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Sample records for acid exposure time

  1. Color Stability of Enamel following Different Acid Etching and Color Exposure Times

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbin, Arezoo; Basafa, Mohammad; Moazzami, Mostafa; Basafa, Behnoush; Eslami, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different etching times on enamel color stability after immediate versus delayed exposure to colored artificial saliva (CAS). Materials and methods. Human first premolars were divided into five groups of twenty. A colorimeter was used according to the CIE system on the mid-buccal and mid-lingual surfaces to evaluate initial tooth color. Samples in group A remained unetched. In groups B to E, buccal and lingual surfaces were initially etched with phosphoric acid for 15 and 60 seconds, respectively. Then, the samples in groups A and C were immersed in colored artificial saliva (cola+saliva). In group B, the teeth were immersed in simple artificial saliva (AS). Samples in groups D and E were immersed in AS for 24 and 72 hours, respectively before being immersed in colored AS. The teeth were immersed for one month in each solution before color measurement. During the test period, the teeth were retrieved from the staining solution and stored in AS for five minutes. This was repeated 60 times. Color changes of buccal and lingual surfaces were calculated. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were used for statistical analysis (α ≤0.05). Results. There were no significant differences between the groups in term of ΔE of buccal (P = 0.148) and lingual surfaces (P = 0.73). Conclusion. Extended time of etching did not result in significant enamel color change. Immediate and delayed exposure of etched enamel to staining solutions did not result in clinically detectable tooth color changes. PMID:25093048

  2. THE TIME-COURSE AND SENSITIVITY OF MUCONIC ACID AS A BIOMARKER FOR HUMAN ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE TO BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preliminary results are presented that show the effect of an increased benzene exposure on the urinary elimination of trans,trans-muconic acid (MA) for an adult male. These results were generated from a controlled exposure experiment where by an individual was exposed to benzene ...

  3. EXPOSURE MODELING OF ACID AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting an intensive characterization and human exposure monitoring program of acid species and related air pollutants in an urban environment. he EPA's Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory (AREAL) in coopera...

  4. Copper corrosion mechanism in the presence of formic acid vapor for short exposure times

    SciTech Connect

    Bastidas, J.M.; Lopez-Delgado, A.; Cano, E.; Polo, J.L.; Lopez, F.A.

    2000-03-01

    The rate of copper corrosion originated by the action of formic acid vapors at 100% relative humidity was studied. Five formic vapor concentration levels (10, 50, 100, 200, and 300 ppm) were used. A copper corrosion rate of up to 1,300 mg/m{sup 2} d was measured for a period of 21 days using a gravimetric method. The patina layers were characterized using cathodic reduction, X-ray powder diffraction. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Some of the components identified in the corrosion-product layers were cuprite (Cu{sub 2}O), cupric hydroxide hydrate [Cu(OH){sub 2}{sm_bullet}H{sub 2}O], and copper formate hydrate [Cu(HCOO){sub 2}{sm_bullet}4H{sub 2}O]. The latter was formed by both cupric hydroxide and formic acid-cuprous ion complex mechanisms.

  5. EXPOSURES TO ACIDIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosol in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. easurements made in Kingston, TN, and Stuebenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H+ ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/m3 more than 10 ti...

  6. ETC: Exposure Time Calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Christopher M.; Gehrels, Neil; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey; Rhodes, Jason; Wang, Yun; Zoubian, Julien

    2013-11-01

    Written for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) high-latitude survey, the exposure time calculator (ETC) works in both imaging and spectroscopic modes. In addition to the standard ETC functions (e.g. background and S/N determination), the calculator integrates over the galaxy population and forecasts the density and redshift distribution of galaxy shapes usable for weak lensing (in imaging mode) and the detected emission lines (in spectroscopic mode). The program may be useful outside of WFIRST but no warranties are made regarding its suitability for general purposes. The software is available for download; IPAC maintains a web interface for those who wish to run a small number of cases without having to download the package.

  7. Acidic sulfate aerosols: characterization and exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, P J; Waldman, J M

    1989-01-01

    Exposures to acidic aerosol in the atmosphere are calculated from data reported in the scientific literature. The majority of date was not derived from studies necessarily designed to examine human exposures. Most of the studies were designed to investigate the characteristics of the atmosphere. However, the measurements were useful in defining two potential exposure situations: regional stagnation and transport conditions and local plume impacts. Levels of acidic aerosol in excess of 20 to 40 micrograms/m3 (as H2SO4) have been observed for time durations ranging from 1 to 12 hr. These were associated with high, but not necessarily the highest, atmospheric SO4(2)- levels. Exposures of 100 to 900 micrograms/m3/hr were calculated for the acid events that were monitored. In contrast, earlier London studies indicated that apparent acidity in excess of 100 micrograms/m3 (as H2SO4) was present in the atmosphere, and exposures less than 2000 micrograms/m3/hr were possible. Our present knowledge about the frequency, magnitude, and duration of acidic sulfate aerosol events and episodes is insufficient. Efforts must be made to gather more data, but these should be done in such a way that evaluation of human exposure is the focus of the research. In addition, further data are required on the mechanisms of formation of H2SO4 and on what factors can be used to predict acidic sulfate episodes. PMID:2651103

  8. Acidic sulfate aerosols: characterization and exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.; Waldman, J.M.

    1989-02-01

    Exposures to acidic aerosol in the atmosphere are calculated from data reported in the scientific literature. The majority of date was not derived from studies necessarily designed to examine human exposures. Most of the studies were designed to investigate the characteristics of the atmosphere. However, the measurements were useful in defining two potential exposure situations: regional stagnation and transport conditions and local plume impacts. Levels of acidicaerosol in excess of 20 to 40 micrograms/m/sup 3/ (as H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) have been observed for time durations ranging from 1 to 12 hr. These were associated with high, but not necessarily the highest, atmospheric SO/sub 4/(2)- levels. Exposures of 100 to 900 micrograms/m/sup 3//hr were calculated for the acid events that were monitored. In contrast, earlier London studies indicated that apparent acidity in excess of 100 micrograms/m/sup 3/ (as H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) was present in the atmosphere, and exposures less than 2000 micrograms/m/sup 3//hr were possible. Our present knowledge about the frequency, magnitude, and duration of acidic sulfate aerosol events and episodes is insufficient. Efforts must be made to gather more data, but these should be done in such a way that evaluation of human exposure is the focus of the research. In addition, further data are required on the mechanisms of formation of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and on what factors can be used to predict acidic sulfate episodes. 96 references.

  9. Assessment of free nitrous acid pre-treatment on a mixture of primary sludge and waste activated sludge: Effect of exposure time and concentration.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, S; Icaran, P; Yuan, Z; Pijuan, M

    2016-09-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) has been shown to enhance the biodegradability of waste activated sludge (WAS) but its effectiveness on the pre-treatment of mixed sludge is not known. This study explores the effectiveness of four different FNA concentrations (0, 2.49, 3.55, 4.62mgN-HNO2/L) and three exposure times (2, 5, 9h) lower than the ones reported in literature (24h) on WAS characteristics and specific methane production (SMP). FNA pre-treatment reduced sludge cell viability below 10% in all cases after an exposure time of 5h, increasing the solubility of the organic matter. The treated mixed sludge was used as substrate for the biochemical methane production tests to assess its SMP. Results showed a significant increase (up to 25%) on SMP when the sludge was pretreated with the lowest FNA concentration (2.49mgN-HNO2/L) during 2 and 5h but did not show any improvement at longer exposure times or higher FNA concentrations. PMID:27318660

  10. Effect of concentration and exposure time on treatment efficacy against Varroa mites (Acari: Varroidae) during indoor winter fumigation of honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) with formic acid.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Robyn M; Currie, Robert W

    2005-12-01

    The combination of the concentration of formic acid and the duration of fumigation (CT product) during indoor treatments of honey bee, Apis mellifera L., colonies to control the varroa mite, Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman, determines the efficacy of the treatment. Because high concentrations can cause queen mortality, we hypothesized that a high CT product given as a low concentration over a long exposure time rather than as a high concentration over a short exposure time would allow effective control of varroa mites without the detrimental effects on queens. The objective of this study was to assess different combinations of formic acid concentration and exposure time with similar CT products in controlling varroa mites while minimizing the effect on worker and queen honey bees. Treated colonies were exposed to a low, medium, or high concentration of formic acid until a mean CT product of 471 ppm*d in room air was realized. The treatments consisted of a long-term low concentration of 19 ppm for 27 d, a medium-term medium concentration of 42 ppm for 10 d, a short-term high concentration of 53 ppm for 9 d, and an untreated control. Both short-term high-concentration and medium-term medium-concentration fumigation with formic acid killed varroa mites, with averages of 93 and 83% mortality, respectively, but both treatments also were associated with an increase in mortality of worker bees, queen bees, or both. Long-term low-concentration fumigation had lower efficacy (60% varroa mite mortality), but it did not increase worker or queen bee mortality. This trend differed slightly in colonies from two different beekeepers. Varroa mite mean abundance was significantly decreased in all three acid treatments relative to the control. Daily worker mortality was significantly increased by the short-term high concentration treatment, which was reflected by a decrease in the size of the worker population, but not an increase in colony mortality. Queen mortality was

  11. Urine pH, container composition, and exposure time influence adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Matthew H; McCue, Joseph J; Klette, Kevin L

    2005-10-01

    11-nor-delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH) is the primary cannabinoid present in the urine of individuals who have used marijuana and is the target analyte identified at forensic urinalysis drug testing laboratories. The preparation, storage, transport, and processing of control materials for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of human urine specimens is critical to accurate compound identification and quantification. Previous studies have suggested that adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is influenced by container composition and storage temperature. In this study, urine solutions of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH (7.5, 15, 60, and 500 ng/mL) at three physiologically-relevant pHs (4.6, 6.5, and 8.4) were prepared and subjected to storage and processing in containers of different compositions (polypropylene and borosilicate glass). Analyte identification and quantification were achieved using tetramethylammonium hydroxide/iodomethane-based derivatization followed by GC separation and electron-impact MS. These analyses demonstrate that adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is a phenomenon found in acidic urine solutions and is relatively absent in urine solutions that are near-neutral or basic. Furthermore, the data indicate that the adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is dependent on solution-container exposure time and is similar between containers of two distinct compositions. These results suggest that for optimal analytical control performance, solution pH and control processing times are critical elements. PMID:16419391

  12. Pulmonary function and clearance after prolonged sulfuric acid aerosol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, P.J. ); Gerrity, T.R.; DeWitt, P.; Folinsbee, L.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The authors studied pulmonary function and clearance responses after a 4 H exposure to 75-100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid aerosol (SAA). Healthy subjects, who exercised for 30 min/H at ventilation of about 25 L/min, were exposed once to clean air and once to SAA. Oral hygiene and acidic juice gargle were used to minimize oral ammonia. Lung function tests, including spirometry, plethysmography, and partial flow-volume (PEFV) curves were performed before and after exposure. Clearance of 99m-Technetium labeled iron oxide was assessed after each exposure. The first moment of fractional tracheobronchial retention (M1TBR), after correcting for 24 H retention and normalizing to time zero, was used as an index of clearance. There were no significant changes in lung volumes, airways resistance, or maximum expiratory flows after SAA exposure. Flow at 40% of total lung capacity on PEFV curves decreased 17% (NS) after SAA exposure. Tracheobronchial clearance was accelerated after a single exposure to SAA; M1TBR decreased from 73 {plus minus} 5 min (air) to 69 {plus minus} 5 min (SAA). These results suggest that acute prolonged exposure to low levels of SAA has minimal effects on lung mechanics in healthy subjects but does produce a modest acceleration of particle clearance.

  13. Real Time Radiation Exposure And Health Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Barzilla, Janet E.; Semones, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation from solar particle events (SPEs) poses a serious threat to future manned missions outside of low Earth orbit (LEO). Accurate characterization of the radiation environment in the inner heliosphere and timely monitoring the health risks to crew are essential steps to ensure the safety of future Mars missions. In this project we plan to develop an approach that can use the particle data from multiple satellites and perform near real-time simulations of radiation exposure and health risks for various exposure scenarios. Time-course profiles of dose rates will be calculated with HZETRN and PDOSE from the energy spectrum and compositions of the particles archived from satellites, and will be validated from recent radiation exposure measurements in space. Real-time estimation of radiation risks will be investigated using ARRBOD. This cross discipline integrated approach can improve risk mitigation by providing critical information for risk assessment and medical guidance to crew during SPEs.

  14. Exposure assessment of oxidant gases and acidic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Clearly the presence of high ozone and acidic species in North America is primarily dependent upon photochemical air pollution. Evidence shows, however, that high acid exposures may occur in specific types of areas of high sulfur fuel use during the winter. At the present time, our concerns about exposure to local populations and regional populations should be directed primarily toward the outdoor activity patterns of individuals in the summer, and how those activity patterns relate to the location, duration, and concentrations of ozone and acid aerosol in photochemical air pollution episodes. Lioy Dyba and Mage et al have examined the activity patterns of children in summer camps. Because they spend more time outside than the normal population, these children form an important group of exercising individuals subject to photochemical pollution exposures. The dose of ozone inhaled by the children in the two camps was within 50% and 25% of the dose inhaled by adults in controlled clinical situations that produced clinically significant decrements in pulmonary function and increased the symptoms after 6.6 hr exposure in a given day. The chamber studies have used only ozone, whereas in the environment this effect may be enhanced by the presence of a complex mixture. The work of Lioy et al in Mendham, New Jersey found that hydrogen ion seemed to play a role in the inability of the children to return immediately to their normal peak expiratory flow rate after exposure. The camp health study conducted in Dunsville, Ontario suggested that children participating in a summer camp where moderate levels of ozone (100 ppb) but high levels of acid (46 micrograms/m3) occurred during an episode had a similar response. Thus, for children or exercising adults who are outdoors for at least one hour or more during a given day, the presence and persistence of oxidants in the environment are of particular concern. 63 references.

  15. Exposure Influences Expressive Timing Judgments in Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honing, Henkjan; Ladinig, Olivia

    2009-01-01

    This study is concerned with the question whether, and to what extent, listeners' previous exposure to music in everyday life, and expertise as a result of formal musical training, play a role in making expressive timing judgments in music. This was investigated by using a Web-based listening experiment in which listeners with a wide range of…

  16. Hippuric acid and methyl hippuric acid in rat hair: possible monitoring of xylene and toluene exposure.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Kusakabe, Takahiko; Takeichi, Sanae

    2003-04-23

    Thinner is mainly composed of toluene and xylenes, and we studied the incorporation of the main metabolites of toluene and xylenes, hippuric acid (HA) and o-, m-, and p-methyl hippuric acids (o-, m-, p-MHA), in dark agouti rats' hair. Rat black hair was shaved before any exposure with an electric shaver designed for animals. Studies were performed in vivo with exposures of 30 min per day at three different concentrations (100, 300, and 1000 ppm) of toluene and o-, m-, and p-xylene for a total of 10 times over 2 weeks. Newly grown hair was tweezed out from the root with tweezers at seventh of the last exposure. Hair samples were then washed, extracted, derivatized, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). HA and o-, m-, and p-MHA were not detected (ND) in the unexposed rat hair. After exposure, the metabolite concentration in the hair changed depending on the exposure concentration. Mean concentrations ranged from ND to 7.6 ng/mg, from ND to 13.8 ng/mg, from ND to 10.1 ng/mg, and from ND to 9.2 ng/ml hair for HA, o-, m-, and p-MHA, respectively. These results indicate that the metabolites concentrations in hair are effective indices of thinner exposure. PMID:12742703

  17. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Mouse Mammary Gland Development and Differentiation Resulting from Cross-Foster and Restricted Gestational Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse consequences of developmental exposures to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) have been established, and include impaired development of the offspring mammary gland (MG). However, the relationship between the timing or route of exposure, and the phenotypic consequences in ...

  18. Exposure of acid aerosol for schoolchildren in metropolitan Taipei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, I.-Fang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chun-Ji; Chen, Yi-Ju; Sung, Fung-Chang; Chen, Mei-Lien

    Metropolitan Taipei, which is located in the subtropical area, is characterized by high population and automobile densities. For convenience, most primary schools are located near major roads. This study explores the exposure of acid aerosols for schoolchildren in areas in Taipei with different traffic densities. Acid aerosols were collected by using a honeycomb denuder filter pack sampling system (HDS). Experimental results indicated that the air pollutants were significantly correlated with traffic densities. The ambient air NO 2, SO 2, HNO 3, NO 3-, SO 42-, and aerosol acidity concentrations were 31.3 ppb, 4.7 ppb, 1.3 ppb, 1.9 μg m -3, 18.5 μg m -3, and 49.5 nmol m -3 in high traffic density areas, and 6.1 ppb, 1.8 ppb, 0.9 ppb, 0.7 μg m -3, 8.8 μg m -3 and 14.7 nmol m -3 in low traffic density areas. The exposure levels of acid aerosols for schoolchildren would be higher than the measurements because the sampling height was 5 m above the ground. The SO 2 levels were low (0.13-8.03 ppb) in the metropolitan Taipei. However, the SO 42- concentrations were relatively high, and might be attributed to natural emissions of sulfur-rich geothermal sources. The seasonal variations of acid aerosol concentrations were also observed. The high levels of acidic particles in spring time may be attributed to the Asian dust storm and low height of the mixture layer. We conclude that automobile contributed not only the primary pollutants but also the secondary acid aerosols through the photochemical reaction. Schoolchildren were exposed to twice the acid aerosol concentrations in high traffic density areas compared to those in low traffic density areas. The incidence of allergic rhinitis of schoolchildren in the high traffic density areas was the highest in spring time. Accompanied by high temperature variation and high levels of air pollution in spring, the health risk of schoolchildren had been observed.

  19. Predicting survival time for cold exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    1995-06-01

    The prediction of survival time (ST) for cold exposure is speculative as reliable controlled data of deep hypothermia are unavailable. At best, guidance can be obtained from case histories of accidental exposure. This study describes the development of a mathematical model for the prediction of ST under sedentary conditions in the cold. The model is based on steady-state heat conduction in a single cylinder comprised of a core and two concentric annular shells representing the fat plus skin and the clothing plus still boundary layer, respectively. The ambient condition can be either air or water; the distinction is made by assigning different values of insulation to the still boundary layer. Metabolic heat production ( M) is comprised of resting and shivering components with the latter predicted by temperature signals from the core and skin. Where the cold exposure is too severe for M to balance heat loss, ST is largely determined by the rate of heat loss from the body. Where a balance occurs, ST is governed by the endurance time for shivering. End of survival is marked by the deep core temperature reaching a value of 30° C. The model was calibrated against survival data of cold water (0 to 20° C) immersion and then applied to cold air exposure. A sampling of ST predictions for the nude exposure of an average healthy male in relatively calm air (1 km/h wind speed) are the following: 1.8, 2.5, 4.1, 9.0, and >24 h for -30, -20, -10, 0, and 10° C, respectively. With two layers of loose clothing (average thickness of 1 mm each) in a 5 km/h wind, STs are 4.0, 5.6, 8.6, 15.4, and >24 h for -50, -40, -30, -20, and -10° C. The predicted STs must be weighted against the extrapolative nature of the model. At present, it would be prudent to use the predictions in a relative sense, that is, to compare or rank-order predicted STs for various combinations of ambient conditions and clothing protection.

  20. The WFIRST Galaxy Survey Exposure Time Calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirata, Christopher M.; Gehrels, Neil; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey; Rhodes, Jason; Wang, Yun; Zoubian, Julien

    2013-01-01

    This document describes the exposure time calculator for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) high-latitude survey. The calculator works in both imaging and spectroscopic modes. In addition to the standard ETC functions (e.g. background and SN determination), the calculator integrates over the galaxy population and forecasts the density and redshift distribution of galaxy shapes usable for weak lensing (in imaging mode) and the detected emission lines (in spectroscopic mode). The source code is made available for public use.

