoura, B; Daugschies, A

    2007-11-01

    Coccidiosis, often caused by Eimeria zuernii, is an important disease in calf rearing and is clinically mainly associated with diarrhoea (PR Fitzgerald in Adv Vet Sci Comp Med, 24:121-143, 1980). Calves were experimentally infected with E. zuernii oocysts to investigate the effects of artificial E. zuernii coccidiosis on electrolyte concentrations, acid-base balance and blood gases. Therefore, animals were assigned to three groups: group 1 (n = 14) served as uninfected control group, group 2 (n = 11) was infected with 150,000 sporulated E. zuernii oocysts per calf, and group 3 (n = 16) was infected with 250,000 sporulated E. zuernii oocysts per calf. Aberrances which were attributed to coccidiosis were observed in the following parameters: sodium and chloride concentrations, pH (only high-dose infected group 3), base excess, standard bicarbonate, total carbon dioxide and partial pressure of carbon dioxide. Alterations were most pronounced in the high-dose infected group 3. Anion gap and oxygen saturation did not show significant differences between the groups. Due to diarrhoea and malabsorption in coccidiosis-affected calves, there is a distinct loss not only of fluid and blood but also of electrolytes and alkaline buffer substances which provokes the development of an acidosis. This is counteracted by metabolism and respiration but cannot be compensated in severely affected and moribund calves.

  5. Cocoa shells for heavy metal removal from acidic solutions.

    PubMed

    Meunier, N; Laroulandie, J; Blais, J F; Tyagi, R D

    2003-12-01

    The development of economic and efficient processes for the removal of heavy metals present in acidic effluents from industrial sources or decontamination technologies has become a priority. The purpose of this work was to study the efficiency with which cocoa shells remove heavy metals from acidic solutions (pH 2) and to investigate how the composition of these solutions influences heavy metal uptake efficiency. Adsorption tests were conducted in agitated flasks with single-metal solutions (0.25 mM Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn), multi-metal solution (comprised of 0.25 mM of each of the cations above) and an effluent obtained from chemical leaching of metal-contaminated soil, in the presence of different cocoa shell concentrations (5-40 g/l). Results from the single-metal solution assays indicated that the fixation capacity of heavy metals by cocoa shells followed a specific order: Pb>Cr>Cd=Cu=Fe>Zn=Co>Mn=Ni=Al. Cocoa shells are particularly efficient in the removal of lead from very acidic solutions (q(max)=6.2 mg Pb/g, pH(i)=2.0 and T=22 degrees C). The presence of other metals and cations in solution did not seem to affect the recovery of lead. It was also observed that the maximum metal uptake was reached in less than 2 h. This research has also demonstrated that the removal of metals caused a decline in solution proton concentration (pH increase) and release of calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium from the cocoa shells.

  6. [Investigation on mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions].

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Yi, Xiao-Yun; Dang, Zhi; Liu, Yun

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions was investigated by electrochemical analysis methods, such as open-circuit potential, cyclic voltammetry, Tafel polarization curve and anodic polarization curve, using a pyrite-carbon paste electrode as working electrode. The results showed that the oxidation process of pyrite in acidic solutions was via a two-step reaction: the first step was the dissolution of iron moiety and formation of a passivation film composed of elemental sulphur, metal-deficient sulfide and polysulfide; the second step was the further oxidation of these intermediate products to SO4(2-). The final reaction products of pyrite oxidation were Fe3+ and SO4(2-) in acidic solutions. In addition, the open-circuit potential and corrosion potential were positively shifted, the peak current and the corrosion current were increased with the increase in concentration of H2SO4 solutions. This indicated that increased acidity of the system was advantageous to the oxidation of pyrite.

  7. Methanol Uptake by Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Essin, A. M.; Golden, D. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global methanol budget is currently unbalanced, with source terms significantly larger than the sinks terms. To evaluate possible losses of gaseous methanol to sulfate aerosols, the solubility and reactivity of methanol in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols is under investigation. Methanol will partition into sulfate aerosols according to its Henry's law solubility. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, for cold (196 - 220 K) solutions ranging between 45 and 70 wt % H2SO4. We have found that methanol solubility ranges from approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) M/atm for UT/LS conditions. Solubility increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. Although methanol is slightly more soluble than are acetone and formaldehyde, current data indicate that uptake by clean aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and any rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H is not significant over our experimental time scale for solutions below 80 wt % H2SO4. To confirm this directly, results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique will also be presented.

  8. Effects of intraduodenal feeding of a branched-chain amino acid-rich solution on ammonia-induced encephalopathy in liver-injured rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Watanabe, A; Shiota, T; Obata, T; Takei, N; Sakata, T; Nagashima, H

    1982-12-01

    A preventive effect of intraduodenal prefeeding of a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA)-rich solution on ammonia-induced encephalopathy was investigated with carbon tetrachloride CC14-injured rats with the elevated levels of blood ammonia. Five out of six cirrhotic rats, to which an electrolyte solution alone was preinfused for 24 hours, fell into coma following ammonia acetate injection and two comatose rats died. However, no cirrhotic rats preinfused with a BCAA-rich solution died and only two out of the six showed coma with complete recovery. The similar preventive effect could not be observed in rats with acute liver injury.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of triflic acid and triflate ion/water mixtures: a proton conducting electrolytic component in fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sunda, Anurag Prakash; Venkatnathan, Arun

    2011-11-30

    Triflic acid is a functional group of perflourosulfonated polymer electrolyte membranes where the sulfonate group is responsible for proton conduction. However, even at extremely low hydration, triflic acid exists as a triflate ion. In this work, we have developed a force-field for triflic acid and triflate ion by deriving force-field parameters using ab initio calculations and incorporated these parameters with the Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations - All Atom (OPLS-AA) force-field. We have employed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the developed force field to characterize structural and dynamical properties of triflic acid (270-450 K) and triflate ion/water mixtures (300 K). The radial distribution functions (RDFs) show the hydrophobic nature of CF(3) group and presence of strong hydrogen bonding in triflic acid and temperature has an insignificant effect. Results from our MD simulations show that the diffusion of triflic acid increases with temperature. The RDFs from triflate ion/water mixtures shows that increasing hydration causes water molecules to orient around the SO(3)(-) group of triflate ions, solvate the hydronium ions, and other water molecules. The diffusion of triflate ions, hydronium ion, and water molecules shows an increase with hydration. At λ = 1, the diffusion of triflate ion is 30 times lower than the diffusion of triflic acid due to the formation of stable triflate ion-hydronium ion complex. With increasing hydration, water molecules break the stability of triflate ion-hydronium ion complex leading to enhanced diffusion. The RDFs and diffusion coefficients of triflate ions, hydronium ions and water molecules resemble qualitatively the previous findings using per-fluorosulfonated membranes.

  10. Electrolyte and acid/base changes in dogs undergoing autologous blood transfusion via a cell salvage device

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Jodie L.; Thieman Mankin, Kelley M.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    This study reports electrolyte and acid/base disturbances observed in clinical cases receiving autologous transfusion of blood processed by a cell salvage device. The records of 12 client-owned dogs that received an autologous transfusion via a cell salvage device with pre- and post-autologous transfusion blood work available were reviewed. Blood work from the 12 case dogs was compared to blood work from 12 control dogs with similar diseases. Control dogs received similar surgical treatment and were administered a similar volume per kg of packed red blood cells as case dogs, but did not undergo autologous transfusion. Case dogs that received autologous transfusion via a cell salvage device were significantly more likely to experience a decrease in ionized calcium and magnesium levels post-transfusion than were control dogs. Calcium and magnesium levels should be closely monitored during and after autologous transfusion. Calcium and/or magnesium supplementation may be required. PMID:26345136

  11. Planetary Resources and Astroecology. Planetary Microcosm Models of Asteroid and Meteorite Interiors: Electrolyte Solutions and Microbial Growth- Implications for Space Populations and Panspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    2002-03-01

    Planetary microcosms were constructed using extracts from meteorites that simulate solutions in the pores of carbonaceous chondrites. The microcosms were found to support the growth of complex algal and microbial populations. Such astroecology experiments demonstrate how a diverse ecosystem could exist in fluids within asteroids, and in meteorites that land on aqueous planets. The microcosm solutions were obtained by extracting nutrient electrolytes under natural conditions from powders of the Allende (CV3) and Murchison (CM2) meteorites at low (0.02 g/ml) and high (10.0 g/ml) solid/solution ratios. The latter solutions contain >3 mol/L electrolytes and about 10 g/L organics, that simulate natural fluids in asteroids during aqueous alteration and in the pores of meteorites, which can help prebiotic synthesis and the survival of early microorganisms. These solutions and wet solids were in fact found to support complex self-sustaining microbial communities with populations of 4 × 105 algae and 6 × 106 bacteria and fungi for long periods (>8 months). The results show that planetary microcosms based on meteorites can: assay the fertilities of planetary materials; identify space bioresources; target astrobiology exploration; and model past and future space-based ecosystems. The results show that bioresources in the carbonaceous asteroids can sustain a biomass of 1018 kg, comprising 1032 microorganisms and a human population of 1014. The results also suggest that protoplanetary nebulae can support and disperse microorganisms and can be therefore effective environments for natural and directed panspermia.

  12. Gelled electrolytes for use in absorptive glass mat valve-regulated lead-acid (AGM VRLA) batteries working under 100% depth of discharge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantichanakul, Titiporn; Chailapakul, Orawon; Tantavichet, Nisit

    2011-10-01

    Gelled electrolytes prepared from fumed silica for use in absorptive glass mat valve-regulated lead-acid (AGM VRLA) batteries and the effect of veratraldehyde addition on the electrochemical behavior and performance of AGM VRLA batteries are investigated. Cyclic voltammetry is used to investigate differences in the electrochemical behaviors of nongelled and gelled electrolytes and between gelled electrolytes with and without veratraldehyde. Battery performance is tested under 100% depth of discharge (100% DoD) conditions at both low- (0.1 C) and high- (1 C) rate discharges. The addition of silica or veratraldehyde does not affect the main reaction of the lead-acid batteries but tends to suppress the hydrogen evolution reaction. AGM VRLA batteries with gelled electrolytes have a higher discharge capacity and longer cycle life than the conventional nongel AGM VRLA batteries. The addition of 0.005% (w/v) veratraldehyde further improves battery performance, but higher (0.01%, w/v) veratraldehyde concentrations reduce it and correlate with the enhanced growth of lead sulfate crystals. The AGM VRLA battery prepared from a gelled electrolyte containing 0.005% (w/v) veratraldehyde provides the best battery performance in every operating temperature studied (0-60 °C).

  13. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-12-21

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  14. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-08-17

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  15. Partial molar volumes of some alpha-amino acids in aqueous sodium acetate solutions at 308.15 K.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Yan, Z; Zhuo, K; Lu, J

    1999-08-30

    The apparent molar volumes V(2,phi) have been determined for glycine, DL-alpha-alanine, DL-alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, DL-valine and DL-leucine in aqueous solutions of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mol kg(-1) sodium acetate by density measurements at 308.15 K. These data have been used to derive the infinite dilution apparent molar volumes V(0)(2,phi) for the amino acids in aqueous sodium acetate solutions and the standard volumes of transfer, Delta(t)V(0), of the amino acids from water to aqueous sodium acetate solutions. It has been observed that both V(0)(2,phi) and Delta(t)V(0) vary linearly with increasing number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of the amino acids. These linear correlations have been utilized to estimate the contributions of the charged end groups (NH(3)(+), COO(-)), CH(2) group and other alkyl chains of the amino acids to V(0)(2,phi) and Delta(t)V(0). The results show that V(0)(2,phi) values for (NH(3)(+), COO(-)) groups increase with sodium acetate concentration, and those for CH(2) are almost constant over the studied sodium acetate concentration range. The transfer volume increases and the hydration number of the amino acids decreases with increasing electrolyte concentrations. These facts indicate that strong interactions occur between the ions of sodium acetate and the charged centers of the amino acids. The volumetric interaction parameters of the amino acids with sodium acetate were calculated in water. The pair interaction parameters are found to be positive and decreased with increasing alkyl chain length of the amino acids, suggesting that sodium acetate has a stronger dehydration effect on amino acids which have longer hydrophobic alkyl chains. These phenomena are discussed by means of the co-sphere overlap model.

  16. Effect of organic acids and nano-sized ceramic doping on PEO-based solid polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Won; Jeong, Euh Duck; Won, Mi-Sook; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    Composite solid polymer electrolytes (CSPEs) consisting of polyethyleneoxide (PEO), LiClO 4, organic acids (malonic, maleic, and carboxylic acids), and/or Al 2O 3 were prepared in acetonitrile. CSPEs were characterized by Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM), thermal analysis, ac impedance, cyclic voltammetry, and tested for charge-discharge capacity with the Li or LiNi 0.5Co 0.5O 2 electrodes coated on stainless steel (SS). The morphologies of the CSPE films were homogeneous and porous. The differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) results suggested that performance of the CSPE film was highly enhanced by the acid and inorganic additives. The composite membrane doped with organic acids and ceramic showed good conductivity and thermal stability. The ac impedance data, processed by non-linear least square (NLLS) fitting, showed good conducting properties of the composite films. The ionic conductivity of the film consisting of (PEO) 8LiClO 4:citric acid (99.95:0.05, w/w%) was 3.25 × 10 -4 S cm -1 and 1.81 × 10 -4 S cm -1 at 30 °C. The conductivity has further improved to 3.81 × 10 -4 S cm -1 at 20 °C by adding 20 w/w% Al 2O 3 filler to the (PEO) 8LiClO 4 + 0.05% carboxylic acid composite. The experimental data for the full cell showed an upper limit voltage window of 4.7 V versus Li/Li + for CSPE at room temperature.

  17. Volumetric Titrations Using Electrolytically Generated Reagents for the Determination of Ascorbic Acid and Iron in Dietary Supplement Tablets: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Christopher; Gebeyehu, Zewdu; Griffin, Kameron; Dabke, Rajeev B.

    2014-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment for the volumetric quantitative analysis of ascorbic acid and iron in dietary supplement tablets is presented. Powdered samples of the dietary supplement tablets were volumetrically titrated against electrolytically generated reagents, and the mass of dietary reagent in the tablet was determined from the…

  18. Evaporation kinetics of acetic acid-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, K.; Wong, N.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of water molecules across vapor-liquid interfaces in the atmosphere is a crucial step in the formation and evolution of cloud droplets. Despite decades of study, the effects of solutes on the mechanism and rate of evaporation and condensation remain poorly characterized. The present work aims to determine the effect of atmospherically-relevant solutes on the evaporation rate of water. In our experiments, we create a train of micron-sized droplets and measure their temperature via Raman thermometry as they undergo evaporation without condensation. Analysis of the cooling rate yields the evaporation coefficient (γ). Previous work has shown that inorganic salts have little effect on γ, with surface-adsorbing anions causing a slight reduction in the coefficient from that measured for pure water. Organic acids are ubiquitous in aqueous aerosol and have been shown to disrupt the surface structure of water. Here we describe measurements of the evaporation rate of acetic acid solutions, showing that acetic acid reduces γ to a larger extent than inorganic ions, and that γ decreases with increasing acetic acid concentration.

  19. Solution Preserves Nucleic Acids in Body-Fluid Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    A solution has been formulated to preserve deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) in specimens of blood, saliva, and other bodily fluids. Specimens of this type are collected for diagnostic molecular pathology, which is becoming the method of choice for diagnosis of many diseases. The solution makes it possible to store such specimens at room temperature, without risk of decomposition, for subsequent analysis in a laboratory that could be remote from the sampling location. Thus, the solution could be a means to bring the benefits of diagnostic molecular pathology to geographic regions where refrigeration equipment and diagnostic laboratories are not available. The table lists the ingredients of the solution. The functions of the ingredients are the following: EDTA chelates divalent cations that are necessary cofactors for nuclease activity. In so doing, it functionally removes these cations and thereby retards the action of nucleases. EDTA also stabilizes the DNA helix. Tris serves as a buffering agent, which is needed because minor contaminants in an unbuffered solution can exert pronounced effects on pH and thereby cause spontaneous degradation of DNA. SDS is an ionic detergent that inhibits ribonuclease activity. SDS has been used in some lysis buffers and as a storage buffer for RNA after purification. The use of the solution is straightforward. For example, a sample of saliva is collected by placing a cotton roll around in the subject's mouth until it becomes saturated, then the cotton is placed in a collection tube. Next, 1.5 mL of the solution are injected directly into the cotton and the tube is capped for storage at room temperature. The effectiveness of the solution has been demonstrated in tests on specimens of saliva containing herpes simplex virus. In the tests, the viral DNA, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction, was detected even after storage for 120 days.

  20. Solution influence on biomolecular equilibria - Nucleic acid base associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Various attempts to construct an understanding of the influence of solution environment on biomolecular equilibria at the molecular level using computer simulation are discussed. First, the application of the formal statistical thermodynamic program for investigating biomolecular equilibria in solution is presented, addressing modeling and conceptual simplications such as perturbative methods, long-range interaction approximations, surface thermodynamics, and hydration shell. Then, Monte Carlo calculations on the associations of nucleic acid bases in both polar and nonpolar solvents such as water and carbon tetrachloride are carried out. The solvent contribution to the enthalpy of base association is positive (destabilizing) in both polar and nonpolar solvents while negative enthalpies for stacked complexes are obtained only when the solute-solute in vacuo energy is added to the total energy. The release upon association of solvent molecules from the first hydration layer around a solute to the bulk is accompanied by an increase in solute-solvent energy and decrease in solvent-solvent energy. The techniques presented are expectd to displace less molecular and more heuristic modeling of biomolecular equilibria in solution.

  1. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.J.; Xu, Q.; Chen, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    The efficient conversion of cellulosic materials to ethanol has been hindered by the low yield of sugars, the high energy consumption in pretreatment processes, and the difficulty of recycling the pre-treatment agents. Zinc chloride may provide an alternative for pre-treating biomass prior to the hydrolysis of cellulose. The formation of a zinc-cellulose complex during the pretreatment of cellulose improves the yield of glucose in both the enzymatic and acid hydrolysis of cellulose. Low-temperature acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution is carried out in two stages, a liquefaction stage and a saccharification stage. Because of the formation of zinc-cellulose complex in the first stage, the required amount of acid in the second stage has been decreased significantly. In 67% zinc chloride solution, a 99.5% yield of soluble sugars has been obtained at 70{degrees}C and 0.5M acid concentration. The ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose has been reduced from 4.5 to 1.5, and the yield of soluble sugars is kept above 80%. The rate of hydrolysis is affected by the ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose, acid concentration, and temperature.

  2. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.; Kaplan, Louis; Mason, George W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  3. Excellent stability of a lithium-ion-conducting solid electrolyte upon reversible Li+/H+ exchange in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Cheng; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Liang, Chengdu; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; More, Karren Leslie; Chi, Miaofang

    2014-10-21

    Batteries with an aqueous catholyte and a Li metal anode have attracted interest owing to their exceptional energy density and high charge/discharge rate. The long-term operation of such batteries requires that the solid electrolyte separator between the anode and aqueous solutions must be compatible with Li and stable over a wide pH range. Unfortunately, no such compound has yet been reported. In this study, an excellent stability in neutral and strongly basic solutions was observed when using the cubic Li7La3Zr2O12 garnet as a Li-stable solid electrolyte. The material underwent a Li+/H+ exchange in aqueous solutions. Nevertheless, its structure remained unchanged even under a high exchange rate of 63.6%. When treated with a 2 M LiOH solution, the Li+/H+ exchange was reversed without any structural change. Furthermore, these observations suggest that cubic Li7La3Zr2O12 is a promising candidate for the separator in aqueous lithium batteries.

