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Sample records for acid emulsion system

  1. Comparison of simple, double and gelled double emulsions as hydroxytyrosol and n-3 fatty acid delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Flaiz, Linda; Freire, María; Cofrades, Susana; Mateos, Raquel; Weiss, Jochen; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco; Bou, Ricard

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare three different emulsion-based systems, namely simple emulsion, double emulsion and gelled double emulsion, for delivery of n-3 fatty acids (perilla oil at 300g/kg) and hydroxytyrosol (300mg/kg). Considering that their structural differences may affect their physical and oxidative stability, this was studied by storing them at 4°C for 22days in the dark. The results showed that the oxidative status was maintained in all systems by the addition of hydroxytyrosol. However, there was some loss of hydroxytyrosol, mainly during sample storage and during preparation of the gelled double emulsion. Moreover, the antioxidant loss was more pronounced in more compartmentalized systems, which was attributed to their increased surface area. However, the double emulsion was found to be less stable than the gelled emulsion. Overall, the encapsulation of labile compounds in more complex systems needs to be carefully studied and adapted to specific technological and/or nutritional requirements. PMID:27451154

  2. Development of a Supported Emulsion Liquid Membrane System for Propionic Acid Separation in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jin; Hu, Shih-Yao B.; Wiencek, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Perstractive fermentation is a good way to increase the productivity of bioreactors. Using Propionibacteria as the model system, the feasibility of using supported emulsion liquid membrane (SELM) for perstractive fermentation is assessed in this study. Five industrial solvents were considered as the solvent for preparing the SELM. The more polar a solvent is, the higher the partition coefficient. However, toxicity of a solvent also increases with its polarity. CO-1055 (industrial decanol/octanol blend) has the highest partition coefficient toward propionic acid among the solvents that has no molecular toxicity toward Propionibacteria. A preliminary extraction study was conducted using tetradecane as solvent in a hydrophobic hollow fiber contactor. The result confirmed that SELM eliminates the equilibrium limitation of conventional liquid-liquid extraction, and allows the use of a non-toxic solvent with low partition coefficient.

  3. Phase behavior and formation of o/w nano-emulsion in vegetable oil/ mixture of polyglycerol polyricinoleate and polyglycerin fatty acid ester/water systems.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Satoshi; Nakanishi, Masami; Gohtani, Shoichi

    2014-01-01

    It is reported that mixing polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) and polyglycerol laurilester has a great emulsifying capacity, and consequently fine oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions can be formed. However, the role of PGPR is not clear. The objective of this research is to investigate the phase behavior of vegetable oil/mixture of PGPR and polyglycerol fatty acid ester/water systems, and to clarify the role of PGPR in making a fine emulsion. Phase diagrams were constructed to elucidate the optimal process for preparing fine emulsions. In all the systems examined in this study, the phases, including the liquid crystal phase (L(c)) and sponge phase (L(3)), spread widely in the phase diagrams. We examined droplet size of the emulsions prepared from each phase and found that o/w nano-emulsions with droplet sizes as small as 50 nm were formed by emulsifying either from a single L(3) phase or a two-phase region, L(c) + L(3). These results indicate that a sponge phase L(3) or liquid crystal phase L(c) or both is necessary to form an o/w nano-emulsion whose average droplet diameter is less than 50 nm for PGPR and polyglycerin fatty acid ester mixtures used as surfactant.

  4. Water transport in water-in-oil-in-water liquid emulsion membrane system for the separation of lactic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Y.S.; Lee, W.K. )

    1994-03-01

    Liquid emulsion membranes (LEMs) were applied to the separation of lactic acid from an aqueous feed phase, and water transport (swelling) was investigated during the separation. Considering that as lactic acid was extracted into the internal stripping phase, osmotic pressure difference across the membrane was varied, the water transfer coefficient was evaluated. The water transfer coefficient was larger at higher carrier concentration and initial lactic acid concentration, which means that emulsion swelling can also be mediated by solute/carrier complexes although it is, in general, osmotically induced. The appropriate LEM formulation was given for separation and concentration of lactic acid. If both separation and concentration are desired, evidently emulsion swelling should be considered in conjunction with the transport rate of lactic acid. It was observed that the separated solute concentration in the internal phase was lowered due to swelling during the operation. Nevertheless, lactic acid could be concentrated in the internal phase more than 6 times in specific conditions, indicating that as the volume ratio of external phase to internal phase is increased, a still higher concentration in the internal phase can be obtained. 22 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Emulsion characteristics, chemical and textural properties of meat systems produced with double emulsions as beef fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Serdaroğlu, Meltem; Öztürk, Burcu; Urgu, Müge

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, double emulsions are stated to have a promising potential in low-fat food production, however, there are very few studies on their possible applications in meat matrices. We aimed to investigate the quality of beef emulsion systems in which beef fat was totally replaced by double emulsions (W1/O/W2) prepared with olive oil and sodium caseinate (SC) by two-step emulsification procedure. Incorporation of W1/O/W2 emulsion resulted in reduced lipid, increased protein content, and modified fatty acid composition. W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments had lower jelly and fat separation, higher water-holding capacity and higher emulsion stability than control samples with beef fat. Increased concentrations of W1/O/W2 emulsions resulted in significant changes in texture parameters. TBA values were lower in W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments than control treatment after 60days of storage. In conclusion, our study confirms that double emulsions had promising impacts on modifying fatty acid composition and developing both technologically and oxidatively stable beef emulsion systems. PMID:26995773

  6. Engineering of acidic O/W emulsions with pectin.

    PubMed

    Alba, K; Sagis, L M C; Kontogiorgos, V

    2016-09-01

    Pectins with distinct molecular design were isolated by aqueous extraction at pH 2.0 or 6.0 and were examined in terms of their formation and stabilisation capacity of model n-alkane-in-water emulsions at acidic pH (pH 2.0). The properties and stability of the resulting emulsions were examined by means of droplet size distribution analysis, Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner modelling, bulk rheology, interfacial composition analysis, large-amplitude oscillatory surface dilatational rheology, electrokinetic analysis and fluorescence microscopy. Both pectin preparations were able to emulsify alkanes in water but exhibited distinct ageing characteristics. Emulsions prepared using pectin isolated at pH 6.0 were remarkably stable with respect to droplet growth after thirty days of ageing, while those prepared with pectin isolated at pH 2.0 destabilised rapidly. Examination of chemical composition of interfacial layers indicated multi-layered adsorption of pectins at the oil-water interface. The higher long-term stability of emulsions prepared with pectin isolated at high pH is attributed to mechanically stronger interfaces, the highly branched nature and the low hydrodynamic volume of the chains that result in effective steric stabilisation whereas acetyl and methyl contents do not contribute to the long-term stability. The present work shows that it is possible by tailoring the fine structure of pectin to engineer emulsions that operate in acidic environments.

  7. Droplet Dynamics of a Flowing Emulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cypull, Olivia; Feitosa, Klebert

    The inner workings of glassy systems have long been a topic of interest for soft material scientists. Similarities between the jamming behavior of emulsions and the glass transition of glassy systems have prompted the conjecture that they might share the same underlying mechanism. Here we study a dense oil-in-water emulsion system forced to flow through a narrow microchannel. By matching the index of refraction of the two phases, we image the internal dynamics of the droplets in a confocal microscope. At low velocity speeds, we find that the velocity along the edge of the microchannel was not significantly different than then the average droplet velocity in the bulk suggesting a near plug flow. By contrast the droplets near the edge experienced more movement perpendicular to the flow indicating the fluidization effect of the confining walls.

  8. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Park, Jinhee; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  9. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Park, Jinhee

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  10. Physical and chemical stability of gum arabic-stabilized conjugated linoleic acid oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaolin; Xu, Qiong; Tian, Dazhi; Wang, Nana; Fang, Yapeng; Deng, Zhongyang; Phillips, Glyn O; Lu, Jiang

    2013-05-15

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions have been used as a delivery system to protect conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid, from oxidation. Conventional gum arabic (GA) and two matured gum arabic samples (EM2 and EM10) were used as emulsifiers to prepare CLA-in-water emulsions. The emulsions have optimal physical and chemical stability at gum concentrations of 5% for all three gums. Emulsions with higher gum concentrations are more susceptible to lipid oxidation. This is attributed to reduced physical stability at higher gum concentrations because of the coalescence and depletion-induced flocculation of the emulsion droplets. The prooxidants iron and copper intrinsically contained in the gums could also contribute to this instability. Among the three gums, EM10 provides the most effective protection for CLA both physically and chemically, because of its superior interfacial properties over GA and EM2. PMID:23614832

  11. Physical and chemical stability of gum arabic-stabilized conjugated linoleic acid oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaolin; Xu, Qiong; Tian, Dazhi; Wang, Nana; Fang, Yapeng; Deng, Zhongyang; Phillips, Glyn O; Lu, Jiang

    2013-05-15

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions have been used as a delivery system to protect conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid, from oxidation. Conventional gum arabic (GA) and two matured gum arabic samples (EM2 and EM10) were used as emulsifiers to prepare CLA-in-water emulsions. The emulsions have optimal physical and chemical stability at gum concentrations of 5% for all three gums. Emulsions with higher gum concentrations are more susceptible to lipid oxidation. This is attributed to reduced physical stability at higher gum concentrations because of the coalescence and depletion-induced flocculation of the emulsion droplets. The prooxidants iron and copper intrinsically contained in the gums could also contribute to this instability. Among the three gums, EM10 provides the most effective protection for CLA both physically and chemically, because of its superior interfacial properties over GA and EM2.

  12. Preparation and impact of multiple (water-in-oil-in-water) emulsions in meat systems.

    PubMed

    Cofrades, S; Antoniou, I; Solas, M T; Herrero, A M; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to prepare and characterise multiple emulsions and assess their utility as pork backfat replacers in meat gel/emulsion model systems. In order to improve the fat content (in quantitative and qualitative terms) pork backfat was replaced by a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion (W1/O/W2) prepared with olive oil (as lipid phase), polyglycerol ester of polyricinoleic acid (PGPR) as a lipophilic emulsifier, and sodium caseinate (SC) and whey protein concentrate (WP) as hydrophilic emulsifiers. The emulsion properties (particle size and distribution, stability, microstructure) and meat model system characteristics (composition, texture, fat and water binding properties, and colour) of the W1/O/W2, as affected by reformulation, were evaluated. Multiple emulsions showed a well-defined monomodal distribution. Freshly prepared multiple emulsions showed good thermal stability (better using SC) with no creaming. The meat systems had good water and fat binding properties irrespective of formulation. The effect on texture by replacement of pork backfat by W1/O/W2 emulsions generally depends on the type of double emulsion (associated with the hydrophilic emulsifier used in its formulation) and the fat level in the meat system. PMID:23768366

  13. [Carnol as a stabilizer of the emulsion I system].

    PubMed

    De Almeida Cunha, B C; Dini, M E

    1975-01-01

    "Carnol" insaponificable fraction from "chalky" carnauba wax, was tested for its emulsified system estabilizing abilities. The required HLB of test system, made up of mineral oil, water, polyoxyethylene sorbitan trioleate and sorbitam monooleate, was 9.0. 1% of carnol (w/v) formed A/O emulsions (HLB less than or equal to 7.0), 2% carnol estabilized O/A emulsions with the required HLB of the test system and 3% carnol estabilized both types of emulsions. PMID:1228835

  14. [Carnol as a stabilizer of the emulsion I system].

    PubMed

    De Almeida Cunha, B C; Dini, M E

    1975-01-01

    "Carnol" insaponificable fraction from "chalky" carnauba wax, was tested for its emulsified system estabilizing abilities. The required HLB of test system, made up of mineral oil, water, polyoxyethylene sorbitan trioleate and sorbitam monooleate, was 9.0. 1% of carnol (w/v) formed A/O emulsions (HLB less than or equal to 7.0), 2% carnol estabilized O/A emulsions with the required HLB of the test system and 3% carnol estabilized both types of emulsions.

  15. Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

    1981-09-01

    Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

  16. Development of a w/o/w emulsion for chemical peeling applications containing glycolic acid.

    PubMed

    Yener, Gülgün; Baitokova, Aida

    2006-01-01

    Glycolic acid is a member of the AHA family, which occurs naturally in foods and has been used for centuries as a cutaneous rejuvenation treatment. It is used in many cosmetic products as an exfoliant and moisturizer. When glycolic acid is used in greater amounts, however, there are greater cosmetic benefits but also potential for skin irritation as far as burning increases. The aim of this work was to investigate the feasibility of a topical delivery system as a multiple emulsion combining glycolic acid, strontium nitrate, and dexpanthenol in order to optimize the acid's cosmetic properties and lowering its side effects. PMID:17256078

  17. How the multiple antioxidant properties of ascorbic acid affect lipid oxidation in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Uluata, Sibel; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-02-18

    Lipid oxidation is a serious problem for oil-containing food products because it negatively affects shelf life and nutritional composition. An antioxidant strategy commonly employed to prevent or delay oxidation in foods is to remove oxygen from the closed food-packaging system. An alternative technique is use of an edible oxygen scavenger to remove oxygen within the food. Ascorbic acid (AA) is a particularly promising antioxidant because of its natural label and multiple antioxidative functions. In this study, AA was tested as an oxygen scavenger in buffer and an oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion. The effects of transition metals on the ability of AA to scavenge oxygen were determined. Headspace oxygen decrease less than 1% in the medium-chain triacylglycerol (MCT) O/W emulsion system (pH 3 and 7). AA was able to almost completely remove dissolved oxygen (DO) in a buffered solution. Transition metals (Fe(2+) and Cu(+)) significantly accelerated the degradation of AA; however, iron and copper only increased DO depletion rates, by 10.6-16.4% from day 1 to 7, compared to the control. AA (2.5-20 mM) decreased DO in a 1% O/W emulsion system 32.0-64.0% and delayed the formation of headspace hexanal in the emulsion from 7 to over 20 days. This research shows that, when AA is used in an O/W emulsion system, oxidation of the emulsion system can be delay by multiple mechanisms. PMID:25650525

  18. Droplet migration in emulsion systems measured using MR methods.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, K G; Johns, M L

    2006-04-15

    The migration of emulsion droplets under shear flow remains a largely unexplored area of study, despite the existence of an extensive literature on the analogous problem of solid particle migration. A novel methodology is presented to track the shear-induced migration of emulsion droplets based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The work is in three parts: first, single droplets of one Newtonian fluid are suspended in a second Newtonian fluid (water in silicone oil (PDMS)) and are tracked as they migrate within a Couette cell; second, the migration of emulsion droplets in Poiseuille flow is considered; third, water-in-silicone oil emulsions are sheared in a Couette cell. The effect of (a) rotational speed of the Couette, (b) the continuous phase viscosity, and (c) the droplet phase concentration are considered. The equilibrium extent of migration and rate of migration increase with rotational speed for two different emulsion systems and increased continuous phase viscosity, leads to a greater equilibrium extent of migration. The relationship between the droplet phase concentration and migration is however complex. These results for semi-concentrated emulsion systems and wide-gap Couette cells are not well described by existing models of emulsion droplet migration. PMID:16257005

  19. Optimization of folic acid nano-emulsification and encapsulation by maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions.

    PubMed

    Assadpour, Elham; Maghsoudlou, Yahya; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Aalami, Mehran

    2016-05-01

    Due to susceptibility of folic acid like many other vitamins to environmental and processing conditions, it is necessary to protect it by highly efficient methods such as micro/nano-encapsulation. Our aim was to prepare and optimize real water in oil nano-emulsions containing folic acid by a low energy (spontaneous) emulsification technique so that the final product could be encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. A non ionic surfactant (Span 80) was used for making nano-emulsions at three dispersed phase/surfactant ratios of 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0. Folic acid content was 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0mg/mL of dispersed phase by a volume fraction of 5.0, 8.5, and 12%. The final optimum nano-emulsion formulation with 12% dispersed phase, a water to surfactant ratio of 0.9 and folic acid content of 3mg/mL in dispersed phase was encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. It was found that the emulsification time for preparing nano-emulsions was between 4 to 16 h based on formulation variables. Droplet size decreased at higher surfactant contents and final nano-emulsions had a droplet size<100 nm. Shear viscosity was higher for those formulations containing more surfactant. Our results revealed that spontaneous method could be used successfully for preparing stable W/O nano-emulsions containing folic acid. PMID:26806649

  20. Optimization of folic acid nano-emulsification and encapsulation by maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions.

    PubMed

    Assadpour, Elham; Maghsoudlou, Yahya; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Aalami, Mehran

    2016-05-01

    Due to susceptibility of folic acid like many other vitamins to environmental and processing conditions, it is necessary to protect it by highly efficient methods such as micro/nano-encapsulation. Our aim was to prepare and optimize real water in oil nano-emulsions containing folic acid by a low energy (spontaneous) emulsification technique so that the final product could be encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. A non ionic surfactant (Span 80) was used for making nano-emulsions at three dispersed phase/surfactant ratios of 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0. Folic acid content was 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0mg/mL of dispersed phase by a volume fraction of 5.0, 8.5, and 12%. The final optimum nano-emulsion formulation with 12% dispersed phase, a water to surfactant ratio of 0.9 and folic acid content of 3mg/mL in dispersed phase was encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. It was found that the emulsification time for preparing nano-emulsions was between 4 to 16 h based on formulation variables. Droplet size decreased at higher surfactant contents and final nano-emulsions had a droplet size<100 nm. Shear viscosity was higher for those formulations containing more surfactant. Our results revealed that spontaneous method could be used successfully for preparing stable W/O nano-emulsions containing folic acid.

  1. Bilayers at High pH in the Fatty Acid Soap Systems and the Applications for the Formation of Foams and Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenlong; Zhang, Heng; Zhong, Yingping; Jiang, Liwen; Xu, Mengxin; Zhu, Xionglu; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-08-20

    In our previous work, we reported bilayers at high pH in the stearic acid/CsOH/H2O system, which was against the traditional viewpoint that fatty acid (FA) bilayers must be formed at the pKa of the fatty acid. Herein, the microstructures at high pH of several fatty acid soap systems were investigated systematically. We found that palmitic acid/KOH/H2O, palmitic acid/CsOH/H2O, stearic acid/KOH/H2O, and stearic acid/CsOH/H2O systems can form bilayers at high pH. The bilayer structure was demonstrated by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR), and molecular dynamics simulation was used to confirm the formation of bilayers. The influence of fatty acids with different chain lengths (n = 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18) and different counterions including Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Cs(+), (CH3)4N(+), (C2H5)4N(+), (C3H7)4N(+), and (C4H9)4N(+) on the formation of bilayers was discussed. The stability of foam and emulsification properties were compared between bilayers and micelles, drawing the conclusion that bilayer structures possess a much stronger ability to foam and stronger emulsification properties than micelles do.

  2. High internal phase emulsion with double emulsion morphology and their templated porous polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lei; Zhang, Qi; Shi, Shuxian; Zhu, Shiping

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports synthesis of the first high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) system with double emulsion (DE) morphology (HIPE-DE). HIPE is a highly concentrated but highly stable emulsion system, which has a dispersed/internal phase fraction over 74vol%. DE represents an emulsion system that hierarchically encapsulates two immiscible phases. The combination of HIPE and DE provides an efficient method for fabrication of complex structures. In this work, HIPE-DE having a water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) morphology has been prepared for the first time via a simple one-step emulsification method with poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDEA) microgel particles as Pickering stabilizer. An oil phase fraction up to 90vol% was achieved by optimizing the microgel concentration in aqueous phase. The mechanism of the DE formation has been elucidated. It was found that while PDEA microgels stabilized the oil droplets in water, small amount protonated DEA monomers acted as surfactant and formed water-containing micelles inside the oil droplets. It was demonstrated that the W/O/W HIPE-DE could be precisely converted into porous polymer structures. With styrene as the oil phase in W/O/W HIPE-DE, porous polystyrene particles were obtained upon polymerization. With dissolved acrylamide as the aqueous phase and toluene as the continuous phase, porous polyacrylamide matrixes were prepared. Elevating temperature required for polymerization did not change the W/O/W HIPE-DE morphologies. This simple approach provides a versatile platform for synthesis of a variety of porous polymer systems. PMID:27560496

  3. Investigation of different emulsion systems for dermal delivery of nicotinamide.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Sakine; Özer, Özgen

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide (NA) has been shown to have beneficial effects on several skin diseases such as tumor, acne vulgaris, photodamage, cellulite and atopic dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to develop a multiple emulsion and a microemulsion formulation as delivery systems for NA. A two-step process was used to prepare the W/O/W multiple emulsion. Optimum microemulsion formulation was selected by using construction of pseudo-ternary phase diagram. The physicochemical properties such as droplet size and viscosity measurements, stability studies were also evaluated. Ex-vivo permeation studies were performed with Franz-type diffusion cells and the samples were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The permeation data showed that there was no significant difference between multiple emulsion and microemulsion (p > 0.05). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured. As a result of TEWL studies, a slight increase of TEWL values was observed for microemulsion formulation on rat skin when compared with multiple emulsion and commercial formulation. The results suggested that microemulsion and multiple emulsion formulations could be new and alternative dosage forms for topical application of NA.

  4. Removal of acetic acid from simulated hemicellulosic hydrolysates by emulsion liquid membrane with organophosphorus extractants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Cheol

    2015-09-01

    Selective removal of acetic acid from simulated hemicellulosic hydrolysates containing xylose and sulfuric acid was attempted in a batch emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) system with organophosphorus extractants. Various experimental variables were used to develop a more energy-efficient ELM process. Total operation time of an ELM run with a very small quantity of trioctylphosphine oxide as the extractant was reduced to about a third of those required to attain almost the same extraction efficiency as obtained in previous ELM works without any extractant. Under specific conditions, acetic acid was selectively separated with a high degree of extraction and insignificant loss of xylose, and its purity and enrichment ratio in the stripping phase were higher than 92% and 6, respectively. Also, reused organic membrane solutions exhibited the extraction efficiency as high as fresh organic solutions did. These results showed that the current ELM process would be quite practical.

  5. Study of O/W micro- and nano-emulsions based on propylene glycol diester as a vehicle for geranic acid.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Małgorzata; Sikora, Elżbieta; Ogonowski, Jan; Konieczna, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Nano- and microemulsions containing as the oil phase caprylic/capric propylene glycol diesters (Crodamol PC) were investigated as potential vehicle for controlled release of geranic acid. The influence of emulsifiers and co-surfactants on stability of the emulsions was investigated. Different kind of polysorbates (ethoxylated esters of sorbitan and fatty acids) were applied as the emulsifiers. The short-chain alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol) were used as co-surfactants. The emulsions were prepared at ambient temperature (25°C), by the phase inversion composition method (PIC). The stable O/W high dispersed emulsion systems based on Crodamol PC, of mean droplets size less than 200 nm, were prepared. Microemulsions stabilized by the mixture of Polisorbat 80 and 1-butanol were characterized by the largest degree of dispersion (137 nm) and the lowest PDI value (0.094), at surfactant/co-surfactant: oil weight ratio 90:10. The stable nano-emulsion (mean droplet size of 33 nm) was obtained for surfactant: oil (S:O) weight ratio 90:10, without co-surfactant addition. This nano-emulsion was chosen to release studies. The obtained results showed that the prepared stable nano-emulsion can be used as a carrier for controlled release of geranic acid. The active substance release from the nano-emulsion and the oil solution, after 24 hours was 22%.

  6. Effects of spray-drying on w/o/w multiple emulsions prepared from a stearic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Mlalila, Nichrous; Swai, Hulda; Kalombo, Lonji; Hilonga, Askwar

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of spray-drying on w/o/w double emulsions of methyltestosterone (MT) loaded in a stearic acid matrix. MT-loaded nanoparticles were formulated by a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion technique using 50, 75, and 100 mg of stearic acid, 2% and 3% w/v polyvinyl alcohol, 5% w/v lactose, and 0.2% w/v chitosan. The emulsions were immediately spray-dried based on an optimized model of inlet temperature and pump rate, and characterized for optimized responses with regard to particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential, for both emulsion and powder samples. Dynamic light scattering analysis shown that the nanoparticles increased in size with increasing concentrations of polyvinyl alcohol and stearic acid. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the MT-loaded nanoparticles were spherical in shape, had a smooth surface, and were in an amorphous state, which was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry. These MT-loaded nanoparticles are a promising candidate carrier for the delivery of MT; however, further studies are needed in order to establish the stability of the system and the cargo release profile under normal conditions of use. PMID:25489238

  7. Effects of spray-drying on w/o/w multiple emulsions prepared from a stearic acid matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mlalila, Nichrous; Swai, Hulda; Kalombo, Lonji; Hilonga, Askwar

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of spray-drying on w/o/w double emulsions of methyltestosterone (MT) loaded in a stearic acid matrix. MT-loaded nanoparticles were formulated by a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion technique using 50, 75, and 100 mg of stearic acid, 2% and 3% w/v polyvinyl alcohol, 5% w/v lactose, and 0.2% w/v chitosan. The emulsions were immediately spray-dried based on an optimized model of inlet temperature and pump rate, and characterized for optimized responses with regard to particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential, for both emulsion and powder samples. Dynamic light scattering analysis shown that the nanoparticles increased in size with increasing concentrations of polyvinyl alcohol and stearic acid. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the MT-loaded nanoparticles were spherical in shape, had a smooth surface, and were in an amorphous state, which was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry. These MT-loaded nanoparticles are a promising candidate carrier for the delivery of MT; however, further studies are needed in order to establish the stability of the system and the cargo release profile under normal conditions of use. PMID:25489238

  8. Aerogel Microparticles from Oil-in-Oil Emulsion Systems.

    PubMed

    Gu, Senlong; Zhai, Chunhao; Jana, Sadhan C

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports preparation of polymer aerogel microparticles via sol-gel reactions inside micrometer size droplets created in an oil-in-oil emulsion system. The oil-in-oil emulsion system is obtained by dispersing in cyclohexane the droplets of the sols of polybenzoxazine (PBZ) or polyimide (PI) prepared in dimethylformamide. The sol droplets transform into harder gel microparticles due to sol-gel reactions. Finally, the aerogel microparticles are recovered using supercritical drying of the gel microparticles. The PBZ and PI aerogel microparticles prepared in this manner show mean diameter 32.7 and 40.0 μm, respectively, mesoporous internal structures, and surface area 55.4 and 512.0 m(2)/g, respectively. Carbonization of PBZ aerogel microparticles maintains the mesoporous internal structures but yields narrower pore size distribution. PMID:27183146

  9. Aerogel Microparticles from Oil-in-Oil Emulsion Systems.

    PubMed

    Gu, Senlong; Zhai, Chunhao; Jana, Sadhan C

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports preparation of polymer aerogel microparticles via sol-gel reactions inside micrometer size droplets created in an oil-in-oil emulsion system. The oil-in-oil emulsion system is obtained by dispersing in cyclohexane the droplets of the sols of polybenzoxazine (PBZ) or polyimide (PI) prepared in dimethylformamide. The sol droplets transform into harder gel microparticles due to sol-gel reactions. Finally, the aerogel microparticles are recovered using supercritical drying of the gel microparticles. The PBZ and PI aerogel microparticles prepared in this manner show mean diameter 32.7 and 40.0 μm, respectively, mesoporous internal structures, and surface area 55.4 and 512.0 m(2)/g, respectively. Carbonization of PBZ aerogel microparticles maintains the mesoporous internal structures but yields narrower pore size distribution.

  10. Medium-chain triglyceride and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing emulsions in intravenous nutrition.

    PubMed

    Chan, S; McCowen, K C; Bistrian, B

    1998-03-01

    Medium-chain triglycerides and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid emulsions as a physical mixture have attracted increasing interest for use in parenteral nutrition and may play an important role in the development of structured triglycerides in a future generation of new lipids. Over the past two decades, the clinical use of intravenous emulsion for the nutritional support of hospitalized patients has relied exclusively on long-chain triglycerides providing both a safe, calorically dense alternative to dextrose and a source of essential fatty acids needed for biological membranes and maintenance of the immune function. During the past decade, the development of new triglycerides (medium- and long-chain triglyceride emulsions and structured triglyceride emulsions) for parenteral use have provided useful advances and opportunities to enhance nutritional and metabolic support. Medium-chain triglycerides and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid emulsions possess unique physical, chemical, and metabolic properties that make them theoretically advantageous over the conventional long-chain triglycerides. The physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides have been used clinically in patients with critical illness, liver disease, immunosuppression, pulmonary disease, and in premature infants, with good tolerance and the avoidance of some of the problems encountered with long-chain triglycerides alone. PMID:10565343

  11. Pickering emulsions and capsules stabilized by wool powder particles.

    PubMed

    Hikima, Takako; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2011-01-01

    We prepared emulsions and capsules that were stabilized by wool powder particles. These powder particles were adsorbed on oil-water interfaces, and they formed both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions. These emulsions were observed in ternary systems containing silicone oil, n-dodecane, fluoric oil, oleic acid, or linoleic acid as the oil phase.

  12. Influence of fatty acid profile of total parenteral nutrition emulsions on the fatty acid composition of different tissues of piglets.

    PubMed

    Amusquivar, E; Sánchez, M; Hyde, M J; Laws, J; Clarke, L; Herrera, E

    2008-08-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) studies in human babies of very-low-birth-weight suggest that the lipid emulsions currently available are not optimum for neonatal nutrition. Since fatty acid metabolism in human and pigs is very similar, the present study examines how lipid emulsions used in clinical TPN (i.e. ClinOleic, Intralipid, Lipofundin or Omegaven), with different fatty acid compositions, administered to neonatal piglets for 7 days, influenced their tissue fatty acid composition as compared to those enterally fed with a sow milk replacer. A positive linear relationship was found between the proportion of all individual fatty acids in the lipid emulsions or in the milk replacer versus those in plasma, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous fat, liver, heart, pancreas, stomach or intestine total lipids or in brain phospholipids, the latter showing the lowest correlation coefficient. With the exception of brain, the proportion of either oleic acid or alpha-linolenic acid in the individual tissues was correlated with those present in the corresponding lipid emulsion or milk replacer, whereas the proportion of linoleic acid correlated significantly with all the tissues studied. With the exception of brain phospholipids, both eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids were higher in the tissues of piglets receiving Omegaven than in all other groups. In conclusion, with the exception of the brain, fatty acid composition of plasma and different tissues in piglets are strongly influenced by the fatty acid profile of TPN emulsions. Fatty acid composition of brain phospholipids are, however, much less influenced by dietary composition, indicating an active and efficient metabolism that ensures its appropriate composition at this key stage of development.

  13. Synthesis of some glucose-fatty acid esters by lipase from Candida antarctica and their emulsion functions.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kangzi; Lamsal, Buddhi P

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of glucose esters with palmitic acid, lauric acid and hexanoic acid using lipase enzyme was studied and their emulsion functionality in oil-in-water system were compared. Reactions at 3:1M ratio of fatty acids-to-glucose had the highest conversion percentages (over 90% for each of the fatty acid). Initial conversion rate increased as substrate solubility increased. Ester bond formation was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance technique that the chemical shifts of glucose H-6 and α-carbon protons of fatty acids in the ester molecules shifted to the higher fields. Contact angle of water on esters' pelleted surface increased as the hydrophobicity increased. Glucose esters' and commercial sucrose esters' functionality as emulsifiers were compared. Glucose esters delayed, but did not prevent coalescence, because the oil droplets diameter doubled during 7days. Sucrose esters prevented coalescence during 7days since the droplets diameter did not have significant change. PMID:27507510

  14. Physicochemical properties of β-carotene emulsions stabilized by chlorogenic acid-lactoferrin-glucose/polydextrose conjugates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuguo; Wang, Di; Xu, Honggao; Sun, Cuixia; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the influence of chlorogenic acid (CA)-lactoferrin (LF)-glucose (Glc) conjugate and CA-LF-polydextrose (PD) conjugate on the physicochemical characteristics of β-carotene emulsions was investigated. Novel emulsifiers were formed during Maillard reaction between CA-LF conjugate and Glc/PD. The physicochemical properties of β-carotene emulsions were characterized by droplet size, ζ-potential, rheological behavior, transmission changes during centrifugal sedimentation and β-carotene degradation. Results showed that the covalent attachment of Glc or PD to CA-LF conjugate effectively increased the hydrophilicity of the oil droplets surfaces and strengthened the steric repulsion between the oil droplets. Glucose was better than polydextrose for the conjugation with CA-LF conjugate to stabilize β-carotene emulsions. In comparison with LF and CA-LF-Glc/PD mixtures, CA-LF-Glc/PD ternary conjugates exhibited better emulsifying properties and improved physical stability of β-carotene emulsions during the freeze-thaw treatment. In addition, CA-LF-Glc/PD conjugates significantly enhanced chemical stability of β-carotene in the emulsions against ultraviolet light exposure. PMID:26593499

  15. [Perfluorocarbon emulsions and other corpuscular systems influence on neutrophil activity].

    PubMed

    Shekhtman, D G; Safronova, V G; Sklifas, A N; Alovskaia, A A; Gapeev, A B; Obraztsov, V V; Chemeris, N K

    1997-01-01

    Influence of perfluorodecalin, perfluoromethilcyclohexylpiperidine, perfluorotributylamine emulsions on active oxygen form (AOF) generation by neutrophils has been studied. All investigated emulsions stabilized both proxanol 268 and egg yolk phospholipids inhibited PMA-stimulated neutrophil activity. Castor oil emulsion also inhibited the neutrophil activity. Neutrophil response for chemotactic peptide, was unchanged in the presence of all tested emulsions. We suppose that fast hydrophobic attachment of inert submicrone emulsion particles to cell surface provokes alteration of neutrophil plasma membrane function resulting in a decrease of AOF generation. PMID:9490112

  16. A computer system to analyze showers in nuclear emulsions: Center Director's discretionary fund report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.; Fountain, W. F.; Berry, F. A., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A system to rapidly digitize data from showers in nuclear emulsions is described. A TV camera views the emulsions though a microscope. The TV output is superimposed on the monitor of a minicomputer. The operator uses the computer's graphics capability to mark the positions of particle tracks. The coordinates of each track are stored on a disk. The computer then predicts the coordinates of each track through successive layers of emulsion. The operator, guided by the predictions, thus tracks and stores the development of the shower. The system provides a significant improvement over purely manual methods of recording shower development in nuclear emulsion stacks.

  17. Oil components modulate physical characteristics and function of the natural oil emulsions as drug or gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Chung, H; Kim, T W; Kwon, M; Kwon, I C; Jeong, S Y

    2001-04-28

    Oil-in-water (o/w) type lipid emulsions were formulated by using 18 different natural oils and egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) to investigate how emulsion particle size and stability change with different oils. Cottonseed, linseed and evening primrose oils formed emulsions with very large and unstable particles. Squalene, light mineral oil and jojoba bean oil formed stable emulsions with small particles. The remaining natural oils formed moderately stable emulsions. Emulsions with smaller initial particle size were more stable than those with larger particles. The correlation between emulsion size made with different oils and two physical properties of the oils was also investigated. The o/w interfacial tension and particle size of the emulsion were inversely proportional. The effect of viscosity was less pronounced. To study how the oil component in the emulsion modulates the in vitro release characteristics of lipophilic drugs, three different emulsions loaded with two different drugs were prepared. Squalene, soybean oil and linseed oil emulsions represented the most, medium and the least stable systems, respectively. For the lipophilic drugs, release was the slowest from the most stable squalene emulsion, followed by soybean oil and then by linseed oil emulsions. Cationic emulsions were also prepared with the above three different oils as gene carriers. In vitro transfection activity was the highest for the most stable squalene emulsion followed by soybean oil and then by linseed oil emulsions. Even though the in vitro transfection activity of emulsions were lower than the liposome in the absence of serum, the activity of squalene emulsion, for instance, was ca. 30 times higher than that of liposome in the presence of 80% (v/v) serum. In conclusion, the choice of oil component in o/w emulsion is important in formulating emulsion-based drug or gene delivery systems.

  18. Microencapsulation of conjugated linolenic acid-rich pomegranate seed oil by an emulsion method.

    PubMed

    Sen Gupta, Surashree; Ghosh, Santinath; Maiti, Prabir; Ghosh, Mahua

    2012-12-01

    Controlled release of food ingredients and their protection from oxidation are the key functionality provided by microencapsulation. In the present study, pomegranate seed oil, rich in conjugated linolenic acid, was microencapsulated. As encapsulating agent, sodium alginate or trehalose was used. Calcium caseinate was used as the emulsifier. Performances of the two encapsulants were compared in respect of the rate of release of core material from the microcapsules and stability of microcapsules against harsh conditions. Microencapsulation was carried out by preparation of an emulsion containing calcium caseinate as the emulsion stabilizer and a water-soluble carbohydrate (either sodium alginate or trehalose) as the encapsulant. An oil-in-water emulsion was prepared with pomegranate seed oil as the inner core material. The emulsion was thereby freeze-dried and the dried product pulverized. External morphology of the microcapsules was studied under scanning electron microscope. Micrographs showed that both types of microcapsules had uneven surface morphology. Release rate of the microcapsules was studied using UV-spectrophotometer. Trehalose-based microcapsules showed higher release rate. On subjecting the microcapsules at 110 °C for specific time periods, it was observed that sodium alginate microcapsules retained their original properties. Hence, we can say that sodium alginate microcapsules are more heat resistant than trehalose microcapsules. PMID:23014855

  19. Changes in Antioxidant Defense System Using Different Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition in Children after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Baena-Gómez, María Auxiliadora; De La Torre Aguilar, María José; Mesa, María Dolores; Pérez Navero, Juan Luis; Gil-Campos, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, lipids used in parenteral nutrition (PN) are based on ω-6 fatty acid-rich vegetable oils, such as soybean oil, with potential adverse effects involving oxidative stress. Methods: We evaluated the antioxidant defense system in children, after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), who were randomized to use a lipid emulsion with fish oil or soybean oil. Blood samples at baseline, at 10 days, and at the end of the PN were taken to analyze plasma retinol, α-tocopherol, β-carotene, coenzyme Q9 and coenzyme Q10 levels, and catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPOX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in lysed erythrocytes. Results: An increase in plasma α-tocopherol levels in the group of patients receiving the fish oil-containing emulsion (FO) compared with the group receiving the soybean emulsion was observed at day 10 of PN. Concurrently, plasma α-tocopherol increased in the FO group and β-carotene decreased in both groups at day 10 compared with baseline levels, being more significant in the group receiving the FO emulsion. Conclusion: FO-containing emulsions in PN could improve the antioxidant profile by increasing levels of α-tocopherol in children after HSCT who are at higher risk of suffering oxidative stress and metabolic disorders. PMID:26343717

  20. Modeling of facilitated transport of phenylalanine by emulsion liquid membranes with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as a carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Liu, D.

    1998-12-01

    A mathematical model is developed in this paper to simulate the facilitated transport of phenylalanine (Phe) in emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as a carrier. The model takes into account the mass transfer in both the external aqueous phase and the organic membrane phase interfacial reaction as well as membrane breakage during agitation. The model is tested by comparing theoretical predications with experimental results using Phe extraction by ELM processes. It is found that the model is valid for simulating the facilitated transport of Phe with ELM under various experimental conditions.

  1. Droplet freezing experiments in stearic acid-water emulsions, role of the droplet-medium interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiez, J.P.; Grange, G.; Mutaftschiev, B.

    1982-02-01

    Droplets of stearic acid emulsions in water, stabilized with cationic or anionic emulsifiers, undergoing freezing-melting cycles with constant temperature scanning rate, freeze as monocrystals and independently from one another, even when visible clustering takes place. The study of the nucleation kinetics by differential scanning calorimetry shows that nucleation threshold (critical undercooling) depends on the nature of the emulsifier, adsorbed at the droplet-medium interface. 30 references.

  2. Microwave selective heating for size effect of water droplet in W/O emulsion with sorbitan fatty acid monostearate surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, Takuya; Horikoshi, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    A stable water/oil (W/O) emulsion was prepared by adjustment with sorbitan fatty acid monoester surfactants. The prepared W/O emulsion was stable for 60 min in the atmosphere; however, the formation of non-uniform water droplets in the height of the emulsion in the quartz tube reactor were observed by the backscattering measurements with an infrared laser at 850 nm. The increase of temperature under microwave irradiation was influenced sensitively by the position of those water droplets. Those results were caused from the size and concentration of water droplets in the W/O emulsion. On the other hand, selective heating of the water droplets caused heating of the entire W/O emulsion, although the temperature difference between the water droplets and the oil phase was 20 °C.

  3. Water-in-diesel emulsions and related systems.

    PubMed

    Lif, Anna; Holmberg, Krister

    2006-11-16

    Water-in-diesel emulsions are fuels for regular diesel engines. The advantages of an emulsion fuel are reductions in the emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matters, which are both health hazardous, and reduction in fuel consumption due to better burning efficiency. An important aspect is that diesel emulsions can be used without engine modifications. This review presents the influence of water on the emissions and on the combustion efficiency. Whereas there is a decrease in emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matters, there is an increase in the emissions of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide with increasing water content of the emulsion. The combustion efficiency is improved when water is emulsified with diesel. This is a consequence of the microexplosions, which facilitate atomization of the fuel. The review also covers related fuels, such as diesel-in-water-in-diesel emulsions, i.e., double emulsions, water-in-diesel microemulsions, and water-in-vegetable oil emulsions, i.e., biodiesel emulsions. A brief overview of other types of alternative fuels is also included.

  4. Resolution of a gold latensification-elon ascorbic acid developer for Ilford L4 emulsion.

    PubMed

    Ginsel, L A; Onderwater, J J; Daems, W T

    1979-07-11

    The electron-microscopical autoradiographical resolution of a gold latensification-elon ascorbic acid (GEA) developer for Ilford L4 emulsion was determined experimentally, using radioactive line sources of tritiated albumin (Heijnen and Geuze, 1977). For sections with a thickness of 62 nm (SD +/- 11), which were covered with a carbon layer about 5 nm thick and a slightly overlapping monolayer of L4 silver bromide crystals, the measured half-distance (HD) of resolution was 115 nm. This improvement in resolution, the high efficiency of the GEA developer for L4 emulsion (Wisse and Tates, 1968), and the excellent visibility of the cellular structures under the small silver grains, mean that the L4-GEA combination deserves preverence as a method for quantitative electron-microscopical autoradiography.

  5. Are Water-in-Oil-Emulsions Suitable Model Systems for Cloud Glaciation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handle, Karl; Loerting, Thomas; Bogdan, Anatoli; Weiss, Fabian; Pummer, Bernhard; Grothe, Hinrich

    2013-04-01

    The technique of studying aqueous solutions emulsified in oil matrices is widely used in the scientific community as a model system for aqueous droplets in the atmosphere, e.g., in the context of ice nucleation and cloud glaciation. These studies are based on the assumption that the interaction between aqueous and oil phase is negligible. In this study we critically test the validity of this assumption by systematically varying the parameters of the emulsification procedure for the study of the freezing behaviour of dilute and concentrated solutions of organic acids, e.g., citric acid, and inorganic salts, e.g., ammonium sulphate. In particular we vary the type of oil, the type of surfactant, the water to oil ratio, the mixing time and the temperature, at which the emulsion is prepared. These emulsions are studied in the context of cloud glaciation by cooling to < 150 K and reheating to ambient temperature. We specifically check for the droplets sizes and distribution as well as imperfectly emulsified regions from optical microscopy observations, first and second freezing events, cold-crystallization upon heating, melting events and possible glass-transitions from differential scanning calorimetry experiments as well as for the phase mixtures and types of ice (cubic vs. hexagonal) formed by powder X-ray diffraction as a function of temperature. The results clearly show that not all emulsions behave alike in these experiments and that it is important to be aware about the possibility of the oil matrix interfering with the experiment, e.g., for oils that vitrify at atmospherically relevant temperatures.

  6. Antioxidant activity of gallic acid and methyl gallate in triacylglycerols of Kilka fish oil and its oil-in-water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Asnaashari, Maryam; Farhoosh, Reza; Sharif, Ali

    2014-09-15

    The anti-DPPH radical effect as well as anti-peroxide activity of gallic acid, methyl gallate, and α-tocopherol in a bulk Kilka fish oil and its oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by soy protein isolate at 55°C were investigated. Gallic acid with the lowest hydrophobicity (log P=-0.28) was found to be the most active antiradical agent (IC50=29.5 μM), followed by methyl gallate (IC50=38.0 μM, log P=-0.23) and α-tocopherol (IC50=105.3 μM, log P=0.70). The anti-peroxide activity in the bulk oil system decreased in the order of methyl gallate>gallic acid>α-tocopherol. In the emulsion system, methyl gallate still behaved better than gallic acid, but the highest activity belonged to α-tocopherol. Based on the calculation of a number of kinetic parameters, the antioxidants, in general, showed better performances in the bulk oil system than in the emulsion system.

  7. Influence of droplet size on the antioxidant activity of rosemary extract loaded oil-in-water emulsions in mixed systems.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Martin E; Zeeb, Benjamin; Salminen, Hanna; Gibis, Monika; Lautenschlaeger, Ralf; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-03-01

    The influence of droplet size on the antioxidant activity of oil-in-water emulsions loaded with rosemary extract in mixed emulsion systems was investigated. Firstly, differently sized hexadecane-in-water model emulsions (10% (w/w) hexadecane, 2% (w/w) Tween 80, pH 5 or 7) containing 4000 ppm rosemary extract in the oil phase or without added antioxidant were prepared using a high shear blender and/or high-pressure homogenizer. Secondly, emulsions were mixed with fish oil-in-water emulsions (10% (w/w) fish oil, 2% (w/w) Tween 80, pH 5 or 7) at a mixing ratio of 1 : 1. Optical microscopy and static light scattering measurements indicated that emulsions were physically stable for 21 days, except for the slight aggregation of emulsions with a mean droplet size d₄₃ of 4500 nm. The droplet size of hexadecane-in-water emulsions containing rosemary extract had no influence on the formation of lipid hydroperoxides at pH 5 and 7. Significantly lower concentrations of propanal were observed for the emulsions loaded with rosemary extract with a mean droplet size d₄₃ of 4500 nm from day 12 to 16 at pH 7. Finally, hexadecane-in-water emulsions containing rosemary extract significantly retarded lipid oxidation of fish oil-in-water emulsions in mixed systems, but no differences in antioxidant efficacy between the differently sized emulsions were observed at pH 5.

  8. Recovery of organic extractant from secondary emulsions formed in the extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Korchnak, J.D.; Fett, R.H.G.

    1984-01-03

    Uranium in wet-process phosphoric acid is extracted with an organic extractant. The pregnant extractant is then centrifuged to separate contaminants from the extractant. Secondary emulsions obtained by separating the contaminants following centrifugation are mixed with water or an acid leaching solution. After mixing, the mixture is centrifuged to separate and recover extractant which is recycled for stripping.

  9. Antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds added to a functional emulsion containing omega-3 fatty acids and plant sterol esters.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Raquel Rainho; Inchingolo, Raffaella; Alencar, Severino Matias; Rodriguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Castro, Inar Alves

    2015-09-01

    The effect of eleven compounds extracted from red propolis on the oxidative stability of a functional emulsion was evaluated. Emulsions prepared with Echium oil as omega 3 (ω-3 FA) source, containing 1.63 g/100mL of α-linolenic acid (ALA), 0.73 g/100 mL of stearidonic acid (SDA) and 0.65 g/100mL of plant sterol esters (PSE) were prepared without or with phenolic compounds (vanillic acid, caffeic acid, trans-cinnamic acid, 2,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, trans-ferulic acid, trans,trans-farnesol, rutin, gallic acid or sinapic acid). tert-Butylhydroquinone and a mixture containing ascorbic acid and FeSO4 were applied as negative and positive controls of the oxidation. Hydroperoxide, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), malondialdehyde and phytosterol oxidation products (POPs) were evaluated as oxidative markers. Based on hydroperoxide and TBARS analysis, sinapic acid and rutin (200 ppm) showed the same antioxidant activity than TBHQ, representing a potential alternative as natural antioxidant to be applied in a functional emulsion containing ω-3 FA and PSE.

  10. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence of common organic luminophores in water using an emulsion system.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jeffrey E; Renault, Christophe; Kim, Byung-Kwon; Bard, Allen J

    2014-10-01

    We describe a method to produce electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) in water using a family of highly hydrophobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) luminophores and boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY). This method is based on an oil-in-water emulsion system. Various PAHs (rubrene, 9,10-diphenylanthracene, pyrene, or perylene) and BODIPY were trapped in a toluene and tri-n-propylamine mixed oil-in-water emulsion using an ionic liquid as the supporting electrolyte and emulsifier. ECL was observed for all the aforementioned PAHs and BODIPY, and the rubrene and BODIPY emulsion systems showed adequate light to record an ECL spectrum. ECL was also observed using oxalate as the co-reactant, which was dissolved in the aqueous continuous phase. The emulsions were stable for hours and showed a droplet size distribution that ranged from 275 to 764 nm, in accordance with dynamic light scattering data. PMID:25222019

  11. Copper-catalyzed oxidation of a structured lipid-based emulsion containing alpha-tocopherol and citric acid: influence of pH and NaCl.

    PubMed

    Osborn-Barnes, Hannah T; Akoh, Casimir C

    2003-11-01

    The effects of salt and pH on copper-catalyzed lipid oxidation in structured lipid-based emulsions were evaluated. Ten percent oil-in-water emulsions were formulated with a canola oil/caprylic acid structured lipid and stabilized with 0.5% whey protein isolate. alpha-Tocopherol and citric acid were added to the emulsions to determine how changes in pH or the addition of NaCl affected their antioxidant activity. The peroxide values and anisidine values of emulsions stored at 50 degrees C were measured over an 8-day period. Increased lipid oxidation occurred in the pH 7.0 emulsions and when 0.5 M NaCl was added to the pH 3.0 samples. Adding alpha-tocopherol, citric acid, or a combination of the two compounds slowed the formation of hydroperoxides and their subsequent decomposition products in pH 3.0 emulsions.

  12. A new fast scanning system for the measurement of large angle tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Buonaura, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Galati, G.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Pupilli, F.; Shchedrina, T.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear emulsions have been widely used in particle physics to identify new particles through the observation of their decays thanks to their unique spatial resolution. Nevertheless, before the advent of automatic scanning systems, the emulsion analysis was very demanding in terms of well trained manpower. Due to this reason, they were gradually replaced by electronic detectors, until the '90s, when automatic microscopes started to be developed in Japan and in Europe. Automatic scanning was essential to conceive large scale emulsion-based neutrino experiments like CHORUS, DONUT and OPERA. Standard scanning systems have been initially designed to recognize tracks within a limited angular acceptance (θ lesssim 30°) where θ is the track angle with respect to a line perpendicular to the emulsion plane. In this paper we describe the implementation of a novel fast automatic scanning system aimed at extending the track recognition to the full angular range and improving the present scanning speed. Indeed, nuclear emulsions do not have any intrinsic limit to detect particle direction. Such improvement opens new perspectives to use nuclear emulsions in several fields in addition to large scale neutrino experiments, like muon radiography, medical applications and dark matter directional detection.

  13. Submicrometer-sized Pickering emulsions stabilized by silica nanoparticles with adsorbed oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Sadeghpour, Amin; Pirolt, Franz; Glatter, Otto

    2013-05-21

    Oil-water Pickering emulsions of about 200 nm were stabilized by nanosized hydrophilic silica after a simple surface treatment method. We have modified the aqueous silica nanoparticle dispersions by simple adsorption of oleic acid to their surfaces, improving the hydrophobicity of the particles while maintaining their charge and stability. The adsorption was monitored by small-angle X-ray scattering and electrophoretic measurements to estimate the interparticle interactions and surface charges. The effect of various parameters, such as nanoparticle concentration, amount of oleic acid, ionic strength, and pH, on the droplets' size and stability was investigated by dynamic light scattering. Furthermore, the ability of these modified silica nanoparticles to stabilize long-chain alkanes, liquid paraffin, and liquid-crystalline phases was examined.

  14. Pickering Emulsion Gels Prepared by Hydrogen-Bonded Zein/Tannic Acid Complex Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-08-26

    Food-grade colloidal particles and complexes, which are formed via modulation of the noncovalent interactions between macromolecules and natural small molecules, can be developed as novel functional ingredients in a safe and sustainable way. For this study was prepared a novel zein/tannic acid (TA) complex colloidal particle (ZTP) based on the hydrogen-bonding interaction between zein and TA in aqueous ethanol solution by using a simple antisolvent approach. Pickering emulsion gels with high oil volume fraction (φ(oil) > 50%) were successfully fabricated via one-step homogenization. Circular dichroism (CD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, which were used to characterize the structure of zein/TA complexes in ethanol solution, clearly showed that TA binding generated a conformational change of zein without altering their supramolecular structure at pH 5.0 and intermediate TA concentrations. Consequently, the resultant ZTP had tuned near neutral wettability (θ(ow) ∼ 86°) and enhanced interfacial reactivity, but without significantly decreased surface charge. These allowed the ZTP to stabilize the oil droplets and further triggered cross-linking to form a continuous network among and around the oil droplets and protein particles, leading to the formation of stable Pickering emulsion gels. Layer-by-layer (LbL) interfacial architecture on the oil-water surface of the droplets was observed, which implied a possibility to fabricate hierarchical interface microstructure via modulation of the noncovalent interaction between hydrophobic protein and natural polyphenol. PMID:26226053

  15. Pickering Emulsion Gels Prepared by Hydrogen-Bonded Zein/Tannic Acid Complex Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-08-26

    Food-grade colloidal particles and complexes, which are formed via modulation of the noncovalent interactions between macromolecules and natural small molecules, can be developed as novel functional ingredients in a safe and sustainable way. For this study was prepared a novel zein/tannic acid (TA) complex colloidal particle (ZTP) based on the hydrogen-bonding interaction between zein and TA in aqueous ethanol solution by using a simple antisolvent approach. Pickering emulsion gels with high oil volume fraction (φ(oil) > 50%) were successfully fabricated via one-step homogenization. Circular dichroism (CD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, which were used to characterize the structure of zein/TA complexes in ethanol solution, clearly showed that TA binding generated a conformational change of zein without altering their supramolecular structure at pH 5.0 and intermediate TA concentrations. Consequently, the resultant ZTP had tuned near neutral wettability (θ(ow) ∼ 86°) and enhanced interfacial reactivity, but without significantly decreased surface charge. These allowed the ZTP to stabilize the oil droplets and further triggered cross-linking to form a continuous network among and around the oil droplets and protein particles, leading to the formation of stable Pickering emulsion gels. Layer-by-layer (LbL) interfacial architecture on the oil-water surface of the droplets was observed, which implied a possibility to fabricate hierarchical interface microstructure via modulation of the noncovalent interaction between hydrophobic protein and natural polyphenol.

  16. Asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems for uranium mill tailings: an overview of the technology

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, D.A.; Dunning, R.L.

    1984-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) office, has developed an asphalt emulsion cover system to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. The system has been field tested at Grand Junction, Colorado. Results from laboratory and field tests indicate that this system is effective in reducing radon release to near-background levels (<2.5 pCi m/sup -2/s/sup -1/) and has the properties required for long-term effectiveness and stability. Engineering specifications have been developed, and analysis indicates that asphalt emulsion covers are cost-competitive with other cover systems. This report summarizes the technology for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. 59 references, 45 figures, 36 tables.

  17. Treating oilfield emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book is divided into the following sections: The Treating Problem of Oilfield Emulsion; The Theory of Emulsions; Emulsions and Production Practices; The Basic Principles of Treating; The Application of Heat in Treating; The Principles of Chemical Treating; Treating with Heater-Treaters; Automatic Central Oil-Treating Systems; Sampling Procedures; Testing for Sediment and Water; Treating Cost Records.

  18. Formation of thermally reversible optically transparent emulsion-based delivery systems using spontaneous emulsification.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Amir Hossein; Fang, Yuan; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-28

    Transparent emulsion-based delivery systems suitable for encapsulating lipophilic bioactive agents can be fabricated using low-energy spontaneous emulsification methods. These emulsions are typically fabricated from non-ionic surfactants whose hydrophilic head groups are susceptible to dehydration upon heating. This phenomenon may promote emulsion instability due to enhanced droplet coalescence at elevated temperatures. Conversely, the same phenomenon can be used to fabricate optically transparent emulsions through the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method. The purpose of the current study was to examine the influence of oil phase composition and surfactant-to-oil ratio on the thermal behavior of surfactant-oil-water systems containing limonene, medium chain triglycerides (MCT), and Tween 60. Various types of thermal behavior (turbidity versus temperature profiles) were exhibited by these systems depending on their initial composition. For certain compositions, thermoreversible emulsions could be formed that were opaque at high temperatures but transparent at ambient temperatures. These systems may be particularly suitable for the encapsulation of bioactive agents in applications where optical clarity is important. PMID:26431057

  19. Parenteral safflower oil emulsion (Liposyn 10%): safety and effectiveness in treating or preventing essential fatty acid deficiency in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bivins, B A; Rapp, R P; Record, K; Meng, H C; Griffen, W O

    1980-01-01

    The safety and effectiveness of a 10% safflower oil emulsion in treating or preventing essential fatty acid deficiency was tested in a prospective study of 15 surgical patients requiring total parenteral nutrition for two to four weeks. Three dosage regimens were evaluated including: Group I: 4% of calories as linoleate daily (five patients), Group II: 4% of calories as linoleate every other day (two patients), and Group III: 8% of calories every other day (eight patients). Patients were monitored for laboratory changes from baseline specifically in those areas where previous fat emulsions have caused serious deviations. No significant changes were noted in hematologic parameters, coagulation studies, cholesterol and triglyceride serum levels. Although there were sporadic mild deviations in liver function changes in several patients, no clinically significant adverse effects could be directly attributed to infusion of the fat emulsion. Three patients had baseline triene/tetraene ratios of 0.4 or greater, indicative of essential fatty/acid deficiency, and these ratios dropped to less than 0.4 within eight days of beginning therapy with the parenteral fat emulsion. The remaining 12 patients maintained a normal triene/tetraene ratio of less than 0.4 throughout the 28 day study period. All three dosage regimens were considered effective for treatment and prevention of essential fatty acid deficiency. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6767452

  20. Bond Graph Modeling and Validation of an Energy Regenerative System for Emulsion Pump Tests

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilei; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    The test system for emulsion pump is facing serious challenges due to its huge energy consumption and waste nowadays. To settle this energy issue, a novel energy regenerative system (ERS) for emulsion pump tests is briefly introduced at first. Modeling such an ERS of multienergy domains needs a unified and systematic approach. Bond graph modeling is well suited for this task. The bond graph model of this ERS is developed by first considering the separate components before assembling them together and so is the state-space equation. Both numerical simulation and experiments are carried out to validate the bond graph model of this ERS. Moreover the simulation and experiments results show that this ERS not only satisfies the test requirements, but also could save at least 25% of energy consumption as compared to the original test system, demonstrating that it is a promising method of energy regeneration for emulsion pump tests. PMID:24967428

  1. Viscosity of the oil-in-water Pickering emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer and nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Tushar; Kumar, G. Suresh; Chon, Bo Hyun; Sangwai, Jitendra S.

    2014-11-01

    Information on the viscosity of Pickering emulsion is required for their successful application in upstream oil and gas industry to understand their stability at extreme environment. In this work, a novel formulation of oil-in-water (o/w) Pickering emulsion stabilized using nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer (polyacrylamide) system as formulated in our earlier work (Sharma et al., Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 2014) is investigated for rheological stability at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions using a controlled-strain rheometer. The nanoparticle (SiO2 and clay) concentration is varied from 1.0 to 5.0 wt%. The results are compared with the rheological behavior of simple o/w emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system. Both the emulsions exhibit non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior. A positive shift in this behavior is observed for surfactant-polymer stabilized emulsion at high pressure conditions. Yield stress is observed to increase with pressure for surfactant-polymer emulsion. In addition, increase in temperature has an adverse effect on the viscosity of emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system. In case of nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer stabilized o/w emulsion system, the viscosity and yield stress are predominantly constant for varying pressure and temperature conditions. The viscosity data for both o/w emulsion systems are fitted by the Herschel-Bulkley model and found to be satisfactory. In general, the study indicates that the Pickering emulsion stabilized by nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer system shows improved and stable rheological properties as compared to conventional emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system indicating their successful application for HPHT environment in upstream oil and gas industry.

  2. Charge Identification of Highly Ionizing Particles in Desensitized Nuclear Emulsion Using High Speed Read-Out System

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Komori, M.; Sato, S.; Asai, M.; /Nagoya U. /Aichi U. of Education /Gunma U., Maebashi /JAXA, Sagamihara /KEK, Tsukuba /Kobe U. /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /SLAC /Toho U.

    2006-05-10

    We performed an experimental study of charge identification of heavy ions from helium to carbon having energy of about 290 MeV/u using an emulsion chamber. Emulsion was desensitized by means of forced fading (refreshing) to expand a dynamic range of response to highly charged particles. For the track reconstruction and charge identification, the fully automated high speed emulsion read-out system, which was originally developed for identifying minimum ionizing particles, was used without any modification. Clear track by track charge identification up to Z=6 was demonstrated. The refreshing technique has proved to be a powerful technique to expand response of emulsion film to highly ionizing particles.