  1. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  2. Zebrafish retinal defects induced by ethanol exposure are rescued by retinoic acid and folic acid supplement

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, producing craniofacial, sensory, motor, and cognitive defects. FASD is highly prevalent in low socioeconomic populations, which are frequently accompanied by malnutrition. FASD-associated ocular pathologies include microphthalmia, optic nerve hypoplasia, and cataracts. The present study characterizes specific retinal tissue defects, identifies ethanol-sensitive stages during retinal development, and dissects the effect of nutrient supplements, such as retinoic acid (RA) and folic acid (FA) on ethanol-induced retinal defects. Exposure to pathophysiological concentrations of ethanol (during midblastula transition through somitogenesis; 2–24 hours post fertilization [hpf]) altered critical transcription factor expression involved in retinal cell differentiation, and produced severe retinal ganglion cell, photoreceptor, and Müller glial differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure did not alter retinal cell differentiation induction, but increased retinal cell death and proliferation. RA and FA nutrient co-supplementation rescued retinal photoreceptor and ganglion cell differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure during retinal morphogenesis stages (16–24 hpf) produced retinal defects like those seen with ethanol exposure between 2–24 hpf. Significantly, during an ethanol-sensitive time window (16–24 hpf), RA co-supplementation moderately rescued these defects, whereas FA co-supplementation showed significant rescue of optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Interestingly, RA, but not FA, supplementation after ethanol exposure could reverse ethanol-induced optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Our results indicate that various ethanol-sensitive events underlie FASD-associated retinal defects. Nutrient supplements like retinoids and folate were effective in alleviating ethanol-induced retinal defects. PMID:25541501

  3. Zebrafish retinal defects induced by ethanol exposure are rescued by retinoic acid and folic acid supplement.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A

    2015-03-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, producing craniofacial, sensory, motor, and cognitive defects. FASD is highly prevalent in low socioeconomic populations, which are frequently accompanied by malnutrition. FASD-associated ocular pathologies include microphthalmia, optic nerve hypoplasia, and cataracts. The present study characterizes specific retinal tissue defects, identifies ethanol-sensitive stages during retinal development, and dissects the effect of nutrient supplements, such as retinoic acid (RA) and folic acid (FA) on ethanol-induced retinal defects. Exposure to pathophysiological concentrations of ethanol (during midblastula transition through somitogenesis; 2-24 h post fertilization [hpf]) altered critical transcription factor expression involved in retinal cell differentiation, and produced severe retinal ganglion cell, photoreceptor, and Müller glial differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure did not alter retinal cell differentiation induction, but increased retinal cell death and proliferation. RA and FA nutrient co-supplementation rescued retinal photoreceptor and ganglion cell differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure during retinal morphogenesis stages (16-24 hpf) produced retinal defects like those seen with ethanol exposure between 2 and 24 hpf. Significantly, during an ethanol-sensitive time window (16-24 hpf), RA co-supplementation moderately rescued these defects, whereas FA co-supplementation showed significant rescue of optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Interestingly, RA, but not FA, supplementation after ethanol exposure could reverse ethanol-induced optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Our results indicate that various ethanol-sensitive events underlie FASD-associated retinal defects. Nutrient supplements like retinoids and folate were effective in alleviating ethanol-induced retinal defects. PMID:25541501

  4. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOEpatents

    Thrall, Karla D.; Kenny, Donald V.; Endres, George W. R.; Sisk, Daniel R.

    1997-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose.

  5. Effects of Graduated Exposure with Feedback of Exposure Times on Snake Phobias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Horst G.; Costello, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    The subject-controlled graduated exposure of a snake with feedback of exposure times resulted in significantly less avoidance behaviors for snake-phobic subjects than for control snake-phobic subjects who did not receive therapy. (Author)

  6. MEASUREMENT AND DECOMPOSITION OF TOTAL EXPOSURE USING THE TOTAL-ISOLATED-BY-MICROENVIRONMENT-EXPOSURE (TIME) MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a new, highly compact and lightweight monitor that directly measures personal exposure resolved into four microenvironments. he device is the "Total-Isolated-by-Microenvironment-Exposure (TIME)" monitor. he monitor can identify electronically a subject's micr...

  7. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOEpatents

    Thrall, K.D.; Kenny, D.V.; Endres, G.W.R.; Sisk, D.R.

    1997-07-08

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose. 7 figs.

  8. EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID EXPOSURE DURING PREGNANCY IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory


    Title:

    Effects Of Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure During Pregnancy In The Mouse

    Authors & affiliations:
    Lau, C., J.R. Thibodeaux*, R.G. Hanson* and J.M. Rogers. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC
    Abstract:<...

  9. EFFECTS OF PHOSGENE EXPOSURE ON LUNG ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phosgene is a pulmonary toxicant that can produce lung edema, bronchoconstriction, and immune suppression following an acute exposure. he response of the lung to phosgene inhalation may be mediated through alternations in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to the biologically pot...

  10. Time-activity relationships to VOC personal exposure factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Rufus D.; Schweizer, Christian; Llacqua, Vito; Lai, Hak Kan; Jantunen, Matti; Bayer-Oglesby, Lucy; Künzli, Nino

    Social and demographic factors have been found to play a significant role in differences between time-activity patterns of population subgroups. Since time-activity patterns largely influence personal exposure to compounds as individuals move across microenvironments, exposure subgroups within the population may be defined by factors that influence daily activity patterns. Socio-demographic and environmental factors that define time-activity subgroups also define quantifiable differences in VOC personal exposures to different sources and individual compounds in the Expolis study. Significant differences in exposures to traffic-related compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were observed in relation to gender, number of children and living alone. Categorization of exposures further indicated time exposed to traffic at work and time in a car as important determinants. Increased exposures to decane, nonane and undecane were observed for males, housewives and self-employed. Categorization of exposures indicated exposure subgroups related to workshop use and living downtown. Higher exposures to 3-carene and α-pinene commonly found in household cleaning products and fragrances were associated with more children, while exposures to traffic compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were reduced with more children. Considerable unexplained variation remained in categorization of exposures associated with home product use and fragrances, due to individual behavior and product choice. More targeted data collection methods in VOC exposure studies for these sources should be used. Living alone was associated with decreased exposures to 2-methyl-1-propanol and 1-butanol, and traffic-related compounds. Identification of these subgroups may help to reduce the large amount of unexplained variation in VOC exposure studies. Further they may help in assessing impacts of urban planning that result in changes in behavior of individuals, resulting in shifts in

  11. Aplastic anaemia after exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Palva, H L; Koivisto, O; Palva, I P

    1975-01-01

    A 64-year-old farmer developed aplastic anaemia after exposure to 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyactic acid while spraying weed killer. Muscular weakness, haemorrhagic gastritis and slight signs of liver damage occurred at the same time. All these symptoms, including blood dyscrasia , are consistent with those described as toxic effects of chlorphenoxyacetic acids in animal experiments. A causal relationship between aplastic anaemia and the 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid thus seems probable. The anaemia was reversible, but the case serves as a warning that careful safety measures are required during the use of chlorphenoxyacetic acids and related compounds. PMID:804793

  12. Laryngeal cancer and occupational exposure to sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Soskolne, C.L.; Zeighami, E.A.; Hanis, N.M.; Kupper, L.L.; Herrmann, N.; Amsel, J.; Mausner, J.S.; Stellman, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    Workers on an ethanol unit which used sulfuric acid in strong concentrations at a large refinery and chemical plant in Baton Rouge, Louisiana were reported in 1979, at excess risk for upper respiratory cancer. The carcinogen implicated by indirect evidence was diethyl sulfate. However, with the continued use of sulfuric acid in the same plant, and with additional cases not attributable to the ethanol process, the hypothesis of an association between sulfuric acid exposure and upper respiratory cancer was tested. Each of 50 confirmed cases of upper respiratory cancer diagnosed between 1944 and 1980, was matched to at least three controls on sex, race, age, date of initial employment, and duration of employment. Thrity-four of the 50 cases were laryngeal cancers. Data were obtained from existing plant records. Retrospective estimates of exposure were made without regard to case or control status. Findings from conditional logistic regression techniques were supported by other statistical methods. Among workers classified as potentially highly exposed, four-fold relative risks for all upper respiratory cancer sites combined were exceeded by the relative risk for laryngeal cancer specifically. Exposure-response and consistency across various comparisons after controlling statistically for tobacco-use, alcoholism and other previously implicated risk factors, suggest increased cancer risk with higher exposure.

  13. Lead exposure among lead-acid battery workers in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Matte, T D; Figueroa, J P; Burr, G; Flesch, J P; Keenlyside, R A; Baker, E L

    1989-01-01

    To assess lead exposure in the Jamaican lead-acid battery industry, we surveyed three battery manufacturers (including 46 production workers) and 10 battery repair shops (including 23 battery repair workers). Engineering controls and respiratory protection were judged to be inadequate at battery manufacturers and battery repair shops. At manufacturers, 38 of 42 air samples for lead exceeded a work-shift time-weighted average concentration of 0.050 mg/m3 (range 0.030-5.3 mg/m3), and nine samples exceeded 0.50 mg/m3. Only one of seven air samples at repair shops exceeded 0.050 mg/m3 (range 0.003-0.066 mg/m3). Repair shop workers, however, had higher blood lead levels than manufacturing workers (65% vs. 28% with blood lead levels above 60 micrograms/dl, respectively). Manufacturing workers had a higher prevalence of safe hygienic practices and a recent interval of minimal production had occurred at one of the battery manufacturers. Workers with blood lead levels above 60 micrograms/dl tended to have higher prevalences of most symptoms of lead toxicity than did workers with lower blood lead levels, but this finding was not consistent or statistically significant. The relationship between zinc protoporphyrin concentrations and increasing blood lead concentrations was consistent with that described among workers in developed countries. The high risk of lead toxicity among Jamaican battery workers is consistent with studies of battery workers in other developing countries. PMID:2773946

  14. Identifiability of PBPK models with applications to dimethylarsinic acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ramon I; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Wambaugh, John F; Kenyon, Elaina M; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2015-12-01

    Any statistical model should be identifiable in order for estimates and tests using it to be meaningful. We consider statistical analysis of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in which parameters cannot be estimated precisely from available data, and discuss different types of identifiability that occur in PBPK models and give reasons why they occur. We particularly focus on how the mathematical structure of a PBPK model and lack of appropriate data can lead to statistical models in which it is impossible to estimate at least some parameters precisely. Methods are reviewed which can determine whether a purely linear PBPK model is globally identifiable. We propose a theorem which determines when identifiability at a set of finite and specific values of the mathematical PBPK model (global discete identifiability) implies identifiability of the statistical model. However, we are unable to establish conditions that imply global discrete identifiability, and conclude that the only safe approach to analysis of PBPK models involves Bayesian analysis with truncated priors. Finally, computational issues regarding posterior simulations of PBPK models are discussed. The methodology is very general and can be applied to numerous PBPK models which can be expressed as linear time-invariant systems. A real data set of a PBPK model for exposure to dimethyl arsinic acid (DMA(V)) is presented to illustrate the proposed methodology. PMID:26194069

  15. Time series analysis of personal exposure to ambient air pollution and mortality using an exposure simulator

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Howard H.; Fuentes, Montserrat; Frey, H. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling framework for estimating the acute effects of personal exposure to ambient air pollution in a time series design. First, a spatial hierarchical model is used to relate Census tract-level daily ambient concentrations and simulated exposures for a subset of the study period. The complete exposure time series is then imputed for risk estimation. Modeling exposure via a statistical model reduces the computational burden associated with simulating personal exposures considerably. This allows us to consider personal exposures at a finer spatial resolution to improve exposure assessment and for a longer study period. The proposed approach is applied to an analysis of fine particulate matter of <2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and daily mortality in the New York City metropolitan area during the period 2001–2005. Personal PM2.5 exposures were simulated from the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation. Accounting for exposure uncertainty, the authors estimated a 2.32% (95% posterior interval: 0.68, 3.94) increase in mortality per a 10 μg/m3 increase in personal exposure to PM2.5 from outdoor sources on the previous day. The corresponding estimates per a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 ambient concentration was 1.13% (95% confidence interval: 0.27, 2.00). The risks of mortality associated with PM2.5 were also higher during the summer months. PMID:22669499

  16. EFFECTS OF SULFURIC ACID MIST EXPOSURE ON PULMONARY FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of 2-hr exposure to sulfuric acid (H2SO4) on pulmonary functions in male nonsmokers were examined. Subjects were exposed to air and 233, 418 and 939 micrograms/cu m H2SO4 at 22C DB/55% RH or air and 314, 600 and 1107 micrograms/cu m H2SO4 at 35C DB/85% RH. Mass media diam...

  17. Exposure Time Optimization for Highly Dynamic Star Trackers

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xinguo; Tan, Wei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Under highly dynamic conditions, the star-spots on the image sensor of a star tracker move across many pixels during the exposure time, which will reduce star detection sensitivity and increase star location errors. However, this kind of effect can be compensated well by setting an appropriate exposure time. This paper focuses on how exposure time affects the star tracker under highly dynamic conditions and how to determine the most appropriate exposure time for this case. Firstly, the effect of exposure time on star detection sensitivity is analyzed by establishing the dynamic star-spot imaging model. Then the star location error is deduced based on the error analysis of the sub-pixel centroiding algorithm. Combining these analyses, the effect of exposure time on attitude accuracy is finally determined. Some simulations are carried out to validate these effects, and the results show that there are different optimal exposure times for different angular velocities of a star tracker with a given configuration. In addition, the results of night sky experiments using a real star tracker agree with the simulation results. The summarized regularities in this paper should prove helpful in the system design and dynamic performance evaluation of the highly dynamic star trackers. PMID:24618776

  18. Exposure time optimization for highly dynamic star trackers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xinguo; Tan, Wei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Under highly dynamic conditions, the star-spots on the image sensor of a star tracker move across many pixels during the exposure time, which will reduce star detection sensitivity and increase star location errors. However, this kind of effect can be compensated well by setting an appropriate exposure time. This paper focuses on how exposure time affects the star tracker under highly dynamic conditions and how to determine the most appropriate exposure time for this case. Firstly, the effect of exposure time on star detection sensitivity is analyzed by establishing the dynamic star-spot imaging model. Then the star location error is deduced based on the error analysis of the sub-pixel centroiding algorithm. Combining these analyses, the effect of exposure time on attitude accuracy is finally determined. Some simulations are carried out to validate these effects, and the results show that there are different optimal exposure times for different angular velocities of a star tracker with a given configuration. In addition, the results of night sky experiments using a real star tracker agree with the simulation results. The summarized regularities in this paper should prove helpful in the system design and dynamic performance evaluation of the highly dynamic star trackers. PMID:24618776

  19. EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID EXPOSURE DURING PREGNANCY IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a member of the perfluoroalkyl acids that have wide commercial applications, has recently been detected in humans and wildlife. The current study characterizes the developmental toxicity of PFOA in the mouse. Timed pregnant CD-1 mice were given 1,...

  20. Characterizing Determinants of Risk: Concentration, Duration, and Timing of Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ongoing challenge in human health risk assessment is to determine the best approach for characterizing the risk from real-world exposures. Three major determinants characterize exposure: concentration (how much), duration (the frequency and how long), and critical timing (whe...

  1. Treatment of hydrofluoric acid exposure to the eye

    PubMed Central

    Atley, Katherine; Ridyard, Edward

    2015-01-01

    AIM To review the current evidence of the treatment of hydrofluoric acid (HF) exposure to the human cornea. METHODS A comprehensive manual search of the literature was conducted through the Ovid interface to assess the mechanism and efficacy of each irrigator through a variety of clinical cases and experimental studies. RESULTS Ocular exposure to HF is extremely damaging to the eye and swift recognition and decontamination with an appropriate agent forms the basis of treatment. Although there are various decontamination solutions that have efficacy against the corrosive action of HF, irrigation with Hexafluorine proved to be the most safe and effective treatment for the eye. CONCLUSION In conclusion emergency departments could benefit from the availability of Hexafluorine for the treatment of HF ocular burns in patients. PMID:25709926

  2. Biomarker-Based Calibration of Retrospective Exposure Predictions of Perfluorooctanoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Estimated historical exposures and serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) have been extensively used in epidemiologic studies that examined associations between PFOA exposures and adverse health outcomes among residents in highly exposed areas in the Mid-Ohio Valley. Using measured serum PFOA levels in 2005–2006, we applied two calibration methods to these retrospective exposure predictions: (1) multiplicative calibration and (2) Bayesian pharmacokinetic calibration with larger adjustments to more recent exposure estimates and smaller adjustments to exposure estimates for years farther in the past. We conducted simulation studies of various hypothetical exposure scenarios and compared hypothetical true historical intake rates with estimates based on mis-specified baseline exposure and pharmacokinetic models to find the method with the least bias. The Bayesian method outperformed the multiplicative method if a change to bottled water consumption was not reported or if the half-life of PFOA was mis-specified. On the other hand, the multiplicative method outperformed the Bayesian method if actual tap water consumption rates were systematically overestimated. If tap water consumption rates gradually decreased over time because of substitution with bottled water or other liquids, neither method clearly outperformed another. Calibration of retrospective exposure estimates using recently collected biomarkers may help reduce uncertainties in environmental epidemiologic studies. PMID:24730513

  3. Effects of carbaryl on green frog (Rana clamitans) tadpoles: Timing of exposure versus multiple exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Bridges, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    The majority of studies on pesticide impacts have evaluated the effects of single exposures. However, multiple exposures to a pesticide may be more prevalent. The objective of our study was to determine how multiple exposures versus single exposure at different times during development affected survival to metamorphosis, tadpole survival, tadpole mass, and tadpole developmental stage of green frog (Rana clamitans) tadpoles reared at low and high density in outdoor cattle tank ponds. Tadpoles were exposed to carbaryl zero, one, two, or three times at 14-d intervals. We applied single doses of carbaryl at one of three times, specifically during early, mid, or late development. Overall, we found that multiple exposures had a greater impact than single exposures during development. More individuals reached metamorphosis in ponds exposed to multiple doses of carbaryl compared with controls, indicating that the presence of carbaryl stimulated metamorphosis. The presence of carbaryl in the aquatic environment also resulted in more developed tadpoles compared with controls. Tadpoles in control ponds did not reach metamorphosis and were less developed than individuals exposed to carbaryl; this effect indicates that, under ideal conditions, green frogs could overwinter in ponds so that greater size could be attained before metamorphosis in the following spring or summer. Our study demonstrated the importance of including realistic application procedures when evaluating the effects of a pesticide and that multiple exposures to a short-lived pesticide are more likely to affect an amphibian population.

  4. Exposure assessment of boron in Bandırma boric acid production plant.

    PubMed

    Duydu, Yalçin; Başaran, Nurşen; Bolt, Hermann M

    2012-06-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates have been considered as being "toxic to reproduction and development", following results of animal studies with high doses. Experimentally, a NOAEL of 17.5mg B/kg-bw/day (corresponds to ∼2020 ng boron/g blood) has been identified for the (male) reproductive effects of boron in a multigenerational study of rats, and a NOAEL for the developmental effects in rats was identified at 9.6 mg B/kg-bw/day (corresponds to 1270 ng boron/g blood). These values are being taken as the basis of current EU safety assessments. The present study was conducted to assess the boron exposure under extreme exposure conditions in a boric acid production plant located in Bandırma, Turkey. The mean blood boron concentrations of low and high exposure groups were 72.94 ± 15.43 (48.46-99.91) and 223.89 ± 60.49 (152.82-454.02)ng/g respectively. The mean blood boron concentration of the high exposure group is still ≈ 6 times lower than the highest no effect level of boron in blood with regard to the developmental effects in rats and ≈ 9 times lower than the highest no effect level of boron in blood with regard to the reprotoxic effects in male rats. In this context, boric acid and sodium borates should not be considered as toxic to reproduction for humans in daily life. PMID:22658716

  5. Trichloroacetic acid in urine as biological exposure equivalent for low exposure concentrations of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Csanády, György A; Göen, Thomas; Klein, Dominik; Drexler, Hans; Filser, Johannes G

    2010-11-01

    A urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCA) concentration of 100 mg/l at the end of the last work shift (8 h/day, 5 days/week) of the week has been established in workers as exposure equivalent for the carcinogenic substance trichloroethene (EKA for TRI) at an exposure concentration of 50 ppm TRI. Due to the continuous reduction of atmospheric TRI concentrations during the last years, the quantitative relation given by the EKA for TRI is revised for exposures to low TRI concentrations. A physiological two-compartment model is presented by which the urinary TCA concentrations are calculated that result from inhaled TRI in humans. The model contains one compartment for trichloroethanol (TCE) and one for TCA. Inhaled TRI is metabolized to TCA and to TCE. The latter is in part further oxidized to TCA. Urinary elimination of TCA is modeled to obey first order kinetics. All required model parameters were taken form the literature. In order to evaluate the model performance on the urinary TCA excretion at low exposure concentrations, predicted urinary TCA concentrations were compared with data obtained in two volunteer studies and in one field study. The model was evaluated at exposure concentrations as low as 12.5 ppm TRI. It is demonstrated that the correlation described by the hitherto used EKA for TRI is also valid at low TRI concentrations. For TRI exposure concentrations of 0.6 and 6 ppm, the resulting urinary TCA concentrations at the end of the last work shift of a week are predicted to be 1.2 and 12 mg/l, respectively. PMID:20414643

  6. Camera add-on records time of exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, E. C.; Kassel, P. C., Jr.; Knight, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Time photograph is taken and is permanently recorded on edge of exposure by compact electronics module that attaches to camera case. Single-chip timing circuit drives LED display, which is imaged on film plane. Normally blanked display is unblanked when shutter switch is activated.