  4. DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions of selected organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhnankova, Edita J.; Hammer, Malte U.; Reuter, Stephan; Krcma, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Effect of four simple organic acids water solution on a DC diaphragm discharge was studied. Efficiency of the discharge was quantified by the hydrogen peroxide production determined by UV-VIS spectrometry of a H2O2 complex formed with specific titanium reagent. Automatic titration was used to study the pH behaviour after the plasma treatment. Optical emission spectroscopy overview spectra were recorded and detailed spectra of OH band and Hβ line were used to calculate the rotational temperature and comparison of the line profile (reflecting electron concentration) in the acid solutions. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  5. Interaction of Ethyl Alcohol Vapor with Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the uptake of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) vapor by sulfuric acid solutions over the range approx.40 to approx.80 wt % H2SO4 and temperatures of 193-273 K. Laboratory studies used a fast flow-tube reactor coupled to an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer for detection of ethanol and reaction products. The uptake coefficients ((gamma)) were measured and found to vary from 0.019 to 0.072, depending upon the acid composition and temperature. At concentrations greater than approx.70 wt % and in dilute solutions colder than 220 K, the values approached approx.0.07. We also determined the effective solubility constant of ethanol in approx.40 wt % H2SO4 in the temperature range 203-223 K. The potential implications to the budget of ethanol in the global troposphere are briefly discussed.

  6. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A.

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  7. Cross-linked poly (vinyl alcohol)/sulfosuccinic acid polymer as an electrolyte/electrode material for H2-O2 proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenezer, D.; Deshpande, Abhijit P.; Haridoss, Prathap

    2016-02-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance with a cross-linked poly (vinyl alcohol)/sulfosuccinic acid (PVA/SSA) polymer is compared with Nafion® N-115 polymer. In this study, PVA/SSA (≈5 wt. % SSA) polymer membranes are synthesized by a solution casting technique. These cross-linked PVA/SSA polymers and Nafion are used as electrolytes and ionomers in catalyst layers, to fabricate different membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for PEMFCs. Properties of each MEA are evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurements, impedance spectroscopy and hydrogen pumping technique. I-V characteristics of each cell are evaluated in a H2-O2 fuel cell testing fixture under different operating conditions. PVA/SSA ionomer causes only an additional ≈4% loss in the anode performance compared to Nafion ionomer. The maximum power density obtained from PVA/SSA based cells range from 99 to 117.4 mW cm-2 with current density range of 247 to 293.4 mA cm-2. Ionic conductivity of PVA/SSA based cells is more sensitive to state of hydration of MEA, while maximum power density obtained is less sensitive to state of hydration of MEA. Maximum power density of cross-linked PVA/SSA membrane based cell is about 35% that of Nafion® N-115 based cell. From these results, cross-linked PVA/SSA polymer is identified as potential candidate for PEMFCs.

  8. Porous aluminum room temperature anodizing process in a fluorinated-oxalic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhahri, S.; Fazio, E.; Barreca, F.; Neri, F.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2016-08-01

    Anodizing of aluminum is used for producing porous insulating films suitable for different applications in electronics and microelectronics. Porous-type aluminum films are most simply realized by galvanostatic anodizing in aqueous acidic solutions. The improvement in application of anodizing technique is associated with a substantial reduction of the anodizing voltage at appropriate current densities as well as to the possibility to carry out the synthesis process at room temperature in order to obtain a self-planarizing dielectric material incorporated in array of super-narrow metal lines. In this work, the anodizing of aluminum to obtain porous oxide was carried out, at room temperature, on three different substrates (glass, stainless steel and aluminum), using an oxalic acid-based electrolyte with the addition of a relatively low amount of 0.4 % of HF. Different surface morphologies, from nearly spherical to larger porous nanostructures with smooth edges, were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy. These evidences are explained by considering the formation, transport and adsorption of the fluorine species which react with the Al3+ ions. The behavior is also influenced by the nature of the original substrate.

  9. Covalent Surface Modification of Gallium Arsenide Photocathodes for Water Splitting in Highly Acidic Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Garner, Logan E; Steirer, K Xerxes; Young, James L; Anderson, Nicholas C; Miller, Elisa M; Tinkham, Jonathan S; Deutsch, Todd G; Sellinger, Alan; Turner, John A; Neale, Nathan R

    2017-02-22

    Efficient water splitting using light as the only energy input requires stable semiconductor electrodes with favorable energetics for the water-oxidation and proton-reduction reactions. Strategies to tune electrode potentials using molecular dipoles adsorbed to the semiconductor surface have been pursued for decades but are often based on weak interactions and quickly react to desorb the molecule under conditions relevant to sustained photoelectrolysis. Here, we show that covalent attachment of fluorinated, aromatic molecules to p-GaAs(1 0 0) surfaces can be employed to tune the photocurrent onset potentials of p-GaAs(1 0 0) photocathodes and reduce the external energy required for water splitting. Results indicate that initial photocurrent onset potentials can be shifted by nearly 150 mV in pH -0.5 electrolyte under 1 Sun (1000 W m(-2) ) illumination resulting from the covalently bound surface dipole. Though X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals that the covalent molecular dipole attachment is not robust under extended 50 h photoelectrolysis, the modified surface delays arsenic oxide formation that results in a p-GaAs(1 0 0) photoelectrode operating at a sustained photocurrent density of -20.5 mA cm(-2) within -0.5 V of the reversible hydrogen electrode.

  10. Development and evaluation of a multimedia e-learning resource for electrolyte and acid-base disorders.

    PubMed

    Davids, Mogamat Razeen; Chikte, Usuf M E; Halperin, Mitchell L

    2011-09-01

    This article reports on the development and evaluation of a Web-based application that provides instruction and hands-on practice in managing electrolyte and acid-base disorders. Our teaching approach, which focuses on concepts rather than details, encourages quantitative analysis and a logical problem-solving approach. Identifying any dangers to the patient is a vital first step. Concepts such as an "appropriate response" to a given perturbation and the need for electroneutrality in body fluids are used repeatedly. Our Electrolyte Workshop was developed using Flash and followed an iterative design process. Two case-based tutorials were built in this first phase, with one tutorial including an interactive treatment simulation. Users select from a menu of therapies and see the impact of their choices on the patient. Appropriate text messages are displayed, and changes in body compartment sizes, brain size, and plasma sodium concentrations are illustrated via Flash animation. Challenges encountered included a shortage of skilled Flash developers, budgetary constraints, and challenges in communication between the authors and the developers. The application was evaluated via user testing by residents and specialists in internal medicine. Satisfaction was measured with a questionnaire based on the System Usability Scale. The mean System Usability Scale score was 78.4 ± 13.8, indicating a good level of usability. Participants rated the content as being scientifically sound; they liked the teaching approach and felt that concepts were conveyed clearly. They indicated that the application held their interest, that it increased their understanding of hyponatremia, and that they would recommend this learning resource to others.

  11. Fast hybridization solution for the detection of immobilized nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yang, T T; Kain, S R

    1995-03-01

    We have developed a fast hybridization solution, termed ExpressHyb, for the rapid and sensitive detection of nucleic acids immobilized on membrane supports. This solution reduces typical hybridization times of 12-24 h to as little as 1 h while simultaneously increasing the sensitivity of detection in many applications. Using ExpressHyb, human beta-actin mRNA was detected on a human multiple tissue Northern (MTN) blot following a 30-min hybridization, with optimal detection occurring with a 1-h hybridization interval. The moderately abundant human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) mRNA was detected using similar hybridization conditions and yielded improved signal-to-background characteristics relative to overnight hybridizations in conventional solutions. ExpressHyb can be used with either 32P- or digoxigenin-labeled probes and works effectively with both cDNA and oligonucleotide probes. For non-isotopic detection in particular, ExpressHyb reduces the nonspecific background commonly encountered with this technique. In cDNA library screening, ExpressHyb was found to both reduce the time required for effective hybridizations and to increase the number of positive colonies obtained relative to conventional overnight procedures. Taken together, these results illustrate the broad capability of ExpressHyb Hybridization Solution to improve nucleic acid detection in a variety of important techniques.

  12. Methanol Uptake By Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols in the global budget of methanol, the solubility and reactivity of CH3OH in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions are under investigation. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H(*), for methanol dissolution into 45 to 70 percent by weight H2SO4. We find that methanol solubility ranges from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 8) M/atm and increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and all rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Our data indicate that simple uptake by aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These results differ from those recently reported in the literature, and an explanation of this disparity will be presented. In addition to solvation, reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H may proceed in the atmosphere but is not significant under our experimental conditions. Results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique confirm this directly. In addition, the extent of methanol sequestration via formation of mono- and dimethylsulfate will be evaluated under several atmospheric conditions.

  13. Sonolysis of an oxalic acid solution under xenon lamp irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hisashi; Harada, Hisashi

    2010-06-01

    The photosonolysis of oxalic acid was carried out in an Ar atmosphere. The detectable products of sonolysis were CO(2), CO, H(2), and H(2)O(2). The yield of CO(2) was higher than that for the sum of sonolysis and photolysis reactions. Namely, a synergistic effect was observed during simultaneous irradiations of 200 kHz ultrasound and Xe lamp. The degradation of oxalic acid was promoted by active species such as H(2)O(2) produced from water by sonolysis. An oxalic acid-H(2)O(2) complex is likely to be present in the solution, but could not be detected. The effects of not only the photo-irradiation but also the thermal or incident energy during Xe lamp illumination were also considered.

  14. Effect of acid dopants in biodegradable gel polymer electrolyte and the performance in an electrochemical double layer capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar, Y. N.; Selvakumar, M.; Krishna Bhat, D.

    2015-09-01

    Proton-conducting biodegradable gellan gum gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) have been prepared using three different dopants, namely ortho-phosphoric (o-H3PO4), sulfuric (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acids (HCl). The GPEs were cross-linked using borax. The polymeric gels were characterized by spectroscopic, thermal, ionic conductivities and dielectric measurements. Proton conductivity was in the range of 5.1 × 10-3 to 3.7 × 10-4 s cm-1 and activation energies were between 0.14 meV and 0.19 meV, at different temperatures. Among the doped acids, the H3PO4 doped GPE exhibited thermal stability at varying temperature. Electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) were fabricated using activated carbon as electrode material and GPEs. The EDLCs were tested using cyclic voltammetry, ac impedance spectroscopic and galvanostatic charge-discharge techniques. The maximum specific capacitance value was 146 F g-1 at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1. Quite stable values were obtained at a constant current density up to 1000 cycles.

  15. The Chemical Behavior and Degradation Mitigation Effect of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Perfluorosulfonic Acid Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Pearman, Benjamin P; Mohajeri, Nahid; Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael; Seal, Sudipta; Cullen, David A

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, the polymer of choice for polymer electrolyte hydrogen fuel cells, are susceptible to degradation due to attacks on polymer chains from radicals. Mitigation of this attack by cerium-based radical scavengers is an approach that has shown promise. In this work, two formulations of single-crystal cerium oxide nanoparticles, with an order of magnitude difference in particle size, are incorporated into said membranes and subjected to proton conductivity measurements and ex-situ durability tests. We found that ceria is reduced to Ce(III) ions in the acidic environment of a heated, humidified membrane which negatively impacts proton conductivity. In liquid and gas Fenton testing, fluoride emission is reduced by an order of magnitude, drastically increasing membrane longevity. Side-product analysis demonstrated that in the liquid Fenton test, the main point of attack are weak polymer end groups, while in the gas Fenton test, there is additional side-chain attack. Both mechanisms are mitigated by the addition of the ceria nanoparticles, whereby the extent of the durability improvement is found to be independent of particle size.

  16. Selection of background electrolyte for CZE analysis by a chemometric approach. Part I. Separation of a mixture of acidic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Furlanetto, Sandra; Lanteri, Silvia; Orlandini, Serena; Gotti, Roberto; Giannini, Iacopo; Pinzauti, Sergio

    2007-03-12

    This paper is the first part of the presentation of a chemometric approach for the rapid selection of a suitable background electrolyte (BGE) in CZE analysis of small drug molecules. The strategy is based on principal component analysis and experimental design. In this first section, the approach is applied to the analysis of a mixture of six arylpropionic anti-inflammatory drugs. Initially, 222 possible aqueous background electrolytes (objects) were characterized using as descriptors pH, conductivity, ionic strength and relative viscosity. In order to allow the dissociation of the acidic analytes, this original data set was reduced to 154 background electrolytes with pH values higher than or equal to 5. Principal component analysis made it possible to graphically represent the new set of objects, described by the four variables, in a two-dimensional space. Among these electrolytes, Kennard-Stone algorithm selected ten objects to be tested by CZE, covering homogeneously principal component space. CZE analyses were carried out with the selected electrolytes, and 0.1 M borax was identified as the most suitable one for the specified application. Finally, the characteristics of the analysis were finely tuned by means of a response surface study, which allowed the best conditions to be determined: borax concentration, 0.09 M; methanol, 6% (v/v); temperature, 24 degrees C, voltage, 20 kV. Applying these conditions, a baseline resolution among the six compounds was obtained in less than 10 min.

  17. Nonaqueous Electrolyte Systems Ionic Transport in Nonaqueous Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ALUMINATES, *IONIC CURRENT), (*ELECTROLYTES, ALUMINA), (*SULFITES, ELECTROLYTES), SODIUM COMPOUNDS, ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES, SOLUTIONS(MIXTURES), PERCHLORATES, FLUOBORATES , LITHIUM COMPOUNDS, VISCOSITY

  18. Voltammetry and conductivity of a polyether-pyridinium room temperature molten salt electrolyte and of its polymer electrolyte solutions in polydimethylsiloxane

    SciTech Connect

    Pyati, R.; Murray, R.W.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the synthesis, microelectrode voltammetry, and ionic conductivity of a new room temperature molten salt N-(methoxy(ethoxy){sub 2}ethyl)pyridinium p-toluene sulfonate (abbreviated as[Py(E{sub 3}M){sup +}][Tos{sup {minus}}]) and of its solution in a hydroxy-terminated polydimethylsiloxane. Both ionically conductive liquids (conductivity = 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}) exhibit voltammetric potential windows of about 1.5 V. The negative potential limit is determined by the reduction of the [Py(E{sub 3}M){sup +}] pyridinium species, with subsequent radical coupling to form a voltammetrically observed viologen dimer. The estimated diffusivities of the [Py(E{sub 3}M){sup +}] species, of a diethyleneglycol-tailed ferrocene redox solute studied, and by application of Nernst-Einstein relation to the ionic charge carriers, all lie in the 10{sup {minus}7} to 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/s range. Viscosities and glass transition thermal observations are reported as is the fit of the temperature dependencies of ionic conductivity in [Py(E{sub 3}M){sup +}][Tos{sup {minus}}] and in [Py(E{sub 3}M){sup +}][TOS{sup {minus}}]/PDMS mixtures to Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher predictions.

  19. Approximate expression for the potential energy of the double-layer interaction between two parallel ion-penetrable membranes at small separations in an electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2010-10-01

    An approximate expression for the potential energy of the double-layer interaction between two parallel similar ion-penetrable membranes in a symmetrical electrolyte solution is derived via a linearization method, in which the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equations in the regions inside and outside the membranes are linearized with respect to the deviation of the electric potential from the Donnan potential. This approximation works quite well for small membrane separations h for all values of the density of fixed charges in the membranes (or the Donnan potential) and gives a correct limiting form of the interaction energy (or the interaction force) as h-->0.

  20. Relationship Between Designed Three-Dimensional YSZ Electrolyte Surface Area and Performance of Solution-Precursor Plasma-Sprayed La0.8Sr0.2MnO3- δ Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Huang, Jiang-Yuan; Li, Cheng-Xin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-12-01

    Active three-phase boundaries (TPBs) significantly influence cathode performance in solid oxide fuel cells, but obtaining long TPBs and understanding the mechanism underlying the improved cathode performance when the electrolyte is prepared with a smooth surface by a high-temperature sintering process remain essential challenges. In this work, we used flame spraying to deposit single-layer semimolten particles on a smooth electrolyte to build a three-dimensional surface with enlarged active surface area and thus increased TPBs. Meanwhile, La0.8Sr0.2MnO3- δ (LSM) cathodes with fine microstructure were deposited by solution-precursor plasma spraying (SPPS) on the designed electrolyte to establish a three-dimensional cathode-electrolyte interface. The deposition behavior of the semimolten particles on the smooth electrolyte and LSM cathodes on the three-dimensional electrolyte surface was studied. The effects of the area enlargement factor ( α area) on the polarization resistance of the SPPS LSM cathodes were investigated, using three-dimensional electrolytes with α area from 1.29 to 2.48. The results indicated that convex particles with different molten states bonded well with the electrolytes. SPPS LSM cathodes also showed good interfacial bonding with convex particles. Finally, the cathode polarization ( R p) decreased linearly with increase of α area. At 800 °C, R p decreased from 0.98 to 0.32 Ω cm2 when α area was increased from 1.29 to 2.48.

  1. Electrochemically stable electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Zhang, S.S.; Xu, K.

    1999-01-05

    This invention relates generally to inorganic ionic liquids which function as electrolytes and do not crystallize at ambient temperature. More specifically, this invention is directed to quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquids which comprise the reaction product of a strong Lewis acid with an inorganic halide-donating molecule. This invention is further directed to quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquid mixtures which comprise combinations of electrolyte additives and quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquids. These quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquid mixtures are useful electrolytes. 16 figs.

  2. Thermochemical comparisons of homogeneous and heterogeneous acids and bases. 1. Sulfonic acid solutions and resins as prototype Broensted acids

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, E.M.; Haaksma, R.A.; Chawla, B.; Healy, M.H.

    1986-08-06

    Heats of ionization by thermometric titration for a series of bases (or acids) can be used to compare solid acids (or bases) with liquid analogues bearing the same functionalities in homogeneous solutions. The method is demonstrated for Broensted acids by reacting a series of substituted nitrogen bases with solutions of p-toluenesulfonic acid (PTSA) in acetonitrile and with suspensions of the microporous polymeric arylsulfonic acid resin-Dowex 50W-X8 in the same solvent. Under well-controlled anhydrous conditions there is a good correlation (r = 0.992) between the heats of reaction of the bases with the homogeneous and heterogeneous acid systems, but the homogeneous system gives a more exothermic interaction by 3-4 kcal mol/sup -1/ for a series of 29 substituted pyrimidines, anilines, and some other amines. This difference may be attributed to homohydrogen bonding interactions between excess acid and sulfonate anion sites which are more restricted geometrically in the resin than in solution. Other factors which affect the enthalpy change for the acid-base interaction are the acid/base ratio, the water content of the sulfonic acid, the solvent, and the resin structure (e.g., microporous vs. macroporous). Steric hindrance in the base does not differentiate solid from homogeneous acid. In addition to the use of titration calorimetry, heats of immersion are reported for the Dowex-arylsulfonic acid resins and the Nafion-perfluorinated sulfonic acid resin in a series of basic liquids. The results are compared with each other and with those from a previous study of several varieties of coal.