  3. Influence of droplet size on the antioxidant activity of rosemary extract loaded oil-in-water emulsions in mixed systems.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Martin E; Zeeb, Benjamin; Salminen, Hanna; Gibis, Monika; Lautenschlaeger, Ralf; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-03-01

    The influence of droplet size on the antioxidant activity of oil-in-water emulsions loaded with rosemary extract in mixed emulsion systems was investigated. Firstly, differently sized hexadecane-in-water model emulsions (10% (w/w) hexadecane, 2% (w/w) Tween 80, pH 5 or 7) containing 4000 ppm rosemary extract in the oil phase or without added antioxidant were prepared using a high shear blender and/or high-pressure homogenizer. Secondly, emulsions were mixed with fish oil-in-water emulsions (10% (w/w) fish oil, 2% (w/w) Tween 80, pH 5 or 7) at a mixing ratio of 1 : 1. Optical microscopy and static light scattering measurements indicated that emulsions were physically stable for 21 days, except for the slight aggregation of emulsions with a mean droplet size d₄₃ of 4500 nm. The droplet size of hexadecane-in-water emulsions containing rosemary extract had no influence on the formation of lipid hydroperoxides at pH 5 and 7. Significantly lower concentrations of propanal were observed for the emulsions loaded with rosemary extract with a mean droplet size d₄₃ of 4500 nm from day 12 to 16 at pH 7. Finally, hexadecane-in-water emulsions containing rosemary extract significantly retarded lipid oxidation of fish oil-in-water emulsions in mixed systems, but no differences in antioxidant efficacy between the differently sized emulsions were observed at pH 5. PMID:25586114

  4. Parenteral lipid emulsions in guinea pigs differentially influence plasma and tissue levels of fatty acids, squalene, cholesterol, and phytosterols.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Kevin; Xu, Zhidong; Walker, Candace; Pavlina, Thomas; McGrath, Sheila; Zaloga, Gary; Siddiqui, Rafat

    2014-08-01

    Lipid emulsions are made by mixing vegetable and/or fish oils with egg yolk and contain different types and amounts of fatty acids and sterols. This study assessed the effects of oral diet, soybean oil (SO)-, fish oil (FO)-, a mixture of olive and soybean oil (OOSO)-, and a mixture of fish, olive, coconut, and soybean oil (FOCS)-based emulsions on plasma triacylglycerols and plasma and tissue fatty acid and sterol content following acute and chronic intravenous administration in the guinea pig. Upon acute administration, peak triacylglycerols were highest with SO and lowest with OOSO. Upon chronic administration, the plasma triglyceride levels did not increase in any group over that of the controls. Fatty acid levels varied greatly between organs of animals on the control diets and organs of animals following acute or chronic lipid administration. Squalene levels increased in plasma following acute administration of OOSO, but plasma squalene levels were similar to control in all emulsion groups following chronic administration. Total plasma phytosterol levels were increased in the SO, OOSO, and FOCS groups following both acute and chronic infusions, whereas phytosterols were not increased following FO infusion. Total phytosterol levels were higher in liver, lung, kidney and adipose tissue following SO and OOSO. Levels were not increased in tissues after FO and FOCS infusion. These results indicate that fatty acid and sterol contents vary greatly among organs and that no one tissue reflects the fatty acid or sterol composition of other tissues, suggesting that different organs regulate these compounds differently.

  5. Lactobionic acid as antioxidant and moisturizing active in alkyl polyglucoside-based topical emulsions: the colloidal structure, stability and efficacy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tasic-Kostov, M; Pavlovic, D; Lukic, M; Jaksic, I; Arsic, I; Savic, S

    2012-10-01

    Cosmeceutical antioxidants may protect the skin against oxidative injury, involved in the pathogenesis of many skin disorders. However, an unsuitable topical delivery system with compromising safety profile can affect the efficacy of an antioxidant active. This study investigated the antioxidant potential of lactobionic acid (LA), a newer cosmeceutical active, per se (in solution) and incorporated into natural alkyl polyglucoside (APG) emulsifier-based system using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging and lipid peroxidation inhibition assays. The α-tocopherol was used as a reference compound. The physical stability (using rheology, polarization microscopy, pH and conductivity measurements) of an Alkyl glucoside-based emulsion was evaluated with and without the active (LA); colloidal structure was assessed using polarization and transmission electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and texture analysis. Additionally, the safety profile and moisturizing potential were investigated using the methods of skin bioengineering. Good physical stability and applicative characteristics were obtained although LA strongly influenced the colloidal structure of the vehicle. LA per se and in APG-based emulsion showed satisfying antioxidant activity that promotes it as mild multifunctional cosmeceutical efficient in the treatment and prevention of the photoaged skin. Employed assays were shown as suitable for the antioxidant activity evaluation of LA in APG-based emulsions, but not for α-tocopherol in the same vehicle. PMID:22691034

  6. Stability assessment of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) oil-in-water beverage emulsion formulated with acacia and xanthan gums.

    PubMed

    Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Maryam; Goli, Sayed Amir Hossein; Nasirpour, Ali

    2016-05-15

    The development of a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) oil-in-water beverage emulsion containing acacia gum (AG) and xanthan gum (XG) was investigated. D-optimal design and response surface method was used and 10% w/w AG, 3.5% w/w CLA and 0.3% w/w XG was introduced as the optimum formula. Afterward the effect of storage time on the physicochemical properties of selected formulation including specific gravity, turbidity, viscosity, average droplet size, span, size index, creaming index, oxidation measurements and stability in its diluted form, were determined. Findings revealed that the size of oil droplets increased after six weeks and resulted in instability of the emulsion concentrate. Peroxide value increased until 21 days and then decreased dramatically, whereas TBA and Totox values began to increase after this time. Turbidity loss rate was low demonstrating the good stability of the diluted emulsion. The results revealed that it is possible to produce a stable CLA oil-in-water emulsion for using in beverages.

  7. Stability assessment of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) oil-in-water beverage emulsion formulated with acacia and xanthan gums.

    PubMed

    Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Maryam; Goli, Sayed Amir Hossein; Nasirpour, Ali

    2016-05-15

    The development of a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) oil-in-water beverage emulsion containing acacia gum (AG) and xanthan gum (XG) was investigated. D-optimal design and response surface method was used and 10% w/w AG, 3.5% w/w CLA and 0.3% w/w XG was introduced as the optimum formula. Afterward the effect of storage time on the physicochemical properties of selected formulation including specific gravity, turbidity, viscosity, average droplet size, span, size index, creaming index, oxidation measurements and stability in its diluted form, were determined. Findings revealed that the size of oil droplets increased after six weeks and resulted in instability of the emulsion concentrate. Peroxide value increased until 21 days and then decreased dramatically, whereas TBA and Totox values began to increase after this time. Turbidity loss rate was low demonstrating the good stability of the diluted emulsion. The results revealed that it is possible to produce a stable CLA oil-in-water emulsion for using in beverages. PMID:26775969

  8. Evaluation of HLB values of mixed non-ionic surfactants on the stability of oil-in-water emulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nursakinah, I.; Ismail, A. R.; Rahimi, M. Y.; Idris, A. B.

    2013-11-01

    Emulsion oil-in-water was prepared with combination of emulsifiers (non-ionic surfactants) following the HLB (hydrophylic-lipophylic balance) method developed by Griffin. The emulsions were prepared at HLB 10, 11, 12, 13 and 13.6 consisting blend of non-ionic emulsifiers fatty acid ethoxylate with 20 moles bound ethylene oxide and Dehydol LS 1 with 1 mole bound ethylene oxide. A mixture of palm-based methyl ester consisting of C6-10 and C12-18 fatty acid composition was used as palm-based solvent. The physicochemical parameters of the emulsion were characterized by accelerate stability tested at 45°C for two months, measurement of particle size and viscosity test. The result of accelerate test showed that all the emulsion at different HLB were found to be stable in the 2 months observation which assumed to be stable in 1 year of storage. Meanwhile, the particle size measurement data showed that the optimum stable particle size of the emulsion was HLB 12±1. The viscosity test of the emulsion tends to support the data from the particle size and have maximum viscosity 189.89 cP at HLB 12. The obtained results indicate that the optimum stable emulsions can be formulated by a combination of emulsifiers with HLB 12±1 which is compatible with that of required HLB of the oil phase.

  9. Pre-irradiation induced emulsion co-graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and acrylic acid onto a polyethylene nonwoven fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanzhou; Yu, Ming; Ma, Hongjuan; Wang, Ziqiang; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2014-01-01

    A pre-irradiation induced emulsion co-graft polymerization method was used to introduce acrylonitrile and acrylic acid onto a PE nonwoven fabric. The use of acrylic acid is meant to improve the hydrophilicity of the modified fabric. The kinetics of co-graft polymerization were studied. The existence of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) graft chains was proven by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The existence of the nitrile groups in the graft chains indicates that they are ready for further amidoximation and adsorption of heavy metal ions.

  10. Pickering emulsion stabilized by lipase-containing periodic mesoporous organosilica particles: a robust biocatalyst system for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjun; Liu, Xinlong; Chen, Yafei; Zhou, Liya; He, Ying; Ma, Li; Gao, Jing

    2014-02-01

    A novel catalytic system of Pickering emulsion stabilized by lipase-containing periodic mesoporous organosilica was constructed (named LP@PE) and used as biocatalyst for biodiesel production. The reaction parameters were optimized and the optimum conditions were as follows: the water fraction 0.65%, molar ratio of ethanol to oleic acid 2:1, immobilized lipase particles 150mg, phosphate buffer pH 7.0 and temperature 30°C. Under these conditions, the maximum biodiesel yield obtained via esterification of oleic acid with ethanol could reach 95.8%. The biodiesel yield could maintain 88.6% after LP@PE was used 15times. The LP@PE was also used in the synthesis of biodiesel from Jatropha curcas oil. The highest yield could reach 87.1% and the yield was 73.0% after 10 cycles. All these results demonstrated that Pickering emulsion system stabilized by immobilized enzyme may possess much potential in many enzymatic industrial applications.

  11. Fatty acid composition in double and multilayered microcapsules of ω-3 as affected by storage conditions and type of emulsions.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Martín, Estefanía; Antequera Rojas, Teresa; Gharsallaoui, Adem; Ruiz Carrascal, Jorge; Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad

    2016-03-01

    Spray-dried microcapsules from double (DM) and multilayered (MM) fish oil emulsions were produced to evaluate the effect of type of emulsion on the fatty acid composition during the microencapsulation process and after one month of storage at refrigeration (4°C) and room (20°C) temperature. Encapsulation efficiency, loading and loading efficiency were significantly higher in MM than in DM. C20:5 n-3 (EPA) and C22:6 n-3 (DHA) showed higher proportions in MM than in DM. Some differences in microstructural features were detected, with DM showing cracks and pores. The influence of the storage was significant, decreasing the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in both MM and DM, above all at 20°C. This decrease was more notable in DM. Multilayered emulsions are more suitable to encapsulate fish oil in terms of quantity of encapsulated oil, microstructure of the microcapsules and protection of fatty acids, especially EPA and DHA, during storage. PMID:26471582

  12. High pressure inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores in model emulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Juliane; Lenz, Christian A.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type E is a cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore-forming organism, primarily associated with aquatic environments. High pressure thermal (HPT) processing presents a promising tool to enhance food safety and stability. The effect of fat on HPT inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores was investigated using an emulsion model system. The distribution of spores in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions and their HPT (300-750 MPa, 45-75 °C, 10 min) inactivation was determined as a function of emulsion fat content (30-70% (v/v) soybean oil in buffer). Approximately 26% and 74% of the spores were located at the oil-buffer interface and the continuous phase, respectively. Spore inactivation in emulsion systems decreased with increasing oil contents, which suggests that the fat content of food plays an important role in the protection of C. botulinum type E endospores against HPT treatments. These results can be helpful for future safety considerations. This paper was presented at the 8th International Conference on High Pressure Bioscience & Biotechnology (HPBB 2014), in Nantes (France), 15-18 July 2014.

  13. The effect of different levels of sunflower head pith addition on the properties of model system emulsions prepared from fresh and frozen beef.

    PubMed

    Sariçoban, Cemalettin; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin; Karakaya, Mustafa; Tiske, Sümeyra Sultan

    2010-01-01

    The effect of sunflower head pith on the functional properties of emulsions was studied by using a model system. Oil/water (O/W) model emulsion systems were prepared from fresh and frozen beef by the addition of the pith at five concentrations. Emulsion capacity (EC), stability (ES), viscosity (EV), colour and flow properties of the prepared model system emulsions were analyzed. The pith addition increased the EC and ES and the highest EC and ES values were reached when 5% of pith added; however, further increase in the pith concentration caused an inverse trend in these values. Fresh beef emulsions had higher EC and ES values than did frozen beef emulsions. One percent pith concentration was the critic level for the EV values of fresh beef emulsions. EV values of the emulsions reached a maximum level at 5% pith level, followed by a decrease at 7% pit level.

  14. Whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized emulsions: Effect of polymer type and pH on release and topical delivery of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Combrinck, Johann; Otto, Anja; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2014-06-01

    Emulsions are widely used as topical formulations in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. They are thermodynamically unstable and require emulsifiers for stabilization. Studies have indicated that emulsifiers could affect topical delivery of actives, and this study was therefore designed to investigate the effects of different polymers, applied as emulsifiers, as well as the effects of pH on the release and topical delivery of the active. O/w emulsions were prepared by the layer-by-layer technique, with whey protein forming the first layer around the oil droplets, while either chitosan or carrageenan was subsequently adsorbed to the protein at the interface. Additionally, the emulsions were prepared at three different pH values to introduce different charges to the polymers. The active ingredient, salicylic acid, was incorporated into the oil phase of the emulsions. Physical characterization of the resulting formulations, i.e., droplet size, zeta potential, stability, and turbidity in the water phase, was performed. Release studies were conducted, after which skin absorption studies were performed on the five most stable emulsions, by using Franz type diffusion cells and utilizing human, abdominal skin membranes. It was found that an increase in emulsion droplet charge could negatively affect the release of salicylic acid from these formulations. Contrary, positively charged emulsion droplets were found to enhance dermal and transdermal delivery of salicylic acid from emulsions. It was hypothesized that electrostatic complex formation between the emulsifier and salicylic acid could affect its release, whereas electrostatic interaction between the emulsion droplets and skin could influence dermal/transdermal delivery of the active.

  15. A comparative study of the physicochemical properties of a virgin coconut oil emulsion and commercial food supplement emulsions.

    PubMed

    Khor, Yih Phing; Koh, Soo Peng; Long, Kamariah; Long, Shariah; Ahmad, Sharifah Zarah Syed; Tan, Chin Ping

    2014-07-01

    Food manufacturers are interested in developing emulsion-based products into nutritional foods by using beneficial oils, such as fish oil and virgin coconut oil (VCO). In this study, the physicochemical properties of a VCO oil-in-water emulsion was investigated and compared to other commercial oil-in-water emulsion products (C1, C2, C3, and C4). C3 exhibited the smallest droplet size of 3.25 µm. The pH for the emulsion samples ranged from 2.52 to 4.38 and thus were categorised as acidic. In a texture analysis, C2 was described as the most firm, very adhesive and cohesive, as well as having high compressibility properties. From a rheological viewpoint, all the emulsion samples exhibited non-Newtonian behaviour, which manifested as a shear-thinning property. The G'G'' crossover illustrated by the VCO emulsion in the amplitude sweep graph but not the other commercial samples illustrated that the VCO emulsion had a better mouthfeel. In this context, the VCO emulsion yielded the highest zeta potential (64.86 mV), which was attributed to its strong repulsive forces, leading to a good dispersion system. C2 comprised the highest percentage of fat among all emulsion samples, followed by the VCO emulsion, with 18.44% and 6.59%, respectively.

  16. Effect of emulsifiers and their liquid crystalline structures in emulsions on dermal and transdermal delivery of hydroquinone, salicylic acid and octadecenedioic acid.

    PubMed

    Otto, A; Wiechers, J W; Kelly, C L; Dederen, J C; Hadgraft, J; du Plessis, J

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of emulsifiers and their liquid crystalline structures on the dermal and transdermal delivery of hydroquinone (HQ), salicylic acid (SA) and octadecenedioic acid (DIOIC). Emulsions containing liquid crystalline phases were compared with an emulsion without liquid crystals. Skin permeation experiments were performed using Franz-type diffusion cells and human abdominal skin dermatomed to a thickness of 400 mum. The results indicate that emulsifiers arranging in liquid crystalline structures in the water phase of the emulsion enhanced the skin penetration of the active ingredients with the exception of SA. SA showed a different pattern of percutaneous absorption, and no difference in dermal and transdermal delivery was observed between the emulsions with and without liquid crystalline phases. The increase in skin penetration of HQ and DIOIC could be attributed to an increased partitioning of the actives into the skin. It was hypothesized that the interaction between the different emulsifiers and active ingredients in the formulations varied and, therefore, the solubilization capacities of the various emulsifiers and their association structures.

  17. Stabilization of emulsion and butter like products containing essential fatty acids using kalonji seeds extract and curcuminoids.

    PubMed

    Rege, Sameera A; Momin, Shamim A; Bhowmick, Dipti N; Pratap, Amit A

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the tendency of essential fatty acids (EFAs) to undergo autoxidation, their storage becomes a key problem. Generally, they are stabilized by synthetic antioxidants like TBHQ that are toxic in nature. Recently many studies were reported where these EFAs are stabilized by natural antioxidants. In the present study, curcuminoids and kalonji seeds ethanol extract (KEE) were used to stabilize these EFAs in refined sunflower oil (RSFO), water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion and butter like products (BLPs). In RSFO, though curcuminoids alone exerted pro-oxidant effect, KEE and curcuminoids showed synergistic antioxidant activity that was comparable to TBHQ. KEE exhibited good antioxidant activity in emulsions and BLPs, providing fine physical properties like slipping point, dropping point and spreadability. EFAs increased the nutritional value of BLPs and antioxidants added for their stabilization provided their medicinal benefits. PMID:22188801

  18. A new generation scanning system for the high-speed analysis of nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Buonaura, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Galati, G.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2016-06-01

    The development of automatic scanning systems was a fundamental issue for large scale neutrino detectors exploiting nuclear emulsions as particle trackers. Such systems speed up significantly the event analysis in emulsion, allowing the feasibility of experiments with unprecedented statistics. In the early 1990s, R&D programs were carried out by Japanese and European laboratories leading to automatic scanning systems more and more efficient. The recent progress in the technology of digital signal processing and of image acquisition allows the fulfillment of new systems with higher performances. In this paper we report the description and the performance of a new generation scanning system able to operate at the record speed of 84 cm2/hour and based on the Large Angle Scanning System for OPERA (LASSO) software infrastructure developed by the Naples scanning group. Such improvement, reduces the scanning time by a factor 4 with respect to the available systems, allowing the readout of huge amount of nuclear emulsions in reasonable time. This opens new perspectives for the employment of such detectors in a wider variety of applications.

  19. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, was used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improve the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study were: (1) Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems. (2) Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system. (3) Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit. (4) Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system. and (5) Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts (not completed due to lack of funds)

  20. Impact of a Glycolic Acid-Containing pH 4 Water-in-Oil Emulsion on Skin pH.

    PubMed

    Behm, Barbara; Kemper, Michael; Babilas, Philipp; Abels, Christoph; Schreml, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The skin pH is crucial for physiological skin functions. A decline in stratum corneum acidity, as observed in aged or diseased skin, may negatively affect physiological skin functions. Therefore, glycolic acid-containing water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions adjusted to pH 4 were investigated regarding their effect on normal or increased skin pH. A pH 4 W/O emulsion was applied on three areas with pathologically increased skin surface pH in diabetics (n = 10). Further, a 28-day half-side trial (n = 30) was performed to test the long-term efficacy and safety of a pH 4 W/O emulsion (n = 30). In summary, the application of a pH 4 W/O emulsion reduced the skin pH in healthy, elderly and diabetic subjects, which may improve epidermal barrier functions.

  1. Further progress for a fast scanning of nuclear emulsions with Large Angle Scanning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2014-02-01

    The LASSO (Large Angle Scanning System for OPERA) is a scanning system designed in the framework of the OPERA experiment as a result of several R&Ds aimed to improve the performance of the European Scanning System (ESS) by increasing the scanning speed, the angular acceptance and the efficiency in microtrack reconstruction. The novel Continuous Motion (CM) scanning approach allows to double the ESS nominal speed without any changes in the hardware set-up. The LASSO modular design makes the system easily adaptable to new hardware. The novel microtrack reconstruction algorithm has been developed to be efficient in both standard Stop&Go (SG) and CM modes, performing a number of corrections during the processing like corrections for vibrations, optical distortions, field of view curvature. As an intermediate step it reconstructs silver grains positions inside emulsion layer to make a transition from 2D images to real 3D traces of a charged particle. This allows the algorithm to have no internal limits on the slope of microtracks being equally efficient on all angles. The LASSO has been used for about one year for mass production scanning of emulsion films of OPERA, Muon Radiography and also of films employed to study nuclear fragmentation of ion beams used in medical physics. More than 50000 cm2 of the emulsion surface have been analyzed during this period.

  2. Optimization for Reduced-Fat / Low-NaCl Meat Emulsion Systems with Sea Mustard (Undaria pinnatifida) and Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cheon-Jei; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The effects of reducing fat levels from 30% to 20% and salt concentrations from 1.5% to 1.0% by partially substituting incorporated phosphate and sea mustard were investigated based on physicochemical properties of reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion systems. Cooking loss and emulsion stability, hardness, springiness, and cohesiveness for reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion systems with 20% pork back fat and 1.2% sodium chloride samples with incorporation of phosphate and sea mustard were similar to the control with 30% pork back fat and 1.5% sodium chloride. Results showed that reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion system samples containing phosphate and sea mustard had higher apparent viscosity. The results of this study show that the incorporation of phosphate and sea mustard in the formulation will successfully reduce fat and salt in the final meat products. PMID:26761874

  3. Analysis of the antimicrobial activity of propolis and lysozyme in semisolid emulsion systems.

    PubMed

    Ramanauskiene, Kristina; Inkeniene, Asta Marija; Savickas, Arūnas; Masteikova, Rūta; Brusokas, Valdemaras

    2009-01-01

    Propolis as an active natural substance is attractive due to its antimicrobial and antimycotic properties. Lysozyme was added to semisolid dermatological preparations as a complementary substance capable of potentiating their antimicrobial and antimycotic effect; this substance has been used for several decades as a preservative in food industry. The aim of this study was to model a semisolid emulsion system (o/w) for cutaneous use with moisturizing and antimicrobial properties, where the active substances would be propolis and/or lysozyme. The microbiological examination was performed under aseptic conditions. The microbiological examination was aimed at determining the antimicrobial efficacy of the studied preparation in the solid growth media using the wells technique. The results of the antimicrobial assay showed that the effectiveness of propolis against the growth of S. aureus was intensified by the lysozyme introduced into the emulsion systems. In addition to that, the results of examinations showed that the active substance propolis in emulsion systems more efficiently inhibited spore bacteria (Bacillus cereus) than lysozyme did, yet lysozyme had a more pronounced antimycotic (against Candida albicans) effect, compared to propolis. All studied cream samples inhibited the growth of Gram-negative microorganisms (Escherichia coli). The results of this study suggest that the application of propolis and lysozyme as the active substances may increase the antimycotic and antibacterial effect of the studied preparations.

  4. Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and 4-Vinylcatechol on the Stabilities of Oil-in-Water Emulsions of Stripped Soybean Oil.

    PubMed

    Jia, Cai-Hua; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, Ki-Teak

    2015-12-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and 4-vinylcatechol (4-VC) were prepared for studying their antioxidative activities in emulsion. Oil-in-water emulsions of stripped soybean oil containing 200 ppm of CAPE, 4-VC, or α-tocopherol were stored at 40 °C in the dark for 50 days, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) was used to identify and quantify the oxidation products. Emulsion droplet sizes, peroxide values, and levels of primary oxidation products (i.e., hydroperoxides) and secondary oxidation products (i.e., aldehydes) were determined. The results showed that CAPE (200 ppm) and 4-VC (200 ppm) had significantly greater antioxidant activities on the oxidation of stripped soybean oil-in-water emulsions than α-tocopherol (200 ppm). The peroxide values of CAPE (8.4 mequiv/L emulsion) and 4-VC (15.0 mequiv/L emulsion) were significantly lower than that of α-tocopherol (33.4 mequiv/L emulsion) (p < 0.05) on 36 days. In addition, the combinations of CAPE + α-tocopherol (100 + 100 ppm) or 4-VC + α-tocopherol (100 + 100 ppm) had better antioxidant activities than α-tocopherol (200 ppm). For CAPE + α-tocopherol, 4-VC + α-tocopherol, and α-tocopherol, the amounts of conjugated diene forms were 16.67, 13.72, and 16.32 mmol/L emulsion, and the concentrations of aldehydes were 2.15, 1.13, and 4.26 mmol/L emulsion, respectively, after 50 days of storage. PMID:26492097

  5. Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and 4-Vinylcatechol on the Stabilities of Oil-in-Water Emulsions of Stripped Soybean Oil.

    PubMed

    Jia, Cai-Hua; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, Ki-Teak

    2015-12-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and 4-vinylcatechol (4-VC) were prepared for studying their antioxidative activities in emulsion. Oil-in-water emulsions of stripped soybean oil containing 200 ppm of CAPE, 4-VC, or α-tocopherol were stored at 40 °C in the dark for 50 days, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) was used to identify and quantify the oxidation products. Emulsion droplet sizes, peroxide values, and levels of primary oxidation products (i.e., hydroperoxides) and secondary oxidation products (i.e., aldehydes) were determined. The results showed that CAPE (200 ppm) and 4-VC (200 ppm) had significantly greater antioxidant activities on the oxidation of stripped soybean oil-in-water emulsions than α-tocopherol (200 ppm). The peroxide values of CAPE (8.4 mequiv/L emulsion) and 4-VC (15.0 mequiv/L emulsion) were significantly lower than that of α-tocopherol (33.4 mequiv/L emulsion) (p < 0.05) on 36 days. In addition, the combinations of CAPE + α-tocopherol (100 + 100 ppm) or 4-VC + α-tocopherol (100 + 100 ppm) had better antioxidant activities than α-tocopherol (200 ppm). For CAPE + α-tocopherol, 4-VC + α-tocopherol, and α-tocopherol, the amounts of conjugated diene forms were 16.67, 13.72, and 16.32 mmol/L emulsion, and the concentrations of aldehydes were 2.15, 1.13, and 4.26 mmol/L emulsion, respectively, after 50 days of storage.

  6. Developing an emulsion model system containing canthaxanthin biosynthesized by Dietzia natronolimnaea HS-1.

    PubMed

    Gharibzahedi, Seyed Mohammad Taghi; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-11-01

    An acceptable strategy to incorporate canthaxanthin (CX) as a natural colorant into products is by means of oil-in-water emulsions. The used CX in this study was produced by bacterium Dietzia natronolimnaea HS-1 using a batch bioreactor system. A central composite rotatable design-response surface methodology (CCRD-RSM) consisting of three-factored factorial design with five levels was applied for analysis of the results to obtain the optimal formulation of emulsions. Three independent variables including fenugreek gum (FG, 0.2-0.5%, w/w), coconut oil (CO, 6-10%, w/w), and CO/CX ratio (10:1-50:1) were transformed to coded values and second-order polynomial models was developed to predict the responses (p<0.0001). The studied independent variables were the stability, viscosity and droplet size properties such as volume-weighted mean diameter (D₄₃), specific surface area (S(v)) and polydispersity index (PDI) of emulsions. The 3-D response surface plot derived from the mathematical models was used to determine the optimal conditions. Main emulsion components under the optimum conditions ascertained presently by RSM: 50:1 CO/CX ratio, 0.49% (w/w) FG content and 6.28% (w/w) CO concentration. At this optimum point, stability, viscosity, D₄₃, S(v) and PDI were 90.6%, 0.0118 Pas, 0.595 μm, 12.03 m²/ml and 1.380, respectively.

  7. Systemically administered gp100 encoding DNA vaccine for melanoma using water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kalariya, Mayurkumar; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2013-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to develop a water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsions-based vaccine delivery system for plasmid DNA encoding the gp100 peptide antigen for melanoma immunotherapy. The gp100 encoding plasmid DNA was encapsulated in the inner-most aqueous phase of squalane oil containing W/O/W multiple emulsions using a two-step emulsification method. In vitro transfection ability of the encapsulated plasmid DNA was investigated in murine dendritic cells by transgene expression analysis using fluorescence microscopy and ELISA methods. Prophylactic immunization using the W/O/W multiple emulsions encapsulated the gp100 encoding plasmid DNA vaccine significantly reduced tumor volume in C57BL/6 mice during subsequent B16-F10 tumor challenge. In addition, serum Th1 cytokine levels and immuno-histochemistry of excised tumor tissues indicated activation of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes mediated anti-tumor immunity causing tumor growth suppression. The W/O/W multiple emulsions-based vaccine delivery system efficiently delivers the gp100 plasmid DNA to induce cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity.

  8. Influences of fatty acid moiety and esterification of polyglycerol fatty acid esters on the crystallization of palm mid fraction in oil-in-water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mitsuhiro; Ohba, Azusa; Kuriyama, Juhei; Maruo, Kouichi; Ueno, Satoru; Sato, Kiyotaka

    2004-08-15

    We examined the crystallization of palm mid fraction (PMF) in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion, after adding polyglycerol fatty acid esters (PGFEs). We employed ultrasonic velocity measurements and DSC techniques, with special emphases on the influences of fatty acid moiety and esterification of PGFE. Twelve types of PGFEs were examined as additives. PGFEs have a large hydrophilic moiety composed of 10 glycerol molecules to which palmitic, stearic and behenic acids were esterified as the fatty acid moiety with different degrees of esterification. Crystallization temperature (T(c)) of PMF remarkably increased with increasing concentrations of the PGFEs as the chain length of the fatty acid moiety increased, and the PGFE became more hydrophobic in accordance with increasing degree of esterification. We observed that the heterogeneous nucleation of PMF in the O/W emulsion was activated at the oil-water interface, where the template effect of very hydrophobic long saturated fatty acid chains of the PGFE might play the main role of heterogeneous nucleation.

  9. Phase behavior, formation, and rheology of cubic phase and related gel emulsion in Tween 80/water/oil systems.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Mydul; Ushiyama, Kousuke; Aramaki, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the phase behavior, formation, and rheology of the cubic phase (I(1)) and related O/I(1) gel emulsion in water/Tween 80/oil systems using squalane, liquid paraffin (LP), and decane as oil components. In the phase behavior study, the phase sequences were similar for squalane and LP systems, while a lamellar liquid crystal (L(alpha)) was observed for decane system. In all the systems the addition of oil to W(m) or H(1) phase induced the I(1) phase, which can solubilize some amounts of oil followed by the appearance of I(1)+O phase. The formation of the O/I(1) gel emulsion has been studied at a fixed w/s (50/50) and we found that 30 wt% decane, 70 wt% squalane, and 60 wt% LP can form the gel emulsion. The water/Tween 80/squalane system has been taken as a model system to study viscoelastic properties of the I(1) phase and O/I(1) gel emulsion. The I(1) phase shows a typical hard gel cubic structure under the frequency and the values of the complex viscosity, /eta*/ and the elastic modulus, G ' increase with the addition of squalane, which could be due to the neighboring micellar interaction. On the other hand, the decreasing values of the viscoelastic parameters in the O/I(1) gel emulsion simply relate to the volume fraction of the I(1) phase in the system.

  10. Mixed O/W emulsions stabilized by solid particles: a model system for controlled mass transfer triggered by surfactant addition.

    PubMed

    Drelich, Audrey; Grossiord, Jean-Louis; Gomez, François; Clausse, Danièle; Pezron, Isabelle

    2012-11-15

    This article deals with a model mixed oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion system developed to study the effect of surfactants on mass transfer between dispersed oil droplets of different composition. In this purpose, our goal was to formulate O/W emulsions without any surface active agents as stabilizer, which was achieved by replacing surfactants by a mixture of hydrophilic/hydrophobic silica particles. Then, to study the specific role of surfactants in the oil transfer process, different types and concentrations of surfactants were added to the mixed emulsion after its preparation. In such a way, the same original emulsion can be used for all experiments and the influence of various surface active molecules on the oil transfer mechanism can be directly studied. The model mixed emulsion used consists of a mixture of hexadecane-in-water and tetradecane-in-water emulsions. The transfer between tetradecane and hexadecane droplets was monitored by using differential scanning calorimetry, which allows the detection of freezing and melting signals characteristic of the composition of the dispersed oil droplets. The results obtained showed that it is possible to trigger the transfer of tetradecane towards hexadecane droplets by adding surfactants at concentrations above their critical micellar concentration, measured in presence of solid particles, through micellar transport mechanism. PMID:22909967

  11. Hyaluronic acid as an internal phase additive to obtain ofloxacin/PLGA microsphere by double emulsion method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Chen, Long; Li, Hong; Wang, Ying-jun

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) was used as an internal phase additive to improve the loading efficiency of ofloxacin, a hydrophilic drug encapsulated by hydrophobic polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) materials, through a double emulsion (water-in-oil-in-water) solvent extraction/evaporation method. Results from laser distribution analysis show that polyelectrolyte additives have low impact on the average particle size and distribution of the microspheres. The negatively charged HA increases the drug loading efficiency as well as the amount of HA in microspheres. Burst release can be observed in the groups with the polyelectrolyte additives. The release rate decreases with the amount of HA inside the microspheres in all negatively charged polyelectrolyte-added microsphere groups.

  12. Enhancing vitamin E bioaccessibility: factors impacting solubilization and hydrolysis of α-tocopherol acetate encapsulated in emulsion-based delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Decker, Eric Andrew; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    2015-01-01

    Oil-soluble vitamins are often encapsulated within emulsion-based delivery systems to facilitate their incorporation into aqueous-based products. We have examined the influence of carrier oil type and simulated small intestinal fluid (SSIF) composition on the bioaccessibility of emulsified vitamin E using a gastrointestinal model. Oil-in-water emulsions containing vitamin E acetate were prepared using bile salts as emulsifier, and either long chain triacylglycerols (glyceryl trioleate, LCT) or medium chain triacylglycerols (glyceryl trioctanoate, MCT) as carrier oils. The addition of calcium (CaCl₂) to the SSIF increased the extent of lipid digestion in LCT-emulsions, but had little impact in MCT-emulsions. The bioaccessibility of vitamin E increased in the presence of calcium and phospholipids (DOPC) in LCT-emulsions, but decreased in MCT-emulsions. The highest bioaccessibility (≈66%) was achieved for LCT-emulsions when the SSIF contained both calcium and phospholipids. The conversion of α-tocopherol acetate to α-tocopherol after in vitro digestion was considerably higher for LCT-emulsions when calcium ions were present in the SSIF, but was not strongly affected by SSIF composition for MCT-emulsions. In general, this research provides important information about the factors influencing the bioaccessibility of emulsified vitamin E, which could be used to design more effective emulsion-based delivery systems for increasing the oral bioavailability of this important bioactive component.

  13. Enhanced mucosal and systemic immune response with squalane oil-containing multiple emulsions upon intranasal and oral administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Shahiwala, Aliasgar; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate squalane oil-containing water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsion for mucosal administration of ovalbumin (OVA) as a model candidate vaccine in BALB/c mice. Control and optimized OVA-containing W/O/W emulsion (OVA-Emul) and chitosan-modified W/O/W emulsion (OVA-Emul-Chi) formulations were administered intranasally and orally at an OVA dose of 100 mug. The mucosal and systemic immune responses were evaluated after the first and second immunization. The OVA-Emul formulations resulted in higher immunoglobulin-G (IgG) and immunoglobulin-A (IgA) responses as compared with aqueous solution. In addition, significant IgG and IgA responses were observed after the second immunization dose using the emulsions with both routes of administration. Intranasal vaccination was more effective in generating the systemic OVA-specific IgG response than the mucosal OVA-specific IgA response. Oral immunizations, on the other hand, showed a much higher systemic IgG and mucosal IgA responses as compared with the nasally treated groups. The results of this study show that squalane oil-containing W/O/W multiple emulsion formulations can significantly enhance the local and systemic immune responses, especially after oral administration, and may be adopted as a better alternative in mucosal delivery of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines.

  14. Design Space Approach for Preservative System Optimization of an Anti-Aging Eye Fluid Emulsion.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Felipe Rebello; Francisco, Fabiane Lacerda; Ferreira, Márcia Regina Spuri; Andreoli, Terezinha De Jesus; Löbenberg, Raimar; Bou-Chacra, Nádia

    2015-01-01

    The use of preservatives must be optimized in order to ensure the efficacy of an antimicrobial system as well as the product safety. Despite the wide variety of preservatives, the synergistic or antagonistic effects of their combinations are not well established and it is still an issue in the development of pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. The purpose of this paper was to establish a space design using a simplex-centroid approach to achieve the lowest effective concentration of 3 preservatives (methylparaben, propylparaben, and imidazolidinyl urea) and EDTA for an emulsion cosmetic product. Twenty-two formulae of emulsion differing only by imidazolidinyl urea (A: 0.00 to 0.30% w/w), methylparaben (B: 0.00 to 0.20% w/w), propylparaben (C: 0.00 to 0.10% w/w) and EDTA (D: 0.00 to 0.10% w/w) concentrations were prepared. They were tested alone and in binary, ternary and quaternary combinations. Aliquots of these formulae were inoculated with several microorganisms. An electrochemical method was used to determine microbial burden immediately after inoculation and after 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 168 h. An optimization strategy was used to obtain the concentrations of preservatives and EDTA resulting in a most effective preservative system of all microorganisms simultaneously. The use of preservatives and EDTA in combination has the advantage of exhibiting a potential synergistic effect against a wider spectrum of microorganisms. Based on graphic and optimization strategies, we proposed a new formula containing a quaternary combination (A: 55%; B: 30%; C: 5% and D: 10% w/w), which complies with the specification of a conventional challenge test. A design space approach was successfully employed in the optimization of concentrations of preservatives and EDTA in an emulsion cosmetic product. PMID:26517141

  15. Design Space Approach for Preservative System Optimization of an Anti-Aging Eye Fluid Emulsion.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Felipe Rebello; Francisco, Fabiane Lacerda; Ferreira, Márcia Regina Spuri; Andreoli, Terezinha De Jesus; Löbenberg, Raimar; Bou-Chacra, Nádia

    2015-01-01

    The use of preservatives must be optimized in order to ensure the efficacy of an antimicrobial system as well as the product safety. Despite the wide variety of preservatives, the synergistic or antagonistic effects of their combinations are not well established and it is still an issue in the development of pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. The purpose of this paper was to establish a space design using a simplex-centroid approach to achieve the lowest effective concentration of 3 preservatives (methylparaben, propylparaben, and imidazolidinyl urea) and EDTA for an emulsion cosmetic product. Twenty-two formulae of emulsion differing only by imidazolidinyl urea (A: 0.00 to 0.30% w/w), methylparaben (B: 0.00 to 0.20% w/w), propylparaben (C: 0.00 to 0.10% w/w) and EDTA (D: 0.00 to 0.10% w/w) concentrations were prepared. They were tested alone and in binary, ternary and quaternary combinations. Aliquots of these formulae were inoculated with several microorganisms. An electrochemical method was used to determine microbial burden immediately after inoculation and after 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 168 h. An optimization strategy was used to obtain the concentrations of preservatives and EDTA resulting in a most effective preservative system of all microorganisms simultaneously. The use of preservatives and EDTA in combination has the advantage of exhibiting a potential synergistic effect against a wider spectrum of microorganisms. Based on graphic and optimization strategies, we proposed a new formula containing a quaternary combination (A: 55%; B: 30%; C: 5% and D: 10% w/w), which complies with the specification of a conventional challenge test. A design space approach was successfully employed in the optimization of concentrations of preservatives and EDTA in an emulsion cosmetic product.

  16. Mineralization and drug release of hydroxyapatite/poly(l-lactic acid) nanocomposite scaffolds prepared by Pickering emulsion templating.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Zou, Shengwen; Chen, Weike; Tong, Zhen; Wang, Chaoyang

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable and bioactive nanocomposite (NC) biomaterials with controlled microstructures and able to deliver special drugs have gained increasing attention in bone tissue engineering. In this study, the hydroxyapatite (HAp)/poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) NC scaffolds were facilely prepared using solvent evaporation from templating Pickering emulsions stabilized with PLLA-modified HAp (g-HAp) nanoparticles. Then, in vitro mineralization experiments were performed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) to evaluate the bioactivity of the NC scaffolds. Moreover, in vitro drug release of the NC scaffolds using anti-inflammatory drug (ibuprofen, IBU) as the model drug was also investigated. The results showed that the NC scaffolds possessed interconnected pore structures, which could be modulated by varying the g-HAp nanoparticle concentration. The NC scaffolds exhibited excellent bioactivity, since they induced the formation of calcium-sufficient, carbonated apatite nanoparticles on the scaffolds after mineralization in SBF for 3 days. The IBU loaded in the NC scaffolds showed a sustained release profile, and the release kinetic followed the Higuchi model with diffusion process. Thus, solvent evaporation based on Pickering emulsion droplets is a simple and effective method to prepare biodegradable and bioactive porous NC scaffolds for bone repair and replacement applications.

  17. Cationic bituminous emulsions and emulsion aggregate slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, P.

    1986-07-01

    A cationic bituminous emulsion is described which consists of from about 30% to about 80% by weight of bitumen, from about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of an emulsifier selected from the group consisting of reaction products of a polyamine reacted with a member of the group consisting of epoxidized unsaturated fatty acids of chain lengths between C/sub 8/ and C/sub 22/ and the esters thereof and adding water to make up 100% by weight, the emulsion having a pH in the range of from 2-7.

  18. Development of Nutraceutical Emulsions as Risperidone Delivery Systems: Characterization and Toxicological Studies.

    PubMed

    Igartúa, Daniela Edith; Calienni, María Natalia; Feas, Daniela Agustina; Chiaramoni, Nadia Silvia; Valle Alonso, Silvia Del; Prieto, María Jimena

    2015-12-01

    Emulsions are gaining increasing interest to be applied as drug delivery systems. The main goal of this work was the formulation of an oil/water nutraceutical emulsion (NE) for oral administration, enriched in omega 3 (ω3) and omega 6 (ω6), and able to encapsulate risperidone (RISP), an antipsychotic drug widely used in the treatment of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). RISP has low solubility in aqueous medium and poor bioavailability because of its metabolism and high protein binding. Coadministration of ω3, ω3, and vitamin E complexed with RISP might increase its bioavailability and induce a synergistic effect on the treatment of ASD. Here, we developed an easy and quick method to obtain NEs and then optimized them. The best formulation was chosen after characterization by particle size, defects of the oil-in-water interface, zeta potential (ZP), and in vitro drug release. The formulation selected was stable over time, with a particle size of around 3 μm, a ZP lower than -20 mV and controlled drug release. To better understand the biochemical properties of the formulation obtained, we studied in vitro toxicity in the Caco-2 cell line. After 4 h of treatment, an increase in cellular metabolism was observed for all RISP concentrations, but emulsions did not change their metabolic rate, except at the highest concentration without drug (25 μg/mL), which showed a significant reduction in metabolism respect to the control. Additionally, locomotor activity and heart rate in zebrafish were measured as parameters of in vivo toxicity. Only the highest concentration (0.625 μg/mL) showed a cardiotoxic effect, which corresponds to the decrease in spontaneous movement observed previously. As all the materials contained in the formulations were US FDA approved, the NE selected would be good candidate for clinical trials.

  19. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R&D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  20. Data on the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, Aldana L; Gliemmo, María F; Campos, Carmen A

    2016-12-01

    This article contains experimental data and images for the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions. Mentioned data are related to the research article "Effect of stabilizers, oil level and structure on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces bailii and on physical stability of model systems simulating acid sauces" (A.L. Zalazar, M.F. Gliemmo, C.A. Campos, 2016) [1]. Physical characterization of emulsions was performed through the evaluation of Span and Specific Surface Area (SSA) determined by light scattering using a Mastersizer. Furthermore, microscopy images were recorded by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The latter are presented to collaborate in the analysis of emulsion microstructure.

  1. Data on the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, Aldana L; Gliemmo, María F; Campos, Carmen A

    2016-12-01

    This article contains experimental data and images for the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions. Mentioned data are related to the research article "Effect of stabilizers, oil level and structure on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces bailii and on physical stability of model systems simulating acid sauces" (A.L. Zalazar, M.F. Gliemmo, C.A. Campos, 2016) [1]. Physical characterization of emulsions was performed through the evaluation of Span and Specific Surface Area (SSA) determined by light scattering using a Mastersizer. Furthermore, microscopy images were recorded by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The latter are presented to collaborate in the analysis of emulsion microstructure. PMID:27631021

  2. Fabrication of Silica Nanospheres Coated Membranes: towards the Effective Separation of Oil-in-Water Emulsion in Extremely Acidic and Concentrated Salty Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuning; Liu, Na; Cao, Yingze; Lin, Xin; Xu, Liangxin; Zhang, Weifeng; Wei, Yen; Feng, Lin

    2016-09-01

    A superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic surface is fabricated by simply coating silica nanospheres onto a glass fiber membrane through a sol-gel process. Such membrane has a complex framework with micro and nano structures covering and presents a high efficiency (more than 98%) of oil-in-water emulsion separation under harsh environments including strong acidic and concentrated salty conditions. This membrane also possesses outstanding stability since no obvious decline in efficiency is observed after different kinds of oil-in-water emulsions separation, which provides it candidate for comprehensive applicability.

  3. Fabrication of Silica Nanospheres Coated Membranes: towards the Effective Separation of Oil-in-Water Emulsion in Extremely Acidic and Concentrated Salty Environments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuning; Liu, Na; Cao, Yingze; Lin, Xin; Xu, Liangxin; Zhang, Weifeng; Wei, Yen; Feng, Lin

    2016-01-01

    A superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic surface is fabricated by simply coating silica nanospheres onto a glass fiber membrane through a sol-gel process. Such membrane has a complex framework with micro and nano structures covering and presents a high efficiency (more than 98%) of oil-in-water emulsion separation under harsh environments including strong acidic and concentrated salty conditions. This membrane also possesses outstanding stability since no obvious decline in efficiency is observed after different kinds of oil-in-water emulsions separation, which provides it candidate for comprehensive applicability. PMID:27597570

  4. Fabrication of Silica Nanospheres Coated Membranes: towards the Effective Separation of Oil-in-Water Emulsion in Extremely Acidic and Concentrated Salty Environments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuning; Liu, Na; Cao, Yingze; Lin, Xin; Xu, Liangxin; Zhang, Weifeng; Wei, Yen; Feng, Lin

    2016-01-01

    A superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic surface is fabricated by simply coating silica nanospheres onto a glass fiber membrane through a sol-gel process. Such membrane has a complex framework with micro and nano structures covering and presents a high efficiency (more than 98%) of oil-in-water emulsion separation under harsh environments including strong acidic and concentrated salty conditions. This membrane also possesses outstanding stability since no obvious decline in efficiency is observed after different kinds of oil-in-water emulsions separation, which provides it candidate for comprehensive applicability. PMID:27597570

  5. Generating double emulsions W/O/W in a PDMS system by controlling locally the wetting properties of the channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willaime, Herve; Pannacci, Nicolas; Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Soares, Emilie-Marie; Benzaquen, Michael; Tabeling, Patrick

    2008-11-01

    In microfluidic systems, it has been shown that wetting properties of the wall of the microchannel are of crucial importance for the generation of emulsions [1]: to generate an emulsion in a fluid, the continuous phase must wet the walls of the channel better than the dispersed phase. In the particular case of alternate double emulsions (water in oil in water), it is necessary to pattern the wetting properties of the channel. In this paper, we present preliminary works on the control of wetting properties on PDMS microchannels for the generation of double emulsion. The method we have chosen is inspired by the works of Allbritton [2] and Kumacheva [3] by UV-grafting a hydrophilic polymer onto the surface inside the microchannel. Once the channels are grafted, it is possible to obtain alternate double emulsions. We will present the objects obtained with such microchannels and will focus on their structures and on their stabilities. [1]^ Dreyfus R., Tabeling P., Willaime H., Physical Review Letters, 2003, 90(14). [2] Hu S., Ren X., Bachman M., Sims C., Li G.P., Allbritton N. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 1865-1870 [3] Seo M., Paquet C., Nie Z., Xua S., Kumacheva E. Soft Matter, 2007, 3, 986--992

  6. Physical and oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with beta-lactoglobulin and pectin.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, Marly S; McClements, D J; Miglioranza, Lucia H S; Decker, Eric A

    2008-07-23

    The oxidation of fatty acids can be inhibited by engineering the surface of oil-in-water emulsion droplets to decrease interactions between aqueous phase prooxidants and lipids. The objective of this research was to evaluate whether emulsions stabilized by a multilayer emulsifier systems consisting of beta-lactoglobulin and citrus or sugar beet pectin could produce fish oil-in-water emulsions that had good physical and oxidative stability. Sugar beet pectin was compared to citrus pectin because the sugar beet pectin contains the known antioxidant, ferulic acid. A primary Menhaden oil-in-water emulsion was prepared with beta-lactoglobulin upon which the pectins were electrostatically deposited at pH 3.5. Emulsions prepared with 1% oil, 0.05% beta-lactoglobulin, and 0.06% pectins were physically stable for up to 16 days. As determined by monitoring lipid hydroperoxide and headspace propanal formation, emulsions prepared with the multilayer system of beta-lactoglobulin and citrus pectin were more stable than emulsions stabilized with beta-lactoglobulin alone. Emulsions prepared with the multilayer system of beta-lactoglobulin and sugar beet pectin were less stable than emulsions stabilized with beta-lactoglobulin alone despite the presence of ferulic acid in the sugar beet pectin. The lower oxidative stability of the emulsions with the sugar beet pectin could be due to its higher iron and copper concentrations which would produce oxidative stress that would overcome the antioxidant capacity of ferulic acid. These data suggest that the oxidative stability of oil-in-water emulsions containing omega-3 fatty acids could be improved by the use of multilayer emulsion systems containing pectins with low metal concentrations.

  7. Direct Observation of Formation Behavior of Metal Emulsion in Sn/Salt System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hironori; Liu, Jiang; Kim, Sun-Joong; Gao, Xu; Ueda, Shigeru; Maruoka, Nobuhiro; Ono, Shinpei; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2016-08-01

    Using two systems with different interfacial tensions, the behavior of metal emulsions during bottom blowing was observed directly with a high-speed camera. The interfacial tension between molten salt (KCl-LiCl-NaCl) and molten Sn was measured by a pendant drop method, and it decreased to about 100 mN/m when the Te content in Sn increased from 0 to 0.5 pct. In both systems, two types of metal emulsion behaviors were observed. In Mode A, fine metal droplets were formed after the metal film ruptured at the interface. In Mode B, the formation of coarse droplets was observed after the disintegration of the column generated by the rising bubble, and the number of droplets increased with the gas flow rate compared to that in Mode A. The generating frequency of each mode revealed that Mode B became dominant with increasing gas flow rate. In the pure Sn/salt system, the numbers of droplets of Mode B showed a local maximum at high gas flow rates, but the numbers of droplets in Sn-0.5 pctTe/salt increased continuously even in the same flow range. Regarding the size distribution, the percentage of coarse metal droplets in the Sn-0.5 pctTe alloy/salt was larger than that in the pure Sn/salt. Furthermore, the effect of interfacial tension on the variation in surface area and volume of the droplets showed a similar tendency for the column height. Therefore, a decrement of the interfacial tension led to an increment of the column height when Mode B occurred and finally resulted in a higher interfacial area.

  8. A modified emulsion gelation technique to improve buoyancy of hydrogel tablets for floating drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Yom-Tov, Ortal; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2015-10-01

    The use of buoyant or floating hydrogel tablets is of particular interest in the sustained release of drugs to the stomach. They have an ability to slow the release rates of drugs by prolonging their absorption window in the upper part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study we synthesized bioactive hydrogels that have sustainable release rates for drugs in the stomach based on a hydrogel preparation technique that employs emulsifying surfactants. The emulsion gelation technique, which encapsulates oil droplets within the hydrogels during crosslinking, was used to decrease their specific gravity in aqueous environments, resulting in floating drug release depots. Properties such as swelling, buoyancy, density and drug release were manipulated by changing the polymer concentrations, surfactant percentages and the oil:polymer ratios. The relationship between these properties and the hydrogel's floating lag time was documented. The potential for this material to be used as a floating drug delivery system was demonstrated.

  9. Vitamin A palmitate and α-lipoic acid stability in o/w emulsions for cosmetic application.

    PubMed

    Moyano, M A; Segall, A

    2011-01-01

    Skin becomes thin, dry, pale, and finely wrinkled with age. Retinoids are a large class of compounds that are important in modern therapy for dermatological treatment of wrinkled skin. Of the retinoids, retinol and vitamin A palmitate are thought to induce thickening of the epidermis and to be effective for treatment of skin diseases. Accordingly, α-lipoic acid or the reduced form, dihydrolipoate, are potent scavengers of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, and nitric oxide with anti-inflammatory properties (1). Cosmetic ingredient stability prediction relies on kinetic quantitative chemical analysis of active components at different temperatures. Vitamin A palmitate and α-lipoic acid, are known to be unstable to light or heat (2). The aims of this study were to evaluate the stability of α-lipoic acid and vitamin A palmitate in the presence of vitamin E (acetate) and other antioxidants in lipophilic/hydrophilic medium (O/W emulsions) at pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0. The formulations that were investigated contained 0.12% (w/w) vitamin A palmitate, 0.4% (w/w) vitamin E acetate, and 0.5 % α-lipoic acid (formulation A), supplemented with ascorbyl palmitate, magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, and vitamin C (formulation B) or with butylhydroxytoluene (BHT, formulation C) or ascorbyl palmitate (formulation D). The chemical analyses of α-lipoic acid and vitamin A palmitate were carried out by HPLC. Formulations C and D at pH 7.0 were selected as the most stable for these components. The purpose of this paper is the selection of the most stable formulations for their application in in vivo studies.

  10. Pickering emulsions with controllable stability.

    PubMed

    Melle, Sonia; Lask, Mauricio; Fuller, Gerald G

    2005-03-15

    We prepare solid-stabilized emulsions using paramagnetic particles at an oil/water interface that can undergo macroscopic phase separation upon application of an external magnetic field. A critical field strength is found for which emulsion droplets begin to translate into the continuous-phase fluid. At higher fields, the emulsions destabilize, leading to a fully phase-separated system. This effect is reversible, and long-term stability can be recovered by remixing the components with mechanical agitation. PMID:15752002

  11. Lutein-enriched emulsion-based delivery systems: Influence of pH and temperature on physical and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Gumus, Cansu Ekin; McClements, David Julian

    2016-04-01

    Lutein may be utilized in foods as a natural pigment or nutraceutical ingredient to improve eye health. Nevertheless, its use is limited by its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. We evaluated the effect of storage temperature and pH on the physical and chemical stability of lutein-enriched emulsions prepared using caseinate. The emulsions (initial droplet diameter=232 nm) remained physically stable at all incubation temperatures (5-70 °C); however the chemical degradation of lutein increased with increasing temperature (activation energy=38 kJ/mol). Solution pH had a major impact on the physical stability of the emulsions, causing droplet aggregation at pH 4 and 5. Conversely, the chemical stability of lutein was largely independent of the pH, with only a slight decrease in degradation at pH 8. This work provides important information for the rational design of emulsion-based delivery systems for a lipophilic natural dye and nutraceutical. PMID:26593560

  12. Lutein-enriched emulsion-based delivery systems: Influence of pH and temperature on physical and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Gumus, Cansu Ekin; McClements, David Julian

    2016-04-01

    Lutein may be utilized in foods as a natural pigment or nutraceutical ingredient to improve eye health. Nevertheless, its use is limited by its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. We evaluated the effect of storage temperature and pH on the physical and chemical stability of lutein-enriched emulsions prepared using caseinate. The emulsions (initial droplet diameter=232 nm) remained physically stable at all incubation temperatures (5-70 °C); however the chemical degradation of lutein increased with increasing temperature (activation energy=38 kJ/mol). Solution pH had a major impact on the physical stability of the emulsions, causing droplet aggregation at pH 4 and 5. Conversely, the chemical stability of lutein was largely independent of the pH, with only a slight decrease in degradation at pH 8. This work provides important information for the rational design of emulsion-based delivery systems for a lipophilic natural dye and nutraceutical.

  13. Lipid nano/submicron emulsions as vehicles for topical flurbiprofen delivery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jia-You; Leu, Yann-Lii; Chang, Chia-Chun; Lin, Chia-Hsuan; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2004-01-01

    The application of lipid nano/submicron emulsions as topical drug carrier systems for the percutaneous absorption of flurbiprofen was investigated. The lipid emulsions were made up of isopropyl myristate (IPM), soybean oil, or coconut oil as the oil phase, egg lecithin as the predominant emulsifier, and double-distilled water as the external phase. Stearylamine (SA) and deoxycholic acid (DA) also were used to produce positively and negatively charged emulsions. To evaluate the physicochemical properties of the lipid emulsions, particle size by laser light scattering, the image of atomic force microscopy, and relaxation time values by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) were determined. The in vitro permeation data showed that incorporation of SA significantly reduced the topical delivery of flurbiprofen. On the other hand, incorporation of DA exhibited no or a negligible effect on drug permeation. Enhancement of drug absorption was observed when adding oleic acid as part of the oil phase. The in vivo topical application of flurbiprofen from selected lipid emulsions showed a similar trend to the in vitro status. Furthermore, the intersubject variability was considerably reduced by lipid emulsions than by aqueous suspensions in both the in vitro and in vivo experiments. The irritant profiles of lipid emulsions showed that IPM elicited higher irritation than soybean oil. The incorporation of oleic acid also produced skin disruption. The results in the present study suggest the feasibility of lipid emulsions for the topical delivery of flurbiprofen.

  14. The effect of oil components on the physicochemical properties and drug delivery of emulsions: tocol emulsion versus lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chi-Feng; Fang, Chia-Lang; Liao, Mei-Hui; Fang, Jia-You

    2007-04-20

    An emulsion system composed of vitamin E, coconut oil, soybean phosphatidylcholine, non-ionic surfactants, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives (referred to as the tocol emulsion) was characterized in terms of its physicochemical properties, drug release, in vivo efficacy, toxicity, and stability. Systems without vitamin E (referred to as the lipid emulsion) and without any oils (referred to as the aqueous micelle system) were prepared for comparison. A lipophilic antioxidant, resveratrol, was used as the model drug for emulsion loading. The incorporation of Brij 35 and PEG derivatives reduced the vesicle diameter to <100nm. The inclusion of resveratrol into the emulsions and aqueous micelles retarded the drug release. The in vitro release rate showed a decrease in the order of aqueous micelle system>tocol emulsion>lipid emulsion. Treatment of resveratrol dramatically reduced the intimal hyperplasia of the injured vascular wall in rats. There was no significant difference in this reduction when resveratrol was delivered by either emulsion or the aqueous micelle system. The percentages of erythrocyte hemolysis by the emulsions and aqueous micelle system were approximately 0 and approximately 10%, respectively. Vitamin E prevented the aggregation of emulsion vesicles. The mean vesicle size of the tocol emulsion remained unchanged during 30 days at 37 degrees C. The lipid emulsion and aqueous micelle system, respectively, showed 11- and 16-fold increases in vesicle size after 30 days of storage.

  15. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  16. Preparing Poly (Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid) (PLGA) Microspheres Containing Lysozyme-Zinc Precipitate Using a Modified Double Emulsion Method

    PubMed Central

    Nafissi Varcheh, Nastaran; Luginbuehl, Vera; Aboofazeli, Reza; Peter Merkle, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Lysozyme, as a model protein, was precipitated through the formation of protein-Zn complex to micronize for subsequent encapsulation within poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres. Various parameters, including pH, type and concentration of added salts and protein concentration, were modified to optimize the yield of protein complexation and precipitation. The resulting protein particles (lysozyme-Zn complex as a freshly prepared suspension or a freeze-dried solid) were then loaded into PLGA (Resomer® 503H) microspheres, using a double emulsion technique and microspheres encapsulation efficiency and their sizes were determined. It was observed that salt type could significantly influence the magnitude of protein complexation. At the same conditions, zinc chloride was found to be more successful in producing pelletizable lysozyme. Generally, higher concentrations of protein solution led also to the higher yields of complexation and at the optimum conditions, the percentage of pelletizable lysozyme reached to 80%. Taking advantage of this procedure, a modified technique for preparation of protein-loaded PLGA microspheres was established, although it is also expected that this technique increases the protein drugs stabilization during the encapsulation process. PMID:24250344

  17. Dynamic encapsulation of hydrophilic nisin in hydrophobic poly (lactic acid) particles with controlled morphology by a single emulsion process.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shaowen; Lu, Jue; Liu, Zhiguo; Srivastava, Devesh; Song, Anna; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ilsoon

    2014-06-01

    Hydrophilic nisin-loaded hydrophobic poly (lactic acid) (PLA) particles with controlled size and shape were successfully produced utilizing a one-step single emulsification method. Preliminary shear stress and temperature tests showed that there was no significant loss in the nisin inhibition activity during this process. PLA/nisin composite particles were prepared into solid nanocomposite spheres (50-200 nm) or hollow microcomposite spheres (1-5 μm) under the operative conditions developed in our previous study, in which the hydrophilic nisin in the aqueous phase solution could be entrapped in the hydrophobic polymer in the emulsification process generating either single or multiple emulsions. The incorporation of nisin in PLA had little effect on key processing conditions, which allows the dynamic control of the morphology and property of resulting particles. Microscopic and surface analyses suggested that nisin was dispersed uniformly inside the polymer matrix and adsorbed on the particle surface. The encapsulation amount and efficiency were enhanced with the increase in nisin loading in the aqueous solution. Unique reversible control of particle size and shape by this process was successfully applied in the nisin encapsulation. Alternating temperature in the repeating emulsification steps improved the encapsulation efficiency while generated particles in desired size and shape.