  7. Prenatal lead exposure, delta-aminolevulinic acid, and schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Opler, Mark G A; Brown, Alan S; Graziano, Joseph; Desai, Manisha; Zheng, Wei; Schaefer, Catherine; Factor-Litvak, Pamela; Susser, Ezra S

    2004-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder of unknown etiology. Recent reports suggest that a number of environmental factors during prenatal development may be associated with schizophrenia. We tested the hypothesis that environmental lead exposure may be associated with schizophrenia using archived serum samples from a cohort of live births enrolled between 1959 and 1966 in Oakland, California. Cases of schizophrenia spectrum disorder were identified and matched to controls. A biologic marker of lead exposure, delta-aminolevulinic acid (delta-ALA), was determined in second-trimester serum samples of 44 cases and 75 controls. delta-ALA was stratified into high and low categories, yielding 66 subjects in the high category, corresponding to a blood lead level (BPb) greater than or equal to 15 micro g/dL, and 53 in the low category, corresponding to BPb less than 15 micro g/dL. Using logistic regression, the odds ratio (OR) for schizophrenia associated with higher delta-ALA was 1.83 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.87-3.87; p = 0.1]. Adjusting for covariates gave an OR of 2.43 (95% CI, 0.99-5.96; p = 0.051). This finding suggests that the effects of prenatal exposure to lead and/or elevated delta-ALA may extend into later life and must be further investigated as risk factors for adult psychiatric diseases. PMID:15064159

  8. Residence and exposure times : when diffusion does not matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhez, Éric J. M.; Deleersnijder, Éric

    2012-12-01

    Under constant hydrodynamic conditions and assuming horizontal homogeneity, negatively buoyant particles released at the surface of the water column have a mean residence time in the surface mixed layer of h/ w, where h is the thickness of the latter and w ( > 0) is the sinking velocity Deleersnijder (Environ Fluid Mech 6(6):541-547, 2006a). The residence time does not depend on the diffusivity and equals the settling timescale. We show that this behavior is a result of the particular boundary conditions of the problem and that it is related to a similar property of the exposure time in a one-dimensional infinite domain. In 1-D advection-diffusion problem with a constant and uniform velocity, the exposure time—which is a generalization of the residence time measuring the total time spent by a particle in a control domain allowing the particle to leave and reenter the control domain—is also equal to the advection timescale at the upstream boundary of the control domain. To explain this result, the concept of point exposure is introduced; the point exposure is the time integral of the concentration at a given location. It measures the integrated influence of a point release at a given location and is related to the concept of number of visits of the theory of random walks. We show that the point exposure takes a constant value downstream the point of release, even when the diffusivity varies in space. The analysis of this result reveals also that the integrated downstream transport of a passive tracer is only effected by advection. While the diffusion flux differs from zero at all times, its integrated value is strictly zero.

  9. Exposure to phenoxyacetic acid herbicides and predictors of exposure among spouses of farmers.

    PubMed

    Jurewicz, Joanna; Hanke, Wojciech; Sobala, Wojciech; Ligocka, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the environmental exposure to 2 commonly used pesticides: 2-methyl-4- chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) among spouses of farmers, not directly involved in the process of spraying. Exposure to 63 sprayings 24 women in households from the rural area of the Łódż Voivodeship in Poland was assessed. The women were asked to collect 3 biological urine samples: in the morning before spraying (sample A), in the evening after spraying (sample B), and on the morning of the next day (sample C). The determination of pesticides in urine was performed by high performance liquid chromatography, coupled with tandem mass spectrometry and negative electrospray (LC-MS/MS-ESI-). In the case of both active ingredient, the number of urine samples with the level of pesticides above limit of detection (LOD) increased from 30% in samples A to 45% in samples B and C. The average levels of herbicides increased from sample A (2.8 ng/g creatinine) to sample B (6.0 ng/g creatinine). The mean value of the C sample was 4.0 ng/g creatinine. Similar results were obtained when the average was calculated for all measurements, including those below LOD. The outdoor activity of the women during spraying was statistically significant (p=0.023), a predictor of exposure in multivariate analyses. The presented study indicates that farmers' spouses might be exposed to pesticides, even if they do not take part in the spraying. PMID:22462445

  10. Recovery of duckweed from time-varying exposure to atrazine.

    PubMed

    Brain, Richard A; Hosmer, Alan J; Desjardins, Debbie; Kendall, Timothy Z; Krueger, Henry O; Wall, Steven B

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the recovery of duckweed (Lemna gibba L. G3) after being removed from multiple duration exposures to the herbicide atrazine. Consequently, L. gibba were exposed under various scenarios to atrazine at nominal concentrations ranging from 5 to 160 µg/L and durations of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 14 d under static-renewal test conditions. Exposures were followed by a recovery phase in untreated media for either 7 or 14 d. The 3-, 5-, 7-, 9-, and 14-d median effective concentration (EC50) values were >137, >137, 124, >77, and >75 µg/L, respectively, based on mean growth rate. No clear effect trends were apparent between exposure duration and the magnitude of effective concentrations (EC50s or EC10s). No phytocidal effects of chlorosis or necrosis were identified for any treatment scenario. Nearly all L. gibba plants transferred from treatment groups of different exposure scenarios to media without atrazine during the recovery phase had growth rates that demonstrated immediate recovery, indicating effects were phytostatic in nature and reversible. Only the 1- and 5-d exposure scenarios had growth rates indicating marginally prolonged recovery at the higher concentrations (160 µg/L; additionally, at 40 µg/L for the 5-d exposure). Time to recovery, therefore, was found to be largely independent of exposure duration except at the highest concentrations assessed. Based on growth rate by interval, all treatments demonstrated recovery by the final assessment interval (days 5-7), indicating complete recovery in all exposure scenarios by 7 d, consistent with the mode of action of atrazine. PMID:22431202

  11. Acute exposure to acid fog. Effects on mucociliary clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Laube, B.L.; Bowes, S.M. III; Links, J.M.; Thomas, K.K.; Frank, R. )

    1993-05-01

    Submicrometric sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol can affect mucociliary clearance without eliciting irritative symptoms or changes in pulmonary function. The effect of larger fog droplets containing H2SO4 on mucociliary clearance is unknown. We quantified mucociliary clearance from the trachea (n = 4) and small airways (n = 7) of young healthy male adults after an acute exposure to H2SO4 fog (MMAD = 10.3 microns; pH = 2.0; liquid water content = 481 +/- 65 mg/m3; osmolarity = 30 mOsm). Acid fog (AF) or saline fog (SF) (10.9 microns; 492 +/- 116 mg/m3; 30 mOsm) was administered for 40 min of unencumbered breathing (no mouth-piece) at rest and for 20 min of exercise sufficient to produce oronasal breathing. Fog exposures were followed by a methacholine (MCh) challenge (a measure of airway reactivity) or inhalation of technetium-99M radioaerosol (MMAD = 3.4 microns) on 2 study days each. Changes in symptoms and forced ventilatory function were also assessed. Clearance was quantified from computer-assisted analyses of gamma camera images of the lower respiratory tract in terms of %removal/min of the radiolabel from the trachea 25 min after inhalation and from the outer zone of the right lung after 1.9 to 3 h. Symptoms, forced ventilatory function, and MCh response were unaffected by either fog. Tracheal clearance was more rapid in four of four subjects after AF (0.83 +/- 1.58% removal/min) compared with that after SF (-0.54 +/- 0.85% removal/min). Outer zone clearance was more rapid in six of seven subjects after AF (0.22 +/- 0.15% removal/min) compared with that after SF (0.01 +/- 0.09% removal/min).

  12. Use of time to pregnancy to study environmental exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, D.D.; Wilcox, A.J.; Weinberg, C.R.

    1986-09-01

    There is need in reproductive epidemiology for sensitive and convenient screening tools that can be used to study environmental and occupational exposures. The measurement of fecundability (the probability of pregnancy in each cycle) by ascertaining how long it takes couples to conceive, may be useful for this purpose. Theoretically, exposures that interfere with any of the biologic processes involved in achieving pregnancy could lower fecundability among exposed men or women. To evaluate problems with collecting data on time to pregnancy, telephone interviews were conducted with nearly 700 pregnant women who reported having planned their pregnancies. Power curves were developed based on the distribution of time to pregnancy in the interviewed population. These curves indicate that relatively small sample sizes are sufficient for investigating an exposure. For example, the authors estimate that to detect a given 50% drop in mean fecundability with 80% power would require data from 55 exposed and 55 unexposed women who are pregnant. Disadvantages of using time to pregnancy as a reproductive endpoint include susceptibility to selection bias and need for data on several potential confounding variables. The next step in evaluating time to pregnancy as a reproductive endpoint is to apply it in studies of environmental or occupational exposures.

  13. Prenatal arachidonic acid exposure and selected immune-related variables in childhood.

    PubMed

    Dirix, Chantal E H; Hogervorst, Janneke G F; Rump, Patrick; Hendriks, Johannes J E; Bruins, Maaike; Hornstra, Gerard

    2009-08-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is considered essential in fetal development and some of its metabolites are thought to be important mediators of the immune responses. Therefore, we studied whether prenatal exposure to AA is associated with some immune-related clinical conditions and plasma markers in childhood. In 280 children aged 7 years, atopy, lung function and plasma inflammation markers were measured and their relationships with early AA exposure were studied by linear and logistic regression analyses. AA exposure was deduced from AA concentrations in plasma phospholipids of the mothers collected at several time points during pregnancy and at delivery, and in umbilical cord plasma and arterial and venous wall phospholipids. In unadjusted regression analyses, significant positive associations were observed between maternal AA concentrations at 16 and 32 weeks of pregnancy (proxies for fetal AA exposure) and peak expiratory flow decline after maximal physical exercise and plasma fibrinogen concentrations of their children, respectively. However, after correction for relevant covariables, only trends remained. A significant negative relationship was observed between AA concentrations in cord plasma (reflecting prenatal AA exposure) and the average daily amplitude of peak expiratory flow at rest, which lost significance after appropriate adjustment. Because of these few, weak and inconsistent relationships, a major impact of early-life exposure to AA on atopy, lung function and selected plasma inflammation markers of children at 7 years of age seems unlikely. PMID:19173768

  14. Exposure of two upland plant species to acidic fogs.

    PubMed

    Ashenden, T W; Rafarel, C R; Bell, S A

    1991-01-01

    A system is described for exposing large numbers of plants to acidic fogs. The system allows low volumes of treatment solutions to be provided at particle sizes chiefly in the 5-30 microm range (equivalent to fog/cloud droplets). Plants of Poa alpina L. and Epilobium brunnescens were propagated from material collected in Snowdonia, North Wales and exposed to fog treatments at pH values of 2.5, 3.5, 4.5 and 5.6. There were 3 x 4 h exposures per week which provided a total of 6 mm deposition. Supplementary watering was with pH 4.5 simulated acid rain (24 mm per week). After 21 weeks, there was increased lowering and a greater dry weight for plants of E. brunnescens exposed to the pH 2.5 fog in comparison with other treatments. Also, the plants used assimilated material to form shoots rather than roots. A similar increase in dry weight accumulation in the pH 2.5 treatment was found in P. alpina after 63 weeks but this was not associated with changes in assimilate partitioning. PMID:15092062

  15. Developmental timing of perchlorate exposure alters threespine stickleback dermal bone

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Postlethwait, John; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate levels of thyroid hormone are critical during development and metamorphosis, and for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Perchlorate, a common contaminant of water sources, inhibits thyroid function in vertebrates. We utilized threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to determine if timing of perchlorate exposure during development impacts adult dermal skeletal phenotypes. Fish were exposed to water contaminated with perchlorate (30 mg/L or 100 mg/L) beginning at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 or 305 days post fertilization until sexual maturity at one year of age. A reciprocal treatment moved stickleback from contaminated to clean water on the same schedule providing for different stages of initial exposure and different treatment durations. Perchlorate exposure caused concentration-dependent significant differences in growth for some bony traits. Continuous exposure initiated within the first 21 days post fertilization had the greatest effects on skeletal traits. Exposure to perchlorate at this early stage can result in small traits or abnormal skeletal morphology of adult fish which could affect predator avoidance and survival. PMID:25753171

  16. Journey-time exposure to particulate air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliver, John; Briggs, David J.

    Journey-time exposures to particulate air pollution were investigated in Leicester, UK, between January and March 2005. Samples of TSP, PM 10, PM 2.5, and PM 1 were simultaneously collected using light scattering devices whilst journeys were made by walking an in-car. Over a period of two months, 33 pairs of walking and in-car measurements were collected along two circular routes. Average exposures while walking were seen to be higher than those found in-car for each of the particle fractions: average walking to in-car ratios were 1.2 (± 0.6), 1.5 (± 0.6), 1.3 (± 0.6), and 1.4 (± 0.6) μg m -3 for coarse (TSP-PM 10), intermediate (PM 10-PM 2.5), fine (PM 2.5-PM 1), and very fine particles (PM 1), respectively. Correlations between walking and in-car exposures were seen to be weak for coarse particles ( r=0.10, p=0.58), moderate for the intermediate particles ( r=0.49, p<0.01) but strong for fine ( r=0.89, p<0.01) and very fine ( r=0.90, P<0.01) particles. PM 10 exposures while walking were on average 70% higher than a nearby roadside fixed-site monitor whilst in-car exposures were 25% higher than the same fixed-site monitor. Particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 μm were seen to be highly correlated between walking and in-car particle exposures and a rural fixed-site monitor about 30 km south of Leicester.

  17. Exposure time for space-borne IR spatial interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, R. H., Jr.; Simpson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical analysis is performed to determine the relationship between the signal-to-noise ratio and the exposure time for an orbiting IR heterodyne spatial interferometer. The analysis includes consideration of the transformation of the interferogram to obtain the source angular intensity distribution so that the signal-to-noise ratio pertains to the angular distribution rather than to the interferogram. The analysis is applied to a number of known IR sources. The results presented show that an interferometer with a 30-m baseline using half-meter telescopes should be able to image a source such as IRC + 30219 with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10 in a total exposure time of less than an hour.

  18. Respiratory hazards associated with exposure to formaldehyde and solvents in acid-curing paints

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandersson, R.; Hedenstierna, G.

    1988-05-01

    Thirty-eight employees exposed to formaldehyde when working with acid-hardening lacquers and 18 nonexposed control persons employed at the same company were examined to determine lung function (spirometry and nitrogen washout), total immunoglobulin blood concentration, and work-related symptoms. The mean exposure to formaldehyde during an 8-hr workshop was 0.40 mg/m/sup 3/ air, and the mean exposure to peak values was 0.70 mg/m/sup 3/. Mean exposure to solvents was low, i.e., approximately 1/10 of the hygienic effect. Eye, nose, and throat irritation was more common in exposed persons than in controls. Monday morning, after two exposure-free days, forced vital capacity (FVC) values were found to have declined by 0.24 L and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV/sub 1.0/) by 0.21 L, compared with normal values. There was a weak correlation between the individual concentration of IgG and decrease in FVC and FEV/sub 1.0/. No significant changes were noted in any other lung function variable before a work shift, and no lung function changes were noted over a full work shift. Deviations in FVC and FEV/sub 1.0/ values did not correlate to peaks or mean exposures or employment time.

  19. Chronic low-level domoic acid exposure alters gene transcription and impairs mitochondrial function in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Hiolski, Emma M; Kendrick, Preston S; Frame, Elizabeth R; Myers, Mark S; Bammler, Theo K; Beyer, Richard P; Farin, Federico M; Wilkerson, Hui-wen; Smith, Donald R; Marcinek, David J; Lefebvre, Kathi A

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid is an algal-derived seafood toxin that functions as a glutamate agonist and exerts excitotoxicity via overstimulation of glutamate receptors (AMPA, NMDA) in the central nervous system (CNS). At high (symptomatic) doses, domoic acid is well-known to cause seizures, brain lesions and memory loss; however, a significant knowledge gap exists regarding the health impacts of repeated low-level (asymptomatic) exposure. Here, we investigated the impacts of low-level repetitive domoic acid exposure on gene transcription and mitochondrial function in the vertebrate CNS using a zebrafish model in order to: 1) identify transcriptional biomarkers of exposure; and 2) examine potential pathophysiology that may occur in the absence of overt excitotoxic symptoms. We found that transcription of genes related to neurological function and development were significantly altered, and that asymptomatic exposure impaired mitochondrial function. Interestingly, the transcriptome response was highly-variable across the exposure duration (36 weeks), with little to no overlap of specific genes across the six exposure time points (2, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 weeks). Moreover, there were no apparent similarities at any time point with the gene transcriptome profile exhibited by the glud1 mouse model of chronic moderate excess glutamate release. These results suggest that although the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity may be similar, gene transcriptome responses to domoic acid exposure do not extrapolate well between different exposure durations. However, the observed impairment of mitochondrial function based on respiration rates and mitochondrial protein content suggests that repetitive low-level exposure does have fundamental cellular level impacts that could contribute to chronic health consequences. PMID:25033243

  20. Indoor exposures to fine aerosols and acid gases.

    PubMed Central

    Koutrakis, P; Brauer, M; Briggs, S L; Leaderer, B P

    1991-01-01

    Indoor exposures to aerosols and gases are associated with both indoor and outdoor air pollution sources. The identification of sources and the assessment of their relative contribution can be a complicated process due to a) the presence of numerous indoor sources, which can vary from building to building; b) the uncertainties associated with the estimation of the impact of outdoor sources on indoor air quality; c) the interactions between pollutants; and d) the importance of reactions between pollutants and indoor surfaces. It is well established that fine particles (diameter less than or equal to 2.5 microns) originating from outdoor sources such as automobiles, oil and coal combustion, incineration, and diverse industrial activities can penetrate into the indoor environment. Indoor/outdoor ratios, usually varying between 0.4 and 0.8, depend on parameters such as particle size and density, air exchange rate, and the surface-to-volume ratio of the indoor environment. Determining fine particle elemental composition makes it possible to identify the contribution of different outdoor sources. This paper focuses on the origin and the concentration of indoor aerosols and acid gases by highlighting the results from two indoor air quality studies. PMID:1821374

  1. TIME-INTEGRATED EXPOSURE MEASURES TO IMPROVE THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF EXPOSURE CLASSIFICATION FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are required to link exposure with health effects in epidemiological studies. Although long-term integrated exposure measurements are a critical component of exposure assessment, the ability to include these measurements into epidemiologic...

  2. Neurotoxicity and efficacy of arteether related to its exposure times and exposure levels in rodents.

    PubMed

    Li, Q G; Mog, S R; Si, Y Z; Kyle, D E; Gettayacamin, M; Milhous, W K

    2002-05-01

    The neurotoxicity of beta-arteether (AE) is related to drug accumulation in blood due to slow and prolonged absorption from the intramuscular injection sites. In this efficacy and toxicity study of AE, the traditional sesame oil vehicle was replaced with cremophore to decrease the accumulation and toxicity of AE. Dihydroartemisinin (DQHS), a more toxic and active metabolite of AE, was also analyzed. When administered at a daily dosage of 25 mg/kg for seven days, blood accumulation of AE with sesame oil (AESO) was used had a 7.5-fold higher area under the curve (AUC) (on last versus first day dosing), while AE with cremophore (AECM) had only a 1.8-fold higher AUC. Although the accumulation of AECM was greatly reduced, its total exposure level (46.29 microg x h/ml) was 2.7-fold higher than with AESO (16.92 microg x h/ml) due to a higher bioavailability of AECM (74.5%) compared with AESO (20.3%). Total exposure time (calculated at over the minimal detected neurotoxicity level of 41.32 ng/ml) of AECM was 103 hours during the whole treatment period (192 hours), which was more than one-third (37%) less than with AESO (162 hours). Similar pharmacokinetic results were also shown with the active metabolite, DQHS. Anorexia and gastrointestinal toxicity with AESO were significantly more severe than with AECM (P < 0.001). Histopathologic examination of the brain demonstrated neurotoxic changes; the AESO rat group was significantly more severe than the AECM rat group. The brain injury scores with AECM were mild to moderate (2.3-3.0), and with AESO they were moderate to severe (3.0-4.7) on day 7 and day 10, respectively. In addition, the results of a 50% cure dose (CD50) against Plasmodium berghei in mice were 34.1 mg/kg for AESO and 14.2 mg/kg for AECM, indicating a significant higher efficacy was found in the AECM animals. Toxicity and efficacy of DQHS were also dependent on its exposure time and level, which was the same as its parent drug (AE). In conclusion, following the

  3. Exposure time calculator for Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph: IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Huynh Anh N.; Pak, Soojong; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Kaplan, Kyle; Lee, Jae-Joon; Im, Myungshin; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    We present an exposure-time calculator (ETC) for the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS). The signal and noise values are calculated by taking into account the telluric background emission and absorption, the emission and transmission of the telescope and instrument optics, and the dark current and read noise of the infrared detector arrays. For the atmospheric transmission, we apply models based on the amount of precipitable water vapor along the line of sight to the target. The ETC produces the expected signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for each resolution element, given the exposure-time and number of exposures. In this paper, we compare the simulated continuum S/N for the early-type star HD 124683 and the late-type star GSS 32, and the simulated emission line S/N for the H2 rovibrational transitions from the Iris Nebula NGC 7023 with the observed IGRINS spectra. The simulated S/N from the ETC is overestimated by 40-50% for the sample continuum targets.