  3. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, “The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations,” J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of “solvated ionic radius” assumed by earlier studies.

  4. Recovery of hydrochloric acid from the waste acid solution by diffusion dialysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Lu, Shuguang; Fu, Dan

    2009-06-15

    Diffusion dialysis using a series of anion exchange membranes was employed to recover HCl acid from the waste acid solution. Effects of flow rate, flow rate ratio of water to feed, and Fe ion concentration on the recovery of HCl were investigated. It was found that the flow rate ratio was an important factor in the diffusion dialysis operation, and the recovered HCl concentration and Fe ion concentration in diffusate decreased significantly with the change of flow rate ratio from 0.4 to 1.7. In addition, the higher the Fe ion concentration in the feed, the higher the Fe leakage in the recovered acid solution. The HCl recovery efficiency was influenced not only by the recovered acid concentration, but also the outlet flow rate. While using the actual pot galvanizing waste HCl solution with the co-existence of 2.70 mol/L of Fe and 0.07 mol/L of Zn ions, over 88% HCl recovery efficiency could be achieved and Fe leakage was within the range of 11-23%. However, over 56% of Zn leakage was found due to the formation of negative Zn complexes in solution, which was unfavorable for the recovered acid reuse.

  5. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  6. Planetary resources and astroecology. Planetary microcosm models of asteroid and meteorite interiors: electrolyte solutions and microbial growth--implications for space populations and panspermia.

    PubMed

    Mautner, Michael N

    2002-01-01

    Planetary microcosms were constructed using extracts from meteorites that simulate solutions in the pores of carbonaceous chondrites. The microcosms were found to support the growth of complex algal and microbial populations. Such astroecology experiments demonstrate how a diverse ecosystem could exist in fluids within asteroids, and in meteorites that land on aqueous planets. The microcosm solutions were obtained by extracting nutrient electrolytes under natural conditions from powders of the Allende (CV3) and Murchison (CM2) meteorites at low (0.02 g/ml) and high (10.0 g/ml) solid/solution ratios. The latter solutions contain > 3 mol/L electrolytes and about 10 g/L organics, that simulate natural fluids in asteroids during aqueous alteration and in the pores of meteorites, which can help prebiotic synthesis and the survival of early microorganisms. These solutions and wet solids were in fact found to support complex self-sustaining microbial communities with populations of 4 x 10(5) algae and 6 x 10(6) bacteria and fungi for long periods (> 8 months). The results show that planetary microcosms based on meteorites can: assay the fertilities of planetary materials; identify space bioresources; target astrobiology exploration; and model past and future space-based ecosystems. The results show that bioresources in the carbonaceous asteroids can sustain a biomass of 10(18) kg, comprising 10(32) microorganisms and a human population of 10(14). The results also suggest that protoplanetary nebulae can support and disperse microorganisms and can be therefore effective environments for natural and directed panspermia.

  7. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  8. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, Narayan; Ingersoll, David

    1995-01-01

    Electrolyte salts for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts.

  9. Proton conductivity and fuel cell property of composite electrolyte consisting of Cs-substituted heteropoly acids and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. Y.; Yoshida, T.; Kawamura, G.; Muto, H.; Sakai, M.; Matsuda, A.

    Inorganic-organic composite electrolytes were fabricated from partially Cs +-substituted heteropoly acids (Cs-HPAs) and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone) (SPEEK) for application in fuel cells. Heteropoly acids, such as phosphotungstic acid (H 3PW 12O 40:WPA), and silicotungstic acid (H 4SiW 12O 40:WSiA), were mechanochemically treated with cesium hydrogen sulfate (CsHSO 4) to obtain the form of Cs-HPAs. SPEEK was prepared from PEEK by sulfonation using concentrated sulfuric acid. Water durability and surface structure of HPAs were modified by introducing Cs + into HPAs. Flexible and hot water stable composite electrolytes were obtained, and their electrochemical properties were markedly improved with the addition of Cs-HPAs into the SPEEK matrix. Maximum power densities of 245 and 247 mW cm -2 were obtained for 50WPA·50CsHSO 4 and 50WSiA·50CsHSO 4 in SPEEK (1/5 by weight) composite electrolytes, respectively, from single cell tests at 80 °C and 80 RH%. These results suggest that a three-dimensional proton-conductive path was formed among homogeneously distributed Cs-HPAs particles in the SPEEK matrix. The Cs-HPAs incorporated into the SPEEK matrix increased the number of protonate sites in the electrolyte. These observations imply that the mechanochemically synthesized Cs-HPAs, which consist of hydrogen bondings between Cs-HPAs and -HSO 4 -, dissociated from CsHSO 4, are promising materials as inorganic fillers in inorganic-organic composite.

  10. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    2012-02-22

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

  11. Plutonium and Americium Alpha Radiolysis of Nitric Acid Solutions.

    PubMed

    Horne, Gregory P; Gregson, Colin R; Sims, Howard E; Orr, Robin M; Taylor, Robin J; Pimblott, Simon M

    2017-02-02

    The yield of HNO2, as a function of absorbed dose and HNO3 concentration, from the α-radiolysis of aerated HNO3 solutions containing plutonium or americium has been investigated. There are significant differences in the yields measured from solutions of the two different radionuclides. For 0.1 mol dm(-3) HNO3 solutions, the radiolytic yield of HNO2 produced by americium α-decay is below the detection limit, whereas for plutonium α-decay the yield is considerably greater than that found previously for γ-radiolysis. The differences between the solutions of the two radionuclides are a consequence of redox reactions involving plutonium and the products of aqueous HNO3 radiolysis, in particular H2O2 and HNO2 and its precursors. This radiation chemical behavior is HNO3 concentration dependent with the differences between plutonium and americium α-radiolysis decreasing with increasing HNO3 concentration. This change may be interpreted as a combination of α-radiolysis direct effects and acidity influencing the plutonium oxidation state distribution, which in turn affects the radiation chemistry of the system.

  12. Adsorption of organic acids from dilute aqueous solution onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.W.

    1980-06-01

    The radioisotope technique was used to study the removal of organic acid contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions onto activated carbon. Acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, n-hexanoic acid and n-heptanoic acid were studied at 278, 298, and 313/sup 0/K. Three bi-solute acid mixtures (acetic and propionic acids, acetic and butanoic acids, and propionic and butanoic acids) were studied at 278 and 298/sup 0/K. Isotherms of the single-solute systems were obtained at three different temperatures in the very dilute concentration region (less than 1% by weight). These data are very important in the prediction of bi-solute equilibrium data. A Polanyi-based competitive adsorption potential theory was used to predict the bi-solute equilibrium uptakes. Average errors between calculated and experimental data ranges from 4% to 14%. It was found that the competitive adsorption potential theory gives slightly better results than the ideal adsorbed solution theory.

  13. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications. PMID:21995776

  14. MetaProlog: Design, implementation, and application to a medical expert system in acid-base and electrolyte disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Bacha, H.

    1988-01-01

    The first part of the dissertation tackles the issues involved in the design and implementation of the MetaProlog system and shows how it was realized as an extension of the Warren Abstract Machine (WAM). In the process, the notions of theories, viewpoints, and proof trees as first-class objects are discussed and shown to add to the expressive power of the language and make it more attractive for a wider range of Artificial Intelligence applications. The second part deals with a medical expert system in the area of Acid-Base and Electrolyte Disorders which exploits the power and flexibility of the MetaProlog system. It uses a new approach to diagnostic reasoning which can be termed as first-principles assisted evidential reasoning, combined with the concept of progressively expanding diagnostic possibilities. Unlike the first-generation medical expert systems which relied mainly on phenomenological associations, this system incorporates some pathophysiological knowledge to enhance the quality of the diagnosis. But, unlike some new systems that take a multi-level approach and try to establish a diagnosis that is coherent at every level, a more realistic approach to that recognizes the limitations associated with medical knowledge is considered.

  15. Solid Polymer Electrolytes Based on Functionalized Tannic Acids from Natural Resources for All-Solid-State Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jimin; Bae, Ki Yoon; Kim, Hee Joong; Lee, Jin Hong; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Yoon, Woo Young; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2015-12-21

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) for all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries are prepared by simple one-pot polymerization induced by ultraviolet (UV) light using poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) as an ion-conducting monomeric unit and tannic acid (TA)-based crosslinking agent and plasticizer. The crosslinking agent and plasticizer based on natural resources are obtained from the reaction of TA with glycidyl methacrylate and glycidyl poly(ethylene glycol), respectively. Dimensionally stable free-standing SPE having a large ionic conductivity of 5.6×10(-4)  Scm(-1) at room temperature can be obtained by the polymerization of PEGMA into P(PEGMA) with a very small amount (0.1 wt %) of the crosslinking agent and 2.0 wt % of the plasticizer. The ionic conductivity value of SPE with a crosslinked structure is one order of magnitude larger than that of linear P(PEGMA) in the waxy state.

  16. Amplification of electrolyte uptake in the absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator for valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Kameswara Rao, P. V.; Rawal, Amit

    2017-02-01

    Absorptive glass mat (AGM) separators are widely used for valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries due to their remarkable fiber and structural characteristics. Discharge performance and recharge effectiveness of VRLA batteries essentially rely on the distribution and saturation levels of the electrolyte within the AGM separator. Herein, we report an analytical model for predicting the wicking characteristics of AGM battery separators under unconfined and confined states. The model of wicking behavior of AGM is based upon Fries and Dreyer's approach that included the effect of gravity component which was neglected in classic Lucas-Washburn's model. In addition, the predictive model of wicking accounted for realistic structural characteristics of AGM via orientation averaging approach. For wicking under confined state, the structural parameters have been updated under defined level of compressive stresses based upon the constitutive equation derived for a planar network of fibers in AGM under transverse loading conditions. A comparison has been made between the theoretical models and experimental results of wicking behavior under unconfined and confined states. Most importantly, the presented work has highlighted the questionable validity of classic Lucas-Washburn model for predicting the wicking characteristics of AGM separator over longer time duration.

  17. Electrocatalytic activities of cathode electrodes for water electrolysis using tetra-alkyl-ammonium-sulfonic acid ionic liquid as electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiegenbaum, Fernanda; de Souza, Michèle O.; Becker, Márcia R.; Martini, Emilse M. A.; de Souza, Roberto F.

    2015-04-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) performed with platinum (Pt), nickel (Ni), stainless steel 304 (SS) or glassy carbon (GC) cathodes in 0.1 M 3-triethylammonium-propanesulfonic acid tetrafluoroborate (TEA-PS.BF4) solution is studied using quasi-potentiostatic and impedance spectroscopy techniques. The objective is to compare the catalytic effect on the cathode using different materials to obtain hydrogen by water electrolysis. Furthermore, the catalytic effect of the ionic liquid (IL) on the cathode compared with that of a hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution with same pH value (0.8) is reported. A low activation energy (Ea) of 8.7 kJ mol-1 is found for the glassy carbon cathode. Tafel plots obtained with TEA-PS.BF4 IL suggest the formation of an electroactive layer of IL on the cathode, which may be responsible for the catalytically enhanced performance observed.

  18. Potential Use of Lime as Nitric Acid Source for Alternative Electrolyte Fuel-Cell Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianto, V.; Smarandache, Florentin

    2011-04-01

    Despite growing popularity for the use of biofuel and other similar methods to generate renewable energy sources from natural plantation in recent years, there is also growing concern over its disadvantage, i.e. that the energy use of edible plants may cause unwanted effects, because the plantation price tends to increase following the oil price. Therefore an alternative solution to this problem is to find `natural plantation' which have no direct link to `food chain' (for basic foods, such as palm oil etc.).

  19. Creatinine, urea, uric acid, water and electrolytes renal handling in the healthy oldest old

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Carlos Guido; Álvarez Gregori, Joaquín; Jauregui, José Ricardo; Macías Núñez, Juan Florencio

    2012-01-01

    Renal physiology in the healthy oldest old has the following characteristics, in comparison with the renal physiology in the young: a reduced creatinine clearance, tubular pattern of creatinine back-filtration, preserved proximal tubule sodium reabsorption and uric acid secretion, reduced sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle, reduced free water clearance, increased urea excretion, presence of medulla hypotonicity, reduced urinary dilution and concentration capabilities, and finally a reduced collecting tubules response to furosemide which expresses a reduced potassium excretion in this segment due to a sort of aldosterone resistance. All physiological changes of the aged kidney are the same in both genders. PMID:24175249

  20. Theoretical study of the morphology of self-assembled amphoteric oxide colloid nanocrystals in weak electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfimov, A. V.; Aryslanova, E. M.; Chivilikhin, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    The present paper is devoted to the theoretical study of the morphology of nanocrystals formed through self-assembly of amphoteric oxide colloidal nanoparticles in weak electrolytes. A mathematical model of multi-particle colloidal interaction was developed within the framework of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeak (DLVO) theory. This model accounts for the surface charge regulation during the multi-particle interaction and reveals the presence of orientation effects during nanoparticle aggregation. These effects are presumed to affect the morphology of the self-assembled nanocrystals and may present the means of controlling the structure of synthesised nanomaterials.

  1. Solution and gas-phase acidities of all-trans (all-E) retinoic acid: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Abboud, José-Luis M; Koppel, Ilmar A; Uggerud, Einar; Leito, Ivo; Koppel, Ivar; Sekiguchi, Osamu; Kaupmees, Karl; Saame, Jaan; Kütt, Karl; Mishima, Masaaki

    2015-07-27

    Retinoic acid is of fundamental biological importance. Its acidity was determined in the gas phase and in acetonitrile solution by means of mass spectrometry and UV/Vis spectrophotometry, respectively. The intrinsic acidity is slightly higher than that of benzoic acid. In solution, the situation is opposite. The experimental systems were described theoretically applying quantum chemical methods (wave function theory and density functional theory). This allowed the determination of the molecular structure of the acid and its conjugate base, both in vacuo and in solution, and for computational estimates of its acidity in both phases.

  2. Nanomechanical Behavior of Human Molars Soaked in Slight Acid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Te-Hua; Chang, Win-Jin; Kang, Shao-Hui; Chu, Chia-Chun

    This paper studied the mechanical and chemical properties of hydroxyl apatite (HA) crystal structure in the teeth when human molars were soaked in slight acid solution. First, we soaked the ground and polished molars respectively in the liquor of 30 wt.% H2CO3 and the liquor of 30 wt.% H2O2 for 10, 20, or 60 minutes. Next, we used a nanoindenter to measure the hardness and Young's modulus. Finally, we used a scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to analyze the variation of Ca, P and Na in teeth, a high resolution transmitting electron microscope (HRTEM) to observe the arrangement of crystallization phase of HA, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to analyze the crystallinity of the hexagonal phase of HA. The results showed that the demineralization phenomenon of the calcium-phosphorous compound in teeth made the teeth reduce sharply in hardness and Young's modulus after they were soaked in the two slight acid solutions for 10 minutes, but the re-mineralization phenomenon made the hardness and Young's modulus ascend gradually when the time lasted longer. With the same period of time, the teeth soaked in H2CO3 were lower in the hardness and Young's modulus than that in H2O2.

  3. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Youngkook; Birdja, Yuvraj Y; Raoufmoghaddam, Saeed; Koper, Marc T M

    2015-05-22

    Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is studied on solid metal electrodes in acidic solution (0.5 M H2 SO4 ) by correlating voltammetry with on-line HPLC product analysis. Three soluble products from HMF hydrogenation are distinguished: 2,5-dihydroxymethylfuran (DHMF), 2,5-dihydroxymethyltetrahydrofuran (DHMTHF), and 2,5-dimethyl-2,3-dihydrofuran (DMDHF). Based on the dominant reaction products, the metal catalysts are divided into three groups: (1) metals mainly forming DHMF (Fe, Ni, Cu, and Pb), (2) metals forming DHMF and DMDHF depending on the applied potentials (Co, Ag, Au, Cd, Sb, and Bi), and (3) metals forming mainly DMDHF (Pd, Pt, Al, Zn, In, and Sb). Nickel and antimony are the most active catalysts for DHMF (0.95 mM cm(-2) at ca. -0.35 VRHE and -20 mA cm(-2) ) and DMDHF (0.7 mM cm(-2) at -0.6 VRHE and -5 mA cm(-2) ), respectively. The pH of the solution plays an important role in the hydrogenation of HMF: acidic condition lowers the activation energy for HMF hydro-genation and hydrogenates the furan ring further to tetrahydrofuran.

  4. Corrosion resistance of flaky aluminum pigment coated with cerium oxides/hydroxides in chloride and acidic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niroumandrad, S.; Rostami, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance the corrosion resistance of lamellar aluminum pigment through surface treatment by cerium oxides/hydroxides. The surface composition of the pigments was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of the pigment was evaluated by conventional hydrogen evolution measurements in acidic solution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Ce-rich coating composed of Ce2O3 and CeO2 was precipitated on the pigment surface after immersion in the cerium solution. The corrosion resistance of pigment was significantly enhanced after modification with cerium layer.

  5. Planetary Bioresources and Astroecology. 1. Planetary Microcosm Bioassays of Martian and Carbonaceous Chondrite Materials: Nutrients, Electrolyte Solutions, and Algal and Plant Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    2002-07-01

    The biological fertilities of planetary materials can be assessed using microcosms based on meteorites. This study applies microcosm tests to martian meteorites and analogues and to carbonaceous chondrites. The biological fertilities of these materials are rated based on the soluble electrolyte nutrients, the growth of mesophile and cold-tolerant algae, and plant tissue cultures. The results show that the meteorites, in particular the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite and DaG 476 martian shergottite, contain high levels of water-extractable Ca, Mg, and SO 4-S. The martian meteorites DaG 476 and EETA 79001 also contain higher levels of extractable essential nutrients NO 3-N (0.013-0.017 g kg -1) and PO 4-P (0.019-0.046 g kg -1) than the terrestrial analogues. The yields of most of the water-extractable electrolytes vary only by factors of 2-3 under a wide range of planetary conditions. However, the long-term extractable phosphate increases significantly under a CO 2 atmosphere. The biological yields of algae and plant tissue cultures correlate with extractable NO 3-N and PO 4-P, identifying these as the limiting nutrients. Mesophilic algae and Asparagus officinalis cultures are identified as useful bioassay agents. A fertility rating system based on microcosm tests is proposed. The results rate the fertilities in the order martian basalts > terrestrial basalt, agricultural soil > carbonaceous chondrites, lava ash > cumulate igneous rock. The results demonstrate the application of planetary microcosms in experimental astroecology to rate planetary materials as targets for astrobiology exploration and as potential space bioresources. For example, the extractable materials in Murchison suggest that concentrated internal solutions in carbonaceous asteroids (3.8 mol L -1 electrolytes and 10 g L -1 organics) can support and disperse microorganisms introduced by natural or directed panspermia in early solar systems. The results also suggest that carbonaceous asteroids

  6. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε < ε(*) , however, ε dependence of their overall conformation is significantly differentiated from each other. PγDLGA tends to aggregate intramolecularly and/or intermolecularly with decreasing ε, but PγLGA still behaves as expanded random-coil. It is speculated that spatial arrangement of adjacent carboxyl groups along the backbone chain essentially affects the overall conformation of PγGA in acidic media.