  18. Influence of microgel architecture and oil polarity on stabilization of emulsions by stimuli-sensitive core-shell poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) microgels: Mickering versus Pickering behavior?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sabrina; Liu, Tingting; Rütten, Stephan; Phan, Kim-Ho; Möller, Martin; Richtering, Walter

    2011-08-16

    Charged poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) [P(NiPAM-co-MAA)] microgels can stabilize thermo- and pH-sensitive emulsions. By placing charged units at different locations in the microgels and comparing the emulsion properties, we demonstrate that their behaviors as emulsion stabilizers are very different from molecular surfactants and rigid Pickering stabilizers. The results show that the stabilization of the emulsions is independent of electrostatic repulsion although the presence and location of charges are relevant. Apparently, the charges facilitate emulsion stabilization via the extent of swelling and deformability of the microgels. The stabilization of these emulsions is linked to the swelling and structure of the microgels at the oil-water interface, which depends not only on the presence of charged moieties and on solvent polarity but also on the microgel (core-shell) morphology. Therefore, the internal soft and porous structure of microgels is important, and these features make microgel-stabilized emulsions characteristically different from classical, rigid-particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions, the stability of which depends on the surface properties of the particles.

  19. Optimization of a gelled emulsion intended to supply ω-3 fatty acids into meat products by means of response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Poyato, Candelaria; Ansorena, Diana; Berasategi, Izaskun; Navarro-Blasco, Iñigo; Astiasarán, Iciar

    2014-12-01

    The optimization of a gelled oil-in-water emulsion was performed for use as fat replacer in the formulation of ω-3 PUFA-enriched cooked meat products. The linseed oil content, carrageenan concentration and surfactant-oil ratio were properly combined in a surface response design for maximizing the hardness and minimizing the syneresis of the PUFA delivery system. The optimal formulation resulted in a gelled emulsion containing 40% of oil and 1.5% of carrageenan, keeping a surfactant-oil ratio of 0.003. The gel was applied as a partial fat replacer in a Bologna-type sausage and compared to the use of an O/W emulsion also enriched in ω-3. Both experimental sausages contributed with higher ω-3 PUFA content than the control. No sensory differences were found among formulations. The selected optimized gelled oil-in-water emulsion was demonstrated to be a suitable lipophilic delivery system for ω-3 PUFA compounds and applicable in food formulations as fat replacer.

  20. Optimization of a gelled emulsion intended to supply ω-3 fatty acids into meat products by means of response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Poyato, Candelaria; Ansorena, Diana; Berasategi, Izaskun; Navarro-Blasco, Iñigo; Astiasarán, Iciar

    2014-12-01

    The optimization of a gelled oil-in-water emulsion was performed for use as fat replacer in the formulation of ω-3 PUFA-enriched cooked meat products. The linseed oil content, carrageenan concentration and surfactant-oil ratio were properly combined in a surface response design for maximizing the hardness and minimizing the syneresis of the PUFA delivery system. The optimal formulation resulted in a gelled emulsion containing 40% of oil and 1.5% of carrageenan, keeping a surfactant-oil ratio of 0.003. The gel was applied as a partial fat replacer in a Bologna-type sausage and compared to the use of an O/W emulsion also enriched in ω-3. Both experimental sausages contributed with higher ω-3 PUFA content than the control. No sensory differences were found among formulations. The selected optimized gelled oil-in-water emulsion was demonstrated to be a suitable lipophilic delivery system for ω-3 PUFA compounds and applicable in food formulations as fat replacer. PMID:25089785

  1. Nanoparticles Engineered from Lecithin-in-Water Emulsions As A Potential Delivery System for Docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Yanasarn, Nijaporn; Sloat, Brian R.; Cui, Zhengrong

    2009-01-01

    Docetaxel is a potent anti-cancer drug. However, there continues to be a need for alternative docetaxel delivery systems to improve its efficacy. We reported the engineering of a novel spherical nanoparticle formulation (~270 nm) from lecithin-in-water emulsions. Docetaxel can be incorporated into the nanoparticles, and the resultant docetaxel-nanoparticles were stable when stored as an aqueous suspension. The release of the docetaxel from the nanoparticles was likely caused by a combination of diffusion and Case II transport. The docetaxel-in-nanoparticles were more effective in killing tumor cells in culture than free docetaxel. Moreover, the docetaxel-nanoparticles did not cause any significant red blood cell lysis or platelet aggregation in vitro, nor did they induce detectable acute liver damage when injected intravenously into mice. Finally, compared to free docetaxel, the intravenously injected docetaxel-nanoparticles increased the accumulation of the docetaxel in a model tumor in mice by 4.5-fold. These lecithin-based nanoparticles have the potential to be a novel biocompatible and efficacious delivery system for docetaxel. PMID:19524029

  2. Rheology as a Tool to Predict the Release of Alpha-Lipoic Acid from Emulsions Used for the Prevention of Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Vera Lucia Borges; Chiari-Andréo, Bruna Galdorfini; Marto, Joana Marques; Moraes, Jemima Daniela Dias; Leone, Beatriz Alves; Corrêa, Marcos Antonio; Ribeiro, Helena Margarida

    2015-01-01

    The availability of an active substance through the skin depends basically on two consecutive steps: the release of this substance from the vehicle and its subsequent permeation through the skin. Hence, studies on the specific properties of vehicles, such as their rheological behavior, are of great interest in the field of dermatological products. Recent studies have shown the influence of the rheological features of a vehicle on the release of drugs and active compounds from the formulation. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the rheological features of two different emulsion formulations on the release of alpha-lipoic acid. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) was chosen for this study because of its antioxidant characteristics, which could be useful for the prevention of skin diseases and aging. The rheological and mechanical behavior and the in vitro release profile were assayed. The results showed that rheological features, such as viscosity, thixotropy, and compliance, strongly influenced the release of ALA from the emulsion and that the presence of a hydrophilic polymer in one of the emulsions was an important factor affecting the rheology and, therefore, the release of ALA. PMID:26788510

  3. Rheology as a Tool to Predict the Release of Alpha-Lipoic Acid from Emulsions Used for the Prevention of Skin Aging.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Vera Lucia Borges; Chiari-Andréo, Bruna Galdorfini; Marto, Joana Marques; Moraes, Jemima Daniela Dias; Leone, Beatriz Alves; Corrêa, Marcos Antonio; Ribeiro, Helena Margarida

    2015-01-01

    The availability of an active substance through the skin depends basically on two consecutive steps: the release of this substance from the vehicle and its subsequent permeation through the skin. Hence, studies on the specific properties of vehicles, such as their rheological behavior, are of great interest in the field of dermatological products. Recent studies have shown the influence of the rheological features of a vehicle on the release of drugs and active compounds from the formulation. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the rheological features of two different emulsion formulations on the release of alpha-lipoic acid. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) was chosen for this study because of its antioxidant characteristics, which could be useful for the prevention of skin diseases and aging. The rheological and mechanical behavior and the in vitro release profile were assayed. The results showed that rheological features, such as viscosity, thixotropy, and compliance, strongly influenced the release of ALA from the emulsion and that the presence of a hydrophilic polymer in one of the emulsions was an important factor affecting the rheology and, therefore, the release of ALA.

  4. Immunogenicity studies of bivalent inactivated virions of EV71/CVA16 formulated with submicron emulsion systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Wei; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Lu, Tsung-Chun; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chong, Pele; Huang, Ming-Hsi

    2014-01-01

    We assessed two strategies for preparing candidate vaccines against hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) caused mainly by infections of enterovirus (EV) 71 and coxsackievirus (CV) A16. We firstly design and optimize the potency of adjuvant combinations of emulsion-based delivery systems, using EV71 candidate vaccine as a model. We then perform immunogenicity studies in mice of EV71/CVA16 antigen combinations formulated with PELC/CpG. A single dose of inactivated EV71 virion (0.2 μg) emulsified in submicron particles was found (i) to induce potent antigen-specific neutralizing antibody responses and (ii) consistently to elicit broad antibody responses against EV71 neutralization epitopes. A single dose immunogenicity study of bivalent activated EV71/CVA16 virion formulated with either Alum or PELC/CpG adjuvant showed that CVA16 antigen failed to elicit CVA16 neutralizing antibody responses and did not affect EV71-specific neutralizing antibody responses. A boosting dose of emulsified EV71/CVA16 bivalent vaccine candidate was found to be necessary to achieve high seroconversion of CVA16-specific neutralizing antibody responses. The current results are important for the design and development of prophylactic vaccines against HFMD and other emerging infectious diseases.

  5. Cyclodextrin stabilised emulsions and cyclodextrinosomes.

    PubMed

    Mathapa, Baghali G; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2013-11-01

    We report the preparation of o/w emulsions stabilised by microcrystals of cyclodextrin-oil inclusion complexes. The inclusion complexes are formed by threading cyclodextrins from the aqueous phase on n-tetradecane or silicone oil molecules from the emulsion drop surface which grow further into microrods and microplatelets depending on the type of cyclodextrin (CD) used. These microcrystals remain attached on the surface of the emulsion drops and form densely packed layers which resemble Pickering emulsions. The novelty of this emulsion stabilisation mechanism is that molecularly dissolved cyclodextrin from the continuous aqueous phase is assembled into colloid particles directly onto the emulsion drop surface, i.e. molecular adsorption leads to effective Pickering stabilisation. The β-CD stabilised tetradecane-in-water emulsions were so stable that we used this system as a template for preparation of cyclodextrinosomes. These structures were produced solely through formation of cyclodextrin-oil inclusion complexes and their assembly into a crystalline phase on the drop surface retained its stability after the removal of the core oil. The structures of CD-stabilised tetradecane-in-water emulsions were characterised using optical microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, cross-polarised light microscopy and WETSEM while the cyclodextrinosomes were characterised by SEM. We also report the preparation of CD-stabilised emulsions with a range of other oils, including tricaprylin, silicone oil, isopropyl myristate and sunflower oil. We studied the effect of the salt concentration in the aqueous phase, the type of CD and the oil volume fraction on the type of emulsion formed. The CD-stabilised emulsions can be applied in a range of surfactant-free formulations with possible applications in cosmetics, home and personal care. Cyclodextrinosomes could find applications in pharmaceutical formulations as microencapsulation and drug delivery vehicles. PMID:24043288

  6. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of ‘minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions. PMID:26797564

  7. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of `minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions.

  8. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, is used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improving the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study are: Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems; Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system; Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit; Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system; Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts; Work for the coming year will focus on the determination of toxicity of various solvents, selection of the emulsifying agents, as well as characterizing the mass transfer of hollow-fiber contactors.

  9. Optimization of cyanide extraction from wastewater using emulsion liquid membrane system by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Xue, Juan Qin; Liu, Ni Na; Li, Guo Ping; Dang, Long Tao

    2016-01-01

    To solve the disposal problem of cyanide wastewater, removal of cyanide from wastewater using a water-in-oil emulsion type of emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) was studied in this work. Specifically, the effects of surfactant Span-80, carrier trioctylamine (TOA), stripping agent NaOH solution and the emulsion-to-external-phase-volume ratio on removal of cyanide were investigated. Removal of total cyanide was determined using the silver nitrate titration method. Regression analysis and optimization of the conditions were conducted using the Design-Expert software and response surface methodology (RSM). The actual cyanide removals and the removals predicted using RSM analysis were in close agreement, and the optimal conditions were determined to be as follows: the volume fraction of Span-80, 4% (v/v); the volume fraction of TOA, 4% (v/v); the concentration of NaOH, 1% (w/v); and the emulsion-to-external-phase volume ratio, 1:7. Under the optimum conditions, the removal of total cyanide was 95.07%, and the RSM predicted removal was 94.90%, with a small exception. The treatment of cyanide wastewater using an ELM is an effective technique for application in industry. PMID:27533852

  10. Tocopherol and tocotrienol homologs in parenteral lipid emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas M; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions, which are made of oils from plant and fish sources, contain different types of tocopherols and tocotrienols (vitamin E homologs). The amount and types of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions vary considerably and are not completely known. The objective of this analysis was to develop a quantitative method to determine levels of all vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions. An HPLC system was used to measure vitamin E homologs using a Pinnacle DB Silica normal phase column and an isocratic, n-hexane:1,4 dioxane (98:2) mobile phase. An optimized protocol was used to report vitamin E homolog concentrations in soybean oil-based (Intralipid®, Ivelip®, Lipofundin® N, Liposyn® III, and Liposyn® II), medium- and long-chain fatty acid-based (Lipofundin®, MCT and Structolipid®), olive oil-based (ClinOleic®), and fish oil-based (Omegaven®) and mixture of these oils-based (SMOFlipid®, Lipidem®) commercial parenteral lipid emulsions. Total content of all vitamin E homologs varied greatly between different emulsions, ranging from 57.9 to 383.9 µg/mL. Tocopherols (α, β, γ, δ) were the predominant vitamin E homologs for all emulsions, with tocotrienol content < 0.3%. In all of the soybean emulsions, except for Lipofundin® N, the predominant vitamin E homolog was γ-tocopherol, which ranged from 57–156 µg/mL. ClinOleic® predominantly contained α-tocopherol (32 µg/mL), whereas α-tocopherol content in Omegaven® was higher than most of the other lipid emulsions (230 µg/mL). Practical applications The information on the types and quantity of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions will be extremely useful to physicians and healthcare personnel in selecting appropriate lipid emulsions that are exclusively used in patients with inadequate gastrointestinal function, including hospitalized and critically ill patients. Some emulsions may require vitamin E supplementation in order to meet minimal human requirements

  11. O/W nano-emulsion formation using an isothermal low-energy emulsification method in a mixture of polyglycerol polyricinoleate and hexaglycerol monolaurate with glycerol system.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Satoshi; Nishimura, Takahisa; Gohtani, Shoichi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how phase behavior changes by replacing water with glycerol in water/mixture of polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) and hexaglycerol monolaurate (HGML) /vegetable oil system, and studied the effect of glycerol on o/w nano-emulsion formation using an isothermal low-energy method. In the phase behavior study, the liquid crystalline phase (Lc) + the sponge phase (L3) expanded toward lower surfactant concentration when water was replaced with glycerol in a system containing surfactant HLP (a mixture of PGPR and HGML). O/W nano-emulsions were formed by emulsification of samples in a region of Lc + L3. In the glycerol/surfactant HLP/vegetable oil system, replacing water with glycerol was responsible for the expansion of a region containing Lc + L3 toward lower surfactant concentration, and as a result, in the glycerol/surfactant HLP/vegetable oil system, the region where o/w nano-emulsions or o/w emulsions could be prepared using an isothermal low-energy emulsification method was wide, and the droplet diameter of the prepared o/w emulsions was also smaller than that in the water/surfactant HLP/vegetable oil system. Therefore, glycerol was confirmed to facilitate the preparation of nano-emulsions from a system of surfactant HLP. Moreover, in this study, we could prepare o/w nano-emulsions with a simple one-step addition of water at room temperature without using a stirrer. Thus, the present technique is highly valuable for applications in several industries.

  12. Multiple pickering emulsions stabilized by microbowls.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Yoshimune; Kobayashi, Naoto; Nakagawa, Naoki

    2011-04-19

    Some researchers have focused on the adsorption of solid particles at fluid-fluid interfaces and prepared emulsions and foams called "Pickering emulsions/foams". However, while several reports exist on simple spherical emulsions, few reports are available on the formation of more complex structures. Here, we show that holes on particle surfaces are a key factor in establishing the variety and complexity of mesoscale structures. Microbowls, which are hollow particles with holes on their surfaces, form multiple emulsions (water-in-oil-in-water and oil-in-water-in-oil emulsions) by simply mixing them with water and oil. Furthermore, stable potato-like or coffee-bean-like emulsions are also obtained, although nonspherical emulsions are usually unstable because of their larger interfacial energies. These findings are useful in designing the building blocks of complex supracolloidal systems for pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  13. Galantamine-loaded PLGA nanoparticles, from nano-emulsion templating, as novel advanced drug delivery systems to treat neurodegenerative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaguera, C.; Feiner-Gracia, N.; Calderó, G.; García-Celma, M. J.; Solans, C.

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles could be promising drug delivery systems to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Among the various methods of nanoparticle preparation, nano-emulsion templating was used in the present study to prepare galantamine-loaded nano-emulsions by a low-energy emulsification method followed by solvent evaporation to obtain galantamine-loaded polymeric nanoparticles. This approach was found to be suitable because biocompatible, biodegradable and safe nanoparticles with appropriate features (hydrodynamic radii around 20 nm, negative surface charge and stability higher than 3 months) for their intravenous administration were obtained. Encapsulation efficiencies higher than 90 wt% were obtained with a sustained drug release profile as compared to that from aqueous and micellar solutions. The enzymatic activity of the drug was maintained at 80% after its encapsulation into nanoparticles that were non-cytotoxic at the required therapeutic concentration. Therefore, novel galantamine-loaded polymeric nanoparticles have been designed for the first time using the nano-emulsification approach and showed the appropriate features to become advanced drug delivery systems to treat neurodegenerative diseases.Polymeric nanoparticles could be promising drug delivery systems to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Among the various methods of nanoparticle preparation, nano-emulsion templating was used in the present study to prepare galantamine-loaded nano-emulsions by a low-energy emulsification method followed by solvent evaporation to obtain galantamine-loaded polymeric nanoparticles. This approach was found to be suitable because biocompatible, biodegradable and safe nanoparticles with appropriate features (hydrodynamic radii around 20 nm, negative surface charge and stability higher than 3 months) for their intravenous administration were obtained. Encapsulation efficiencies higher than 90 wt% were obtained with a sustained drug release profile as compared to that from

  14. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition123

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10–15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  15. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10-15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  16. Development of a cryo-SEM system enabling direct observation of the cross sections of an emulsion adhesive in a moist state during the drying process.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshiko; Ranner, Robert; Mimietz-Oeckler, Saskia; Nishino, Yuri; Miyazawa, Atsuo

    2015-12-01

    In order to analyse the internal structures of multi-component fluid materials such as emulsions (including the inter-particle spacing) by cryo-electron microscopy, it is necessary to observe their smooth cross-sectional surfaces over wide areas. We have developed a system that involves the following steps: preservation of the structure of an emulsion adhesive using freeze fixation in its normal (moist) state and during the drying process after being coated, preparation of cross sections of the internal structure using a cryo-ultramicrotome and then transferral of the cross sections into a cryo-scanning electron microscope for observation via a cryo-transfer system. This system allows the direct observation of the cross sections of emulsions and of several fluid materials.

  17. Galantamine-loaded PLGA nanoparticles, from nano-emulsion templating, as novel advanced drug delivery systems to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Fornaguera, C; Feiner-Gracia, N; Calderó, G; García-Celma, M J; Solans, C

    2015-07-28

    Polymeric nanoparticles could be promising drug delivery systems to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Among the various methods of nanoparticle preparation, nano-emulsion templating was used in the present study to prepare galantamine-loaded nano-emulsions by a low-energy emulsification method followed by solvent evaporation to obtain galantamine-loaded polymeric nanoparticles. This approach was found to be suitable because biocompatible, biodegradable and safe nanoparticles with appropriate features (hydrodynamic radii around 20 nm, negative surface charge and stability higher than 3 months) for their intravenous administration were obtained. Encapsulation efficiencies higher than 90 wt% were obtained with a sustained drug release profile as compared to that from aqueous and micellar solutions. The enzymatic activity of the drug was maintained at 80% after its encapsulation into nanoparticles that were non-cytotoxic at the required therapeutic concentration. Therefore, novel galantamine-loaded polymeric nanoparticles have been designed for the first time using the nano-emulsification approach and showed the appropriate features to become advanced drug delivery systems to treat neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26118655

  18. Nano-sized water-in-oil-in-water emulsion enhances intestinal absorption of calcein, a high solubility and low permeability compound.

    PubMed

    Koga, Kenjiro; Takarada, Nobuo; Takada, Kanji

    2010-02-01

    Our goal was to develop safe and stable multilayer emulsions capable of enhancing intestinal absorption of biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class III drugs. First, w/o emulsions were prepared using calcein as a model BCS class III compound and condensed ricinoleic acid tetraglycerin ester as a hydrophobic emulsifier. Then water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsions were prepared with shirasu porous glass (SPG) membranes. Particle size analyses and calcein leakage from oil droplets in w/o/w emulsions led us to select stearic acid hexaglycerin esters (HS-11) and Gelucire 44/14 as hydrophilic emulsifiers. Analyses of the absorption-enhancing effects of w/o/w emulsions on intestinal calcein absorption in rats showed that calcein bioavailability after intraduodenal (i.d.) administration of HS-11 or Gelucire 44/14+polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) w/o/w emulsions prepared with 0.1-microm pore-sized SPGs was significantly higher than that of the calcein control. However, serum calcein concentration vs. time profiles after i.d. administration of w/o/w emulsions prepared with 1.1-microm and 30-microm pore-sized SPGs and an emulsion prepared with a calcein-containing outer water phase were comparable to control profiles. These results suggested that HS-11 or Gelucire 44/14+PVA are safe outer water phase additives and that 0.1-microm pore-sized SPGs are important for preparing w/o/w emulsions that enhanced intestinal calcein absorption.

  19. Compartmentalization of incompatible reagents within Pickering emulsion droplets for one-pot cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengquan; Fu, Luman; Wei, Lijuan; Liang, Jifen; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-01-28

    It is a dream that future synthetic chemistry can mimic living systems to process multistep cascade reactions in a one-pot fashion. One of the key challenges is the mutual destruction of incompatible or opposing reagents, for example, acid and base, oxidants and reductants. A conceptually novel strategy is developed here to address this challenge. This strategy is based on a layered Pickering emulsion system, which is obtained through lamination of Pickering emulsions. In this working Pickering emulsion, the dispersed phase can separately compartmentalize the incompatible reagents to avoid their mutual destruction, while the continuous phase allows other reagent molecules to diffuse freely to access the compartmentalized reagents for chemical reactions. The compartmentalization effects and molecular transport ability of the Pickering emulsion were investigated. The deacetalization-reduction, deacetalization-Knoevenagel, deacetalization-Henry and diazotization-iodization cascade reactions demonstrate well the versatility and flexibility of our strategy in processing the one-pot cascade reactions involving mutually destructive reagents.

  20. Physicochemical properties and antioxidant potential of phosvitin-resveratrol complexes in emulsion system.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiang; Li, Mei; Ma, Huijie; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Liu, Xuebo

    2016-09-01

    Egg yolk phosvitin is the most highly phosphorylated protein found in the nature. The physicochemical properties of phosvitin-resveratrol complexes and their synergistic antioxidant activities in microemulsions were investigated. The particle diameters of microemulsions containing 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% phosvitin were 2.660, 0.501 and 0.414μm, respectively. The emulsifying activity index increased largely from 3.72 to 21.5m(2)/g with increasing phosvitin concentration from 0.5% to 2.0%. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal analyses indicated that the microemulsions underwent a conformational change during homogenization. Antioxidant assays showed that phosvitin-resveratrol microemulsions exhibited a higher antioxidant activity than that of phosvitin-resveratrol primary emulsions. The MTT assay indicated that HepG2 cell viability remained higher than 80% at phosvitin concentration below 1.0mg/ml. This suggested that phosvitin, when coupled with polyphenol, can effectively inhibit lipid oxidation in food emulsions, which provided valuable insights into deep processing and application of egg proteins in food industry. PMID:27041304

  1. A theory of electrophoresis of emulsion drops in aqueous two-phase polymer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S.

    1982-01-01

    An electrophoresis study has been carried out in an emulsion formed from an electrically neutral aqueous mixture of dextran and polyethylene glycol equilibrated at sufficient concentrations in the presence of electrolytes. Electrophoresis of a drop of one phase suspended in the other is observed, and the direction of the drop's motion is reversed when the disperse phase and the continuous phase are interchanged. In the presence of sulfate, phosphate, or citrate ions, an electrostatic potential difference of the order of a few mV exists between the two phases. The potential implied by the direction of the electrophoretic motion is opposite to the Donnan potential observed between the two phases. The mobility of an emulsion drop increases with the drop radius and depends on ion concentration. These results are explained in terms of a model postulating an electric dipole layer associated with a mixture of oriented polymer molecules at the surface of a drop, with a potential difference between the interiors of the two phases resulting from the unequal ion distribution.

  2. In vitro digestibility of highly concentrated methylcellulose O/W emulsions: rheological and structural changes.

    PubMed

    Espert, María; Salvador, Ana; Sanz, Teresa

    2016-09-14

    The changes in structure during the digestion of highly concentrated methyl cellulose (MC) O/W emulsions and of hydrated MC were investigated. The effect of human saliva and in vitro stomach digestion was attributed to a dilution effect, rather than to pH or pepsin activity. After in vitro intestine incubation, a decrease in viscoelasticity and an increase in fat globule size were observed. The fat released after the digestion of the MC emulsion was 49.8% of the initial fat, indicating the existence of a big physical impediment. In comparison with an O/W whey protein emulsion with fat content equal to the fat released during the MC emulsion digestion, a 12% reduction in free fatty acid formation was found, which indicates that the decrease in fat bioaccessibility in the MC emulsion should be attributed not only to a physical effect against fat release but also to a further impediment related to the fat digestion process. Fat released quantification informs about the physical retention of fat in the emulsion matrix structure. Enzymes may not act if fat is not released and solubilized. Free fatty acid quantification is the real indicator of fat digestion, but contrary to the total fat released, it is affected by a wide variety of enzymatic factors, which should be considered for the correct comparison of systems of different properties, for example systems where the amount of fat release during the digestion may be different or initially unknown. PMID:27529606

  3. Inhibitory activity of chlorogenic acids in decaffeinated green coffee beans against porcine pancreas lipase and effect of a decaffeinated green coffee bean extract on an emulsion of olive oil.

    PubMed

    Narita, Yusaku; Iwai, Kazuya; Fukunaga, Taiji; Nakagiri, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    A decaffeinated green coffee bean extract (DGCBE) inhibited porcine pancreas lipase (PPL) activity with an IC50 value of 1.98 mg/mL. Six different chlorogenic acids in DGCBE contributed to this PPL inhibition, accounting for 91.8% of the inhibitory activity. DGCBE increased the droplet size and decreased the specific surface area of an olive oil emulsion.

  4. Inhibitory activity of chlorogenic acids in decaffeinated green coffee beans against porcine pancreas lipase and effect of a decaffeinated green coffee bean extract on an emulsion of olive oil.

    PubMed

    Narita, Yusaku; Iwai, Kazuya; Fukunaga, Taiji; Nakagiri, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    A decaffeinated green coffee bean extract (DGCBE) inhibited porcine pancreas lipase (PPL) activity with an IC50 value of 1.98 mg/mL. Six different chlorogenic acids in DGCBE contributed to this PPL inhibition, accounting for 91.8% of the inhibitory activity. DGCBE increased the droplet size and decreased the specific surface area of an olive oil emulsion. PMID:23221697

  5. Nano-Emulsions:. Overview and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Anton, Nicolas; Vandamme, Thierry

    2013-09-01

    Nano-emulsions, also called sub-micrometer emulsions, are one of the most important nanocarriers in nanomedicine. More than 40% active susbtances are hydrophobic and therefore they are difficult to be formulated using conventional approaches. Nano-emulsion systems are considered as new vehicles for hydrophobic drug administration because they can enhance the penetration and absorption of these hydrophobic active compounds and provide safer and more patient-compliant dosage forms. This chapter describes the conception and methods of preparation of nano-emulsions, their characterization methods and their applications in pharmacetical areas.

  6. An emulsion polymerization process for soluble and electrically conductive polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Kinlen, P.J.; Ding, Y.; Graham, C.R.; Liu, J.; Remsen, E.E.

    1998-07-01

    A new emulsion process has been developed for the direct synthesis of the emeraldine salt of polyaniline (PANI) that is soluble in organic solvents. The process entails forming an emulsion composed of water, a water soluble organic solvent (e.g., 2-butoxyethanol), a water insoluble organic acid (e.g., dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid) and aniline. Aniline is protonated by the organic acid to form a salt which partitions into the organic phase. As oxidant (ammonium peroxydisulfate) is added, PANI salt forms in the organic phase and remains soluble. As the reaction proceeds, the reaction mixture changes from an emulsion to a two phase system, the soluble PANI remaining in the organic phase. With dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (DNNSA) as the organic acid, the resulting product is truly soluble in organic solvents such as xylene and toluene (not a dispersion), of high molecular weight (M{sub w} > 22,000), film forming and miscible with many polymers such as polyurethanes, epoxies and phenoxy resins. As cast, the polyaniline film is only moderately conductive, (10{sup {minus}5} S/cm), however treatment of the film with surfactants such as benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BTEAC) or low molecular weight alcohols and ketones such as methanol and acetone increases the conductivity 2--3 orders of magnitude.

  7. Stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsions: recent advances and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juntao; Quinlan, Patrick James; Tam, Kam Chiu

    2015-05-14

    Pickering emulsions possess many advantages over traditional surfactant stabilized emulsions. For example, Pickering emulsions impart better stability against coalescence and, in many cases, are biologically compatible and environmentally friendly. These characteristics open the door for their use in a variety of industries spanning petroleum, food, biomedicine, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Depending on the application, rapid, but controlled stabilization and destabilization of an emulsion may be necessary. As a result, Pickering emulsions with stimuli-responsive properties have, in recent years, received a considerable amounts of attention. This paper provides a concise and comprehensive review of Pickering emulsion systems that possess the ability to respond to an array of external triggers, including pH, temperature, CO2 concentration, light intensity, ionic strength, and magnetic field. Potential applications for which stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsion systems would be of particular value, such as emulsion polymerization, enhanced oil recovery, catalyst recovery, and cosmetics, are discussed.

  8. Analysis system of submicron particle tracks in the fine-grained nuclear emulsion by a combination of hard x-ray and optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Naka, T.; Asada, T.; Yoshimoto, M.; Katsuragawa, T.; Tawara, Y.; Umemoto, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Terada, Y.; Takeuchi, A.; Uesugi, K.; Kimura, M.

    2015-07-15

    Analyses of nuclear emulsion detectors that can detect and identify charged particles or radiation as tracks have typically utilized optical microscope systems because the targets have lengths from several μm to more than 1000 μm. For recent new nuclear emulsion detectors that can detect tracks of submicron length or less, the current readout systems are insufficient due to their poor resolution. In this study, we developed a new system and method using an optical microscope system for rough candidate selection and the hard X-ray microscope system at SPring-8 for high-precision analysis with a resolution of better than 70 nm resolution. Furthermore, we demonstrated the analysis of submicron-length tracks with a matching efficiency of more than 99% and position accuracy of better than 5 μm. This system is now running semi-automatically.

  9. Comparative prophylactic effects of α-eleostearic acid rich nano and conventional emulsions in induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Paul, Debjyoti; Dey, Tanmoy Kumar; Mukherjee, Sayani; Ghosh, Mahua; Dhar, Pubali

    2014-09-01

    The present work entailed perspicacious fabrication of Bitter Gourd Seed Oil Nanoemulsion (BGO-NE) for increasing bioavailability of CLnA in oxidative stress induced in vivo system. The BGO-NE was characterized and evaluated for dimensional as well as rheological changes periodically during a 12 week storage period. BGO comprising ∼50 % α-eleostearic acid, was assessed in conventional and NE formulation at different doses, for its ability to stimulate antioxidative enzyme marker paradigm comprising SOD, GPx, CAT and GSH, inherent to the subjects under study. The formulated BGO-NE (d < 100 nm) was found to be stable for 12 weeks compared to BGO-CE as was determined by particle size characterization and associated parameters. Diet supplementation of 0.5 % (w/v) BGO-NE formulation exhibited maximum efficiency in countering oxidative stress as compared to 1 % BGO-NE formulation and equivalent doses of BGO-CE. Higher efficacy at very low dose of the nano-sized formulation was thus, also established. Histopathological data from liver, pancreas and kidney sections corroborated the above findings. The present study with formulated BGO-NE and BGO-CE evaluates and confirms the implications of a NE formulation of a bioactive lipid - conjugated linolenic acid (CLnA), targeting specific in vivo processes to counter the negative influence of excess ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) in the system. It, thus presents itself as a potent nutraceutical against diabetes mellitus in an optimized delivery system. PMID:25190828

  10. Effectiveness of ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Based Lipid Emulsions for Treatment of Patients after Hepatectomy: A Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuanfeng; Liu, Zhaohui; Liao, Yadi; Mai, Cong; Chen, Tiejun; Tang, Hui; Tang, Yunqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of parenteral nutritional support with ω-3 PUFAs–based lipid emulsions in patients after liver resection. Methods: A total of 119 patients were randomly assigned to the immunonutrition (IM) group (n = 59) and control group (n = 60). The IM group was continuously given Omegaven® 10% 100 mL/day rather than regular nutrition for five days postoperatively. Venous blood samples were obtained from all subjects before surgery and D1, D3 and D7 after surgery. Results: No significant difference was found in baseline characteristics of the two groups. On D1 after surgery, no statistically significant differences were observed in the blood sample tests between the two groups. On D3 after surgery, the levels of white blood cell count (WBC), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and total bilirubin (TBil) were dramatically decreased in the IM group (t = 3.065, p = 0.003; t = 2.149, p = 0.034; t = 5.313, p= 0.001; and t = 2.419, p = 0.017, respectively). Furthermore, on D7 after surgery, not only could a significant decrease be observed in the IM group concerning the levels of WBC, ALT and TBil (t = 3.025, p = 0.003; t = 2.094, p = 0.038; and t = 2.046, p = 0.043, respectively), but it was also seen in the level of Δprothrombintime (PT) (t = 2.450, p = 0.016). An increase in the level of prealbumin (Pre-Alb) in the IM group was observed on D7 after surgery (t = 2.237, p = 0.027). The frequency of total complications in the IM group were significantly lower than in the control group (χ2 = 4.225, p = 0.040 and χ2 = 3.174, p = 0.075). The trend favored the IM group in reducing the total infective complications rate (χ2 = 3.174, p = 0.075). A significant decrease in the duration of the hospital stay after surgery was also observed in the IM group (t = 2.012, p = 0.047).Conclusion: ω-3 PUFAs–based lipid emulsions for treatment of patients after hepatectomy are safe and effective in

  11. Effects of Environmental pH on Antioxidant Interactions between Rosmarinic Acid and α-Tocopherol in Oil-in-Water (O/W) Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kittipongpittaya, Ketinun; Panya, Atikorn; Phonsatta, Natthaporn; Decker, Eric A

    2016-08-31

    Antioxidant regeneration could be influenced by various factors such as antioxidant locations and pH conditions. The effects of environmental pH on the antioxidant interaction between rosmarinic acid and α-tocopherol in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were investigated. Results showed that the combined antioxidants at pH 7 exhibited the strongest synergistic antioxidant activity in comparison with the combinations at other pH conditions as indicated by the interaction index. A drop in pH from 7 to 3 resulted in a reduction in the synergistic effect. However, in the case of pH 3, an additive effect was obtained. Moreover, the effect of the pH on the regeneration of α-tocopherol by rosmarinic acid in heterogeneous Tween 20 solutions was studied using EPR spectrometer. The same was true for the regeneration efficiency, where the reaction at pH 7 exhibited the highest regeneration efficiency of 0.3 mol of α-tocopheroxyl radicals reduced/mol of phenolics. However, the study on depletions of rosmarinic acid and α-tocopherol revealed that the formation of caffeic acid, an oxidative degradation product of rosmarinic acid, could be involved in enhancing the antioxidant activity observed at pH 7 rather than the antioxidant regeneration. This study has highlighted that the importance of pH-dependent antioxidant interactions does not solely rely on antioxidant regeneration. In addition, the formation of other oxidative products from an antioxidant should be taken into account. PMID:27494424

  12. Advances with holographic DESA emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünkel, Lothar; Eichler, Jürgen; Schneeweiss, Claudia; Ackermann, Gerhard

    2006-02-01

    DESA emulsions represent layer systems based on ultra-fine grained silver halide (AgX) technology. The new layers have an excellent performance for holographic application. The technology has been presented repeatedly in recent years, including the emulsion characterization and topics of chemical and spectral sensitization. The paper gives a survey of actual results referring to panchromatic sensitization and other improvements like the application of silver halide sensitized gelatine (SHSG) procedure. These results are embedded into intensive collaborations with small and medium enterprises (SME's) to commercialize DESA layers. Predominant goals are innovative products with holographic components and layers providing as well as cost effectiveness and high quality.

  13. Efficiency of emulsifier-free emulsions and emulsions containing rapeseed lecithin as delivery systems for vectorization and release of coenzyme Q10: physico-chemical properties and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kaci, M; Arab-Tehrany, E; Dostert, G; Desjardins, I; Velot, E; Desobry, S

    2016-11-01

    To improve the encapsulation and release of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), emulsifier-free-emulsions were developed with a new emulsification process using high-frequency ultrasound (HFU) at 1.7MHz. Nano-emulsions containing CoQ10 were prepared with or without rapeseed lecithin as an emulsifier. The emulsions prepared with HFU were compared with an emulsion of CoQ10 containing emulsifier prepared with the same emulsification technique as well as with emulsions prepared with low-frequency ultrasound coupled with high-pressure homogenization (LFU+HPH). The physico-chemical properties of the emulsions were determined by average droplet size measurement with nano-droplet tracking analysis, droplet surface charge with ζ potential measurement, surface tension and rheological behaviour. Emulsions made by LFU+HPH with an emulsifier showed lower droplet sizes due to cavitation generated by the HFU process. Surface tension results showed that there was no significant difference between emulsions containing lecithin emulsifier regardless of the preparation process or the inclusion of CoQ10. In vitro biocompatibility tests were performed on human mesenchymal stem cells in order to show the cytotoxicity of various formulations and the efficiency of CoQ10-loaded emulsions. In vitro tests proved that the vectors were not toxic. Furthermore, CoQ10 facilitated a high rate of cell proliferation and metabolic activity especially when in an emulsifier-free formulation. PMID:27497933

  14. Preparation of solid lipid nanoparticles from W/O/W emulsions: preliminary studies on insulin encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Gallarate, Marina; Trotta, Michele; Battaglia, Luigi; Chirio, Daniela

    2009-08-01

    A method to produce solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) from W/O/W multiple emulsions was developed applying the solvent-in-water emulsion-diffusion technique. Insulin was chosen as hydrophilic peptide drug to be dissolved in the acidic inner aqueous phase of multiple emulsions and to be consequently carried in SLN. Several partially water-miscible solvents with low toxicity were screened in order to optimize emulsions and SLN composition, after assessing that insulin did not undergo any chemical modification in the presence of the different solvents and under the production process conditions. SLN of spherical shape and with mean diameters in the 600-1200 nm range were obtained by simple water dilution of the W/O/W emulsion. Best results, in terms of SLN mean diameter and encapsulation efficiencies, were obtained using glyceryl monostearate as lipid matrix, butyl lactate as a solvent, and soy lecithin and Pluronic F68 as surfactants. Encapsulation efficiencies up to 40% of the loaded amount were obtained, owing to the actual multiplicity of the system; the use of multiple emulsion-derived SLN can be considered a useful strategy to encapsulate a hydrophilic drug in a lipid matrix.

  15. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-01

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  16. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-31

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  17. [Interactions between cyclodextrins and triglycerides: from emulsion stabilisation to the emergence of a new drug delivery system called "beads"].

    PubMed

    Hamoudi, M; Trichard, L; Grossiord, J-L; Chaminade, P; Duchêne, D; Le Bas, G; Fattal, E; Bochot, A

    2009-11-01

    Natural cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides which can be modified to obtain more water soluble or insoluble derivatives. The main interest of cyclodextrins results from their ability to form an inclusion complex with hydrophobic molecules. Inclusion constitutes a true molecular encapsulation. This property is employed in pharmaceutical industry to facilitate the formulation of poorly water soluble and/or fragile drugs. A more recent application of cyclodextrins consists in their use in the preparation of dispersed systems such as micro- and nanoparticles or even liposomes. When incorporated in dispersed systems, cyclodextrin can enhance drug solubility, drug stability and drug loading. Interestingly, cyclodextrins themselves can also be employed to form or stabilise dispersed systems (material or emulsifying agent). For example, the interactions between cyclodextrins with components of the vegetable oils (more especially with triglycerides) allow to stabilise simple or multiple emulsions but also to form particles called "beads". Very rich in oil, this novel lipid carrier presents an important potential for the encapsulation of highly lipophilic compounds and their delivery by topical and oral routes. These two applications are more particularly developed in the present paper.

  18. Effects of pH-Shift Processing and Microbial Transglutaminase on the Gel and Emulsion Characteristics of Porcine Myofibrillar System

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Geun-Pyo; Chun, Ji-Yeon; Jo, Yeon-Ji

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) and pH-shift processing on the functional properties of porcine myofibrillar proteins (MP). The pH-shift processing was carried out by decreasing the pH of MP suspension to 3.0, followed by re-adjustment to pH 6.2. The native (CM) and pH-shifted MP (PM) was reacted with and without MTGase, and the gelling and emulsion characteristics were compared. To compare the pH-shifted MTGase-treated MP (PT), deamidation (DM) was conducted by reacting MTGase with MP at pH 3.0. Rigid thermal gel was produced by MTGase-treated native MP (CT) and PT. PM and DM showed the lowest storage modulus (G') at the end of thermal scanning. Both MTGase and pH-shifting produced harder MP gel, and the highest gel strength was obtained in PT. All treatments yielded lower than CM, and CT showed significantly higher yield than PM and DM treatments. For emulsion characteristics, pH-shifting improved the emulsifying ability of MP-stabilized emulsion, while the treatments had lower emulsion stability. PM-stabilized emulsion exhibited the lowest creaming stability among all treatments. The emulsion stability could be improved by the usage of MTGase. The results indicated that pH-shifting combined with MTGase had a potential application to modify or improve functional properties of MP in manufacturing of meat products. PMID:26760940

  19. Aging mechanism in model Pickering emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouilloux, Sarah; Malloggi, Florent; Daillant, Jean; Thill, Antoine

    We study the stability of a model Pickering emulsion system. A special counter-flow microfluidics set-up was used to prepare monodisperse Pickering emulsions, with oil droplets in water. The wettability of the monodisperse silica nanoparticles (NPs) could be tuned by surface grafting and the surface coverage of the droplets was controlled using the microfluidics setup. A surface coverage as low as 23$\\%$ is enough to stabilize the emulsions and we evidence a new regime of Pickering emulsion stability where the surface coverage of emulsion droplets of constant size increases in time, in coexistence with a large amount of dispersed phase. Our results demonstrate that the previously observed limited coalescence regime where surface coverage tends to control the average size of the final droplets must be put in a broader perspective.

  20. Spruce galactoglucomannans inhibit the lipid oxidation in rapeseed oil-in-water emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oil-in-water emulsions are functional and industrially valuable systems, whose large interfacial area makes them prone to deterioration, due in part to as the oxidation and oligomerization of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Spruce galactoglucomannans (GGM), wood biomacromolecules abundantly available f...

  1. Influence of layer thickness and composition of cross-linked multilayered oil-in-water emulsions on the release behavior of lutein.

    PubMed

    Beicht, Johanna; Zeeb, Benjamin; Gibis, Monika; Fischer, Lutz; Weiss, Jochen

    2013-10-01

    Multilayering and enzymatic cross-linking of emulsions may cause alterations in the release behavior of encapsulated core material due to changes in thickness, porosity and permeability of the membrane. An interfacial engineering technology based on the layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition of oppositively charged biopolymers onto the surfaces of emulsion droplets in combination with an enzymatic treatment was used to generate emulsions with different droplet interfaces to test this hypothesis. Release behavior of primary, secondary (coated) and laccase-treated secondary emulsions carrying lutein, an oxygenated carotenoid, was characterized and studied. Fish gelatin (FG), whey protein isolate (WPI) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) were used as primary emulsifiers under acidic conditions (pH 3.5) to facilitate the adsorption of a negatively charged biopolymer (sugar beet pectin). Laccase was added to promote cross-linking of adsorbed beet pectin. The release of lutein-loaded emulsions was investigated and quantified by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Primary WPI-stabilized emulsions showed a five times higher release of lutein after 48 h than secondary emulsions (pH 3.5). Primary DTAB-stabilized emulsions released 7.2% of encapsulated lutein within the observation period, whereas beet pectin-DTAB-coated emulsions released only 0.13% of lutein. Cross-linking of adsorbed pectin did not significantly decrease release of lutein in comparison to non-cross-linked secondary emulsions. Additionally, release of lutein was also affected by changes in the pH of the surrounding medium. Results suggest that modulating the interfacial properties of oil-in-water emulsion by biopolymer deposition and/or cross-linking may be a useful approach to generate food-grade delivery systems that have specific release-over-time profiles of incorporated active ingredients.

  2. Influence of layer thickness and composition of cross-linked multilayered oil-in-water emulsions on the release behavior of lutein.

    PubMed

    Beicht, Johanna; Zeeb, Benjamin; Gibis, Monika; Fischer, Lutz; Weiss, Jochen

    2013-10-01

    Multilayering and enzymatic cross-linking of emulsions may cause alterations in the release behavior of encapsulated core material due to changes in thickness, porosity and permeability of the membrane. An interfacial engineering technology based on the layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition of oppositively charged biopolymers onto the surfaces of emulsion droplets in combination with an enzymatic treatment was used to generate emulsions with different droplet interfaces to test this hypothesis. Release behavior of primary, secondary (coated) and laccase-treated secondary emulsions carrying lutein, an oxygenated carotenoid, was characterized and studied. Fish gelatin (FG), whey protein isolate (WPI) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) were used as primary emulsifiers under acidic conditions (pH 3.5) to facilitate the adsorption of a negatively charged biopolymer (sugar beet pectin). Laccase was added to promote cross-linking of adsorbed beet pectin. The release of lutein-loaded emulsions was investigated and quantified by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Primary WPI-stabilized emulsions showed a five times higher release of lutein after 48 h than secondary emulsions (pH 3.5). Primary DTAB-stabilized emulsions released 7.2% of encapsulated lutein within the observation period, whereas beet pectin-DTAB-coated emulsions released only 0.13% of lutein. Cross-linking of adsorbed pectin did not significantly decrease release of lutein in comparison to non-cross-linked secondary emulsions. Additionally, release of lutein was also affected by changes in the pH of the surrounding medium. Results suggest that modulating the interfacial properties of oil-in-water emulsion by biopolymer deposition and/or cross-linking may be a useful approach to generate food-grade delivery systems that have specific release-over-time profiles of incorporated active ingredients. PMID:23978837

  3. Surface-active properties of lipophilic antioxidants tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol fatty acid esters: a potential explanation for the nonlinear hypothesis of the antioxidant activity in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Ricardo; Comelles, Francisco; Alcántara, David; Maldonado, Olivia S; Curcuroze, Melanie; Parra, Jose L; Morales, Juan C

    2010-07-14

    Our group has recently observed a nonlinear tendency in antioxidant capacity of different hydroxytyrosol fatty acid esters in fish oil-in-water emulsions, where a maximum of antioxidant efficiency appeared for hydroxytyrosol octanoate. These results appear to disagree with the antioxidant polar paradox. Because the physical location of the antioxidants in an oil-water interface has been postulated as an important factor in explaining this behavior, we have prepared a series of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol fatty acid esters with different chain length and studied their surface-active properties in water, because these physicochemical parameters could be directly related to the preferential placement at the interface. We have found that tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol fatty acid esters are relevant surfactants when the right hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) is attained and, in some cases, as efficient as emulsifiers commonly used in industry, such as Brij 30 or Tween 20. Moreover, a nonlinear dependency of surfactant effectiveness is observed with the increase in chain length of the lipophilic antioxidants. This tendency seems to fit quite well with the reported antioxidant activity in emulsions, and the best antioxidant of the series (hydroxytyrosol octanoate) is also a very effective surfactant. This potential explanation of the nonlinear hypothesis will help in the rational design of antioxidants used in oil-in-water emulsions.

  4. Fabrication of magnetic hydroxypropyl cellulose-g-poly(acrylic acid) porous spheres via Pickering high internal phase emulsion for removal of Cu(2+) and Cd(2.).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongfeng; Zheng, Yian; Zong, Li; Wang, Feng; Wang, Aiqin

    2016-09-20

    A series of magnetic hydroxypropyl cellulose-g-poly(acrylic acid) porous spheres were prepared via O/W Pickering high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) integrated precipitation polymerization. The structure and composition of modified Fe3O4 and porous structures were characterized by TEM, XRD, TGA and SEM. The results indicated that the silanized Fe3O4 can influence greatly the pore structure of magnetic porous sphere in addition to non-negligible impacts of the proportion of mixed solvent and co-surfactant. The adsorption experiment demonstrated that the adsorption equilibrium can be reached within 40min and the maximal adsorption capacity was 300.00mg/g for Cd(2+) and 242.72mg/g for Cu(2+), suggesting its fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacity. After five adsorption-desorption cycles, no significant changes in the adsorption capacity were observed, suggesting its excellent reusability. The magnetic porous sphere can be easily separated from the solution and then find its potential as a recyclable material for highly efficient removal of heavy metals. PMID:27261748

  5. Effect of pectins on the mass transfer kinetics of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion in a Franz diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Restrepo-Sánchez, Luz-Patricia; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo

    2016-10-15

    The effect of high (HMP) and low (LMP) methoxylated pectins (2%w/w) on the rate and extent of the mass transfer of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion across a cellulose membrane was evaluated. A sigmoidal response kinetic analysis was used to calculate both the diffusion coefficients (rate) and the amount of nutrients transferred through the membrane (extent). In all cases, except for lysine, HMP was more effective than LMP in inhibiting both the rate and extent of the mass transfer of nutrients through the membrane. LMP and HMP, e.g., reduced 1.3 and 3.0times, respectively, the mass transfer rate of glucose, as compared to control (containing no pectin), and 1.3 and 1.5times, respectively, the amount of glucose transferred through the membrane. Viscosity, molecular interactions, and flocculation were the most important parameters controlling the mass transfer of electrically neutral nutrients, electrically charged nutrients, and emulsified lipids, respectively. PMID:27173546

  6. Preparation and characterization of polylactic acid microspheres containing water-soluble dyes using a novel w/o/w emulsion solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Yoshida, K; Goto, S

    1996-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres containing soluble dyes as water-soluble model compounds were prepared using the water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation method. Addition of electrolytes such as NaCl or CaCl2 into the external aqueous phase significantly improved brilliant blue (BB) entrapment efficiency compared to the case of no additives. NaCl was the most effective for obtaining high entrapment efficiency (80-90% of theoretical BB content). The average diameter of the obtained microspheres was in the region of 10-20 microns in all cases. PLA microspheres containing 5 and 10% (w/w) BB exhibited the so-called burst release. The release rate decreased with decrease in the internal aqueous droplet volume in the preparation process. In particular, with PLA microspheres containing 5% (w/w) BB, those prepared with the smallest internal droplet volume (63 microliter), the initial burst release was reduced significantly, and 50% (w/w) of the loaded BB remained in the microspheres for 7 days. PMID:8999126

  7. Effect of pectins on the mass transfer kinetics of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion in a Franz diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Restrepo-Sánchez, Luz-Patricia; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo

    2016-10-15

    The effect of high (HMP) and low (LMP) methoxylated pectins (2%w/w) on the rate and extent of the mass transfer of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion across a cellulose membrane was evaluated. A sigmoidal response kinetic analysis was used to calculate both the diffusion coefficients (rate) and the amount of nutrients transferred through the membrane (extent). In all cases, except for lysine, HMP was more effective than LMP in inhibiting both the rate and extent of the mass transfer of nutrients through the membrane. LMP and HMP, e.g., reduced 1.3 and 3.0times, respectively, the mass transfer rate of glucose, as compared to control (containing no pectin), and 1.3 and 1.5times, respectively, the amount of glucose transferred through the membrane. Viscosity, molecular interactions, and flocculation were the most important parameters controlling the mass transfer of electrically neutral nutrients, electrically charged nutrients, and emulsified lipids, respectively.

  8. A method for the characterization of emulsions, thermogranulometry: application to water-in-crude oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Clausse, D; Gomez, F; Dalmazzone, C; Noik, C

    2005-07-15

    Emulsions are used in a wide range of applications and industries. Their size distribution is an important parameter because it influences most of the emulsion properties of emulsions. Several techniques of characterization are used to determine the granulometric distribution of emulsions, but they are generally limited to dilute samples and are based on complex algorithms. We describe a method that allows characterization of the droplet size distribution of emulsions using thermal analysis (thermogranulometry). This method permits the use of very concentrated samples without any dilution or perturbation of the system. We first define our method by a thermodynamic and kinetic approach. We studied a real system, i.e., crude oil emulsions, which form very concentrated, viscous, and opaque emulsions with water. We present a correlation between the size of droplets and their freezing temperature, corresponding to our system. Then we compare the size distributions obtained by our method with those derived by direct microscopy observations. The results obtained show that thermogranulometry may be an interesting method of characterization of emulsions, even for concentrated systems. PMID:15925639

  9. Oil emulsions of fluorosilicone fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, J. W.

    1985-08-27

    Emulsions of fluorosilicone fluids in mineral oil are disclosed. These emulsions are stabilized by a polydimethylsiloxane-polybutadiene copolymer or a polydimethylsiloxane-hydrogenated polybutadiene copplymer. The emulsions are an effective foam suppressant for organic liquids, especially crude petroleum.

  10. Latest Developments in Nuclear Emulsion Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. These trajectories are recorded as tracks consist of a lot of silver grains. The size of silver grain is about 1 μm, so that nuclear emulsion has submicron three-dimensional spatial resolution, which gives us a few mrad three-dimensional angular resolution. The important technical progress was speed-up of the read-out technique of nuclear emulsions built with optical microscope system. We succeeded in developing a high-speed three-dimensional read-out system named Super Ultra Track Selector (S-UTS) with the operating read-out speed of approximately 50 cm2/h. Nowadays we are developing the nuclear emulsion gel independently in Nagoya University by introducing emulsion gel production machine. Moreover, we are developing nuclear emulsion production technologies (gel production, poring and mass production). In this paper, development of nuclear emulsion technologies for the OPERA experiment, applications by the technologies and current development are described.

  11. Impact of extra virgin olive oil and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the oxidative stability of fish oil emulsions and spray-dried microcapsules stabilized by sugar beet pectin.

    PubMed

    Polavarapu, Sudheera; Oliver, Christine M; Ajlouni, Said; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2012-01-11

    The influence of EDTA on lipid oxidation in sugar beet pectin-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions (pH 6, 15% oil, wet basis), prepared from fish oil (FO) and fish oil-extra virgin olive oil (FO-EVOO) (1:1 w/w), as well as the spray-dried microcapsules (50% oil, dry basis) prepared from these emulsions, was investigated. Under accelerated conditions (80 °C, 5 bar oxygen pressure) the oxidative stability was significantly (P < 0.05) higher for FO and FO-EVOO formulated with EDTA, in comparison to corresponding emulsions and spray-dried microcapsules formulated without EDTA. The EDTA effect was greater in emulsions than in spray-dried microcapsules, with the greatest protective effect obtained in FO-EVOO emulsions. EDTA enhanced the oxidative stability of the spray-dried microcapsules during ambient storage (~25 °C, a(w) = 0.5), as demonstrated by their lower concentration of headspace volatile oxidation products, propanal and hexanal. These results show that the addition of EDTA is an effective strategy to maximize the oxidative stability of both FO emulsions and spray-dried microcapsules in which sugar beet pectin is used as the encapsulant material.

  12. [Liberation of active agents from coherent emulsions].

    PubMed

    Erós, I; Csóka, I; Csányi, E; Aref, T

    2000-01-01

    Drug release from coherent emulsions containing high water concentration (50-80 w/w%) was studied. Composition of coherent systems was as follows: self-emulsifying wax and preserved water. Griseofulvin was applied as active agent in suspended form. The liberation experiments were carried out with Hanson vertical diffusion cell, acceptor phase was distilled water, membrane was celophane one. It was established that the time course of liberation of griseofulvin from coherent emulsions can be characterized with a multiplicative function and the exponent of this function is about 0.5. The quantity of released drug increased linearly with the water content and it decreased exponentially with the viscosity of coherent emulsions.

  13. Influence of whey protein-beet pectin conjugate on the properties and digestibility of β-carotene emulsion during in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Duoxia; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Yanxiang; Panya, Atikorn; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The impact of a whey protein isolate (WPI)-beet pectin (BP) conjugate (formed by dry-heating) on the physical properties and digestibilities of β-carotene and carrier oil in oil-in-water emulsions was studied when they passed through a model gastrointestinal system. β-Carotene emulsions were stabilized by WPI, unconjugated and conjugated WPI-BP, separately. The emulsions were then passed through an in vitro digestion model and the mean droplet size, droplet distribution, zeta-potential, free fatty acids and β-carotene released were measured. The stability to droplet flocculation and coalescence during digestion was increased for the WPI-BP conjugate stabilized emulsion. Addition of BP onto the WPI stabilized emulsions could inhibit the releases of carrier oil (MCT) and β-carotene. The releases of free fatty acids and β-carotene did not differ greatly between the unconjugated and conjugated WPI-BP stabilized emulsions. These results have important implications for protein-polysaccharide stabilized emulsions and conjugates used for the protection and delivery of bioactive compounds.

  14. A direct correlation between the antioxidant efficiencies of caffeic acid and its alkyl esters and their concentrations in the interfacial region of olive oil emulsions. The pseudophase model interpretation of the "cut-off" effect.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marlene; Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Paiva-Martins, Fátima; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence S

    2015-05-15

    Recently published results for a series of homologous antioxidants, AOs, of increasing alkyl chain length show a maximum in AO efficiency followed by a significant decrease for the more hydrophobic AOs, typically called the "cut-off" effect. Here we demonstrate that in olive oil emulsions both antioxidant efficiencies and partition constants for distributions of AOs between the oil and interfacial regions, PO(I), show a maximum at the C8 ester. A reaction between caffeic acid, CA, and its specially synthesised C1-C16 alkyl esters, and a chemical probe is used to estimate partition constants for AO distributions and interfacial rate constants, kI, in intact emulsions based on the pseudophase kinetic model. The model provides a natural interpretation for both the maximum and the "cut-off" effect. More than 70% of the CA esters are in the interfacial region even at low surfactant volume fraction, ΦI=0.005.

  15. Squalene and squalane emulsions as adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Allison, A C

    1999-09-01

    Microfluidized squalene or squalane emulsions are efficient adjuvants, eliciting both humoral and cellular immune responses. Microfluidization stabilizes the emulsions and allows sterilization by terminal filtration. The emulsions are stable for years at ambient temperature and can be frozen. Antigens are added after emulsification so that conformational epitopes are not lost by denaturation and to facilitate manufacture. A Pluronic block copolymer can be added to the squalane or squalene emulsion. Soluble antigens administered in such emulsions generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes able to lyse target cells expressing the antigen in a genetically restricted fashion. Optionally a relatively nontoxic analog of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) or another immunomodulator can be added; however, the dose of MDP must be restricted to avoid systemic side effects in humans. Squalene or squalane emulsions without copolymers or MDP have very little toxicity and elicit potent antibody responses to several antigens in nonhuman primates. They could be used to improve a wide range of vaccines. Squalene or squalane emulsions have been administered in human cancer vaccines, with mild side effects and evidence of efficacy, in terms of both immune responses and antitumor activity.

  16. Before and After Study of Pharmacists’ and Students’ Knowledge of Two Novel Antidotes: High-Dose Insulin Euglycemia and Intravenous Fatty Acid Emulsion 20%

    PubMed Central

    Tolento, Amanda; Howland, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess pharmacists’ and students’ knowledge of high-dose insulin euglycemia (HIE) and intravenous fatty acid emulsion 20% (IFE) and to see whether it improved after an educational intervention. Methods: A survey to assess the knowledge about the use of HIE and IFE as antidotes was e-mailed to practicing pharmacists, pharmacy residents, and students prior to and following an educational intervention. Fact sheets on the antidotes were developed in conjunction with the New York City Poison Control Center and were used as the educational intervention in this study. The impact of exposure to the intervention was measured by comparing the number of correct responses per question on the pre- and posttests and the mean pre- and posttest scores using chi-square and t tests, respectively. Results: Most respondents felt either not at all or only somewhat comfortable with managing a toxicologic emergency. There was a statistically significant difference in mean scores on the pretest and posttest (2.9 vs 5.45; P = .001) and for the number of participants giving correct responses for each question before and after education: 52.4% of respondents answered “I don’t know” to the questions prior to education versus 21.2% after education (P < .001). Fewer respondents felt not at all comfortable managing a toxicologic emergency after the educational intervention (42.4 vs 50.3%; P < .001). Conclusion: Pharmacists and students reported little comfort in managing toxicological emergencies in general and have limited baseline knowledge about these agents. Educational interventions can significantly improve knowledge. Prior familiarity with these newer antidotes should reduce delays in their administration in an emergency. PMID:26448670

  17. Microgel-stabilized smart emulsions for biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Susanne; Spiess, Antje C; Richtering, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Emulsions stabilized by stimuli-responsive microgels were used to perform enzyme catalysis. Many substrates are poorly water-soluble, while enzymes naturally require aqueous environments, thus resulting in a two-phase aqueous-organic system. Smart microgels allow an enzyme-catalyzed reaction to be performed in an emulsion that can be broken under controlled conditions to separate the reaction product and to recycle the enzyme (E) and the microgel.