  4. Immunochemical analysis of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid, a biomarker of forestry worker exposure to pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ki Chang; Gee, Shirley J.; Kim, Hee-Joo; Aronov, Pavel A.; Vega, Helen; Krieger, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides widely used in forestry, agricultural, industrial, and residential applications have potential for human exposure. Short sample preparation time and sensitive, economical high-throughput assays are needed for biomonitoring studies that analyze a large number of samples. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for determining 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), a general urinary biomarker of exposure to some pyrethroid insecticides. A mixed-mode solid-phase extraction reduced interferences from acid hydrolyzed urine and gave 110±6% recoveries from spiked samples. The method limit of quantification was 2 μg/L. Urine samples were collected from forestry workers that harvest pine cone seeds where pyrethroid insecticides were applied at ten different orchards. At least four samples for each worker were collected in a 1-week period. The 3-PBA in workers classified as high, low, or no exposure based on job analysis over all sampling days was 6.40± 9.60 (n=200), 5.27±5.39 (n=52), and 3.56±2.64 ng/mL (n=34), respectively. Pair-wise comparison of the differences in least squares means of 3-PBA concentrations among groups only showed a significant difference between high and no exposure. Although this difference was not significant when 3-PBA excretion was normalized by creatinine excretion, the general trend was still apparent. No significant differences were observed among days or orchards. This ELISA method using a 96-well plate was performed as a high-throughput tool for analyzing around 300 urine samples measured in triplicate to provide data for workers exposure assessment. PMID:21717113

  5. Breastfeeding: A Potential Excretion Route for Mothers and Implications for Infant Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Acids

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Debapriya; Weldon, Rosana Hernandez; Armstrong, Ben G.; Gibson, Lorna J.; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Shin, Hyeong-Moo

    2013-01-01

    Background: The presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in breast milk has been documented, but their lactational transfer has been rarely studied. Determination of the elimination rates of these chemicals during breastfeeding is important and critical for assessing exposure in mothers and infants. Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association between breastfeeding and maternal serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS). For a subset of the population, for whom we also have their infants’ measurements, we investigated associations of breastfeeding with infant serum PFAA concentrations. Methods: The present analysis included 633 women from the C8 Science Panel Study who had a child < 3.5 years of age and who provided blood samples and reported detailed information on breastfeeding at the time of survey. PFAA serum concentrations were available for all mothers and 8% (n = 49) of the infants. Maternal and infant serum concentrations were regressed on duration of breastfeeding. Results: Each month of breastfeeding was associated with lower maternal serum concentrations of PFOA (–3%; 95% CI: –5, –2%), PFOS (–3%; 95% CI: –3, –2%), PFNA (–2%; 95% CI: –2, –1%), and PFHxS (–1%; 95% CI: –2, 0%). The infant PFOA and PFOS serum concentrations were 6% (95% CI: 1, 10%) and 4% (95% CI: 1, 7%) higher per month of breastfeeding. Conclusions: Breast milk is the optimal food for infants, but is also a PFAA excretion route for lactating mothers and exposure route for nursing infants. Citation: Mondal D, Weldon RH, Armstrong BG, Gibson LJ, Lopez-Espinosa MJ, Shin HM, Fletcher T. 2014. Breastfeeding: a potential excretion route for mothers and implications for infant exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids. Environ Health Perspect 122:187–192; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306613 PMID:24280536

  6. Lung cancer in French and Czech uranium miners: Radon-associated risk at low exposure rates and modifying effects of time since exposure and age at exposure.

    PubMed

    Tomasek, Ladislav; Rogel, Agnès; Tirmarche, Margot; Mitton, Nicolas; Laurier, Dominique

    2008-02-01

    Radon is recognized as a public health concern for indoor exposure. Precise quantification derived from occupational exposure in miners is still needed for estimating the risk and the factors that modify the dependence on cumulated exposure. The present paper reports on relationship between radon exposure and lung cancer risk in French and Czech cohorts of uranium miners (n = 10,100). Miners from these two cohorts are characterized by low levels of exposure (average cumulated exposure of less than 60 WLM) protracted over a long period (mean duration of exposure of 10 years) and by a good quality of individual exposure estimates (95% of annual exposures based on radon measurements). The modifying effect of the quality of exposure on the risk is analyzed. A total of 574 lung cancer deaths were observed, which is 187% higher than expected from the national statistics. This significantly elevated risk is strongly associated with cumulated radon exposure. The estimated overall excess relative risk per WLM is 0.027 (95% CI: 0.017-0.043, related to measured exposures). For age at exposure of 30 and 20 years since exposure, the ERR/WLM is 0.042, and this value decreases by approximately 50% for each 10-year increase in age at exposure and time since exposure. The present study emphasizes that the quality of exposure estimates is an important factor that may substantially influence results. Time since exposure and simultaneously age at exposure were the most important effect modifiers. No inverse exposure-rate effect below 4 WL was observed. The results are consistent with estimates of the BEIR VI report using the concentration model at an exposure rate below 0.5 WL. PMID:18220460

  7. AMMONIA ABATEMENT SYSTEM FOR WHOLE-BODY SMALL ANIMAL INHALATION EXPOSURES TO ACID MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conducting whole-body acid aerosol inhalation exposures of laboratory animals is complicated by ammonia arising from the excrement of the test animals which is sufficient to completely neutralize much of the acid aerosol. he neutralization of acid by ammonia con only be controlle...

  8. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure and Pregnancy Outcome in a Highly Exposed Community

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, David A.; Stein, Cheryl R.; Bartell, Scott M.; Elston, Beth; Gong, Jian; Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Wellenius, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Background We assessed the association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and pregnancy outcome in an area with elevated exposure to PFOA from drinking water contaminated by chemical plant releases. Methods Serum PFOA was measured and reproductive and residential histories were obtained in 2005 – 2006. We estimated serum PFOA levels at the time of pregnancy for 11,737 pregnancies occurring between 1990 and 2006 based on historical information on PFOA releases, environmental distribution, pharmacokinetic modeling, and residential histories. We assessed the association between PFOA and the odds of miscarriage, stillbirth, preeclampsia, preterm birth, term low birthweight, and birth defects controlling for calendar time, age, parity, education, and smoking. PFOA exposure was evaluated as a continuous measure (with and without log-transformation) and in quintiles, combining the lowest two quintiles (<6.8 ng/mL) as the referent. Results Measures of association between PFOA and miscarriage, preterm birth, term low birthweight, and birth defects were close to the null. Odds of stillbirth were elevated in the 4th quintile only. For preeclampsia, the odds ratio was 1.13 (95% confidence interval = 1.00 – 1.28) for an interquartile shift in log-transformed PFOA, and the odds ratios were 1.1 – 1.2 across the upper three quintiles of exposure. Conclusions In this large, population-based study in a region with markedly elevated PFOA exposure, we found no associations between estimated serum PFOA levels and adverse pregnancy outcomes other than possibly preeclampsia. Conclusions are tempered by inherent limitations in exposure reconstruction and self-reported pregnancy outcome information. PMID:22370857

  9. ETC-42 Exposure Time Calculator: Evolution and New Functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, A.; Meunier, J. C.; Surace, C.; Apostolakos, N.

    2015-09-01

    We developed at CeSAM (Centre de donnees Astrophysiques de Marseille) ETC-42, an Exposure Time Calculator compliant with Virtual Observatory standards. ETC-42 has been designed to facilitate the integration of new sites, instruments and sources by the user. It is not instrument-specific, but is based on generic XML input data. It is used in several project implementations (EUCLID, PFS, IRIS, WISH, EELTs) covering a wide wavelength range, from NIR to UV. The previous release has been optimized to achieve gain of computation time. New functionalities for automatic input parameterization have been added to target specific instrumental configuration and to give an increased level of user-friendliness. This article describes the new functionalities : fixtures, sdaptive optics, Fabry Perot implementation and two new builder tools to create Telescope transmission curves and sky brightness tables. And, in order to facilitate the integration to the Virtual Observatory environment, VO drag and drop functionality is now available.

  10. Downregulation of p63 upon exposure to bile salts and acid in normal and cancer esophageal cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sabine; Pétré, Aurélia; Thépot, Amélie; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Mion, François; Hainaut, Pierre

    2007-07-01

    p63 is a member of the p53 protein family that regulates differentiation and morphogenesis in epithelial tissues and is required for the formation of squamous epithelia. Barrett's mucosa is a glandular metaplasia of the squamous epithelium that develops in the lower esophagus in the context of chronic, gastroesophageal reflux and is considered as a precursor for adenocarcinoma. Normal or squamous cancer esophageal cells were exposed to deoxycholic acid (DCA, 50, 100, or 200 microM) and chenodeoxycholic and taurochenodeoxycholic acid at pH 5. p63 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions were studied by Western blot and RT-PCR. DCA exposure at pH 5 led to a spectacular decrease in the levels of all isoforms of the p63 proteins. This decrease was observed within minutes of exposure, with a synergistic effect between DCA and acid. Within the same time frame, levels of p63 mRNA were relatively unaffected, whereas levels of COX-2, a marker of stress responses often induced in Barrett's mucosa, were increased. Similar results were obtained with chenodeoxycholic acid but not its taurine conjugate at pH 5. Proteasome inhibition by lactacystin or MG-132 partially blocked the decrease in p63, suggesting a posttranslational degradation mechanism. These results show that combined exposure to bile salt and acid downregulates a critical regulator of squamous differentiation, providing a mechanism to explain the replacement of squamous epithelium by a glandular metaplasia upon exposure of the lower esophagus to gastric reflux. PMID:17615180

  11. Retrospective exposure assessment of perfluorooctanoic acid serum concentrations at a fluoropolymer manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Woskie, Susan R; Gore, Rebecca; Steenland, Kyle

    2012-11-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a suspect human carcinogen, causes neonatal loss, liver enlargement, and a variety of tumors in rodents, and has been associated with increased cholesterol levels in humans. Mortality analyses of worker cohorts have not been conclusive or consistent. As part of a series of epidemiologic studies of workers in a West Virginia plant that manufactures fluoropolymers, estimates of serum PFOA for the worker cohort were developed for the period of 1950-2004. An existing database of 2125 worker biomarker measurements of serum PFOA was used to model retrospective exposures. Historical PFOA serum levels for eight job category/job group combinations were modeled using linear mixed models to account for repeated measures, along with exposure determinants such as cumulative years worked in potentially exposed jobs, the amount of C8 used or emitted by the plant over time, as well as a four-knot restricted cubic spline function to reflect the influence of process changes over calendar time on exposure. The modeled biomarker levels matched well with measured levels, including those collected independently as part of a community study of PFOA levels (Spearman correlations of 0.8 for internal data comparisons and 0.6 for external data comparisons). These annualized PFOA serum estimates will be used in a series of morbidity and mortality studies of this worker cohort. PMID:22539556

  12. Effects of ascorbic acid supplementation on male reproductive system during exposure to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havazhagan, G.; Riar, S. S.; Kain, A. K.; Bardhan, Jaya; Thomas, Pauline

    1989-09-01

    Two groups of male rats were exposed to simulated altitudes of 6060 m and 7576 m for 6 h/day for 7 days (intermittent exposure). In two additional groups of animals exposed to the same altitude, 100 mg of ascorbic acid (AA) was fed daily for 5 days prior to the exposure period and also during the exposure period. Rats that did not receive AA showed loss of body weight and weight of reproductive organs after exposure. Sex organs showed atrophy on histological examination and there was a deterioration in spermatozoal quality. There was an increase in alkaline and acid phosphatase, and decrease in protein, sialic acid and glyceryl phosphorylcholine content in various reproductive tissues after exposure. All the above changes in histology and biochemical composition could be partially prevented by AA supplementation. AA supplementation can therefore protect the male reproductive system from deleterious effects of hypoxia. The probable mechanism of action of AA is discussed.

  13. TOXICOGENOMIC DISSECTION OF RODENT LIVER TRANSCRIPT PROFILES AFTER EXPOSURE TO PERFLUOROALKYL ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) leads to alterations in the balance between hepatocyte growth and apoptosis, increases in liver to body weight ratios and liver tumors. The perfluoroalkyl acids including perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (...

  14. The protective role of ascorbic acid on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in a rat model of maternal lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Hamid; Ganji, Farzaneh

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress is a major pathogenic mechanism of lead neurotoxicity. The antioxidant ascorbic acid protects hippocampal pyramidal neurons against cell death during congenital lead exposure; however, critical functions like synaptic transmission, integration, and plasticity depend on preservation of dendritic and somal morphology. This study was designed to examine if ascorbic acid also protects neuronal morphology during developmental lead exposure. Timed pregnant rats were divided into four treatment groups: (1) control, (2) 100mg/kg ascorbic acid once a day via gavage, (3) 0.05% lead acetate in drinking water, and (4) 0.05% lead+100mg/kg oral ascorbic acid. Brains of eight male pups (P25) per treatment group were processed for Golgi staining. Changes in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons' somal size were estimated by cross-sectional area and changes in dendritic arborization by Sholl's analysis. One-way ANOVA was used to compare results among treatment groups. Lead-exposed pups exhibited a significant decrease in somal size compared to controls (P<0.01) that was reversed by cotreatment with ascorbic acid. Sholl's analysis revealed a significant increase in apical dendritic branch points near cell body (P<0.05) and a decreased total dendritic length in both apical and basal dendritic trees of CA1 neurons (P<0.05). Ascorbic acid significantly but only partially reversed the somal and dendritic damage caused by developmental lead exposure. Oxidative stress thus contributes to lead neurotoxicity but other pathogenic mechanisms are also involved. PMID:26783884

  15. Inattentional blindness is influenced by exposure time not motion speed.

    PubMed

    Kreitz, Carina; Furley, Philip; Memmert, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Inattentional blindness is a striking phenomenon in which a salient object within the visual field goes unnoticed because it is unexpected, and attention is focused elsewhere. Several attributes of the unexpected object, such as size and animacy, have been shown to influence the probability of inattentional blindness. At present it is unclear whether or how the speed of a moving unexpected object influences inattentional blindness. We demonstrated that inattentional blindness rates are considerably lower if the unexpected object moves more slowly, suggesting that it is the mere exposure time of the object rather than a higher saliency potentially induced by higher speed that determines the likelihood of its detection. Alternative explanations could be ruled out: The effect is not based on a pop-out effect arising from different motion speeds in relation to the primary-task stimuli (Experiment 2), nor is it based on a higher saliency of slow-moving unexpected objects (Experiment 3). PMID:26031845

  16. Influence of the Exposure Time after Removing of Covering Materials over Shading Tea Field on the Quality of Gyokuro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaida, Teruki; Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Nitabaru, Juichi; Nakazono, Kentaro; Kubota, Akira; Nariyama, Hideki

    We revealed the influences of the exposure time after removing of covering materials over shading tea field for making gyokuro on the quality of made tea. As the exposure time increased, the green color of the fresh leaves faded; their total amino acid and theanine contents reduced; and the concentration of dimethyl sulfide, a representative aromatic compound in gyokuro, decreased. In contrast, the catechin content increased. The overall quality of the tea was lowered. These results indicated it was necessary to plucking of tea shoots for short time after removing of covering materials over shading tea field.

  17. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity. PMID:25212408

  18. Continuous exposure to dibromoacetic acid delays pubertal development and compromises sperm quality in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously our work on the haloacid by-products of drinking water disinfection focused on adult exposures. Herein we evaluate the consequence of continuous exposure to dibromoacetic acid (DBA) via drinking water through reproductive development into adulthood. An initial study in...

  19. Assessing the Impact of Exposure Time and Incapacitation on Longitudinal Trajectories of Criminal Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquero, Alex; Blumstein, Alfred; Brame, Robert; Haapanen, Rudy; Mulvey, Edward P.; Nagin, Daniel S.

    2001-01-01

    Examined effect of accounting for exposure (incarceration) time on arrest rate of 272 paroled serious offenders followed through age 33. Analysis without exposure time adjustments suggested that over 92 percent exhibited highest arrest activity in late teens and early 20s. Adjusted for exposure time, about 72 percent showed a decline in arrest…

  20. PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID AND PERFLUORONONANOIC ACID IN FETAL AND NEONATAL MICE FOLLOWING IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO 8-2 FLUOROTELOMER ALCOHOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    8-2 fluorotelomer alcohol (FTOH) and its metabolites, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), are developmental toxicants, but metabolism and distribution during pregnancy is not known. To examine this, timed-pregnant mice received a single gavage dose (...

  1. [Solar time--the importance of standard time for the UV-exposure of the skin].

    PubMed

    Stick, Carsten

    2007-09-01

    Dermatologists recommend that people avoid exposure to the blazing sun around noontime. In most places in Europe there are considerable deviations between true solar time and standard time: Firstly, during summer the standard time in the European countries is set one hour ahead according to the summer time or daylight saving time. Secondly, in all countries of Western and Central Europe, except Great Britain, Ireland and Portugal, standard time uniformly is Central European Summer Time (CEST). Although this standard central European time zone refers to the longitude 15 degrees East of Greenwich, it is valid for all longitudes up to nearly about 9 degrees West of Greenwich. This leads to a maximum deviation between standard time and solar time of nearly 1 hour and 36 min. Thirdly, a comparably small time shift is due to the equation of time. It amounts up to a maximum of about six and a half minutes at the end of July. Altogether, the shift between standard time and true solar time adds up to about 2 h 40 min at the Spanish coast of the Atlantic Ocean, e.g. noon is not at 12:00 but rather at 2:40 p. m. (14:40 h CEST).A paradoxical situation results for British holiday-makers who go to Spain. Although they move to a more westerly geographical position they do not put back their clocks but set them one hour ahead, since they enter the CEST zone. The recommendations given by dermatologists to the people regarding their exposure to the sun should allow for these geographical and astronomical facts. PMID:17760900

  2. Case-control study: soft-tissue sarcomas and exposure to phenoxyacetic acids or chlorophenols.

    PubMed Central

    Hardell, L.; Sandström, A.

    1979-01-01

    In 1977 a number of patients with soft-tissue sarcomas and previous exposure to phenoxyacetic acids were described. Following from these observations a matched case-control study was made. Exposure to chlorophenols was also included in this study. The results showed that exposure to phenoxyacetic acids or chlorophenols gave an approximately 6-fold increase in the risk for this type of tumour. It was not possible to determine, however, whether the carcinogenic effect was exerted by these compounds or by impurities such as chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans that in almost all cases were part of the commercial preparations. PMID:444410

  3. Making Time for Nature: Visual Exposure to Natural Environments Lengthens Subjective Time Perception and Reduces Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Meredith S.; Repke, Meredith A.; Nickerson, Norma P.; Conway, Lucian G.; Odum, Amy L.; Jordan, Kerry E.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity in delay discounting is associated with maladaptive behaviors such as overeating and drug and alcohol abuse. Researchers have recently noted that delay discounting, even when measured by a brief laboratory task, may be the best predictor of human health related behaviors (e.g., exercise) currently available. Identifying techniques to decrease impulsivity in delay discounting, therefore, could help improve decision-making on a global scale. Visual exposure to natural environments is one recent approach shown to decrease impulsive decision-making in a delay discounting task, although the mechanism driving this result is currently unknown. The present experiment was thus designed to evaluate not only whether visual exposure to natural (mountains, lakes) relative to built (buildings, cities) environments resulted in less impulsivity, but also whether this exposure influenced time perception. Participants were randomly assigned to either a natural environment condition or a built environment condition. Participants viewed photographs of either natural scenes or built scenes before and during a delay discounting task in which they made choices about receiving immediate or delayed hypothetical monetary outcomes. Participants also completed an interval bisection task in which natural or built stimuli were judged as relatively longer or shorter presentation durations. Following the delay discounting and interval bisection tasks, additional measures of time perception were administered, including how many minutes participants thought had passed during the session and a scale measurement of whether time "flew" or "dragged" during the session. Participants exposed to natural as opposed to built scenes were less impulsive and also reported longer subjective session times, although no differences across groups were revealed with the interval bisection task. These results are the first to suggest that decreased impulsivity from exposure to natural as opposed to built

  4. The Exposure Experience: Ohio River Valley Residents Respond to Local Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) Contamination.