  7. Electrolytic oxidation of anthracite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Patton, K.M.; Heard, I.

    1981-01-01

    An anthracite slurry can be oxidized only with difficulty by electrolytic methods in which aqueous electrolytes are used if the slurry is confined to the region of the anode by a porous pot or diaphragm. However, it can be easily oxidized if the anthracite itself is used as the anode. No porous pot or diaphragm is needed. Oxidative consumption of the coal to alkali-soluble compounds is found to proceed preferentially at the edges of the aromatic planes. An oxidation model is proposed in which the chief oxidants are molecular and radical species formed by the electrolytic decomposition of water at the coal surface-electrolyte interface. The oxidation reactions proposed account for the opening of the aromatic rings and the subsequent formation of carboxylic acids. The model also explains the observed anisotropic oxidation and the need for the porous pot or diaphragm used in previous studies of the oxidation of coal slurries. ?? 1981.

  8. Electrolytic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, J. S.; Hale, B. D.

    1984-09-01

    An apparatus is described for the separation of the anolyte and the catholyte during electrolysis. The electrolyte flows through an electrolytic cell between the oppositely charged electrodes. The cell is equipped with a wedge-shaped device, the tapered end is located between the electrodes on the effluent side of the cell. The wedge diverts the flow of the electrolyte to either side of the wedge, substantially separating the anolyte and the catholyte.

  9. Infrared optical constants of H2O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Jordon, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. We have also found the infrared optical constants of H2O ice. We measured the transmission of infrared light throught thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500/cm at temperatures below 200 K. We developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. We used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds.

  10. Anode activation polarization on Pt(h k l) electrodes in dilute sulphuric acid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. F.; Amphlett, J. C.; Peppley, B. A.; Thurgood, C. P.

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells have been under development for many years and appear to be the potential solution for many electricity supply applications. Modelling and computer simulation of PEM fuel cells have been equally active areas of work as a means of developing better understanding of cell and stack operation, facilitating design improvements and supporting system simulation studies. The prediction of activation polarization in our previous PEM modelling work, as in most PEM models, concentrated on the cathode losses. Anode losses are commonly much smaller and tend to be ignored compared to cathode losses. Further development of the anode activation polarization term is being undertaken in order to broaden the application and usefulness of PEM models in general. Previously published work on the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction using Pt(h k l) electrodes in dilute H 2SO 4 has been examined and further developed for eventual application to the modelling of PEM fuel cells. New correlations for the exchange current density are developed for Pt(1 0 0), Pt(1 1 0) and Pt(1 1 1) electrodes. Predictive equations for the anode activation polarization are also proposed. In addition, terminology has been modified to make the correlation approach and, eventually, the modelling method more easily understood and used by those without an extensive background in electrochemistry.

  11. Polymer electrolyte membrane based on 2-acrylamido-2-methyl propanesulfonic acid fabricated by embedded polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Haiqin; Hong, Liang; Lee, Jim Yang

    Methanol crossover through the Nafion membrane is a perennial problem in the operation of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and therefore justifies the search for a Nafion substitute. This study reports a new methanol-blocking polymer matrix which consists of a methanol barrier phase and an embedded proton source. A three-component polymer blend (TCPB) of poly(4-vinylphenol-co-methyl methacrylate), poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA), and Paraloid ® B-82 acrylic copolymer resins is used as a methanol barrier. In order to implant a proton source in the membrane as homogeneously as possible, the hydrophilic monomers, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl propanesulfonic acid (AMPS), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and a cross-linking agent (poly(ethylene glycol) dimethylacrylate) (PEGDMA) are polymerized after they have been embedded in the TCPB matrix. The embedded polymerization has resulted in an asymmetric membrane structure, in which the hydrophilic network is sandwiched by two outer layers of predominantly hydrophobic TCPB. Measurements are made of properties of the AMPS-containing membranes that are important to fuel cell applications such as water uptake, ion-exchange capacity, proton conductivity, methanol permeability and tensile strength. The highest proton conductivity of the AMPS-containing membrane is about 0.030 S cm -1 at 70 °C. The low methanol permeability (10 -8 to 10 -7 cm 2 s -1) of the AMPS-containing membranes is their primary advantage for DMFC applications.

  12. Effect of Fluid Flow on Zinc Electrodeposits from Acid Chloride Electrolytes. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmassir, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Zinc was deposited potentiostatically from acid chloride baths. Once bath chemistry and electrochemistry were controlled, the study was focused on convective mass transfer at horizontal electrodes and its effect on cell performance. A laser schlieren imaging technique allowed in situ observations of flow patterns and their correlation with current transients. Convection was turbulent and mass transfer as a function of Rayleigh number was well correlated by: Sh = 0.14 R to the 1/3 power. Similarly, convection initiation time was correlated by DT/d squared = 38 Ra to the -2/3 power. Time scale of fluctuations was about half the initiation time. Taking the boundary layer thickness as a characteristic length, a critical Rayleigh number for the onset of convection was deduced: Ra sub CR = 5000. Placing the anode on the top of the cathode completely changed the flow pattern but kept the I-t curves identical whereas the use of a cathode grid doubled the limiting current. A well defined plateau in the current voltage curves suggested that hydrogen evolution has been successfully inhibited. Finally, long time deposition showed that convection at horizontal electrodes increased the induction time for dentrite growth by at least a factor of 2 with respect to a vertical wire.

  13. Resistance to protein and oil fouling of sulfobetaine-grafted Poly(vinylidene Fluoride) hollow fiber membrane and the electrolyte-responsive behavior in NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Bi, Qiu-Yan; Liu, Tian-Yin; Wang, Xiao-Lin

    2012-07-01

    An excellent protein-fouling-resistance performance of the sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF hollow fiber membrane was obtained and the potential of sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF membrane to resist the oil fouling was confirmed in the filtration solution which contained inorganic electrolyte, sodium chloride (NaCl). The electrolyte-responsive behavior of the sulfobetaine-modified PVDF membrane was demonstrated by the filtration of NaCl aqueous solution. The grafting amount of the modified PVDF hollow fiber membrane showed a stable value as 680 μg/cm2. An almost complete coverage of the membrane surface by the grafted sulfobetaine polymer contributed to the high hydrophilicity and membrane strength. The membrane surface became denser and the permeate flux reduced with the increase of NaCl concentration. The cyclic filtration experiment showed that during the filtration of the protein solution with 0.05 mol/L of NaCl, the sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF membrane exhibited an excellent protein-fouling-resistance performance with a high relative flux recovery of 98.2% and a low irreversible fouling extent which was lower 10 times than that of the nascent PVDF hollow fiber membrane. In addition, the sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF hollow fiber membrane showed an oil-fouling-resistance property during the filtration experiment of the oil-in-water emulsion with 0.05 mol/L of NaCl, resulting in an relative flux recovery of about twice that of the nascent PVDF membrane. The results extended the application of poly(sulfobetaine)-g-PVDF hollow fiber membrane in the fields of bio-separation, artificial oil and wastewater treatment.

  14. [Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids on the Speciation of Pb in Purple Soil and Soil Solution].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Jiang, Tao; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-15

    Lead (Pb) in purple soil was selected as the research target, using one-step extraction method with 0.01 mol · L⁻¹ sodium nitrate as the background electrolyte to study the release effect of citric acid (CA), tartaric acid (TA) and acetic acid (AC) with different concentrations. Sequential extraction and geochemical model (Visual Minteq v3.0) were applied to analyze and predict the speciation of Pb in soil solid phase and soil solution phase. Then the ebvironmental implications and risks of low-molecule weight organic acid (LMWOA) on soil Pb were analyzed. The results indicated that all three types of LMWOA increased the desorption capacity of Pb in purple soil, and the effect followed the descending order of CA > TA > AC. After the action of LMWOAs, the exchangeable Pb increased; the carbonate-bound Pb and Fe-Mn oxide bound Pb dropped in soil solid phase. Organic bound Pb was the main speciation in soil solution phase, accounting for 45.16%-75.05%. The following speciation of Pb in soil solution was free Pb, accounting for 22.71%-50.25%. For CA and TA treatments, free Pb ions and inorganic bound Pb in soil solution increased with increasing LMWOAs concentration, while organic bound Pb suffered a decrease in this process. An opposite trend for AC treatment was observed compared with CA and TA treatments. Overall, LMWOAs boosted the bioavailability of Pb in purple soil and had a potential risk to contaminate underground water. Among the three LMWOAs in this study, CA had the largest potential to activate soil Pb.

  15. Synthesis of Pd9Ru@Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic electrolytes

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Yu; Hsieh, Yu -Chi; Chang, Li -Chung; ...

    2014-11-22

    Nanoparticles of PdRu, Pd₃Ru, and Pd₉Ru are synthesized and impregnated on carbon black via a wet chemical reflux process. X-ray diffraction patterns of the as-synthesized samples, PdxRu/C (x=1/3/9), suggest succesful formation of alloy without presence of individual Pd and Ru nanoparticles. Images from transmission electron microscope confirm irregularly-shaped nanoparticles with average size below 3 nm. Analysis from extended X-ray absorption fine structure on both Pd and Ru K-edge absorption profiles indicate the Ru atoms are enriched on the surface of PdxRu/C. Among these samples, the Pd₉Ru/C exhibits the strongest electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an oxygen-saturated 0.1more » M aqueous HClO₄ solution. Subsequently, the Pd₉Ru/C undegoes Cu under potential deposition, followed by a galvanic displacement reaction to deposit a Pt monolayer on the Pd₉Ru surface (Pd₉Ru@Pt). The Pd₉Ru@Pt reveals better ORR performance than that of Pt, reaching a mass activity of 0.38 mA μg⁻¹ Pt, as compared to that of commercially available Pt nanoparticles (0.107 mA μg⁻¹ Pt). Thus, the mechanisms responsible for the ORR enhancement are attributed to the combined effects of lattice strain and ligand interaction. In addition, this core-shell Pd₉Ru@Pt electrocatalyst represents a substantial reduction in the amount of Pt consumption and raw material cost.« less

  16. Ionic liquids as electrolytes for non-aqueous solutions electrochemical supercapacitors in a temperature range of 20 °C-80 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Tsay, Ken; Bock, Christina; Zhang, Jiujun

    2016-08-01

    To increase the operating temperature of the supercapacitors (SCs) without compromising their high cycle-life, several typical fluoro- and non-fluoro containing ionic liquids (EMI-mesylate, EMI-hydrogen sulfate, PP13-triflate, PP13-TFSI, and EMI-TFSI, as shown in Fig. 1) are studied as the electrolytes to prepare organic solutions for SC performance measurements using a two-electrode cell. Both cyclic voltammograms and charge/discharge curves at various temperatures such as 20, 40, 60 and 80 °C are collected. At 60 °C, the increased performance order in both rating and cyclability measurements are found to be as follows: 1) EMI-hydrogen sulfate < PP13-TFSI < EMI-mesylate < PP13-triflate < EMI-TFSI for rating; and 2) EMI-hydrogen sulfate < EMI-mesylate < PP13-Triflate < PP13-TFSI < EMI-TFSI for life-time. The fluoro-containing group of ILs, i.e., PP13-Triflate, PP13-TFSI and EMI-TFSI can give a specific capacitance between 100 and 170 F/g for various scan rates for a conventional carbon electrode, and an extended lifetime test of 10, 000 cycles with a capacitance degradation of less than 10%, indicating that these two ion liquids can be used for SC electrolytes operated at high temperature.

  17. Representation of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S absorption by aqueous solutions of diethanolamine using an electrolyte equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, G.; Fuerst, W.; Mougin, P.; Jullian, S.

    1999-09-01

    The electrolyte equation of state published in 1993 by Fuerst and Renon (AIChE J. 1993, 39, 335) has been applied to the representation of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S solubility in diethaloamine (DEA) aqueous solutions. This equation of state extends the classical Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state associated with a Wong-Sandler mixing rule to the case of systems containing ions. The study of binary systems allowed the authors to determine the parameters of the nonelectrolyte part of the equation of state. The ionic parameters have been fitted from experimental solubility data covering a wide range of experimental conditions (temperature range, 25--100 C; amine concentration, from 0.5 to 3.5 M; loadings up to 2.34 mol{sub Co{sub 2}}/mol{sub amine}). With the assumption used in previous applications of their model to various electrolyte systems, the adjusted ionic parameters are interaction ones involving protonated amine and anions as well as molecular compounds. The resulting model represents experimental data with deviations consistent with the experimental ones and close to the deviations obtained in previous studies.

  18. The solvent effect on the acidities of haloacetic acids in aqueous solution. A RISM-SCF study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Masaaki; Ten-no, Seiichiro; Kato, Shigeki; Hirata, Fumio

    1995-06-01

    The acidities of acetic, fluoracetic and chloroacetic acids in aqueous solution are calculated by means of the ab initio method combined with the reference interaction site method in the statistical mechanics of molecular liquids (the RISM-SCF method). The inversion in the order of acidities experimentally observed when a series of haloacetic acids is immersed into aqueous solution is reproduced. It is shown that the inversion is caused by competition between substitution and solvation effects. The solvation effect is discussed in molecular detail in terms of the charge distribution of the solute and the solute-solvent radial distribution functions.

  19. Thermodynamics of aqueous borate solutions I. Mixture of boric acid with sodium or potassium borate and chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, J.M.; Roy, R.N.; Roy, L.N.; Johnson, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Potentials for the cell without liquid junction H/sub 2/, Ptlt. slashB(OH)/sub 3/(m/sub 1/),MB(OH)/sub 4/(m/sub 2/),MCl(m/sub 3/)lt. slashAgCl,Ag where M is sodium or potassium are reported over a range of ionic strength to I = 3 mol-kg/sup -1/ at 5 to 55/sup 0/C. Total boron concentration in the solutions was restricted to low levels to minimize formation of polynuclear boron species. Cell potentials are treated with the Pitzer ion interaction treatment for mixed electrolytes, with linear ionic strength dependence assumed for the activity coefficient of undissociated boric acid. Trace activity coefficients of sodium and potassium borates in chloride media are calculated at various temperatures.

  20. The extraction of actinides from nitric acid solutions with diamides of dipicolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapka, Joseph L.; Paulenova, Alena; Alyapyshev, Mikhail Yu; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott

    2010-03-01

    Diamides of dipicolinic acid (N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyl-dipicolinamide, EtTDPA) were synthesized and evaluated for their extraction capability for actinides. In this work the extractions of neptunium(V), protactinium(V), and thorium(IV) with EtTDPA in a polar fluorinated diluent from nitric acid were investigated. EtTDPA shows a high affinity for Th(IV) even at millimolar concentrations. Np(V) and Pa(V) are both reasonably extractable with EtTDPA; however, near saturated solutions are required to achieve appreciable distribution ratios. A comparison with previously published actinide extraction data is given.

  1. Non-aqueous electrolytes for isotachophoresis of weak bases and its application to the comprehensive preconcentration of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids in column-coupling ITP/CE-MS.

    PubMed

    Kler, Pablo A; Huhn, Carolin

    2014-11-01

    Isotachophoresis (ITP) has long been used alone but also as a preconcentration technique for capillary electrophoresis (CE). Unfortunately, up to now, its application is restricted to relatively strong acids and bases as either the degree of (de)protonation is too low or the water dissociation is too high, evoking zone electrophoresis. With the comprehensive ITP analysis of all 20 proteinogenic amino acids as model analytes, we, here, show that non-aqueous ITP using dimethylsulfoxide as a solvent solves this ITP shortcoming. Dimethylsulfoxide changes the pH regime of analytes and electrolytes but, more importantly, strongly reduces the proton mobility by prohibiting hydrogen bonds and thus, the so-called Zundel-Eigen-Zundel electrical conduction mechanism of flipping hydrogen bonds. The effects are demonstrated in an electrolyte system with taurine or H(+) as terminator, and imidazole as leader together with strong acids such as oxalic and even trifluoroacetic acid as counterions, both impossible to use in aqueous solution. Mass spectrometric as well as capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) are used to follow the ITP processes. To demonstrate the preconcentration capabilities of ITP in a two-dimensional set-up, we, here, also demonstrate that our non-aqueous ITP method can be combined with capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry in a column-coupling system using a hybrid approach of capillaries coupled to a microfluidic interface. For this, C(4)D was optimized for on-chip detection with the electrodes aligned on top of a thin glass lid of the microfluidic chip.

  2. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2012-03-12

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 °C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. At 25 °C, for 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 11 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2.5 g/L and 0.8 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd in 4 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate at 10 °C is about 1.5 g/L. For 6 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate, the solubility of Gd at 10

  3. Radiolysis gases from nitric acid solutions containing HSA and HAN

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1994-10-28

    The concentration of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the radiolytically produced off-gas from 2.76-4.25M HNO{sub 3}/PU solutions has been found to be greatly reduced in the presence of sulfamic acid (HSA) and hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN). The H{sub 2} concentration ([H{sub 2}]) is reduced from 35 percent to about 4 percent by dilution caused from an increase in the production rates of nitrogen (N{sub 2}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and oxygen (O{sub 2}) gases. The generation rate of H{sub 2} was not affected by HSA or HAN giving a measured radiolytic yield, G(H{sub 2}), value of 0.201 molecules/100 eV for 2.765M NO{sub 3}{sup -} solution (a value of 0.213 is predicted from previous data). The G(H{sub 2}) values are dependent on the solution nitrate concentration ([NO{sub 3}{sup -}]). The generation rates of N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} are not dependent on the [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] in this narrow range, but are dependent on the presence of HSA and the concentration of HAN. The percentage [H{sub 2}] for the 2.5 to 3.0M NO{sub 3}{sup -} range expected in the off- from the FB-Line Pu{sup +3} Hold Tanks is conservatively estimated to be about 3.5 to 4.5 % for Pu + 3 solutions initially containing 0.023M HAN/0.165M HSA. The upper limit [H{sub 2}] may actually be about 4.1 % (4.3 % at 90 % confidence limits) but more {open_quotes}initial{close_quotes} off-gas rate data is needed at about 2.9M [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] in Pu{sup +3} solution for verification. Addition of ascorbic acid had no effect on the off-gas rate of Pu{sup +3} solutions containing HSA and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations higher than those expected in the hold tanks. The maximum {open_quotes}hold time{close_quotes} for 50 grams/liter Pu{sup +3}/0.165M HSA/0.023M HAN/2.5-3.0M HNO{sub 3} solution is 20.3{+-}2.1 days. After this time the HSA initially present will become exhausted and the [H{sub 2}] will increase to 35 %. This hold time may be longer in [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] < 3.0M, but again more study is needed.

  4. Optical properties of chitosan in aqueous solution of L- and D-ascorbic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinkina, Olga N.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.; Kazmicheva, Olga F.

    2016-04-01

    The optical properties of aqueous chitosan solutions in L- and D-ascorbic acids were studied by optical rotatory dispersion and spectrophotometry. The specific optical rotation [α] of all chitosan solutions tested was positive, in contrast to aqueous solutions of the ascorbic acid enantiomers, which exhibit an inverse relationship of [α] values. Significant differences in the absolute values of [α] of the chitosan solutions at polymer-acid ratios exceeding the equimolar one were found.