  18. The opioid system majorly contributes to preference for fat emulsions but not sucrose solutions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Okahashi, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Okafuji, Yoko; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Rodents show a stronger preference for fat than sucrose, even if their diet is isocaloric. This implies that the preference mechanisms for fat and sucrose differ. To compare the contribution of the opioid system to the preference of fat and sucrose, we examined the effects of mu-, delta-, kappa-, and non-selective opioid receptor antagonists on the preference of sucrose and fat, assessed by a two-bottle choice test and a licking test, in mice naïve to sucrose and fat ingestion. Administration of non-selective and mu-selective opioid receptor antagonists more strongly inhibited the preference of fat than sucrose. While the preference of fat was reduced to the same level as water by the antagonist administration that of sucrose was still greater than water. Our results suggest that the preference of fat relies strongly on the opioid system, while that of sucrose is regulated by other mechanisms in addition to the opioid system.

  19. Emulsion formation at the Pore-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. T.; Van Den Bos, P.; Berg, S.

    2012-12-01

    The use of surfactant cocktails to produce ultra-low interfacial tension between water and oil is an enhanced oil recovery method. In phase behavior tests three distinct emulsion phases are observed: (1) oil-in-water emulsion; (2) microemulsion; and (3) water-in-oil emulsion. However, it is unknown how phase behavior manifests at the pore-scale in a porous media system. What is the time scale needed for microemulsion formation? Where in the pore-space do the microemulsions form? And in what order do the different emulsion phases arrange during oil bank formation? To answer these questions micromodel experiments were conducted. These experiments are used to build a conceptual model for phase behavior at the pore-scale.

  20. Multi-body coalescence in Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Haitao; Jing, Benxin; Liu, Fang; Burns, Peter C; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-01-12

    Particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions have shown unusual behaviours such as the formation of non-spherical droplets and the sudden halt of coalescence between individual droplets. Here we report another unusual behaviour of Pickering emulsions-the simultaneous coalescence of multiple droplets in a single event. Using latex particles, silica particles and carbon nanotubes as model stabilizers, we show that multi-body coalescence can occur in both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. The number of droplets involved in the nth coalscence event equals four times the corresponding number of the tetrahedral sequence in close packing. Furthermore, coalescence is promoted by repulsive latex and silica particles but inhibited by attractive carbon nanotubes. The revelation of multi-body coalescence is expected to help better understand Pickering emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications.

  1. Phase Behavior of Dilute Carbon Black Suspensions and Carbon Black Stabilized Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, Michael; Tiwari, Ayush; Bose, Arijit; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2014-11-01

    We use para-amino benzoic acid terminated carbon black (CB) as a tunable model particulate material to study the effect of inter-particle interactions on phase behavior and steady shear stresses in suspensions and particle-stabilized emulsions. We modulate inter-particle interactions by adding NaCl to the suspension, thus salting surface carboxylate groups. Surprisingly, yield stress behavior emerged at a volume fraction of CB as low as ϕCB = 0.008, and gel behavior was observed at ϕCB >0.05, well below the percolation threshold for non-interacting particles. The yield stress was found to grow rapidly with carbon black concentration suggesting that salt-induced hydrophobicity leads to strong inter-particle interactions and the formation of a network at low particle concentrations. The yield stresses of CB-stabilized emulsions also grows rapidly with carbon black concentrations, implying that inter-droplet interactions can be induced through the tuning of carbon black concentration in emulsion systems. Emulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants show no inter-droplet interactions. In contrast, oil droplets in the CB-stabilized emulsion move collectively or are immobilized because of an interconnected CB network in the aqueous phase.

  2. An exclusively based parenteral fish-oil emulsion reverses cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Triana Junco, Miryam; García Vázquez, Natalia; Zozaya, Carlos; Ybarra Zabala, Marta; Abrams, Steven; García de Lorenzo, Abelardo; Sáenz de Pipaón Marcos, Miguel

    2014-10-25

    Prolonged parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to liver damage. Recent interest has focused on the lipid component of PN. A lipid emulsion based on w-3 fatty acids decrease conjugated bilirubin. A mixed lipid emulsion derived from soybean, coconut, olive, and fish oils reverses jaundice. Here we report the reversal of cholestasis and the improvement of enteral feeding tolerance in 1 infant with intestinal failure-associated liver disease. Treatment involved the substitution of a mixed lipid emulsion with one containing primarily omega-3 fatty acids during 37 days. Growth and biochemical tests of liver function improved significantly. This suggests that fat emulsions made from fish oils may be more effective means of treating this condition compared with an intravenous lipid emulsion containing soybean oil, medium -chain triglycerides, olive oil, and fish oil.

  3. Oxidation phenomena and color properties of grape pomace on nitrite-reduced meat emulsion systems.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Fatemeh; Zeynali, Fariba; Hoseini, Ebrahim; Behmadi, Homa; Savadkoohi, Sobhan

    2016-11-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of different levels of red grape pomace (1 and 2%, w/w) on the color changes, lipid oxidation (TBARS), antioxidant activity, microbial counts, total phenol content and sensory attributes of the sausages formulated with various levels of sodium nitrite (30, 60 and 120mg/kg). It was found that the addition of grape pomace (1%, w/w) in combination of reduced nitrite levels to the beef sausage samples reduced TBARS content and the degree of lipid oxidation. Antioxidant activity and total phenol contents were further evaluated based on DPPH scavenging activity method. A significant reduction in lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) of systems containing grape pomace was observed, following by an increase in the oxidative stability and the radical scavenging activity. Acceptability of beef sausages was not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the addition of grape pomace and had relatively greater scores from a sensory point of view. PMID:27424305

  4. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    concentration and micellization of the surfactant. At the same time, the silica solidifies around the surfactant structures, forming equally sized mesoporous particles. The procedure can be tuned to produce well-separated particles or alternatively particles that are linked together. The latter allows us to create 2D or 3D structures with hierarchical porosity. Oil, water, and surfactant liquid mixtures exhibit very complex phase behavior. Depending on the conditions, such mixtures give rise to highly organized structures. A proper selection of the type and concentration of surfactants determines the structuring at the nanoscale level. In this work, we show that hierarchically bimodal nanoporous structures can be obtained by templating silica microparticles with a specially designed surfactant micelle/microemulsion mixture. Tuning the phase state by adjusting the surfactant composition and concentration allows for the controlled design of a system where microemulsion droplets coexist with smaller surfactant micellar structures. The microemulsion droplet and micellar dimensions determine the two types of pore sizes (single nanometers and tens of nanometers). We also demonstrate the fabrication of carbon and carbon/platinum replicas of the silica microspheres using a "lost-wax" approach. Such particles have great potential for the design of electrocatalysts for fuel cells, chromatography separations, and other applications. It was determined that slight variations in microemulsion mixture components (electrolyte concentration, wt% of surfactants, oil to sol ratio, etc.) produces strikingly different pore morphologies and particle surface areas. Control over the size and structure of the smaller micelle-templated pores was made possible by varying the length of the hydrocarbon block within the trimethyl ammonium bromide surfactant and characterized using X-ray diffraction. The effect of emulsion aging was studied by synthesizing particles at progressive time levels from a sample

  5. Development of Single-Sided Silicon Detectors in the Emulsion-Hybrid System at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Ahn, J. K.; Ekawa, H.; Han, Y. C.; Hasegawa, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hayakawa, T.; Hosomi, K.; Hwang, S. H.; Imai, K.; Ito, K.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, S. H.; Kiuchi, R.; Moon, T. J.; Nakazawa, K.; Oue, K.; Sako, H.; Sato, S.; Sugimura, H.; Tanida, K.; Watabe, T.

    A new single-sided silicon micro-strip detector (SSD) is being developed at the J-PARC K1.8 beam line for an emulsion-counter hybrid experiment (J-PARC E07). The SSD will be mainly used for vetex measurements in emulsion plates. Two prototypes of SSD have been fabricated to check the performance of the circuit board and silicon sensors. The first prototype consists of only one layer of a silicon sensor whereas the second prototype consists of two layers of silicon sensors. The final product will be a stack of 4 layers of silicon sensors in the order of X-Y-X-Y. The first and second prototypes of SSD have been tested and the final product will be fabricated based on the test result.

  6. Rapid and medium setting high float bituminous emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, P.; Schreuders, H.G.

    1987-06-30

    This patent describes a rapid set high float aqueous bituminous emulsion-comprising bitumen, water, and from about 0.4% to about 0.6%, based on the weight of the emulsion, of an anionic emulsifier comprised of an alkaline solution of a combination of (1) 20% to 80% fatty acids selected from the group consisting of tall oil fatty acids, tallow fatty acids, and mixtures. (2) 20% to 80% of a product of the reaction of the fatty acids with a member of the group consists of acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, fumaric acid, and maleic anhydride.

  7. [Systemic emulsions. 2. Use of different methods of formulation: the effect of essential oils of thyme on stability].

    PubMed

    Passet, J; Laget, J P; Nielloud, F; Delonca, H

    1994-01-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation on emulsifying techniques, we studied the influence of different essential oils from Thymus vulgaris on emulsion stability. All four chimiotypes tested (geraniol, linalol, carvacrol, and thymol) caused a marked decrease in stability. This instability cannot be explained by a change in the hydrophilic lipophilic balance since the HLBc of the new oil phase (essential oil + paraffine oil) was not significantly different from that of paraffine alone. PMID:7884636

  8. Biomimetic aqueous-core lipid nanoballoons integrating a multiple emulsion formulation: a suitable housing system for viable lytic bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Balcão, Victor M; Glasser, Cássia A; Chaud, Marco V; del Fiol, Fernando S; Tubino, Matthieu; Vila, Marta M D C

    2014-11-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains and the weak penetration of antibiotics into bacterial biofilms put an emphasis in the need for safe and effective alternatives for antimicrobial treatments. The application of strictly lytic bacteriophages (or phages) has been proposed as an alternative (or complement) to conventional antibiotics, allowing release of the natural predators of bacteria directly to the site of infection. In the present research effort, production of bacteriophage derivatives (starting from lytic phage particle isolates), encompassing full stabilization of their three-dimensional structure, has been attempted via housing said bacteriophage particles within lipid nanovesicles integrating a multiple water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsion. As a proof-of-concept for the aforementioned strategy, bacteriophage particles with broad lytic spectrum were entrapped within the aqueous core of lipid nanoballoons integrating a W/O/W multiple emulsion. Long-term storage of the multiple emulsions produced did not lead to leaching of phage particles, thus proving the effectiveness of the encapsulation procedure.

  9. Usnea barbata CO2-supercritical extract in alkyl polyglucoside-based emulsion system: contribution of Confocal Raman imaging to the formulation development of a natural product.

    PubMed

    Zugic, Ana; Lunter, Dominique Jasmin; Daniels, Rolf; Pantelic, Ivana; Tasic Kostov, Marija; Tadic, Vanja; Misic, Dusan; Arsic, Ivana; Savic, Snezana

    2016-08-01

    Topical treatment of skin infections is often limited by drawbacks related to both antimicrobial agents and their vehicles. In addition, considering the growing promotion of natural therapeutic products, our objective was to develop and evaluate naturally-based emulsion system, as prospective topical formulation for skin infections-treatment. Therefore, alkyl polyglucoside surfactants were used for stabilization of a vehicle serving as potential carrier for supercritical CO2-extract of Usnea barbata, lichen with well-documented antimicrobial activity, incorporated using two protocols and three concentrations. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization suggested possible involvement of extract's particles in stabilization of the investigated system. Raman spectral imaging served as the key method in disclosing extract's particles potential to participate in the microstructure of the tested emulsion system via three mechanisms: (1) particle-particle aggregation, (2) adsorption at the oil-water interface and (3) hydrophobic particle-surfactant interactions. Stated extract-vehicle interaction proved to be correlated to the preparation procedure and extract concentration on one hand and to affect the physicochemical and biopharmaceutical features of investigated system, on the other hand. Thereafter, formulation with the best preliminary stability and liberation profile was selected for further efficiency and in vivo skin irritation potential evaluation, implying pertinent in vitro antimicrobial activity against G+ bacteria and overall satisfying preliminary safety profile. PMID:26135231

  10. Development of food-grade nanoemulsions and emulsions for delivery of omega-3 fatty acids: opportunities and obstacles in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rebecca; Decker, Eric A; McClements, David Julian

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of biologically active amounts of omega-3 fatty acids is linked to improved human health, which has partly been attributed to their important role in brain development and cardiovascular health. Western diets are relatively low in omega-3 fatty acids and many consumers turn to supplements or functional foods to increase their intake of these healthy lipids. Fish oil is one of the most widely used sources of omega-3 fatty acid for supplementation and has greater health benefits than plant sources because of its higher concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The incorporation of omega-3 fatty acids into foods and beverages is often challenging due to their low water-solubility, poor oxidative stability, and variable bioavailability. Nanoemulsions offer a promising way to incorporate omega-3 fatty acids into liquid food systems like beverages, dressing, sauces, and dips. Nanoemulsions are colloidal dispersions that contain small oil droplets (r<100 nm) that may be able to overcome many of the challenges of fortifying foods and beverages with omega-3 fatty acids. The composition and fabrication of nanoemulsions can be optimized to increase the chemical and physical stability of oil droplets, as well as to increase the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids.

  11. Physical and antimicrobial properties of thyme oil emulsions stabilized by ovalbumin and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Niu, Fuge; Pan, Weichun; Su, Yujie; Yang, Yanjun

    2016-12-01

    Natural biopolymer stabilized oil-in-water emulsions were formulated using ovalbumin (OVA), gum arabic (GA) solutions and their complexes. The influence of interfacial structure of emulsion (OVA-GA bilayer and OVA/GA complexes emulsions) on the physical properties and antimicrobial activity of thyme oil (TO) emulsion against Escherichia coli (E. coli) was evaluated. The results revealed that the two types of emulsions with different oil phase compositions remained stable during a long storage period. The oil phase composition had an appreciable influence on the mean particle diameter and retention of the TO emulsions. The stable emulsion showed a higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and the TO emulsions showed an improved long-term antimicrobial activity compared to the pure thyme oil, especially complexes emulsion at pH 4.0. These results provided useful information for developing protection and delivery systems for essential oil using biopolymer. PMID:27374517

  12. Nucleic acid based logical systems.

    PubMed

    Han, Da; Kang, Huaizhi; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Cuichen; Zhou, Cuisong; You, Mingxu; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2014-05-12

    Researchers increasingly visualize a significant role for artificial biochemical logical systems in biological engineering, much like digital logic circuits in electrical engineering. Those logical systems could be utilized as a type of servomechanism to control nanodevices in vitro, monitor chemical reactions in situ, or regulate gene expression in vivo. Nucleic acids (NA), as carriers of genetic information with well-regulated and predictable structures, are promising materials for the design and engineering of biochemical circuits. A number of logical devices based on nucleic acids (NA) have been designed to handle various processes for technological or biotechnological purposes. This article focuses on the most recent and important developments in NA-based logical devices and their evolution from in vitro, through cellular, even towards in vivo biological applications.

  13. Conditions for equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela J; de Folter, Julius W J; Luigjes, Bob; Castillo, Sonja I R; Sacanna, Stefano; Philipse, Albert P; Kegel, Willem K

    2010-08-19

    Particular types of solid-stabilized emulsions can be thermodynamically stable as evidenced by their spontaneous formation and monodisperse droplet size, which only depends on system parameters. Here, we investigate the generality of these equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions with respect to the basic constituents: aqueous phase with ions, oil, and stabilizing particles. From systematic variations of these constituents, we identify general conditions for the spontaneous formation of monodisperse solid-stabilized emulsions droplets. We conclude that emulsion stability is achieved by a combination of solid particles as well as amphiphilic ions adsorbed at the droplet surface, and low interfacial tensions of the bare oil-water interface of order 10 mN/m or below. Furthermore, preferential wetting of the colloidal particles by the oil phase is necessary for thermodynamic stability. We demonstrate the sufficiency of these basic requirements by extending the observed thermodynamic stability to emulsions of different compositions. Our findings point to a new class of colloid-stabilized meso-emulsions with a potentially high impact on industrial emulsification processes due to the associated large energy savings. PMID:20701369

  14. Magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  15. Magnetoresistive Emulsion Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  16. Coagulation and electrocoagulation of oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Cañizares, Pablo; Martínez, Fabiola; Jiménez, Carlos; Sáez, Cristina; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2008-02-28

    In this work the efficiencies of the chemical and the electrochemical break-up of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions with hydrolyzing aluminium salts are compared. It has been obtained that the efficiency of the processes does not depend directly on the dosing technology, but on the total concentration of aluminium and pH. This latter parameter changes in a different way in the chemical and the electrochemical processes: the pH increases during the electrochemical experiments since the electrochemical system leads to the formation of aluminum hydroxide as a net final product, but it decreases in the conventional ones due to the acid properties of the aluminum salts added (AlCl3 or Al2(SO4)3). The break-up of the emulsions only takes place in the range of pHs between 5 and 9, and the amount of aluminium necessary to produce the destabilization of the emulsion is proportional to the oil concentration. Electrolytes containing chlorides improve COD removal as compared with those containing sulphate ions. Aluminium hydroxide precipitates were found to be the primary species present in solution in the conditions in which the breaking process is favoured. Consequently, the attachment of more than one droplet of oil at a time to a charged precipitate-particle (bridging flocculation) was proposed as the primary destabilization mechanism. PMID:17583426

  17. Preparation and evaluation of minoxidil foamable emu oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Shatalebi, M A; Rafiei, Y

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a minoxidil foamable emu oil emulsion with the purpose of improving minoxidil permeation into the skin, increasing hair growth, reducing skin irritation, and increasing consumer compliance. Minoxidil was dissolved in a solvent system comprising ethanol: glycerin: lactic acid: water (10:20:5:65). The foamable emulsion was prepared by mixing the oil phase with minoxidil solution using different amount of various emulsifiers. Seventeen formulations were prepared and the most stable foamable emulsion was selected and evaluated for various pharmaceutical parameters such as homogeneity, pH, stability to centrifugal stress, freeze-thaw and foamability. The adopted formulation showed good pharmaceutical characteristics. In vitro release rate of the formulations were evaluated using Franz diffusion cell using phosphate buffer pH 7.4 and ethanol as the receiver medium at sink condition. The release rate of formulations was found to obey Higuchi kinetic model. Experimental animal study was performed to evaluate hair growth potential of the formulation. Different cyclic phases of hair follicles, like anagen, and telogen phases, were determined at one month period. Histological study after treatment with adopted formulation exhibited greater number of hair follicles in anagenic phase (96%) which were higher as compared to marketed 5% minoxidil solution (Pakdaru® 70%) and the control group (42%). From animal study it was concluded that the selected formulation exhibited a significant potency in promoting hair growth in comparison with marketed 5% minoxidil solution Pakdaru®. PMID:25657781

  18. Preparation and evaluation of minoxidil foamable emu oil emulsion

    PubMed Central

    Shatalebi, M.A.; Rafiei, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a minoxidil foamable emu oil emulsion with the purpose of improving minoxidil permeation into the skin, increasing hair growth, reducing skin irritation, and increasing consumer compliance. Minoxidil was dissolved in a solvent system comprising ethanol: glycerin: lactic acid: water (10:20:5:65). The foamable emulsion was prepared by mixing the oil phase with minoxidil solution using different amount of various emulsifiers. Seventeen formulations were prepared and the most stable foamable emulsion was selected and evaluated for various pharmaceutical parameters such as homogeneity, pH, stability to centrifugal stress, freeze-thaw and foamability. The adopted formulation showed good pharmaceutical characteristics. In vitro release rate of the formulations were evaluated using Franz diffusion cell using phosphate buffer pH 7.4 and ethanol as the receiver medium at sink condition. The release rate of formulations was found to obey Higuchi kinetic model. Experimental animal study was performed to evaluate hair growth potential of the formulation. Different cyclic phases of hair follicles, like anagen, and telogen phases, were determined at one month period. Histological study after treatment with adopted formulation exhibited greater number of hair follicles in anagenic phase (96%) which were higher as compared to marketed 5% minoxidil solution (Pakdaru® 70%) and the control group (42%). From animal study it was concluded that the selected formulation exhibited a significant potency in promoting hair growth in comparison with marketed 5% minoxidil solution Pakdaru®. PMID:25657781

  19. Boric Acid Reclamation System (BARS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kniazewycz, B.G.; Markind, J.

    1986-03-01

    KLM Technologies' personnel have identified a Boric Acid Reclamation System (BARS) utilizing reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration to produce a recyclable grade of otherwise waste boric acid at PWRs, thus reducing a major source of low-level radwaste. The design of a prototype BARS as a compact volume reduction system was the result of KLM's Phase 1 Program, and based upon a preliminary feasibility program, which assessed the applicability of membrane technology to refurbish and recycle waste boric acid from floor and equipment drain streams. The analysis of the overall program indicated a substantial savings regarding off-site disposal costs. Today's economic scenario indicates that optimization of volume reduction operation procedures could significantly reduce waste management costs, especially where burial penalties have become more severe. As a reaction to the economic burden imposed by final disposal, many nuclear plants are currently modifying their design and operating philosophies concerning liquid radwaste processing systems to meet stricter environmental regulations, and to derive potential economic benefits by reducing the ever-increasing volumes of wastes that are produced. To effect these changes, innovative practices in waste management and more efficient processing technologies are being successfully implemented.

  20. Evaluation on oxidative stability of walnut beverage emulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Liu, Fuguo; Xue, Yanhui; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-07-15

    Walnut beverage emulsions were prepared with walnut kernels, mixed nonionic emulsifiers and xanthan gum. The effects of food antioxidants on the physical stability and lipid oxidation of walnut beverage emulsions were investigated. The results showed that tea polyphenols could not only increase the droplet size of the emulsions, but also enhance physical stability during the thermal storage at 62 ± 1 °C. However, water-dispersed oil-soluble vitamin E and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin obviously decreased the physical stability of the emulsion system during the thermal storage. BHT and natural antioxidant extract had scarcely influenced on the physical stability of walnut beverage emulsions. Tea polyphenols and BHT could significantly retard lipid oxidation in walnut beverage emulsions against thermal and UV light exposure during the storage. Vitamin E exhibited the prooxidant effect during the thermal storage and the antioxidant attribute during UV light exposure. Other food antioxidants had no significant effect on retarding lipid oxidation during thermal or light storage.

  1. Development of Nuclear Emulsion for Fast Neutron Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machii, Shogo; Kuwabara, Kenichi; Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. Energy resolution of nuclear emulsion is 21% (12%) FWHM against neutron energy of 2.8 MeV (4.9 MeV). Nuclear emulsion has high gamma ray rejection power. For now, at least 2×104 gamma rays/cm2, no increase of as a background for neutron measurement when scan using automatic nuclear emulsion read out system HTS. This value suggests that it is applicable even under high gamma ray environment, such as nuclear fusion reactor.

  2. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE.

  3. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. PMID:27021875

  4. Preparation and in vitro characterization of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-loaded poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres using a double emulsion/solvent evaporation technique.

    PubMed

    Karal-Yılmaz, Okşan; Serhatlı, Müge; Baysal, Kemal; Baysal, Bahattin M

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradable Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid; PLGA), microspheres encapsulating the angiogenic protein recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) were formed to achieve VEGF release in a sustained manner. These microspheres are a promising delivery system which can be used for therapeutic angiogenesis. The PLGA microspheres incorporating two different initial loading amounts of rhVEGF have been prepared by a modified water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsion/solvent evaporation technique. The microspheres have been characterized by particle size distribution, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), light microscopy, encapsulation efficiency and their degradation was studied in vitro. The rhVEGF released from microspheres was quantified by the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation assay was used to assess biological activity of the released VEGF. The microspheres were spherical with diameters of 10-60 µm and the encapsulation efficiency was between 46% and 60%. The release kinetics of rhVEGF was studied for two different amounts: 5 µg VEGF (V5) and 50 µg VEGF (V50) per 500 mg starting polymer. The total protein (VEGF:BSA) release increased up to 4 weeks for two rhVEGF concentrations. The ELISA results showed that the burst release for V5 and V50 microspheres were 4 and 27 ng/mL, respectively. For V5, the microspheres showed an initial burst release, followed by a higher steady-state release until 14 days. VEGF release increased up to 2 weeks for V50 microsphere. HUVEC proliferation assay showed that endothelial cells responded to bioactive VEGF by proliferating and migrating.

  5. Chitin nanocrystals for Pickering high internal phase emulsions.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Emilie; Bizot, Hervé; Cathala, Bernard; Capron, Isabelle

    2014-10-13

    Chitin is a natural polymer of glucosamine bearing N-acetyl groups. Chitin nanocrystals (ChiNCs), resulting from the acid hydrolysis of amorphous regions of chitin, are crystalline positively charged rod-like particles. ChiNCs show some interfacial properties and very efficiently stabilize oil/water interfaces, leading to the so-called Pickering emulsions. In accordance with the irreversible adsorption of particles, these Pickering emulsions proved stable over time, with constant emulsion volume for several months, even though natural creaming may occur. The emulsions produced are not clearly susceptible to ionic strength or pH in terms of average droplet diameter. However, when mixed with a large amount of oil, high internal phase emulsions (HIPE) containing up to 96% of internal phase are formed as a gel with a texture that can be modulated from soft to solid gel by adjusting concentration, pH, and ionic strength.

  6. Intravenous lipid emulsion for levobupivacaine intoxication in acidotic and hypoxaemic pigs.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, J A; Skrifvars, M B; Haasio, J; Backman, J T; Rosenberg, P H; Litonius, E

    2016-03-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion is, in some countries, the recommended treatment for local anaesthetic toxicity. Systemic local anaesthetic toxicity results in hypoxaemia and acidosis, and whether this influences the effects of lipid therapy on drug concentrations and cardiovascular recovery is currently unknown. Twenty anaesthetised pigs were given a 3-mg/kg bolus of levobupivacaine followed by a five minute phase of hypoventilation and 1 mmol/kg of lactic acid in one minute. After lactic acid infusion, pigs were treated, in randomised order, with either 20% lipid emulsion or Ringer's acetate for 30 min: a 1.5-ml/kg bolus followed by a 0.25-ml/kg/minute infusion. Haemodynamic parameters were recorded and blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis. There was no difference between the groups in the area under the plasma levobupivacaine concentration-time curve (AUC) or between that and AUC of unentrapped levobupivacaine in the Lipid group, or in the plasma half-lives. The cardiovascular outcome and normalisation of the electrocardiogram were similar in both groups. Five pigs developed marked hypotension: one in both groups died, while two in the Lipid group and one in the Ringer group needed adrenaline. Administration of lipid emulsion did not improve cardiovascular recovery from levobupivacaine toxicity exacerbated by acidosis and hypoxaemia. Lipid emulsion did not entrap levobupivacaine or affect levobupivacaine pharmacokinetics. PMID:27029660

  7. Effect of resveratrol or ascorbic acid on the stability of α-tocopherol in O/W emulsions stabilized by whey protein isolate: Simultaneous encapsulation of the vitamin and the protective antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Gao, Yahui; Li, Juan; Subirade, Muriel; Song, Yuanda; Liang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Food proteins have been widely used as carrier materials due to their multiple functional properties. Hydrophobic bioactives are generally dissolved in the oil phase of O/W emulsions. Ligand-binding properties provide the possibility of binding bioactives to the protein membrane of oil droplets. In this study, the influence of whey protein isolate (WPI) concentration and amphiphilic resveratrol or hydrophilic ascorbic acid on the decomposition of α-tocopherol in the oil phase of WPI emulsions is considered. Impact of ascorbic acid, in the continuous phase, on the decomposition depended on the vitamin concentration. Resveratrol partitioned into the oil-water interface and the cis-isomer contributed most of the protective effect of this polyphenol. About 94% of α-tocopherol and 50% of resveratrol were found in the oil droplets stabilized by 0.01% WPI. These results suggest the feasibility of using the emulsifying and ligand-binding properties of WPI to produce carriers for simultaneous encapsulation of bioactives with different physicochemical properties.

  8. Effect of resveratrol or ascorbic acid on the stability of α-tocopherol in O/W emulsions stabilized by whey protein isolate: Simultaneous encapsulation of the vitamin and the protective antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Gao, Yahui; Li, Juan; Subirade, Muriel; Song, Yuanda; Liang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Food proteins have been widely used as carrier materials due to their multiple functional properties. Hydrophobic bioactives are generally dissolved in the oil phase of O/W emulsions. Ligand-binding properties provide the possibility of binding bioactives to the protein membrane of oil droplets. In this study, the influence of whey protein isolate (WPI) concentration and amphiphilic resveratrol or hydrophilic ascorbic acid on the decomposition of α-tocopherol in the oil phase of WPI emulsions is considered. Impact of ascorbic acid, in the continuous phase, on the decomposition depended on the vitamin concentration. Resveratrol partitioned into the oil-water interface and the cis-isomer contributed most of the protective effect of this polyphenol. About 94% of α-tocopherol and 50% of resveratrol were found in the oil droplets stabilized by 0.01% WPI. These results suggest the feasibility of using the emulsifying and ligand-binding properties of WPI to produce carriers for simultaneous encapsulation of bioactives with different physicochemical properties. PMID:26593516

  9. The atomization of water-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Broniarz-Press, L.; Ochowiak, M.; Rozanski, J.; Woziwodzki, S.

    2009-09-15

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies on atomization of the emulsions flowing through twin-fluid atomizers obtained by the use of the digital microphotography method. The main elements of the test installation were: nozzle, reservoir, pump and measurement units of liquid flow. The photographs were taken by a digital camera with automatic flash at exposure time of 1/8000 s and subsequently analyzed using Image Pro-Plus. The oils used were mineral oils 20-90, 20-70, 20-50 and 20-30. The studies were performed at flow rates of liquid phase changed from 0.0014 to 0.011 (dm{sup 3}/s) and gas phase changed from 0.28 to 1.4 (dm{sup 3}/s), respectively. The analysis of photos shows that the droplets being formed during the liquid atomization have very different sizes. The smallest droplets have diameters of the order of 10 {mu}m. The experimental results showed that the changes in physical properties of a liquid phase lead to the significant changes in the spray characteristics. The analysis of the photos of water and emulsions atomization process showed that the droplet sizes are dependent on gas and liquid flow rates, construction of nozzle and properties of liquid. The differences between characteristics of atomization for water and emulsions have been observed. Analysis of photos on forming the droplets in air-water and air-emulsions systems showed that droplets are bigger in air-emulsion system (at the same value of gas to liquid mass ratio). The values of Sauter mean diameter (SMD) increased with increase of volume fraction of oil in emulsion. The droplet size increased with emulsion viscosity. (author)

  10. How does oil type determine emulsion characteristics in concentrated Na-caseinate emulsions?

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Lin; McGrath, Kathryn M

    2013-08-01

    Macroscopic properties and ensemble average diffusion of concentrated (dispersed phase 50-60 wt%) Na-caseinate-stabilised emulsions for three different oils (soybean oil, palm olein and tetradecane) were explored. On a volume fraction basis, pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE)-NMR data show that droplet dynamics for all three systems are similar within a region of the emulsion morphology diagram. The exact limits of the emulsion space depend however on which oil is considered. The reduced solubility of tetradecane in water, and Na-caseinate in tetradecane, result in the stabilisation of flocs during formulation. Floc formation is not observed when soybean oil or palm olein is used under identical emulsion formulation conditions. Linear rheology experiments provide indirect evidence that the local structure and the properties of the thin film interfacial domain of tetradecane emulsions vary from those of soybean oil and palm olein emulsions. Collectively these data indicate that protein/oil interactions within a system dominate over specific oil droplet structure and size distribution, which are similar in the three systems. PMID:23683496

  11. Chemical Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity Evaluation of Natural Oil Nanostructured Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Alencar, Everton N; Xavier-Júnior, Francisco H; Morais, Andreza R V; Dantas, Teresa R F; Dantas-Santos, Nednaldo; Verissimo, Lourena M; Rehder, Vera L G; Chaves, Guilherme M; Oliveira, Anselmo G; Egitol, E Sócrates T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of nanostructured emulsions based on copaiba (Copaifera langsdorffii) resin-oil, copaiba essential oil, and bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana Shaw) oil against fungi and bacteria related to skin diseases. Firstly, the essential oil was extracted from copaiba resin-oil and these oils, along with bullfrog oil, were characterized by gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Secondly, nanostructured emulsion systems were produced and characterized. The antimicrobial susceptibility assay was performed, followed by the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) determination, the bioautography assay, and the antibiofilm determination. Strains of the genera Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, and Candida were used. The CG-MS analysis was able to identify the components of copaiba resin-oil, copaiba essential oil, and bullfrog oil. The MIC assay in association with the bioautography revealed that some esters of palmitic and oleic acids, a-curcumene, a-himachalene, isothujol, and α-fenchene--probably inhibited some strains. The nanostructured emulsions based on copaiba resin-oil and essential oil improved the antimicrobial activity of the pure oils, especially against Staphylococcus and Candida, resistant to azoles. The bullfrog oil nanostructured emulsion showed a lower antimicrobial effect when compared to the copaiba samples. However, bullfrog oil-based nanostructured emulsion showed a significant antibiofilm activity (p < 0.05). Given the significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of the evaluated oils, it may be concluded that nanostructured emulsions based on copaiba and bullfrog oils are promising candidates for the treatment of infections and also may be used to incorporate other antimicrobial drugs.

  12. Gelation of Soy Milk with Hagfish Exudate Creates a Flocculated and Fibrous Emulsion- and Particle Gel

    PubMed Central

    Böni, Lukas; Rühs, Patrick A.; Windhab, Erich J.; Fischer, Peter; Kuster, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Hagfish slime is an ultra dilute, elastic and cohesive hydrogel that deploys within milliseconds in cold seawater from a glandularly secreted exudate. The slime is made of long keratin-like fibers and mucin-like glycoproteins that span a network which entraps water and acts as a defense mechanism against predators. Unlike other hydrogels, the slime only confines water physically and is very susceptible to mechanical stress, which makes it unsuitable for many processing operations and potential applications. Despite its huge potential, little work has been done to improve and functionalize the properties of this hydrogel. To address this shortcoming, hagfish exudate was mixed with a soy protein isolate suspension (4% w/v) and with a soy emulsion (commercial soy milk) to form a more stable structure and combine the functionalities of a suspension and emulsion with those of the hydrogel. Hagfish exudate interacted strongly with the soy systems, showing a markedly increased viscoelasticity and water retention. Hagfish mucin was found to induce a depletion and bridging mechanism, which caused the emulsion and suspension to flocculate, making “soy slime”, a cohesive and cold-set emulsion- and particle gel. The flocculation network increases viscoelasticity and substantially contributes to liquid retention by entrapping liquid in the additional confinements between aggregated particles and protein fibers. Because the mucin-induced flocculation resembles the salt- or acid-induced flocculation in tofu curd production, the soy slime was cooked for comparison. The cooked soy slime was similar to conventional cooked tofu, but possessed a long-range cohesiveness from the fibers. The fibrous, cold-set, and curd-like structure of the soy slime represents a novel way for a cold coagulation and fiber incorporation into a suspension or emulsion. This mechanism could be used to efficiently gel functionalized emulsions or produce novel tofu-like structured food products. PMID

  13. Gelation of Soy Milk with Hagfish Exudate Creates a Flocculated and Fibrous Emulsion- and Particle Gel.

    PubMed

    Böni, Lukas; Rühs, Patrick A; Windhab, Erich J; Fischer, Peter; Kuster, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Hagfish slime is an ultra dilute, elastic and cohesive hydrogel that deploys within milliseconds in cold seawater from a glandularly secreted exudate. The slime is made of long keratin-like fibers and mucin-like glycoproteins that span a network which entraps water and acts as a defense mechanism against predators. Unlike other hydrogels, the slime only confines water physically and is very susceptible to mechanical stress, which makes it unsuitable for many processing operations and potential applications. Despite its huge potential, little work has been done to improve and functionalize the properties of this hydrogel. To address this shortcoming, hagfish exudate was mixed with a soy protein isolate suspension (4% w/v) and with a soy emulsion (commercial soy milk) to form a more stable structure and combine the functionalities of a suspension and emulsion with those of the hydrogel. Hagfish exudate interacted strongly with the soy systems, showing a markedly increased viscoelasticity and water retention. Hagfish mucin was found to induce a depletion and bridging mechanism, which caused the emulsion and suspension to flocculate, making "soy slime", a cohesive and cold-set emulsion- and particle gel. The flocculation network increases viscoelasticity and substantially contributes to liquid retention by entrapping liquid in the additional confinements between aggregated particles and protein fibers. Because the mucin-induced flocculation resembles the salt- or acid-induced flocculation in tofu curd production, the soy slime was cooked for comparison. The cooked soy slime was similar to conventional cooked tofu, but possessed a long-range cohesiveness from the fibers. The fibrous, cold-set, and curd-like structure of the soy slime represents a novel way for a cold coagulation and fiber incorporation into a suspension or emulsion. This mechanism could be used to efficiently gel functionalized emulsions or produce novel tofu-like structured food products.

  14. Chemical Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity Evaluation of Natural Oil Nanostructured Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Alencar, Everton N; Xavier-Júnior, Francisco H; Morais, Andreza R V; Dantas, Teresa R F; Dantas-Santos, Nednaldo; Verissimo, Lourena M; Rehder, Vera L G; Chaves, Guilherme M; Oliveira, Anselmo G; Egitol, E Sócrates T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of nanostructured emulsions based on copaiba (Copaifera langsdorffii) resin-oil, copaiba essential oil, and bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana Shaw) oil against fungi and bacteria related to skin diseases. Firstly, the essential oil was extracted from copaiba resin-oil and these oils, along with bullfrog oil, were characterized by gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Secondly, nanostructured emulsion systems were produced and characterized. The antimicrobial susceptibility assay was performed, followed by the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) determination, the bioautography assay, and the antibiofilm determination. Strains of the genera Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, and Candida were used. The CG-MS analysis was able to identify the components of copaiba resin-oil, copaiba essential oil, and bullfrog oil. The MIC assay in association with the bioautography revealed that some esters of palmitic and oleic acids, a-curcumene, a-himachalene, isothujol, and α-fenchene--probably inhibited some strains. The nanostructured emulsions based on copaiba resin-oil and essential oil improved the antimicrobial activity of the pure oils, especially against Staphylococcus and Candida, resistant to azoles. The bullfrog oil nanostructured emulsion showed a lower antimicrobial effect when compared to the copaiba samples. However, bullfrog oil-based nanostructured emulsion showed a significant antibiofilm activity (p < 0.05). Given the significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of the evaluated oils, it may be concluded that nanostructured emulsions based on copaiba and bullfrog oils are promising candidates for the treatment of infections and also may be used to incorporate other antimicrobial drugs. PMID:26328453

  15. Gelation of Soy Milk with Hagfish Exudate Creates a Flocculated and Fibrous Emulsion- and Particle Gel.

    PubMed

    Böni, Lukas; Rühs, Patrick A; Windhab, Erich J; Fischer, Peter; Kuster, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Hagfish slime is an ultra dilute, elastic and cohesive hydrogel that deploys within milliseconds in cold seawater from a glandularly secreted exudate. The slime is made of long keratin-like fibers and mucin-like glycoproteins that span a network which entraps water and acts as a defense mechanism against predators. Unlike other hydrogels, the slime only confines water physically and is very susceptible to mechanical stress, which makes it unsuitable for many processing operations and potential applications. Despite its huge potential, little work has been done to improve and functionalize the properties of this hydrogel. To address this shortcoming, hagfish exudate was mixed with a soy protein isolate suspension (4% w/v) and with a soy emulsion (commercial soy milk) to form a more stable structure and combine the functionalities of a suspension and emulsion with those of the hydrogel. Hagfish exudate interacted strongly with the soy systems, showing a markedly increased viscoelasticity and water retention. Hagfish mucin was found to induce a depletion and bridging mechanism, which caused the emulsion and suspension to flocculate, making "soy slime", a cohesive and cold-set emulsion- and particle gel. The flocculation network increases viscoelasticity and substantially contributes to liquid retention by entrapping liquid in the additional confinements between aggregated particles and protein fibers. Because the mucin-induced flocculation resembles the salt- or acid-induced flocculation in tofu curd production, the soy slime was cooked for comparison. The cooked soy slime was similar to conventional cooked tofu, but possessed a long-range cohesiveness from the fibers. The fibrous, cold-set, and curd-like structure of the soy slime represents a novel way for a cold coagulation and fiber incorporation into a suspension or emulsion. This mechanism could be used to efficiently gel functionalized emulsions or produce novel tofu-like structured food products. PMID:26808048

  16. Water-in-model oil emulsions studied by small-angle neutron scattering: interfacial film thickness and composition.

    PubMed

    Verruto, Vincent J; Kilpatrick, Peter K

    2008-11-18

    The ever-increasing worldwide demand for energy has led to the upgrading of heavy crude oil and asphaltene-rich feedstocks becoming viable refining options for the petroleum industry. Traditional problems associated with these feedstocks, particularly stable water-in-petroleum emulsions, are drawing increasing attention. Despite considerable research on the interfacial assembly of asphaltenes, resins, and naphthenic acids, much about the resulting interfacial films is not well understood. Here, we describe the use of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate interfacial film properties from model emulsion systems. Modeling the SANS data with both a polydisperse core/shell form factor as well as a thin sheet approximation, we have deduced the film thickness and the asphaltenic composition within the stabilizing interfacial films of water-in-model oil emulsions prepared in toluene, decalin, and 1-methylnaphthalene. Film thicknesses were found to be 100-110 A with little deviation among the three solvents. By contrast, asphaltene composition in the film varied significantly, with decalin leading to the most asphaltene-rich films (30% by volume of the film), while emulsions made in toluene and methylnaphthalene resulted in lower asphaltenic contents (12-15%). Through centrifugation and dilatational rheology, we found that trends of decreasing water resolution (i.e., increasing emulsion stability) and increasing long-time dilatational elasticity corresponded with increasing asphaltene composition in the film. In addition to the asphaltenic composition of the films, here we also deduce the film solvent and water content. Our analyses indicate that 1:1 (O/W) emulsions prepared with 3% (w/w) asphaltenes in toluene and 1 wt % NaCl aqueous solutions at pH 7 and pH 10 resulted in 80-90 A thick films, interfacial areas around 2600-3100 cm (2)/mL, and films that were roughly 25% (v/v) asphaltenic, 60-70% toluene, and 8-12% water. The increased asphaltene and water film

  17. Forces acting in quasi 2d emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Carlos; Lowensohn, Janna; Weeks, Eric

    We study the forces in a quasi two dimensional emulsion system. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsions confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the oil droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. By means of microscopy, we measure the droplet positions and their deformation, which we can relate to the contact forces due to surface tension. We improve over prior work in our lab, achieving a better force resolution. We use this result to measure and calibrate the viscous forces acting in our system, which fully determine all the forces on the droplets. Our results can be applied to study static configurations of emulsion, as well as faster flows.

  18. Nanoscale and Microscale Iron Emulsions for Treating DNAPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Cherie L.

    2002-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using emulsified nanoscale and microscale iron particles to enhance dehalogenation of (Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid) DNAPL free-phase. The emulsified system consisted of a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable oil-in-water emulsion with nanoscale or microscale iron particles contained within the emulsion droplets. It was demonstrated that DNAPLs, such as trichloroethene (TCE), diffuse through the oil membrane of the emulsion particle whereupon they reach an aqueous interior and the surface of an iron particle where dehalogenation takes place. The hydrocarbon reaction by-products of the dehalogenation reaction, primarily ethene (no chlorinated products detected), diffuse out of the emulsion droplet. This study also demonstrated that an iron-emulsion system could be delivered in-situ to the DNAPL pool in a soil matrix by using a simulated push well technique. Iron emulsions degraded pure TCE at a rate comparable to the degradation of dissolved phase TCE by iron particles, while pure iron had a very low degradation rate for free-phase TCE. The iron-emulsion systems can be injected into a sand matrix where they become immobilized and are not moved by flowing water. It has been documented that surfactant micelles possess the ability to pull pooled TCE into emulsion droplets where degradation of TCE takes place.

  19. Tuneable Rheological Properties of Fluorinated Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon Orellana, Laura Andreina; Riechers, Birte; Caen, Ouriel; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    Pickering emulsions are an appealing approach to stabilize liquid-liquid dispersions without surfactants. Recently, amphiphilic silica nanoparticles have been proposed as an alternative to surfactants for droplet microfluidics applications, where aqueous drops are stabilized in fluorinated oils. This system, proved to be effective in preventing the leakage of resorufin, a model dye that was known to leak in surfactant-stabilized drops. The overall capabilities of droplet-based microfluidics technology is highly dependent on the dynamic properties of droplets, interfaces and emulsions. Therefore, fluorinated pickering emulsions dynamic properties need to be characterized, understood and controlled to be used as a substitute of already broadly studied emulsions for droplet microfluidics applications. In this study, fluorinated pickering emulsions have been found to behave as a Herschel Bulkley fluid, representing a challenge for common microfluidic operations as re-injection and sorting of droplets. We found that this behavior is controlled by the interaction between the interfacial properties of the particle-laden interface and the bulk properties of the two phases

  20. Pickering emulsions for food applications: background, trends, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Berton-Carabin, Claire C; Schroën, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized emulsions, also referred to as Pickering emulsions, have garnered exponentially increasing interest in recent years. This has also led to the first food applications, although the number of related publications is still rather low. The involved stabilization mechanisms are fundamentally different as compared to conventional emulsifiers, which can be an asset in terms of emulsion stability. Even though most of the research on Pickering emulsions has been conducted on model systems, with inorganic solid particles, recent progress has been made on the utilization of food-grade or food-compatible organic particles for this purpose. This review reports the latest advances in that respect, including technical challenges, and discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of using Pickering emulsions for food applications, as an alternative to conventional emulsifier-based systems.

  1. Multivariate-parameter optimization of aroma compound release from carbohydrate-oil-protein model emulsions.

    PubMed

    Samavati, Vahid; D-jomeh, Zahra Emam

    2013-11-01

    Optimization for retention and partition coefficient of ethyl acetate in emulsion model systems was investigated using response surface methodology in this paper. The effects of emulsion model ingredients, tragacanth gum (TG) (0.5-1 wt%), whey protein isolate (WPI) (2-4 wt%) and oleic acid (5-10%, v/v) on retention and partition coefficient of ethyl acetate were studied using a five-level three-factor central composite rotatable design (CCRD). Results showed that the regression models generated adequately explained the data variation and significantly represented the actual relationships between the independent and response parameters. The results showed that the highest retention (97.20±0.51%) and lowest partition coefficient (4.51±0.13%) of ethyl acetate were reached at the TG concentration 1 wt%, WPI concentration 4 wt% and oleic acid volume fraction 10% (v/v).

  2. [Liberation of active agents from coherent emulsions].

    PubMed

    Erós, I; Csóka, I; Csányi, E; Aref, T

    2000-01-01

    Drug release from coherent emulsions containing high water concentration (50-80 w/w%) was studied. Composition of coherent systems was as follows: self-emulsifying wax and preserved water. Griseofulvin was applied as active agent in suspended form. The liberation experiments were carried out with Hanson vertical diffusion cell, acceptor phase was distilled water, membrane was celophane one. It was established that the time course of liberation of griseofulvin from coherent emulsions can be characterized with a multiplicative function and the exponent of this function is about 0.5. The quantity of released drug increased linearly with the water content and it decreased exponentially with the viscosity of coherent emulsions. PMID:11379037

  3. Multi-body coalescence in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Haitao; Jing, Benxin; Liu, Fang; Burns, Peter C.; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions have shown unusual behaviours such as the formation of non-spherical droplets and the sudden halt of coalescence between individual droplets. Here we report another unusual behaviour of Pickering emulsions—the simultaneous coalescence of multiple droplets in a single event. Using latex particles, silica particles and carbon nanotubes as model stabilizers, we show that multi-body coalescence can occur in both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. The number of droplets involved in the nth coalscence event equals four times the corresponding number of the tetrahedral sequence in close packing. Furthermore, coalescence is promoted by repulsive latex and silica particles but inhibited by attractive carbon nanotubes. The revelation of multi-body coalescence is expected to help better understand Pickering emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications.

  4. ESI-MS method for in vitro investigation of skin penetration by copper-amino acid complexes: from an emulsion through a model membrane.

    PubMed

    Mazurowska, Lena; Nowak-Buciak, Kinga; Mojski, Mirosław

    2007-07-01

    Copper can be found in many cosmetic formulations, mainly as complexes with peptides, hydroxyacids or amino acids. The main reason that the usage of this element in this context is still increasing is its beneficial biochemical activity, although the mechanism that enables its complexes to permeate through skin barriers is largely unknown. The ability of copper complexes with amino acids to penetrate through the stratum corneum and participate in copper ion transport processes is key to their cosmetic and pharmaceutical activities. The penetration process was studied in vitro in a model system, a Franz diffusion cell with a liposome membrane, where a liquid crystalline system with physicochemical properties similar to those of the intercellular cement of stratum corneum was used to model the skin barrier. The influences of various ligands on the model membrane migration rate of copper ions was studied, and the results highlighted the crucial roles of metal ion complex structure and stability in this process. PMID:17530231

  5. Fundamental study of cold heat-storage system of O/W-type emulsion having cold latent-heat-dispersion material. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shinichi; Nozu, Shigeru

    1995-02-01

    This paper deals with thermal properties of an oil (tetradecane, C{sub 14}H{sub 30}, melting point 278.9K)/water emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. The measured results of the physical properties of the test emulsion, that is, thermal conductivity, specific heat, latent heat, and density, are discussed for the temperature region of solid and liquid phases of the dispersion material (tetradecane). It is clarified that Eucken`s equation can be applied to the estimation of the thermal conductivity of the emulsion. Moreover, it is established that tetradecane as the dispersion material exhibits a supercooling phenomenon which influences the thermal properties. Useful correlation equations of the thermal properties for the emulsion were proposed in terms of temperature and concentration ratio of the emulsion constituents.

  6. Effects of emulsion droplet size on the structure of electrospun ultrafine biocomposite fibers with cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; Ko, Frank K; Hamad, Wadood Y

    2013-11-11

    Electrospinning of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)/poly(lactic acid) (PLA) emulsions has been demonstrated to be an effective dispersion and alignment method to control assembly of CNC into continuous composite ultrafine fibers. CNC-PLA nanocomposite random-fiber mats and aligned-fiber yarns were prepared by emulsion electrospinning. A dispersed phase of CNC aqueous suspension and an immiscible continuous phase of PLA solution comprised the CNC-PLA water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion system. Under a set of specific conditions, the as-spun composite ultrafine fibers assumed core-shell or hollow structures. In these structures, CNCs were aligned along the core in the core-shell case, or on the wall of the hollow cylinder in the hollow fiber case. CNCs act as nucleating agents influencing PLA crystallinity, and improve the strength and stiffness of electrospun composite fibers. The effects of emulsion droplet size on fiber structural formation and CNC distribution within the electrospun fibers have been carefully examined. PMID:23789830

  7. Development of an Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Ultrasound Drug Delivery Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Sebastian, Ian E.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-03-01

    Many therapeutic applications of ultrasound (US) include the use of pefluorocarbon (PFC) microbubbles or emulsions. These colloidal systems can be activated in the presence of US, which in the case of emulsions, results in the production of bubbles—a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). ADV can be used as a drug delivery mechanism, thereby yielding the localized release of toxic agents such a chemotherapeutics. In this work, emulsions that contain PFC and chlorambucil, a chemotherapy drug, are formulated using albumin or lipid shells. For albumin droplets, the oil phase—which contained CHL—clearly enveloped the PFC phase. The albumin emulsion also displayed better retention of CHL in the absence of US, which was evaluated by incubating Chinese hamster ovary cells with the various formulations. Thus, the developed emulsions are suitable for further testing in ADV-induced release of CHL.

  8. Breaking of double emulsions based on electrohydrodynamics principles.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Aleksandar M; Jovanovic, Jovan M; Manojlovic, Vaso; Jovanovic, Mica

    2016-10-01

    This research focuses on the modeling of the liquid-liquid dispersed system, including particular insight on the electrocoalescence (EC) process that occurs during the breaking of double emulsions. The representative system, used in this work, was taken from the pilot plant for solvent extraction of uranium from wet phosphoric acid. The chosen framework required for elucidation of the EC process is based on the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) principles. During the model development it was necessary to consider several theoretical concepts for easier understanding and description of the related events. The first is the concept of entities, and corresponding classification of finely dispersed systems. The second concept is an introduction of almost forgotten basic electrodynamics element the memdiode or memristor as a current controlled device, and corresponding memristive systems. Hence, the conclusions that may be withdrawn from the presented results and findings could enable easier designing of the solutions for a breaking of double emulsions problems, that is, the entrainment problems that may arise in some pilot or industrial plants. Finally, the perspectives and the remaining challenges, considering the here discussed concepts and model based on the EHD principles, are mentioned. PMID:27388130

  9. Breaking of double emulsions based on electrohydrodynamics principles.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Aleksandar M; Jovanovic, Jovan M; Manojlovic, Vaso; Jovanovic, Mica

    2016-10-01

    This research focuses on the modeling of the liquid-liquid dispersed system, including particular insight on the electrocoalescence (EC) process that occurs during the breaking of double emulsions. The representative system, used in this work, was taken from the pilot plant for solvent extraction of uranium from wet phosphoric acid. The chosen framework required for elucidation of the EC process is based on the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) principles. During the model development it was necessary to consider several theoretical concepts for easier understanding and description of the related events. The first is the concept of entities, and corresponding classification of finely dispersed systems. The second concept is an introduction of almost forgotten basic electrodynamics element the memdiode or memristor as a current controlled device, and corresponding memristive systems. Hence, the conclusions that may be withdrawn from the presented results and findings could enable easier designing of the solutions for a breaking of double emulsions problems, that is, the entrainment problems that may arise in some pilot or industrial plants. Finally, the perspectives and the remaining challenges, considering the here discussed concepts and model based on the EHD principles, are mentioned.

  10. [On bitumen emulsions in water].

    PubMed

    Rivas, Hercilio; Gutierrez, Xiomara; Silva, Felix; Chirinos, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    The most important factors, controlling the process of emulsification of highly viscous hydrocarbons in water, which are responsible for keeping the stability and other properties of these systems, are discused in this article. The effect of non-ionic surfactants, such as nonil phenol ethoxilated compounds on the interfacial behavior of bitumen/water systems is analyzed. The effect of the natural surfactants in presence or in absence of electrolytes is also analyzed. The procedures followed in order to obtain the optimal conditions of formulation and formation of bitumen in water emulsions, are discussed and the effect of some parameters on the mean droplet diameter and distribution are also considered. It was found that keeping constant mixing speed and time of mixing, the mean droplet diameter decreases as the bitumen concentration increases. Emulsion stability, which can be monitored by following the changes in mean droplet diameters and viscosity as a function of the storage time, is deeply affected by the type and concentration of surfactant. PMID:15916176

  11. The influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction of ghee.

    PubMed

    Newton, Angela E; Fairbanks, Antony J; Golding, Matt; Andrewes, Paul; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2015-04-15

    Food systems, such as cream and butter, have an emulsion or emulsion-like structure. When these food emulsions are heated to high temperatures to make products such as ghee, the Maillard reaction forms a range of volatile flavour compounds. The objective of this paper was to unravel the specific influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction pathways that occur during the cooking of ghee using model systems. Switching the dispersed phase from oil to water provided a means of altering the ratios of volatile compounds produced in the cooked samples. The oil-in-water emulsion generated a volatile compound profile similar to that of the fat containing two phase model matrix, whereas the water-in-oil emulsion produced a different ratio of these compounds. The ability to generate different volatile compound profiles through the use of inverted emulsion structures could point to a new avenue for control of the Maillard reaction in high temperature food systems. PMID:25466150

  12. The influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction of ghee.

    PubMed

    Newton, Angela E; Fairbanks, Antony J; Golding, Matt; Andrewes, Paul; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2015-04-15

    Food systems, such as cream and butter, have an emulsion or emulsion-like structure. When these food emulsions are heated to high temperatures to make products such as ghee, the Maillard reaction forms a range of volatile flavour compounds. The objective of this paper was to unravel the specific influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction pathways that occur during the cooking of ghee using model systems. Switching the dispersed phase from oil to water provided a means of altering the ratios of volatile compounds produced in the cooked samples. The oil-in-water emulsion generated a volatile compound profile similar to that of the fat containing two phase model matrix, whereas the water-in-oil emulsion produced a different ratio of these compounds. The ability to generate different volatile compound profiles through the use of inverted emulsion structures could point to a new avenue for control of the Maillard reaction in high temperature food systems.

  13. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    concentration and micellization of the surfactant. At the same time, the silica solidifies around the surfactant structures, forming equally sized mesoporous particles. The procedure can be tuned to produce well-separated particles or alternatively particles that are linked together. The latter allows us to create 2D or 3D structures with hierarchical porosity. Oil, water, and surfactant liquid mixtures exhibit very complex phase behavior. Depending on the conditions, such mixtures give rise to highly organized structures. A proper selection of the type and concentration of surfactants determines the structuring at the nanoscale level. In this work, we show that hierarchically bimodal nanoporous structures can be obtained by templating silica microparticles with a specially designed surfactant micelle/microemulsion mixture. Tuning the phase state by adjusting the surfactant composition and concentration allows for the controlled design of a system where microemulsion droplets coexist with smaller surfactant micellar structures. The microemulsion droplet and micellar dimensions determine the two types of pore sizes (single nanometers and tens of nanometers). We also demonstrate the fabrication of carbon and carbon/platinum replicas of the silica microspheres using a "lost-wax" approach. Such particles have great potential for the design of electrocatalysts for fuel cells, chromatography separations, and other applications. It was determined that slight variations in microemulsion mixture components (electrolyte concentration, wt% of surfactants, oil to sol ratio, etc.) produces strikingly different pore morphologies and particle surface areas. Control over the size and structure of the smaller micelle-templated pores was made possible by varying the length of the hydrocarbon block within the trimethyl ammonium bromide surfactant and characterized using X-ray diffraction. The effect of emulsion aging was studied by synthesizing particles at progressive time levels from a sample

  14. Synthetic Polymers at Interfaces: Monodisperse Emulsions Multiple Emulsions and Liquid Marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guanqing

    from surfactant-free emulsion polymerization were proved to be effective liquid marble stabilizers. The influence of drying conditions on the properties of liquid marbles was investigated through a macroscopic way. The pH value of the particle dispersion, which influences the protonation states of the particles before freeze-drying, has a profound influence on the property of the stabilized liquid marbles. A brief comment to the future of work of these investigated systems is delivered in the last part.

  15. Pickering Interfacial Catalysts for solvent-free biomass transformation: physicochemical behavior of non-aqueous emulsions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaoyu; Tay, Astrid; Pera-Titus, Marc; Zhou, Wen-Juan; Benhabbari, Samy; Feng, Xiaoshuang; Malcouronne, Guillaume; Bonneviot, Laurent; De Campo, Floryan; Wang, Limin; Clacens, Jean-Marc

    2014-08-01

    A key challenge in biomass conversion is how to achieve valuable molecules with optimal reactivity in the presence of immiscible reactants. This issue is usually tackled using either organic solvents or surfactants to promote emulsification, making industrial processes expensive and not environmentally friendly. As an alternative, Pickering emulsions using solid particles with tailored designed surface properties can promote phase contact within intrinsically biphasic systems. Here we show that amphiphilic silica nanoparticles bearing a proper combination of alkyl and strong acidic surface groups can generate stable Pickering emulsions of the glycerol/dodecanol system in the temperature range of 35-130°C. We also show that such particles can perform as Pickering Interfacial Catalysts for the acid-catalyzed etherification of glycerol with dodecanol at 150°C. Our findings shed light on some key parameters governing emulsion stability and catalytic activity of Pickering interfacial catalytic systems. This understanding is critical to pave the way toward technological solutions for biomass upgrading able to promote eco-efficient reactions between immiscible organic reagents with neither use of solvents nor surfactants. PMID:24360842

  16. Pickering Interfacial Catalysts for solvent-free biomass transformation: physicochemical behavior of non-aqueous emulsions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaoyu; Tay, Astrid; Pera-Titus, Marc; Zhou, Wen-Juan; Benhabbari, Samy; Feng, Xiaoshuang; Malcouronne, Guillaume; Bonneviot, Laurent; De Campo, Floryan; Wang, Limin; Clacens, Jean-Marc

    2014-08-01

    A key challenge in biomass conversion is how to achieve valuable molecules with optimal reactivity in the presence of immiscible reactants. This issue is usually tackled using either organic solvents or surfactants to promote emulsification, making industrial processes expensive and not environmentally friendly. As an alternative, Pickering emulsions using solid particles with tailored designed surface properties can promote phase contact within intrinsically biphasic systems. Here we show that amphiphilic silica nanoparticles bearing a proper combination of alkyl and strong acidic surface groups can generate stable Pickering emulsions of the glycerol/dodecanol system in the temperature range of 35-130°C. We also show that such particles can perform as Pickering Interfacial Catalysts for the acid-catalyzed etherification of glycerol with dodecanol at 150°C. Our findings shed light on some key parameters governing emulsion stability and catalytic activity of Pickering interfacial catalytic systems. This understanding is critical to pave the way toward technological solutions for biomass upgrading able to promote eco-efficient reactions between immiscible organic reagents with neither use of solvents nor surfactants.