    PubMed

    Judge, J Matthew; Brown, Phil; Brody, Julia Green; Ryan, Serena

    2016-09-01

    This article explores the "exposure experience" of participants who received their personal results in a biomonitoring study for perfluorooctanoic acid. Exposure experience is the process of identifying, understanding, and responding to chemical contamination. When biomonitoring studies report results to participants, those participants generate an exposure experience that identifies hidden contaminants and helps level informational imbalances between polluters and affected communities. Participants welcomed the opportunity to learn their exposure results, reporting no psychological harm following report-back. They wove health, economic, and political considerations into their interpretation of results and their present views of past impact. Participants framed their experiences by a half-century of dependence on the chemical industry's economic benefits, leading them to considerable acceptance of chemical exposure as a tradeoff for jobs and the local economy. Our findings show that the exposure experience is an ongoing process that influences social action, with new activism being generated by exposure and health studies. PMID:27601409

  5. A MULTISTAGE BIOLOGICALLY BASED MODEL FOR MOUSE LIVER TUMORS RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic Acid (DCA) is a major byproduct of the chlorine disinfection of humic acid containing drinking water sources. It is a hepatocarcinogen in mice and rats at exposure concentrations in drinking water that are at least 4 orders of magnitude above the concentrations in ...

  6. DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID PARTIALLY AMELIORATES DEFICITS IN SOCIAL BEHAVIOR AND ULTRASONIC VOCALIZATIONS CAUSED BY PRENATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Wellmann, Kristen A.; George, Finney; Brnouti, Fares; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure disrupts social behavior in humans and rodents. One system particularly important for social behavior is the somatosensory system. Prenatal ethanol exposure alters the structure and function of this area. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is necessary for normal brain development and brains from ethanol-exposed animals are DHA deficient. Thus, we determined whether postnatal DHA supplementation ameliorated behavioral deficits induced by prenatal ethanol exposure. Timed pregnant Long-Evans rats were assigned to one of three groups: ad libitum access to an ethanol-containing liquid diet, pair fed an isocaloric isonutritive non-alcohol liquid diet, or ad libitum access to chow and water. Pups were assigned to one of two postnatal treatment groups; gavaged intragastrically once per day between postnatal day (P)11 and P20 with DHA (10 g/kg in artificial rat milk) or artificial rat milk. A third group was left untreated. Isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations (iUSVs) were recorded on P14. Social behavior and play-induced USVs were tested on P28 or P42. Somatosensory performance was tested with a gap crossing test around P33 or on P42. Anxiety was tested on elevated plus maze around P35. Animals exposed to ethanol prenatally vocalized less, play fought less, and crossed a significantly shorter gap than control-treated animals. Administration of DHA ameliorated these ethanol-induced deficits such that the ethanol-exposed animals given DHA were no longer significantly different to control-treated animals. Thus, DHA administration may have therapeutic value to reverse some of ethanol’s damaging effects. PMID:25746516

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid partially ameliorates deficits in social behavior and ultrasonic vocalizations caused by prenatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Wellmann, Kristen A; George, Finney; Brnouti, Fares; Mooney, Sandra M

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure disrupts social behavior in humans and rodents. One system particularly important for social behavior is the somatosensory system. Prenatal ethanol exposure alters the structure and function of this area. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is necessary for normal brain development and brains from ethanol-exposed animals are DHA deficient. Thus, we determined whether postnatal DHA supplementation ameliorated behavioral deficits induced by prenatal ethanol exposure. Timed pregnant Long-Evans rats were assigned to one of three groups: ad libitum access to an ethanol-containing liquid diet, pair fed an isocaloric isonutritive non-alcohol liquid diet, or ad libitum access to chow and water. Pups were assigned to one of two postnatal treatment groups; gavaged intragastrically once per day between postnatal day (P)11 and P20 with DHA (10g/kg in artificial rat milk) or artificial rat milk. A third group was left untreated. Isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations (iUSVs) were recorded on P14. Social behavior and play-induced USVs were tested on P28 or P42. Somatosensory performance was tested with a gap crossing test around P33 or on P42. Anxiety was tested on elevated plus maze around P35. Animals exposed to ethanol prenatally vocalized less, play fought less, and crossed a significantly shorter gap than control-treated animals. Administration of DHA ameliorated these ethanol-induced deficits such that the ethanol-exposed animals given DHA were no longer significantly different to control-treated animals. Thus, DHA administration may have therapeutic value to reverse some of ethanol's damaging effects. PMID:25746516

  8. Understanding Potential Exposure Sources of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Mary A.; Dawson, Barbara J.; Barton, Catherine A.; Botelho, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper integrates perspectives from analytical chemistry, environmental engineering, and industrial hygiene to better understand how workers may be exposed to perfluorinated carboxylic acids when handling them in the workplace in order to identify appropriate exposure controls. Due to the dramatic difference in physical properties of the protonated acid form and the anionic form, this family of chemicals provides unique industrial hygiene challenges. Workplace monitoring, experimental data, and modeling results were used to ascertain the most probable workplace exposure sources and transport mechanisms for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and its ammonium salt (APFO). PFOA is biopersistent and its measurement in the blood has been used to assess human exposure since it integrates exposure from all routes of entry. Monitoring suggests that inhalation of airborne material may be an important exposure route. Transport studies indicated that, under low pH conditions, PFOA, the undissociated (acid) species, actively partitions from water into air. In addition, solid-phase PFOA and APFO may also sublime into the air. Modeling studies determined that contributions from surface sublimation and loss from low pH aqueous solutions can be significant potential sources of workplace exposure. These findings suggest that keeping surfaces clean, preventing accumulation of material in unventilated areas, removing solids from waste trenches and sumps, and maintaining neutral pH in sumps can lower workplace exposures. PMID:20974675

  9. Effects of developmental alcohol and valproic acid exposure on play behavior of ferrets.

    PubMed

    Krahe, Thomas E; Filgueiras, Claudio C; Medina, Alexandre E

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to alcohol and valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy can lead to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and fetal valproate syndrome, respectively. Altered social behavior is a hallmark of both these conditions and there is ample evidence showing that developmental exposure to alcohol and VPA affect social behavior in rodents. However, results from rodent models are somewhat difficult to translate to humans owing to the substantial differences in brain development, morphology, and connectivity. Since the cortex folding pattern is closely related to its specialization and that social behavior is strongly influenced by cortical structures, here we studied the effects of developmental alcohol and VPA exposure on the play behavior of the ferret, a gyrencephalic animal known for its playful nature. Animals were injected with alcohol (3.5g/kg, i.p.), VPA (200mg/kg, i.p.) or saline (i.p) every other day during the brain growth spurt period, between postnatal days 10 and 30. The play behavior of pairs of the same experimental group was evaluated 3 weeks later. Both treatments induced significant behavioral differences compared to controls. Alcohol and VPA exposed ferrets played less than saline treated ones, but while animals from the alcohol group displayed a delay in start playing with each other, VPA treated ones spent most of the time close to one another without playing. These findings not only extend previous results on the effects of developmental exposure to alcohol and VPA on social behavior, but make the ferret a great model to study the underlying mechanisms of social interaction. PMID:27208641

  10. Enhanced biofilm production by a toluene-degrading Rhodococcus observed after exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Tess S; Higgins, Christopher P; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on interactions between aerobic soil-derived hydrocarbon degrading bacteria and a suite of perfluorocarboxylic acids and perfluoroalkylsulfonates that are found in aqueous film-forming foams used for fire suppression. No effect on toluene degradation rate or induction time was observed when active cells of Rhodococcus jostii strain RHA1 were exposed to toluene and a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) at concentrations near the upper bounds of groundwater relevance (11 PFAAs at 10 mg/L each). However, exposure to aqueous PFAA concentrations above 2 mg/L (each) was associated with enhanced aggregation of bacterial cells and significant increases in extracellular polymeric substance production. Flocculation was only observed during exponential growth and not elicited when PFAAs were added to resting incubations; analogous flocculation was also observed in soil enrichments. Aggregation was accompanied by 2- to 3-fold upregulation of stress-associated genes, sigF3 and prmA, during growth of this Rhodococcus in the presence of PFAAs. These results suggest that biological responses, such as microbial stress and biofilm formation, could be more prominent than suppression of co-contaminant biodegradation in subsurface locations where poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances occur with hydrocarbon fuels. PMID:25806435

  11. The time line method for assessing galloping exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, A.S.

    1982-08-01

    The design of double circuit transmission structures is often determined by the need to allow sufficient electrical clearance between phases under galloping span conditions. In the past such designs have been arrived at according to certain ''galloping ellipse'' criteria in which the ellipse geometry is based on mid-span sag. The new method, disclosed herein, starts with the statistical history of the weather in the particular region, as to wind, wind direction, temperature, and ice leading to an exposure rate (Hrs./Yr.) for the normal component of wind speed. These data are combined with estimates of galloping motion including amplitude dependence on wind speed, gusting, and frequency mis-match between galloping and horizontal (swinging) movement at mid-span. A comparison is included between untreated and treated spans, the latter having galloping control devices with only 50% amplitude reduction capability. A range of span lengths between 750 ft. (227M) and 1,500 ft. (454M) is considered. The new method, for the first time, provides a means to assess the benefits of alternative designs in quantitative terms.

  12. PHARMACOKINETIC PROFILES OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID IN MICE AFTER CHRONIC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is highly persistent in humans, with serum half-life estimates of 2.3 to 3.8 years. In the mouse, elimination of PFOA appears to be first-order after a single oral administration, with serum half-life estimates of 16 days for females and 22 days for ...

  13. ALTERED GENE EXPRESSION IN MOUSE LIVERS AFTER DICHLOROACETIC ACID EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated that DCA exhibits hepatocarcinogenic effects in rodents when administered in drinking water. The mechanism(s) involved in DCA induction of cancer are not clear...

  14. Dynamic peracetic acid (PAA) exposure, a treatment strategy against ectoparasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The search for alternative therapeutic agents is a difficult and laborious task. The use of peracetic acid (PAA) has recently been evaluated as an alternative compound for disinfection (Gustavino et al., 2005). In addition to having a broad antimicrobial spectrum, PAA does not contribute to the form...

  15. Persistence of DNA damage following exposure of human bladder cells to chronic monomethylarsonous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, S.M.; Medeiros, M.K.; Eblin, K.E.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2009-12-01

    Malignant transformation was demonstrated in UROtsa cells following 52-weeks of exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}); the result was the malignantly transformed cell line, URO-MSC. URO-MSC cells were used to study the induction of DNA damage and the alteration of DNA repair enzymes in both the presence of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(+)] and after subsequent removal of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(-)] following chronic, low-level exposure. In the presence of MMA{sup III}, URO-MSC(+) cells demonstrated a sustained increase in DNA damage following 12-weeks of exposure; in particular, a significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks at 12-weeks of exposure consistently elevated through 52 weeks. The persistence of DNA damage in URO-MSC cells was assessed after a 2-week removal of MMA{sup III}. URO-MSC(-) cells demonstrated a decrease in DNA damage compared to URO-MSC(+); however, DNA damage in URO-MSC(-) remained significantly elevated when compared to untreated UROtsa and increased in a time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were demonstrated to be a critical component in the generation of DNA damage determined through the incubation of ROS scavengers with URO-MSC cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a key repair enzyme in DNA single-strand break repair. URO-MSC(+) resulted in a slight increase in PARP activity after 36-weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure, suggesting the presence of MMA{sup III} is inhibiting the increase in PARP activity. In support, PARP activity in URO-MSC(-) increased significantly, coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage demonstrated in URO-MSC(-) compared to URO-MSC(+). These data demonstrate that chronic, low-level exposure of UROtsa cells to 50 nM MMA{sup III} results in: the induction of DNA damage that remains elevated upon removal of MMA{sup III}; increased levels of ROS that play a role in MMA{sup III} induced-DNA damage; and decreased PARP activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}.

  16. [The favorable effect of humic acid based complex micro-element preparations in cadmium exposure].

    PubMed

    Hudák, A; Náray, M; Nagy, I; Molnár, M; Gömöry, I; Ungváry, G

    1997-06-01

    The authors have studied the effect of consumption of a humic acid based complex microelement preparation (potassium, magnesium, iron, zinc, manganese, copper, vanadium, cobalt, molibden, selenium bound to humic acids) for six weeks (10 ml daily) on the biological exposure indices (blood and urine cadmium levels) and clinical laboratory parameters (liver and kidney tests, blood picture) of men (n = 18; 39.7 +/- 10.4 years of age;) working in cadmium exposure for 8.3 +/- 5.0 years. The initial mean blood and urine cadmium levels of the non-smoking subjects was twice higher than that of the non-smoking male controls living in the same urban area (n = 35), and significantly correlated with the length of exposure. Their mean serum alanin-aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl-transferase, creatinine, uric acid and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase levels were significantly higher than that of the controls. After the six-week treatment blood cadmium level, activity of serum alanin-aminotransferase, serum uric acid and urinary protein concentrations decreased significantly, the abnormal serum iron levels normalized. According to this results, the absorption of cadmium decreased on the effect of the complex microelement supplementation and the adverse laboratory changes attributable partly to cadmium exposure improved. Therefore humic acid based complex microelement supplementation is recommended as an effective tool for prevention and health protection in occupational cadmium exposure as well as for smokers known to be considerably burdened by cadmium. PMID:9254361

  17. Time course of systemic oxidative stress and inflammatory response induced by an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Marchini, T.; Magnani, N.D.; Paz, M.L.; Vanasco, V.; Tasat, D.; González Maglio, D.H.; and others

    2014-01-15

    It is suggested that systemic oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases associated with the exposure to particulate matter (PM). The aim of this work was to evaluate the time changes of systemic markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash (ROFA). Female Swiss mice were intranasally instilled with a ROFA suspension (1.0 mg/kg body weight) or saline solution, and plasma levels of oxidative damage markers [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) and protein carbonyls], antioxidant status [reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, ascorbic acid levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity], cytokines levels, and intravascular leukocyte activation were evaluated after 1, 3 or 5 h of exposure. Oxidative damage to lipids and decreased GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in ROFA-exposed mice as early as 1 h. Afterwards, increased protein oxidation, decreased ascorbic acid content and SOD activity were found in this group at 3 h. The onset of an adaptive response was observed at 5 h after the ROFA exposure, as indicated by decreased TBARS plasma content and increased SOD activity. The observed increase in oxidative damage to plasma macromolecules, together with systemic antioxidants depletion, may be a consequence of a systemic inflammatory response triggered by the ROFA exposure, since increased TNF-α and IL-6 plasma levels and polymorphonuclear leukocytes activation was found at every evaluated time point. These findings contribute to the understanding of the increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, in association with environmental PM inhalation. - Highlights: • An acute exposure to ROFA triggers the occurrence of systemic oxidative stress. • Changes in plasmatic oxidative stress markers appear as early as 1 h after exposure. • ROFA induces proinflammatory cytokines release and intravascular leukocyte activation. • PMN

  18. Optimal SNR exposure time for speckle imaging: experimental results with frequency-dependent detector noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, David W.; Suzuki, Andrew H.; von Bokern, Mark A.; Keating, Donna D.; Roggemann, Michael C.

    1994-06-01

    We review recent arguments for using increased spectral bandwidth and exposure times to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio of speckle imaging estimators and discuss the tradeoff between camera exposure time and the number of data frames collected when observing time is fixed. We compare experimental results with a previously-derived expression for optimal exposure time and find reasonable agreement after accounting for frequency-dependent camera noise.

  19. Behavioral and developmental effects in suckling mice following maternal exposure to the mycotoxin secalonic acid D.

    PubMed

    Bolon, B; St Omer, V E

    1989-10-01

    Pregnant mice (dams) were gavaged once on gestational day 13 with 4 ml/kg of dimethylsulfoxide vehicle containing 0 (groups 15, 25 and negative control) or 25 (positive behavioral teratogenic control group) mg/kg of secalonic acid D (SAD). While nursing their offspring, dams were gavaged on postgestational days 1 to 10 with vehicle containing 0 (negative and positive control groups), 15 (group 15) or 25 (group 25) mg/kg/day of SAD. Gestational lengths, maternal pregnancy weights, litter sizes, neonatal sex ratios, neonatal physical appearance and female birth weights were unaffected by prenatal treatment, but male pups born to positive control dams weighed less (p less than 0.05) than negative control group. Compared to negative control, the positive control dams gained significantly more weight while nursing their offspring. Prenatal (positive control) and postnatal (15, 25) SAD exposure delayed ontogeny of surface righting, olfactory discrimination and hindlimb grip behaviors in males and females, and testes descent in males. Negative geotaxis in male and female offspring of group 25 and male offspring of positive control group, as well as times of incisor eruptions of both sexes in groups 15 and 25 were delayed. A significant dose-response effect in olfactory discrimination existed between the groups exposed to postnatal SAD. SAD was behaviorally teratogenic following both prenatal and early postnatal exposure. PMID:2622978

  20. Making fate and exposure models for freshwater ecotoxicity in life cycle assessment suitable for organic acids and bases.

    PubMed

    van Zelm, Rosalie; Stam, Gea; Huijbregts, Mark A J; van de Meent, Dik

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater fate and exposure factors were determined for organic acids and bases, making use of the knowledge on electrical interaction of ionizing chemicals and their sorption to particles. The fate factor represents the residence time in the environment whereas exposure factors equal the dissolved fraction of a chemical. Multimedia fate, exposure, and effect model USES-LCA was updated to take into account the influence of ionization, based upon the acid dissociation constant (pK(a)) of a chemical, and the environmental pH. Freshwater fate (FF) and exposure (XF) factors were determined for 415 acids and 496 bases emitted to freshwater, air, and soil. The relevance of taking account of the degree of ionization of chemicals was tested by determining the ratio (R) of the new vs. fate and exposure factors determined with USES-LCA suitable for neutral chemicals only. Our results show that the majority of freshwater fate and exposure factors of chemicals that are largely ionized in the environment are larger with the ionics model compared to the factors determined with the neutrals model version. R(FF) ranged from 2.4×10(-1) to 1.6×10(1) for freshwater emissions, from 1.2×10(-2) to 2.0×10(4) for soil emissions and from 5.8×10(-2) to 6.0×10(3) for air emissions, and R(XF) from 5.3×10(-1) to 2.2×10(1). Prediction of changed solid-water partitioning, implying a change in runoff and in removal via sedimentation, and prediction of negligible air-water partition coefficient, leading to negligible volatilization were the main contributors to the changes in freshwater fate factors. PMID:22884491

  1. CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO DIBROMOACETIC ACID, A WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT, DIMINISHES PRIMORDIAL FOLLICLES IN THE RABBIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to dibromoacetic acid (DBA), a commonly occurring water disinfection by-product, has detrimental effects on spermatogenesis and fertility in rats and rabbits. Despite indications of important reproductive consequences of DBA exposure in males, reproductive sequelae follo...

  2. Another hot tub hazard. Toxicity secondary to bromine and hydrobromic acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Burns, M J; Linden, C H

    1997-03-01

    We describe the clinical course of two patients who developed acute pneumonitis followed by reactive airways dysfunction syndrome after bathing in a hot tub. Additional findings were present and suggested that exposure to a corrosive agent was responsible. Bromine and hydrobromic acid generated from a widely used water disinfectant were implicated as the underlying cause. Physicians should be alert to the possibility that such exposures may initiate or exacerbate inflammatory pulmonary disease. PMID:9118727

  3. Time-space modeling of journey-time exposure to traffic-related air pollution using GIS.

    PubMed

    Gulliver, John; Briggs, David J

    2005-01-01

    Journey-time exposures represent an important, though as yet little-studied, component of human exposure to traffic-related air pollution, potentially with important health effects. Methods for assessing journey-time exposures, either as part of epidemiological studies or for policy assessment, are, however, poorly developed. This paper describes the development and testing of a GIS-based system for modeling human journey-time exposures to traffic-related air pollution: STEMS (Space-Time Exposure Modeling System). The model integrates data on source activity, pollutant dispersion, and travel behavior to derive individual- or group-level exposure measures to atmospheric pollution. The model, which is designed to simulate exposures of people as they move through a changing air pollution field, was developed, validated, and trialed in Northampton, UK. The system currently uses ArcInfo to couple four separate submodels: a source activity/emission model (SATURN), a proprietary atmospheric dispersion model (ADMS-Urban), an empirically derived background air pollution model, and a purposely designed time-activity-based exposure model (TOTEM). This paper describes the structure of the modeling system; presents results of field calibration, validation, and sensitivity analysis; and illustrates the use of the model to analyze journey-time exposures of schoolchildren. PMID:15476729

  4. Hepatotoxicity Induced by Subchronic Exposure of Fluoride and Chlorpyrifos in Wistar Rats: Mitigating Effect of Ascorbic Acid.