  5. Direct electric current treatment under physiologic saline conditions kills Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms via electrolytic generation of hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Elizabeth L; McLeod, Bruce R; Parker, Albert E; Stewart, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which a direct electrical current reduced the viability of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms in conjunction with ciprofloxacin at physiologic saline conditions meant to approximate those in an infected artificial joint. Biofilms grown in CDC biofilm reactors were exposed to current for 24 hours in 1/10(th) strength tryptic soy broth containing 9 g/L total NaCl. Dose-dependent log reductions up to 6.7 log(10) CFU/cm(2) were observed with the application of direct current at all four levels (0.7 to 1.8 mA/cm(2)) both in the presence and absence of ciprofloxacin. There were no significant differences in log reductions for wells with ciprofloxacin compared to those without at the same current levels. When current exposures were repeated without biofilm or organics in the medium, significant generation of free chlorine was measured. Free chlorine doses equivalent to the 24 hour endpoint concentration for each current level were shown to mimic killing achieved by current application. Current exposure (1.8 mA/cm(2)) in medium lacking chloride and amended with sulfate, nitrate, or phosphate as alternative electrolytes produced diminished kills of 3, 2, and 0 log reduction, respectively. Direct current also killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms when NaCl was present. Together these results indicate that electrolysis reactions generating hypochlorous acid from chloride are likely a main contributor to the efficacy of direct current application. A physiologically relevant NaCl concentration is thus a critical parameter in experimental design if direct current is to be investigated for in vivo medical applications.

  6. Direct Electric Current Treatment under Physiologic Saline Conditions Kills Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilms via Electrolytic Generation of Hypochlorous Acid

    PubMed Central

    Sandvik, Elizabeth L.; McLeod, Bruce R.; Parker, Albert E.; Stewart, Philip S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which a direct electrical current reduced the viability of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms in conjunction with ciprofloxacin at physiologic saline conditions meant to approximate those in an infected artificial joint. Biofilms grown in CDC biofilm reactors were exposed to current for 24 hours in 1/10th strength tryptic soy broth containing 9 g/L total NaCl. Dose-dependent log reductions up to 6.7 log10 CFU/cm2 were observed with the application of direct current at all four levels (0.7 to 1.8 mA/cm2) both in the presence and absence of ciprofloxacin. There were no significant differences in log reductions for wells with ciprofloxacin compared to those without at the same current levels. When current exposures were repeated without biofilm or organics in the medium, significant generation of free chlorine was measured. Free chlorine doses equivalent to the 24 hour endpoint concentration for each current level were shown to mimic killing achieved by current application. Current exposure (1.8 mA/cm2) in medium lacking chloride and amended with sulfate, nitrate, or phosphate as alternative electrolytes produced diminished kills of 3, 2, and 0 log reduction, respectively. Direct current also killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms when NaCl was present. Together these results indicate that electrolysis reactions generating hypochlorous acid from chloride are likely a main contributor to the efficacy of direct current application. A physiologically relevant NaCl concentration is thus a critical parameter in experimental design if direct current is to be investigated for in vivo medical applications. PMID:23390518

  7. Observation of pH Value in Electrokinetic Remediation using various electrolyte (MgSO4, KH2PO4 and Na(NO3)) for Barren Acidic Soil at Ayer Hitam, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norashira, J.; Zaidi, E.; Aziman, M.; Saiful Azhar, A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Barren acidic soil collected at Ayer Hitam, Johor Malaysia was recorded at pH value of 2.36 with relative humidity of 86%. This pH value is not suitable for the growth of any plants especially for the soil stabilization purposes. Gradation weathering within the range of 4 to 6 indicates an incomplete/partial weathering process. The soil grade in this range is known as a black shale mudstone. Beside, this also influences to a factor of the high surface water runoff at this particular soil species. As the acidic pH become a major problem for soil fertilizing hence an appropriate technique was implemented known as using ‘Electrokinetic Remediation’, EKR. This technique has a great potential in changing the soil pH value from acidic to less acidic and also kept maintain the pH at the saturated rate of electrochemical process. This research study presents the monitoring data of pH value due to the effect of various electrolyte consist of 0.5M of MgSO4, KH2PO4, and Na(NO3). Here, the distilled water (DW) was used as reference solution. The electric field was provided by dipping two pieces of identical rectangular aluminum foil as anode and cathode. The EKR was conducted under a constant voltage gradient of 50 V/m across the sample bulk at 0.14 m length measured between both electrodes. The data collection was conducted during the total period of 7 days surveillance. The variation of pH values at the remediation area between anode and cathode for various type of electrolyte indicates that there are a significant saturated value as it reaches 7 days of treatment. During the analysis, it is found that the highest pH value at the remediation area after 7 days treatment using Na(NO3), KH2PO4 and MgSO4 was 3.93, 3.33 and 3.39 respectively. Hence from the last stage of pH value observation, it can be conclude that the best electrolyte for barren soil treatment is Na(NO3) whereby it contribute to highest pH value and turn the soil to be less acidic.

  8. High-compactness coating grown by plasma electrolytic oxidation on AZ31 magnesium alloy in the solution of silicate-borax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, M. J.; Wang, X. J.; Zhang, M. F.

    2012-10-01

    A ceramic coating was formed on the surface of AZ31 magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in the silicate solution with and without borax doped. The composition, morphology, elements and roughness as well as mechanical property of the coating were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reciprocal-sliding tribometer. The results show that the PEO coating is mainly composed of magnesia. When using borax dope, boron element is permeating into the coating and the boron containing phase exist in the form of amorphous. In addition, the microhardness and compactness of the PEO coating are improved significantly due to doped borax.

  9. Effects of different sulphur amino acids and dietary electrolyte balance levels on performance, jejunal morphology, and immunocompetence of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Nikoofard, V; Mahdavi, A H; Samie, A H; Jahanian, E

    2016-02-01

    As alterations of dietary electrolyte balance (DEB) can influence amino acid metabolism via changes the ions incur in their configurations, performance and immunological responses of broiler chicks might be affected. So, the current study was carried out to investigate the effects of different levels of sulphur amino acids (SAA) and DEB on performance, jejunal morphology and immunocompetence of broiler chicks. A total of 360 1-day-old male Ross 308 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to nine experimental treatments with four replicates of 10 birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of three levels of SAA (100, 110, and 120% of NRC recommendation, provided by methionine supplementation in diets with the same cysteine level) and three levels of DEB (150, 250, and 350 mEq/kg) that were fed during the entire of trial in a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement. Results showed that the relative weights of intestine and abdominal fat were decreased markedly (p < 0.001) with increasing levels of SAA and DEB respectively. Antibody titre against sheep red blood cell was neither individually nor in combination influenced by supplementation of SAA or DEB. Nevertheless, a decrease in DEB level led to a suppression in heterophile (p < 0.05) and an increase in lymphocyte counts (p = 0.06); consequently, heterophile to lymphocyte ratio was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by decremental levels of DEB. Albumin to globulin ratio was increased after inclusion of at least 10% SAA (p < 0.001) and 150 mEq DEB/kg in the diet (p = 0.11). Although feeding high-DEB level led to a remarkable decrease in villus height (p < 0.01) and goblet cell numbers (p < 0.001), supplementing the highest level of SAA improved the height of jejunal villus. During the entire trial period, average daily feed intake (ADFI) was increased by incremental SAA levels (p < 0.05). However, inclusion of 150 mEq/kg led to not only a remarkable increase (p < 0.0001) in both ADFI and average daily weight gain (ADWG) but

  10. Uptake of ozone to mixed sodium bromide/ citric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Tao; Steimle, Emilie; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Kato, Shunsuke; Lampimäki, Markus; Brown, Matthew; van Bokhoven, Jeroen; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Sea-salt solution - air interfaces play an important role in the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. The reaction of ozone (O3) with bromide is of interest in the context of formation of photolabile halogens (Br2, BrCl) in the marine boundary layer. Recent experiments have suggested that the bromide oxidation rate is related to the surface concentration of bromide [1] and inversely related to the gas phase concentration of O3, an indication for a precursor mediated reaction at the surface [2]. So far, the effect of organics (such as those occurring at the ocean surface or in marine aerosols) on the reaction of O3 with bromide aerosols has not been studied yet. In our study we investigate the uptake kinetics of O3 to a mixed solution of sodium bromide (NaBr) and citric acid (CA), which represents highly oxidized organic compounds present in the environment, with a well-established coated wall flow tube technique, which leads to exposure of the film to O3 allowing the heterogeneous reactions to take place and the loss of O3 being measured. The results indicate that the uptake of O3 to the films with the higher bromide concentrations (0.34M and 4M) is independent of the gas phase concentration and roughly consistent with uptake limited by reaction in the bulk. For the lower bromide concentration (84mM), however, we observe a trend of the uptake coefficient to decrease with increasing O3 concentration, indicating an increasing importance of a surface reaction. In an attempt to constrain the kinetic data, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to get insight into the surface composition of the aqueous solution - air interface. Previous XPS studies have shown that halide ion concentrations are enhanced at the aqueous solution air interface [3-4], which likely promotes the surface reactions of bromide or iodide with O3. A first XPS study of ternary solutions of KI with butanol indicated the importance of specific interactions of the cation with the alcohol

  11. Electrocatalysis of fuel cell reactions: Investigation of alternate electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, D. T.; Hsueh, K. L.; Chang, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Oxygen reduction and transport properties of the electrolyte in the phosphoric acid fuel cell are studied. A theoretical expression for the rotating ring-disk electrode technique; the intermediate reaction rate constants for oxygen reduction on platinum in phosphoric acid electrolyte; oxygen reduction mechanism in trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMSA), considered as an alternate electrolyte for the acid fuel cells; and transport properties of the phosphoric acid electrolyte at high concentrations and temperatures are covered.

  12. Small angle x-ray scattering of a supercritical electrolyte solution: the effect of density fluctuations on the hydration of ions.

    PubMed

    Testemale, Denis; Coulet, Marie Vanessa; Hazemann, Jean Louis; Simon, Jean Paul; Bley, Françoise; Geaymond, Olivier; Argoud, Roger

    2005-05-15

    Synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering measurements on water and zinc bromide ZnBr2 aqueous solutions were carried out from ambient to supercritical conditions. For both systems several isobars (between 285 and 600 bars) were followed beyond the critical isochore. The data were analyzed through an Ornstein-Zernike formalism in terms of correlation length and null angle structure factor. The results for pure water are in agreement with previously published values. Solutions of different electrolyte concentrations were studied. In each case, the values of the correlation length and null angle structure factor are larger than those of pure water. This effect is more pronounced for higher concentrations and/or for pressure closer to the critical point of pure water. This is in agreement with the shift of the critical point determined in the literature for NaCl solutions. Comparing these results to previous x-ray absorption measurements carried out on identical samples we propose the following two step sequence for ionic hydration up to supercritical conditions: (1) from ambient to about 300 degrees C, an increase of ion pairing and formation of multi-ionic complexes which can be correlated to the decrease of the dielectric constant; (2) an enhancement of the local solvation shell of ions due to the onset of the thermal density fluctuations at high temperature, leading to a screening effect between ions and inhibiting the ion pairing processes.

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of mixed solvent electrolytes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    P.T. Cummings; J.P. O'Connell

    1995-01-31

    The goals of the research program evolved into six areas: Molecular simulation of phase equilibria in aqueous and mixed solvent electrolyte solutions. Molecular simulation of solvation and structure in supercritical aqueous systems. Extension of experimental database on mixed solvent electrolytes. Analysis of the thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions and mixed electrolyte solutions using fluctuation solution theory. Development of analytic expressions for thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions using analytically solved integral equation approximations. Fundamental modeling of mixed solvent electrolytes using numerically solved integral equation approximation theories.

  14. High performing solution-coated electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors for aqueous media operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiaoming; Leonardi, Francesca; Casalini, Stefano; Temiño, Inés; Mas-Torrent, Marta

    2016-12-01

    Since the first demonstration, the electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors (EGOFETs) have immediately gained much attention for the development of cutting-edge technology and they are expected to have a strong impact in the field of (bio-)sensors. However EGOFETs directly expose their active material towards the aqueous media, hence a limited library of organic semiconductors is actually suitable. By using two mostly unexplored strategies in EGOFETs such as blended materials together with a printing technique, we have successfully widened this library. Our benchmarks were 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene and 2,8-difluoro-5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl)anthradithiophene (diF-TES-ADT), which have been firstly blended with polystyrene and secondly deposited by means of the bar-assisted meniscus shearing (BAMS) technique. Our approach yielded thin films (i.e. no thicker than 30 nm) suitable for organic electronics and stable in liquid environment. Up to date, these EGOFETs show unprecedented performances. Furthermore, an extremely harsh environment, like NaCl 1M, has been used in order to test the limit of operability of these electronic devices. Albeit an electrical worsening is observed, our devices can operate under different electrical stresses within the time frame of hours up to a week. In conclusion, our approach turns out to be a powerful tool for the EGOFET manufacturing.

  15. Enhanced fluorescence of triphenylmethane dyes in aqueous surfactant solutions at supramicellar concentrations—effect of added electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Swati; Girigoswami, Agnishwar; Mandal, Suchismita

    2002-10-01

    The colour change of triphenylmethane (TPM) dyes induced by surfactants at concentrations much greater than their critical micellar concentrations is found to be accompanied by enhanced fluorescence. Thus, the otherwise weak fluorescence of TPM dyes can be detected using supramicellar surfactant concentrations. In this respect, the nonionic polyoxyethylene (POE) chain-containing surfactants are found to be more efficient compared with ionic surfactants. The POE surfactants, Triton X-100, Tween-20 and Tween-60 present a polymer-like surface to the dyes, which can thus easily bind to them. At supramicellar concentrations, the hydrophobic environment formed in these micelles is effective in preventing nonradiative relaxation processes of the dyes. As a result, there is enhanced fluorescence for even micromolar concentrations of the dyes. Among the Tween series, Tween-60 being more hydrophobic leads to greater fluorescence enhancement than Tween-20. From the fluorescence properties, binding constants for dye binding to the surfactants can be determined. Thus the relative efficiency of these surfactants as binding substrates can be assessed. Another interesting observation is that the electrolyte LiCl in presence of the surfactants leads to even larger fluorescence enhancement than the surfactants alone.

  16. High performing solution-coated electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors for aqueous media operation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiaoming; Leonardi, Francesca; Casalini, Stefano; Temiño, Inés; Mas-Torrent, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Since the first demonstration, the electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors (EGOFETs) have immediately gained much attention for the development of cutting-edge technology and they are expected to have a strong impact in the field of (bio-)sensors. However EGOFETs directly expose their active material towards the aqueous media, hence a limited library of organic semiconductors is actually suitable. By using two mostly unexplored strategies in EGOFETs such as blended materials together with a printing technique, we have successfully widened this library. Our benchmarks were 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene and 2,8-difluoro-5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl)anthradithiophene (diF-TES-ADT), which have been firstly blended with polystyrene and secondly deposited by means of the bar-assisted meniscus shearing (BAMS) technique. Our approach yielded thin films (i.e. no thicker than 30 nm) suitable for organic electronics and stable in liquid environment. Up to date, these EGOFETs show unprecedented performances. Furthermore, an extremely harsh environment, like NaCl 1M, has been used in order to test the limit of operability of these electronic devices. Albeit an electrical worsening is observed, our devices can operate under different electrical stresses within the time frame of hours up to a week. In conclusion, our approach turns out to be a powerful tool for the EGOFET manufacturing. PMID:28004824

  17. Electrolytic removal of nitrate from crop residues.

    PubMed

    Colon, G; Sager, J C

    2001-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) resource recovery system, which is a waste-processing system,uses aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors to recover plants nutrients and secondary foods from the inedible biomass. Crop residues contain a significant amount of nitrate. There are actually two major problems concerning nitrate: 1) both CELSS biomass production and resource recovery consume large quantities of nitric acid, and 2) nitrate causes a variety of problems in both aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors. The nitrate anion causes several problems in the resource recovery system in such a way that removal prior to the process is highly desirable. The technique proposed to remove nitrate from potato inedible biomass leachate and to satisfy the nitric acid demand was a four-compartment electrolytic cell. In order to establish the electrolytic cell performance variables, experiments were carried out using potato crop residue aqueous leachate as the diluate solution. The variables studied were the potato biomass leachate composition and electrical properties, preparation of compartment solutions to be compatible with the electrolytic system, limiting current density, nutrients removal rates as a function of current density, fluid hydrodynamic conditions, applied voltage, and process operating time during batch recirculation operation. Results indicated that the limiting current density (maximum operating current density) was directly proportional to the solution electrical conductivity an a power function of the linear fluid velocity in the range between 0.083 and 0.403 m/s. During the electrolytic cell once-through operation, the nitrate, potassium, and other nutrient removal rates were proportional to the current density and were inversely proportional to fluid velocity. The removal of monovalent ions was found to be higher than divalent ones. Under batch recirculation operation at constant applied voltage of 4.5 and 8.5 V, it was found that the nutrient

  18. Thermodynamic studies of ionic hydration and interactions for amino acid ionic liquids in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K.

    PubMed

    Dagade, Dilip H; Madkar, Kavita R; Shinde, Sandeep P; Barge, Seema S

    2013-01-31

    Amino acid ionic liquids are a special class of ionic liquids due to their unique acid-base behavior, biological significance, and applications in different fields such as templates in synthetic chemistry, stabilizers for biological macromolecules, etc. The physicochemical properties of these ionic liquids can easily be altered by making the different combinations of amino acids as anion along with possible cation modification which makes amino acid ionic liquids more suitable to understand the different kinds of molecular and ionic interactions with sufficient depth so that they can provide fruitful information for a molecular level understanding of more complicated biological processes. In this context, volumetric and osmotic coefficient measurements for aqueous solutions containing 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ([Emim]) based amino acid ionic liquids of glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine are reported at 298.15 K. From experimental osmotic coefficient data, mean molal activity coefficients of ionic liquids were estimated and analyzed using the Debye-Hückel and Pitzer models. The hydration numbers of ionic liquids in aqueous solutions were obtained using activity data. Pitzer ion interaction parameters are estimated and compared with other electrolytes reported in the literature. The nonelectrolyte contribution to the aqueous solutions containing ionic liquids was studied by calculating the osmotic second virial coefficient through an application of the McMillan-Mayer theory of solution. It has been found that the second osmotic virial coefficient which includes volume effects correlates linearly with the Pitzer ion interaction parameter estimated independently from osmotic data as well as the hydrophobicity of ionic liquids. The enthalpy-entropy compensation effect, explained using the Starikov-Nordén model of enthalpy-entropy compensation, and partial molar entropy analysis for aqueous [Emim][Gly] solutions are made by using experimental Gibb

  19. Advanced Proton Conducting Polymer Electrolytes for Electrochemical Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Han

    Research on solid electrochemical energy storage devices aims to provide high performance, low cost, and safe operation solutions for emerging applications from flexible consumer electronics to microelectronics. Polymer electrolytes, minimizing device sealing and liquid electrolyte leakage, are key enablers for these next-generation technologies. In this thesis, a novel proton-conducing polymer electrolyte system has been developed using heteropolyacids (HPAs) and polyvinyl alcohol for electrochemical capacitors. A thorough understanding of proton conduction mechanisms of HPAs together with the interactions among HPAs, additives, and polymer framework has been developed. Structure and chemical bonding of the electrolytes have been studied extensively to identify and elucidate key attributes affecting the electrolyte properties. Numerical models describing the proton conduction mechanism have been applied to differentiate those attributes. The performance optimization of the polymer electrolytes through additives, polymer structural modifications, and synthesis of alternative HPAs has achieved several important milestones, including: (a) high proton mobility and proton density; (b) good ion accessibility at electrode/electrolyte interface; (c) wide electrochemical stability window; and (d) good environmental stability. Specifically, high proton mobility has been addressed by cross-linking the polymer framework to improve the water storage capability at normal-to-high humidity conditions (e.g. 50-80% RH) as well as by incorporating nano-fillers to enhance the water retention at normal humidity levels (e.g. 30-60% RH). High proton density has been reached by utilizing additional proton donors (i.e. acidic plasticizers) and by developing different HPAs. Good ion accessibility has been achieved through addition of plasticizers. Electrochemical stability window of the electrolyte system has also been investigated and expanded by utilizing HPAs with different heteroatoms

  20. EVALUATING EFFECTS OF NEPTUNIUM ON THE SRS METHOD FOR CONTROLLED POTENTIAL COULOMETRIC ASSAY OF PLUTONIUM IN SULFURIC ACID SUPPORTING ELECTROLYTE

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, M; Sheldon Nichols, S

    2008-05-09

    A study of the impact of neptunium on the coulometric assay of plutonium in dilute sulfuric acid was performed. Weight aliquots of plutonium standard solutions were spiked with purified neptunium solution to evaluate plutonium measurement performance for aliquots with Pu:Np ratios of 50:1, 30:1, 20:1, 15:1, and 10:1. Weight aliquots of the pure plutonium standard solution were measured as controls. Routine plutonium instrument control standards were also measured. The presence of neptunium in plutonium aliquots significantly increases the random uncertainty associated with the plutonium coulometric measurement performed in accordance with ISO12183:2005.7 However, the presence of neptunium does not appear to degrade electrode performance and conditioning as aliquots of pure plutonium that were interspersed during the measurement of the mixed Pu:Np aliquots continued to achieve the historical short-term random uncertainty for the method. Lack of adequate control of the neptunium oxidation state is suspected to be the primary cause of the elevated measurement uncertainty and will be pursued in a future study.