  17. Double Emulsion Templated Celloidosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriaga, Laura R.; Marquez, Samantha M.; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Chang, Connie; Wilking, Jim; Monroy, Francisco; Marquez, Manuel; Weitz, David A.

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel approach for fabricating celloidosomes, which represent a hollow and spherical three-dimensional self-assembly of living cells encapsulating an aqueous core. Glass- capillary microfluidics is used to generate monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion templates using lipids as stabilizers. Such templates allow for obtaining single but also double concentric celloidosomes. In addition, after a solvent removal step the double emulsion templates turn into monodisperse lipid vesicles, whose membrane spontaneously phase separates when choosing the adequate lipid composition, providing the adequate scaffold for fabricating Janus-celloidosomes. These structures may find applications in the development of bioreactors in which the synergistic effects of two different types of cells selectively adsorbed on one of the vesicle hemispheres may be exploited.

  18. FINE GRAIN NUCLEAR EMULSION

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, A.J.

    1962-04-24

    A method of preparing nuclear track emulsions having mean grain sizes less than 0.1 microns is described. The method comprises adding silver nitrate to potassium bromide at a rate at which there is always a constant, critical excess of silver ions. For minimum size grains, the silver ion concentration is maintained at the critical level of about pAg 2.0 to 5.0 during prectpitation, pAg being defined as the negative logarithm of the silver ion concentration. It is preferred to eliminate the excess silver at the conclusion of the precipitation steps. The emulsion is processed by methods in all other respects generally similar to the methods of the prior art. (AEC)

  19. Automated method of tracing proton tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Jin-lu; Li, Hong-yun; Song, Ji-wen; Zhang, Jian-fu; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Zhong-bing; Liu, Jin-liang; Liu, Lin-yue

    2015-07-01

    The low performance of the manual recognition of proton-recoil tracks in nuclear emulsions has limited its application to energy spectrum measurement of a pulsed neutron source. We developed an automated microscope system to trace proton-recoil tracks in nuclear emulsions. Given a start point on the proton track of interest, the microscope system can automatically trace and record the entire track using an image processing algorithm. Tests indicate that no interaction of the operator is needed in tracing the entire track. This automated microscope greatly reduces the labor of the operator and increases the efficiency of track data collection in nuclear emulsion.

  20. Chemical Demulsification of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurahman; Nour, H.; Mohd Yunus, Rosli; Jemaat, Zulkifly

    Demulsification (emulsion breaking) is necessary in many practical applications such as the petroleum industry, painting and waste-water treatment in environmental technology. Chemical demulsification is the most widely applied method of treating water-in-crude oil emulsions and involves the use of chemical additives to accelerate the emulsion breaking process. The effect of chemical demulsification operations on the stability and properties of water-in-crude oil emulsions was assessed experimentally. In this regard, Amine Demulsifier, Polyhydric Alcohol, Acid and Polymeric demulsifiers were used. Using samples of w/o, the data presented for several commercial-type demulsifiers show a strong connection (correlation) between good performance (fast coalescence) and the demulsifiers. The relative rates of water separation were characterized via beaker tests. The amine group demulsifiers promoted best coalescence of droplets. In contrast, polymeric demulsifier group is the least in water separation.

  1. Evaporation from an ionic liquid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Stig E

    2007-03-15

    The conditions during evaporation in a liquid crystal-in-ionic liquid microemulsion (LC/microEm) were estimated using the phase diagram of the system. The equations for selected tie lines were established and the coordinates calculated for the sites, at which the evaporation lines crossed the tie lines. These values combined with the coordinates for the phases connecting the tie lines were used to calculate the amounts and the composition of the fractions of the two phases present in the emulsion during the evaporation. One of the emulsion phases was a lamellar liquid crystal and high energy emulsification would lead to the liquid crystal being disrupted to form vesicles. Such a system tenders a unique opportunity to study the interaction between vesicles and normal micelles, which gradually change to inverse micelles over bi-continuous structures. The amount of vesicles in the liquid phase versus the fraction liquid crystal was calculated for two extreme cases of vesicle core size and shell thickness. The limit of evaporation while retaining the vesicle structure was calculated for emulsions of different original compositions assuming the minimum continuous liquid phase to be 50% of the emulsion.

  2. Evaporation from an ionic liquid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Stig E

    2007-03-15

    The conditions during evaporation in a liquid crystal-in-ionic liquid microemulsion (LC/microEm) were estimated using the phase diagram of the system. The equations for selected tie lines were established and the coordinates calculated for the sites, at which the evaporation lines crossed the tie lines. These values combined with the coordinates for the phases connecting the tie lines were used to calculate the amounts and the composition of the fractions of the two phases present in the emulsion during the evaporation. One of the emulsion phases was a lamellar liquid crystal and high energy emulsification would lead to the liquid crystal being disrupted to form vesicles. Such a system tenders a unique opportunity to study the interaction between vesicles and normal micelles, which gradually change to inverse micelles over bi-continuous structures. The amount of vesicles in the liquid phase versus the fraction liquid crystal was calculated for two extreme cases of vesicle core size and shell thickness. The limit of evaporation while retaining the vesicle structure was calculated for emulsions of different original compositions assuming the minimum continuous liquid phase to be 50% of the emulsion. PMID:17207810

  3. Stability indicating HPLC-UV method for detection of curcumin in Curcuma longa extract and emulsion formulation.

    PubMed

    Syed, Haroon Khalid; Liew, Kai Bin; Loh, Gabriel Onn Kit; Peh, Kok Khiang

    2015-03-01

    A stability-indicating HPLC-UV method for the determination of curcumin in Curcuma longa extract and emulsion was developed. The system suitability parameters, theoretical plates (N), tailing factor (T), capacity factor (K'), height equivalent of a theoretical plate (H) and resolution (Rs) were calculated. Stress degradation studies (acid, base, oxidation, heat and UV light) of curcumin were performed in emulsion. It was found that N>6500, T<1.1, K' was 2.68-3.75, HETP about 37 and Rs was 1.8. The method was linear from 2 to 200 μg/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The intra-day precision and accuracy for curcumin were ⩽0.87% and ⩽2.0%, while the inter-day precision and accuracy values were ⩽2.1% and ⩽-1.92. Curcumin degraded in emulsion under acid, alkali and UV light. In conclusion, the stability-indicating method could be employed to determine curcumin in bulk and emulsions.

  4. Role of Counterions in Controlling the Properties of Ultrasonically Generated Chitosan-Stabilized Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Enrico; Cavalieri, Francesca; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2015-06-17

    An oil-in-water emulsion was ultrasonically prepared in aqueous chitosan solutions containing different counterions. Tetradecane was used as the oil phase in order to mimic nonpolar substances used in food processes. Various acids were used to dissolve chitosan, and we found that conjugate bases of the acids used, which act as counterions to neutralize the positive charges of ammonium ions present in the chitosan backbone, played a significant role in controlling the size, size distribution, and stability of chitosan-encapsulated tedradecane emulsion droplets (microspheres). The counterion effect is also found to be strongly dependent upon tetradecane (TD)/chitosan (CS) ratio and ultrasonic power. Key observations are: (i) for a given TD/CS ratio, the size and size distribution decrease when the acid is varied from nitric acid to benzenesulfonic acid at high TD/CS ratio, and the effect becomes less significant at low TD/CS ratio; (ii) for a given acid, the size and size distribution increase with an increase in TD/CS ratio; and (iii) at low TD/CS ratio the size and size distribution are significantly influenced by the viscosity of the system. A possible mechanism for the observed counterion effect is proposed. The role of counterions, solution viscosity, and ultrasonic power in controlling the physical and functional properties of ultrasonically generated chitosan-stabilized tetradecane microspheres is discussed in detail. The key new finding of this study is that it is possible to form stable emulsions without the addition of external emulsifiers and stabilizers, but only using chitosan with different acids to dissolve chitosan. This strategy could be used in the generation of stable food emulsions. PMID:26000458

  5. Role of Counterions in Controlling the Properties of Ultrasonically Generated Chitosan-Stabilized Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Enrico; Cavalieri, Francesca; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2015-06-17

    An oil-in-water emulsion was ultrasonically prepared in aqueous chitosan solutions containing different counterions. Tetradecane was used as the oil phase in order to mimic nonpolar substances used in food processes. Various acids were used to dissolve chitosan, and we found that conjugate bases of the acids used, which act as counterions to neutralize the positive charges of ammonium ions present in the chitosan backbone, played a significant role in controlling the size, size distribution, and stability of chitosan-encapsulated tedradecane emulsion droplets (microspheres). The counterion effect is also found to be strongly dependent upon tetradecane (TD)/chitosan (CS) ratio and ultrasonic power. Key observations are: (i) for a given TD/CS ratio, the size and size distribution decrease when the acid is varied from nitric acid to benzenesulfonic acid at high TD/CS ratio, and the effect becomes less significant at low TD/CS ratio; (ii) for a given acid, the size and size distribution increase with an increase in TD/CS ratio; and (iii) at low TD/CS ratio the size and size distribution are significantly influenced by the viscosity of the system. A possible mechanism for the observed counterion effect is proposed. The role of counterions, solution viscosity, and ultrasonic power in controlling the physical and functional properties of ultrasonically generated chitosan-stabilized tetradecane microspheres is discussed in detail. The key new finding of this study is that it is possible to form stable emulsions without the addition of external emulsifiers and stabilizers, but only using chitosan with different acids to dissolve chitosan. This strategy could be used in the generation of stable food emulsions.

  6. Non-coalescence of oppositely charged droplets in pH-sensitive emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Seiffert, Sebastian; Thiele, Julian; Abate, Adam R.; Weitz, David A.; Richtering, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Like charges stabilize emulsions, whereas opposite charges break emulsions. This is the fundamental principle for many industrial and practical processes. Using micrometer-sized pH-sensitive polymeric hydrogel particles as emulsion stabilizers, we prepare emulsions that consist of oppositely charged droplets, which do not coalesce. We observe noncoalescence of oppositely charged droplets in bulk emulsification as well as in microfluidic devices, where oppositely charged droplets are forced to collide within channel junctions. The results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions between droplets do not determine their stability and reveal the unique pH-dependent properties of emulsions stabilized by soft microgel particles. The noncoalescence can be switched to coalescence by neutralizing the microgels, and the emulsion can be broken on demand. This unusual feature of the microgel-stabilized emulsions offers fascinating opportunities for future applications of these systems. PMID:22203968

  7. Factors that affect Pickering emulsions stabilized by graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    He, Yongqiang; Wu, Fei; Sun, Xiying; Li, Ruqiang; Guo, Yongqin; Li, Chuanbao; Zhang, Lu; Xing, Fubao; Wang, Wei; Gao, Jianping

    2013-06-12

    Stable Pickering emulsions were prepared using only graphene oxide (GO) as a stabilizer, and the effects of the type of oil, the sonication time, the GO concentration, the oil/water ratio, and the pH value on the stability, type, and morphology of these emulsions were investigated. In addition, the effects of salt and the extent of GO reduction on emulsion formation and stability were studied and discussed. The average droplet size decreased with sonication time and with GO concentration, and the emulsions tended to achieve good stability at intermediate oil/water ratios and at low pH values. In all solvents, the emulsions were of the oil-in-water type, but interestingly, some water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) multiple emulsion droplets were also observed with low GO concentrations, low pH values, high oil/water ratios, high salt concentrations, or moderately reduced GO in the benzyl chloride-water system. A Pickering emulsion stabilized by Ag/GO was also prepared, and its catalytic performance for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol was investigated. This research paves the way for the fabrication of graphene-based functional materials with novel nanostructures and microstructures.

  8. Pickering-type water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsions toward multihollow nanocomposite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hayata; Okada, Masahiro; Fujii, Syuji; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2010-09-01

    Multihollow hydroxyapatite (HAp)/poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanocomposite microspheres were readily fabricated by solvent evaporation from a "Pickering-type" water-in-(dichloromethane solution of PLLA)-in-water multiple emulsion stabilized with HAp nanoparticles. The multiple emulsion was stabilized with the aid of PLLA molecules used as a wettability modifier for HAp nanoparticles, although HAp nanoparticles did not work solely as particulate emulsifiers for Pickering-type emulsions consisting of pure dichloromethane and water. The interaction between PLLA and HAp nanoparticles at the oil-water interfaces plays a crucial role toward the preparation of stable multiple emulsion and multihollow microspheres.

  9. Design and in vitro evaluation of biocompatible dexamethasone-loaded nanoparticle dispersions, obtained from nano-emulsions, for inhalatory therapy.

    PubMed

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Llinàs, Meritxell; Solans, Conxita; Calderó, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticle dispersions containing dexamethasone (DXM) have been prepared from O/W nano-emulsions of the water/polysorbate 80/[4 wt% poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid+0.18 wt% DXM in ethyl acetate] system by a low-energy method at 25°C. Nano-emulsions were formed at O/S ratios between 45/55 and 72/25 and water contents above 70 wt% by the phase inversion composition (PIC) method. The mean hydrodynamic diameter of nano-emulsions with a constant water content of 90 wt% and O/S ratios from 50/50 to 70/30 was below 350 nm as assessed by dynamic light scattering. The nanoparticles obtained from these nano-emulsions (by solvent evaporation) showed mean diameters of around 130 nm, as determined by transmission electron microscopy image analysis. Therapeutic concentrations of DXM were encapsulated in the nano-emulsions prior to nanoparticle preparation. DXM entrapment efficiency of the nanoparticle dispersion (above 74 wt%) decreased at increasing O/S ratios of the precursor nano-emulsion while DXM loading, which was around 10 mg/100 mL, showed the reverse tendency. DXM release from nanoparticle dispersions was about an order of magnitude slower than from an aqueous solution. In vitro studies performed in a lung carcinoma cell line and in vitro haemolysis studies performed in red blood cells revealed a dose-dependent toxicity and haemolytic response, respectively. The as-prepared nanoparticle dispersions were non-toxic up to a concentration of 40 μg/mL and non-haemolytic up to a concentration of 1 mg/mL. After purification, nanoparticle dispersions were non-toxic up to a concentration of 90 μg/mL. These results allow concluding that these polymeric nanoparticle dispersions are good candidates for inhalatory therapy.

  10. Influence of different types and proportions of added edible seaweeds on characteristics of low-salt gel/emulsion meat systems.

    PubMed

    Cofrades, S; López-López, I; Solas, M T; Bravo, L; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2008-08-01

    The effects of three different types of edible seaweeds, Sea Spaghetti (Himanthalia elongata), Wakame (Undaria pinnatifida), and Nori (Porphyra umbilicalis) added at two concentrations (2.5% and 5% dry matter) on the physicochemical and morphological characteristics of gel/emulsion systems were evaluated. The addition of seaweeds improved (P<0.05) water- and fat-binding properties except in the case of Nori added at 2.5%. Hardness and chewiness of the cooked products with added seaweed were higher (P<0.05), and springiness and cohesiveness were lower (P<0.05) than in control samples. Colour changes in meat systems were affected by the type of seaweed. The morphology of sample differed depending on the type of seaweed added, and this is the result of differences in physical and chemical characteristic of the seaweed powder used. In general, products formulated with the brown seaweeds (Sea Spaghetti and Wakame) exhibited similar behaviour, different from that of products made with the red seaweed Nori. PMID:22063041

  11. Rubberized asphalt emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, E.

    1986-09-02

    A method is described of making a rubberized asphalt composition which comprises the steps of: (a) combining asphalt with a hydrocarbon oil having a flash point of 300/sup 0/F. or more to provide a homogenous asphalt-oil mixture or solution, (b) then combining the asphalt-oil mixture with a particulate rubber at a temperature sufficient to provide a homogenous asphalt-rubber-oil gel, and (c) emulsifying the asphalt-rubber-oil gel by passing the gel, water, and an emulsifying agent through a colloid mill to provide an emulsion.

  12. Impact of parenteral lipid emulsions on metabolomic phenotype in preterm TPN-fed piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy for hospitalized neonates. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the US, but new generation emulsions include Omegaven (OV) and SMOFlipid (SL). There are no studies describing the metabolit...

  13. Impact of parenteral lipid emulsions on the metabolomic phenotype in preterm TPN-fed piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy for hospitalized neonates. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the U.S, but new generation emulsions include Omegaven (OV) and SMOFlipid (SL). There are no studies describing the metaboli...

  14. Dehydration of oil waste emulsions by means of flocculants

    SciTech Connect

    Gandurina, L.V.; Butseva, L.N.; Shtondina, V.S.

    1995-05-01

    Oil waste emulsions are formed in the course of pumping petroleum crudes and products and are collected from the surfaces of equipment in recirculating water systems and wastewater disposal facilities (oil separators, sand traps, oil traps, holding pits for accidental spills, settlers, ponds, sludge accumulators, and so on). Emulsions are also obtained in the course of cleaning equipment in crude oil desalting and dehydration units. Such emulsions are stable, structurized systems that are very resistant to dewatering by heating and settling in separator tanks. In order to break stabilized emulsions, i.e., in order to ensure complete coalescence of drops when they collide, it is not sufficient to increase the forces of mutual attraction of drops at the moment of collision; in addition, the protective shell must be either destroyed or weakened. Demulsifying agents, or surfactants, will displace the stabilizers. This report is concerned with demulsifier efficiency.

  15. Synthesis, characterization, and morphology study of poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid)-grafted-poly(styrene-co-methyl methacrylate) "raspberry"-shape like structure microgels by pre-emulsified semi-batch emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Ros Azlinawati; Hashim, Shahrir; Laftah, Waham Ashaier

    2013-02-01

    A novel microgels were polymerized using styrene (St), methyl methacrylate (MMA), acrylamide (AAm), and acrylic acid (AAc) monomers in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) cross-linker. Pre-emulsified monomer was first prepared followed by polymerizing monomers using semi-batch emulsion polymerization. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) were used to determine the chemical structure and to indentify the related functional group. Grafting and cross-linking of poly(acrylamide-co-acrilic acid)-grafted-poly(styrene-co-methyl methacrylate) [poly(AAm-co-AAc)-g-poly(St-co-MMA)] microgels are approved by the disappearance of band at 1300 cm(-1), 1200 cm(-1) and 1163 cm(-1) of FTIR spectrum and the appearance of CH peaks at 5.5-5.7 ppm in (1)H NMR spectrum. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images indicated that poly(St-co-MMA) particle was lobed morphology coated by cross-linked poly(AAm-co-AAc) shell. Furthermore, SEM results revealed that poly(AAm-co-AAc)-g-poly(St-co-MMA) is composite particle that consist of "raspberry"-shape like structure core. Internal structures of the microgels showed homogeneous network of pores, an extensive interconnection among pores, thicker pore walls, and open network structures. Water absorbency test indicated that the sample with particle size 0.43 μm had lower equilibrium water content, % than the sample with particle size 7.39 μm. PMID:23123033

  16. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base status... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base status... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base status... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base status... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section...

  20. Effect of layer-by-layer coatings and localization of antioxidant on oxidative stability of a model encapsulated bioactive compound in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanjie; Nitin, N

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of encapsulated bioactives in emulsions is one of the key challenges that limit shelf-life of many emulsion containing products. This study seeks to quantify the role of layer-by-layer coatings and localization of antioxidant molecules at the emulsion interface in influencing oxidation of the encapsulated bioactives. Oxidative barrier properties of the emulsions were simulated by measuring the rate of reaction of peroxyl radicals generated in the aqueous phase with the encapsulated radical sensitive dye in the lipid core of the emulsions. The results of peroxyl radical permeation were compared to the stability of encapsulated retinol (model bioactive) in emulsions. To evaluate the role of layer-by-layer coatings in influencing oxidative barrier properties, radical permeation rates and retinol stability were evaluated in emulsion formulations of SDS emulsion and SDS emulsion with one or two layers of polymers (ϵ-polylysine and dextran sulfate) coated at the interface. To localize antioxidant molecules to the interface, gallic acid (GA) was chemically conjugated with ϵ-polylysine and subsequently deposited on SDS emulsion based on electrostatic interactions. Emulsion formulations with localized GA molecules at the interface were compared with SDS emulsion with GA molecules in the bulk aqueous phase. The results of this study demonstrate the advantage of localization of antioxidant at the interface and the limited impact of short chain polymer coatings at the interface of emulsions in reducing permeation of radicals and oxidation of a model encapsulated bioactive in oil-in-water emulsions. PMID:26283496

  1. Programmed emulsions for sodium reduction in emulsion based foods.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Natalie; Hewson, Louise; Fisk, Ian; Wolf, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    In this research a microstructure approach to reduce sodium levels in emulsion based foods is presented. If successful, this strategy will enable reduction of sodium without affecting consumer satisfaction with regard to salty taste. The microstructure approach comprised of entrapment of sodium in the internal aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. These were designed to destabilise during oral processing when in contact with the salivary enzyme amylase in combination with the mechanical manipulation of the emulsion between the tongue and palate. Oral destabilisation was achieved through breakdown of the emulsion that was stabilised with a commercially modified octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-starch. Microstructure breakdown and salt release was evaluated utilising in vitro, in vivo and sensory methods. For control emulsions, stabilised with orally inert proteins, no loss of structure and no release of sodium from the internal aqueous phase was found. The OSA-starch microstructure breakdown took the initial form of oil droplet coalescence. It is hypothesised that during this coalescence process sodium from the internalised aqueous phase is partially released and is therefore available for perception. Indeed, programmed emulsions showed an enhancement in saltiness perception; a 23.7% reduction in sodium could be achieved without compromise in salty taste (p < 0.05; 120 consumers). This study shows a promising new approach for sodium reduction in liquid and semi-liquid emulsion based foods. PMID:25865459

  2. Programmed emulsions for sodium reduction in emulsion based foods.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Natalie; Hewson, Louise; Fisk, Ian; Wolf, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    In this research a microstructure approach to reduce sodium levels in emulsion based foods is presented. If successful, this strategy will enable reduction of sodium without affecting consumer satisfaction with regard to salty taste. The microstructure approach comprised of entrapment of sodium in the internal aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. These were designed to destabilise during oral processing when in contact with the salivary enzyme amylase in combination with the mechanical manipulation of the emulsion between the tongue and palate. Oral destabilisation was achieved through breakdown of the emulsion that was stabilised with a commercially modified octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-starch. Microstructure breakdown and salt release was evaluated utilising in vitro, in vivo and sensory methods. For control emulsions, stabilised with orally inert proteins, no loss of structure and no release of sodium from the internal aqueous phase was found. The OSA-starch microstructure breakdown took the initial form of oil droplet coalescence. It is hypothesised that during this coalescence process sodium from the internalised aqueous phase is partially released and is therefore available for perception. Indeed, programmed emulsions showed an enhancement in saltiness perception; a 23.7% reduction in sodium could be achieved without compromise in salty taste (p < 0.05; 120 consumers). This study shows a promising new approach for sodium reduction in liquid and semi-liquid emulsion based foods.

  3. Stabilization of Pickering Emulsions with Oppositely Charged Latex Particles: Influence of Various Parameters and Particle Arrangement around Droplets.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Trivikram; Binks, Bernard P; Mani, Ethayaraja; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2015-10-20

    In this study we explore the fundamental aspects of Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged particles. Using oppositely charged latex particles as a model system, Pickering emulsions with good long-term stability can be obtained without the need for any electrolyte. The effects of parameters like oil to water ratio, mixed particle composition, and pH on emulsion type and stability are explored and linked to the behavior of the aqueous particle dispersion prior to emulsification. The particle composition is found to affect the formation of emulsions, viz., stable emulsions were obtained close to a particle number ratio of 1:1, and no emulsion was formed with either positively or negatively charged particles alone. The emulsions in particle mixtures exhibited phase inversion from oil-in-water to water-in-oil beyond an oil volume fraction of 0.8. Morphological features of emulsion droplets in terms of particle arrangement on the droplets are discussed.

  4. [Multiple emulsions; bioactive compounds and functional foods].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The continued appearance of scientific evidence about the role of diet and/or its components in health and wellness, has favored the emergence of functional foods which currently constitute one of the chief factors driving the development of new products. The application of multiple emulsions opens new possibilities in the design and development of functional foods. Multiple emulsions can be used as an intermediate product (food ingredient) into technological strategies normally used in the optimization of the presence of bioactive compounds in healthy and functional foods. This paper presents a summary of the types, characteristics and formation of multiple emulsions, possible location of bioactive compounds and their potential application in the design and preparation of healthy and functional foods. Such applications are manifested particularly relevant in relation to quantitative and qualitative aspects of lipid material (reduced fat/calories and optimization of fatty acid profile), encapsulation of bioactive compounds mainly hydrophilic and sodium reduction. This strategy offers interesting possibilities regarding masking flavours and improving sensory characteristics of foods. PMID:24160194

  5. [Multiple emulsions; bioactive compounds and functional foods].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The continued appearance of scientific evidence about the role of diet and/or its components in health and wellness, has favored the emergence of functional foods which currently constitute one of the chief factors driving the development of new products. The application of multiple emulsions opens new possibilities in the design and development of functional foods. Multiple emulsions can be used as an intermediate product (food ingredient) into technological strategies normally used in the optimization of the presence of bioactive compounds in healthy and functional foods. This paper presents a summary of the types, characteristics and formation of multiple emulsions, possible location of bioactive compounds and their potential application in the design and preparation of healthy and functional foods. Such applications are manifested particularly relevant in relation to quantitative and qualitative aspects of lipid material (reduced fat/calories and optimization of fatty acid profile), encapsulation of bioactive compounds mainly hydrophilic and sodium reduction. This strategy offers interesting possibilities regarding masking flavours and improving sensory characteristics of foods.

  6. Pickering emulsions prepared by layered niobate K₄Nb₆O₁₇ intercalated with organic cations and photocatalytic dye decomposition in the emulsions.

    PubMed

    Nakato, Teruyuki; Ueda, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Sachika; Terao, Ryosuke; Kameyama, Miyuki; Mouri, Emiko

    2012-08-01

    We investigated emulsions stabilized with particles of layered hexaniobate, known as a semiconductor photocatalyst, and photocatalytic degradation of dyes in the emulsions. Hydrophobicity of the niobate particles was adjusted with the intercalation of alkylammonium ions into the interlayer spaces to enable emulsification in a toluene-water system. After the modification of interlayer space with hexylammonium ions, the niobate stabilized water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions in a broad composition range. Optical microscopy showed that the niobate particles covered the surfaces of emulsion droplets and played a role of emulsifying agents. The niobate particles also enabled the generation of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions in a limited composition range. Modification with dodecylammonium ions, which turned the niobate particles more hydrophobic, only gave w/o emulsions, and the particles were located not only at the toluene-water interface but also inside the toluene continuous phase. On the other hand, interlayer modification with butylammonium ions led to the formation of o/w emulsions. When porphyrin dyes were added to the system, the cationic dye was adsorbed on niobate particles at the emulsion droplets whereas the lipophilic dye was dissolved in toluene. Upon UV irradiation, both of the dyes were degraded photocatalytically. When the cationic and lipophilic porphyrin molecules were simultaneously added to the emulsions, both of the dyes were photodecomposed nonselectively.

  7. Heavy crude oils/particle stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kralova, Iva; Sjöblom, Johan; Øye, Gisle; Simon, Sébastien; Grimes, Brian A; Paso, Kristofer

    2011-12-12

    Fluid characterization is a key technology for success in process design for crude oil mixtures in the future offshore. In the present article modern methods have been developed and optimized for crude oil applications. The focus is on destabilization processes in w/o emulsions, such as creaming/sedimentation and flocculation/coalescence. In our work, the separation technology was based on improvement of current devices to promote coalescence of the emulsified systems. Stabilizing properties based on particles was given special attention. A variety of particles like silica nanoparticles (AEROSIL®), asphalthenes, wax (paraffin) were used. The behavior of these particles and corresponding emulsion systems was determined by use of modern analytical equipment, such as SARA fractionation, NIR, electro-coalescers (determine critical electric field), Langmuir technique, pedant drop technique, TG-QCM, AFM.

  8. Analytical applications of emulsions and microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Burguera, José Luis; Burguera, Marcela

    2012-07-15

    Dispersion systems like emulsions and microemulsions are able to solubilize both polar and non-polar substances due to the special arrangement of the oil and aqueous phases. The main advantages of using emulsions or microemulsions in analytical chemistry are that they do not require the previous destruction of the sample matrix or the use of organic solvents as diluents, and behave similarly to aqueous solutions, frequently allowing the use of aqueous standard solutions for calibration. However, it appears that there are many contradictory concepts and misunderstandings often related to terms definition when referring to such systems. The main aim of this review is to outline the differences between these two aggregates and to give an overview of the most recent advances on their analytical applications with emphasis on the potentiality of the on-line emulsification processes. PMID:22817921

  9. Heavy crude oils/particle stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kralova, Iva; Sjöblom, Johan; Øye, Gisle; Simon, Sébastien; Grimes, Brian A; Paso, Kristofer

    2011-12-12

    Fluid characterization is a key technology for success in process design for crude oil mixtures in the future offshore. In the present article modern methods have been developed and optimized for crude oil applications. The focus is on destabilization processes in w/o emulsions, such as creaming/sedimentation and flocculation/coalescence. In our work, the separation technology was based on improvement of current devices to promote coalescence of the emulsified systems. Stabilizing properties based on particles was given special attention. A variety of particles like silica nanoparticles (AEROSIL®), asphalthenes, wax (paraffin) were used. The behavior of these particles and corresponding emulsion systems was determined by use of modern analytical equipment, such as SARA fractionation, NIR, electro-coalescers (determine critical electric field), Langmuir technique, pedant drop technique, TG-QCM, AFM. PMID:22047991

  10. Drug-nanoencapsulated PLGA microspheres prepared by emulsion electrospray with controlled release behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Shenglian; Liu, Huiying; Yu, Shukui; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Luning

    2016-01-01

    The development of modern therapeutics has raised the requirement for controlled drug delivery system which is able to efficiently encapsulate bioactive agents and achieve their release at a desired rate satisfying the need of the practical system. In this study, two kind of aqueous model drugs with different molecule weight, Congo red and albumin from bovine serum (BSA) were nano-encapsulated in poly (dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres by emulsion electrospray. In the preparation process, the aqueous phase of drugs was added into the PLGA chloroform solution to form the emulsion solution. The emulsion was then electrosprayed to fabricate drug-nanoencapsulated PLGA microspheres. The morphology of the PLGA microspheres was affected by the volume ratio of aqueous drug phase and organic PLGA phase (Vw/Vo) and the molecule weight of model drugs. Confocal laser scanning microcopy showed the nanodroplets of drug phase were scattered in the PLGA microspheres homogenously with different distribution patterns related to Vw/Vo. With the increase of the volume ratio of aqueous drug phase, the number of nanodroplets increased forming continuous phase gradually that could accelerate drug release rate. Moreover, BSA showed a slower release rate from PLGA microspheres comparing to Congo red, which indicated the drug release rate could be affected by not only Vw/Vo but also the molecule weight of model drug. In brief, the PLGA microspheres prepared using emulsion electrospray provided an efficient and simple system to achieve controlled drug release at a desired rate satisfying the need of the practices.

  11. Drug-nanoencapsulated PLGA microspheres prepared by emulsion electrospray with controlled release behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Shenglian; Liu, Huiying; Yu, Shukui; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Luning

    2016-01-01

    The development of modern therapeutics has raised the requirement for controlled drug delivery system which is able to efficiently encapsulate bioactive agents and achieve their release at a desired rate satisfying the need of the practical system. In this study, two kind of aqueous model drugs with different molecule weight, Congo red and albumin from bovine serum (BSA) were nano-encapsulated in poly (dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres by emulsion electrospray. In the preparation process, the aqueous phase of drugs was added into the PLGA chloroform solution to form the emulsion solution. The emulsion was then electrosprayed to fabricate drug-nanoencapsulated PLGA microspheres. The morphology of the PLGA microspheres was affected by the volume ratio of aqueous drug phase and organic PLGA phase (Vw/Vo) and the molecule weight of model drugs. Confocal laser scanning microcopy showed the nanodroplets of drug phase were scattered in the PLGA microspheres homogenously with different distribution patterns related to Vw/Vo. With the increase of the volume ratio of aqueous drug phase, the number of nanodroplets increased forming continuous phase gradually that could accelerate drug release rate. Moreover, BSA showed a slower release rate from PLGA microspheres comparing to Congo red, which indicated the drug release rate could be affected by not only Vw/Vo but also the molecule weight of model drug. In brief, the PLGA microspheres prepared using emulsion electrospray provided an efficient and simple system to achieve controlled drug release at a desired rate satisfying the need of the practices. PMID:27699061

  12. Formation and stability of polychlorinated biphenyl Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Perreault, Andréanne; Kueper, Bernard H.; Rawson, Jim

    2005-03-01

    An emulsion stabilized by colloidal suspensions of finely divided solids is known as a Pickering emulsion. The potential for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to form Pickering emulsions ex situ when in contact with powdered solids, such as clays and metal oxides, is investigated here. Bentonite, iron oxide and magnesium oxide dispersions proved to be robust Pickering emulsion stabilizers, whereas manganese oxide dispersions were not. Batch experiments revealed that emulsions can be formed using a moderately low energy input and can be stabilized with solid concentrations as low as 0.5 wt.%. For the base conditions (volumetric oil fraction ( ϕoil)=30 vol.%; solid concentration ( χ)=2 wt.%), the formed emulsions were indefinitely stable and the initial average droplet diameters varied from 80 to 258 μm, depending on the solid used in the colloidal dispersion. The average droplet size varied at early time, but for most conditions stabilized to a steady-state value 1 week after preparation. The effect of Ostwald ripening was limited. At greater than 0.5 wt.% concentration, the efficiency of the solid dispersion as a stabilizer was dependant on the volumetric oil fraction but not on the solid concentration. Generally, systems with volumetric oil fractions outside of the 20-70 vol.% range were unstable. The emulsions' droplet stability, average droplet size and size distribution were observed to vary as a function of the amount of energy provided to the system, the volumetric oil fraction, and the concentration of the solid in the aqueous dispersion. It is hypothesized that drilling through fractured rock in the immediate vicinity of dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) PCBs may provide both the energy and solid material necessary to form Pickering emulsions.

  13. Generation of colloidal granules and capsules from double emulsion drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kathryn S.

    Assemblies of colloidal particles are extensively used in ceramic processing, pharmaceuticals, inks and coatings. In this project, the aim was to develop a new technique to fabricate monodispersed colloidal assemblies. The use of microfluidic devices and emulsion processing allows for the fabrication of complex materials that can be used in a variety of applications. A microfluidic device is used to create monodispersed water/oil/water (w/o/w) double emulsions with interior droplets of colloidal silica suspension ranging in size from tens to hundreds of microns. By tailoring the osmotic pressure using glycerol as a solute in the continuous and inner phases of the emulsion, we can control the final volume size of the monodispersed silica colloidal crystals that form in the inner droplets of the double emulsion. Modifying the ionic strength in the colloidal dispersion can be used to affect the particle-particle interactions and crystal formation of the final colloidal particle. This w/o/w technique has been used with other systems of metal oxide colloids and cellulose nanocrystals. Encapsulation of the colloidal suspension in a polymer shell for the generation of ceramic-polymer core-shell particles has also been developed. These core-shell particles have spawned new research in the field of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. Systems and chemistries for creating cellulose hydrogels within the double emulsions have also been researched. Water in oil single emulsions and double emulsions have been used to create cellulose hydrogel spheres in the sub-100 micron diameter range. Oil/water/oil double emulsions allow us to create stable cellulose capsules. The addition of a second hydrogel polymer, such as acrylate or alginate, further strengthens the cellulose gel network and can also be processed into capsules and particles using the microfluidic device. This work could have promising applications in acoustic metamaterials, personal care products, pharmaceuticals

  14. Acid sensing by the Drosophila olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Ai, Minrong; Min, Soohong; Grosjean, Yael; Leblanc, Charlotte; Bell, Rati; Benton, Richard; Suh, Greg S B

    2010-12-01

    The odour of acids has a distinct quality that is perceived as sharp, pungent and often irritating. How acidity is sensed and translated into an appropriate behavioural response is poorly understood. Here we describe a functionally segregated population of olfactory sensory neurons in the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, that are highly selective for acidity. These olfactory sensory neurons express IR64a, a member of the recently identified ionotropic receptor (IR) family of putative olfactory receptors. In vivo calcium imaging showed that IR64a+ neurons projecting to the DC4 glomerulus in the antennal lobe are specifically activated by acids. Flies in which the function of IR64a+ neurons or the IR64a gene is disrupted had defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioural responses, but their responses to non-acidic odorants remained unaffected. Furthermore, artificial stimulation of IR64a+ neurons elicited avoidance responses. Taken together, these results identify cellular and molecular substrates for acid detection in the Drosophila olfactory system and support a labelled-line mode of acidity coding at the periphery. PMID:21085119

  15. Micellar emulsions composed of mPEG-PCL/MCT as novel nanocarriers for systemic delivery of genistein: a comparative study with micelles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianpeng; Wang, Huan; Ye, Yanghuan; Zhang, Xingwang; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric micelles receive considerable attention as drug delivery vehicles, depending on the versatility in drug solubilization and targeting therapy. However, their use invariably suffers with poor stability both in in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we aimed to develop a novel nanocarrier (micellar emulsions, MEs) for a systemic delivery of genistein (Gen), a poorly soluble anticancer agent. Gen-loaded MEs (Gen-MEs) were prepared from methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-(ε-caprolactone) and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) by solvent-diffusion technique. Nanocarriers were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and in vitro release. The resulting Gen-MEs were approximately 46 nm in particle size with a narrow distribution. Gen-MEs produced a different in vitro release profile from the counterpart of Gen-ME. The incorporation of MCT significantly enhanced the stability of nanoparticles against dilution with simulated body fluid. Pharmacokinetic study revealed that MEs could notably extend the mean retention time of Gen, 1.57- and 7.38-fold as long as that of micelles and solution formulation, respectively, following intravenous injection. Furthermore, MEs markedly increased the elimination half-life (t1/2β) of Gen, which was 2.63-fold larger than that of Gen solution. Interestingly, Gen distribution in the liver and kidney for MEs group was significantly low relative to the micelle group in the first 2 hours, indicating less perfusion in such two tissues, which well accorded with the elongated mean retention time. Our findings suggested that MEs may be promising carriers as an alternative of micelles to systemically deliver poorly soluble drugs. PMID:26491290

  16. Micellar emulsions composed of mPEG-PCL/MCT as novel nanocarriers for systemic delivery of genistein: a comparative study with micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianpeng; Wang, Huan; Ye, Yanghuan; Zhang, Xingwang; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric micelles receive considerable attention as drug delivery vehicles, depending on the versatility in drug solubilization and targeting therapy. However, their use invariably suffers with poor stability both in in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we aimed to develop a novel nanocarrier (micellar emulsions, MEs) for a systemic delivery of genistein (Gen), a poorly soluble anticancer agent. Gen-loaded MEs (Gen-MEs) were prepared from methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-(ε-caprolactone) and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) by solvent-diffusion technique. Nanocarriers were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and in vitro release. The resulting Gen-MEs were approximately 46 nm in particle size with a narrow distribution. Gen-MEs produced a different in vitro release profile from the counterpart of Gen-ME. The incorporation of MCT significantly enhanced the stability of nanoparticles against dilution with simulated body fluid. Pharmacokinetic study revealed that MEs could notably extend the mean retention time of Gen, 1.57- and 7.38-fold as long as that of micelles and solution formulation, respectively, following intravenous injection. Furthermore, MEs markedly increased the elimination half-life (t(1/2β)) of Gen, which was 2.63-fold larger than that of Gen solution. Interestingly, Gen distribution in the liver and kidney for MEs group was significantly low relative to the micelle group in the first 2 hours, indicating less perfusion in such two tissues, which well accorded with the elongated mean retention time. Our findings suggested that MEs may be promising carriers as an alternative of micelles to systemically deliver poorly soluble drugs. PMID:26491290

  17. Sulfuric acid thermoelectrochemical system and method

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.

    1989-01-01

    A thermoelectrochemical system in which an electrical current is generated between a cathode immersed in a concentrated sulfuric acid solution and an anode immersed in an aqueous buffer solution of sodium bisulfate and sodium sulfate. Reactants consumed at the electrodes during the electrochemical reaction are thermochemically regenerated and recycled to the electrodes to provide continuous operation of the system.

  18. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-08-17

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  19. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-12-21

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  20. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290....1290 Fatty acids test system. (a) Identification. A fatty acids test system is a device intended to measure fatty acids in plasma and serum. Measurements of fatty acids are used in the diagnosis...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1295 - Folic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Folic acid test system. 862.1295 Section 862.1295....1295 Folic acid test system. (a) Identification. A folic acid test system is a device intended to measure the vitamin folic acid in plasma and serum. Folic acid measurements are used in the diagnosis...

  2. Rheology of hydrate forming emulsions.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Jorge; Karanjkar, Prasad U; Lee, Jae W; Morris, Jeffrey F

    2010-07-20

    Results are reported on an experimental study of the rheology of hydrate-forming water-in-oil emulsions. Density-matched concentrated emulsions were quenched by reducing the temperature and an irreversible transition was observed where the viscosity increased dramatically. The hydrate-forming emulsions have characteristic times for abrupt viscosity change dependent only on the temperature, reflecting the importance of the effect of subcooling. Mechanical transition of hydrate-free water-in-oil emulsions may require longer times and depends on the shear rate, occurring more rapidly at higher rates but with significant scatter which is characterized through a probabilistic analysis. This rate dependence together with dependence on subcooling reflects the importance of hydrodynamic forces to bring drops or particles together.

  3. Droplet-based microfluidics and the dynamics of emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baret, Jean-Christophe; Brosseau, Quentin; Semin, Benoit; Qu, Xiaopeng

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions are complex fluids already involved for a long time in a wide-range of industrial processes, such as, for example, food, cosmetics or materials synthesis [1]. More recently, applications of emulsions have been extended to new fields like biotechnology or biochemistry where the compartmentalization of compounds in emulsion droplets is used to parallelise (bio-) chemical reactions [2]. Interestingly, these applications pinpoint to fundamental questions dealing with surfactant dynamics, dynamic surface tension, hydrodynamic interactions and electrohydrodynamics. Droplet-based microfluidics is a very powerful tool to quantitatively study the dynamics of emulsions at the single droplet level or even at the single interface level: well-controlled emulsions are produced and manipulated using hydrodynamics, electrical forces, optical actuation and combination of these effects. We will describe here how droplet-based microfluidics is used to extract quantitative informations on the physical-chemistry of emulsions for a better understanding and control of the dynamics of these systems [3].[4pt] [1] J. Bibette et al. Rep. Prog. Phys., 62, 969-1033 (1999)[0pt] [2] A. Theberge et al., Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed. 49, 5846 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.-C. Baret et al., Langmuir, 25, 6088 (2009)

  4. Evaluation on oxidative stability of walnut beverage emulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Liu, Fuguo; Xue, Yanhui; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-07-15

    Walnut beverage emulsions were prepared with walnut kernels, mixed nonionic emulsifiers and xanthan gum. The effects of food antioxidants on the physical stability and lipid oxidation of walnut beverage emulsions were investigated. The results showed that tea polyphenols could not only increase the droplet size of the emulsions, but also enhance physical stability during the thermal storage at 62 ± 1 °C. However, water-dispersed oil-soluble vitamin E and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin obviously decreased the physical stability of the emulsion system during the thermal storage. BHT and natural antioxidant extract had scarcely influenced on the physical stability of walnut beverage emulsions. Tea polyphenols and BHT could significantly retard lipid oxidation in walnut beverage emulsions against thermal and UV light exposure during the storage. Vitamin E exhibited the prooxidant effect during the thermal storage and the antioxidant attribute during UV light exposure. Other food antioxidants had no significant effect on retarding lipid oxidation during thermal or light storage. PMID:26948632

  5. Determination of emulsion explosives with Span-80 as emulsifier by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei-Fei; Yu, Jing; Hu, Jia-Hong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Meng-Xia; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Hai-Ling; Han, Jie

    2011-06-01

    A novel approach for identification and determination of emulsion explosives with Span-80 (sorbitol mono-oleate) as the emulsifier and their postblast residues by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed. 24 kinds of emulsion explosives collected have been processed by transesterification reaction with metholic KOH solution and the emulsifier has turned into methyl esters of fatty acids. From the peak area ratios of their methyl esters, most of these emulsion explosives can be differentiated. In order to detect the postblast residues of emulsion explosives, the sorbitols in the emulsifier Span-80 obtained after transesterification reaction have been further derivatized by silylation reaction with N,O-bis-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing 1% trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) as the derivatizing reagent. The derivatization conditions were optimized and the derivatives were determined by GC-MS. The results showed that the silylation derivatives of sorbitol and it isomers, combined with hydrocarbon compounds and methyl esters of fatty acids, were the characteristic components for identification of the emulsion explosives. The established approach was applied to analyze the postblast residues of emulsion explosives. It has been found that the method was sensitive and specific, especially when detecting the derivatives of sorbitol and its isomers by GC-MS in selecting ion mode. The information of the characteristic components can help probe the origin of the emulsion explosives and providing scientific evidences and clues for solving the crimes of the emulsion explosive explosion.

  6. Home Parenteral Nutrition: Fat Emulsions and Potential Complications.

    PubMed

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Salonen, Bradley R; Bonnes, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Since the first intravenous nutrition support attempt with olive oil in the 17th century, intravenous fat emulsions (IVFEs) have evolved to become an integral component in the management of patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). IVFEs serve as a calorie source and provide essential fatty acids (linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid) in patients unable to achieve adequate intake of these fatty acids through alternative means. However, IVFE use is also associated with multiple complications, including increased infection risk, liver disease, and systemic proinflammatory states. In the United States, most IVFEs are composed of 100% soybean oil; internationally multiple alternative IVFEs (using fish oil, olive oil, and long- and medium-chain triglycerides) are available or being developed. The hope is that these IVFEs will prevent, or decrease the risk of, some of the HPN-associated complications. The goal of this article is to review how IVFEs came into use, their composition and metabolism, options for IVFE delivery in HPN, benefits and risks of IVFE use, and strategies to minimize the risks associated with IVFE use in HPN patients.

  7. Home Parenteral Nutrition: Fat Emulsions and Potential Complications.

    PubMed

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Salonen, Bradley R; Bonnes, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Since the first intravenous nutrition support attempt with olive oil in the 17th century, intravenous fat emulsions (IVFEs) have evolved to become an integral component in the management of patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). IVFEs serve as a calorie source and provide essential fatty acids (linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid) in patients unable to achieve adequate intake of these fatty acids through alternative means. However, IVFE use is also associated with multiple complications, including increased infection risk, liver disease, and systemic proinflammatory states. In the United States, most IVFEs are composed of 100% soybean oil; internationally multiple alternative IVFEs (using fish oil, olive oil, and long- and medium-chain triglycerides) are available or being developed. The hope is that these IVFEs will prevent, or decrease the risk of, some of the HPN-associated complications. The goal of this article is to review how IVFEs came into use, their composition and metabolism, options for IVFE delivery in HPN, benefits and risks of IVFE use, and strategies to minimize the risks associated with IVFE use in HPN patients. PMID:27533943

  8. Removal of phenols from aqueous solutions by emulsion liquid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reis, M Teresa A; Freitas, Ondina M F; Agarwal, Shiva; Ferreira, Licínio M; Ismael, M Rosinda C; Machado, Remígio; Carvalho, Jorge M R

    2011-09-15

    The present study deals with the extraction of phenols from aqueous solutions by using the emulsion liquid membranes technique. Besides phenol, two derivatives of phenol, i.e., tyrosol (2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol) and p-coumaric acid (4-hydroxycinnamic acid), which are typical components of the effluents produced in olive oil plants, were selected as the target solutes. The effect of the composition of the organic phase on the removal of solutes was examined. The influence of pH of feed phase on the extraction of tyrosol and p-coumaric was tested for the membrane with Cyanex 923 as an extractant. The use of 2% Cyanex 923 allowed obtaining a very high extraction of phenols (97-99%) in 5-6 min of contact time for either single solute solutions or for their mixtures. The removal efficiency of phenol and p-coumaric acid attained equivalent values by using the system with 2% isodecanol, but the removal rate of tyrosol was found greatly reduced. The extraction of tyrosol and p-coumaric acid from their binary mixture was also analysed for different operating conditions like the volume ratio of feed phase to stripping phase (sodium hydroxide), the temperature and the initial concentration of solute in the feed phase.

  9. To Model Chemical Reactivity in Heterogeneous Emulsions, Think Homogeneous Microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence Stuart; Liu, Changyao; Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Pastoriza-Gallego, Maria José; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Qing; Krishnan, Gunaseelan; Sánchez-Paz, Verónica; Zhang, Yongliang; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2015-08-25

    Two important and unsolved problems in the food industry and also fundamental questions in colloid chemistry are how to measure molecular distributions, especially antioxidants (AOs), and how to model chemical reactivity, including AO efficiency in opaque emulsions. The key to understanding reactivity in organized surfactant media is that reaction mechanisms are consistent with a discrete structures-separate continuous regions duality. Aggregate structures in emulsions are determined by highly cooperative but weak organizing forces that allow reactants to diffuse at rates approaching their diffusion-controlled limit. Reactant distributions for slow thermal bimolecular reactions are in dynamic equilibrium, and their distributions are proportional to their relative solubilities in the oil, interfacial, and aqueous regions. Our chemical kinetic method is grounded in thermodynamics and combines a pseudophase model with methods for monitoring the reactions of AOs with a hydrophobic arenediazonium ion probe in opaque emulsions. We introduce (a) the logic and basic assumptions of the pseudophase model used to define the distributions of AOs among the oil, interfacial, and aqueous regions in microemulsions and emulsions and (b) the dye derivatization and linear sweep voltammetry methods for monitoring the rates of reaction in opaque emulsions. Our results show that this approach provides a unique, versatile, and robust method for obtaining quantitative estimates of AO partition coefficients or partition constants and distributions and interfacial rate constants in emulsions. The examples provided illustrate the effects of various emulsion properties on AO distributions such as oil hydrophobicity, emulsifier structure and HLB, temperature, droplet size, surfactant charge, and acidity on reactant distributions. Finally, we show that the chemical kinetic method provides a natural explanation for the cut-off effect, a maximum followed by a sharp reduction in AO efficiency with

  10. The Effect of Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion and Soybean Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion on Cholestasis Associated with Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Jiejin; Qian, Yan; Ling, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively study the effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsion and soybean oil-based lipid emulsion on cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. Methods. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsion and fish oil-based lipid emulsion had been applied in our neonatology department clinically between 2010 and 2014. There were 61 qualified premature infants included in this study and divided into two groups. Soybean oil group was made up of 32 premature infants, while fish oil group was made up of 29 premature infants. Analysis was made on the gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, age at which feeding began, usage of lipid emulsions, and incidence of cholestasis between the two groups. Results. There were no statistical differences in terms of gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, and age at which feeding began. Besides, total incidence of cholestasis was 21.3%, and the days of life of occurrence of cholestasis were 53 ± 5.0 days. Incidence of cholestasis had no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusion. This study did not find the different role of fish oil-based lipid emulsions and soybean oil-based lipid emulsions in cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. PMID:27110237

  11. The Effect of Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion and Soybean Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion on Cholestasis Associated with Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition in Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Jiejin; Qian, Yan; Ling, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively study the effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsion and soybean oil-based lipid emulsion on cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. Methods. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsion and fish oil-based lipid emulsion had been applied in our neonatology department clinically between 2010 and 2014. There were 61 qualified premature infants included in this study and divided into two groups. Soybean oil group was made up of 32 premature infants, while fish oil group was made up of 29 premature infants. Analysis was made on the gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, age at which feeding began, usage of lipid emulsions, and incidence of cholestasis between the two groups. Results. There were no statistical differences in terms of gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, and age at which feeding began. Besides, total incidence of cholestasis was 21.3%, and the days of life of occurrence of cholestasis were 53 ± 5.0 days. Incidence of cholestasis had no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusion. This study did not find the different role of fish oil-based lipid emulsions and soybean oil-based lipid emulsions in cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants.

  12. PEGylated bile acids for use in drug delivery systems: enhanced solubility and bioavailability of itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Le Dévédec, Frantz; Strandman, Satu; Hildgen, Patrice; Leclair, Grégoire; Zhu, X X

    2013-08-01

    Itraconazole is a drug of choice for the treatment of severe fungal infections and parasitic diseases, but its use is limited by its low water solubility and varying bioavailability. New self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) based on PEGylated bile acids (BA-PEGs) were designed and prepared, where the number and length of PEG arms were varied to optimize the loading of itraconazole in the final drug formulation. The use of both BA-PEGs and oleic acid improved the solubilization and absorption of the drug, which was in a glassy state in the SEDDS prepared with the melting method. High loading efficiencies of itraconazole (up to 20%) and stable liquid formulations were obtained at neutral pH, and full dispersion of itraconazole was reached in 2 h in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 6.8). Aqueous emulsions consisting of spherical micelles with mean hydrodynamic diameters (Dh) of ca. 75-220 nm, as verified by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, are expected to improve the intestinal absorption of the drug. The new SEDDS showed good cytocompatibility by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays of BA-PEGs with Caco-2 and RAW 264.2 cells, and a low degree of hemolysis of human erythrocytes. The SEDDS based on PEGylated bile acids provide a controlled release system with significant improvement of the bioavailability of itraconazole in rats, as demonstrated by the pharmacokinetic studies.

  13. Diazepam submicron emulsions containing soya-bean oil and intended for oral or rectal delivery.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, M; Sznitowska, M; Janicki, S

    2001-03-01

    Physically stable diazepam submicron emulsions were prepared using soya-bean oil. Diazepam concentration 4 mg/ml, suitable for rectal or oral delivery, was achieved in 20% emulsions. Mixture of egg lecithin (1.2%) and poloxamer (2.0%) has been chosen as the most suitable emulsifying agent. Composition of the emulsion may be supplemented with alpha-tocopherol and parabens. However, the system was not stable when either phenylethanol or chlorhexidine gluconate was added. Taste masking agents commonly used as food additives decreased stability of the preparation and were not efficient in elimination of a bitter taste of the drug-loaded emulsions.

  14. Rapid Evaluation of Water-in-Oil (w/o) Emulsion Stability by Turbidity Ratio Measurements.

    PubMed

    Song; Jho; Kim; Kim

    2000-10-01

    In this Note, we investigated the turbidity ratio method for the evaluation of water-in-oil emulsion stability. The slope of turbidity ratio of water-in-oil emulsions with time was taken as an index of stability; the higher the slope, the less stable the system. Various factors affecting the stability of emulsion such as HLB of emulsifier, amount of emulsifiers, and water were tested using this technique. The results of the turbidity ratio technique for the evaluation of emulsion stability were well consistent with those obtained by the measurement of phase separation when incubated for 30 days at room temperature. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana; Petrina Jáuregui, Estrella; Elizondo Armendáriz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a particularly important problem in patients who need this type of nutritional support for a long time. Prevalence of the condition is highly variable depending on the series, and its clinical presentation is different in adults and children. The etiology of PNALD is not well defined, and participation of several factors at the same time has been suggested. When a bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is detected for a long time, other causes of liver disease should be ruled out and risk factors should be minimized. The composition of lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition is one of the factors related to PNALD. This article reviews the different types of lipid emulsions and the potential benefits of emulsions enriched with omega-3 fatty acids.

  16. [What lipid emulsion should be administered to ICU patients?].

    PubMed

    Kreymann, G

    2014-01-01

    The review deals with a question what lipid emulsion should be administered to ICU patients according to recently published official parenteral and enteral nutrition guidelines. Classic lipid emulsions based on omega-6 fatty acids are immunosuppressive and should not be used with ICU patients. The olive/soy emulsion is immunoneutral and can be used for most patients. Many ICU patients are in an inflammatory state (e.g. sepsis, ARDS, pancreatitis). A common belief is that this "hyperinflammed patient population" would profit from an anti-inflammatory lipid component of their parenteral nutrition solution, such as fish oil. On the other hand, every anti-inflammatory therapy has the disadvantage of also being immunosuppressive. Inflammation is a necessary part of the host defense against infection and any correct anti-inflammatory medication presupposes the exact immunologic knowledge that there is too much inflammation for a given situation. This "too much" is certainly not fulfilled in every patient with sepsis, ARDS or pancreatitis. At the bedside it is nearly impossible to determine the degree of "hyper" inflammation. In reality, a number of these patients may be adequately inflamed or, in fact, even hypoinflammed. Specific emulsions which can be used in hyper- or hypoinflammation should be developed in the future. As long as these difficulties in the immunologic diagnosis prevail, the clinician might be best advised to use an immunoneutral lipid emulsion when choosing a lipid preparation for the ICU patients. PMID:25306684

  17. 21 CFR 862.1795 - Vanilmandelic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vanilmandelic acid test system. 862.1795 Section... Systems § 862.1795 Vanilmandelic acid test system. (a) Identification. A vanilmandelic acid test system is a device intended to measure vanilmandelic acid in urine. Measurements of vanilmandelic...

  18. Antioxidant activity and emulsion-stabilizing effect of pectic enzyme treated pectin in soy protein isolate-stabilized oil/water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping-Hsiu; Lu, Hao-Te; Wang, Yuh-Tai; Wu, Ming-Chang

    2011-09-14

    The antioxidant activity of pectic enzyme treated pectin (PET-pectin) prepared from citrus pectin by enzymatic hydrolysis and its potential use as a stabilizer and an antioxidant for soy protein isolate (SPI)-stabilized oil in water (O/W) emulsion were investigated. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) was found to be positively associated with molecular weight (M(w)) of PET-pectin and negatively associated with degree of esterification (DE) of PET-pectin. PET-pectin (1 kDa and 11.6% DE) prepared from citrus pectin after 24 h of hydrolysis by commercial pectic enzyme produced by Aspergillus niger expressed higher α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, TEAC, and reducing power than untreated citrus pectin (353 kDa and 60% DE). The addition of PET-pectin could increase both emulsifying activity (EA) and emulsion stability (ES) of SPI-stabilized O/W emulsion. When the SPI-stabilized lipid droplet was coated with the mixture of PET-pectin and pectin, the EA and ES of the emulsion were improved more than they were when the lipid droplet was coated with either pectin or PET-pectin alone. The amount of secondary oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) produced in the emulsion prepared with the mixture of SPI and PET-pectin was less than the amount produced in the emulsion prepared with either SPI or SPI/pectin. These results suggest that PET-pectin has an emulsion-stabilizing effect and lipid oxidation inhibition ability on SPI-stabilized emulsion. Therefore, PET-pectin can be used as a stabilizer as well as an antioxidant in plant origin in SPI-stabilized O/W emulsion and thus prolong the shelf life of food emulsion. PMID:21806056

  19. Antioxidant activity and emulsion-stabilizing effect of pectic enzyme treated pectin in soy protein isolate-stabilized oil/water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping-Hsiu; Lu, Hao-Te; Wang, Yuh-Tai; Wu, Ming-Chang

    2011-09-14

    The antioxidant activity of pectic enzyme treated pectin (PET-pectin) prepared from citrus pectin by enzymatic hydrolysis and its potential use as a stabilizer and an antioxidant for soy protein isolate (SPI)-stabilized oil in water (O/W) emulsion were investigated. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) was found to be positively associated with molecular weight (M(w)) of PET-pectin and negatively associated with degree of esterification (DE) of PET-pectin. PET-pectin (1 kDa and 11.6% DE) prepared from citrus pectin after 24 h of hydrolysis by commercial pectic enzyme produced by Aspergillus niger expressed higher α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, TEAC, and reducing power than untreated citrus pectin (353 kDa and 60% DE). The addition of PET-pectin could increase both emulsifying activity (EA) and emulsion stability (ES) of SPI-stabilized O/W emulsion. When the SPI-stabilized lipid droplet was coated with the mixture of PET-pectin and pectin, the EA and ES of the emulsion were improved more than they were when the lipid droplet was coated with either pectin or PET-pectin alone. The amount of secondary oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) produced in the emulsion prepared with the mixture of SPI and PET-pectin was less than the amount produced in the emulsion prepared with either SPI or SPI/pectin. These results suggest that PET-pectin has an emulsion-stabilizing effect and lipid oxidation inhibition ability on SPI-stabilized emulsion. Therefore, PET-pectin can be used as a stabilizer as well as an antioxidant in plant origin in SPI-stabilized O/W emulsion and thus prolong the shelf life of food emulsion.