    PubMed

    Raina, Rajinder; Baba, Naseer Ahmad; Verma, Pawan K; Sultana, Mudasir; Singh, Maninder

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the ameliorative properties of ascorbic acid against the subchronic effect of co-exposure of fluoride (F) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) on oxidative damage markers such as lipid peroxidation (MDA) and antioxidant defense system in the liver of adult Wistar rats. The animal groups were provided with either vehicle or ascorbic acid (60 mg/kg, b.w.) or NOAEL dose of fluoride (1 ppm) or CPF (1 mg/kg, b.w.) or ten times of such doses orally alone and in combination or pre-treated with ascorbic acid along with co-exposure of F and CPF every consecutive day for 28 days. Hepatic damage marker analysis in blood revealed that aspartate and alanine aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase were significantly (P < 0.05) increased with single or combined exposure of F or CPF at either dose levels. Significant increased oxidative damage of hepatocytes as indicated by increased MDA levels with decrease in tissue ascorbate and free radical scavenging enzymes like catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase was observed in groups treated with either F or CPF as well as in combinedly treated animals as compared to control animals. Supplementation of ascorbic acid restored the hepatic specific marker enzymes in blood following co-exposure of F and CPF at lower doses which were otherwise increased in the F and CPF co-exposed rats. The results show that ascorbic acid supplementation with F and CPF prevents or diminishes the hepatic damage in rats co-exposed to toxicants and may act as a putative protective agent against toxicant-induced liver tissue injury. PMID:25669166

  5. Evaluation of the toxicity data for peracetic acid in deriving occupational exposure limits: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Pechacek, Nathan; Osorio, Magdalena; Caudill, Jeff; Peterson, Bridget

    2015-02-17

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a peroxide-based chemistry that is highly reactive and can produce strong local effects upon direct contact with the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Given its increasing prominence in industry, attention has focused on health hazards and associated risks for PAA in the workplace. Occupational exposure limits (OEL) are one means to mitigate risks associated with chemical hazards in the workplace. A mini-review of the toxicity data for PAA was conducted in order to determine if the data were sufficient to derive health-based OELs. The available data for PAA frequently come from unpublished studies that lack sufficient study details, suffer from gaps in available information and often follow unconventional testing methodology. Despite these limitations, animal and human data suggest sensory irritation as the most sensitive endpoint associated with inhalation of PAA. Rodent RD50 data (the concentration estimated to cause a 50% depression in respiratory rate) were selected as the critical studies in deriving OELs. Based on these data, a range of 0.36-0.51mg/m(3) (0.1-0.2ppm) was calculated for a time-weighted average (TWA), and 1.2-1.7mg/m(3) (0.4-0.5ppm) as a range for a short-term exposure limit (STEL). These ranges compare favorably to other published OELs for PAA. Considering the applicable health hazards for this chemistry, a joint TWA/STEL OEL approach for PAA is deemed the most appropriate in assessing workplace exposures to PAA, and the selection of specific values within these proposed ranges represents a risk management decision. PMID:25542141

  6. Global Metabolomic Profiling Reveals an Association of Metal Fume Exposure and Plasma Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiung-yu; Fan, Tianteng; Su, Li; Chen, Feng; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Welding-associated air pollutants negatively affect the health of exposed workers; however, their molecular mechanisms in causing disease remain largely unclear. Few studies have systematically investigated the systemic toxic effects of welding fumes on humans. Objectives To explore the effects of welding fumes on the plasma metabolome, and to identify biomarkers for risk assessment of welding fume exposure. Methods The two-stage, self-controlled exploratory study included 11 boilermakers from a 2011 discovery panel and 8 boilermakers from a 2012 validation panel. Plasma samples were collected pre- and post-welding fume exposure and analyzed by chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Eicosapentaenoic or docosapentaenoic acid metabolic changes post-welding were significantly associated with particulate (PM2.5) exposure (p<0.05). The combined analysis by linear mixed-effects model showed that exposure was associated with a statistically significant decline in metabolite change of eicosapentaenoic acid [(95% CI) = −0.013(−0.022∼−0.004); p = 0.005], docosapentaenoic acid n3 [(95% CI) = −0.010(−0.018∼−0.002); p = 0.017], and docosapentaenoic acid n6 [(95% CI) = −0.007(−0.013∼−0.001); p = 0.021]. Pathway analysis identified an association of the unsaturated fatty acid pathway with exposure (pStudy−2011 = 0.025; pStudy−2012 = 0.021; pCombined = 0.009). The functional network built by these fatty acids and their interactive genes contained significant enrichment of genes associated with various diseases, including neoplasms, cardiovascular diseases, and lipid metabolism disorders. Conclusions High-dose exposure of metal welding fumes decreases unsaturated fatty acids with an exposure-response relationship. This alteration in fatty acids is a potential biological mediator and biomarker for exposure-related health disorders. PMID:24143234

  7. Retention of Idioms Following One-Time Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuterskiold, Christina; Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana

    2013-01-01

    This study explored retention of idioms and novel (i.e. newly created or grammatically generated) expressions in English-speaking girls following exposure only once during a conversation. Our hypothesis was that idioms, because of their inherent holistic, nonliteral and social characteristics, are acquired differently and more rapidly than novel…

  8. Optimum exposure time for speckle imaging through the atmosphere using the bispectrum technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrae, Kimberley A.; Roggemann, Michael C.; Welsh, Byron M.

    1996-10-01

    Bispectrum speckle imaging uses the average of many short exposure frames to eliminate atmospheric effects on images. Unfortunately, objects are often dim, requiring longer exposure times to collect enough photons to reconstruct an image. We investigate this trade-off using a computer simulation to create image frames under various seeing conditions, then determine the exposure time that yields the highest signal-to-noise ratio for the unbiased speckle interferometry estimator and the lowest mean square error for the reconstructed phase. We have found that for low light levels and for high read noise cases the optimum exposure time is greater than one Greenwood coherence time.

  9. Ascorbic Acid Ameliorates Nicotine Exposure Induced Impaired Spatial Memory Performance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sirasanagandla, SR; Rooben, RK; Rajkumar; Narayanan, SN; Jetti, R

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The long lasting behavioural and cognitive impairments in offspring prenatally exposed to nicotine have been confirmed in animal models. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ascorbic acid on prenatal nicotine exposure induced behavioural deficits in male offspring of rats. Methods: The pregnant Wistar dams were divided into four groups of six rats: control, vehicle control, nicotine and nicotine+ascorbic acid groups. The nicotine group received daily dose of subcutaneous injections of 0.96 mg/kg body weight (bw) nicotine free base throughout gestation. Pregnant dams in nicotine+ascorbic acid group were first given nicotine free base (0.96 mg/kg bw/day; subcutaneous route) followed by ascorbic acid (50 mg/kg bw/day, orally) daily throughout gestation. The cognitive function of male offspring of all the experimental groups was studied using Morris water maze test at postnatal day 40. Results: Prenatal nicotine exposure altered spatial learning and memory in male offspring. However, treatment with ascorbic acid ameliorated these changes in rats. Conclusion: Ascorbic acid supplementation was found to be effective in preventing the prenatal nicotine exposure induced cognitive deficits in rat offspring to some extent. PMID:25429474

  10. Polymer Effects on Acid Generation Efficiency Using EUV and DUV Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dentinger

    2000-05-30

    Thin resist films (< 1500 {angstrom}) based on DUV chemical approaches have been demonstrated for use in EUV lithography. Resists with good sensitivity (5--6 mJ/cm{sup 2}) were observed but imaging mechanisms, in particular as they affect sensitivity, are poorly understood. To clarify mechanisms leading to photosensitivity, acid-generation efficiency at both EUV and DUV wavelengths was measured for the most promising EUV resist compositions as well as initial radiation damage experiments. In previous work, polymer composition was found to be more important in determining the relative dose to print of resists to EUV and DUV radiation than was PAG composition. Here, acid generating efficiency for several polymers upon exposure to EUV and DW are compared to gain insight into the role of the polymer and PAG in converting the incident EUV photon energy into resist images. It is shown that acid generation efficiencies at EUV do not track efficiencies measured on identical films with DUV exposures, and is attributable to polymer and polymer/PAG interactions. No particular structural feature of the polymer could be correlated to the acid generation results. Radiation damage studies showed that polymers that create acid in different yields at EUV do not show differences in radiation damage, as detected by dissolution rate changes. In addition, it is shown that no significant dissolution altering mechanisms occur with EW radiation at relevant exposure doses. The authors conclude that photospeed differences between EUV and DUV are quantitatively attributable to acid generation efficiencies for the compositions studied.

  11. Near-Real-Time Analysis of the Phenotypic Responses of Escherichia coli to 1-Butanol Exposure Using Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Theresah N. K.; Athamneh, Ahmad I. M.; Wallace, Robert S.; Collakova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to study the time course of phenotypic responses of Escherichia coli (DH5α) to 1-butanol exposure (1.2% [vol/vol]). Raman spectroscopy is of interest for bacterial phenotyping because it can be performed (i) in near real time, (ii) with minimal sample preparation (label-free), and (iii) with minimal spectral interference from water. Traditional off-line analytical methodologies were applied to both 1-butanol-treated and control cells to draw correlations with Raman data. Here, distinct sets of Raman bands are presented that characterize phenotypic traits of E. coli with maximized correlation to off-line measurements. In addition, the observed time course phenotypic responses of E. coli to 1.2% (vol/vol) 1-butanol exposure included the following: (i) decreased saturated fatty acids levels, (ii) retention of unsaturated fatty acids and low levels of cyclopropane fatty acids, (iii) increased membrane fluidity following the initial response of increased rigidity, and (iv) no changes in total protein content or protein-derived amino acid composition. For most phenotypic traits, correlation coefficients between Raman spectroscopy and traditional off-line analytical approaches exceeded 0.75, and major trends were captured. The results suggest that near-real-time Raman spectroscopy is suitable for approximating metabolic and physiological phenotyping of bacterial cells subjected to toxic environmental conditions. PMID:25157078

  12. [Development of breathing chest radiography: study of exposure timing].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Inoue, Hitoshi

    2003-08-01

    The flat-panel detector (FPD) has been introduced into clinical practice. A modified FPD, which has the ability to obtain dynamic chest radiographs, was introduced into our hospital, and clinical testing is ongoing. Both the inspiratory and expiratory phases have to be included in dynamic chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the most appropriate chest radiography signal for observation of the respiratory process. We prepared ten protocol patterns that differed in terms of respiratory phase at X-ray exposure, exposure duration, and signal multiplicity. We also performed preliminary experiments and administered several questionnaires to ten volunteers. The volunteers breathed according to vocal and visual signals, and their respiratory waves were recorded by spirometer. The most appropriate protocol was similar to the method used for conventional chest radiography. PMID:12960952

  13. Perinatal exposure to endocrine disruptors: sex, timing and behavioral endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Palanza, Paola; Nagel, Susan C; Parmigiani, Stefano; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2016-01-01

    Of the approximately 85,000 chemicals in use, 1000 have been identified as having the ability to disrupt normal endocrine function. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during critical period in brain differentiation (prenatal and neonatal life) via the mother can alter the course of the development of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a very high volume chemical used in plastic, resins and other products, and virtually everyone examined has detectable BPA. BPA has estrogenic activity and is one of the most studied EDCs. We review evidence from studies in rodents using dose levels relevant to human exposure. BPA alters behavior and eliminates or in some cases reverses sexually dimorphic behaviors observed in unexposed animals. PMID:27019862

  14. Chronic cigarette smoke exposure adversely alters /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid metabolism in rat lungs, aortas and platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Lubawy, W.C.; Valentovic, M.A.; Atkinson, J.E.; Gairola, G.C.

    1983-08-08

    Male rats were exposed to freshly generated cigarette smoke once daily, 5 times a week for 10 weeks. Inhalation of smoke was verified by elevated carboxyhemoglobin in blood sampled immediately after smoke exposure and by increased lung aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity 24 hours after the last smoke exposure. Aortic rings isolated from smoke-exposed rats synthesized less prostacyclin (PGI2) from /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid than rings from sham rats. Platelets from smoke-exposed rats synthesized more thromboxane (TXA2) from /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid than platelets from room controls but not those from sham rats. Lung microsomes from smoke-exposed rats synthesized more TXA2 and had a lower PGI2/TXA2 ratio than lung microsomes from room controls and shams. It is concluded that chronic cigarette smoke exposure alters arachidonic acid metabolism in aortas, platelets and lungs in a manner resulting in decreased PGI2 and increased TXA2, thereby creating a condition favoring platelet aggregation and a variety of cardiovascular diseases.

  15. EXPOSURE DOMAINS: ROLE OF TIMING, PATTERN AND MAGNITUDE OF EXPOSURE ON HEALTH RISKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental health risk assessment may be broadly separated into assessment of risks from exposures to agents affecting health endpoints for which it may be presumed there is no dose threshold, and to agents affecting endpoints that more likely have a dose threshold. For hea...

  16. Acute leukaemia after exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Timonen, T T; Palva, I P

    1980-01-01

    Acute leukaemia is known to develop in many cases of benzene-induced pancytopenia [1]. This is a report of the development of acute leukaemia in a patient who had apparently recovered from pancytopenia after chronic exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid. PMID:6769284

  17. NITROGEN DIOXIDE EXPOSURE AND LUNG ANTIOXIDANTS IN ASCORBIC ACID-DEFICIENT GUINEA PIGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have previously found that ascorbic acid (AA) deficiency in guinea pigs enhances the pulmonary toxicity of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The present study showed that exposure to NO2 (4.8 ppm, 3 hr) significantly increased lung lavage fluid protein (a sensitive indicator of...

  18. Neurobehavioral effects of exposure to propionic acid revisited-Does psychosocial stress interfere with distractive effects in volunteers?

    PubMed

    Pacharra, Marlene; Schäper, Michael; Kleinbeck, Stefan; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Golka, Klaus; van Thriel, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Local irritants stimulate the nervous system via chemosensory pathways that trigger cognitive distraction, subjective complaints about impaired health, and physiological defense reflexes (e.g. eye-blinks). At workplaces and in the environment chemical exposures often co-occur with psychosocial stress. This study investigated if stress modulates adverse effects of exposure to the local irritant and malodorant propionic acid (PA). Forty-eight participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (false negative feedback+salient surveillance) or control group. In a cross-over design, both groups were exposed for 4h to PA in concentrations of 0.3 and 0-20ppm (time-weighted average=10ppm). In the experimental group, the stress protocol induced moderate psychosocial stress as indicated by salivary cortisol and subjective responses. Despite concentration-dependent increases in chemosensory perceptions and symptoms, the level of exposure to PA had no impact upon the results of four out of six neurobehavioral tests. In the sustained attention test, there was a significant increase in error rates that corresponded to the exposure levels. However, a concentration-dependent impairment of spatial working memory and an adverse increase in eye-blink frequency were restricted to the control group. Stressed participants had shorter simple reaction times and high eye-blink frequency irrespective of exposure suggesting enhanced alertness. Psychosocial stress increased complaints, ocular irritation and unspecific symptoms at the end of the 0.3ppm exposure to a level that was comparable with that in the control group during exposure to 0-20ppm. Results indicate that the adverse effects of a local irritant and psychosocial stress are non-additive. PMID:27246649

  19. Identification of Dynamic Changes in Proteins Associated with the Cellular Cytoskeleton after Exposure to Okadaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Opsahl, Jill A.; Ljostveit, Sonja; Solstad, Therese; Risa, Kristin; Roepstorff, Peter; Fladmark, Kari E.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of cells to the diarrhetic shellfish poison, okadaic acid, leads to a dramatic reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture and loss of cell-cell contact. When cells are exposed to high concentrations of okadaic acid (100–500 nM), the morphological rearrangement is followed by apoptotic cell death. Okadaic acid inhibits the broad acting Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which results in hyperphosphorylation of a large number of proteins. Some of these hyperphosphorylated proteins are most likely key players in the reorganization of the cell morphology induced by okadaic acid. We wanted to identify these phosphoproteins and searched for them in the cellular lipid rafts, which have been found to contain proteins that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. By using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture cells treated with okadaic acid (400 nM) could be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules and cell adhesion structures. A large number of these okadaic acid-regulated proteins have previously also been shown to be similarly regulated prior to cell proliferation and migration. Our results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment. PMID:23708184

  20. Acute effects of chlorinated resin acid exposure on juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.J.; Sweeting, R.M.; Farrell, A.P.; McKeown, B.A.; Johansen, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    The effects of an acute exposure to either 14-monochlorodehydroabietic acid (MCDHAA) or 12,14-dichlorodehydroabietic acid (DCDHAA) were examined in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The experimentally determined 96-h LC50 values (and their 95% confidence limits) were 1.03 (0.72, 1.48) and 0.91 (0.70, 1.21) mg/L, for MCDHAA and DCDHAA, respectively. To measure effects on several biochemical parameters, swimming performance, and disease resistance, juvenile trout were exposed for 24 h to sublethal concentrations of one or the other resin acid in an intermittent-flow respirometer. Hematocrit, plasma lactate, and liver protein were significantly affected by exposure to the highest dose (80% of the 96-h LC50 value) of either of the resin acids. Plasma cortisol levels were 14- and 3-fold higher than were controls. Resistance to infection by Aeromonas salmonicida was significantly reduced; the cumulative percent mortalities due to furunculosis in fish exposed to MCDHAA or DCDHAA reached 20 and 26%, respectively. Swimming performance, measured as critical swimming speed (mean values 6.32 {+-} 0.20 and 5.93 {+-} 0.15 body lengths per second for MCDHAA and DCDHAA, respectively), was not significantly affected by resin acid exposure.

  1. Evaluation of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip under experimental and natural exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, P A; Wildman, E E; Pankey, J W

    1990-08-01

    A postmilking teat dip containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide was evaluated by experimental challenge and in two herds under natural exposure. The test product had an efficacy of 78.9% against Staphylococcus aureus and 52.5% against Streptococcus agalactiae in the experimental challenge trial. The product was compared with a 1% iodine product in a 15-mo natural exposure study. Post-dipping with chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide reduced incidence of udder infection by major mastitis pathogens 36.1% when data were combined from the two herds. The 1% iodine and the chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide products were not equivalent for major mastitis pathogens; the test product was more effective. Incidence of udder infection by environmental mastitis pathogens was reduced 36.8% in both herds combined. Efficacy of the two teat dips was equivalent for environmental pathogens. PMID:2229601

  2. Altered behavioral development in Nrf2 knockout mice following early postnatal exposure to valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Melody A.; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Kong, Ah-Ng; Wagner, George C

    2015-01-01

    Early exposure to valproic acid results in autism-like neural and behavioral deficits in humans and other animals through oxidative stress-induced neural damage. In the present study, valproic acid was administered to genetically altered mice lacking the Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2) gene on postnatal day 14 (P14). Nrf2 is a transcription factor that induces genes that protect against oxidative stress. It was found that valproic acid-treated Nrf2 knockout mice were less active in open field activity chambers, less successful on the rotorod, and had deficits in learning and memory in the Morris water maze compared to the valproic acid-treated wild type mice. Given these results, it appears that Nrf2 knockout mice were more sensitive to the neural damage caused by valproic acid administered during early development. PMID:25454122

  3. Assessment of exposure to carbon disulfide in viscose production workers from urinary 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid determinations.