  1. Compatible solute influence on nucleic acids: Many questions but few answers

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Compatible solutes are small organic osmolytes including but not limited to sugars, polyols, amino acids, and their derivatives. They are compatible with cell metabolism even at molar concentrations. A variety of organisms synthesize or take up compatible solutes for adaptation to extreme environments. In addition to their protective action on whole cells, compatible solutes display significant effects on biomolecules in vitro. These include stabilization of native protein and nucleic acid structures. They are used as additives in polymerase chain reactions to increase product yield and specificity, but also in other nucleic acid and protein applications. Interactions of compatible solutes with nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid complexes are much less understood than the corresponding interactions of compatible solutes with proteins. Although we may begin to understand solute/nucleic acid interactions there are only few answers to the many questions we have. I summarize here the current state of knowledge and discuss possible molecular mechanisms and thermodynamics. PMID:18522725

  2. HYDROGEN CHEMISORPTION ON Pt SINGLE CRYSTAL SURFACES IN ACIDIC SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Jr., Philip N.

    1980-04-01

    Hydrogen chemisorption from dilute acidic solution onto Pt single crystal surfaces was examined using an electrochemical cell directly coupled to LEED/Auger analytical system. No pre-anodization was used prior to observing hydrogen adsorption by cyclic voltammetry so that clean surfaces having the ordered structures indicated by LEED were studied. The problem of contributions from non-ordered parts of the electrode like support wires and edges was solved by using a gold evaporation masking technique. The specific contribution of atomic imperfections to the voltammetry curve was deduced from the ordered and countable imperfections occurring on high Miller index single crystal surfaces that have a stepped structure. The H-Pt bond energy Has found to be structure sensitive, and sensitive both to local site geometry and long range order in the surface. The bond strength was found to vary systematically: n(111)x(100) > (100) > n(111)x(111) > (110) > (111). Distinct states for hydrogen at steps versus hydrogen on terraces could be distinguished. The (110) surface is shown to be a (111) vicinal, probably the [3(111) x 2(111)] microfacetted surface. The zero coverage heat of adsorption on the well-ordered (111) surface (48 kJ/mol) in solutions is the same as the value reported by Ertl and co-workers for adsorption on a (111) surface in vacuum. Adsorption Isotherms for hydrogen on the (111) and (100) surfaces is adequately fit by the classical model for immobile adsorption at single sites with nearest neighbor repulsive interaction.

  3. Electrolytes: transport properties and non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.G.

    1980-12-01

    This paper presents a review on the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamics to transport in electrolyte solutions, and some recent experimental work and results for mutual diffusion in electrolyte solutions.

  4. Effect of electrolyte valency, alginate concentration and pH on engineered TiO₂ nanoparticle stability in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Frédéric; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Stoll, Serge

    2015-12-01

    Agglomeration and disagglomeration processes are expected to play a key role on the fate of engineered nanoparticles in natural aquatic systems. These processes are investigated here in detail by studying first the stability of TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of monovalent and divalent electrolytes at different pHs (below and above the point of zero charge of TiO2) and discussing the importance of specific divalent cation adsorption with the help of the DLVO theory as well as the importance of the nature of the counterions. Then the impact of one polysaccharide (alginate) on the stability of agglomerates formed under pH and water hardness representative of Lake Geneva environmental conditions is investigated. In these conditions the large TiO2 agglomerates (diameter>1μm) are positively charged due to Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) specific adsorption and alginate, which is negatively charged, adsorbs onto the agglomerate surface. Our results indicate that the presence of alginate at typical natural organic matter concentration (1-10 mg L(-1)) strongly modifies the TiO2 agglomerate (50 mg L(-1)) stability by inducing their partial and rapid disagglomeration. The importance of disagglomeration is found dependent on the alginate concentration with maximum of disagglomeration obtained for alginate concentration ≥8 mg L(-1) and leading to 400 nm fragments. From an environmental point of view partial restabilization of TiO2 agglomerates in the presence of alginate constitutes an important outcome. Disagglomeration will enhance their transport and residence time in aquatic systems which is an important step in the current knowledge on risk assessment associated to engineered nanoparticles.

  5. Surface Analytical Study of CuInSe2 Treated in Cd-Containing Partial Electrolyte Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, S. E.; Ramanathan, K.; Wiesner H.; Moutinho, H.; Niles, D. W.

    1998-11-19

    Junction formation in CuInSe2 (CIS) has been studied by exposing thin films and single-crystal samples to solutions containing NH4OH and CdSO4. The treated samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry to determine the amount and distribution of Cd deposited on the surface of the films. Cadmium is found to react with the surface for all the solution exposure times and temperatures studied. The reaction rapidly approaches the endpoint and remains relatively unchanged for subsequent solution exposure. Cadmium in-diffusion, as measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, is obscured by topography effects in the thin-film samples and by ion-beam mixing and topography in the single-crystal sample.

  6. Thermal and volumetric properties of complex aqueous electrolyte solutions using the Pitzer formalism - The PhreeSCALE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Adeline; Boulahya, Faïza; André, Laurent; Lassin, Arnault; Azaroual, Mohamed; Serin, Jean-Paul; Cézac, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    The thermal and volumetric properties of complex aqueous solutions are described according to the Pitzer equation, explicitly taking into account the speciation in the aqueous solutions. The thermal properties are the apparent relative molar enthalpy (Lϕ) and the apparent molar heat capacity (Cp,ϕ). The volumetric property is the apparent molar volume (Vϕ). Equations describing these properties are obtained from the temperature or pressure derivatives of the excess Gibbs energy and make it possible to calculate the dilution enthalpy (∆HD), the heat capacity (cp) and the density (ρ) of aqueous solutions up to high concentrations. Their implementation in PHREEQC V.3 (Parkhurst and Appelo, 2013) is described and has led to a new numerical tool, called PhreeSCALE. It was tested first, using a set of parameters (specific interaction parameters and standard properties) from the literature for two binary systems (Na2SO4-H2O and MgSO4-H2O), for the quaternary K-Na-Cl-SO4 system (heat capacity only) and for the Na-K-Ca-Mg-Cl-SO4-HCO3 system (density only). The results obtained with PhreeSCALE are in agreement with the literature data when the same standard solution heat capacity (Cp0) and volume (V0) values are used. For further applications of this improved computation tool, these standard solution properties were calculated independently, using the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations. By using this kind of approach, most of the Pitzer interaction parameters coming from literature become obsolete since they are not coherent with the standard properties calculated according to the HKF formalism. Consequently a new set of interaction parameters must be determined. This approach was successfully applied to the Na2SO4-H2O and MgSO4-H2O binary systems, providing a new set of optimized interaction parameters, consistent with the standard solution properties derived from the HKF equations.

  7. Infiltration of Solution-Processable Solid Electrolytes into Conventional Li-Ion-Battery Electrodes for All-Solid-State Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyeon; Oh, Dae Yang; Park, Kern Ho; Choi, Young Eun; Nam, Young Jin; Lee, Han Ah; Lee, Sang-Min; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2017-04-05

    Bulk-type all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries (ASLBs) have the potential to be superior to conventional lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in terms of safety and energy density. Sulfide SE materials are key to the development of bulk-type ASLBs because of their high ionic conductivity (max of ∼10(-2) S cm(-1)) and deformability. However, the severe reactivity of sulfide materials toward common polar solvents and the particulate nature of these electrolytes pose serious complications for the wet-slurry process used to fabricate ASLB electrodes, such as the availability of solvent and polymeric binders and the formation of ionic contacts and networks. In this work, we report a new scalable fabrication protocol for ASLB electrodes using conventional composite LIB electrodes and homogeneous SE solutions (Li6PS5Cl (LPSCl) in ethanol or 0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4 in methanol). The liquefied LPSCl is infiltrated into the tortuous porous structures of LIB electrodes and solidified, providing intimate ionic contacts and favorable ionic percolation. The LPSCl-infiltrated LiCoO2 and graphite electrodes show high reversible capacities (141 and 364 mA h g(-1)) at 0.14 mA cm(-2) (0.1 C) and 30 °C, which are not only superior to those for conventional dry-mixed and slurry-mixed ASLB electrodes but also comparable to those for liquid electrolyte cells. Good electrochemical performance of ASLBs employing the LPSCl-infiltrated LiCoO2 and graphite electrodes at 100 °C is also presented, highlighting the excellent thermal stability and safety of ASLBs.

  8. Aggregation Kinetics and Self-Assembly Mechanisms of Graphene Quantum Dots in Aqueous Solutions: Cooperative Effects of pH and Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingqing; Chen, Baoliang; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-02-07

    The cooperative effects of pH and electrolytes on the aggregation of GQDs and the aggregate morphologies are characterized. Because GQDs have an average size of 9 nm with abundant O-functionalized edges, their suspension was very stable even in a high electrolyte concentration and low pH solution. Divalent cations (Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)) excelled at aggregating the GQD nanoplates, while monovalent cations (Na(+) and K(+)) did not disturb the stability. For Na(+) and K(+), positive linear correlations were observed between the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) and pH levels. For Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), negative, but nonlinear, correlations between CCC and pH values could not be explained and predicted by the traditional DLVO theory. Three-step mechanisms are proposed for the first time to elucidate the complex aggregation of GQDs. The first step is the protonation/deprotonation of GQDs under different pH values and the self-assembly of GQDs into GQD-water-GQD. The second step is the self-assembly of small GQD pieces into large plates (graphene oxide-like) induced by the coexisting Ca(2+) and then conversion into 3D structures via π-π stacking. The third step is the aggregation of the 3D-assembled GQDs into precipitates via the suppression of the electric double layer. The self-assembly of GQDs prior to aggregation was supported by SEM and HRTEM imaging. Understanding of the colloidal behavior of ultrasmall nanoparticles like GQDs is significantly important for the precise prediction of their environmental fate and risk.

  9. Temperature induced denaturation of collagen in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Mu, Changdao; Li, Defu; Lin, Wei; Ding, Yanwei; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2007-07-01

    The denaturation of collagen solution in acetic acid has been investigated by using ultra-sensitive differential scanning calorimetry (US-DSC), circular dichroism (CD), and laser light scattering (LLS). US-DSC measurements reveal that the collagen exhibits a bimodal transition, i.e., there exists a shoulder transition before the major transition. Such a shoulder transition can recover from a cooling when the collagen is heated to a temperature below 35 degrees C. However, when the heating temperature is above 37 degrees C, both the shoulder and major transitions are irreversible. CD measurements demonstrate the content of triple helix slowly decreases with temperature at a temperature below 35 degrees C, but it drastically decreases at a higher temperature. Our experiments suggest that the shoulder transition and major transition arise from the defibrillation and denaturation of collagen, respectively. LLS measurements show the average hydrodynamic radius R(h), radius of gyration R(g)of the collagen gradually decrease before a sharp decrease at a higher temperature. Meanwhile, the ratio R(g)/R(h) gradually increases at a temperature below approximately 34 degrees C and drastically increases in the range 34-40 degrees C, further indicating the defibrillation of collagen before the denaturation.

  10. Hyaluronic acid solution injection for upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed conventional endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyung Hun

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be an additional endoscopic modality for controlling bleeding in difficult cases when other techniques have failed. We evaluated 12 cases in which we used hyaluronic acid solution injection for stopping bleeding. Immediately following hyaluronic acid solution injection, bleeding was controlled in 11 out of 12 cases. There was no clinical evidence of renewed bleeding in 11 cases during follow up.Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be a simple and efficient additional method for controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy.

  11. Liquid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, J.; Mizuhashi, M.; Kamimori, T.

    1990-12-31

    In contrast to lithium batteries, the electrochromic windows are used under the sunlight, which requires the stability against UV-light, in addition to the usual electrochemical and thermal stabilities. Thus, the selection of the electrode materials and the combination with the electrolytes should be carefully performed in terms of stability requirements. Recently many reports in relation to those subjects were published. Therefore only fundamental properties of liquid electrolytes required for the electrochromic research are reviewed in this chapter.

  12. Large-scale production of anhydrous nitric acid and nitric acid solutions of dinitrogen pentoxide

    DOEpatents

    Harrar, Jackson E.; Quong, Roland; Rigdon, Lester P.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for a large scale, electrochemical production of anhydrous nitric acid and N.sub.2 O.sub.5. The method includes oxidizing a solution of N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /aqueous-HNO.sub.3 at the anode, while reducing aqueous HNO.sub.3 at the cathode, in a flow electrolyzer constructed of special materials. N.sub.2 O.sub.4 is produced at the cathode and may be separated and recycled as a feedstock for use in the anolyte. The process is controlled by regulating the electrolysis current until the desired products are obtained. The chemical compositions of the anolyte and catholyte are monitored by measurement of the solution density and the concentrations of N.sub.2 O.sub.4.

  13. Density-functional theory of spherical electric double layers and zeta potentials of colloidal particles in restricted-primitive-model electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang-Xin; Wu, Jianzhong; Gao, Guang-Hua

    2004-04-15

    A density-functional theory is proposed to describe the density profiles of small ions around an isolated colloidal particle in the framework of the restricted primitive model where the small ions have uniform size and the solvent is represented by a dielectric continuum. The excess Helmholtz energy functional is derived from a modified fundamental measure theory for the hard-sphere repulsion and a quadratic functional Taylor expansion for the electrostatic interactions. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the results from Monte Carlo simulations and from previous investigations using integral-equation theory for the ionic density profiles and the zeta potentials of spherical particles at a variety of solution conditions. Like the integral-equation approaches, the density-functional theory is able to capture the oscillatory density profiles of small ions and the charge inversion (overcharging) phenomena for particles with elevated charge density. In particular, our density-functional theory predicts the formation of a second counterion layer near the surface of highly charged spherical particle. Conversely, the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory and its variations are unable to represent the oscillatory behavior of small ion distributions and charge inversion. Finally, our density-functional theory predicts charge inversion even in a 1:1 electrolyte solution as long as the salt concentration is sufficiently high.

  14. The role of external electric fields in enhancing ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift-diffusion rates in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Sohail

    2011-03-01

    Molecular simulations have been carried out using the method of molecular dynamics to investigate the role of external electric fields on the ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift-diffusion rate of ions in aqueous electrolyte solutions. These properties are critical for a range of processes including electrodialysis, electro-deionization, electrophoresis, and electroosmosis. Our results show that external electric fields relax the hydrated ion structure at significantly larger time scales (between 300 and 800 ps), than most other relaxation processes in solutions (generally of the order of 1 ps). Previous studies that did not account for the much longer relaxation times did not observe this behavior for ions even with very high electric fields. External electric fields must also overcome several (at least two or more) activation energy barriers to significantly change the structure of hydrated ions. As a result, the dynamic behavior changes almost in bands as a function of electric field strengths, rather than linearly. Finally, the effect of the field is much less dramatic on water than the ions. Thus electric fields will be of more significance in processes that involve the transport of ions (such as electro-deionization) than the transport of water (electroosmosis).

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl₂) solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison

    2011-01-01

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl–CaCl2 electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO2 or high-level radioactive waste (0.34–1.83 molc dm-3). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, β-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the β- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) “indifferent electrolyte” ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl+ ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations {>=0.34 molc dm-3}, properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid “ice-like” structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

  16. Studies of the pulse charge of lead-acid batteries for PV applications. Part III. Electrolyte concentration effects on the electrochemical performance of the positive plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Delaille, A.; Karoui, F.; Perrin, M.; Lemaire, E.; Mattera, F.

    2008-05-01

    In the third part of this work the effects of the sulphuric acid concentration on the positive plate discharge capacity, impedance and oxygen overvoltage are discussed. It has been found that the full discharge capacity of the positive plate is available down to electrolyte concentrations of 3 mol l-1 (s.g. 1.18 g ml-1). At further acid dilution, capacity of the positive plate declines, keeping the utilization of the sulphuric acid about 50%. Decreasing the acid concentration, the oxygen overvoltage decreases with a factor of 12-18 mV M-1, excluding the effect of the equilibrium potential of the oxygen electrode as a function of pH. The capacitance of the electrical double layer decrease linearly with the dilution of the sulphuric acid suggesting strong adsorption effects. This suggestion has been confirmed from the measurements of potential of the zero charge of the positive plate, which increases from 1.11 to 1.34 V vs. Ag/Ag2SO4 in the region 1.11-4.60 M H2SO4. From the measurement of the time constant of the electronic transfer through the gel part of the lead dioxide (Tgel) as a function of the acid concentration and the applied potential, a change in the mechanism of the lead dioxide hydration has been estimated-below 1 M H2SO4Tgel increases sharply, showing sharp increases of the extent of the hydration. The dilution of the electrolyte increases substantially the value of average double layer current in the beginning of the charge. During the pulse overcharge at the employed frequency of 1 Hz, the average double layer current is equal to the pulse amplitude, suggesting that the maximal efficiency of the pulse charge is reached.

  17. Uptake of Hypobromous Acid (HOBr) by Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions: Low-Temperature Solubility and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samatha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol/L/atm. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with Delta H = -46.2 kJ/mol and Delta S = -106.2 J/mol/K for 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into aqueous 45 wt% H2SO4, the solubility can be described by log H* = 3665/T - 10.63. For 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4, log H* = 2412/T - 5.55. At temperatures colder than approx. 213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is noticeably larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Our measurements indicate chemical reaction of HOBr upon uptake into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2, particularly at 70 wt% H2SO4.