  20. Formulation and physicochemical properties of macro- and microemulsions prepared by interfacial ion-pair formation between amino acids and fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, G.T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Emulsions were prepared by dissolving an amino acid in the aqueous phase and a fatty acid in the oil phase of the emulsions. When the two phases were mixed, the amino acid and fatty acid formed an ion pair at the oil-water interface which stabilized one phase as small droplets within the other to give a stable emulsion. NMR spectra indicated protonation on the amino groups when a carboxylic acid was added to an aqueous solution of an amino acid. Various hydrocarbons and mineral oil could be emulsified into oil-in-water emulsions with a high volume ratio containing up to 75% internal oil phase. Vegetable oils such as soybean oil, safflower seed oil and cottonseed oil were emulsified to a lesser extent. Both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions could be formed with the same emulsifying agents depending on the phase volume ratio and the order of addition of oil phase to water phase or the reverse. Particle size measurements using laser light-scattering techniques indicated an oil-in-water emulsion mixed by a magnetic stirring bar had an internal droplet size in the range of 0.1 to 0.3 micron. Such emulsions were stable at 50/degrees/ and 60/degrees/C for three to six months. In addition to the macroemulsions described above, completely clear water-in-oil microemulsions can be prepared from the above systems by the addition of long-chain fatty alcohols such as oleyl alcohol. Clear regions of such clear microemulsions were characterized. Microemulsion systems suitable for tertiary oil recovery were also studied. Clear microemulsions prepared by ion-pairing between ammonia and hexanoic acid could contain octane or tetradecane in the form of oil-in-water or water-in-oil microemulsions at a wide range of oil to aqueous ratio.

  1. Influence of formulation on the oxidative stability of water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Wafa; Essafi, Wafa; Gargouri, Mohamed; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Cansell, Maud

    2016-07-01

    The oxidation of water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions was investigated, emphasizing the impact of compositional parameters. The emulsions had approximately the same average droplet size and did not show any physical destabilization throughout the study. In the absence of pro-oxidant ions in the aqueous phase, lipid oxidation of the W/O emulsions was moderate at 60°C and was in the same range as that measured for the neat oils. Oxidation was significantly promoted by iron encapsulation in the aqueous phase, even at 25°C. However, iron chelation reduced the oxidation rate. Emulsions based on triglycerides rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids were more prone to oxidation, whether the aqueous phase encapsulated iron or not. The emulsions were stabilized by high- and low-molecular weight surfactants. Increased relative fractions of high molecular weight components reduced the oxidation rate when iron was present. PMID:26920286

  2. Dynamics of encapsulation and controlled release systems based on water-in-water emulsions: Liposomes and polymersomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagis, Leonard M. C.

    2009-07-01

    The deformation relaxation behavior of two types of vesicles, liposomes and polymersomes, was investigated using a general nonequilibrium thermodynamics theory based on the interfacial transport phenomena (ITP) formalism. Liposomes and polymersomes are limiting cases of this theory with respect to rheological behavior of the interfaces. They represent respectively viscous, and viscoelastic surface behavior. We have determined the longest relaxation time for a small perturbation of the interfaces for both these limiting cases. Parameter maps were calculated which can be used to determine when surface tension, bending rigidity, spontaneous curvature, interfacial permeability, or surface rheology dominate the response of the vesicles. In these systems up to nine different scaling regimes were identified for the relaxation time of a deformation with droplet size, with scaling exponent n ranging from 0 to 4.

  3. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Ackman, Terry E.; Place, John M.

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  4. Interfacial Concentrations of Hydroxytyrosol and Its Lipophilic Esters in Intact Olive Oil-in-Water Emulsions: Effects of Antioxidant Hydrophobicity, Surfactant Concentration, and the Oil-to-Water Ratio on the Oxidative Stability of the Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Almeida, João; Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Costa, Marlene; Paiva-Martins, Fátima; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence S

    2016-06-29

    We determined the interfacial molarities of the antioxidants, AOs, hydroxytyrosol (HT), and HT fatty acid esters with chain lengths of 1 to 16 carbons in intact olive oil/water/Tween 20 emulsions. The results were compared with chain length effects on the oxidative stability of the same emulsions, and a direct correlation was established. Both (AOI) molarities (varying 50-250 times greater than the stoichiometric 3.5 × 10(-3) M AO concentration) and antioxidant efficiencies show similar parabola-like dependences on AO chain length with a maximum at C8, consistent with the "cut-off" effect often observed at longer chain lengths. Results should aid in understanding the complex structure-reactivity relationships between AO efficiencies in emulsified systems and their hydrophobilic-hydrophobic balance.

  5. Cholesterol improves the utilization of parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Druml, Wilfred; Fischer, Margot

    2003-11-28

    Lipid emulsions have become an indispensable component of parenteral nutrition. Commercially available emulsions mostly have an identical composition of triglycerides (from plant oils) and egg-yolk phospholipids as emulsifier. Previous attempts to improve the composition of lipid emulsions have focused mainly on the triglyceride moiety. In the first fundamental modification of a lipid emulsion since their broader introduction into clinical medicine, we included free cholesterol in a lipid emulsion. We evaluated elimination and hydrolysis of triglycerides and lipid oxidation (by indirect calorimetry) in 10 healthy male normolipemic volunteers, comparing a conventional lipid emulsion (20% triglycerides) with an otherwise identical emulsion with the addition of 4 g/l free cholesterol. The rise in plasma triglycerides was mitigated during infusion of the cholesterol-enriched solution (323.8 +/- 27.5 vs. 202.0 +/- 18.9 mg.dL-1, p < 0.001), plasma half-life was reduced (41.6 +/- 5.4 vs. 29.3 +/- 5.1 min, p < 0.05), and total-body clearance was enhanced (0.96 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.52 +/- 0.2 ml.b.w.(.)min-1, p < 0.02). The rise in plasma free fatty acids (400.7 +/- 39.0 vs. 532.2 +/- 64.0 mumol.L-1; p < 0.02) and ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate) (151.6 +/- 37.0 vs. 226.3 +/- 33.01 mumol.L-1; p < 0.02) was augmented. Increases in plasma insulin and glucagon were less pronounced (p < 0.05). The fall in respiratory quotient was greater and the fraction of lipid oxidation as a percentage of total energy expenditure was increased (66.2% +/- 6.0 vs. 70.9% +/- 6.3, p < 0.05) during infusion of the modified solution. No impairment of gas exchange or other side effects were observed. Taken together these results indicate that the elimination of a cholesterol-supplemented lipid emulsion is accelerated, triglyceride hydrolysis is enhanced, and lipid oxidation is augmented. Thus, addition of cholesterol to a lipid emulsion might not only present a means of providing cholesterol in

  6. Intravascular behavior of a perfluorochemical emulsion.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Y; Yamanouchi, K; Okamoto, H; Yokoyama, K; Heldebrant, C

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the reason why two similar perfluorochemical (PFC) emulsions, namely a mixed PFC (perfluorodecalin: FDC and perfluorotripropylamine: FTPA) and an FDC emulsion, resulted in a very different survival time for the exchange-transfused rats. Supposing that some difference in the intravascular behavior of both emulsions would account for such a difference in efficacy, experiments on behavior of PFC emulsions were carried out focusing on the particle size. It was reconfirmed that larger PFC particles were eliminated from the blood stream much more rapidly than smaller particles with three FMIQ (perfluoro-N-methyldecahydroisoquinoline) emulsions. After the FDC + FTPA emulsion or the FDC emulsion were injected into rabbits, PFC particles in the blood tended to decrease in size. When each of the collected blood samples was incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the FDC emulsion enlarged in size markedly, but the FDC + FTPA emulsion showed no change. The retention of PFC particles appeared to depend on the emulsion stability rather than simply on the emulsifying agent alone. These data showed that some differences were observed in intravascular persistence of the FDC + FTPA emulsion and the FDC emulsion, and suggested that the efficacy of PFC emulsions would reflect their behavior in the circulation. PMID:2374085

  7. Sub-micron alignment for nuclear emulsion plates using low energy electrons caused by radioactive isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Ariga, A.; Fukuda, T.; Kazuyama, M.; Komatsu, M.; Nakano, T.; Niwa, K.; Sato, O.; Takahashi, S.

    2007-06-01

    Nuclear emulsion plates are employed in three-dimensional charged particle detectors that have sub-micron position resolution over 1 m2 with no dead space and no dead time. These detectors are suitable for the study of short-lived particle decays, and direct detection of neutrino interactions of all flavors. Typically emulsion plates are used in a stacked structure. Precise alignment between plates is required for physics analysis. The most accurate alignment method is to use tracks passing through the emulsion plates. The accuracy is about 0.2 μm. However, in an experiment with low track density alignment accuracy decreases to 20 μm because of plate distortion and it becomes more difficult to perform the analysis. This paper describes a new alignment method between emulsion plates by using trajectories of low energy electrons originating from environmental radioactive isotopes. As a trial emulsion plates were exposed to β-rays and γ-rays from K40. The trajectories which passed through emulsion layers were detected by a fully automated emulsion readout system. Using this method, the alignment between emulsion plates is demonstrated to be sub-micron. This method can be applied to many nuclear emulsion experiments. For example, the location of neutrino interaction vertices in the OPERA experiment can benefit from this new technique.

  8. Starch-based Pickering emulsions for topical drug delivery: A QbD approach.

    PubMed

    Marto, J; Gouveia, L; Jorge, I M; Duarte, A; Gonçalves, L M; Silva, S M C; Antunes, F; Pais, A A C C; Oliveira, E; Almeida, A J; Ribeiro, H M

    2015-11-01

    Pickering emulsions are stabilized by solid particles instead of surfactants and have been widely investigated in pharmaceutical and cosmetic fields since they present less adverse effects than the classical emulsions. A quality by design (QbD) approach was applied to the production of w/o emulsions stabilized by starch. A screening design was conducted to identify the critical variables of the formula and the process affecting the critical quality properties of the emulsion (droplet size distribution). The optimization was made by establishing the Design Space, adjusting the concentration of starch and the quantity of the internal aqueous phase. The emulsion production process was, in turn, adjusted by varying the time and speed of stirring, to ensure quality and minimum variability. The stability was also investigated, demonstrating that an increase in starch concentration improves the stability of the emulsion. Rheological and mechanical studies indicated that the viscosity of the emulsions was enhanced by the addition of starch and, to a higher extent, by the presence of different lipids. The developed formulations was considered non-irritant, by an in vitro assay using human cells from skin (Df and HaCat) with the cell viability higher than 90% and, with self-preserving properties. Finally, the QbD approach successfully built quality in Pickering emulsions, allowing the development of hydrophilic drug-loaded emulsions stabilized by starch with desired organoleptic and structural characteristics. The results obtained suggest that these systems are a promising vehicle to be used in products for topical administration.

  9. Starch-based Pickering emulsions for topical drug delivery: A QbD approach.

    PubMed

    Marto, J; Gouveia, L; Jorge, I M; Duarte, A; Gonçalves, L M; Silva, S M C; Antunes, F; Pais, A A C C; Oliveira, E; Almeida, A J; Ribeiro, H M

    2015-11-01

    Pickering emulsions are stabilized by solid particles instead of surfactants and have been widely investigated in pharmaceutical and cosmetic fields since they present less adverse effects than the classical emulsions. A quality by design (QbD) approach was applied to the production of w/o emulsions stabilized by starch. A screening design was conducted to identify the critical variables of the formula and the process affecting the critical quality properties of the emulsion (droplet size distribution). The optimization was made by establishing the Design Space, adjusting the concentration of starch and the quantity of the internal aqueous phase. The emulsion production process was, in turn, adjusted by varying the time and speed of stirring, to ensure quality and minimum variability. The stability was also investigated, demonstrating that an increase in starch concentration improves the stability of the emulsion. Rheological and mechanical studies indicated that the viscosity of the emulsions was enhanced by the addition of starch and, to a higher extent, by the presence of different lipids. The developed formulations was considered non-irritant, by an in vitro assay using human cells from skin (Df and HaCat) with the cell viability higher than 90% and, with self-preserving properties. Finally, the QbD approach successfully built quality in Pickering emulsions, allowing the development of hydrophilic drug-loaded emulsions stabilized by starch with desired organoleptic and structural characteristics. The results obtained suggest that these systems are a promising vehicle to be used in products for topical administration. PMID:26263210

  10. Effects of trans-4-(aminomethyl) cyclohexanecarboxylic acid/potassium azeloyl diglycinate/niacinamide topical emulsion in Thai adults with melasma: a single-center, randomized, double-blind, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Viyoch, Jarupa; Tengamnuay, Isaree; Phetdee, Khemjira; Tuntijarukorn, Punpimol; Waranuch, Neti

    2010-01-01

    Background: Melasma is an acquired hyperpigmentary disorder characterized by dark patches or macules located on the cheeks, forehead, upper lip, chin, and neck. Treatment of melasma involves the use of topical hypopigmenting agents such as hydroquinone, tretinoin, and azelaic acid and its derivatives. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a formulation containing a combination of trans-4-(aminomethyl) cyclohexanecarboxylic acid/potassium azeloyl diglycinate/niacinamide compared with an emulsion-based control in the treatment of melasma in Thai adults. Methods: In this single-center, randomized, double-blind, controlled study, Thai patients with mild to moderate facial melasma (relative melanin value [RMV] in range of 20–120) were randomized for the application of either the test or the emulsion-based (control) product in the morning and before bedtime for 8 weeks. The supplemental sunscreen product with sun protection factor 30 was distributed to all patients. Subjects were assessed for the intensity of their hyperpigmented skin area by measuring the difference in the absolute melanin value between hyperpigmented skin and normal skin (RMV). This parameter was used as a primary outcome of this study. Additionally, the severity of melasma was determined visually using the Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) scored independently by 3 investigators. The assessments of melasma intensity and other skin properties were performed before administration (week 0) and every 2 weeks thereafter for up to 8 weeks. Other skin properties, including moisture content, pH, and redness (erythema value), were measured. Adverse events (AEs), including erythema, scaling, and edema, were also assessed by a dermatologist using the visual grading scale of Frosch and Kligman and COLIPA. Results: The resulting primary intent-to-treat (ITT) population included 33 patients in the test group and 34 patients in the control group. Sixty patients completed all 8

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid in neural signaling systems.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid has been conserved in neural signalling systems in the cephalopods, fish, amphibian, reptiles, birds, mammals, primates and humans. This extreme conservation, despite wide genomic changes over 500 million years, testifies to a uniqueness of this molecule in the brain. The brain selectively incorporates docosahexaenoic acid and its rate of incorporation into the developing brain has been shown to be greater than ten times more efficient than its synthesis from the omega 3 fatty acids of land plant origin. Data has now been published demonstrating a significant influence of dietary omega 3 fatty acids on neural gene expression. As docosahexaenoic acid is the only omega 3 fatty acid in the brain, it is likely that it is the ligand involved. The selective uptake, requirement for function and stimulation of gene expression would have conferred an advantage to a primate which separated from the chimpanzees in the forests and woodlands and sought a different ecological niche. In view of the paucity of docosahexaenoic acid in the land food chain it is likely that the advantage would have been gained from a lacustrine or marine coastal habitat with access to food rich in docosahexaenoic acid and the accessory micronutrients, such as iodine, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium, of importance in brain development and protection against peroxidation. Land agricultural development has, in recent time, come to dominate the human food chain. The decline in use and availability of aquatic resources is not considered important by Langdon (2006) as he considers the resource was not needed for human evolution and can be replaced from the terrestrial food chain. This notion is not supported by the biochemistry nor the molecular biology. He misses the point that the shoreline hypothesis is not just dependent on docosahexaenoic acid but also on the other accessory nutrients specifically required by the brain. Moreover he neglects the basic principle of Darwinian

  12. 21 CFR 862.1509 - Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 862.1509 Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to identify methylmalonic acid in urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1509 - Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 862.1509 Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to identify methylmalonic acid in urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1509 - Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 862.1509 Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to identify methylmalonic acid in urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775....1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to measure uric acid in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775....1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to measure uric acid in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the...

  17. Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract and some of its active ingredients as potential emulsion stabilizers: a new approach to the formation of multiple (W/O/W) emulsion.

    PubMed

    Cizauskaite, Ugne; Ivanauskas, Liudas; Jakštas, Valdas; Marksiene, Ruta; Jonaitiene, Laimute; Bernatoniene, Jurga

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, novel topical formulations loaded with natural functional actives are under intense investigations. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate how the rosemary extract and some of its active ingredients [rosmarinic acid (RA), ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA)] affect technological characteristics of multiple emulsion. Formulation has been prepared by adding investigated solutions (10%) in water/oil/water (W/O/W) multiple emulsion consisting of different lipophilic phases: olive oil and liquid paraffin, with 0.5% emulsifying agent (complex of sodium polyacrylate and polysorbate 20) under constant stirring with mechanical stirrer at room temperature. The emulsion parameters were evaluated using centrifugation test, freeze-thaw cycle test, microscopical and texture analyses. Rosemary's triterpenic saponins UA and OA showed the highest emulsion stabilizing properties: they decreased CI from 3.26% to 10.23% (p < 0.05). According to obtained interfacial tension data, the effect of rosemary active ingredients is not surfactant-like. Even though emulsifier itself at low concentration intends to form directly the multiple emulsion, the obtained results indicate that rosemary extract containing active ingredients does not only serve as functional cosmetic agent due to a number of biological activities, but also offer potential advantages as a stabilizer and an enhancer of W/O/W emulsions formation for dermopharmaceutical and cosmetic preparations. PMID:26000558

  18. Optimizing organoclay stabilized Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yannan; Threlfall, Mhairi; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2011-04-15

    Oil-in-water emulsions were prepared using montmorillonite clay platelets, pre-treated with quaternary amine surfactants. In previous work, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) has been used. In this study, two more hydrophilic quaternary amine surfactants, Berol R648 and Ethoquad C/12, were used and formed Pickering emulsions, which were more stable than the emulsions prepared using CTAB coated clay. The droplets were also more mono-disperse. The most hydrophilic surfactant Berol R648 stabilizes the emulsions best. Salt also plays an important role in forming a stable emulsion. The droplet size decreases with surfactant concentration and relatively mono-disperse droplets can be obtained at moderate surfactant concentrations. The time evolution of the droplet size indicates a good stability to coalescence in the presence of Berol R648. Using polarizing microscopy, the clay platelets were found to be lying flat at the water oil interface. However, a significant fraction (about 90%) of clay stayed in the water phase and the clay particles at the water-oil interface formed stacks, each consisting of four clay platelets on average.

  19. Phytosterol colloidal particles as Pickering stabilizers for emulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu; Tang, Chuan-He

    2014-06-01

    Water-insoluble phytosterols were developed into a kind of colloidal particle as Pickering stabilizers for emulsions by a classic anti-solvent method using 100% ethanol as the organic phase to solubilize the phytosterols and whey protein concentrate (WPC) as the emulsifier. The colloidal particles in the dispersion, with morphology of stacked platelet-like sheets, had a mean diameter of 44.7 and 24.7 μm for the volume- and surface-averaged sizes, respectively. The properties and stability of the emulsions stabilized by these colloidal particles were highly dependent upon the applied total solid concentration (c; in the dispersion) and oil fraction (ø). The results indicated that (1) at a low c value (<1.0%, w/v) the emulsions were susceptible to phase separation, even at a low ø of 0.2, (2) at low ø values (e.g., 0.2 or 0.3) and a relatively high c value (1.0%, w/v, or above), a severe droplet flocculation occurred for the emulsions, and (3) when both c and ø were appropriately high, a kind of self-supporting gel-like emulsions could be formed. More interestingly, a phase inversion of the emulsions from the oil-in-water to water-in-oil type was observed, upon the ø increasing from 0.2 to 0.6 (especially at high c values, e.g., 3.0%, w/v). The elaborated Pickering emulsions stabilized by the phytosterol colloidal particles with a gel-like behavior would provide a candidate to act as a novel delivery system for active ingredients.

  20. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes at the Interface of Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Nicholas M; Weston, Javen S; Li, Brian; Venkataramani, Deepika; Aichele, Clint P; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Crossley, Steven P

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit very unique properties in biphasic systems. Their interparticle attraction leads to reduced droplet coalescence rates and corresponding improvements in emulsion stability. Here we use covalent and noncovalent techniques to modify the hydrophilicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and study their resulting behavior at an oil-water interface. By using both paraffin wax/water and dodecane/water systems, the thickness of the layer of MWNTs at the interface and resulting emulsion stability are shown to vary significantly with the approach used to modify the MWNTs. Increased hydrophilicity of the MWNTs shifts the emulsions from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. The stability of the emulsion is found to correlate with the thickness of nanotubes populating the oil-water interface and relative strength of the carbon nanotube network. The addition of a surfactant decreases the thickness of nanotubes at the interface and enhances the overall interfacial area stabilized at the expense of increased droplet coalescence rates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the interfacial thickness of modified carbon nanotubes has been quantified and correlated to emulsion stability.

  1. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes at the Interface of Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Nicholas M; Weston, Javen S; Li, Brian; Venkataramani, Deepika; Aichele, Clint P; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Crossley, Steven P

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit very unique properties in biphasic systems. Their interparticle attraction leads to reduced droplet coalescence rates and corresponding improvements in emulsion stability. Here we use covalent and noncovalent techniques to modify the hydrophilicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and study their resulting behavior at an oil-water interface. By using both paraffin wax/water and dodecane/water systems, the thickness of the layer of MWNTs at the interface and resulting emulsion stability are shown to vary significantly with the approach used to modify the MWNTs. Increased hydrophilicity of the MWNTs shifts the emulsions from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. The stability of the emulsion is found to correlate with the thickness of nanotubes populating the oil-water interface and relative strength of the carbon nanotube network. The addition of a surfactant decreases the thickness of nanotubes at the interface and enhances the overall interfacial area stabilized at the expense of increased droplet coalescence rates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the interfacial thickness of modified carbon nanotubes has been quantified and correlated to emulsion stability. PMID:26549532

  2. Temperature dependence of emulsion morphologies and the dispersion morphology diagram. 2. Three-phase emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Johnson, G.K.

    1995-07-06

    Using several different compositions of the (pseudo)ternary amphiphile/oil/`water` system C{sub 6}H{sub 13}(OC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}-OH/n-tetradecane/aqueous 10 mM NaCl, we show by means of electrical conductivity measurements that the temperature dependencies of the emulsion morphologies were consistent with predictions from isothermal dispersion morphology diagrams, thus contradicting phase inversion temperature ideas. 26 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Automated Track Recognition and Event Reconstruction in Nuclear Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deines-Jones, P.; Cherry, M. L.; Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Jones, W. V.; Kolganova, E. D.; Kudzia, D.; Nilsen, B. S.; Olszewski, A.; Pozharova, E. A.; Sengupta, K.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Waddington, C, J.; Wefel, J. P.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.

    1998-01-01

    The major advantages of nuclear emulsion for detecting charged particles are its submicron position resolution and sensitivity to minimum ionizing particles. These must be balanced, however, against the difficult manual microscope measurement by skilled observers required for the analysis. We have developed an automated system to acquire and analyze the microscope images from emulsion chambers. Each emulsion plate is analyzed independently, allowing coincidence techniques to be used in order to reject back- ground and estimate error rates. The system has been used to analyze a sample of high-multiplicity Pb-Pb interactions (charged particle multiplicities approx. 1100) produced by the 158 GeV/c per nucleon Pb-208 beam at CERN. Automatically reconstructed track lists agree with our best manual measurements to 3%. We describe the image analysis and track reconstruction techniques, and discuss the measurement and reconstruction uncertainties.

  4. Perfluorochemical emulsions decrease Kupffer cell phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottalico, L.A.; Betensky, H.T.; Min, Y.B.; Weinstock, S.B. )

    1991-07-01

    One drawback to using perfluorochemical emulsions as blood substitutes is that perfluorochemical particles are cleared from the blood by the reticuloendothelial system, primarily liver and spleen. The authors measured the impact of two perfluorochemical emulsions on clearance of colloidal carbon (less than 1 microns) and 51Cr-sheep red blood cells (about 8 microns) by the reticuloendothelial system in vivo and in the isolated perfused liver. Male rats were injected with 2 ml/100 gm body wt of Fluosol-DA or Oxypherol-ET for 4 consecutive days. Carbon (1 ml/100 gm body wt) or sheep red blood cells (0.05 ml of 5% vol/vol/100 gm body wt) were then injected intravenously (in vivo) or added to perfusate. Samples were taken at several time points for 1 hr. In the isolated perfused liver, carbon clearance was depressed by 25% 1 day after treatment. Rates returned to control levels by 12 days in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but remained depressed by 67% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats. Sheep red blood cell (8 microns) clearance was two to five times slower than carbon clearance and depressed by 40% in livers from Fluosol-DA rats 1 day and 12 days after treatment. Added serum did not improve phagocytosis. In vivo carbon clearance remained normal in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but decreased by 74% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats 1 day after treatment, returning to normal by 12 days. Clearance rates were similar in control rats in vivo and in the perfused liver. They conclude that the isolated perfused liver is a good model to measure liver clearance function. Although low doses of perfluorochemical emulsions may depress Kupffer cell phagocytosis, general reticuloendothelial system function is not significantly compromised.

  5. [Study of a new lactic acid and pH 5.2 lactoserum emulsion for feminine hygiene. Results of a clinical study].

    PubMed

    Jacquet, A; Roussilhes, R; Anoufa, S; Marteau, C; Mallet, F; Audebert, A

    1995-01-01

    A new solution intended for use in feminine hygiene, and composed of a lactic acid base and of lactoserum at pH 5.2, was tested for a period of 8 weeks on 40 women. This test focused on its influence on the pH and the flora, as well as on the tolerance of the mucous membrane. Successive measurements of the vulvar and vaginal pH revealed no statistically significant variation between the beginning and the end of the trial. At the study inclusion thirty patients had a normal flora; of these, twenty-eight showed no change during the eight weeks of the trial. A candidiasis appeared in two patients in the middle of the trial; one of these patients received no treatment, while the other was given a five-day treatment due to similar occurrences in her past medical history. The product under study was continued throughout the trial, at the conclusion of which the flora was found to have returned to normal. At the study inclusion ten patients had either a candidiasis or a vaginitis. Their lack of symptoms and the absence of any previous problems resulted in no treatment being made in five of the ten cases, while in four cases the presence of such prior problems led to the immediate carrying out of short-length treatments. In every case, the product under study was used until the end of the trial. Bacteriological studies showed that in all the patients--whether or not they had been treated--the flora rapidly returned to normal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to...

  8. Induced phase transitions of nanoparticle-stabilized emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijters, Stefan; Günther, Florian; Harting, Jens

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticles can stabilize fluid-fluid interfaces over long timescales and are nowadays commonly used, e.g. in emulsions. However, their fundamental properties are as of yet poorly understood. Nanoparticle-stabilized emulsions can exhibit different phases, such as Pickering emulsions or bijels, which can be characterized by their different topologies and rheology. We investigate the effect of various initial conditions on random mixtures of two fluids and nanoparticles - in particular, the final state these systems will reach. For this, we use the well-established 3D lattice Boltzmann method, extended to allow for the added nanoparticles. After the evolution of the emulsions has stopped, we induce transitions from one state to another by gradually changing the wettability of the nanoparticles over time. This changes the preferential local curvature of the interfaces, which strongly affects the global state. We observe strong hysteresis effects because of the energy barrier presented by the necessary massive reordering of the particles. Being able to change emulsion states in situ has potential application possibilities in filtering technology, or creating particle scaffolds.

  9. PHEA-PLA biocompatible nanoparticles by technique of solvent evaporation from multiple emulsions.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Gennara; Craparo, Emanuela Fabiola; Sardo, Carla; Lamberti, Gaetano; Barba, Anna Angela; Dalmoro, Annalisa

    2015-11-30

    Nanocarriers of amphiphilic polymeric materials represent versatile delivery systems for poorly water soluble drugs. In this work the technique of solvent evaporation from multiple emulsions was applied to produce nanovectors based on new amphiphilic copolymer, the α,β-poly(N-2-hydroxyethyl)-DL-aspartamide-polylactic acid (PHEA-PLA), purposely synthesized to be used in the controlled release of active molecules poorly soluble in water. To this aim an amphiphilic derivative of PHEA, a hydrophilic polymer, was synthesized by derivatization of the polymeric backbone with hydrophobic grafts of polylactic acid (PLA). The achieved copolymer was thus used to produce nanoparticles loaded with α tocopherol (vitamin E) adopted as lipophilic model molecule. Applying a protocol based on solvent evaporation from multiple emulsions assisted by ultrasonic energy and optimizing the emulsification process (solvent selection/separation stages), PHEA-PLA nanostructured particles with total α tocopherol entrapment efficiency (100%), were obtained. The drug release is expected to take place in lower times with respect to PLA due to the presence of the hydrophilic PHEA, therefore the produced nanoparticles can be used for semi-long term release drug delivery systems.

  10. PHEA-PLA biocompatible nanoparticles by technique of solvent evaporation from multiple emulsions.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Gennara; Craparo, Emanuela Fabiola; Sardo, Carla; Lamberti, Gaetano; Barba, Anna Angela; Dalmoro, Annalisa

    2015-11-30

    Nanocarriers of amphiphilic polymeric materials represent versatile delivery systems for poorly water soluble drugs. In this work the technique of solvent evaporation from multiple emulsions was applied to produce nanovectors based on new amphiphilic copolymer, the α,β-poly(N-2-hydroxyethyl)-DL-aspartamide-polylactic acid (PHEA-PLA), purposely synthesized to be used in the controlled release of active molecules poorly soluble in water. To this aim an amphiphilic derivative of PHEA, a hydrophilic polymer, was synthesized by derivatization of the polymeric backbone with hydrophobic grafts of polylactic acid (PLA). The achieved copolymer was thus used to produce nanoparticles loaded with α tocopherol (vitamin E) adopted as lipophilic model molecule. Applying a protocol based on solvent evaporation from multiple emulsions assisted by ultrasonic energy and optimizing the emulsification process (solvent selection/separation stages), PHEA-PLA nanostructured particles with total α tocopherol entrapment efficiency (100%), were obtained. The drug release is expected to take place in lower times with respect to PLA due to the presence of the hydrophilic PHEA, therefore the produced nanoparticles can be used for semi-long term release drug delivery systems. PMID:26410757

  11. Separation Properties of Wastewater Containing O/W Emulsion Using Ceramic Microfiltration/Ultrafiltration (MF/UF) Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuho; Matsumoto, Kanji

    2013-01-01

    Washing systems using water soluble detergent are used in electrical and mechanical industries and the wastewater containing O/W emulsion are discharged from these systems. Membrane filtration has large potential for the efficient separation of O/W emulsion for reuses of treated water and detergent. The separation properties of O/W emulsions by cross-flow microfiltration and ultrafiltration were studied with ceramic MF and UF membranes. The effects of pore size; applied pressure; cross-flow velocity; and detergent concentration on rejection of O/W emulsion and flux were systematically studied. At the condition achieving complete separation of O/W emulsion the pressure-independent flux was observed and this flux behavior was explained by gel-polarization model. The O/W emulsion tended to permeate through the membrane at the conditions of larger pore size; higher emulsion concentration; and higher pressure. The O/W emulsion could permeate the membrane pore structure by destruction or deformation. These results imply the stability of O/W emulsion in the gel-layer formed on membrane surface play an important role in the separation properties. The O/W emulsion was concentrated by batch cross-flow concentration filtration and the flux decline during the concentration filtration was explained by the gel- polarization model. PMID:24958621

  12. Rapid crystallization and morphological adjustment of zeolite ZSM-5 in nonionic emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ying; Jin Chao

    2011-01-15

    Zeolite ZSM-5 was synthesized for the first time in a nonionic emulsion composed of polyoxyethylated alkylphenol, butanol, cyclohexane and tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAOH)-containing zeolite synthesis mixture. The crystallization kinetics in the emulsion was investigated and the ZSM-5 product was characterized in detail by XRD, SEM, FT-IR, TG, N{sub 2} adsorption and CHN analysis techniques. Compared with the conventionally hydrothermal synthesis with the same structure directing agent TEAOH, the emulsion system allows rapid crystallization of ZSM-5. The ZSM-5 product exhibits unusual agglomerated structure and possesses larger specific surface area. The FT-IR, TG results plus CHN analysis show the encapsulation of a trace of emulsion components in the emulsion ZSM-5. Control experiments show the emulsion system exerts the crystallization induction and morphological adjustment effects mainly during the aging period. The effects are tentatively attributed to the confined space domains, surfactant-water interaction as well as surfactant-growing crystals interaction existing in the emulsion. -- Graphical abstract: The nonionic emulsion synthesis allows rapid crystallization and morphological adjustment of zeolite ZSM-5 compared with the conventional hydrothermal synthesis. Display Omitted

  13. Nucleic acid detection systems for enteroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Rotbart, H A

    1991-01-01

    The enteroviruses comprise nearly 70 human pathogens responsible for a wide array of diseases including poliomyelitis, meningitis, myocarditis, and neonatal sepsis. Current diagnostic tests for the enteroviruses are limited in their use by the slow growth, or failure to grow, of certain serotypes in culture, the antigenic diversity among the serotypes, and the low titer of virus in certain clinical specimens. Within the past 6 years, applications of molecular cloning techniques, in vitro transcription vectors, automated nucleic acid synthesis, and the polymerase chain reaction have resulted in significant progress toward nucleic acid-based detection systems for the enteroviruses that take advantage of conserved genomic sequences across many, if not all, serotypes. Similar approaches to the study of enteroviral pathogenesis have already produced dramatic advances in our understanding of how these important viruses cause their diverse clinical spectra. PMID:1649002

  14. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  15. High speed automated microtomography of nuclear emulsions and recent application

    SciTech Connect

    Tioukov, V.; Aleksandrov, A.; Consiglio, L.; De Lellis, G.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-12-31

    The development of high-speed automatic scanning systems was the key-factor for massive and successful emulsions application for big neutrino experiments like OPERA. The emulsion detector simplicity, the unprecedented sub-micron spatial resolution and the unique ability to provide intrinsically 3-dimensional spatial information make it a perfect device for short-living particles study, where the event topology should be precisely reconstructed in a 10-100 um scale vertex region. Recently the exceptional technological progress in image processing and automation together with intensive R&D done by Italian and Japanese microscopy groups permit to increase the scanning speed to unbelievable few years ago m{sup 2}/day scale and so greatly extend the range of the possible applications for emulsion-based detectors to other fields like: medical imaging, directional dark matter search, nuclear physics, geological and industrial applications.

  16. High speed automated microtomography of nuclear emulsions and recent application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tioukov, V.; Aleksandrov, A.; Consiglio, L.; De Lellis, G.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-12-01

    The development of high-speed automatic scanning systems was the key-factor for massive and successful emulsions application for big neutrino experiments like OPERA. The emulsion detector simplicity, the unprecedented sub-micron spatial resolution and the unique ability to provide intrinsically 3-dimensional spatial information make it a perfect device for short-living particles study, where the event topology should be precisely reconstructed in a 10-100 um scale vertex region. Recently the exceptional technological progress in image processing and automation together with intensive R&D done by Italian and Japanese microscopy groups permit to increase the scanning speed to unbelievable few years ago m2/day scale and so greatly extend the range of the possible applications for emulsion-based detectors to other fields like: medical imaging, directional dark matter search, nuclear physics, geological and industrial applications.

  17. Arrested of coalescence of emulsion droplets of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Burke, Christopher; Blair, Donald W.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    With applications ranging from food products to cosmetics via targeted drug delivery systems, structured anisotropic colloids provide an efficient way to control the structure, properties and functions of emulsions. When two fluid emulsion droplets are brought in contact, a reduction of the interfacial tension drives their coalescence into a larger droplet of the same total volume and reduced exposed area. This coalescence can be partially or totally hindered by the presence of nano or micron-size particles that coat the interface as in Pickering emulsions. We investigate numerically the dependance of the mechanical stability of these arrested shapes on the particles size, their shape anisotropy, their polydispersity, their interaction with the solvent, and the particle-particle interactions. We discuss structural shape changes that can be induced by tuning the particles interactions after arrest occurs, and provide design parameters for the relevant experiments.

  18. Manipulation of gel emulsions by variable microchannel geometry.

    PubMed

    Surenjav, Enkhtuul; Priest, Craig; Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf

    2009-01-21

    In this article we investigate the morphology and manipulation of monodisperse emulsions at high dispersed phase volume fractions (gel emulsions) in a microfluidic environment. Confined monodisperse gel emulsions self-organize into well-ordered droplet arrangements, which may be stable or metastable, depending on the geometry of the confining microchannel. Three arrangements are considered, in which the droplets are aligned in a single file, a two row, or a three row arrangement. We explore the potential for induced transitions between these distinct droplet arrangements as a tool for droplet-based microfluidic processing. Transitions are readily achieved by means of localized (geometrical) features in channel geometry, however the onset of the transition is strongly dependent on the subtleties of the microfluidic system, e.g. volume fraction, droplet size, and feature dimensions. The transitions can be achieved via fixed channel features or, when the continuous phase is a ferrofluid, by a virtual channel constriction created using a magnetic field. PMID:19107292

  19. A novel nanoparticulate system for sustained delivery of acid-labile lansoprazole.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind Sadashiv; Lin, Wen Jen

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, an effort was made to develop the Eudragit RS100 based nanoparticulate system for sustained delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ). LPZ-loaded Eudragit RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNPs) were prepared by oil-in-water emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The effects of various formulation variables such as polymer concentration, drug amount and solvent composition on physicochemical performance of nanoparticles and in vitro drug release were investigated. All nanoparticles were spherical with particle size 198.9 ± 8.6-376.9 ± 5.6 nm and zeta potential +35.1 ± 1.7 to +40.2 ± 0.8 mV. The yield of nanoparticles was unaffected by change of these three variables. However, the drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were affected by polymer concentration and drug amount. On the other hand, the particle size of nanoparticles was significantly affected by polymer concentration and internal phase composition due to influence of droplet size during emulsification process. All nanoparticles prolonged drug release for 24h which was dominated by a combination of drug diffusion and polymer chain relaxation. The fastest and the slowest release rates were observed in C2-1002-10/0 and C8-4001-10/0, respectively, based on the release rate constant (k). Thus, the developed nanoparticles possessed a potential as a nano-carrier to sustain drug delivery for treatment of acid related disorders.

  20. The emulsion chamber technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Photographic emulsion has the unique property of recording tracks of ionizing particles with a spatial precision of 1 micron, while also being capable of deployment over detector areas of square meters or 10's of square meters. Detectors are passive, their cost to fly in Space is a fraction of that of instruments of similar collecting. A major problem in their continued use has been the labor intensiveness of data retrieval by traditional microscope methods. Two factors changing the acceptability of emulsion technology in space are the astronomical costs of flying large electronic instruments such as ionization calorimeters in Space, and the power and low cost of computers, a small revolution in the laboratory microscope data-taking. Our group at UAH made measurements of the high energy composition and spectra of cosmic rays. The Marshall group has also specialized in space radiation dosimetry. Ionization calorimeters, using alternating layers of lead and photographic emulsion, to measure particle energies up to 10(exp 15) eV were developed. Ten balloon flights were performed with them. No such calorimeters have ever flown in orbit. In the ECT program, a small emulsion chamber was developed and will be flown on the Shuttle mission OAST-2 to resolve the principal technological questions concerning space exposures. These include assessments of: (1) pre-flight and orbital exposure to background radiation, including both self-shielding and secondary particle generation; the practical limit to exposure time in space can then be determined; (2) dynamics of stack to optimize design for launch and weightlessness; and (3) thermal and vacuum constraints on emulsion performance. All these effects are cumulative and affect our ability to perform scientific measurements but cannot be adequately predicted by available methods.

  1. Phytic acid interactions in food systems.

    PubMed

    Cheryan, M

    1980-01-01

    Phytic acid is present in many plant systems, constituting about 1 to 5% by weight of many cereals and legumes. Concern about its presence in food arises from evidence that it decreases the bioavailability of many essential minerals by interacting with multivalent cations and/or proteins to form complexes that may be insoluble or otherwise unavailable under physiologic conditions. The precise structure of phytic acid and its salts is still a matter of controversy and lack of a good method of analysis is also a problem. It forms fairly stable chelates with almost all multivalent cations which are insoluble about pH 6 to 7, although pH, type, and concentration of cation have a tremendous influence on their solubility characteristics. In addition, at low pH and low cation concentration, phytate-protein complexes are formed due to direct electrostatic interaction, while at pH > 6 to 7, a ternary phytic acid-mineral-protein complex is formed which dissociates at high Na+ concentrations. These complexes appear to be responsible for the decreased bioavailability of the complexed minerals and are also more resistant to proteolytic digestion at low pH. Development of methods for producing low-phytate food products must take into account the nature and extent of the interactions between phytic acid and other food components. Simple mechanical treatment, such as milling, is useful for those seeds in which phytic acid tends to be localized in specific regions. Enzyme treatment, either directly with phytase or indirectly through the action of microorganisms, such as yeast during breadmaking, is quite effective, provided pH and other environmental conditions are favorable. It is also possible to produce low-phytate products by taking advantage of some specific interactions. For example, adjustment of pH and/or ionic strength so as to dissociate phytate-protein complexes and then using centrifugation or ultrafiltration (UF) has been shown to be useful. Phytic acid can also

  2. Temperature dependence of emulsion morphologies and the dispersion morphology diagram for three-phase emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Johnson, G.K.

    1995-12-31

    Using several different compositions of the (pseudo)ternary amphiphile/oil/{open_quotes}water{close_quotes} system C{sub 6}H{sub 13}(OC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}OH/n-tetradecane/aqueous 10 mM NaCl that form oil-rich top phases (J), water-rich bottom phases ({Beta}), and middle-phase microemulsions (m), we showed by means of electrical conductivity measurements that the temperature dependencies of the three-phase emulsion morphologies were consistent with predictions from isothermal dispersion morphology diagrams, thus contradicting ideas derived from the PIT (phase inversion temperature) model for two-phase emulsions. In particular, we formed three-phase emulsions in which either (1) the continuous phase was an oil-rich phase (actually, m) below the PIT and the water-rich phase ({Beta}) above that temperature; (2) the water-rich phase was continuous both below and above the PIT; or (3) oil-rich phase was the continuous phase both below and above the PIT.

  3. Acid preservation systems for food products

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberio, J. E.; Cirigiano, M. C.

    1984-10-16

    Fumaric acid is used in combination with critical amounts of acetic acid to preserve acid containing food products from microbiological spoilage in the absence of or at reduced levels of chemical preservative.

  4. Mass-Transfer-Induced Multistep Phase Separation in Emulsion Droplets: Toward Self-Assembly Multilayered Emulsions and Onionlike Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuaishuai; Li, Jiang; Man, Jia; Chen, Haosheng

    2016-08-01

    Mass-transfer-induced multistep phase separation was found in emulsion droplets. The agent system consists of a monomer (ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate, ETPTA), an oligomer (polyethylene glycol diacrylate, PEGDA 700), and water. The PEGDA in the separated layers offered partial miscibility of all the components throughout the multistep phase-separation procedure, which was terminated by the depletion of PEGDA in the outermost layer. The number of separated portions was determined by the initial PEGDA content, and the initial droplet size influenced the mass-transfer process and consequently determined the sizes of the separated layers. The resultant multilayered emulsions were demonstrated to offer an orderly temperature-responsive release of the inner cores. Moreover, the emulsion droplets can be readily solidified into onionlike microspheres by ultraviolet light curing, providing a new strategy in designing particle structures.

  5. Mass-Transfer-Induced Multistep Phase Separation in Emulsion Droplets: Toward Self-Assembly Multilayered Emulsions and Onionlike Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuaishuai; Li, Jiang; Man, Jia; Chen, Haosheng

    2016-08-01

    Mass-transfer-induced multistep phase separation was found in emulsion droplets. The agent system consists of a monomer (ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate, ETPTA), an oligomer (polyethylene glycol diacrylate, PEGDA 700), and water. The PEGDA in the separated layers offered partial miscibility of all the components throughout the multistep phase-separation procedure, which was terminated by the depletion of PEGDA in the outermost layer. The number of separated portions was determined by the initial PEGDA content, and the initial droplet size influenced the mass-transfer process and consequently determined the sizes of the separated layers. The resultant multilayered emulsions were demonstrated to offer an orderly temperature-responsive release of the inner cores. Moreover, the emulsion droplets can be readily solidified into onionlike microspheres by ultraviolet light curing, providing a new strategy in designing particle structures. PMID:27427849

  6. Antagonistic effects between magnetite nanoparticles and a hydrophobic surfactant in highly concentrated Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos; Menner, Angelika; Bismarck, Alexander; Esquena, Jordi

    2014-05-13

    Herein we present a systematic study of the antagonistic interaction between magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) and nonionic hydrophobic surfactant in Pickering highly concentrated emulsions. Interfacial tension measurements, phase behavior, and emulsion stability studies, combined with electron microscopy observations in polymerized systems and magnetometry, are used to support the discussion. First, stable W/O highly concentrated emulsions were obtained using partially hydrophobized magnetite nanoparticles. These emulsions experienced phase separation when surfactant is added at concentrations as low as 0.05 wt %. Such phase separation arises from the preferential affinity of the surfactant for the nanoparticle surfaces, which remarkably enhances their hydrophobicity, leading to a gradual desorption of nanoparticles from the interface. W/O emulsions were obtained at higher surfactant concentrations, but in this case, these emulsions were mainly stabilized by surfactant molecules. Therefore, stable emulsions could be prepared in two separate ranges of surfactant concentrations. After polymerization, low-density macroporous polymers were obtained, and the adsorption and aggregation of nanoparticles was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The progressive displacement of the nanoparticles was revealed: from the oil-water interface, in which aggregated nanoparticles were adsorbed, forming dense layers, to the continuous phase of the emulsions, where small nanoparticle aggregates were randomly dispersed. Interestingly, the results also show that the blocking temperature of the iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles embedded in the macroporous polymers could be modulated by appropriate control of the concentrations of both surfactant and nanoparticles. PMID:24738961

  7. Antagonistic effects between magnetite nanoparticles and a hydrophobic surfactant in highly concentrated Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos; Menner, Angelika; Bismarck, Alexander; Esquena, Jordi

    2014-05-13

    Herein we present a systematic study of the antagonistic interaction between magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) and nonionic hydrophobic surfactant in Pickering highly concentrated emulsions. Interfacial tension measurements, phase behavior, and emulsion stability studies, combined with electron microscopy observations in polymerized systems and magnetometry, are used to support the discussion. First, stable W/O highly concentrated emulsions were obtained using partially hydrophobized magnetite nanoparticles. These emulsions experienced phase separation when surfactant is added at concentrations as low as 0.05 wt %. Such phase separation arises from the preferential affinity of the surfactant for the nanoparticle surfaces, which remarkably enhances their hydrophobicity, leading to a gradual desorption of nanoparticles from the interface. W/O emulsions were obtained at higher surfactant concentrations, but in this case, these emulsions were mainly stabilized by surfactant molecules. Therefore, stable emulsions could be prepared in two separate ranges of surfactant concentrations. After polymerization, low-density macroporous polymers were obtained, and the adsorption and aggregation of nanoparticles was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The progressive displacement of the nanoparticles was revealed: from the oil-water interface, in which aggregated nanoparticles were adsorbed, forming dense layers, to the continuous phase of the emulsions, where small nanoparticle aggregates were randomly dispersed. Interestingly, the results also show that the blocking temperature of the iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles embedded in the macroporous polymers could be modulated by appropriate control of the concentrations of both surfactant and nanoparticles.

  8. Conductivity reduction due to emulsification during surfactant enhanced-aquifer remediation. 1. Emulsion transport.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vivek; Demond, Avery H

    2002-12-15

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is a promising technology for the remediation of subsurface zones contaminated with organic liquids. To ensure the success of SEAR, the potential reduction in hydraulic conductivity must be evaluated. The objective of this study was to examine the process of conductivity reduction due to the transport of an emulsion, generated by mixing tetrachloroethylene with 4% solutions of two nonionic surfactants, in packed beds of sand-sized silica particles. The injection of the emulsion resulted in a 75-85% reduction in conductivity, depending on the properties of the surfactant and the porous medium. The greater viscosity of the emulsion relative to that of water accounted for about 25% of the reduction. The remainder was attributed to the clogging of the porous medium by the emulsion. The relative sizes of the emulsion droplets and the packed bed's pores, coupled with measurements of zeta potential of the emulsion droplets and silica particles, suggested that multilayer deposition was the principal mechanism of clogging. This hypothesis was corroborated by direct observation of the emulsion transport process in a micromodel. To simulate the reduction in hydraulic conductivity in these systems accurately, it was necessary to modify the emulsion transport model by Soo and Radke to include the phenomena of viscosity variation and multilayering.

  9. Effect of Grape Seed Proanthocyanidin-Gelatin Colloidal Complexes on Stability and in Vitro Digestion of Fish Oil Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chin; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Chao, An-Chong; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Tsai, Min-Lang; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2015-11-25

    The colloidal complexes composed of grape seed proanthocyanidin (GSP) and gelatin (GLT), as natural antioxidants to improve stability and inhibit lipid oxidation in menhaden fish oil emulsions, were evaluated. The interactions between GSP and GLT, and the chemical structures of GSP/GLT self-assembled colloidal complexes, were characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism (CD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) studies. Fish oil was emulsified with GLT to obtain an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion. After formation of the emulsion, GLT was fixed by GSP to obtain the GSP/GLT colloidal complexes stabilized fish oil emulsion. Menhaden oil emulsified by GSP/GLT(0.4 wt %) colloidal complexes yielded an emulsion with smaller particles and higher emulsion stability as compared to its GLT emulsified counterpart. The GSP/GLT colloidal complexes inhibited the lipid oxidation in fish oil emulsions more effectively than free GLT because the emulsified fish oil was surrounded by the antioxidant GSP/GLT colloidal complexes. The digestion rate of the fish oil emulsified with the GSP/GLT colloidal complexes was reduced as compared to that emulsified with free GLT. The extent of free fatty acids released from the GSP/GLT complexes stabilized fish oil emulsions was 63.3% under simulated digestion condition, indicating that the fish oil emulsion was considerably hydrolyzed with lipase.

  10. Preparation and physicochemical properties of surfactant-free emulsions using electrolytic-reduction ion water containing lithium magnesium sodium silicate.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Masahiro; Wada, Yuko; Hosoya, Takashi; Hino, Fumio; Kitahara, Yoshiyasu; Shimokawa, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Fumiyoshi

    2013-04-01

    Surfactant-free emulsions by adding jojoba oil, squalane, olive oil, or glyceryl trioctanoate (medium chain fatty acid triglycerides, MCT) to electrolytic-reduction ion water containing lithium magnesium sodium silicate (GE-100) were prepared, and their physiochemical properties (thixotropy, zeta potential, and mean particle diameter) were evaluated. At an oil concentration of 10%, the zeta potential was ‒22.3 ‒ ‒26.8 mV, showing no marked differences among the emulsions of various types of oil, but the mean particle diameters in the olive oil emulsion (327 nm) and MCT emulsion (295 nm) were smaller than those in the other oil emulsions (452-471 nm). In addition, measurement of the hysteresis loop area of each type of emulsion revealed extremely high thixotropy of the emulsion containing MCT at a low concentration and the olive emulsion. Based on these results, since surfactants and antiseptic agents markedly damage sensitive skin tissue such as that with atopic dermatitis, surfactant- and antiseptic-free emulsions are expected to be new bases for drugs for external use. PMID:23715508

  11. Preparation and physicochemical properties of surfactant-free emulsions using electrolytic-reduction ion water containing lithium magnesium sodium silicate.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Masahiro; Wada, Yuko; Hosoya, Takashi; Hino, Fumio; Kitahara, Yoshiyasu; Shimokawa, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Fumiyoshi

    2013-04-01

    Surfactant-free emulsions by adding jojoba oil, squalane, olive oil, or glyceryl trioctanoate (medium chain fatty acid triglycerides, MCT) to electrolytic-reduction ion water containing lithium magnesium sodium silicate (GE-100) were prepared, and their physiochemical properties (thixotropy, zeta potential, and mean particle diameter) were evaluated. At an oil concentration of 10%, the zeta potential was ‒22.3 ‒ ‒26.8 mV, showing no marked differences among the emulsions of various types of oil, but the mean particle diameters in the olive oil emulsion (327 nm) and MCT emulsion (295 nm) were smaller than those in the other oil emulsions (452-471 nm). In addition, measurement of the hysteresis loop area of each type of emulsion revealed extremely high thixotropy of the emulsion containing MCT at a low concentration and the olive emulsion. Based on these results, since surfactants and antiseptic agents markedly damage sensitive skin tissue such as that with atopic dermatitis, surfactant- and antiseptic-free emulsions are expected to be new bases for drugs for external use.

  12. Effects of Operational Conditions on Preparation of Oil in Water Emulsion using Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hiwatashi, Ryosuke; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Shimada, Yuichiro; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    Ultrasonic emulsification is known to be useful in preparation of nanoemulsions, because use of surfactant can be reduced. Moreover, nanoemulsions with droplet diameters of around 100 nm can be prepared by sequential ultrasonic irradiation from low to high frequency. In this study, oil-in-water systems of toluene-water emulsions were prepared by ultrasonic emulsification and mechanical emulsification. Ultrasound emulsification was found to be more suitable than mechanical emulsification with a homogenizer. In addition, a two-step emulsification method was applied to preparation of emulsion. Crude emulsion was prepared mechanically in the first stage, and this was irradiated with ultrasound in the second stage. The droplet size of the emulsion was found to be influenced by the relationship between droplet size of the crude emulsion and ultrasonic frequency in the second stage.

  13. Rheological characterization of O/W emulsions incorporated with neutral and charged polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Vianna-Filho, Ricardo Padilha; Petkowicz, Carmen Lúcia Oliveira; Silveira, Joana Léa Meira

    2013-03-01

    The effects of polysaccharides, including xyloglucan from Hymenaea courbaril (XG), galactomannans from Schizolobium parahybae (GMSP) and Mimosa scabrella (GMMS), xanthan gum (XT), sodium hyaluronate (HNa) and Fucogel(®) (FG), on the rheological behavior of cosmetic emulsions were evaluated. These incorporations gave rise to six emulsified systems, denoted XGE, GMSPE, GMMSE, XTE, HNaE and FGE, respectively. The emulsion consistency was found to follow the trend GMSPE>XGE>HNaE>FGE>XTE>GMMSE. In general, the addition of polysaccharides increased the viscoelastic properties of the emulsions and decreased the creep compliance. The neutral polysaccharides (GMSPE, GMMSE) led to better stability of the emulsions after storing for 20 days relative to charged polymers. It was found that polysaccharides XG, GMSP and GMMS, which come from the seeds of native Brazilian plant species, might be used to modify the flow properties and stabilities of oil-water emulsions.

  14. A novel process for upgrading heavy oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, F.T.T.; Rintjema, R.T.

    1994-12-31

    Canada has extensive reserves of high sulfur heavy oils. These heavy oils are recovered primarily by steam injection techniques. As a result, the heavy oils are obtained as emulsions at well-heads. The heavy oils, being high in sulfur and metals, and low in hydrogen to carbon atomic ratio, require upgrading such as desulfurization and hydrocracking before it can be used in conventional refineries. Conventional emulsion treatment and desulfurization technology require multistage processing. Thus, alternative technologies for processing heavy oil emulsions would be attractive. The authors have recently developed a novel single stage process for upgrading emulsions via activation of water to provide hydrogen in situ for catalytic desulfurization and hydrocracking. Current work is focused on the desulfurization aspect of upgrading, using benzothiophene as the model sulfur compound and molybdic acid as the catalyst. At 340 C and a CO loading pressure of 600 psi, up to 86% sulfur removal was obtained. As well, in situ generated H{sub 2} was found to be more active than externally supplied molecular H{sub 2}. A likely pathway for desulfurization of benzothiophene was via the initial hydrogenation of benzothiophene to dihydrobenzothiophene followed by hydrogenolysis to give ethylbenzene and H{sub 2}S.

  15. Biofilm Formation in Microscopic Double Emulsion Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Connie; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    In natural, medical, and industrial settings, there exist surface-associated communities of bacteria known as biofilms. These highly structured films are composed of bacterial cells embedded within self-produced extracellular matrix, usually composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids; this matrix serves to protect the bacterial community from antibiotics and environmental stressors. Here, we form biofilms encapsulated within monodisperse, microscopically-sized double emulsion droplets using microfluidics. The bacteria self-organize at the inner liquid-liquid droplet interfaces, multiply, and differentiate into extracellular matrix-producing cells, forming manifold three-dimensional shell-within-a-shell structures of biofilms, templated upon the inner core of spherical liquid droplets. By using microfluidics to encapsulate bacterial cells, we have the ability to view individual cells multiplying in microscopically-sized droplets, which allows for high-throughput analysis in studying the genetic program leading to biofilm development, or cell signaling that induces differentiation.

  16. Emulsions Made of Oils from Seeds of GM Flax Protect V79 Cells against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Skorkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Hasiewicz-Derkacz, Karolina; Gębarowski, Tomasz; Kulma, Anna; Kostyn, Kamil; Gębczak, Katarzyna; Szyjka, Anna; Wojtasik, Wioleta; Gąsiorowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids, sterols, and hydrophilic phenolic compounds are components of flax oil that act as antioxidants. We investigated the impact of flax oil from transgenic flax in the form of emulsions on stressed Chinese hamster pulmonary fibroblasts. We found that the emulsions protect V79 cells against the H2O2 and the effect is dose dependent. They reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and protected genomic DNA against damage. The rate of cell proliferation increased upon treatment with the emulsions at a low concentration, while at a high concentration it decreased significantly, accompanied by increased frequency of apoptotic cell death. Expression analysis of selected genes revealed the upregulatory impact of the emulsions on the histones, acetylases, and deacetylases. Expression of apoptotic, proinflammatory, and anti-inflammatory genes was also altered. It is thus suggested that flax oil emulsions might be useful as a basis for biomedical products that actively protect cells against inflammation and degeneration. The beneficial effect on fibroblast resistance to oxidative damage was superior in the emulsion made of oil from transgenic plants which was correlated with the quantity of antioxidants and squalene. The emulsions from transgenic flax are promising candidates for skin protection against oxidative damage. PMID:26779302

  17. Physicopharmaceutical characteristics of an oil-in-water emulsion-type ointment containing diclofenac sodium.

    PubMed

    Takamura, A; Ishii, F; Noro, S; Koishi, M

    1984-05-01

    The oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion-type ointment was prepared with food additives containing diclofenac sodium. The oil phase and the emulsifier used were 1,2,3- propanetriyl trioctanoate (caprylic acid glyceryl ester) and sugar wax, and sugar ester, respectively. The emulsion stability of the o/w emulsion-type ointment as well as the diclofenac sodium release profile were investigated and compared with those from conventional ointments. The emulsion stability was evaluated in terms of the viscosity of the emulsion product, the particle size distribution of oil droplets, and the zeta potential of the droplets. It was found that sugar esters have excellent properties as emulsifiers, based on the results of viscosity and zeta potential measurements. The in vitro release test revealed that the amount of diclofenac sodium released from o/w emulsion-type ointment was greater than from the hydrophilic and absorptive ointment. Accordingly, it was concluded that o/w emulsion-type bases are suitable for pharmaceutical use in ointment products. PMID:6737243

  18. Physicopharmaceutical characteristics of an oil-in-water emulsion-type ointment containing diclofenac sodium.

    PubMed

    Takamura, A; Ishii, F; Noro, S; Koishi, M

    1984-05-01

    The oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion-type ointment was prepared with food additives containing diclofenac sodium. The oil phase and the emulsifier used were 1,2,3- propanetriyl trioctanoate (caprylic acid glyceryl ester) and sugar wax, and sugar ester, respectively. The emulsion stability of the o/w emulsion-type ointment as well as the diclofenac sodium release profile were investigated and compared with those from conventional ointments. The emulsion stability was evaluated in terms of the viscosity of the emulsion product, the particle size distribution of oil droplets, and the zeta potential of the droplets. It was found that sugar esters have excellent properties as emulsifiers, based on the results of viscosity and zeta potential measurements. The in vitro release test revealed that the amount of diclofenac sodium released from o/w emulsion-type ointment was greater than from the hydrophilic and absorptive ointment. Accordingly, it was concluded that o/w emulsion-type bases are suitable for pharmaceutical use in ointment products.

  19. Emulsions Made of Oils from Seeds of GM Flax Protect V79 Cells against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Skorkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Hasiewicz-Derkacz, Karolina; Gębarowski, Tomasz; Kulma, Anna; Moreira, Helena; Kostyn, Kamil; Gębczak, Katarzyna; Szyjka, Anna; Wojtasik, Wioleta; Gąsiorowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids, sterols, and hydrophilic phenolic compounds are components of flax oil that act as antioxidants. We investigated the impact of flax oil from transgenic flax in the form of emulsions on stressed Chinese hamster pulmonary fibroblasts. We found that the emulsions protect V79 cells against the H2O2 and the effect is dose dependent. They reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and protected genomic DNA against damage. The rate of cell proliferation increased upon treatment with the emulsions at a low concentration, while at a high concentration it decreased significantly, accompanied by increased frequency of apoptotic cell death. Expression analysis of selected genes revealed the upregulatory impact of the emulsions on the histones, acetylases, and deacetylases. Expression of apoptotic, proinflammatory, and anti-inflammatory genes was also altered. It is thus suggested that flax oil emulsions might be useful as a basis for biomedical products that actively protect cells against inflammation and degeneration. The beneficial effect on fibroblast resistance to oxidative damage was superior in the emulsion made of oil from transgenic plants which was correlated with the quantity of antioxidants and squalene. The emulsions from transgenic flax are promising candidates for skin protection against oxidative damage.