    PubMed

    Riihimäki, V; Kivistö, H; Peltonen, K; Helpiö, E; Aitio, A

    1992-01-01

    The follow-up of environmental carbon disulfide (CS2) exposure and urinary excretion of 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TTCA) among 20 operatives over a 4-day working week in two viscose producing factories confirmed earlier observations that TTCA is a sensitive and reliable indicator of exposure to CS2. Exposure to as low as 0.5-1.0 ppm (1.6-3.2 mg/m3) of CS2 (8-hour time-weighted average [TWA]) was associated with detectable amounts of TTCA in end-of-shift urine. Moreover, the excretion of TTCA, relative to estimated CS2 uptake, appeared surprisingly constant in the studied work force. Approximately 3% (range 2-6.5%) of absorbed CS2 was detected in urine as TTCA. The proportional TTCA excretion did not show dose dependency in the estimated CS2 dose range which varied by about 20-fold. TTCA elimination exhibited both a fast (T 1/2 6 hour) and a slow (T 1/2 68 hour) phase. The slow elimination is compatible with a high lipid solubility and reversible protein binding of CS2. Consequently, urinary excretion of TTCA, relative to CS2 exposure, increased by about a third during the workweek. Urinary TTCA concentration of 4.5 mmol/mol creatinine in a postshift sample corresponded to a TWA exposure to 10 ppm CS2 towards the end of the working week. PMID:1415281

  4. Assessment of exposure to carbon disulfide in viscose production workers from urinary 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Riihimaeki, V.K.; Kivistoe, H.P.; Peltonen, K.; Helpioe, E.A.; Aitio, A. )

    1992-01-01

    The follow-up of environmental carbon disulfide (CS2) exposure and urinary excretion of 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TTCA) among 20 operatives over a 4-day working week in two viscose producing factories confirmed earlier observations that TTCA is a sensitive and reliable indicator of exposure to CS2. Exposure to as low as 0.5-1.0 ppm (1.6-3.2 mg/m3) of CS2 (8-hour time-weighted average [TWA]) was associated with detectable amounts of TTCA in end-of-shift urine. Moreover, the excretion of TTCA, relative to estimated CS2 uptake, appeared surprisingly constant in the studied work force. Approximately 3% (range 2-6.5%) of absorbed CS2 was detected in urine as TTCA. The proportional TTCA excretion did not show dose dependency in the estimated CS2 dose range which varied by about 20-fold. TTCA elimination exhibited both a fast (T 1/2 6 hour) and a slow (T 1/2 68 hour) phase. The slow elimination is compatible with a high lipid solubility and reversible protein binding of CS2. Consequently, urinary excretion of TTCA, relative to CS2 exposure, increased by about a third during the workweek. Urinary TTCA concentration of 4.5 mmol/mol creatinine in a postshift sample corresponded to a TWA exposure to 10 ppm CS2 towards the end of the working week.

  5. The Timing of Exposure in Clinic-Based Treatment for Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gryczkowski, Michelle R.; Tiede, Michael S.; Dammann, Julie E.; Jacobsen, Amy Brown; Hale, Lisa R.; Whiteside, Stephen P. H.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines treatment length and timing of exposure from two child anxiety disorders clinics. Data regarding symptoms and treatment characteristics for 28 youth were prospectively obtained through self, parent, and therapist report at each session. Information regarding length of treatment, timing of exposure initiation, and…

  6. Physiological, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of impaired seawater tolerance following exposure of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, smolts to acid and aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monette, M.Y.; Yada, T.; Matey, V.; McCormick, S.D.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the physiological, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of impaired ion regulation in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, smolts following acute acid and aluminum (Al) exposure. Smolts were exposed to: control (pH 6.5, 3.4??gl-1 Al), acid and low Al (LAl: pH 5.4, 11??gl-1 Al), acid and moderate Al (MAl: pH 5.3, 42??gl-1 Al), and acid and high Al (HAl: pH 5.4, 56??gl-1 Al) for two and six days. At each time-point, smolts were sampled directly from freshwater treatment tanks and after a 24h seawater challenge. Exposure to acid/MAl and acid/HAl led to accumulation of gill Al, substantial alterations in gill morphology, reduced gill Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) activity, and impaired ion regulation in both freshwater and seawater. Exposure to acid/MAl for six days also led to a decrease in gill mRNA expression of the apical Cl- channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator I), increased apoptosis upon seawater exposure, an increase in the surface expression of mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) within the filament epithelium of the gill, but reduced abundance of gill NKA-positive MRCs. By contrast, smolts exposed to acid and the lowest Al concentration exhibited minor gill Al accumulation, slight morphological modifications in the gill, and impaired seawater tolerance in the absence of a detectable effect on freshwater ion regulation. These impacts were accompanied by decreased cell proliferation, a slight increase in the surface expression of MRCs within the filament epithelium, but no impact on gill apoptosis or total MRC abundance was observed. However, MRCs in the gills of smolts exposed to acid/LAl exhibited morphological alterations including decreased size, staining intensity, and shape factor. We demonstrate that the seawater tolerance of Atlantic salmon smolts is extremely sensitive to acute exposure to acid and low levels of Al, and that the mechanisms underlying this depend on the time-course and severity of Al exposure. We propose that when smolts are

  7. Effect of Exposure Time and Organic Matter on Efficacy of Antimicrobial Compounds against Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Kalchayanand, Norasak; Koohmaraie, Mohammad; Wheeler, Tommy L

    2016-04-01

    Several antimicrobial compounds are in commercial meat processing plants for pathogen control on beef carcasses. However, the efficacy of the method used is influenced by a number of factors, such as spray pressure, temperature, type of chemical and concentration, exposure time, method of application, equipment design, and the stage in the process that the method is applied. The objective of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of time of exposure of various antimicrobial compounds against nine strains of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and four strains of Salmonella in aqueous antimicrobial solutions with and without organic matter. Non-O157 STEC, STEC O157:H7, and Salmonella were exposed to the following aqueous antimicrobial solutions with or without beef purge for 15, 30, 60, 120, 300, 600, and 1,800 s: (i) 2.5% lactic acid, (ii) 4.0% lactic acid, (iii) 2.5% Beefxide, (iv) 1% Aftec 3000, (v) 200 ppm of peracetic acid, (vi) 300 ppm of hypobromous acid, and (vii) water as a control. In general, increasing exposure time to antimicrobial compounds significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased the effectiveness against pathogens tested. In aqueous antimicrobial solutions without organic matter, both peracetic acid and hypobromous acid were the most effective in inactivating populations of STEC and Salmonella, providing at least 5.0-log reductions with exposure for 15 s. However, in antimicrobials containing organic matter, 4.0% lactic acid was the most effective compound in reducing levels of STEC and Salmonella, providing 2- to 3-log reductions with exposure for 15 s. The results of this study indicated that organic matter and exposure time influenced the efficacy of antimicrobial compounds against pathogens, especially with oxidizer compounds. These factors should be considered when choosing an antimicrobial compound for an intervention. PMID:27052859

  8. Should we relax seismic criteria for shorter system exposure times?

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, C.A.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

    1996-12-01

    Structures are conventionally designed for a level of earthquake-induced ground motion associated with a specified annual frequency of exceedance. Recently, a question has been raised as to whether the design basis seismic load can be reduced for systems with exposure durations much shorter than the normal economic life of a facility implying that a greater annual frequency of exceedance can be justified. Examples are temporary structures and structures with a short remaining life. With the intent of initiating a dialogue for establishing a well-founded basis for design of such systems, this paper identifies factors that might influence their design, introduces some fundamental safety principles that should be considered and reviews several related analyses that suggest bases for such reductions.

  9. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28 d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice.

  10. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28 d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice. PMID:26066376

  11. Controlled exposures of volunteers to respirable carbon and sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.R.; Avol, E.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Ruchuan Peng; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1992-06-01

    Respirable carbon or fly ash particles are suspected to increase the respiratory toxicity of coexisting acidic air pollutants, by concentrating acid on their surfaces and so delivering it efficiently to the lower respiratory tract. To investigate this issue, the authors exposed 15 healthy and 15 asthmatic volunteers in a controlled-environment chamber to four test atmospheres: (1) clean air; (2) 0.5-{mu}m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol at {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from water solution; (3) 0.5-{mu}m carbon aerosol at {approx}250 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from highly pure carbon black with specific surface area comparable to ambient pollution particles; and (4) carbon as in (3) plus {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of ultrafine H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol generated from fuming sulfuric acid. Electron microscopy showed that nearly all acid in (4) became attached to carbon particle surfaces, and that most particles remained in the sub-{mu}m size range. Exposures were performed double-blind, 1 week apart. They lasted 1 hr each, with alternate 10-min periods of heavy exercise (ventilation {approx}50 L/min) and rest. Subjects gargled citrus juice before exposure to suppress airway ammonia. Lung function and symptoms were measured pre-exposure, after initial exercise, and at end-exposure. Bronchial reactivity to methacholine was measured after exposure. Statistical analyses tested for effects of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or carbon, separate or interactive, on health measures.

  12. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  13. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  14. Chronic Dietary Exposure to Aristolochic Acid and Kidney Function in Native Farmers from a Croatian Endemic Area and Bosnian Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Jelaković, Bojan; Karanović, Sandra; Dika, Živka; Kos, Jelena; Dickman, Kathleen; Šekoranja, Maja; Poljičanin, Tamara; Mišić, Maja; Premužić, Vedran; Abramović, Mirta; Matijević, Vesna; Miletić Medved, Marica; Cvitković, Ante; Edwards, Karen; Fuček, Mirjana; Leko, Ninoslav; Teskera, Tomislav; Laganović, Mario; Čvorišćec, Dubravka; Grollman, Arthur P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Improvements in agricultural practices in Croatia have reduced exposure to consumption of aristolochic acid-contaminated flour and development of endemic (Balkan) nephropathy. Therefore, it was hypothesized that Bosnian immigrants who settled in an endemic area in Croatia 15–30 years ago would be at lower risk of developing endemic nephropathy because of reduced exposure to aristolochic acid. To test this hypothesis, past and present exposure to aristolochic acid, proximal tubule damage as a hallmark of endemic nephropathy, and prevalence of CKD in Bosnian immigrants were analyzed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In this cross-sectional observational study from 2005 to 2010, 2161 farmers were divided into groups: indigenous inhabitants from endemic nephropathy and nonendemic nephropathy villages and Bosnian immigrants; α-1 microglobulin-to-creatinine ratio >31.5 mg/g and eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 were considered to be abnormal. Results CKD and proximal tubule damage prevalence was significantly lower in Bosnian immigrants than inhabitants of endemic nephropathy villages (6.9% versus 16.6%; P<0.001; 1.3% versus 7.3%; P=0.003, respectively); 20 years ago, Bosnian immigrants observed fewer Aristolochia clematitis in cultivated fields (41.9% versus 67.8%) and fewer seeds among wheat seeds (6.1% versus 35.6%) and ate more purchased than homemade bread compared with Croatian farmers from endemic nephropathy villages (38.5% versus 14.8%, P<0.001). Both Croatian farmers and Bosnian immigrants observe significantly fewer Aristolochia plants growing in their fields compared with 15–30 years ago. Prior aristolochic acid exposure was associated with proximal tubule damage (odds ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 2.58; P=0.02), whereas present exposure was not (odds ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.75 to 2.30; P=0.33). Furthermore, immigrant status was an independent negative predictor of proximal tubule damage

  15. Duration and Timing of Exposure to Neighborhood Poverty and the Risk of Adolescent Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Wodtke, Geoffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Theory suggests that the impact of neighborhood poverty depends on both the duration and timing of exposure. Previous research, however, does not properly analyze the sequence of neighborhoods to which children are exposed throughout the early life course. This study investigates the effects of different longitudinal patterns of exposure to disadvantaged neighborhoods on the risk of adolescent parenthood. It follows a cohort of children in the PSID from age 4 to 19 and uses novel methods for time-varying exposures that overcome critical limitations of conventional regression when selection processes are dynamic. Results indicate that sustained exposure to poor neighborhoods substantially increases the risk of becoming a teen parent and that exposure to neighborhood poverty during adolescence may be more consequential than exposure earlier during childhood. PMID:23720166

  16. Duration and timing of exposure to neighborhood poverty and the risk of adolescent parenthood.

    PubMed

    Wodtke, Geoffrey T

    2013-10-01

    Theory suggests that the impact of neighborhood poverty depends on both the duration and timing of exposure. Previous research, however, has not properly analyzed the sequence of neighborhoods to which children are exposed throughout the early life course. This study investigates the effects of different longitudinal patterns of exposure to disadvantaged neighborhoods on the risk of adolescent parenthood. It follows a cohort of children in the PSID from age 4 to 19 and uses novel methods for time-varying exposures that overcome critical limitations of conventional regression when selection processes are dynamic. Results indicate that sustained exposure to poor neighborhoods substantially increases the risk of becoming a teen parent and that exposure to neighborhood poverty during adolescence may be more consequential than exposure earlier during childhood. PMID:23720166

  17. Real-time Measurements of Amino Acid and Protein Hydroperoxides Using Coumarin Boronic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Radoslaw; Zielonka, Jacek; Gapys, Ewa; Marcinek, Andrzej; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2014-01-01

    Hydroperoxides of amino acid and amino acid residues (tyrosine, cysteine, tryptophan, and histidine) in proteins are formed during oxidative modification induced by reactive oxygen species. Amino acid hydroperoxides are unstable intermediates that can further propagate oxidative damage in proteins. The existing assays (oxidation of ferrous cation and iodometric assays) cannot be used in real-time measurements. In this study, we show that the profluorescent coumarin boronic acid (CBA) probe reacts with amino acid and protein hydroperoxides to form the corresponding fluorescent product, 7-hydroxycoumarin. 7-Hydroxycoumarin formation was catalase-independent. Based on this observation, we have developed a fluorometric, real-time assay that is adapted to a multiwell plate format. This is the first report showing real-time monitoring of amino acid and protein hydroperoxides using the CBA-based assay. This approach was used to detect protein hydroperoxides in cell lysates obtained from macrophages exposed to visible light and photosensitizer (rose bengal). We also measured the rate constants for the reaction between amino acid hydroperoxides (tyrosyl, tryptophan, and histidine hydroperoxides) and CBA, and these values (7–23 m−1 s−1) were significantly higher than that measured for H2O2 (1.5 m−1 s−1). Using the CBA-based competition kinetics approach, the rate constants for amino acid hydroperoxides with ebselen, a glutathione peroxidase mimic, were also determined, and the values were within the range of 1.1–1.5 × 103 m−1 s−1. Both ebselen and boronates may be used as small molecule scavengers of amino acid and protein hydroperoxides. Here we also show formation of tryptophan hydroperoxide from tryptophan exposed to co-generated fluxes of nitric oxide and superoxide. This observation reveals a new mechanism for amino acid and protein hydroperoxide formation in biological systems. PMID:24928516

  18. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) smolts require more than two weeks to recover from acidic water and aluminium exposure.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Tom O; Ebbesson, Lars O E; Handeland, Sigurd O; Kroglund, Frode; Finstad, Bengt; Angotzi, Anna R; Stefansson, Sigurd O

    2013-10-15

    The detrimental effects of acid rain and aluminium (Al) on salmonids have been extensively studied, yet knowledge about the extent and rate of potential recovery after exposures to acid and Al episodes is limited. Atlantic salmon smolts in freshwater (FW) were exposed for 2 and 7-day episodes (ACID2 and ACID7, respectively) to low pH (5.7±0.2) and inorganic aluminium (Ali; 40±4 μg) and then transferred to good water quality, control water (CW; pH 6.8±0.1; <14±2 μg Ali). Al accumulation on gills after 2 and 7 days of acid/Al exposure was 35.3±14.1 and 26.6±1.8 μg g(-1) dry weight, respectively. These elevated levels decreased 2 days post transfer to CW and remained higher than in control (CON; 5-10 μg Ali) for two weeks. Plasma Na(+) levels in ACID2 and ACID7 smolts decreased to 141±0.8 and 138.6±1.4mM, respectively, and remained significantly lower than CON levels for two weeks post transfer to CW. Similarly, plasma Cl(-) levels in ACID7 smolts (124.3±2.8mM) were significantly lower than in CON, with Cl(-) levels remaining significantly lower in ACID7 (126.2±4.8 mM) and ACID2 (127.6±3.7 mM) than in CON following 9 and 14 days post-transfer to CW, respectively. ACID2 and ACID7 smolts sustained elevated plasma glucose levels post transfer to CW suggesting elevated stress for more than a week following exposure. While gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity was only slightly affected in ACID2 and not in ACID7 smolts in FW, acid/Al exposure resulted in a transient decrease in NKA activity following SW exposure in both groups. Acid/Al episodes had limited impact on isoform specific NKA α-subunit mRNA during exposure. However, the transfer of ACID2 and ACID7 smolts to CW showed an increase in NKAα1a mRNA (the FW isoform) and inhibited the up-regulation of NKAα1b (the SW isoform), probably resulting in higher abundance of the enzyme favouring ion uptake. Gill caspase 3B gene transcription did not change in acid/Al treated smolts, indicating no increased

  19. The design of a miniature personal exposure monitor for continuous real-time data acquisition in electromagnetic field exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, N.H.; Conroy, T.J.; Wilson, B.W.

    1994-06-01

    The design of a small, light-weight personal exposure monitor suitable for use in EMF exposure assessment studies is nearing completion at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The monitor is designed to be non-obtrusive, battery operated, and able to continuously record extremely low-frequency (ELF) (1Ohz--500hz) magnetic-field data. It also captures high-frequency (500hz--1OMhz) transients that exceed a preset threshold, retaining the largest transients in memory. The monitor can record one or more days of data on a single easily replaceable, credit-card-size memory (PCMCIA). A battery charge will last a minimum of one day. Batteries are rechargeable and easily replaced. A data-compression algorithm is under development that will be tailored to the efficient compression of low-frequency EMF signals and will permit data to be logged for at least one day before swapping memory cards. The memory cards are readable by a base- station computer that can perform analysis of the data. The monitor is designed to accommodate four inputs supporting full-field sensors as well as a proposed ocular exposure measurement system. Our design effort has shown that a practical personal exposure monitor for EMF can be built based on current technology, continuous logging of real-time ELF waveforms is both feasible and practical, and such a device is appropriate for proposed EMF exposure studies.

  20. Lead exposure assessment from study near a lead-acid battery factory in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Laiguo; Xu, Zhencheng; Liu, Ming; Huang, Yumei; Fan, Ruifang; Su, Yanhua; Hu, Guocheng; Peng, Xiaowu; Peng, Xiaochun

    2012-07-01

    The production of lead-acid battery in China covered about one-third of the world total output and there are more than 2000 lead-acid battery factories. They may cause the major environment lead pollution. Blood lead levels of several hundreds of residents were over 100 μg/L due to the waste discharges from a lead-acid battery factory in Heyuan, Guangdong province. This study aimed to find out the environmental lead sources, the human lead exposure pathways, and the amplitudes from a lead-acid battery factory. The study results showed that lead levels in soil, dust, tree leaves and human blood declined with the distances increased from the production site. Twenty nine of 32 participants had blood lead levels of over 100 μg/L with an exceptional high value of 639 μg/L for one child. This result suggested that the lead-acid battery production from this factory has caused the elevated lead levels in its neighboring environment and residents. Dust intake was the dominant exposure pathway for humans (over 90%). The lead levels found in adult and toddler (6.19 and 50.1 μg/kg/d, respectively) in the polluted area were far higher than the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) of 25 μg/kg body weight (translated into 3.5 μg/kg/d), which was established by the joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee. Blood lead levels within the family members were strongly correlated with the house dust lead levels. Our results in this study suggested that further studies in this area should be performed to assess human exposure and relevant human health risks from living close to lead-acid battery factories. PMID:22578522

  1. Exposure assessment of food preservatives (sulphites, benzoic and sorbic acid) in Austria.

    PubMed

    Mischek, Daniela; Krapfenbauer-Cermak, Christine

    2012-01-01

    An exposure assessment was performed to estimate the potential intake of preservatives in the Austrian population. Food consumption data of different population groups, such as preschool children aged 3-6 years, female and male adults aged 19-65 years were used for calculation. Levels of the preservatives in food were derived from analyses conducted from January 2007 to August 2010. Dietary intakes of the preservatives were estimated and compared to the respective acceptable daily intakes (ADIs). In the average-intake scenario, assuming that consumers randomly consume food products that do or do not contain food additives, estimated dietary intakes of all studied preservatives are well below the ADI for all population groups. Sulphite exposure accounted for 34%, 84% and 89% of the ADI in preschool children, females and males, respectively. The mean estimated daily intake of benzoic acid was 32% (preschool children), 31% (males) and 36% (females) of the ADI. Sorbic acid intakes correspond to 7% of the ADI in preschool children and 6% of the ADI in adults. In the high-intake scenario assuming that consumers always consume food products that contain additives and considering a kind of brand loyalty of consumers, the ADI is exceeded for sulphites among adults (119 and 124%, respectively). Major contributors to the total intake of sulphites were wine and dried fruits for adults. Mean estimated dietary intakes of benzoic acid exceeded the ADI in all population groups, 135% in preschool children, 124% in females and 118% of the ADI in males, respectively. Dietary intakes of sorbic acid are well below the ADI, accounting for a maximum of 30% of the ADI in preschool children. The highest contributors to benzoic and sorbic acid exposure were fish and fish products mainly caused by high consumption data of this large food group, including also mayonnaise-containing fish salads. Other important sources of sorbic acid were bread, buns and toast bread and fruit and vegetable

  2. Impact of time-activity patterns on personal exposure to black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dons, Evi; Int Panis, Luc; Van Poppel, Martine; Theunis, Jan; Willems, Hanny; Torfs, Rudi; Wets, Geert

    2011-07-01

    Time-activity patterns are an important determinant of personal exposure to air pollution. This is demonstrated by measuring personal exposure of 16 participants for 7 consecutive days: 8 couples of which one person was a full-time worker and the other was a homemaker; both had a very different time-activity pattern. We used portable aethalometers to measure black carbon levels with a high temporal resolution and a PDA with GPS-logger and electronic diary. The exposure to black carbon differs between partners by up to 30%, although they live at the same location. The activity contributing most to this difference is transport: Average exposure in transport is 6445 ng m -3, followed by exposure during shopping (2584 ng m -3). Average exposure is lowest while sleeping (1153 ng m -3) and when doing home-based activities (1223 ng m -3). Full-time workers spend almost twice as much time in transport as the homemakers. As a result of the study design we measured in several different homes, shops, cars, etc. enabling a better insight in true overall exposure in those microenvironments. Other factors influencing personal exposure are: background concentrations and location of residence in an urban, suburban or rural environment.