  18. Definition of chemical and electrochemical properties of a fuel cell electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, J.; Foley, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The present research is oriented toward the task of developing an improved electrolyte for the direct hydrocarbon-air fuel cell. The electrochemical behavior of methanesulfonic acid, ethanesulfonic acid, and sulfoacetic acid as fuel cell electrolytes was studied in a half cell at various temperatures. The rate of electro-oxidation of hydrogen at 115 degrees was very high in methanesulfonic acid and sulfoacetic acids. The rate of the electro-oxidation of propane in methanesulfonic acid at 80 C and 115 C was low. Further, there is evidence for adsorption of these acids on the platinum electrode. Sulfoacetic acid with H2 has supported about two times higher current density than trifluoromethanesulfonic acid monohydrate, but, attempts to purify the compound were unsuccessful. It was concluded that anhydrous sulfonic acids are not good electrolytes; water solutions are required. Sulfonic acids containing unprotected C-H bonds are adsorbed on platinum and probably decompose during electrolysis. A completely substituted sulfonic acid would be the preferred electrolyte.

  19. Alternative hybrid electrolytes based on a series of bis(trialkoxysilyl)alkanes and 3-(trihydroxysilyl)-1-propane sulfonic acid applied in gas diffusion electrodes of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. W.; Chung, L. C.; Veerapur, R. S.; Yang, F. C.

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the electrolyte distribution in catalyst layers and enhancing the utilization of catalyst existing in primary pores. Bis(trialkoxysilyl)alkanes (BTAS-alkanes) and 3-(trihydroxysilyl)-1-propane sulfonic acid (THS)Pro-SO 3H) precursors have been used to prepare a series of hybrid electrolytes with various organic segment lengths of BTAS-alkanes and ratios of organic moiety and sulfonic acid groups. Investigations of BTAS-alkanes series includes bis(triethoxysilyl)octane (BTES-Oct), bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane (BTMS-Hex), and bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTES-Eth). Small angle X-ray spectroscopy (SAXS) identifies morphological phase separation in BTES-Oct and BTMS-Hex hybrid electrolytes. The results of mercury porosimetry and BET porosimetry show that the hybrid electrolytes have better capability than Nafion ionomer to penetrate into primary pores of the catalyst layers. Electrochemical measurements including electrode polarization, electrochemical active surface (EAS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are discussed. The BTES-Oct or BTMS-Hex hybrid electrolytes with higher ratio of organic moiety and sulfonic acid group have achieved better electrode performance. Oxygen benefit current (OBC) results indicate that higher ratios of BTES-Oct/(THS)Pro-SO 3H provides higher hydrophobicity with better gas transport properties. However, the hybrid electrodes exhibit lower cathode performance than Nafion ®-based electrodes due to excessive electrolyte incorporated in the catalyst layer.

  20. Extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from nitric acid solutions by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid dissolved in kerosene.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Sheng; Tsai, Teh-Hua

    2012-01-04

    The extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from a nitric acid solution using di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an acidic extractant of organophosphorus compounds dissolved in kerosene was studied. By graphical and numerical analysis, the compositions of indium-D2EHPA complexes in organic phase and stoichiometry of the extraction reaction were examined. Nitric acid solutions with various indium concentrations at 25 °C were used to obtain the equilibrium constant of InR₃ in the organic phase. The experimental results showed that the extraction distribution ratios of indium(III) between the organic phase and the aqueous solution increased when either the pH value of the aqueous solution and/or the concentration of the organic phase extractant increased. Finally, the recovery efficiency of indium(III) in nitric acid was measured.

  1. Process for electrolytic deposition of metals on zirconium materials

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.

    1979-01-30

    A process for the electrolytic deposition of a metal layer on an article comprised of zirconium or a zirconium alloy is disclosed. The article is activated in an aged aqueous solution comprising from about 10 to about 20 grams per liter ammonium bifluoride and from about 0.75 to about 2 grams per liter of sulfuric acid. The solution is aged by immersion of pickled zirconium in the solution for at least about 10 minutes. The loosely adhering film formed on the article in the activating step is removed and the article is contacted with an electrolytic plating solution containing the metal to be deposited on the article in the presence of an electrode receiving current.

  2. Effects of long chain fatty acids on solute absorption: perfusion studies in the human jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Ammon, H V; Thomas, P J; Phillips, S F

    1977-01-01

    Perfusion studies were performed in healthy volunteers to test the hypothesis that net fluid secretion induced by fatty acids is accompanied by parallel reduction in solute transport. Ricinoleic acid provoked a marked net secretion of fluid and concomitantly inhibited the absorption of all solutes tested; these included glucose, xylose, L-leucine, L-lysine, Folic acid, and 2-mono-olein. Oleic acid also reduced net fluid and solute transport, but was less potent in reducing solute absorption than was ricinoleic acid. When fluid secretion was induced osmotically with mannitol, glucose and xylose absorption was not affected. The mechanism for this generalised effect of fatty acids on solute absorption is uncertain, possibly nonspecific, and might be related to mucosal damage and altered mucosal permeability induced by these agents. PMID:590838

  3. Evaluation of Electrolytically-Generated Hypochlorous Acid (‘Electrolyzed Water’) for Sanitation of Meat and Meat-Contact Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, Shawnna; Muriana, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    ‘Electrolyzed water’ generators are readily available in the food industry as a renewable source of hypochlorous acid that eliminates the need for workers to handle hazardous hypochlorite concentrates. We applied electrolyzed water (EW) directly to multi-strain cocktails of Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, and Salmonella sp. at 250 ppm free available chlorine (FAC) and achieved greater than 6-log reductions in 2 min. Lower EW values were examined as antimicrobial interventions for fresh meat (beef carcasses), processed meats (frankfurters), and food contact surfaces (slicing blades). Little or no reduction relative to controls was observed when generic E. coli-inoculated beef carcasses or L. monocytogenes-inoculated frankfurters were showered with EW. Spray application of EW (25 and 250-ppm FAC) onto L. monocytogenes-inoculated slicing blades showed that greater reductions were obtained with ‘clean’ (3.6 and 5.7-log reduction) vs. ‘dirty’ (0.6 and 3.3-log reduction) slicing blades, respectively. Trials with L. monocytogenes-inoculated protein-EW solutions demonstrated that protein content as low as 0.1% is capable of eliminating FAC, reducing antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes. EW appears better positioned as a surface sanitizer with minimal organic material that can otherwise act as an effective reducing agent to the oxidizing solution rendering it ineffective. PMID:28231137

  4. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

    1994-12-16

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO{sub 3} reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min{sup {minus}1} at 110 C for an open ``vented`` system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min{sup {minus}1} in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols` (1.33E-3 min{sup {minus}1}) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ``reacting`` 14.3M HNO{sub 3} aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO{sub 3} reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk.

  5. Ion Beam Generation from an Electrolyte Solution Containing Polyatomic Cations and Anions for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Watanabe, Kouji; Saito, Naoaki; Nonaka, Hidehiko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nakanaga, Taisuke; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki; Kurokawa, Akira; Ichimura, Shingo; Tomita, Mitsuhiro

    2009-12-01

    A solution-type ion beam source was fabricated to utilize polyatomic anions as well as polyatomic cations that are stable in solutions. The ion source consists of an electrospray section at atmospheric pressure and a vacuum section with a differential pumping system. To demonstrate the beam generation of cations or anions, ethanol solution containing a room-temperature molten salt (i.e., an ionic liquid) was tested. The ionic liquid, N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, consists of a polyatomic cation, [C8H20ON]+, and a polyatomic anion, [C2F6NO4S2]-. Ions produced at atmospheric pressure were passed through an aperture into a vacuum chamber and then transported to a target. The effects of the aperture dimensions were investigated in the range from 50 to 200 µm in diameter and 0.25 to 1 mm in thickness. The ratio of current passing through the aperture into the vacuum chamber to the total electrosprayed current was on the order of 10-3 to 10-5. The ratio increased with increasing aperture diameter. A reduction in the aperture thickness also improved the ratio. Beam current increased with applied voltage in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes. It was demonstrated that stable negative-ion beams as well as positive-ion beams on the order of pA were produced.

  6. Uptake of isoprene, methacrylic acid and methyl methacrylate into aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Ge, Maofa; Wang, Weigang

    2012-01-01

    Multiphase acid-catalyzed oxidation by hydrogen peroxide has been suggested to be a potential route to secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene and its gas-phase oxidation products, but the lack of kinetics data significantly limited the evaluation of this process in the atmosphere. Here we report the first measurement of the uptake of isoprene, methacrylic acid and methyl methacrylate into aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide. Isoprene cannot readily partition into the solution because of its high volatility and low solubility, which hinders its further liquid-phase oxidation. Both methacrylic acid and methyl methacrylate can enter the solutions and be oxidized by hydrogen peroxide, and steady-state uptake was observed with the acidity of solution above 30 wt.% and 70 wt.%, respectively. The steady-state uptake coefficient of methacrylic acid is much larger than that of methyl methacrylate for a solution with same acidity. These observations can be explained by the different reactivity of these two compounds caused by the different electron-withdrawing conjugation between carboxyl and ester groups. The atmospheric lifetimes were estimated based on the calculated steady-state uptake coefficients. These results demonstrate that the multiphase acid-catalyzed oxidation of methacrylic acid plays a role in secondary organic aerosol formation, but for isoprene and methyl methacrylate, this process is not important in the troposphere.

  7. Effect of citric acid on the acidification of artificial pepsin solution for metacercariae isolation from fish.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ki; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Young-Sang; Chun, Hyang Sook; Park, Ki Hwan; Ko, Seong-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2013-11-15

    Artificial digestive solution based on pepsin is essential for collecting metacercariae from fish. To promote the enzymatic reactivity of pepsin, the pH of the solution has to be adjusted to pH 1.0-2.0. Hydrochloride (HCl) is usually used for this purpose, but the use of HCl raises safety concerns. The aim of this work was to address the usefulness of citric acid as an alternative for HCl for the acidification of pepsin solution, and to examine its potential to damage metacercariae during in vitro digestion as compared with HCl. Changes in pH after adding 1-9% of citric acid (m/v) to pepsin solution were compared to a 1% HCl (v/v) addition. Digestion of fish muscle was evaluated by measuring released protein concentrations by spectrophotometry. In addition, survival rates of metacercariae in pepsin solution were determined at different citric acid concentrations and were compared that of with 1% HCl. The present study shows that addition of citric acid reduced the pH of pepsin solutions to the required level. Addition of more than 5% of citric acid resulted in the effective digestion of fish muscle over 3h in vitro, and 5% citric acid was less lethal to metacercariae than 1% HCl in pepsin solution. Pepsin solution containing 5% citric acid had digestive capacity superior to pepsin solution containing 1% HCl after 3h incubation with released protein concentrations of 12.0 ng/ml for 5% citric acid and 9.6 ng/ml for 1% HCl. Accordingly, the present study suggests that the addition of 5% citric acid to pepsin solution is a good alternative to 1% HCl in infection studies because citric acid is a stable at room temperature and has a good safety profile. In addition, we suggest that the use of citric acid enables the preparation of commercial digestive solutions for the detection of microorganisms in fish and other vertebrate muscle tissue.

  8. Impact of Fluorescent Lighting on Oxidation of Model Wine Solutions Containing Organic Acids and Iron.

    PubMed

    Grant-Preece, Paris; Barril, Celia; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Clark, Andrew C

    2017-03-22

    Previous studies have provided evidence that light exposure can increase oxygen consumption in wine and that the photodegradation of iron(III) tartrate could contribute to this process. In the present study, model wine solutions containing iron(III) and various organic acids, either alone or combined, were stored in sealed clear glass wine bottles and exposed to light from fluorescent lamps. Dissolved oxygen was monitored, and afterward the organic acid degradation products were determined and the capacity of the solutions to bind sulfur dioxide, the main wine preservative, was assessed. In the dark controls, little or no dissolved oxygen was consumed and the organic acids were stable. In the irradiated solutions, dissolved oxygen was consumed at a rate that was dependent on the specific organic acid present, and the latter were oxidized to various carbonyl compounds. For the solutions containing tartaric acid, malic acid, and/or citric acid, irradiation increased their sulfur dioxide-binding capacity.

  9. Surface chemistry of Cu(100) in acidic sulfate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Charles B.; Stickney, John L.

    1990-12-01

    The surface chemistry of Cu(100), in H 2SO 4 and acidic K 2SO 4 solutions, has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Experiments were conducted in an electrochemical cell coupled directly to a UHV surface analysis chamber. Structures formed on the Cu(100) surface emersed (removed) from sulfate solutions were the principal focus of this study. Structures and coverages were primarily dependent on sulfate concentration and the presence of coadsorbates such as Cl and K +. Emersion of Cu(100) from 1 mM H 2SO 4 resulted in a Cu(100)(2 × 2)-SO 2-4 adlattice with a {1}/{4} coverage of sulfate. A {1}/{5} coverage Cu(100)( 5 × 5) R26.6°- SO2-4 structure formed upon emersion mM H 2SO 4 containing trace Cl - contaminants, and a {1}/{3} coverage Cu(100)(2 × 100)- SO2-4 structure formed following e from 10 mM H 2SO 4. Emersion of Cu(100) from 1 mM K 2SO 4 (pH = 3.6) resulted in a Cu(100)(4 × 2 5)- SO2-4, K + surface structure, with K + and SO 2-4 coadsorbed in a 1:1 stoichiometry, each at {1}/{4} coverage. No significant potential-dependent variatio in surface structure or coverage was observed when the electrode was emersed from H 2SO 4 at potentials in the double-layer charging region. For emersion from 1 mM K 2SO 4 (pH = 3.6), a reduction in K + coverage along with a change in the surface structure to a (2 × 2) occurred at positive potentials. Comparisons were made of sulfate adsorption on the low-index planes of Cu using a Cu single crystal polished on three different faces to the (111), (110) and (100) planes. This electrode was emersed from 1 mM K 2SO 4 (pH = 3.6) at several potentials. A c(8 × 2) and a diffuse (1 × 1) LEED pattern were observed on Cu(110) and Cu(111), respectively. The K + and SO 2-4 coverages differed appreciably between the three surfaces. Significant differences were observed in the thermal desorption spectra of Cu(100) emersed from H 2SO 4 and K 2SO

  10. Food-based solutions are a viable alternative to glucose-electrolyte solutions for oral hydration in acute diarrhoea--studies in a rat model of secretory diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Rolston, D D; Mathew, P; Mathan, V I

    1990-01-01

    A survey of acute diarrhoea and its treatment, in 3 groups of villages in south India, revealed that use of the World Health Organization oral rehydration solution (WHO-ORS) was poor or virtually non-existent and that several liquid foods were given to children during acute diarrhoea. The effects of the most commonly used, boiled and cooled supernatants of these liquid foods [rice (Oryza sativa)-water, ragi (Eleusine coracana)-water, arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea)-water], and tender coconut-water, and of the bicarbonate- and citrate-WHO-ORS on intestinal water transport were evaluated using a rat model of secretory diarrhoea. All solutions either decreased cholera toxin-induced net water secretion (arrowroot-water) or reversed it to net absorption. Ragi-water produced maximum net water absorption, significantly greater than the WHO oral rehydration solutions. WHO-ORS utilization is poor in some developing countries, and locally used food-based solutions could be used for maintaining hydration or correcting the dehydration due to acute diarrhoea once their effectiveness has been proved by clinical trials.

  11. Electrolytes for Hydrocarbon Air Fuel Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    available electrolytes; namely, -methanedisulfonic acid - sulfoacetic acid -10-dl-camphorsulfonic acid -and pentadecafluorooctanoic acid . These four...in the hydrocarbon chain can increase the stability of aliphatic sulfonic acids . Sulfoacetic and dl-10-camphorsulfonic acids were tested and found to...decompose thermally. 6 Sulfoacetic acid thermally decomposes at 180 C apparently due to decarboxylation. This is substantially 6 below the 245 C

  12. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  13. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  14. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  15. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  16. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  17. Flexible polyelectrolyte chain in a strong electrolyte solution: Insight into equilibrium properties and force-extension behavior from mesoscale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekzadeh Moghani, Mahdy; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecules with ionizable groups are ubiquitous in biological and synthetic systems. Due to the complex interaction between chain and electrostatic decorrelation lengths, both equilibrium properties and micro-mechanical response of dilute solutions of polyelectrolytes (PEs) are more complex than their neutral counterparts. In this work, the bead-rod micromechanical description of a chain is used to perform hi-fidelity Brownian dynamics simulation of dilute PE solutions to ascertain the self-similar equilibrium behavior of PE chains with various linear charge densities, scaling of the Kuhn step length (lE) with salt concentration cs and the force-extension behavior of the PE chain. In accord with earlier theoretical predictions, our results indicate that for a chain with n Kuhn segments, lE ˜ cs-0.5 as linear charge density approaches 1/n. Moreover, the constant force ensemble simulation results accurately predict the initial non-linear force-extension region of PE chain recently measured via single chain experiments. Finally, inspired by Cohen's extraction of Warner's force law from the inverse Langevin force law, a novel numerical scheme is developed to extract a new elastic force law for real chains from our discrete set of force-extension data similar to Padè expansion, which accurately depicts the initial non-linear region where the total Kuhn length is less than the thermal screening length.

  18. Cloud-point temperatures for lysozyme in electrolyte solutions: effect of salt type, salt concentration and pH.

    PubMed

    Grigsby, J J; Blanch, H W; Prausnitz, J M

    2001-07-24

    Liquid-liquid phase-separation data were obtained for aqueous saline solutions of hen egg-white lysozyme at a fixed protein concentration (87 g/l). The cloud-point temperature (CPT) was measured as a function of salt type and salt concentration to 3 M, at pH 4.0 and 7.0. Salts used included those from mono and divalent cations and anions. For the monovalent cations studied, as salt concentration increases, the CPT increases. For divalent cations, as salt concentration rises, a maximum in the CPT is observed and attributed to ion binding to the protein surface and subsequent water structuring. Trends for sulfate salts were dramatically different from those for other salts because sulfate ion is strongly hydrated and excluded from the lysozyme surface. For anions at fixed salt concentration, the CPT decreases with rising anion kosmotropic character. Comparison of CPTs for pH 4.0 and 7.0 revealed two trends. At low ionic strength for a given salt, differences in CPT can be explained in terms of repulsive electrostatic interactions between protein molecules, while at higher ionic strength, differences can be attributed to hydration forces. A model is proposed for the correlation and prediction of the CPT as a function of salt type and salt concentration. NaCl was chosen as a reference salt, and CPT deviations from that of NaCl were attributed to hydration forces. The Random Phase Approximation, in conjunction with a square-well potential, was used to calculate the strength of protein-protein interactions as a function of solution conditions for all salts studied.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions Containing Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Rebak, R B

    2005-11-04

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is a nickel based alloy containing alloying elements such as chromium, molybdenum and tungsten. It is highly corrosion resistant both under reducing and under oxidizing conditions. Electrochemical studies such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. Tests were also carried out in NaCl solutions containing oxalic acid or acetic acid. It is shown that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was higher in a solution containing oxalic acid than in a solution of the same pH acidified with HCl. Acetic acid was not corrosive to Alloy 22. The corrosivity of oxalic acid was attributed to its capacity to form stable complex species with metallic cations from Alloy 22.