  20. Emulsions Made of Oils from Seeds of GM Flax Protect V79 Cells against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Skorkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Hasiewicz-Derkacz, Karolina; Gębarowski, Tomasz; Kulma, Anna; Moreira, Helena; Kostyn, Kamil; Gębczak, Katarzyna; Szyjka, Anna; Wojtasik, Wioleta; Gąsiorowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids, sterols, and hydrophilic phenolic compounds are components of flax oil that act as antioxidants. We investigated the impact of flax oil from transgenic flax in the form of emulsions on stressed Chinese hamster pulmonary fibroblasts. We found that the emulsions protect V79 cells against the H2O2 and the effect is dose dependent. They reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and protected genomic DNA against damage. The rate of cell proliferation increased upon treatment with the emulsions at a low concentration, while at a high concentration it decreased significantly, accompanied by increased frequency of apoptotic cell death. Expression analysis of selected genes revealed the upregulatory impact of the emulsions on the histones, acetylases, and deacetylases. Expression of apoptotic, proinflammatory, and anti-inflammatory genes was also altered. It is thus suggested that flax oil emulsions might be useful as a basis for biomedical products that actively protect cells against inflammation and degeneration. The beneficial effect on fibroblast resistance to oxidative damage was superior in the emulsion made of oil from transgenic plants which was correlated with the quantity of antioxidants and squalene. The emulsions from transgenic flax are promising candidates for skin protection against oxidative damage. PMID:26779302

  1. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Fine Particles for Ocean and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan

    2006-07-08

    This semi-annual progress report includes our latest research on deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) emulsions stabilized by pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}). We describe a practical system that could be employed for the release of a dense C/W emulsion. The heart of the system is a Kenics-type static mixer. The testing and evaluation of a static mixer in the NETL High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility was described in the previous semi-annual report. The release system could be deployed from a floating platform over the open ocean, or at the end of an off-shore pipe laying on the continental slope. Because the emulsion is much denser than ambient seawater, modeling shows that upon release the plume will sink much deeper from the injection point, increasing the sequestration time for CO{sub 2}. When released in the open ocean, a plume containing the output of a 500 MW{sub el} coal-fired power plant will typically sink hundreds of meters below the injection point. When released from a pipe on the continental shelf, the plume will sink about twice as much because of the limited entrainment of ambient seawater when the plume flows along the sloping seabed. Furthermore, the plume is slightly alkaline, not acidic. The disadvantage is that the creation of the emulsion requires significant amounts of pulverized limestone, on the order of 0.5-0.75 weight ratio of limestone to CO{sub 2}. While pulverized limestone with particle size appropriate for creating C/W emulsions can be purchased for $38 per ton, it is shown in this report that it may be more economic to purchase raw limestone from quarries and pulverize it in situ using grinding mills. In this case the major cost elements are the capital and operating costs of the grinding mills, resulting in a total cost of about $11 per ton of pulverized limestone, including the cost of raw material and shipping. Because we need approximately 0.75 ton of pulverized limestone per ton of liquid CO2 to create a stable

  2. Mannan-stabilized oil-in-water beverage emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stabilizing effect of spruce galactoglucomannan (GGM) on a model beverage emulsion system was studied and compared to that of guar gum and locust bean gum galactomannans, konjac glucomannan, and corn arabinoxylan. In addition, enzymatic modification was applied on guar gum to examine the effect ...

  3. Oxidative desulfurization of dibenzothiophene with molecular oxygen using emulsion catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Hongying; Gao, Jinbo; Jiang, Zongxuan; Yang, Yongxing; Song, Bo; Li, Can

    2007-01-14

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT) is oxidized to the corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone in an emulsion system (W/O) composed of polyoxometalate anion [C(18)H(37)N(CH(3))3](5)[PV(2)Mo(10)O(40)] as both the surfactant and catalyst, using molecular oxygen as the oxidant and aldehyde as the sacrificial agent under mild conditions. PMID:17180229

  4. MOF-polymer composite microcapsules derived from Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jia; Marcello, Marco; Garai, Ashesh; Bradshaw, Darren

    2013-05-21

    Hollow composite microcapsules are prepared by the assembly of pre-formed nanocrystals of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) around emulsion droplets, followed by interfacial polymerisation of the interior. The micropores of the MOF crystals embedded within a semipermeable hierarchically structured polymeric membrane are an effective combination for the retention of encapsulated dye molecules. Release can be triggered however by acid dissolution of the MOF component.

  5. Analysis of emulsion stability in acrylic dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions either micro or nano permit transport or solubilization of hydrophobic substances within a water-based phase. Different methods have been introduced at laboratory and industrial scales: mechanical stirring, high-pressure homogenization, or ultrasonics. In digital imaging, toners may be formed by aggregating a colorant with a latex polymer formed by batch or semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. Latex emulsions are prepared by making a monomer emulsion with monomer like Beta-carboxy ethyl acrylate (β-CEA) and stirring at high speed with an anionic surfactant like branched sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonates , aqueous solution until an emulsion is formed. Initiator for emulsion polymerization is 2-2'- azobis isobutyramide dehydrate with chain transfer agent are used to make the latex. If the latex emulsion is unstable, the resulting latexes produce a toner with larger particle size, broader particle size distribution with relatively higher latex sedimentation, and broader molecular weight distribution. Oswald ripening and coalescence cause droplet size to increase and can result in destabilization of emulsions. Shear thinning and elasticity of emulsions are applied to determine emulsion stability.

  6. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  7. Emulsion stability measurements by single electrode capacitance probe (SeCaP) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüller, R. B.; Løkra, S.; Salas-Bringas, C.; Egelandsdal, B.; Engebretsen, B.

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes a new and novel method for the determination of the stability of emulsions. The method is based on the single electrode capacitance technology (SeCaP). A measuring system consisting of eight individual measuring cells, each with a volume of approximately 10 ml, is described in detail. The system has been tested on an emulsion system based on whey proteins (WPC80), oil and water. Xanthan was added to modify the emulsion stability. The results show that the new measuring system is able to quantify the stability of the emulsion in terms of a differential variable. The whole separation process is observed much faster in the SeCaP system than in a conventional separation column. The complete separation process observed visually over 30 h is seen in less than 1.4 h in the SeCaP system.

  8. Optimum phase-behavior formulation of surfactant/oil/water systems for the determination of chromium in heavy crude oil and in bitumen-in-water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Burguera, José L; Avila-Gómez, Rita M; Burguera, Marcela; Antón de Salager, Raquel; Salager, Jean-Louis; Bracho, Carlos L; Burguera-Pascu, Margarita; Burguera-Pascu, Constantin; Brunetto, Rosario; Gallignani, Máximo; Petit de Peña, Yaneita

    2003-11-01

    An "oil in water" formulation was optimized to determine chromium in heavy crude oil (HCO) and bitumen-in-water emulsion (Orimulsion-400(R)) samples by transversally heated electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (TH-ET AAS) using Zeeman effect background correction. The optimum proportion of the oil-water mixture ratio was 7:3 v/v (70 ml of oil as the internal phase) with a non-ionic surfactant concentration (Intan-100) in the emulsion of 0.2% w/w. Chromium was determined in different crude oil samples after dilution of the emulsions 1:9 v/v with a 0.2% w/w solution of surfactant in order to further reduce the viscosity from 100 to 1.6 cP and at the same time to bring the concentration of chromium within the working range of the ET AAS technique. The calibration graph was linear from 1.7 to 100 mug Cr l(-1). The sensitivity was of 0.0069 s l mug(-1), the characteristic mass (m(o)) was of 5.7 pg per 0.0044 s and the detection limit (3sigma) was of 0.52 mug l(-1). The relative standard deviation of the method, evaluated by replicate analyses of three crude oil samples varied in all cases between 1.5 and 2.6%. Recovery studies were performed on four Venezuelan crude oils, and the average chromium recovery values varied between 95.9-104.8, 90.6-107.6, 95.6-104.0 and 98.8-103.9% for the Cerro Negro, Crudo Hamaca and Boscán crude oils and for the Orimulsión(R)-400, respectively. The results obtained in this work for the Cerro Negro, Crudo Hamaca and Boscán crude oils and for the Orimulsión(R)-400 following the proposed procedure were of 0.448+/-0.008, 0.338+/-0.004 0.524+/-0.021 and 0.174+/-0.008 mg Cr l(-1), respectively, which were in good agreement with the values obtained by a tedious recommended standard procedure (respectively: 0.470+/-0.05, 0.335+/-0.080, 0.570+/-0.021 and 0.173+/-0.009 mg Cr l(-1)). PMID:18969194

  9. Optimum phase-behavior formulation of surfactant/oil/water systems for the determination of chromium in heavy crude oil and in bitumen-in-water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Burguera, José L; Avila-Gómez, Rita M; Burguera, Marcela; Antón de Salager, Raquel; Salager, Jean-Louis; Bracho, Carlos L; Burguera-Pascu, Margarita; Burguera-Pascu, Constantin; Brunetto, Rosario; Gallignani, Máximo; Petit de Peña, Yaneita

    2003-11-01

    An "oil in water" formulation was optimized to determine chromium in heavy crude oil (HCO) and bitumen-in-water emulsion (Orimulsion-400(R)) samples by transversally heated electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (TH-ET AAS) using Zeeman effect background correction. The optimum proportion of the oil-water mixture ratio was 7:3 v/v (70 ml of oil as the internal phase) with a non-ionic surfactant concentration (Intan-100) in the emulsion of 0.2% w/w. Chromium was determined in different crude oil samples after dilution of the emulsions 1:9 v/v with a 0.2% w/w solution of surfactant in order to further reduce the viscosity from 100 to 1.6 cP and at the same time to bring the concentration of chromium within the working range of the ET AAS technique. The calibration graph was linear from 1.7 to 100 mug Cr l(-1). The sensitivity was of 0.0069 s l mug(-1), the characteristic mass (m(o)) was of 5.7 pg per 0.0044 s and the detection limit (3sigma) was of 0.52 mug l(-1). The relative standard deviation of the method, evaluated by replicate analyses of three crude oil samples varied in all cases between 1.5 and 2.6%. Recovery studies were performed on four Venezuelan crude oils, and the average chromium recovery values varied between 95.9-104.8, 90.6-107.6, 95.6-104.0 and 98.8-103.9% for the Cerro Negro, Crudo Hamaca and Boscán crude oils and for the Orimulsión(R)-400, respectively. The results obtained in this work for the Cerro Negro, Crudo Hamaca and Boscán crude oils and for the Orimulsión(R)-400 following the proposed procedure were of 0.448+/-0.008, 0.338+/-0.004 0.524+/-0.021 and 0.174+/-0.008 mg Cr l(-1), respectively, which were in good agreement with the values obtained by a tedious recommended standard procedure (respectively: 0.470+/-0.05, 0.335+/-0.080, 0.570+/-0.021 and 0.173+/-0.009 mg Cr l(-1)).

  10. Emulsion-cryogelation technique for fabricating a versatile toolbox of hierarchical polymeric monolith and its application in chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaping; Qi, Li; Li, Nan; Ma, Huimin

    2016-05-15

    A novel poly (glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith has been fabricated via the environmental friendly cryogelation-emulsion technique. The polymerization process is assisted by self-assembly of typical tri-block copolymer Pluronic F127 at sub-zero temperature using ice crystal as template, which can avoid consumption of organic porogenic solvents and thermal unstability of emulsion system. The developed monolith possesses hierarchical networks, which is confirmed by nitrogen adsorption measurement, mercury intrusion porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and permeability testing. Further, the effect of the amounts of Pluronic F127 on the microstructure has been investigated. Moreover, the prepared polymer monolith undergoes acidic hydrolysis of epoxy groups into hydroxyl groups on the surface and its liquid chromatographic performance is explored by separating model analytes. The results indicate that the unique porous polymer monolith with hierarchical networks could be prepared via an organic porogen-free approach and used for analysis of polar and nonpolar molecules, extending the application of cryogelation-emulsion technique and methacrylate-based monolith. PMID:26992517

  11. Emulsion-cryogelation technique for fabricating a versatile toolbox of hierarchical polymeric monolith and its application in chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaping; Qi, Li; Li, Nan; Ma, Huimin

    2016-05-15

    A novel poly (glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith has been fabricated via the environmental friendly cryogelation-emulsion technique. The polymerization process is assisted by self-assembly of typical tri-block copolymer Pluronic F127 at sub-zero temperature using ice crystal as template, which can avoid consumption of organic porogenic solvents and thermal unstability of emulsion system. The developed monolith possesses hierarchical networks, which is confirmed by nitrogen adsorption measurement, mercury intrusion porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and permeability testing. Further, the effect of the amounts of Pluronic F127 on the microstructure has been investigated. Moreover, the prepared polymer monolith undergoes acidic hydrolysis of epoxy groups into hydroxyl groups on the surface and its liquid chromatographic performance is explored by separating model analytes. The results indicate that the unique porous polymer monolith with hierarchical networks could be prepared via an organic porogen-free approach and used for analysis of polar and nonpolar molecules, extending the application of cryogelation-emulsion technique and methacrylate-based monolith.

  12. Facile fabrication of biocompatible PLGA drug-carrying microspheres by O/W pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zengjiang; Wang, Chaoyang; Liu, Hao; Zou, Shengwen; Tong, Zhen

    2012-03-01

    This study is focused on the preparation of Ibuprofen (IBU) loaded micrometer-sized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres and process variables on the size, drug loading and release during preparation of formulation. Silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) nanoparticle-coated PLGA microspheres were fabricated via a combined system of "Pickering-type" emulsion route and solvent volatilization method in the absence of any molecular surfactants. Stable oil-in-water emulsions were prepared using SiO(2) nanoparticles as a particulate emulsifier and a dichloromethane (CH(2)Cl(2)) solution of PLGA as an oil phase. The SiO(2) nanoparticle-coated PLGA microspheres were fabricated by the evaporation of CH(2)Cl(2) in situ, and then bare-PLGA microspheres were prepared by removal of the SiO(2) nanoparticles using HF aqueous solution. The two types of microspheres were characterized in terms of size, component and morphology using scanning electronic microscope (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared, optical microscope, and so on. Moreover, IBU was encapsulated into the hybrid beads by dispersing them in the CH(2)Cl(2) solution of PLGA in the fabrication process. The sustained release could be obtained due to the barrier of the polymeric matrix (PLGA). More over, the release curves were nicely fitted by the Weibull equation and the release followed Fickian diffusion. The combined system of Pickering emulsion and solvent volatilization opens up a new route to fabricate a variety of microspheres. The resulting microspheres may find applications as delivery vehicles for biomolecules, drugs, cosmetics and living cells. PMID:22088755

  13. Facile fabrication of biocompatible PLGA drug-carrying microspheres by O/W pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zengjiang; Wang, Chaoyang; Liu, Hao; Zou, Shengwen; Tong, Zhen

    2012-03-01

    This study is focused on the preparation of Ibuprofen (IBU) loaded micrometer-sized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres and process variables on the size, drug loading and release during preparation of formulation. Silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) nanoparticle-coated PLGA microspheres were fabricated via a combined system of "Pickering-type" emulsion route and solvent volatilization method in the absence of any molecular surfactants. Stable oil-in-water emulsions were prepared using SiO(2) nanoparticles as a particulate emulsifier and a dichloromethane (CH(2)Cl(2)) solution of PLGA as an oil phase. The SiO(2) nanoparticle-coated PLGA microspheres were fabricated by the evaporation of CH(2)Cl(2) in situ, and then bare-PLGA microspheres were prepared by removal of the SiO(2) nanoparticles using HF aqueous solution. The two types of microspheres were characterized in terms of size, component and morphology using scanning electronic microscope (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared, optical microscope, and so on. Moreover, IBU was encapsulated into the hybrid beads by dispersing them in the CH(2)Cl(2) solution of PLGA in the fabrication process. The sustained release could be obtained due to the barrier of the polymeric matrix (PLGA). More over, the release curves were nicely fitted by the Weibull equation and the release followed Fickian diffusion. The combined system of Pickering emulsion and solvent volatilization opens up a new route to fabricate a variety of microspheres. The resulting microspheres may find applications as delivery vehicles for biomolecules, drugs, cosmetics and living cells.

  14. A prospective, randomized, controlled study of ω-3 fish oil fat emulsion-based parenteral nutrition for patients following surgical resection of gastric tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nutrients such as ω-3 fatty acids including fish oil components eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) suppress the growth and promote apoptosis of tumor cells, improve immune function and reduce the effects of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. We sought to investigate the effect of ω-3 fish oil fat emulsion-based parenteral nutrition (PN) on nutritional state, immune function, inflammatory reaction, expression of tumor factors and complication incidence in patients after surgical resection of gastric cancer. Methods Forty-eight patients after surgical operation of gastric tumor in hospital were randomly divided into the control group and intervention group. Patients in both groups were treated with iso-nitrogen and iso-caloric parenteral nutrition support. In addition, the intervention group received ω-3 fish oil fat emulsion and the control group received soybean oil. The indicators of nutrition, immune function and inflammation in the two groups were detected on the day before the operation and postoperative day 6. The rate of complication was compared between the two groups. Results There was no significant difference in nutritional state, liver function and renal function between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, the levels of inflammatory markers were significantly decreased (P < 0.01), and the rate of complication was also decreased in the intervention group as compared with the control group. Conclusions ω-3 fish oil fat emulsion-based parenteral nutrition alleviates the inflammatory reaction and reduces the rate of inflammatory complications. PMID:24655407

  15. Preparation and characterization of narrow sized (o/w) magnetic emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagne, F.; Mondain-Monval, O.; Pichot, C.; Mozzanega, H.; Elaı̈ssari, A.

    2002-09-01

    The preparation of well-defined (o/w) magnetic emulsions from an organic ferrofluid is reported. The ferrofluid synthesis is first described and a complete characterization is achieved by using numerous techniques. The ferrofluid is found to be composed of superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles, with a diameter below 10 nm, stabilized in octane by a surrounding oleic acid layer. This magnetic fluid is then emulsified in aqueous media in order to obtain stable ferrofluid droplets. The use of a couette mixer and a size sorting step under magnetic field allowed to produce magnetic emulsion with a narrow size distribution. Morphology and chemical composition of the magnetic emulsion are investigated. Magnetic properties of both ferrofluid and magnetic emulsion are also compared and discussed. In particular, it is showed that the superparamagnetic behavior is still observed after the emulsification process.

  16. Lysophosphatidic Acid signaling in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Yung, Yun C; Stoddard, Nicole C; Mirendil, Hope; Chun, Jerold

    2015-02-18

    The brain is composed of many lipids with varied forms that serve not only as structural components but also as essential signaling molecules. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important bioactive lipid species that is part of the lysophospholipid (LP) family. LPA is primarily derived from membrane phospholipids and signals through six cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), LPA1-6. These receptors are expressed on most cell types within central and peripheral nervous tissues and have been functionally linked to many neural processes and pathways. This Review covers a current understanding of LPA signaling in the nervous system, with particular focus on the relevance of LPA to both physiological and diseased states. PMID:25695267

  17. Enhancing the antibacterial efficacy of isoeugenol by emulsion encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Krogsgård Nielsen, Christina; Kjems, Jørgen; Mygind, Tina; Snabe, Torben; Schwarz, Karin; Serfert, Yvonne; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2016-07-16

    Food spoilage and foodborne illnesses are two global challenges for food manufacturers. Essential oils are natural antibacterials that could have a potential for use in food preservation. Unfortunately high concentrations are needed to obtain the desired antibacterial effect, and this limits their use in food due to their adverse organoleptic properties. Encapsulation could make essential oils more effective by concentrating them in the aqueous phase of the food matrix where the bacteria are present. Here we tested encapsulation of the essential oil isoeugenol in spray-dried emulsions as a means of making isoeugenol a more effective antibacterial for use in food preservation. We used β-lactoglobulin and n-OSA starch as emulsifiers, and some emulsions were coated with positively charged chitosan to promote the contact with bacteria through electrostatic interactions. The antibacterial efficacy was quantified as the minimal bactericidal concentration in growth media, milk and carrot juice. The emulsion encapsulation system developed in this study provided high loading capacities, and encapsulation enhanced the efficacy of isoeugenol against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria in media and carrot juice but not in milk. Chitosan-coating did not enhance the efficacy further, possibly due to the aggregation of the chitosan-coated emulsions. The encapsulation system is easy to upscale and should be applicable for encapsulation of similar essential oils. Therefore, we believe it has potential to be used for natural food preservation. PMID:27089032

  18. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification.

  19. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  20. Development of low-energy methods for preparing food Nano-emulsions.

    PubMed

    Miyanoshita, Michitaka; Hashida, Chitose; Ikeda, Shinya; Gohtani, Shoichi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of sucrose on the phase behavior of vegetable oil/polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (MOPS, Tween 80) and decaglycerol monolaurilester (DGML)/aqueous solution systems to establish low-energy emulsification methods for preparing nano-emulsions suitable for food uses. Phase diagrams were constructed to elucidate the optimal process for preparing the nano-emulsions. It was found that nano-emulsions were obtained when the composition was altered to either cross the sponge phase (L(3)) or lamellar phase (La) in the vegetable oil/MOPS/aqueous solution system or vegetable oil/DGML/aqueous solution system, respectively. The average droplet sizes in the former and latter emulsions were 0.203 µm and 0.165 µm, respectively. The addition of sucrose changed the hexagonal phase in the vegetable oil/MOPS/aqueous solution system into the sponge phase. As a result, the sponge region in the vegetable oil/MOPS/sucrose aqueous solution system occupied a larger area than that in the vegetable oil/MOPS/water system. In contrast, sucrose had no effect on the area of the La region in the vegetable oil/DGML/aqueous solution system. However, the addition of sucrose decreased the amount of emulsifier required to prepare nano-emulsions in both the vegetable oil/MOPS and DGML/aqueous solution systems. Sucrose was confirmed to facilitate the preparation of nano-emulsions in both systems.

  1. Hydroxybenzoic acid isomers and the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Today we are beginning to understand how phytochemicals can influence metabolism, cellular signaling and gene expression. The hydroxybenzoic acids are related to salicylic acid and salicin, the first compounds isolated that have a pharmacological activity. In this review we examine how a number of hydroxyphenolics have the potential to ameliorate cardiovascular problems related to aging such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. The compounds focused upon include 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Pyrocatechuic acid), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Gentisic acid), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Protocatechuic acid), 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (α-Resorcylic acid) and 3-monohydroxybenzoic acid. The latter two compounds activate the hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors with a consequence there is a reduction in adipocyte lipolysis with potential improvements of blood lipid profiles. Several of the other compounds can activate the Nrf2 signaling pathway that increases the expression of antioxidant enzymes, thereby decreasing oxidative stress and associated problems such as endothelial dysfunction that leads to hypertension as well as decreasing generalized inflammation that can lead to problems such as atherosclerosis. It has been known for many years that increased consumption of fruits and vegetables promotes health. We are beginning to understand how specific phytochemicals are responsible for such therapeutic effects. Hippocrates’ dictum of ‘Let food be your medicine and medicine your food’ can now be experimentally tested and the results of such experiments will enhance the ability of nutritionists to devise specific health-promoting diets. PMID:24943896

  2. Hydroxybenzoic acid isomers and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Juurlink, Bernhard H J; Azouz, Haya J; Aldalati, Alaa M Z; AlTinawi, Basmah M H; Ganguly, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Today we are beginning to understand how phytochemicals can influence metabolism, cellular signaling and gene expression. The hydroxybenzoic acids are related to salicylic acid and salicin, the first compounds isolated that have a pharmacological activity. In this review we examine how a number of hydroxyphenolics have the potential to ameliorate cardiovascular problems related to aging such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. The compounds focused upon include 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Pyrocatechuic acid), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Gentisic acid), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Protocatechuic acid), 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (α-Resorcylic acid) and 3-monohydroxybenzoic acid. The latter two compounds activate the hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors with a consequence there is a reduction in adipocyte lipolysis with potential improvements of blood lipid profiles. Several of the other compounds can activate the Nrf2 signaling pathway that increases the expression of antioxidant enzymes, thereby decreasing oxidative stress and associated problems such as endothelial dysfunction that leads to hypertension as well as decreasing generalized inflammation that can lead to problems such as atherosclerosis. It has been known for many years that increased consumption of fruits and vegetables promotes health. We are beginning to understand how specific phytochemicals are responsible for such therapeutic effects. Hippocrates' dictum of 'Let food be your medicine and medicine your food' can now be experimentally tested and the results of such experiments will enhance the ability of nutritionists to devise specific health-promoting diets. PMID:24943896

  3. Controlled generation of double emulsions in air.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dingsheng; Hakimi, Bejan; Volny, Michael; Rolfs, Joelle; Chen, Xudong; Turecek, Frantisek; Chiu, Daniel T

    2013-07-01

    This Letter describes the controlled generation of double emulsions in the gas phase, which was carried out using an integrated emitter in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic chip. The integrated emitter was formed using a molding approach, in which metal wires with desirable diameters were used as emitter molds. The generation of double emulsions in air was achieved with electrohydrodynamics actuation, which offers controllable force exerting on the double emulsions. We developed this capability for future integration of droplet microfluidics with mass spectrometry (MS), where each aqueous droplet in the microchannel is introduced into the gas phase as a double emulsion for subsequent ionization and MS analysis. PMID:23767768

  4. Drop size stability assessment of fluorocarbon emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krafft, M P; Postel, M; Riess, J G; Ni, Y; Pelura, T J; Hanna, G K; Song, D

    1992-01-01

    The aging of fluorocarbon emulsions prepared with natural egg yolk phospholipids (EYP) has been studied and a linear variation (r2 greater than 0.95) of the mean average volume of the droplets with time has been observed. The slope of the experimental lines, called "Stability Parameter, S" can thus be taken as a representation of the rate of aging of the emulsions. Examples are given of use of parameter S to assess the effect of formulation and processing parameters on the stability of diverse fluorocarbon emulsions. S is a useful tool to compare emulsions and ascertain any factors of stabilization/destabilization. PMID:1391525

  5. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G H; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions-liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid-are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number-the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  6. Recent Studies of Pickering Emulsions: Particles Make the Difference.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Ma, Guang-Hui

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, emulsions stabilized by micro- or nanoparticles (known as Pickering emulsions) have attracted much attention. Micro- or nanoparticles, as the main components of the emulsion, play a key role in the preparation and application of Pickering emulsions. The existence of particles at the interface between the oil and aqueous phases affects not only the preparation, but also the properties of Pickering emulsions, affording superior stability, low toxicity, and stimuli-responsiveness compared to classical emulsions stabilized by surfactants. These advantages of Pickering emulsions make them attractive, especially in biomedicine. In this review, the effects of the characteristics of micro- and nanoparticles on the preparation and properties of Pickering emulsions are introduced. In particular, the preparation methods of Pickering emulsions, especially uniform-sized emulsions, are listed. Uniform Pickering emulsions are convenient for both mechanistic research and applications. Furthermore, some biomedical applications of Pickering emulsions are discussed and the problems hindering their clinical application are identified.

  7. Wettability of Freon hydrates in crude oil/brine emulsions.

    PubMed

    Høiland, S; Askvik, K M; Fotland, P; Alagic, E; Barth, T; Fadnes, F

    2005-07-01

    The surface energy of petroleum hydrates is believed to be a key parameter with regard to hydrate morphology and plugging tendency in petroleum production. As of today, the surface energy of natural gas hydrates is unknown, but will depend on the fluids in which they grow. In this work, the wettability of Freon hydrates is evaluated from their behavior in crude oil emulsions. For emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles, the particle wettability is a governing parameter for the emulsion behavior. The transition between continuous and dispersed phases as a function of brine volume in crude oil-brine emulsions containing Freon hydrates has been determined for 12 crude oils. Silica particles are used for comparison. The results show that phase inversion is highly dependent on crude oil properties. Based on the measured points of phase inversion, the wettability of the Freon hydrates generated in each system is evaluated as being oil-wet, intermediate-wet, or water-wet. Generation of oil-wet hydrates correlates with low hydrate plugging tendency. The formation of oil-wet hydrates will prevent agglomeration into large hydrate aggregates and plugs. Hence, it is believed that the method is applicable for differentiating oils with regard to hydrate morphology. PMID:15914170

  8. Stable Ultrathin-Shell Double Emulsions for Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Xia; Chen, Dong; Hui, Yue; Weitz, David A; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2016-06-01

    Double emulsions are normally considered as metastable systems and this limit in stability restricts their applications. To enhance their stability, the outer shell can be converted into a mechanically strong layer, for example, a polymeric layer, thus allowing improved performance. This conversion can be problematic for food and drug applications, as a toxic solvent is needed to dissolve the polymer in the middle phase and a high temperature is required to remove the solvent. This process can also be highly complex, for example, involving UV initiation of polymeric monomer crosslinking. In this study, we report the formation of biocompatible, water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) double emulsions with an ultrathin layer of fish oil. We demonstrate their application for the encapsulation and controlled release of small hydrophilic molecules. Without a trigger, the double emulsions remained stable for months, and the release of small molecules was extremely slow. In contrast, rapid release was achieved by osmolarity shock, leading to complete release within 2 h. This work demonstrates the significant potential of double emulsions, and provides new insights into their stability and practical applications. PMID:26934572

  9. Adelphi-Goddard emulsified fuel project. [using water/oil emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Thermal efficiency and particle emissions were studied using water/oil emulsions. These studies were done using number 2 and number 6 fuel oil. The number 6 oil had a sulfur content greater than one percent and experiments were conducted to remove the sulfur dioxide from the stack gases. Test findings include: (1) emulsion effected a reduction in soot at a low excess air levels; (2) a steam atomizing system will produce a water/oil emulsion. The fuel in the study was emulsified in the steam atomization process, hence, pre-emulsification did not yield a dramatic reduction in soot or an increase in thermal efficiency.

  10. Combined Effect of Kimchi Powder and Onion Peel Extract on Quality Characteristics of Emulsion Sausages Prepared with Irradiated Pork.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Yoen; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Choi, Min-Sung; Ham, Youn-Kyung; Choi, Yun-Sang; Lee, Ju-Woon; Lee, Si-Kyung; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of kimchi powder and onion peel extract on the quality characteristics of emulsion sausage manufactured with irradiated pork. The emulsion sausages were formulated with 2% kimchi powder and/or 0.05% onion peel extract. The changes in pH value of all treatments were similar, depending on storage periods. The addition of kimchi powder increased the redness and yellowness of the emulsion sausage. The addition of onion peel extract decreased the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances value of the emulsion sausages prepared with irradiated pork. The volatile basic nitrogen value of the emulsion sausage prepared with kimchi powder was the highest, whereas that of the emulsion sausage prepared with onion peel extract was the lowest. The treatment without kimchi powder or onion peel extract and the treatments prepared with onion peel extract showed lower microbial populations than the other treatment. Sensory evaluations indicated that a higher acceptability was attained when kimchi powder was added to the emulsion sausages manufactured with irradiated pork. In conclusion, our results suggest that combined use of kimchi powder and onion peel extract could improve quality characteristics and shelf stability of the emulsion sausage formulated with irradiated pork during chilled storage. PMID:26761840

  11. The evaluation of cosmetic and pharmaceutical emulsions aging process using classical techniques and a new method: FTIR.

    PubMed

    Masmoudi, H; Dréau, Y Le; Piccerelle, P; Kister, J

    2005-01-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the utilization of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can be interesting in stability studying of cosmetic or pharmaceutical "oil in water" (O/W) emulsions. In this study temperature storage tests were performed to accelerate the aging process and evaluate the stability of five emulsions. Emulsions were analyzed by FTIR and classical methods (conductivity, viscosity, pH, texture analysis) in order to determine a method that would enable predicting the emulsion's stability. During the aging process, modifications of chemical functions are measured by FTIR (using spectrometric indices), such modifications included: a decrease of unsaturation index, an increase of carbonyl index and a broadening of the carbonyl band. This band was deconvoluted to evaluate the contribution of different species in the broadening phenomenon, which seems to be caused by the appearance of free fatty acids. Conductimetry seems to be the most sensitive technique to assess physical modifications during emulsion's aging. Concerning the most unstable emulsions, a progressive increasing of conductivity was observed several months before the emulsion destabilizes. Consequently, FTIR and conductimetry are two complementary techniques. Conductimetry is a useful technique to predict emulsion destabilization while FTIR allows the measurement of chemical modifications and helps to understand the chemical mechanisms which occur during the oxidation.

  12. Combined Effect of Kimchi Powder and Onion Peel Extract on Quality Characteristics of Emulsion Sausages Prepared with Irradiated Pork

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Lee, Ju-Woon; Lee, Si-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of kimchi powder and onion peel extract on the quality characteristics of emulsion sausage manufactured with irradiated pork. The emulsion sausages were formulated with 2% kimchi powder and/or 0.05% onion peel extract. The changes in pH value of all treatments were similar, depending on storage periods. The addition of kimchi powder increased the redness and yellowness of the emulsion sausage. The addition of onion peel extract decreased the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances value of the emulsion sausages prepared with irradiated pork. The volatile basic nitrogen value of the emulsion sausage prepared with kimchi powder was the highest, whereas that of the emulsion sausage prepared with onion peel extract was the lowest. The treatment without kimchi powder or onion peel extract and the treatments prepared with onion peel extract showed lower microbial populations than the other treatment. Sensory evaluations indicated that a higher acceptability was attained when kimchi powder was added to the emulsion sausages manufactured with irradiated pork. In conclusion, our results suggest that combined use of kimchi powder and onion peel extract could improve quality characteristics and shelf stability of the emulsion sausage formulated with irradiated pork during chilled storage. PMID:26761840

  13. Mechanism of aerobic biological destabilisation of wool scour effluent emulsions.

    PubMed

    Poole, Andrew J; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; William Jones, F

    2005-07-01

    Wool scouring effluent is a highly polluted industrial wastewater in which the main pollutant, wool wax, is held in a stable oil-in-water emulsion by non-ionic detergent. The use of microbial action to cause emulsion destabilisation has been proposed as a new treatment strategy for this effluent stream. This strategy aims at improving aerobic treatment performance by physically removing the high-COD, slowly bio-degradable wool wax from the system without bio-degradation. The mechanism by which an aerobic-mixed culture destabilises the wool scouring effluent emulsion was investigated. Our results show that destabilisation is due to partial bio-degradation of both the scouring detergent and the wool wax. Cleavage of the wool wax esters was the first stage in wax degradation, when 40-50% of wax was de-emulsified. Over the same period, detergent degradation was low, at 7-21%. With further incubation, detergent degradation increased, aiding further breakdown of the emulsion. The degradation of the detergent, a nonylphenol ethoxylate, resulted in both a reduction in molar concentration (of up to 82%) and a shortening of the ethoxylate chain length. The latter reduced the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) from 12 to approximately 7, thereby reducing the ability of the residual detergent to stabilise the emulsion. Analysis of the emulsified and de-emulsified wax fractions could not identify a group of compounds that were preferentially de-emulsified based on molecular weight or polarity. These findings will assist in using a de-emulsification strategy in both existing and new treatment systems in order to save on aeration costs and treatment times for biological treatment of this highly polluted wastewater. PMID:15979119

  14. Mechanism of aerobic biological destabilisation of wool scour effluent emulsions.

    PubMed

    Poole, Andrew J; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; William Jones, F

    2005-07-01

    Wool scouring effluent is a highly polluted industrial wastewater in which the main pollutant, wool wax, is held in a stable oil-in-water emulsion by non-ionic detergent. The use of microbial action to cause emulsion destabilisation has been proposed as a new treatment strategy for this effluent stream. This strategy aims at improving aerobic treatment performance by physically removing the high-COD, slowly bio-degradable wool wax from the system without bio-degradation. The mechanism by which an aerobic-mixed culture destabilises the wool scouring effluent emulsion was investigated. Our results show that destabilisation is due to partial bio-degradation of both the scouring detergent and the wool wax. Cleavage of the wool wax esters was the first stage in wax degradation, when 40-50% of wax was de-emulsified. Over the same period, detergent degradation was low, at 7-21%. With further incubation, detergent degradation increased, aiding further breakdown of the emulsion. The degradation of the detergent, a nonylphenol ethoxylate, resulted in both a reduction in molar concentration (of up to 82%) and a shortening of the ethoxylate chain length. The latter reduced the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) from 12 to approximately 7, thereby reducing the ability of the residual detergent to stabilise the emulsion. Analysis of the emulsified and de-emulsified wax fractions could not identify a group of compounds that were preferentially de-emulsified based on molecular weight or polarity. These findings will assist in using a de-emulsification strategy in both existing and new treatment systems in order to save on aeration costs and treatment times for biological treatment of this highly polluted wastewater.

  15. Jamming and unjamming transition of oil-in-water emulsions under continuous temperature change.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se Bin; Lee, Joon Sang

    2015-05-01

    To analyze the jamming and unjamming transition of oil-in-water emulsions under continuous temperature change, we simulated an emulsion system whose critical volume fraction was 0.3, which was validated with experimental results under oscillatory shear stress. In addition, we calculated the elastic modulus using the phase lag between strain and stress. Through heating and cooling, the emulsion experienced unjamming and jamming. A phenomenon-which is when the elastic modulus does not reach the expected value at the isothermal system-occurred when the emulsion system was cooled. We determined that this phenomenon was caused by the frequency being faster than the relaxation of the deformed droplets. We justified the relation between the frequency and relaxation by simulating the frequency dependency of the difference between the elastic modulus when cooled and the expected value at the same temperature. PMID:26064194

  16. Impact of Protein Gel Porosity on the Digestion of Lipid Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anwesha; Juan, Jean-Marc; Kolodziejczyk, Eric; Acquistapace, Simone; Donato-Capel, Laurence; Wooster, Tim J

    2015-10-14

    The present study sought to understand how the microstructure of protein gels impacts lipolysis of gelled emulsions. The selected system consisted of an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion embedded within gelatin gels. The gelatin-gelled emulsions consisted of a discontinuous network of aggregated emulsion droplets (mesoscale), dispersed within a continuous network of gelatin (microscale). The viscoelastic properties of the gelled emulsions were dominated by the rheological behavior of the gelatin, suggesting a gelatin continuous microstructure rather than a bicontinuous gel. A direct relationship between the speed of fat digestion and gel average mesh size was found, indicating that the digestion of fat within gelatin-gelled emulsions is controlled by the ability of the gel's microstructure to slow lipase diffusion to the interface of fat droplets. Digestion of fat was facilitated by gradual breakdown of the gelatin network, which mainly occurred via surface erosion catalyzed by proteases. Overall, this work has demonstrated that the lipolysis kinetics of gelled emulsions is driven by the microstructure of protein gels; this knowledge is key for the future development of microstructures to control fat digestion and/or the delivery of nutrients to different parts of the gastrointestinal tract.

  17. Influence of Steam Injection and Water-in-Oil Emulsions on Diesel Fuel Combustion Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Meagan

    Water injection can be an effective strategy for reducing NOx because water's high specific heat allows it to absorb heat and lower system temperatures. Introducing water as an emulsion can potentially be more effective at reducing emissions than steam injection due to physical properties (such as microexplosions) that can improve atomization and increase mixing. Unfortunately, the immiscibility of emulsions makes them difficult to work with so they must be mixed properly. In this effort, a method for adequately mixing surfactant-free emulsions was established and verified using high speed cinematography. As the water to fuel mass ratio (W/F) increased, emulsion atomization tests showed little change in droplet size and spray angle, but a shorter overall breakup point. Dual-wavelength planar laser induced fluorescence (D-PLIF) patternation showed an increase in water near the center of the spray. Steam injection flames saw little change in reaction stability, but emulsion flames experienced significant losses in stability that limited reaction operability at higher W/F. Emulsions were more effective at reducing NOx than steam injection, likely because of liquid water's latent heat of vaporization and the strategic injection of water into the flame core. OH* chemiluminescence showed a decrease in heat release for both methods, though the decrease was greater for emulsions. Both methods saw decreases in flame length for W/F 0.15. Lastly, flame imaging showed a shift towards a redder appearance with the addition or more water, as well as a reduction in flame flares.

  18. Impact of Protein Gel Porosity on the Digestion of Lipid Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anwesha; Juan, Jean-Marc; Kolodziejczyk, Eric; Acquistapace, Simone; Donato-Capel, Laurence; Wooster, Tim J

    2015-10-14

    The present study sought to understand how the microstructure of protein gels impacts lipolysis of gelled emulsions. The selected system consisted of an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion embedded within gelatin gels. The gelatin-gelled emulsions consisted of a discontinuous network of aggregated emulsion droplets (mesoscale), dispersed within a continuous network of gelatin (microscale). The viscoelastic properties of the gelled emulsions were dominated by the rheological behavior of the gelatin, suggesting a gelatin continuous microstructure rather than a bicontinuous gel. A direct relationship between the speed of fat digestion and gel average mesh size was found, indicating that the digestion of fat within gelatin-gelled emulsions is controlled by the ability of the gel's microstructure to slow lipase diffusion to the interface of fat droplets. Digestion of fat was facilitated by gradual breakdown of the gelatin network, which mainly occurred via surface erosion catalyzed by proteases. Overall, this work has demonstrated that the lipolysis kinetics of gelled emulsions is driven by the microstructure of protein gels; this knowledge is key for the future development of microstructures to control fat digestion and/or the delivery of nutrients to different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26378382

  19. Characterization of starch Pickering emulsions for potential applications in topical formulations.

    PubMed

    Marku, Diana; Wahlgren, Marie; Rayner, Marilyn; Sjöö, Malin; Timgren, Anna

    2012-05-30

    The aim of this work has been to characterize starch based Pickering emulsions as a first step to evaluate their possible use as vehicles for topical drug delivery. A minor phase study of emulsions with high oil content has been performed. Emulsion stability against coalescence over eight weeks and after mild centrifugation treatment has been studied. The particle size, rheological properties and in vitro skin penetration of emulsions containing three different oils (Miglyol, paraffin and sheanut oil) was investigated. It was shown that it is possible to produce oil in water starched stabilised Pickering emulsions with oil content as high as 56%. Furthermore, this emulsions show good stability during storage over eight weeks and towards mild centrifugation. The particle size of the systems are only dependent on the ratio between oil and starch and for liquid oils the type of oil do not affect the particle size. The type of oil also affects the cosmetic and rheological properties of the creams but did not affect the transdermal diffusion in in vitro tests. However, it seems as if the Pickering emulsions affected the transport over the skin, as the flux was twice that of what has been previously reported for solutions.

  20. Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals grafted with thermo-responsive polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Zoppe, Justin O; Venditti, Richard A; Rojas, Orlando J

    2012-03-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) from ramie fibers are studied as stabilizers of oil-in-water emulsions. The phase behavior of heptane and water systems is studied, and emulsions stabilized by CNCs are analyzed by using drop sizing (light scattering) and optical, scanning, and freeze-fracture electron microscopies. Water-continuous Pickering emulsions are produced with cellulose nanocrystals (0.05-0.5 wt%) grafted with thermo-responsive poly(NIPAM) brushes (poly(NIPAM)-g-CNCs). They are observed to be stable during the time of observation of 4 months. In contrast, unmodified CNCs are unable to stabilize heptane-in-water emulsions. After emulsification, poly(NIPAM)-g-CNCs are observed to form aligned, layered structures at the oil-water interface. The emulsions stabilized by poly(NIPAM)-g-CNCs break after heating at a temperature above the LCST of poly(NIPAM), which is taken as indication of the temperature responsiveness of the brushes installed on the particles and thus the responsiveness of the Pickering emulsions. This phenomenon is further elucidated via rheological measurements, in which viscosities of the Pickering emulsions increase on approach of the low critical solution temperature of poly(NIPAM). The effect of temperature can be counterbalanced with the addition of salt which is explained by the reduction of electrostatic and steric interactions of poly(NIPAM)-g-CNCs at the oil-water interface.

  1. Should we consider the infusion of lipid emulsion in the resuscitation of poisoned patients?

    PubMed

    Cave, Grant; Harvey, Martyn G

    2014-01-01

    The use of intravenous lipid emulsions (ILEs) as antidote in local anaesthetic systemic toxicity has gained widespread support following convincing data from animal models, and successful case reports in humans. Proposed beneficial mechanisms of action for ILEs include intravascular sequestration of intoxicant and subsequent enhanced redistribution to biologically inert tissues, augmentation of fatty acid utilisation for ATP synthesis in the context of metabolic poisoning, and direct cardiotonic and ion channel effects. The evidence base for use of ILEs in acute drug intoxication is evolving. The present evidence supports use of ILEs only in local anaesthetic systemic toxicity and in lipophilic cardiotoxin intoxication when there is an immediate threat to life, and other therapies have proven ineffective. PMID:25673255

  2. Metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Haorong; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Medforth, Craig J

    2013-10-29

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  3. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  4. Emulsions Droplet Capture Mechanism in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidani, Khalil; Polikar, Marcel

    2006-03-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the physics of emulsion flow in porous media. The objective of experiments were to study the applicability of oil-in-water emulsion as a plugging agent in the vicinity of the well bore for thousands of Canadian gas wells that are continuously leaking gas to surface. The motion of oil droplets and the capture mechanisms were investigated through visualized experiments. Well-characterized emulsions were injected into a micro model resembling a two parallel plate model packed with glass beads. Effects of emulsion properties and wettability of the medium were studied on a plugging mechanism. The results demonstrate the reduction in permeability mainly due to droplets size exclusion compared to the pore constrictions. Also, smaller droplets may lodge and coalesce in pores crevices thereby accelerating the blockage process. Moreover, more viscous emulsions are more effective compared with the less viscous ones due to combined effects of capillary and viscous forces. The deposition of droplets was adjusted through utilizing different preflush solutions. Criteria were set for enhancing emulsion penetration depth thereby defining the extent of the blocked region. In conclusion, this work characterizes the physics of emulsion flow in porous media and demonstrates its application as a novel sealant in near well bore region. The novelty, which constitutes a step-change in technology, is a method that emplaces an emulsion at a desired location in underground media.

  5. Flows of Wet Foamsand Concentrated Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemer, Martin B.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project was is to advance a microstructural understanding of foam and emulsion flows. The dynamics of individual surfactant-covered drops and well as the collective behavior of dilute and concentrated was explored using numerical simulations. The long-range goal of this work is the formulation of reliable microphysically-based statistical models of emulsion flows.

  6. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-06-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability.

  7. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  8. NEWS: Nuclear Emulsions for WIMP Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, Natalia; NEWS Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    In the field of direct Dark Matter search a different and promising approach is the directionality: the observation of the incoming apparent direction of WIMPs would in fact provide a new and unambiguous signature. The NEWS project is a very innovative approach for a high sensitivity experiment aiming at the directional detection of WIMPs: the detector is based on a novel emulsion technology called NIT (Nano Imaging Trackers) acting both as target and tracking device. In this paper we illustrate the features of a NIT-based detector and the newly developed read-out systems allowing to reach a spatial resolution of the order of 10 nm. We present the background studies and the experimental design. Finally we report about the time schedule of the experiment and the expected sensitivity for DM searches.

  9. Distribution and Antioxidant Efficiency of Resveratrol in Stripped Corn Oil Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Costa, Marlene; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Paiva-Martins, Fátima

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of resveratrol (RES) on the oxidative stability of emulsions composed of stripped corn oil, acidic water and Tween 20 and determined its distribution in the intact emulsions by employing a well-established kinetic method. The distribution of RES is described by two partition constants, that between the oil-interfacial region, POI, and that between the aqueous and interfacial region, PWI. The partition constants, POI and PWI, are obtained in the intact emulsions from the variations of the observed rate constant, kobs, for the reaction between the hydrophobic 4-hexadecylbenzenediazonium ion and RES with the emulsifier volume fraction, ФI. The obtained POI and PWI values are quite high, PWI = 4374 and POI = 930, indicating that RES is primarily located in the interfacial region of the emulsions, %RESI > 90% at ФI = 0.005, increasing up to 99% at ФI = 0.04. The oxidative stability of the corn oil emulsions was determined by measuring the formation of conjugated dienes at a given time in the absence and in the presence of RES. The addition of RES did not improve their oxidative stability in spite that more than 90% of RES is located in the interfacial region of the emulsion, because of the very low radical scavenging activity of RES. PMID:26784868

  10. Evaporation rates of water from concentrated oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Aranberri, I; Binks, B P; Clint, J H; Fletcher, P D I

    2004-03-16

    We have investigated the rate of water evaporation from concentrated oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions containing an involatile oil. Evaporation of the water continuous phase causes compression of the emulsion with progressive distortion of the oil drops and thinning of the water films separating them. Theoretically, the vapor pressure of water is sensitive to the interdroplet interactions, which are a function of the film thickness. Three main possible situations are considered. First, under conditions when the evaporation rate is controlled by mass transfer across the stagnant vapor phase, model calculations show that evaporation can, in principle, be slowed by repulsive interdroplet interactions. However, significant retardation requires very strong repulsive forces acting over large separations for typical emulsion drop sizes. Second, water evaporation may be limited by diffusion in the network of water films within the emulsion. In this situation, water loss by evaporation from the emulsion surface leads to a gradient in the water concentration (and in the water film thickness). Third, compression of the drops may lead to coalescence of the emulsion drops and the formation of a macroscopic oil film at the emulsion surface, which serves to prevent further water evaporation. Water mass-loss curves have been measured for silicone o/w emulsions stabilized by the anionic surfactant SDS as a function of the water content, the thickness of the stagnant vapor-phase layer, and the concentration of electrolyte in the aqueous phase, and the results are discussed in terms of the three possible scenarios just described. In systems with added salt, water evaporation virtually ceases before all the water present is lost, probably as a result of oil-drop coalescence resulting in the formation of a water-impermeable oil film at the emulsion surface. PMID:15835653

  11. Evaporation rates of water from concentrated oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Aranberri, I; Binks, B P; Clint, J H; Fletcher, P D I

    2004-03-16

    We have investigated the rate of water evaporation from concentrated oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions containing an involatile oil. Evaporation of the water continuous phase causes compression of the emulsion with progressive distortion of the oil drops and thinning of the water films separating them. Theoretically, the vapor pressure of water is sensitive to the interdroplet interactions, which are a function of the film thickness. Three main possible situations are considered. First, under conditions when the evaporation rate is controlled by mass transfer across the stagnant vapor phase, model calculations show that evaporation can, in principle, be slowed by repulsive interdroplet interactions. However, significant retardation requires very strong repulsive forces acting over large separations for typical emulsion drop sizes. Second, water evaporation may be limited by diffusion in the network of water films within the emulsion. In this situation, water loss by evaporation from the emulsion surface leads to a gradient in the water concentration (and in the water film thickness). Third, compression of the drops may lead to coalescence of the emulsion drops and the formation of a macroscopic oil film at the emulsion surface, which serves to prevent further water evaporation. Water mass-loss curves have been measured for silicone o/w emulsions stabilized by the anionic surfactant SDS as a function of the water content, the thickness of the stagnant vapor-phase layer, and the concentration of electrolyte in the aqueous phase, and the results are discussed in terms of the three possible scenarios just described. In systems with added salt, water evaporation virtually ceases before all the water present is lost, probably as a result of oil-drop coalescence resulting in the formation of a water-impermeable oil film at the emulsion surface.

  12. Combined delivery of the adiponectin gene and rosiglitazone using cationic lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Davaa, Enkhzaya; Kang, Bong-Seok; Han, Joo-Hui; Lee, Sang-Eun; Ng, Choon Lian; Myung, Chang-Seon; Park, Jeong-Sook

    2015-04-10

    For the combined delivery of an insulin-sensitizing adipokine; i.e., the ADN gene, and the potent PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, cationic lipid emulsions were formulated using the cationic lipid DOTAP, helper lipid DOPE, castor oil, Tween 20 and Tween 80. The effect of drug loading on the physicochemical characteristics of the cationic emulsion/DNA complexes was investigated. Complex formation between the cationic emulsion and negatively charged plasmid DNA was confirmed and protection from DNase was observed. The in vitro transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity were evaluated in HepG2 cells. The particle sizes of the cationic emulsion/DNA complex were in the range 230-540 nm and those of the rosiglitazone-loaded cationic emulsion/DNA complex were in the range 220-340 nm. Gel retardation of the complexes was observed when the complexation weight ratios of the cationic lipid to plasmid DNA exceeded 4:1 for both the drug-free and rosiglitazone-loaded complexes. Both complexes stabilized plasmid DNA against DNase. The ADN expression level increased dose-dependently when cells were transfected with the cationic emulsion/DNA complexes. The rosiglitazone-loaded cationic emulsion/DNA complexes showed higher cellular uptake in HepG2 cells depending on the rosiglitazone loading, but not depending on the type of plasmid DNA type such as pVAX/ADN, pCAG/ADN, or pVAX. The drug-loaded cationic emulsion/plasmid DNA complexes were less cytotoxic than free rosiglitazone. Therefore, a cationic emulsion could potentially serve as a co-delivery system for rosiglitazone and the adiponectin gene.

  13. Formation of flavor oil microemulsions, nanoemulsions and emulsions: influence of composition and preparation method.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jiajia; McClements, David Julian

    2011-05-11

    This study aimed to establish conditions where stable microemulsions, nanoemulsions or emulsions could be fabricated from a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80) and flavor oil (lemon oil). Different colloidal dispersions could be formed by simple heat treatment (90 °C, 30 min) depending on the surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR): emulsions (r > 100 nm) at SOR < 1; nanoemulsions (r < 100 nm) at 1 < SOR < 2; microemulsions (r < 10 nm) at SOR > 2. Turbidity, electrical conductivity, shear rheology, and DSC measurements suggested there was a kinetic energy barrier in the oil-water-surfactant systems at ambient temperature that prevented them from forming metastable emulsion/nanoemulsion or thermodynamically stable microemulsion systems. High energy homogenization (high pressure or ultrasonic homogenizer) or low energy homogenization (heating) could be used to form emulsions or nanoemulsions at low or intermediate SOR values; whereas only heating was necessary to form stable microemulsions at high SOR values. PMID:21410259

  14. A ternary model for double-emulsion formation in a capillary microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang Min; Anderson, Patrick D

    2012-08-01

    To predict double-emulsion formation in a capillary microfluidic device, a ternary diffuse-interface model is presented. The formation of double emulsions involves complex interfacial phenomena of a three-phase fluid system, where each component can have different physical properties. We use the Navier-Stokes/Cahn-Hilliard model for a general ternary system, where the hydrodynamics is coupled with the thermodynamics of the phase field variables. Our model predicts important features of the double-emulsion formation which was observed experimentally by Utada et al. [Utada et al., Science, 2005, 308, 537]. In particular, our model predicts both the dripping and jetting regimes as well as the transition between those two regimes by changing the flow rate conditions. We also demonstrate that a double emulsion having multiple inner drops can be formed when the outer interface is more stable than the inner interface. PMID:22592893

  15. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16–240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  16. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Lane, Jacob A; Derry, Matthew J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-04-21

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16-240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  17. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Lane, Jacob A; Derry, Matthew J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-04-21

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16-240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration.

  18. Thoron-tartaric acid systems for spectrophotometric determination of thorium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Fletcher, M.H.

    1956-01-01

    Thoron is commonly used for the spectrophotometric determination of thorium. An undesirable feature of its use is its high sensitivity to zirconium. This study describes the use of tartaric acid as a masking reagent for zirconium. Three tartaric acid-thoron systems, developed for the determination of thorium, differ with respect to the concentrations of thoron and tartaric acid. Mesotartaric acid, used in one of the systems, is most effective in masking zirconium. The behavior of rarer elements, usually associated with thorium ores, is determined in two systems, and a dilution method is described for the direct determination of thorium in monazite concentrates.

  19. Tested Demonstrations: Color Oscillations in the Formic Acid-Nitric Acid-Sulfuric Acid System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raw, C. J. G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presented are procedures for demonstrating the production of color oscillations when nitric acid is added to a formic acid/concentrated sulfuric acid mixture. Because of safety considerations, "Super-8" home movie of the color changes was found to be satisfactory for demonstration purposes. (JN)

  20. Dual responsive pickering emulsion stabilized by poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] grafted cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juntao; Lee, Micky Fu Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Boxin; Berry, Richard M; Tam, Kam C

    2014-08-11

    A weak polyelectrolyte, poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA), was grafted onto the surface of cellulose nanocrystals via free radical polymerization. The resultant suspension of PDMAEMA-grafted-cellulose nanocrystals (PDMAEMA-g-CNC) possessed pH-responsive properties. The grafting was confirmed by FTIR, potentiometric titration, elementary analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); the surface and interfacial properties of the modified particles were characterized by surface tensiometer. Compared to pristine cellulose nanocrystals, modified CNC significantly reduced the surface and interfacial tensions. Stable heptane-in-water and toluene-in-water emulsions were prepared with PDMAEMA-g-CNC. Various factors, such as polarity of solvents, concentration of particles, electrolytes, and pH, on the properties of the emulsions were investigated. Using Nile Red as a florescence probe, the stability of the emulsions as a function of pH and temperature was elucidated. It was deduced that PDMAEMA chains promoted the stability of emulsion droplets and their chain conformation varied with pH and temperature to trigger the emulsification and demulsification of oil droplets. Interestingly, for heptane system, the macroscopic colors varied depending on the pH condition, while the color of the toluene system remained the same. Reversible emulsion systems that responded to pH were observed and a thermoresponsive Pickering emulsion system was demonstrated. PMID:24983405

  1. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  2. Functional properties of ultrasonically generated flaxseed oil-dairy emulsions.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Akalya; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-09-01

    This study reports on the functional properties of 7% flaxseed oil/milk emulsion obtained by sonication (OM) using 20 kHz ultrasound (US) at 176 W for 1-8 min in two different delivery formulae, viz., ready-to-drink (RTD) and lactic acid gel. The RTD emulsions showed no change in viscosity after sonication for up to 8 min followed by storage up to a minimum of 9 days at 4±2 °C. Similarly, the oxidative stability of the RTD emulsion was studied by measuring the conjugated diene hydroperoxides (CD). The CD was unaffected after 8 min of ultrasonic processing. The safety aspect of US processing was evaluated by measuring the formation of CD at different power levels. The functional properties of OM gels were evaluated by small and large scale deformation studies. The sonication process improved the gelation characteristics, viz., decreased gelation time, increased elastic nature, decreased syneresis and increased gel strength. The presence of finer sono-emulsified oil globules, stabilized by partially denatured whey proteins, contributed to the improvements in the gel structure in comparison to sonicated and unsonicated pasteurized homogenized skim milk (PHSM) gels. A sono-emulsification process of 5 min followed by gelation for about 11 min can produce gels of highest textural attibutes.

  3. Functional properties of ultrasonically generated flaxseed oil-dairy emulsions.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Akalya; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-09-01

    This study reports on the functional properties of 7% flaxseed oil/milk emulsion obtained by sonication (OM) using 20 kHz ultrasound (US) at 176 W for 1-8 min in two different delivery formulae, viz., ready-to-drink (RTD) and lactic acid gel. The RTD emulsions showed no change in viscosity after sonication for up to 8 min followed by storage up to a minimum of 9 days at 4±2 °C. Similarly, the oxidative stability of the RTD emulsion was studied by measuring the conjugated diene hydroperoxides (CD). The CD was unaffected after 8 min of ultrasonic processing. The safety aspect of US processing was evaluated by measuring the formation of CD at different power levels. The functional properties of OM gels were evaluated by small and large scale deformation studies. The sonication process improved the gelation characteristics, viz., decreased gelation time, increased elastic nature, decreased syneresis and increased gel strength. The presence of finer sono-emulsified oil globules, stabilized by partially denatured whey proteins, contributed to the improvements in the gel structure in comparison to sonicated and unsonicated pasteurized homogenized skim milk (PHSM) gels. A sono-emulsification process of 5 min followed by gelation for about 11 min can produce gels of highest textural attibutes. PMID:24713146

  4. New Pickering emulsions stabilized by bacterial cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Bizot, Hervé; Cathala, Bernard; Capron, Isabelle

    2011-06-21

    We studied oil in water Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals obtained by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis of bacterial cellulose. The resulting solid particles, called bacterial cellulose nanocrystals (BCNs), present an elongated shape and low surface charge density, forming a colloidal suspension in water. The BCNs produced proved to stabilize the hexadecane/water interface, promoting monodispersed oil in water droplets around 4 μm in diameter stable for several months. We characterized the emulsion and visualized the particles at the surface of the droplets by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and calculated the droplet coverage by varying the BCN concentration in the aqueous phase. A 60% coverage limit has been defined, above which very stable, deformable droplets are obtained. The high stability of the more covered droplets was attributed to the particle irreversible adsorption associated with the formation of a 2D network. Due to the sustainability and low environmental impact of cellulose, the BCN based emulsions open opportunities for the development of environmentally friendly new materials.

  5. Some modification of cellulose nanocrystals for functional Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Saidane, Dorra; Perrin, Emilie; Cherhal, Fanch; Guellec, Florian; Capron, Isabelle

    2016-07-28

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are negatively charged colloidal particles well known to form highly stable surfactant-free Pickering emulsions. These particles can vary in surface charge density depending on their preparation by acid hydrolysis or applying post-treatments. CNCs with three different surface charge densities were prepared corresponding to 0.08, 0.16 and 0.64 e nm(-2), respectively. Post-treatment might also increase the surface charge density. The well-known TEMPO-mediated oxidation substitutes C6-hydroxyl groups by C6-carboxyl groups on the surface. We report that these different modified CNCs lead to stable oil-in-water emulsions. TEMPO-oxidized CNC might be the basis of further modifications. It is shown that they can, for example, lead to hydrophobic CNCs with a simple method using quaternary ammonium salts that allow producing inverse water-in-oil emulsions. Different from CNC modification before emulsification, modification can be carried out on the droplets after emulsification. This way allows preparing functional capsules according to the layer-by-layer process. As a result, it is demonstrated here the large range of use of these biobased rod-like nanoparticles, extending therefore their potential use to highly sophisticated formulations.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'.

  6. Some modification of cellulose nanocrystals for functional Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Saidane, Dorra; Perrin, Emilie; Cherhal, Fanch; Guellec, Florian; Capron, Isabelle

    2016-07-28

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are negatively charged colloidal particles well known to form highly stable surfactant-free Pickering emulsions. These particles can vary in surface charge density depending on their preparation by acid hydrolysis or applying post-treatments. CNCs with three different surface charge densities were prepared corresponding to 0.08, 0.16 and 0.64 e nm(-2), respectively. Post-treatment might also increase the surface charge density. The well-known TEMPO-mediated oxidation substitutes C6-hydroxyl groups by C6-carboxyl groups on the surface. We report that these different modified CNCs lead to stable oil-in-water emulsions. TEMPO-oxidized CNC might be the basis of further modifications. It is shown that they can, for example, lead to hydrophobic CNCs with a simple method using quaternary ammonium salts that allow producing inverse water-in-oil emulsions. Different from CNC modification before emulsification, modification can be carried out on the droplets after emulsification. This way allows preparing functional capsules according to the layer-by-layer process. As a result, it is demonstrated here the large range of use of these biobased rod-like nanoparticles, extending therefore their potential use to highly sophisticated formulations.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298429

  7. Continuous-flow free acid monitoring method and system

    DOEpatents

    Strain, J.E.; Ross, H.H.

    1980-01-11

    A free acid monitoring method and apparatus is provided for continuously measuring the excess acid present in a process stream. The disclosed monitoring system and method is based on the relationship of the partial pressure ratio of water and acid in equilibrium with an acid solution at constant temperature. A portion of the process stream is pumped into and flows through the monitor under the influence of gravity and back to the process stream. A continuous flowing sample is vaporized at a constant temperature and the vapor is subsequently condensed. Conductivity measurements of the condensate produces a nonlinear response function from which the free acid molarity of the sample process stream is determined.

  8. Continuous-flow free acid monitoring method and system

    DOEpatents

    Strain, James E.; Ross, Harley H.

    1981-01-01

    A free acid monitoring method and apparatus is provided for continuously measuring the excess acid present in a process stream. The disclosed monitoring system and method is based on the relationship of the partial pressure ratio of water and acid in equilibrium with an acid solution at constant temperature. A portion of the process stream is pumped into and flows through the monitor under the influence of gravity and back to the process stream. A continuous flowing sample is vaporized at a constant temperature and the vapor is subsequently condensed. Conductivity measurements of the condensate produces a nonlinear response function from which the free acid molarity of the sample process stream is determined.

  9. Study and modeling of the rheological properties of concentrated water-in-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Koroleva, M.Yu.; Yurtov, E.V.

    1994-07-01

    Study of the rheological curves of concentrated water-in-oil emulsions indicates that such systems behave like non-Newtonian pseudo-plastic liquids. A number of mathematical models for rheological curves: Chong, Frankel-Acrivos, Ostwald-Weil, Bingham, Stainer, Ferry, Haven, Ellis, and Meter models are considered. The regions of the model adequacy for rheological curves of emulsions with different contents of the dispersed phase are determined. It was shown that only the Ellis model adequately describes the complete rheological curves of concentrated water-in-oil emulsions of the studied composition. Therefore, this model can be applied to the prediction of the viscosity values for emulsions with various phase ratios.

  10. Light controlled reversible inversion of nanophosphor-stabilized Pickering emulsions for biphasic enantioselective biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaowei; Zhou, Li; Bing, Wei; Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Zhenhua; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-05-21

    In this work, by utilizing photochromic spiropyrans conjugated upconversion nanophosphors, we have successfully prepared NIR/visible light tuned interfacially active nanoparticles for the formulation of Pickering emulsions with reversible inversion properties. By loading a model enantioselective biocatalytic active bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis ATCC 8750 in the aqueous phase, we demonstrated for the first time that the multifunctional Pickering emulsion not only highly enhanced its catalytic performance but also relieved the substrate inhibition effect. In addition, product recovery, and biocatalysts and colloid emulsifiers recycling could be easily realized based on the inversion ability of the Pickering emulsion. Most importantly, the utilization of NIR/visible light to perform the reversible inversion without any chemical auxiliaries or temperature variation showed little damage toward the biocatalysts, which was highlighted by the high catalytic efficiency and high enantioselectivity even after 10 cycles. The NIR/visible light controlled Pickering emulsion showed promising potential as a powerful technique for biocatalysis in biphasic systems.

  11. Microemulsion versus emulsion as effective carrier of hydroxytyrosol.

    PubMed

    Chatzidaki, Maria D; Arik, Nehir; Monteil, Julien; Papadimitriou, Vassiliki; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Xenakis, Aristotelis

    2016-01-01

    Two edible Water-in-Oil (W/O) dispersions, an emulsion that remains kinetically stable and a microemulsion which is spontaneously formed, transparent and thermodynamically stable, were developed for potential use as functional foods, due to their ability to be considered as matrices to encapsulate biologically active hydrophilic molecules. Both systems contained Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT) as the continuous phase and were used as carriers of Hydroxytyrosol (HT), a hydrophilic antioxidant of olive oil. A low energy input fabrication process of the emulsion was implemented. The obtained emulsion contained 1.3% (w/w) of surfactants and 5% (w/w) aqueous phase. The spontaneously formed microemulsion contained 4.9% (w/w) of surfactants and 2% (w/w) aqueous phase. A comparative study in terms of structural characterization of the systems in the absence and presence of HT was carried out. Particle size distribution obtained by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) technique and interfacial properties of the surfactants' layer, examined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy indicated the involvement of HT in the surfactant membrane. Finally, the proposed systems were studied for the scavenging activity of the encapsulated antioxidant toward galvinoxyl stable free radical showing a high scavenging activity of HT in both systems. PMID:25999235

  12. Nucleic acid detection system and method for detecting influenza

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hong; Song, Jian

    2015-03-17

    The invention provides a rapid, sensitive and specific nucleic acid detection system which utilizes isothermal nucleic acid amplification in combination with a lateral flow chromatographic device, or DNA dipstick, for DNA-hybridization detection. The system of the invention requires no complex instrumentation or electronic hardware, and provides a low cost nucleic acid detection system suitable for highly sensitive pathogen detection. Hybridization to single-stranded DNA amplification products using the system of the invention provides a sensitive and specific means by which assays can be multiplexed for the detection of multiple target sequences.

  13. Emulsion-based encapsulation and delivery of nanoparticles for the controlled release of alkalinity within the subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsburg, C. A.; Muller, K.; Gill, J.

    2012-12-01

    where acid fluxes are lower. The ability of emulsions to sustain alkalinity release within porous media was preliminarily examined using a series of 1-D column experiments. Emulsions were introduced for 2 pore volumes in a medium sand at Darcy velocities of approximately 0.8 cm/hr. Following the emulsion pulse, a pH 4 solution (adjusted with HCl) was introduced into the column and the effluent was monitored for pH, oil content, and droplet size distributions. All un-retained emulsion (~20% wt. was retained) was flushed from the column within approximately 2 pore volumes of terminating the emulsion pulse. The effluent pH at quasi-steady state and the reactive life of the emulsion depended on the retention characteristics, as well as the type and loading of nanoparticles employed within the emulsion. For the scenarios considered here, quasi-steady effluent pHs were observed to be between 6.5 and 10, and reactive lifetimes (i.e., the number of pore volumes for which the retained emulsion resulted in the effluent pH exceeding that of the influent) were between 15 and 100 pore volumes. These results demonstrate the ability of the emulsion to offer longer-term release and highlight the ability to tune the alkalinity release rate to match site characteristics by adjusting the emulsion content. Current research is directed toward evaluation release properties in heterogeneous aquifer cell experiments.

  14. Effect of Phytosterols on the Crystallization Behavior of Oil-in-Water Milk Fat Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zychowski, Lisa M; Logan, Amy; Augustin, Mary Ann; Kelly, Alan L; Zabara, Alexandru; O'Mahony, James A; Conn, Charlotte E; Auty, Mark A E

    2016-08-31

    Milk has been used commercially as a carrier for phytosterols, but there is limited knowledge on the effect of added plant sterols on the properties of the system. In this study, phytosterols dispersed in milk fat at a level of 0.3 or 0.6% were homogenized with an aqueous dispersion of whey protein isolate (WPI). The particle size, morphology, ζ-potential, and stability of the emulsions were investigated. Emulsion crystallization properties were examined through the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Synchrotron X-ray scattering at both small and wide angles. Phytosterol enrichment influenced the particle size and physical appearance of the emulsion droplets, but did not affect the stability or charge of the dispersed particles. DSC data demonstrated that, at the higher level of phytosterol addition, crystallization of milk fat was delayed, whereas, at the lower level, phytosterol enrichment induced nucleation and emulsion crystallization. These differences were attributed to the formation of separate phytosterol crystals within the emulsions at the high phytosterol concentration, as characterized by Synchrotron X-ray measurements. X-ray scattering patterns demonstrated the ability of the phytosterol to integrate within the milk fat triacylglycerol matrix, with a concomitant increase in longitudinal packing and system disorder. Understanding the consequences of adding phytosterols, on the physical and crystalline behavior of emulsions may enable the functional food industry to design more physically and chemically stable products.

  15. Effect of Phytosterols on the Crystallization Behavior of Oil-in-Water Milk Fat Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zychowski, Lisa M; Logan, Amy; Augustin, Mary Ann; Kelly, Alan L; Zabara, Alexandru; O'Mahony, James A; Conn, Charlotte E; Auty, Mark A E

    2016-08-31

    Milk has been used commercially as a carrier for phytosterols, but there is limited knowledge on the effect of added plant sterols on the properties of the system. In this study, phytosterols dispersed in milk fat at a level of 0.3 or 0.6% were homogenized with an aqueous dispersion of whey protein isolate (WPI). The particle size, morphology, ζ-potential, and stability of the emulsions were investigated. Emulsion crystallization properties were examined through the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Synchrotron X-ray scattering at both small and wide angles. Phytosterol enrichment influenced the particle size and physical appearance of the emulsion droplets, but did not affect the stability or charge of the dispersed particles. DSC data demonstrated that, at the higher level of phytosterol addition, crystallization of milk fat was delayed, whereas, at the lower level, phytosterol enrichment induced nucleation and emulsion crystallization. These differences were attributed to the formation of separate phytosterol crystals within the emulsions at the high phytosterol concentration, as characterized by Synchrotron X-ray measurements. X-ray scattering patterns demonstrated the ability of the phytosterol to integrate within the milk fat triacylglycerol matrix, with a concomitant increase in longitudinal packing and system disorder. Understanding the consequences of adding phytosterols, on the physical and crystalline behavior of emulsions may enable the functional food industry to design more physically and chemically stable products. PMID:27476512

  16. The use of emulsions for the determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in fish-eggs oil by cold vapor generation in a flow injection system with atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Burguera, J L; Quintana, I A; Salager, J L; Burguera, M; Rondón, C; Carrero, P; Anton de Salager, R; Petit de Peña, Y

    1999-04-01

    An on-line time based injection system used in conjunction with cold vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry and microwave-aided oxidation with potassium persulfate has been developed for the determination of the different mercury species in fish-eggs oil samples. A three-phase surfactant-oil-water emulsion produced an advantageous flow when a peristaltic pump was used to introduce the highly viscous sample into the system. The optimum proportion of the oil-water mixture ratio was 2:3 v/v with a Tween 20 surfactant concentration in the emulsion of 0.008% v/v. Inorganic mercury was determined after reduction with sodium borohydride while total mercury was determined after an oxidation step with persulfate prior to the reduction step to elemental mercury with the same reducing agent. The difference between total and inorganic mercury determined the organomercury content in samples. A linear calibration graph was obtained in the range 0.1-20 micrograms l-1 of Hg2+ by injecting 0.7 ml of samples. The detection limits based on 3 sigma of the blank signals were 0.11 and 0.12 microgram l-1 for total and inorganic mercury, respectively. The relative standard deviation of ten independent measurements were 2.8 and 2.2% for 10 micrograms l-1 and 8.8 and 9.0% for 0.1 microgram l-1 amounts of total and inorganic mercury, respectively. The recoveries of 0.3, 0.6 and 8 micrograms l-1 of inorganic and organic mercury added to fish-eggs oil samples ranged from 93.0 to 94.8% and from 100 to 106%, respectively. Good agreement with those values obtained for total mercury content in real samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was also obtained, differences between mean values were < 7%. With the proposed procedure, 22 proteropterous catfish-eggs oil samples from the northwestern coast of Venezuela were measured; while the organic mercury lay in the range 2.0 and 3.3 micrograms l-1, inorganic mercury was not detected.

  17. Amino acid auxotrophy as a system of immunological control nodes.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    Cells of the immune system are auxotrophs for most amino acids, including several nonessential ones. Arginine and tryptophan are used within the regulatory immune networks to control proliferation and function through pathways that actively deplete the amino acid from the microenvironment or that create regulatory molecules such as nitric oxide or kynurenines. How immune cells integrate information about essential amino acid supplies and then transfer these signals to growth and activation pathways remains unclear but has potential for pathway discovery about amino sensing. In applied research, strategies to harness amino acid auxotrophy so as to block cancerous lymphocyte growth have been attempted for decades with limited success. Emerging insights about amino acid metabolism may lead to new strategies in clinical medicine whereby both amino acid auxotrophy and the immunoregulatory pathways controlled by amino acids can be manipulated.

  18. System for agitating the acid in a lead-acid battery

    DOEpatents

    Weintraub, Alvin; MacCormack, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    A system and method for agitating the acid in a large lead-sulfuric acid storage battery of the calcium type. An air-lift is utilized to provide the agitation. The air fed to the air-lift is humidified prior to being delivered to the air-lift.

  19. Highly stable phase change material emulsions fabricated by interfacial assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers during phase inversion.

    PubMed

    Park, Hanhee; Han, Dong Wan; Kim, Jin Woong

    2015-03-10

    This study introduced a robust and promising approach to fabricate highly stable phase change material (PCM) emulsions consisting of n-tetradecane as a dispersed phase and a mixture of meso-2,3-butanediol (m-BDO) and water as a continuous phase. We showed that amphiphilic poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) block copolymers assembled to form a flexible but tough polymer membrane at the interface during phase inversion from water-in-oil emulsion to oil-in-water emulsion, thus remarkably improving the emulsion stability. Although the incorporation of m-BDO into the emulsion lowered the phase changing enthalpy, it provided a useful means to elevate the melting temperature of the emulsions near to 15 °C. Interestingly, supercooling was commonly observed in our PCM emulsions. We attributed this to the fact that the PCM molecules confined in submicron-scale droplets could not effectively nucleate to grow molecular crystals. Moreover, the presence of m-BDO in the continuous phase rather dominated the heat emission of the emulsion system during freezing, which made the supercooling more favorable. PMID:25674921

  20. Dynamical and structural signatures of the glass transition in emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Gnan, Nicoletta; Mason, Thomas G.; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-09-01

    We investigate structural and dynamical properties of moderately polydisperse emulsions across an extended range of droplet volume fractions ϕ, encompassing fluid and glassy states up to jamming. Combining experiments and simulations, we show that when ϕ approaches the glass transition volume fraction {φg} , dynamical heterogeneities and amorphous order arise within the emulsion. In particular, we find an increasing number of clusters of particles having five-fold symmetry (i.e. the so-called locally favoured structures, LFS) as ϕ approaches {φg} , saturating to a roughly constant value in the glassy regime. However, contrary to previous studies, we do not observe a corresponding growth of medium-range crystalline order; instead, the emergence of LFS is decoupled from the appearance of more ordered regions in our system. We also find that the static correlation lengths associated with the LFS and with the fastest particles can be successfully related to the relaxation time of the system. By contrast, this does not hold for the length associated with the orientational order. Our study reveals the existence of a link between dynamics and structure close to the glass transition even in the absence of crystalline precursors or crystallization. Furthermore, the quantitative agreement between our confocal microscopy experiments and Brownian dynamics simulations indicates that emulsions are and will continue to be important model systems for the investigation of the glass transition and beyond.

  1. Hydrodynamic model for drying emulsions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huanhuan; Sprakel, Joris; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-08-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model for film formation in a dense oil-in-water emulsion under a unidirectional drying stress. Water flow through the plateau borders towards the drying end leads to the buildup of a pressure gradient. When the local pressure exceeds the critical disjoining pressure, the water films between droplets break and the droplets coalesce. We show that, depending on the critical pressure and the evaporation rate, the coalescence can occur in two distinct modes. At low critical pressures and low evaporation rates, coalescence occurs throughout the sample, whereas at high critical pressures and high evaporation rate, coalescence occurs only at the front. In the latter case, an oil layer develops on top of the film, which acts as a diffusive barrier and slows down film formation. Our findings, which are summarized in a state diagram for film formation, are in agreement with recent experimental findings.

  2. A transportable system for the in situ recording of color Denisyuk holograms of Greek cultural heritage artifacts in silver halide panchromatic emulsions and an optimized illuminating device for the finished holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakinos, A.; Lembessis, A.; Zervos, N.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we will present the Z-Lab transportable color holography system, the HoLoFoS illuminator and results of actual in situ recording of color Denisyuk holograms of artifacts on panchromatic silver halide emulsions. Z-lab and HoLoFoS were developed to meet identified prerequisites of holographic recording of artifacts: a) in situ recording b) a high degree of detail and color reproduction c) a low degree of image distortions. The Z-Lab consists of the Z3RGB camera, its accessories and a mobile darkroom. HoLoFoS is an RGB LED-based lighting device for the display of color holograms. The device is capable of digitally controlled intensity mixing and provides a beam of uniform color cross section. The small footprint and emission characteristics of the device LEDs result in a narrow band, quasi point source at selected wavelengths. A case study in recording and displaying 'Optical Clones' of Greek cultural heritage artifacts with the aforementioned systems will also be presented.

  3. Preparation and physical characterization of a novel marine oil emulsion as a potential new formulation vehicle for lipid soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guohui; Wang, Lili; Davis, Philip J; Kara, Mohameditaki; Liu, Hu

    2006-11-15

    Emulsions often contain vegetable oils such as soybean oil. In this study, a 10% (w/w) of marine mammal oil emulsion was prepared. The effect of a group of emulsifying agents on the stability of the 10% of seal oil emulsion was examined. The emulsifying agents studied were hydrogenated castor oil coated with various polyoxyethylene derivatives. It was found that 2.5% of HCO-40 resulted in the most stable seal oil emulsion. The size of the emulsified droplets defined by their diameters was found to be around 240-270 nm. The initial zeta-potential and pH value of the emulsion were found to be around -27 mV and 3.5, respectively, which decreased over time, to about -31 mV and 2.4, respectively. This is believed to be a result of the hydrolysis of triacylglycerides into free fatty acids in the emulsion. The effect of various amounts of Crodasinic LS-30, a negatively charged surfactant, and Incroqal Behenyl TMS, a positively charged surfactant, on the emulsion was investigated. It was shown that Crodasinic LS-30 had very little effect on the particle size, zeta-potential and pH, while the effect of Incroquat Benhenyl TMS was found to be dependent upon the concentration of the surfactant used.

  4. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  5. Flocculation of inverted emulsions. Influence of electrostatic repulsion of droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bedenko, V.G.; Pertsov, A.V.

    1988-09-01

    The dependence of the degree of flocculation of emulsions of water in various hydrocarbons stabilized with respect to the coalescence by nonionogenic surfactants and of the zeta potential of the droplets on the presence of additions of chromium stearate has been studied experimentally. The introduction of 0.01-0.03% chromium stearate into an emulsion results in the complete prevention of flocculation and a significant increase in the /zeta/ potential. The observed correlation of the stability toward flocculation and the /zeta/ potential points out the significant role of the stability of the systems studied. The theoretical analysis of the energy of interaction of the droplets with consideration of the collective character of the interaction is consistent with such a conclusion.

  6. Enzymatically activated emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanofibre networks.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Inês P; Sasselli, Ivan Ramos; Cannon, Daniel A; Hughes, Meghan; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Tuttle, Tell; Ulijn, Rein V

    2016-03-01

    We report on-demand formation of emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanoscale networks. These are formed through biocatalytic dephosphorylation and self-assembly of Fmoc(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)dipeptide amphiphiles in aqueous/organic mixtures. This is achieved by using alkaline phosphatase which transforms surfactant-like phosphorylated precursors into self-assembling aromatic peptide amphiphiles (Fmoc-tyrosine-leucine, Fmoc-YL) that form nanofibrous networks. In biphasic organic/aqueous systems, these networks form preferentially at the interface thus providing a means of emulsion stabilisation. We demonstrate on-demand emulsification by enzyme addition, even after storage of the biphasic mixture for several weeks. Experimental (Fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) and computational techniques (atomistic molecular dynamics) are used to characterise the interfacial self-assembly process. PMID:26905042

  7. Effect of fullerene on the dispersibility of nanostructured lipid particles and encapsulation in sterically stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V; Moinuddin, Zeinab; Agarwal, Yash

    2016-10-15

    We report on the effect of fullerenes (C60) on the stability of nanostructured lipid emulsions. These (oil-in-water) emulsions are essentially aqueous dispersions of lipid particles exhibiting self-assembled nanostructures at their cores. The majority of previous studies on fullerenes were focused on planar and spherical lipid bilayer systems including pure lipids and liposomes. In this work, fullerenes were interacted with a lipid that forms nanostructured dispersions of non-lamellar self-assemblies. A range of parameters including the composition of emulsions and sonication parameters were examined to determine the influence of fullerenes on in-situ and pre-stabilized lipid emulsions. We found that fullerenes mutually stabilize very low concentrations of lipid molecules, while other concentration emulsions struggle to stay stable or even to form at first instance; we provide hypotheses to support these observations. Interestingly though, we were able to encapsulate varying amounts of fullerenes in sterically stabilized emulsions. This step has a significant positive impact, as we could effectively control an inherent aggregation tendency of fullerenes in aqueous environments. These novel hybrid nanomaterials may open a range of avenues for biotechnological and biomedical applications exploiting properties of both lipid and fullerene nanostructures.

  8. Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

    2011-09-30

    This project involves the use of an innovative new invention Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude

  9. Effect of fullerene on the dispersibility of nanostructured lipid particles and encapsulation in sterically stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V; Moinuddin, Zeinab; Agarwal, Yash

    2016-10-15

    We report on the effect of fullerenes (C60) on the stability of nanostructured lipid emulsions. These (oil-in-water) emulsions are essentially aqueous dispersions of lipid particles exhibiting self-assembled nanostructures at their cores. The majority of previous studies on fullerenes were focused on planar and spherical lipid bilayer systems including pure lipids and liposomes. In this work, fullerenes were interacted with a lipid that forms nanostructured dispersions of non-lamellar self-assemblies. A range of parameters including the composition of emulsions and sonication parameters were examined to determine the influence of fullerenes on in-situ and pre-stabilized lipid emulsions. We found that fullerenes mutually stabilize very low concentrations of lipid molecules, while other concentration emulsions struggle to stay stable or even to form at first instance; we provide hypotheses to support these observations. Interestingly though, we were able to encapsulate varying amounts of fullerenes in sterically stabilized emulsions. This step has a significant positive impact, as we could effectively control an inherent aggregation tendency of fullerenes in aqueous environments. These novel hybrid nanomaterials may open a range of avenues for biotechnological and biomedical applications exploiting properties of both lipid and fullerene nanostructures. PMID:27416287

  10. Stability assessment of injectable castor oil-based nano-sized emulsion containing cationic droplets stabilized by poloxamer-chitosan emulsifier films.

    PubMed

    Tamilvanan, S; Kumar, B Ajith; Senthilkumar, S R; Baskar, Raj; Sekharan, T Raja

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of the present work were to prepare castor oil-based nano-sized emulsion containing cationic droplets stabilized by poloxamer-chitosan emulgator film and to assess the kinetic stability of the prepared cationic emulsion after subjecting it to thermal processing and freeze-thaw cycling. Presence of cryoprotectants (5%, w/w, sucrose +5%, w/w, sorbitol) improved the stability of emulsions to droplet aggregation during freeze-thaw cycling. After storing the emulsion at 4 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 37 degrees C over a period of up to 6 months, no significant change was noted in mean diameter of the dispersed oil droplets. However, the emulsion stored at the highest temperature did show a progressive decrease in the pH and zeta potential values, whereas the emulsion kept at the lowest temperatures did not. This indicates that at 37 degrees C, free fatty acids were formed from the castor oil, and consequently, the liberated free fatty acids were responsible for the reduction in the emulsion pH and zeta potential values. Thus, the injectable castor oil-based nano-sized emulsion could be useful for incorporating various active pharmaceutical ingredients that are in size from small molecular drugs to large macromolecules such as oligonucleotides.

  11. Chitosan-Based Conventional and Pickering Emulsions with Long-Term Stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Heuzey, Marie-Claude

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan-based conventional and Pickering oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions with very fine droplet size (volume average diameter, dv, as low as 1.7 μm) and long-term stability (up to 5 months) were ultrasonically generated at different pH values without the addition of any surfactant or cross-linking agent. The ultrasonication treatment was found to break and disperse chitosan agglomerates effectively (particularly at pH ≥ 4.5) and also reduce the chitosan molecular weight, benefiting its emulsification properties. The emulsion stability and emulsion type could be controlled by chitosan solution pH. Increasing pH from 3.5 to 5.5 led to the formation of conventional emulsions with decreasing droplet size (dv from 14 to 2.1 μm) and increasing emulsion stability (from a few days to 2 months). These results can be explained by the increase of dynamic interfacial pressure, which results from the conformation transition of chitosan molecules from an extended state to a more flexible structure as pH increases. At pH = 6.5 (the acid dissociation constant (pKa) of chitosan), the chitosan molecules self-assembled into well-dispersed nanoparticles (dv = 82.1 nm) with the assistance of ultrasonication, which resulted in a Pickering emulsion with the smallest droplet size (dv = 1.7 μm) and highest long-term stability (up to 5 months) because of the presence of chitosan solid nanoparticles at the oil/water interface. The key originality of this study is the elucidation of the role of pH in the formation of conventional and Pickering chitosan-based O/W emulsions with the assistance of ultrasonication. Our results suggest that chitosan possesses great potential to be used as an effective pH-controlled emulsifier and stabilizer without the need of other additives.

  12. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials.

  13. Fluorocarbon emulsions--the stability issue.

    PubMed

    Postel, M; Riess, J G; Weers, J G

    1994-01-01

    Long-term room temperature stability of ready-to-use concentrated fluorocarbon emulsions is necessary in order to fully exploit the therapeutic potential of fluorocarbons. Consequently, considerable efforts have been directed at investigating the physical nature of such emulsions, the mechanisms which lead to their degradation and the means of counteracting these. The particles which constitute typical fluorocarbon/egg yolk phospholipid emulsions have been identified to be surfactant-coated fluorocarbon droplets and lipid vesicles. Better understanding has been gained on the formation, structure and evolution of these particles during processing and storage. This has led to optimized formulations and processing, better control of emulsion characteristics and significantly improved stability. Molecular diffusion (Ostwald ripening or transcondensation) has been shown to be the maun mechanism of degradation when particles are less than 1 micron in diameter, even for the highly concentrated (volume fraction of fluorocarbon up to 50%) second generation fluorocarbon emulsions. Significant emulsion stabilization has been accomplished by adding fluorochemicals which are both less volatile and less water soluble, and nevertheless have an organ dwell time acceptable for intravascular use. The rate of molecular diffusion can also be reduced by decreasing the fluorocarbon/water interfacial tension; this was effectively achieved with appropriate, well-defined fluorinated surfactants. A further, novel means of stabilizing fluorocarbon-in-water emulsions makes use of mixed fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon amphiphiles which act as molecular dowels to reinforce the adhesion between the fluorocarbon phase and the lipophilic zone of the surfactant film. Both long-term room temperature stability, and particle-size control over a large range of diameter, have been achieved by applying this principle. All in all it can be said that the challenge of producing injectable fluorocarbon emulsions

  14. Tunable stability of monodisperse secondary O/W nano-emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchione, R.; Ciotola, U.; Sagliano, A.; Bianchini, P.; Diaspro, A.; Netti, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    Stable and biodegradable oil in water (O/W) nano-emulsions can have a huge impact on a wide range of bio-applications, from food to cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Emulsions, however, are immiscible systems unstable over time; polymer coatings are known to be helpful, but an effective procedure to stabilize monodisperse and biodegradable O/W nano-emulsions is yet to be designed. Here, we coat biodegradable O/W nano-emulsions with a molecular layer of biodegradable polyelectrolytes such as polysaccharides - like chitosan - and polypeptides - like polylysine - and effectively re-disperse and densify the polymer coating at high pressure, thus obtaining monodisperse and stable systems. In particular, focusing on chitosan, our tests show that it is possible to obtain unprecedented ultra-stable O/W secondary nano-emulsions (diameter sizes tunable from ~80 to 160 nm and polydispersion indices below 0.1) by combining this process with high concentrations of polymers. Depending on the polymer concentration, it is possible to control the level of coating that results in a tunable stability ranging from a few weeks to several months. The above range of concentrations has been investigated using a fluorescence-based approach with new insights into the coating evolution.Stable and biodegradable oil in water (O/W) nano-emulsions can have a huge impact on a wide range of bio-applications, from food to cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Emulsions, however, are immiscible systems unstable over time; polymer coatings are known to be helpful, but an effective procedure to stabilize monodisperse and biodegradable O/W nano-emulsions is yet to be designed. Here, we coat biodegradable O/W nano-emulsions with a molecular layer of biodegradable polyelectrolytes such as polysaccharides - like chitosan - and polypeptides - like polylysine - and effectively re-disperse and densify the polymer coating at high pressure, thus obtaining monodisperse and stable systems. In particular, focusing on

  15. Recognition of Endogenous Nucleic Acids by the Innate Immune System.

    PubMed

    Roers, Axel; Hiller, Björn; Hornung, Veit

    2016-04-19

    Recognition of DNA and RNA by endosomal and cytosolic sensors constitutes a central element in the detection of microbial invaders by the innate immune system. However, the capacity of these sensors to discriminate between microbial and endogenous nucleic acids is limited. Over the past few years, evidence has accumulated to suggest that endogenous DNA or RNA species can engage nucleic-acid-sensing pattern-recognition receptors that can trigger or sustain detrimental pathology. Here, we review principles of how the activation of innate sensors by host nucleic acids is prevented in the steady state and discuss four important determinants of whether a nucleic-acid-driven innate response is mounted. These include structural features of the ligand being sensed, the subcellular location and quantity of pathogen-derived or endogenous nucleic acids, and the regulation of sensor-activation thresholds. Furthermore, we emphasize disease mechanisms initiated by failure to discriminate self from non-self in nucleic acid detection.

  16. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  17. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This section provides a description of the Hanford Site, identifies the proposed method of 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS) closure, and briefly summarizes the contents of each chapter of this plan.

  18. Pickering emulsions stabilized by charged nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ridel, Laure; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Gilon-Delepine, Nicole; Dugas, Pierre-Yves; Chevalier, Yves

    2016-09-28

    The stabilization of o/w Pickering emulsions in cases of weak adsorption of solid particles at the surface of oil droplets is addressed. Though the adsorption is usually very strong and irreversible when partial wetting conditions are fulfilled, electrostatic repulsions between charged solid particles act against the adsorption. The regime of weak adsorption was reached using charged silica nanoparticles at high pH and low ionic strength. O/w Pickering emulsions of the diisopropyl adipate oil were stabilized by colloidal nanoparticles of Ludox® AS40 consisting of non-aggregated particles of bare silica (hydrophilic). The combination of stability assessment, droplet size and electrokinetic potential measurements at various pH values, adsorption isotherms and cryo-SEM observations of the adsorbed layers disclosed the specificities of the stabilization of Pickering emulsions by adsorption of solid nanoparticles against strong electrostatic repulsions. Not only the long-term stability of emulsions was poor under strong electrostatic repulsions at high pH, but emulsification failed since full dispersion of oil could not be achieved. Emulsion stability was ensured by decreasing electrostatic repulsions by lowering the pH from 9 to 3. Stable emulsions were stabilized by a monolayer of silica particles at 54% coverage of the oil droplet surface at low silica content and an adsorption regime as multilayers was reached at higher concentrations of silica although there was no aggregation of silica in the bulk aqueous phase.

  19. Nanomedical system for nucleic acid drugs created with the biodegradable nanoparticle platform.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiromitsu; Tahara, Kohei; Kawashima, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Nanomedical applications of biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) developed are discussed in this review. A surface-functionalized PLGA NP platform for drug delivery was established to encapsulate a number of macromolecular drugs such as peptides and nucleic acids as well as low-molecular-weight drugs by the emulsion solvent diffusion method. The interaction of PLGA NPs with cells and tissues could be controlled by changing the surface properties of NPs, suggesting their potential utility for the intracellular drug delivery of nucleic acid-based drugs. Furthermore, orally administered NF-κB decoy oligonucleotide-loaded CS-PLGA NPs are also useful in treating experimental colitis. These approaches using surface-modified PLGA NPs could be able to open new possibilities for nucleic acid-based drug delivery via noninvasive administration method.

  20. Acid-base homeostasis in the human system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Acid-base regulation is a cooperative phenomena in vivo with body fluids, extracellular and intracellular buffers, lungs, and kidneys all playing important roles. The present account is much too brief to be considered a review of present knowledge of these regulatory systems, and should be viewed, instead, as a guide to the elements necessary to construct a simple model of the mutual interactions of the acid-base regulatory systems of the body.

  1. Formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a cationic emulsion as a vehicle for improving adenoviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Jin; Lim, Soo-Jeong

    2014-11-20

    Advancements in the use of adenoviral vectors in gene therapy have been limited by the need for specific receptors on targeted cell types, immunogenicity and hepatotoxicity following systemic administration. In an effort to overcome the current limitations of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, cationic emulsions were explored as a vehicle to improve adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer. Complexation of adenovirus with emulsions containing the cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP) enhanced the potency of adenoviral gene transfer as compared to DOTAP liposomes. Among the various emulsion formulations examined, those containing the iodized oil, Lipiodol, as an inner core and stabilized by DOTAP/cholesterol/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxy(poly-ethylene glycol)-5000 most efficiently enhanced adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. Optimized Lipiodol-containing emulsions appear to be more strongly associated with adenoviral particles, exhibiting higher complex stability compared to other formulations. They provide the adenovirus with an additional cellular entry mechanism through caveolae-dependent endocytosis, thereby increasing adenovirus entry into cells. Furthermore, adenovirus-emulsion complexation significantly reduced transgene expression in the liver following systemic administration. These findings indicate that emulsion complexation may be a promising strategy for overcoming many of the challenges associated with the use of adenoviruses in gene therapy. Additionally, the observation of increased transgene expression in lung together with reduced expression in liver demonstrates that the adenovirus-emulsion complex may act as a lung-targeting adenoviral gene delivery system.

  2. Enhanced fluorescence emitted by microdroplets containing organic dye emulsions.

    PubMed

    Boni, M; Nastasa, V; Andrei, I R; Staicu, Angela; Pascu, M L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, laser beam resonant interaction with pendant microdroplets that are seeded with a laser dye (Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G)) water solution or oily Vitamin A emulsion with Rhodamine 6G solution in water is investigated through fluorescence spectra analysis. The excitation is made with the second harmonic generated beam emitted by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser system at 532 nm. The pendant microdroplets containing emulsion exhibit an enhanced fluorescence signal. This effect can be explained as being due to the scattering of light by the sub-micrometric drops of oily Vitamin A in emulsion and by the spherical geometry of the pendant droplet. The droplet acts as an optical resonator amplifying the fluorescence signal with the possibility of producing lasing effect. Here, we also investigate how Rhodamine 6G concentration, pumping laser beam energies and number of pumping laser pulses influence the fluorescence behavior. The results can be useful in optical imaging, since they can lead to the use of smaller quantities of fluorescent dyes to obtain results with the same quality. PMID:25784965

  3. Stabilising emulsion-based colloidal structures with mixed food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Eric

    2013-03-15

    The physical scientist views food as a complex form of soft matter. The complexity has its origin in the numerous ingredients that are typically mixed together and the subtle variations in microstructure and texture induced by thermal and mechanical processing. The colloid science approach to food product formulation is based on the assumption that the major product attributes such as appearance, rheology and physical stability are determined by the spatial distribution and interactions of a small number of generic structural entities (biopolymers, particles, droplets, bubbles, crystals) organised in various kinds of structural arrangements (layers, complexes, aggregates, networks). This review describes some recent advances in this field with reference to three discrete classes of dispersed systems: particle-stabilised emulsions, emulsion gels and aerated emulsions. Particular attention is directed towards explaining the crucial role of the macromolecular ingredients (proteins and polysaccharides) in controlling the formation and stabilisation of the colloidal structures. The ultimate objective of this research is to provide the basic physicochemical insight required for the reliable manufacture of novel structured foods with an appealing taste and texture, whilst incorporating a more healthy set of ingredients than those found in many existing traditional products.

  4. Pickering emulsions with α-cyclodextrin inclusions: Structure and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Salmeron, Raul; Chaab, Ismail; Carn, Florent; Djabourov, Madeleine; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2016-11-15

    This paper explores structural, interfacial and thermal properties of two types of Pickering emulsions containing α-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes: on one hand, emulsions were obtained between aqueous solutions of α-cyclodextrin and different oils (fatty acids, olive oil, silicone oil) and on the other hand, emulsions were obtained between these oils, water and micro or nano-platelet suspensions with inclusion complexes of hydrophobically-modified polysaccharides. The emulsions exhibit versatile properties according to the molecular architecture of the oils. Experiments were performed by microcalorimetry, X-ray diffraction and confocal microscopy. The aptitude of oil molecules to be threaded in α-cyclodextrin cavity is a determining parameter in emulsification and thermal stability. The heat flow traces and images showed dissolution, cooperative melting and de-threading of inclusion complexes which take place progressively, ending at high temperatures, close or above 100°C. Another important feature observed in the emulsions with micro-platelets is the partial substitution of the guest molecules occurring at room temperature at the oil/water interfaces without dissolution, possibly by a diffusion mechanism of the oil. Accordingly, the dissolution and the cooperative melting temperatures of the inclusion crystals changed, showing marked differences upon the type of guest molecules. The enthalpies of dissolution of crystals were measured and compared with soluble inclusions. PMID:27491001

  5. Pickering emulsions with α-cyclodextrin inclusions: Structure and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Salmeron, Raul; Chaab, Ismail; Carn, Florent; Djabourov, Madeleine; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2016-11-15

    This paper explores structural, interfacial and thermal properties of two types of Pickering emulsions containing α-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes: on one hand, emulsions were obtained between aqueous solutions of α-cyclodextrin and different oils (fatty acids, olive oil, silicone oil) and on the other hand, emulsions were obtained between these oils, water and micro or nano-platelet suspensions with inclusion complexes of hydrophobically-modified polysaccharides. The emulsions exhibit versatile properties according to the molecular architecture of the oils. Experiments were performed by microcalorimetry, X-ray diffraction and confocal microscopy. The aptitude of oil molecules to be threaded in α-cyclodextrin cavity is a determining parameter in emulsification and thermal stability. The heat flow traces and images showed dissolution, cooperative melting and de-threading of inclusion complexes which take place progressively, ending at high temperatures, close or above 100°C. Another important feature observed in the emulsions with micro-platelets is the partial substitution of the guest molecules occurring at room temperature at the oil/water interfaces without dissolution, possibly by a diffusion mechanism of the oil. Accordingly, the dissolution and the cooperative melting temperatures of the inclusion crystals changed, showing marked differences upon the type of guest molecules. The enthalpies of dissolution of crystals were measured and compared with soluble inclusions.

  6. Controlled release behaviour of protein-loaded microparticles prepared via coaxial or emulsion electrospray

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Xiaoping; Liu, Wentao; Zhang, Feng; Cai, Qing; Deng, Xuliang

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles are an effective way to achieve sustained drug release. In this study, we investigated a sustained release model of PLGA microparticles with incorporated protein via either emulsion or coaxial electrospray techniques. PLGA (75:25) was used as the carrier, and bovine serum albumin as a model protein. Coaxial electrospray resulted in a type of core–shell structure with mean diameters of 2.41 ± 0.60 µm and a centralised protein distribution within the core. Emulsion electrospray formed bigger microparticles with mean diameters of 22.75 ± 8.05 µm and a heterogeneous protein distribution throughout the microparticles. The coaxial electrospray microparticles presented a much slighter burst release than the emulsion electrospray microparticles. Loading efficiency was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the coaxial group than emulsion group. This indicated that both emulsion and coaxial electrospray could produce protein-loaded microparticles with sustained release behaviour, but the former revealed a superior approach for drug delivery. PMID:23346923

  7. Influence of interfacial properties on Ostwald ripening in crosslinked multilayered oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Gibis, Monika; Fischer, Lutz; Weiss, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    The influence of interfacial crosslinking, layer thickness and layer density on the kinetics of Ostwald ripening in multilayered emulsions at different temperatures was investigated. Growth rates of droplets were measured by monitoring changes in the droplet size distributions of 0.5% (w/w) n-octane, n-decane, and n-dodecane oil-in-water emulsions using static light scattering. Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory was used to calculate Ostwald ripening rates. A sequential two step process, based on electrostatic deposition of sugar beet pectin onto fish gelatin or whey protein isolate (WPI) interfacial membranes, was used to manipulate the interfacial properties of the oil droplets. Laccase was added to the fish gelatin-beet pectin emulsions to promote crosslinking of adsorbed pectin molecules via ferulic acid groups, whereas heat was induced to promote crosslinking of WPI and helix coil transitions of fish gelatin. Ripening rates of single-layered, double-layered and crosslinked emulsions increased as the chain length of the n-alkanes decreased. Emulsions containing crosslinked fish gelatin-beet pectin coated droplets had lower droplet growth rates (3.1±0.3×10(-26) m(3)/s) than fish gelatin-stabilized droplets (7.3±0.2×10(-26) m(3)/s), which was attributed to the formation of a protective network. Results suggest that physical or enzymatic biopolymer-crosslinking of interfaces may reduce the molecular transport of alkanes between the droplets in the continuous phase.

  8. Enzymatically structured emulsions in simulated gastrointestinal environment: impact on interfacial proteolysis and diffusion in intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Macierzanka, Adam; Böttger, Franziska; Rigby, Neil M; Lille, Martina; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mills, E N Clare; Mackie, Alan R

    2012-12-18

    Fundamental knowledge of physicochemical interactions in the gastrointestinal environment is required in order to support rational designing of protein-stabilized colloidal food and pharmaceutical delivery systems with controlled behavior. In this paper, we report on the colloidal behavior of emulsions stabilized with the milk protein sodium caseinate (Na-Cas), and exposed to conditions simulating the human upper gastrointestinal tract. In particular, we looked at how the kinetics of proteolysis was affected by adsorption to an oil-water interface in emulsion and whether the proteolysis and the emulsion stability could be manipulated by enzymatic structuring of the interface. After cross-linking with the enzyme transglutaminase, the protein was digested with use of an in vitro model of gastro-duodenal proteolysis in the presence or absence of physiologically relevant surfactants (phosphatidylcholine, PC; bile salts, BS). Significant differences were found between the rates of digestion of Na-Cas cross-linked in emulsion (adsorbed protein) and in solution. In emulsion, the digestion of a population of polypeptides of M(r) ca. 50-100 kDa was significantly retarded through the gastric digestion. The persistent interfacial polypeptides maintained the original emulsion droplet size and prevented the system from phase separating. Rapid pepsinolysis of adsorbed, non-cross-linked Na-Cas and its displacement by PC led to emulsion destabilization. These results suggest that structuring of emulsions by enzymatic cross-linking of the interfacial protein may affect the phase behavior of emulsion in the stomach and the gastric digestion rate in vivo. Measurements of ζ-potential revealed that BS displaced the remaining protein from the oil droplets during the simulated duodenal phase of digestion. Diffusion of the postdigestion emulsion droplets through ex vivo porcine intestinal mucus was only significant in the presence of BS due to the high negative charge these

  9. New generation lipid emulsions prevent PNALD in chronic parenterally fed preterm pigs

    PubMed Central

    Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; Ng, Kenneth; Stoll, Barbara; Benight, Nancy; Chacko, Shaji; Kluijtmans, Leo A. J.; Kulik, Wim; Squires, E. James; Olutoye, Oluyinka; Schady, Deborah; Finegold, Milton L.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Burrin, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) in infants. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions can reverse PNALD, yet it is unknown if they can prevent PNALD. We studied preterm pigs administered TPN for 14 days with either 100% soybean oil (IL), 100% fish oil (OV), or a mixture of soybean oil, medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), olive oil, and fish oil (SL); a group was fed formula enterally (ENT). In TPN-fed pigs, serum direct bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and plasma bile acids increased after the 14 day treatment but were highest in IL pigs. All TPN pigs had suppressed hepatic expression of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), cholesterol 7-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), and plasma 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) concentrations, yet hepatic CYP7A1 protein abundance was increased only in the IL versus ENT group. Organic solute transporter alpha (OSTα) gene expression was the highest in the IL group and paralleled plasma bile acid levels. In cultured hepatocytes, bile acid-induced bile salt export pump (BSEP) expression was inhibited by phytosterol treatment. We show that TPN-fed pigs given soybean oil developed cholestasis and steatosis that was prevented with both OV and SL emulsions. Due to the presence of phytosterols in the SL emulsion, the differences in cholestasis and liver injury among lipid emulsion groups in vivo were weakly correlated with plasma and hepatic phytosterol content. PMID:24478031

  10. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  11. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  12. Multiphase flow microfluidics for the production of single or multiple emulsions for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Xia

    2013-11-01

    Considerable effort has been directed towards developing novel drug delivery systems. Microfluidics, capable of generating monodisperse single and multiple emulsion droplets, executing precise control and operations on these droplets, is a powerful tool for fabricating complex systems (microparticles, microcapsules, microgels) with uniform size, narrow size distribution and desired properties, which have great potential in drug delivery applications. This review presents an overview of the state-of-the-art multiphase flow microfluidics for the production of single emulsions or multiple emulsions for drug delivery. The review starts with a brief introduction of the approaches for making single and multiple emulsions, followed by presentation of some potential drug delivery systems (microparticles, microcapsules and microgels) fabricated in microfluidic devices using single or multiple emulsions as templates. The design principles, manufacturing processes and properties of these drug delivery systems are also discussed and compared. Furthermore, drug encapsulation and drug release (including passive and active controlled release) are provided and compared highlighting some key findings and insights. Finally, site-targeting delivery using multiphase flow microfluidics is also briefly introduced.

  13. Effect of intravenous omega-6 and omega-3 fat emulsions on nitrogen retention and protein kinetics in burned rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, N; Tashiro, T; Yamamori, H; Takagi, K; Morishima, Y; Otsubo, Y; Sugiura, T; Furukawa, K; Nitta, H; Nakajima, N; Suzuki, N; Ito, I

    1999-02-01

    The effect of omega-3 fat emulsion on nitrogen retention and kinetics in relation to fatty acid profile were investigated in burned rats receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). A fat emulsion of a structured symmetrical triacylglycerol containing only eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (2:1) was prepared. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed by fat-free chow for 2 wk. Then rats were fed exclusively with one of three types of TPN for 7 d. Animals in group C received fat-free TPN (n = 11). Group omega 6 received safflower oil fat emulsion, which accounted for 20% of total caloric intake (n = 11). Group omega 3 received fat emulsion containing only EPA and DHA (1% of total calories, n = 11), in addition to safflower oil emulsion (19% of total calories). On day 5, each rat was subjected to 20% full-thickness scald burns. Rats were sacrificed under ether anesthesia 48 h after burning. The rats in group C became deficient in omega-6 essential fatty acids. Cumulative nitrogen balance was decreased significantly in group omega 6. The rates of whole-body protein synthesis were increased significantly in both groups omega 6 and omega 3. In omega 6, however, the rates of whole-body protein breakdown were increased significantly. In conclusion, the rates of whole-body protein breakdown increased and nitrogen retention was aggravated significantly in animals administered the safflower oil emulsion. Significant increases of urinary excretion of total catecholamine were also observed. Prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2 concentrations were not significantly different among three groups. Supplementation with the new omega-3 fat emulsion, however, improved protein metabolism in burned rats receiving TPN. PMID:9990578

  14. Identification of a novel system L amino acid transporter structurally distinct from heterodimeric amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ellappan; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Chairoungdua, Arthit; Kim, Do Kyung; Iribe, Yuji; Tangtrongsup, Sahatchai; Jutabha, Promsuk; Li, Yuewei; Ahmed, Nesar; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Anzai, Naohiko; Nagamori, Seishi; Endou, Hitoshi

    2003-10-31

    A cDNA that encodes a novel Na+-independent neutral amino acid transporter was isolated from FLC4 human hepatocarcinoma cells by expression cloning. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the encoded protein designated LAT3 (L-type amino acid transporter 3) transported neutral amino acids such as l-leucine, l-isoleucine, l-valine, and l-phenylalanine. The LAT3-mediated transport was Na+-independent and inhibited by 2-aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid, consistent with the properties of system L. Distinct from already known system L transporters LAT1 and LAT2, which form heterodimeric complex with 4F2 heavy chain, LAT3 was functional by itself in Xenopus oocytes. The deduced amino acid sequence of LAT3 was identical to the gene product of POV1 reported as a prostate cancer-up-regulated gene whose function was not determined, whereas it did not exhibit significant similarity to already identified transporters. The Eadie-Hofstee plots of LAT3-mediated transport were curvilinear, whereas the low affinity component is predominant at physiological plasma amino acid concentration. In addition to amino acid substrates, LAT3 recognized amino acid alcohols. The transport of l-leucine was electroneutral and mediated by a facilitated diffusion. In contrast, l-leucinol, l-valinol, and l-phenylalaninol, which have a net positive charge induced inward currents under voltage clamp, suggesting these compounds are transported by LAT3. LAT3-mediated transport was inhibited by the pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide, consistent with the property of system L2 originally characterized in hepatocyte primary culture. Based on the substrate selectivity, affinity, and N-ethylmaleimide sensitivity, LAT3 is proposed to be a transporter subserving system L2. LAT3 should denote a new family of organic solute transporters. PMID:12930836

  15. Release of salicylic acid, diclofenac acid and diclofenac acid salts from isotropic and anisotropic nonionic surfactant systems across rat skin.

    PubMed

    Gabboun, N H; Najib, N M; Ibrahim, H G; Assaf, S

    2001-01-01

    Release of salicylic acid, diclofenac acid, diclofenac diethylamine and diclofenac sodium, from lyotropic structured systems, namely; neat and middle liquid crystalline phases, across mid-dorsal hairless rat skin into aqueous buffer were studied. Release results were compared with those from the isotropic systems. The donor systems composed of the surfactant polyoxyethylene (20) isohexadecyl ether, HCl buffer of pH 1 or distilled water and the specific drug. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods were used to monitor the transfer of the drugs across the skin barrier. Results indicated that the rate-determining step in the transport process was the release of the drug from the specified donor system. Further, apparent zero order release was demonstrated with all systems. Except for diclofenac sodium, drug fluxes decreased as the donor medium changed from isotropic to anisotropic. The decrease in fluxes was probably due to the added constrains on the movement of drug molecules. By changing the anisotropic donor medium from neat to middle phase, drug flux decreased in case of salicylic acid and diclofenac sodium. In the mean time, flux increased in case of the diethylamine salt and appeared nearly similar in case of diclofenac acid. Rates of drug transfer across the skin from the anisotropic donors seemed to be largely controlled by the entropy contribution to the transport process. The type and extent of drug-liquid crystal interactions probably influenced the latter.

  16. The effect of butter grains on physical properties of butter-like emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rønholt, Stine; Buldo, Patrizia; Mortensen, Kell; Andersen, Ulf; Knudsen, Jes C; Wiking, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Milk fat exists as globules in its natural state in milk. The potential of using globular fat to modulate the rheological properties and crystallization behavior in butter-like emulsions was studied in the present work. We conducted a comparative study of butter-like emulsions, with a fat phase consisting of 0, 10, 25, 50, or 100% anhydrous milk fat (AMF), the remaining fat being butter grains, and all samples containing 20% water, to obtain systematic variation in the ratio of globular fat. All emulsions were studied over 4wk of storage at 5°C. By combining small and large deformation rheology, we conducted a detailed characterization of the rheological behavior of butter-like emulsions. We applied differential scanning calorimetry to monitor thermal behavior, confocal laser scanning microscopy for microstructural analysis, and low-field pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry to measure solid fat content. By combining these techniques, we determined that increasing the fraction of globular fat (by mixing with butter grains) decreases the hardness of butter-like emulsions up to an order of magnitude at d 1. However, no difference was observed in thermal behavior as a function of butter grain content, as all emulsions containing butter grains revealed 2 endothermal peaks corresponding to the high (32.7°C ± 0.6) and medium (14.6°C ± 0.1) melting fractions of fatty acids. In terms of microstructure, decreasing the amount of butter grains in the emulsions resulted in formation of a denser fat crystal network, corresponding to increased hardness. Moreover, microstructural analysis revealed that the presence of butter grains resulted in faster formation of a continuous fat crystal network compared with the 100% AMF sample, which was dominated by crystal clusters surrounded by liquid oil. During storage, hardness remained stable and no changes in thermal behavior were observed, despite an increase in solid fat content of up to 5%. After 28d of storage, we

  17. Effect of lactoferrin on oxidative stability of corn oil emulsions and liposomes.

    PubMed

    Huang, S W; Satué-Gracia, M T; Frankel, E N; German, J B

    1999-04-01

    Interest in using lactoferrin in foods for its antimicrobial activity inspired the present study of its antioxidant activity. Natural bovine lactoferrin inhibited oxidation in buffered corn oil emulsions and lecithin liposome systems at pH 6.6 and 50 degrees C. The antioxidant activity increased with lactoferrin concentration in both phosphate- and Tris-buffered emulsions, but not in both buffered liposome systems. A mixture of 1 microM lactoferrin and 0.5 microM ferrous ions was a significantly better antioxidant than 1 microM lactoferrin alone in Tris-buffered emulsions and in phosphate-buffered liposomes. Lactoferrin was a prooxidant at 1 microM in phosphate-buffered liposomes and at 15 and 20 microM in Tris-buffered liposomes. Copper was a stronger prooxidant than iron in both buffered emulsions. Lactoferrin decreased the prooxidant effect of iron, but not of copper, in emulsions. The antioxidant or prooxidant activities of lactoferrin depended on the lipid system, buffer, its concentration, the presence of metal ions, and oxidation time. PMID:10563980

  18. Microbial Nucleic Acid Sensing in Oral and Systemic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Crump, K E; Sahingur, S E

    2016-01-01

    One challenge in studying chronic infectious and inflammatory disorders is understanding how host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), specifically toll-like receptors (TLRs), sense and respond to pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, their communication with each other and different components of the immune system, and their role in propagating inflammatory stages of disease. The discovery of innate immune activation through nucleic acid recognition by intracellular PRRs such as endosomal TLRs (TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) and cytoplasmic proteins (absent in melanoma 2 and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factor) opened a new paradigm: Nucleic acid sensing is now implicated in multiple immune and inflammatory conditions (e.g., atherosclerosis, cancer), viral (e.g., human papillomavirus, herpes virus) and bacterial (e.g., Helicobacter pylori, pneumonia) diseases, and autoimmune disorders (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis). Clinical investigations reveal the overexpression of specific nucleic acid sensors in diseased tissues. In vivo animal models show enhanced disease progression associated with receptor activation. The involvement of nucleic acid sensors in various systemic conditions is further supported by studies reporting receptor knockout mice being either protected from or prone to disease. TLR9-mediated inflammation is also implicated in periodontal diseases. Considering that persistent inflammation in the oral cavity is associated with systemic diseases and that oral microbial DNA is isolated at distal sites, nucleic acid sensing may potentially be a link between oral and systemic diseases. In this review, we discuss recent advances in how intracellular PRRs respond to microbial nucleic acids and emerging views on the role of nucleic acid sensors in various systemic diseases. We also highlight new information on the role of intracellular PRRs in the pathogenesis of oral diseases including periodontitis

  19. Utilization of interfacial engineering to improve physicochemical stability of β-carotene emulsions: Multilayer coatings formed using protein and protein-polyphenol conjugates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuguo; Wang, Di; Sun, Cuixia; McClements, David Julian; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-08-15

    The impact of lactoferrin (LF)-chlorogenic acid (CA) and (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) conjugates on the physicochemical properties of β-carotene emulsions was investigated. Formation of lactoferrin-polyphenol conjugates, which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, caused changes in the structure and nature of lactoferrin. Based on layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition, β-carotene bilayer emulsions were prepared by lactoferrin and lactoferrin-polyphenol conjugates at pH 7.0. The physicochemical properties of primary and secondary emulsions were evaluated and the results suggested that LF-polyphenol conjugates-stabilized primary and secondary emulsions exhibited better emulsifying properties and improved physical stability of β-carotene bilayer emulsions under freeze-thaw, ionic strength and thermal treatments. In addition, the lactoferrin-polyphenol conjugates could effectively enhance chemical stability of β-carotene in oil-in-water emulsions against heat treatment and ultraviolet light exposure, and the least degradation of β-carotene occurred in LF-EGCG conjugate-stabilized primary emulsion. The interfacial engineering technology utilized in this study may lead to the formation of emulsions with improved physicochemical and functional performance. PMID:27006223

  20. 21 CFR 862.1095 - Ascorbic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ascorbic acid test system. 862.1095 Section 862.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1095 - Ascorbic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ascorbic acid test system. 862.1095 Section 862.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1295 - Folic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Folic acid test system. 862.1295 Section 862.1295 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1095 - Ascorbic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ascorbic acid test system. 862.1095 Section 862.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1295 - Folic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Folic acid test system. 862.1295 Section 862.1295 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1295 - Folic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Folic acid test system. 862.1295 Section 862.1295 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1095 - Ascorbic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ascorbic acid test system. 862.1095 Section 862.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1095 - Ascorbic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ascorbic acid test system. 862.1095 Section 862.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1295 - Folic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Folic acid test system. 862.1295 Section 862.1295 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pyruvic acid test system. 862.1655 Section 862.1655 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pyruvic acid test system. 862.1655 Section 862.1655 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  17. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOEpatents

    Ruhe, Thomas C.; Rao, Pilaka P.

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  18. Dissolution state of cellulose in aqueous systems. 2. Acidic solvents.

    PubMed

    Alves, Luis; Medronho, Bruno; Antunes, Filipe E; Topgaard, Daniel; Lindman, Björn

    2016-10-20

    Cellulose is insoluble in water but can be dissolved in strong acidic or alkaline conditions. How well dissolved cellulose is in solution and how it organizes are key questions often neglected in literature. The typical low pH required for dissolving cellulose in acidic solvents limits the use of typical characterization techniques. In this respect, Polarization Transfer Solid State NMR (PT ssNMR) emerges as a reliable alternative. In this work, combining PT ssNMR, microscopic techniques and X-ray diffraction, a set of different acidic systems (phosphoric acid/water, sulfuric acid/glycerol and zinc chloride/water) is investigated. The studied solvent systems are capable to efficiently dissolve cellulose, although degradation occurs to some extent. PT ssNMR is capable to identify the liquid and solid fractions of cellulose, the degradation products and it is also sensitive to gelation. The materials regenerated from the acidic dopes were found to be highly sensitive to the solvent system and to the presence of amphiphilic additives in solution. PMID:27474617

  19. Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid activate a common defense system in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, Daisuke; Seo, Shigemi; Yamada, Shoko; Kano, Akihito; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Shishido, Hodaka; Miyoshi, Seika; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play important roles in plant defense systems. JA and SA signaling pathways interact antagonistically in dicotyledonous plants, but, the status of crosstalk between JA and SA signaling is unknown in monocots. Our rice microarray analysis showed that more than half of the genes upregulated by the SA analog BTH are also upregulated by JA, suggesting that a major portion of the SA-upregulated genes are regulated by JA-dependent signaling in rice. A common defense system that is activated by both JA and SA is thus proposed which plays an important role in pathogen defense responses in rice. PMID:23518581

  20. Emulsions stability, from dilute to dense emulsions -- role of drops deformation.

    PubMed

    Sanfeld, Albert; Steinchen, Annie

    2008-07-01

    , considering that in most publications on emulsions foams and colloidal systems, much attention is paid on the role of the drainage in the stability process, we devote the last section to the drainage between flattened drops. We first describe briefly Taylor's approach and extend Reynolds revisited formulae taking into account the viscous friction, the disjoining pressure, the film elasticity and the wetting angle weighting the capillary pressure through the characteristic length. Our calculated values are compared to some experimental data. In conclusion to make this long paper as useful as possible for research purposes, we have the hope that our understanding of emulsion stability is not only based on knowledge of numerous theoretical and experimental works sometimes controversial given in a critical way but that it gives a new approach based on an interpretation of the drop deformation in terms of a characteristic length linked to a deformation number analogous to a Bond number. PMID:18313631