  20. Facile preparation of acid-resistant magnetite particles for removal of Sb(Ⅲ) from strong acidic solution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Guan, Kaiwen; Bai, Zhiping; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new facile coating strategy based on the hydrophobicity of methyl groups was developed to prevent nano-sized magnetite particles from strong acid corrosion. In this method, three steps of hydrolysis led to three layers of protection shell coating Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Filled with hydrophobic methyl groups, the middle layer mainly prevented the magnetic core from strong acid corrosion. These magnetite particles managed to resist 1 M HCl solution and 2.5 M H2SO4 solution. The acid resistant ability was higher than those reported previously. After further modification with amino-methylene-phosphonic groups, these magnetite particles successfully adsorbed Sb(III) in strong acid solution. This new strategy can also be applied to protect other materials from strong acid corrosion. PMID:27877860

  1. Thermochemical study of the reactions of acid-base interaction in an aqueous solution of α-aminobutyric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.; Skvortsov, I. A.; Korchagina, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The heat effects of the interaction between a solution of α-aminobutyric acid and solutions of HNO3 and KOH are measured by means of calorimetry in different ranges of pH at 298.15 K and values of ionic strength of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 (KNO3). The heat effects of the stepwise dissociation of the amino acid are determined. Standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δr H 0, Δr G 0, and Δr S 0) of the reactions of acid-base interaction in aqueous solutions of α-aminobutyric acid are calculated. The connection between the thermodynamic characteristics of the dissociation of the amino acid and the structure of this compound is considered.

  2. The ototoxic effect of boric acid solutions applied into the middle ear of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Oztürkcan, Sedat; Dündar, Riza; Katilmis, Hüseyin; Ilknur, Ali Ekber; Aktaş, Sinem; Haciömeroğlu, Senem

    2009-05-01

    This study analyzed the ototoxic effects of boric acid solutions. Boric acid solutions have been used as otologic preparations for many years. Boric acid is commonly found in solutions prepared with alcohol or distilled water but can also be found in a powder form. These preparations are used for both their antiseptic and acidic qualities in external and middle ear infections. We investigated the ototoxic effect of boric acid solutions on guinea pigs. We are unaware of any similar, previously published study of this subject in English. The study was conducted on 28 young albino guinea pigs. Prior to application of the boric acid solution under general anesthesia, an Auditory Brainstem Response (ABRs) test was applied to the right ear of the guinea pigs. Following the test, a perforation was created on the tympanic membrane of the right ear of each guinea pig and small gelfoam pieces were inserted into the perforated area. Test solutions were administered to the middle ear for 10 days by means of a transcanal route. Fifteen days after inserting the gelfoams in all of the guinea pigs, we anasthesized the guinea pigs and removed the gelfoams from the perforated region of the ear and then performed an ABRs on each guinea pig. The ABRs were within the normal range before the applications. After the application, no significant changes were detected in the ABRs thresholds in neither the saline group nor the group administered boric acid and distilled water solution; however, significant changes were detected in the ABRs thresholds of the Gentamicine and boric acid and alcohol solution groups. We believe that a 4% boric acid solution prepared with distilled water can be a more reliable preparation than a 4% boric acid solution prepared with alcohol.

  3. Comparison between pulsed irrigation enhanced evacuation and polyethylene glycol-electrolyte lavage solution for bowel preparation prior to elective colonoscopy in veterans with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Korsten, Mark A.; Spungen, Ann M.; Radulovic, Miroslav; Rosman, Alan S.; Hunt, Kristel; Galea, Marinella D.; Kornfeld, Stephen D.; Yen, Christina; Bauman, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor preparation for elective colonoscopy is common in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). This unsatisfactory outcome is likely due to long-standing difficulty with evacuation and decreased colonic motility. Our objective was to determine the most effective preparation for elective colonoscopy applying a novel and traditional approach to bowel cleansing. Methods Twenty-four subjects with SCI were consented and scheduled to receive one of the two possible arms: pulsed irrigation enhanced evacuation (PIEE) or polyethylene glycol-electrolyte lavage solution (PEG; CoLyte®). The quality of the preparation was scored during the colonoscopy by applying the Ottawa scoring system. Results Patients with SCI who received PIEE tended to have lower Ottawa scores and a higher percentage of acceptable preparations than did those who received PEG; however, the results were not statistically different. Conclusion In this preliminary study in subjects with SCI, neither PIEE nor PEG produced acceptable bowel preparation for elective colonoscopy. Future studies should confirm our findings and consider studying alternative, more efficacious approaches to bowel cleansing prior to colonoscopic procedures in patients with SCI, which should provide better outcomes. Registration number for clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00745095. PMID:25096918

  4. The standard enthalpies of formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid and its aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernyavskaya, N. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Nikol'Skii, V. M.

    2007-07-01

    The energy of combustion of N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid (CMAA) was determined by bomb calorimetry in oxygen. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid were calculated. The heat effects of solution of crystalline CMAA in water and a solution of sodium hydroxide were measured at 298.15 K by direct calorimetry. The standard enthalpies of formation of CMAA and its dissociation products in aqueous solution were determined.

  5. Electrolytic gate for quantum efficiency enhancement in thinned CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damento, Michael A.; Watson, Mary; Sims, Gary R.

    1993-07-01

    A transparent, semi-solid, electrolytic gate has been applied to the backside of thinned CCDs for quantum efficiency enhancement. The gate is applied by spreading a water solution of phosphoric acid and polyvinyl alcohol onto the silicon and drying it to form a thin plastic film. When a negative voltage of less than one volt with respect to substrate ground is applied to the gate, a QE pinned condition (100% internal quantum efficiency) is produced. An insulating layer is not needed with this gate (as it is with electronic conductors) since a threshold voltage of about 1.2 V is required before conduction into the silicon can occur. The mechanism of charging is believed to involve a pile-up of negative ions at the silicon-electrolyte interface which compensates for the positive oxide charge. Conduction into the silicon at low voltages is restricted by the oxidation potential of the negative ions in the electrolyte.

  6. Oxalic acid complexes: promising draw solutes for forward osmosis (FO) in protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2015-03-21

    Highly soluble oxalic acid complexes (OACs) were synthesized through a one-pot reaction. The OACs exhibit excellent performance as draw solutes in FO processes with high water fluxes and negligible reverse solute fluxes. Efficient protein enrichment was achieved. The diluted OACs can be recycled via nanofiltration and are promising as draw solutes.

  7. Solution properties and taste behavior of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions at different temperatures: Volumetric and rheological approach.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Sinha, Biswajit

    2016-11-15

    The densities and viscosities of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions with several molal concentrations m=(0.00-0.08)molkg(-1) of ascorbic acid were determined at T=(298.15-318.15)K and pressure p=101kPa. Using experimental data apparent molar volume (ϕV), standard partial molar volume (ϕV(0)), the slope (SV(∗)), apparent specific volumes (ϕVsp), standard isobaric partial molar expansibility (ϕE(0)) and its temperature dependence [Formula: see text] the viscosity B-coefficient and solvation number (Sn) were determined. Viscosity B-coefficients were further employed to obtain the free energies of activation of viscous flow per mole of the solvents (Δμ1(0≠)) and of the solute (Δμ2(0≠)). Effects of molality, solute structure and temperature and taste behavior were analyzed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions; results revealed that the solutions are characterized predominantly by solute-solvent interactions and lactose monohydrate behaves as a long-range structure maker.

  8. Charge-patterning phase transition on a surface lattice of titratable sites adjacent to an electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Joel; Thurston, George

    We discuss a model for a charge-patterning phase transition on a two-dimensional square lattice of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed on a square lattice in a dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and an aqueous salt solution. Within Debye-Huckel theory, the analytical form of the electrostatic repulsion between protonated sites exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease beyond short distances. The problem can thus be mapped onto the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic Ising model with this longer-range interaction, which we study with Monte Carlo simulations. As we increase pH, the occupation probability of a site decreases from 1 at low pH to 0 at high pH. For sufficiently-strong interaction strengths, a phase transition occurs as the occupation probability of 1/2 is approached: the charges arrange themselves into a checkerboard pattern. This ordered phase persists over a range of pH until a transition occurs back to a disordered state. This state is the analogue of the Neel state in the antiferromagnetic Ising spin model. More complicated ordered phases are expected for sufficiently strong interactions (with occupation probabilities of 1/4 and 3/4) and if the lattice is triangular rather than square. This work was supported by NIH EY018249 (GMT).

  9. A self-standing hydrogel neutral electrolyte for high voltage and safe flexible supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batisse, N.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.

    2017-04-01

    The development of safe flexible supercapacitors implies the use of new non-liquid electrolytes for avoiding device leakage which combine mechanical properties and electrochemical performance. In this sense, hydrogel electrolytes composed of a solid non-conductive matrix holding an aqueous electrolytic phase are a reliable solution. In this work, we propose a green physical route for producing self-standing hydrogel films from a PVA polymer based on the freezing/thawing method without using chemical cross-linking agents. Moreover, a neutral electrolytic phase as Na2SO4 is used for reaching higher cell voltages than in an acidic or basic electrolyte. Such new PVA-Na2SO4 hydrogel electrolyte, which also acts as separator, allows reaching voltages windows as high as 1.8 V in a symmetric carbon/carbon supercapacitor with optimal capacitance retention through thousands of cycles. Additionally, in reason of the fast mobility of the ions inside of the polymeric matrix, the hydrogel electrolyte based supercapacitor keeps the power density of the liquid electrolyte device.

  10. On-ice sweat rate, voluntary fluid intake, and sodium balance during practice in male junior ice hockey players drinking water or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Matthew S; Logan, Heather M; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluated the repeatability of hydration and sweat measurements taken during on-ice hockey practices with players drinking only water, and determined whether having only a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) to drink during practices decreased fluid intake or affected other hydration and (or) sweat measures. All testing was conducted on elite players of an Ontario Hockey League team (+/-SE; mean age, 17.6 +/- 0.3 years; mean height, 182.9 +/- 1.4 cm; mean body mass, 83.0 +/- 1.7 kg). Players were studied 3 times over the course of 6 weekly on-ice practices (+/-SE; mean playing time, 1.58 +/- 0.07 h; mean temperature, 11.4 +/- 0.8 degrees C; mean relative humidity, 52% +/- 3%). There was strong repeatability of the measured hydration and sweat parameters between 2 similar on-ice practices when players drank only water. Limiting the players to drinking only a CES (as opposed to water) did not decrease fluid intake during practice (+/-SE; mean CES intake, 0.72 +/- 0.07 L.h-1 vs. mean water intake, 0.82 +/- 0.08 L.h-1) or affect sweat rate (1.5 +/- 0.1 L.h-1 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.1 L.h-1), sweat sodium concentration (72.4 +/- 5.6 mmol.L-1 vs. 73.0 +/- 4.4 mmol.L-1), or percent body mass loss (1.1% +/- 0.2% vs. 0.9% +/- 0.2%). Drinking a CES also improved sodium balance (-2.1 +/- 0.2 g.h-1 vs. -2.6 +/- 0.3 g.h-1) and provided the players with a significant carbohydrate (43 +/- 4 g.h-1 vs. 0 +/- 0 g.h-1) during practice. In summary, a single field sweat test during similar on-ice hockey practices in male junior hockey players is sufficient to evaluate fluid and electrolyte balance. Also, a CES does not affect voluntary fluid intake during practice, compared with water, in these players. The CES provided some salt to offset the salt lost in sweat, and carbohydrate, which may help maintain physical and mental performance in the later stages of practice.

  11. An amino acid-based oral rehydration solution (AA-ORS) enhanced intestinal epithelial proliferation in mice exposed to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Liangjie; Gupta, Reshu; Vaught, Lauren; Grosche, Astrid; Okunieff, Paul; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan

    2016-01-01

    Destruction of clonogenic cells in the crypt following irradiation are thought to cause altered gastrointestinal function. Previously, we found that an amino acid-based oral rehydration solution (AA-ORS) improved gastrointestinal function in irradiated mice. However, the exact mechanisms were unknown. Electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, qPCR, and Western blot analysis were used to determine that AA-ORS increased proliferation, maturation, and differentiation and improved electrolyte and nutrient absorption in irradiated mice. A single-hit, multi-target crypt survival curve showed a significant increase in crypt progenitors in irradiated mice treated with AA-ORS for six days (8.8 ± 0.4) compared to the saline-treated group (6.1 ± 0.3; P < 0.001) without a change in D0 (4.8 ± 0.1 Gy). The Dq values increased from 8.8 ± 0.4 Gy to 10.5 ± 0.5 Gy with AA-ORS treatment (P < 0.01), indicating an increased radiation tolerance of 1.7 Gy. We also found that AA-ORS treatment (1) increased Lgr5+, without altering Bmi1 positive cells; (2) increased levels of proliferation markers (Ki-67, p-Erk, p-Akt and PCNA); (3) decreased apoptosis markers, such as cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2; and (4) increased expression and protein levels of NHE3 and SGLT1 in the brush border membrane. This study shows that AA-ORS increased villus height and improved electrolyte and nutrient absorption. PMID:27876791

  12. Electrolyte Racers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellie, Shawn; Kellie, Tonya; Corbin-Tipton, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    A fast way to teach investigative skills in science is to tie them to NASCAR using Hot Wheels Formula Fuelers Race Cars. These inexpensive toy cars travel different distances based on the strength of the "electrolyte" (a substance that conducts electricity when dissolved in water) in their "fuel" tanks. Advertisements for these race cars urge kids…

  13. Biosorption of acidic textile dyestuffs from aqueous solution by Paecilomyces sp. isolated from acidic mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Çabuk, Ahmet; Aytar, Pınar; Gedikli, Serap; Özel, Yasemin Kevser; Kocabıyık, Erçin

    2013-07-01

    Removal of textile dyestuffs from aqueous solution by biosorption onto a dead fungal biomass isolated from acidic mine drainage in the Çanakkale Region of Turkey was investigated. The fungus was found to be a promising biosorbent and identified as Paecilomyces sp. The optimal conditions for bioremediation were as follows: pH, 2.0; initial dyestuff concentration, 50 mg l(-1) for Reactive Yellow 85 and Reactive Orange 12, and 75 mg l(-1) for Reactive Black 8; biomass dosage, 2 g l(-1) for Reactive Yellow 85, 3 g l(-1) for Reactive Orange 12, 4 g l(-1) for Reactive Black 8; temperature, 25 °C; and agitation rate, 100 rpm. Zeta potential measurements indicated an electrostatic interaction between the binding sites and dye anions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that amine, hydroxyl, carbonyl, and amide bonds were involved in the dyestuff biosorption. A toxicity investigation was also carried out before and after the biosorption process. These results showed that the toxicities for the reactive dyestuffs in aqueous solutions after biosorption studies decreased. The Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the biosorption equilibrium, and isotherm constants were evaluated for each dyestuff. Equilibrium data of biosorption of RY85 and RO12 dyestuffs fitted well to both models at the studied concentration and temperature.

  14. Chemical equilibrium of minced turkey meat in organic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Goli, T; Abi Nakhoul, P; Zakhia-Rozis, N; Trystram, G; Bohuon, P

    2007-02-01

    The distribution of acid (HA), anions (A(-)), free protons (H(3)O(+)) and bound protons (H(b)), in homogenized turkey meat was evaluated at various meat/water mass ratios of (1/4-1/10) during titration with acetic acid (0.25N) or lactic acid (0.2N). H(b) concentration was determined by titration with hydrochloric acid (0.075N) and a correlation for [H(b)]=f(pH) was proposed. A procedure was used to calculate the fractions of the various species in equilibrium, starting from an initial acid concentration in a meat/water system and assuming the accuracy of the pK(a) value of the pure weak acids despite the chemical complexity of meat. Calculated results were in very good agreement (±0.15) with experimental pH values, whatever the acid, meat batch or meat/water mass ratios used. Less than 1% of the total protons were free (H(3)O(+)) and determined the meat pH.

  15. Process for the removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of /sup 226/Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  16. Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, Frank M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  17. Electrolytes for Hydrocarbon Air Fuel Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    performed on four commercially available electrolytes; namely, -methanedisulfonic acid - sulfoacetic acid -10-dl-camphorsulfonic acid -and...hydrocarbon chain can increase the stability of aliphatic sulfonic acids . Sulfoacetic and dl-10-camphorsulfonic acids were tested and found to decompose...thermally. 0 Sulfoacetic acid thermally decomposes at 180 C apparently due to decarboxylation. This is substantially below the 245 C reported by previous

  18. Electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughey, John; Jansen, Andrew N.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2014-08-05

    A family of electrolytes for use in a lithium ion battery. The genus of electrolytes includes ketone-based solvents, such as, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone; 3,3-dimethyl 2-butanone(pinacolone) and 2-butanone. These solvents can be used in combination with non-Lewis Acid salts, such as Li.sub.2[B.sub.12F.sub.12] and LiBOB.

  19. Discoloration of titanium alloy in acidic saline solutions with peroxide.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare corrosion behavior in several titanium alloys with immersion in acidulated saline solutions containing hydrogen peroxide. Seven types of titanium alloy were immersed in saline solutions with varying levels of pH and hydrogen peroxide content, and resulting differences in color and release of metallic elements determined in each alloy. Some alloys were characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy. Ti-55Ni alloy showed a high level of dissolution and difference in color. With immersion in solution containing hydrogen peroxide at pH 4, the other alloys showed a marked difference in color but a low level of dissolution. The formation of a thick oxide film was observed in commercially pure titanium showing discoloration. The results suggest that discoloration in titanium alloys immersed in hydrogen peroxide-containing acidulated solutions is caused by an increase in the thickness of this oxide film, whereas discoloration of Ti-55Ni is caused by corrosion.

  20. Effect of polyacrylonitrile on triethylene glycol diacetate-2-propenoic acid butyl ester gel polymer electrolytes with interpenetrating crosslinked network for flexible lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiujun; Song, Wei-Li; Fan, Li-Zhen; Shi, Qiao

    2015-11-01

    A new flexible gel polymer electrolytes (GPE) with interpenetrating cross-linked network is fabricated by blending long-chain polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymer matrix and short-chain triethylene glycol diacetate-2-propenoic acid butyl ester (TEGDA-BA) framework, with the purpose of enhancing the mechanical stability of the GPE frameworks via synergistic effects of the linear polymers and crosslinked monomers. The as fabricated frameworks enable the liquid electrolytes to be firmly entrapped in the polymeric matrices, which significantly improves the mechanical bendability and interface stability of the resultant GPE. The GPE with 5 wt% PAN exhibits high ionic conductivity up to 5.9 × 10-3 S cm-1 at 25 °C with a stable electrochemical window observed (>5.0 V vs. Li/Li+). The Li|GPE|LiFePO4 half cells demonstrate remarkably stable capacity retention and rate ability during cycling tests. As expected, the LiFePO4|GPE|Li4Ti5O12 full cells also exhibit discharge capacity of 125.2 mAh g-1 coupled with high columbic efficiency greater than 98% after 100 cycles. The excellent mechanical flexibility and charge/discharge performance suggest that the GPE holds great application potential in flexible LIBs.