  3. Population exposure to ultraviolet radiation in Finland 1920-1995: Exposure trends and a time-series analysis of exposure and cutaneous melanoma incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kojo, Katja . E-mail: katja.kojo@uta.fi; Jansen, Christer T.; Nybom, Pia; Huurto, Laura; Laihia, Jarmo; Ilus, Taina; Auvinen, Anssi

    2006-05-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the principal cause of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). However, the relation between CMM and UVR exposure is not clear. We present the trends of population exposure to UVR and conduct a time-series analysis of the relation between UVR exposure and incidence of CMM. Data on CMM incidence were obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Clothing coverage of the body was scored from archival photographs and the proportion of uncovered skin was used as a measure of solar exposure. Information on the number of sunny resort holidays, duration of annual holidays, and sunscreen sales were obtained from various sources. Exposed skin area doubled from 1920 to 1985. The average duration of annual holidays increased 30-fold. The number of sunny resort holidays and the sales of sunscreens increased rapidly from 1980. CMM was most strongly associated with solar exposure of 5-19 years earlier. There is a considerable decrease in clothing coverage during the 20th century. UVR exposure preceding CMM occurrence 4 years or less does not appear relevant, whereas the period 5-19 years prior to CMM occurrence might be the most relevant period. However, findings of ecological studies may not be applicable at the individual level.

  4. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-04-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

  5. Determination of Exposure to the Alternaria Mycotoxin Tenuazonic Acid and Its Isomer allo-Tenuazonic Acid in a German Population by Stable Isotope Dilution HPLC-MS(3).

    PubMed

    Hövelmann, Yannick; Hickert, Sebastian; Cramer, Benedikt; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-08-31

    The content of the Alternaria toxin tenuazonic acid and its isomer allo-tenuazonic acid was quantitated in urine of a German cohort (n = 48) using a newly developed and successfully validated solid phase extraction based stable isotope dilution HPLC-MS(3) method. Tenuazonic acid was detected in all of the samples and quantifiable in 97.9% of these samples in a range of 0.16-44.4 ng/mL (average = 6.58 ng/mL) or 0.07-63.8 ng/mg creatinine (average = 8.13 ng/mg creatinine). allo-Tenuazonic acid was for the first time detected in human urine (95.8% of the samples positive) and quantitated in 68.8% of the samples in a range of 0.11-5.72 ng/mL (average = 1.25 ng/mL) or 0.08-10.1 ng/mg creatinine (average = 1.52 ng/mg creatinine), representing 3.40-25.0% of the sum of both isomers (average = 12.4%). Food-frequency questionnaires were used to document food consumption of study participants to correlate mycotoxin exposure to nutritional habits. Although no statistically significant correlation between consumption of a specific food and urinary excretion of tenuazonic acid could be determined, a trend regarding elevated intake of cereal products and higher excretion of tenuazonic acid was evident. On the basis of these results, a provisional mean daily intake (PDI) for both tenuazonic acid and allo-tenuazonic acid was calculated, being 0.183 and 0.025 μg/kg body weight, respectively. A combined mean PDI for both isomers amounts to 0.208 μg/kg body weight with the highest individual PDI for one of the participants (1.582 μg/kg body weight) slightly exceeding the threshold of toxicological concern assumed for tenuazonic acid by the European Food Safety Authority of 1.500 μg/kg body weight. This is the first study to investigate the tenuazonic acid content in human urine of a larger sample cohort enabling the calculation of PDIs for tenuazonic acid and allo-tenuazonic acid. PMID:27452834

  6. Influence of different anoxic time exposures on active biomass, protozoa and filamentous bacteria in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Perez, S; Fermoso, F G; Arnaiz, C

    2016-01-01

    Medium-sized wastewater treatment plants are considered too small to implement anaerobic digestion technologies and too large for extensive treatments. A promising option as a sewage sludge reduction method is the inclusion of anoxic time exposures. In the present study, three different anoxic time exposures of 12, 6 and 4 hours have been studied to reduce sewage sludge production. The best anoxic time exposure was observed under anoxic/oxic cycles of 6 hours, which reduced 29.63% of the biomass production compared with the oxic control conditions. The sludge under different anoxic time exposures, even with a lower active biomass concentration than the oxic control conditions, showed a much higher metabolic activity than the oxic control conditions. Microbiological results suggested that both protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria decrease under anoxic time exposures compared to oxic control conditions. The anoxic time exposures 6/6 showed the highest reduction in both protozoa density, 37.5%, and abundance of filamentous bacteria, 41.1%, in comparison to the oxic control conditions. The groups of crawling ciliates, carnivorous ciliates and filamentous bacteria were highly influenced by the anoxic time exposures. Protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria have been shown as promising bioindicators of biomass production reduction. PMID:27508364

  7. Deoxyribonucleic Acid Degradation in Bacillus subtilis During Exposure to Actinomycin D1

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, James L.

    1968-01-01

    At high concentrations (10 μg/ml), actinomycin D inhibited deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in Bacillus subtilis. Inhibition occurred quickly (in less than 1 min) and was complete. In strain 23 thy his, inhibition of DNA synthesis by actinomycin D was followed by partial degradation of one of the two daughter strands to acid-soluble products. Degradation began at the replication point and proceeded over a distance equal to about 12% of a chromosome in length. Actinomycin D played some essential part in degradation, since exposure of the cells to other treatments or agents which inhibit growth did not lead to the above result. PMID:4967199

  8. EFFECTS OF THE DURATION AND TIMING OF DIETARY METHYL PARATHION EXPOSURE ON BOBWHITE REPRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two northern bobwhite (colinus virginianus) reproduction tests were conducted concurrently to evaluate how the duration and time of initiation of methyl parathion exposure affeCted dose-response relationships of reproductive parameters. n the long-term exposure test, pairs of adu...

  9. Effect of time-activity adjustment on exposure assessment for traffic-related ultrafine particles

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Kevin J; Levy, Jonathan I; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Patton, Allison P; Durant, John L; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Zamore, Wig; Brugge, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Exposures to ultrafine particles (<100 nm, estimated as particle number concentration, PNC) differ from ambient concentrations because of the spatial and temporal variability of both PNC and people. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of time-activity adjustment on exposure assignment and associations with blood biomarkers for a near-highway population. A regression model based on mobile monitoring and spatial and temporal variables was used to generate hourly ambient residential PNC for a full year for a subset of participants (n=140) in the Community Assessment of Freeway Exposure and Health study. We modified the ambient estimates for each hour using personal estimates of hourly time spent in five micro-environments (inside home, outside home, at work, commuting, other) as well as particle infiltration. Time-activity adjusted (TAA)-PNC values differed from residential ambient annual average (RAA)-PNC, with lower exposures predicted for participants who spent more time away from home. Employment status and distance to highway had a differential effect on TAA-PNC. We found associations of RAA-PNC with high sensitivity C-reactive protein and Interleukin-6, although exposure-response functions were non-monotonic. TAA-PNC associations had larger effect estimates and linear exposure-response functions. Our findings suggest that time-activity adjustment improves exposure assessment for air pollutants that vary greatly in space and time. PMID:25827314

  10. The choice of optimum exposure time for a simple electron counting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. D.; Reinhard, D.; Monot, R.

    1991-10-01

    The question of an optimum exposure time for an event counting charge coupled device electron detection system is discussed [B. D. Hall, M. Flüeli, J. -P. Borel, and R. Monot, Rev. Sci. Instrum. (in press)]. The system is a null-event detector, providing a single piece of information per exposure: whether an event has not been detected. It is shown that when the number of exposure periods is fixed, optimum operation conditions require high exposures, in spite of the loss of information due to multiple events being detected as single ones.

  11. Ethanol exposure affects gene expression in the embryonic organizer and reduces retinoic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Yelin, Ronit; Schyr, Racheli Ben-Haroush; Kot, Hadas; Zins, Sharon; Frumkin, Ayala; Pillemer, Graciela; Fainsod, Abraham

    2005-03-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a set of developmental malformations caused by alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), the strongest manifestation of FASD, results in short stature, microcephally and facial dysmorphogenesis including microphthalmia. Using Xenopus embryos as a model developmental system, we show that ethanol exposure recapitulates many aspects of FAS, including a shortened rostro-caudal axis, microcephally and microphthalmia. Temporal analysis revealed that Xenopus embryos are most sensitive to ethanol exposure between late blastula and early/mid gastrula stages. This window of sensitivity overlaps with the formation and early function of the embryonic organizer, Spemann's organizer. Molecular analysis revealed that ethanol exposure of embryos induces changes in the domains and levels of organizer-specific gene expression, identifying Spemann's organizer as an early target of ethanol. Ethanol also induces a defect in convergent extension movements that delays gastrulation movements and may affect the overall length. We show that mechanistically, ethanol is antagonistic to retinol (Vitamin A) and retinal conversion to retinoic acid, and that the organizer is active in retinoic acid signaling during early gastrulation. The model suggests that FASD is induced in part by an ethanol-dependent reduction in retinoic acid levels that are necessary for the normal function of Spemann's organizer. PMID:15708568

  12. Benzene exposure, assessed by urinary trans,trans-muconic acid, in urban children with elevated blood lead levels.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, V M; Davoli, C T; Heller, P J; Fitzwilliam, A; Peters, H L; Sunyer, J; Murphy, S E; Goldstein, G W; Groopman, J D

    1996-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of using trans,trans-muconic acid (MA) as a biomarker of environmental benzene exposure. A secondary aim was to provide data on the extent of exposure to selected toxicants in a unique population consisting of inner-city children who were already overexposed to one urban hazard, lead. Potential sources of benzene were assessed by a questionnaire. Exposure biomarkers included urinary MA and cotinine and blood lead. Mean MA was 176.6 +/- 341.7 ng/mg creatinine in the 79 children who participated. A wide range of values was found with as many as 10.1%, depending on the comparison study, above the highest levels reported in adults not exposed by occupation. Mean MA was increased in children evaluated in the afternoon compared to morning, those at or above the median for time spent playing near the street, and those studied in the first half of the investigation. MA levels were not associated with blood lead or, consistently, with either questionnaire environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) data or cotinine. As expected, the mean blood lead level was elevated (23.6 micrograms/dl). Mean cotinine was also increased at 79.2 ng/mg creatinine. We conclude that the use of MA as a biomarker for environmental benzene exposure is feasible since it was detectable in 72% of subjects with a wide range of values present. In future studies, correlation of MA with personal air sampling in environmental exposure will be essential to fully interpret the significance of these findings. In addition, these inner-city children comprise a high risk group for exposure to environmental toxicants including ETS, lead, and probably benzene, based on questionnaire sources and its presence in ETS. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8919771

  13. Malignant lymphoma and exposure to chemicals, especially organic solvents, chlorophenols and phenoxy acids: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Hardell, L.; Eriksson, M.; Lenner, P.; Lundgren, E.

    1981-01-01

    A number of men with malignant lymphoma of the histiocytic type and previous exposure to phenoxy acids or chlorophenols were observed and reported in 1979. A matched case-control study has therefore been performed with cases of malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma). This study included 169 cases and 338 controls. The results indicate that exposure to phenoxy acids, chlorophenols, and organic solvents may be a causative factor in malignant lymphoma. Combined exposure of these chemicals seemed to increase the risk. Exposure to various other agents was not obviously different in cases and in controls. PMID:7470379

  14. Ascorbic acid abrogates microparticle generation and vascular injuries associated with high-pressure exposure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Bhopale, Veena M; Thom, Stephen R

    2015-07-01

    We hypothesized that pathological changes associated with elevations in annexin V-positive microparticles (MPs) following high-pressure exposures can be abrogated by ascorbic acid in a murine model. Mice exposed for 2 h to 790-kPa air and killed at 2 or 13 h postdecompression exhibited over threefold elevations in circulating MPs, as well as subgroups bearing Ly6G, CD41, Ter119, CD31, and CD142 surface proteins. There was evidence of significant neutrophil activation, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and vascular injury to brain, omentum, psoas, and skeletal muscles assessed as leakage of high-molecular-weight dextran. Prophylactic ascorbic acid (500 mg/kg ip) administration prevented all postdecompression neutrophil changes and vascular injuries. Ascorbic acid administration immediately after decompression abrogated most changes, but evidence of vascular leakage in the brain and skeletal muscle at 13 h postdecompression persisted. No significant elevations in these parameters occurred after injection of ascorbic acid alone. The findings support the idea that MP production occurring with exposures to elevated gas pressure is an oxidative stress response and that antioxidants may offer protection from pathological effects associated with decompression. PMID:25977448

  15. Repeated exposure of acidic beverages on esthetic restorative materials: An in-vitro surface microhardness study

    PubMed Central

    Sunny, Steffy M.; Rai, Kavita; Hegde, Amitha M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A manifold increase in the consumption of aerated beverages has witnessed a twin increase in tooth wear and raised demand for esthetic restorative materials. This study aimed to evaluate the surface microhardness changes of esthetic restorative materials following treatment with aerated beverages in an in-vitro situation. Material and Methods The initial surface microhardness of the restorative materials GC Fuji II LC, GC Fuji IX, Nano Glass ionomer, Resin and Nano composite was recorded. These materials were studied under 3 groups that included those exposed to the acidic beverages daily, weekly once in a month and those that had no exposures at all. The final surface microhardness of the materials was recorded following experimentation and was subjected to statistical comparisons. Results The restorative materials were compared for their surface microhardness changes following respective treatments using the T-test and One-way ANOVA analysis. Inter-comparisons between the groups showed statistical significance (p<.05), when treated with both the beverages. The five restorative materials revealed surface microhardness loss; the maximum reduction noticed with the Nano glass ionomer cement tested (p<.0005). Conclusions The surface microhardness of restorative materials markedly reduced upon repeated exposures with acidic beverages; the product with phosphoric acid producing the maximum surface microhardness loss. Key words:Restorative materials, acidic beverages, surface microhardness, resin composites, glass ionomers. PMID:27398183

  16. Chamber exposures of children to mixed ozone, sulfur dioxide, and sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Linn, W S; Gong, H; Shamoo, D A; Anderson, K R; Avol, E L

    1997-01-01

    To help assess acute health effects of summer air pollution in the eastern United States, we simulated ambient "acid summer haze" as closely as was practical in a laboratory chamber. We exposed young volunteers who were thought to be sensitive to this pollutant mixture on the basis of previous epidemiologic evidence. Specifically, we exposed 41 subjects aged 9-12 y to mixed ozone (0.10 ppm), sulfur dioxide (0.10 ppm), and 0.6-microm sulfuric acid aerosol (100 +/- 40 microg/m3, mean +/- standard deviation) for 4 h, during which there was intermittent exercise. Fifteen subjects were healthy, and 26 had allergy or mild asthma. The entire group responded nonsignificantly (p > .05) to pollution exposure (relative to clean air), as determined by spirometry, symptoms, and overall discomfort level during exercise. Subjects with allergy/asthma showed a positive association (p = .01) between symptoms and acid dose; in healthy subjects, that association was negative (p = .08). In these chamber-exposure studies, we noted less of an effect than was reported in previous epidemiologic studies of children exposed to ambient "acid summer haze." PMID:9169627

  17. Neurobehavioral effects during exposures to propionic acid--an indicator of chemosensory distraction?

    PubMed

    Hey, Kathrin; Juran, Stephanie; Schäper, Michael; Kleinbeck, Stefan; Kiesswetter, Ernst; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Golka, Klaus; Brüning, Thomas; van Thriel, Christoph

    2009-11-01

    The chemosensory effects of propionic acid (PA) in humans have not been conclusively studied and there is no established occupational exposure limit (OEL) in Germany. In addition to sensory irritation caused by PA, it was hypothesized that the annoying odor of PA might interfere with the performance results. There were 23 consenting healthy participants (12 female, 11 male) in the group studied. They were exposed for 4 h to PA in concentrations of 0.3, 5 and 10 ppm in a cross-over design. During these exposures, performance was recorded with four cognitive tests measuring response-inhibition, working memory, set-shifting, and divided attention. Odor annoyance, other chemosensory sensations, and acute symptoms were assessed before, during, and after exposure with standardized rating scales. Moderate odor annoyance and weak sensory irritation were reported during 5 and 10 ppm exposure conditions. The different levels of exposure to PA had no impact upon the results of three out of the four behavioral tests. The difficulties of the task were reflected in the results. However in the fourth, which was the response-inhibition task, there was significant increase in the error rates which corresponded to the exposure levels. Results from previous experiments suggested high odor annoyance at the investigated concentrations. Our findings showed that odor annoyance and reported sensory irritations were low. In conclusion, the hypothesis of a distractive effect due to the malodor of PA could not be confirmed. Only in concentrations as high as 10 ppm acute PA exposure affected the response accuracy of one of the four neurobehavioral task. For other more annoying substances, a neurobehavioral effect influenced by an indirect mechanism of resources competition is still conceivable. PMID:19733590

  18. Accounting for Unobservable Exposure Time Bias When Using Medicare Prescription Drug Data

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Elizabeth A.; Schneider, Kathleen M; Chrischilles, Elizabeth; Brooks, John M

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence and correlates of unobservable medication exposure time, and to recommend approaches for minimizing bias, in studies using Medicare Part D data.. Sample 179,065 Medicare patients hospitalized for an AMI in 2007 or 2008. Methods We compared two methods for creating medication exposure observation periods using acute care discharge vs. post-acute care discharge dates. We examined options for increasing cohort sizes by requiring different thresholds for observable days, or by using as a covariate, in the observation period. We calculated the extent and health status correlates of unobserved Medicare Part D exposure time and examined its association with receipt of beta-blockers. Results 39% of patients had unobservable time during the 30 day exposure assessment period following acute care; they were significantly older, had more comorbidity and longer acute care stays, had worse 1-year survival, and were significantly less likely to be classified as beta-blocker users. Using the alternative exposure assessment window, only 29% of the sample had unobservable time, and differences between groups were less pronounced. Significant gains in sample size can be obtained by restricting or controlling for the number of observable days required in the exposure assessment period. Conclusions Unobservable exposure time is common among Medicare Part D beneficiaries, and they are often in worse health. To retain patients with unobservable exposure time, we recommend stratifying patients on receipt of post-acute facility-based care, calculating and using observable days as a covariate and, when appropriate, using the discharge date from contiguous post-acute facility care for beginning the exposure assessment period. PMID:24834364

  19. Judgment of facial expressions of emotion as a function of exposure time.

    PubMed

    Kirouac, G; Doré, F Y

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to study the accuracy of judgment of facial expressions of emotions that were displayed for very brief exposure times. Twenty university students were shown facial stimuli that were presented for durations ranging from 10 to 50 msec. The data showed that accuracy of judgment reached a fairly high level even at very brief exposure times and that human observers are especially competent to process very rapid changes in facial appearance. PMID:6493929

  20. Accounting for time-dependent covariates whose levels are influenced by exposure status.

    PubMed

    Weiss, N S; Dublin, S

    1998-07-01

    When measuring the association between an exposure and disease, one must decide whether to account for confounding or modifying variables whose levels are altered by the presence of the exposure. For example, to assess the impact of cessation of unopposed estrogen therapy on the occurrence of endometrial cancer, a researcher needs to consider the duration of the estrogen therapy, a strong risk factor for endometrial cancer, as a potential confounder or effect modifier. Duration of estrogen therapy, however, is itself influenced by the decision to stop the therapy (the "exposure" of interest). In such a case, two distinct approaches may be taken, depending upon the question being considered. One may wish to assess the degree to which the exposure predicts disease incidence, over and above the additional variable, at some later point in time. In this case, it is appropriate to consider the value of the other variable (for example, duration) at that later time. On the other hand, one may also wish to measure the rate of disease beginning at the time of cessation of the exposure, relative to the corresponding rate in persons with continuing exposure Here, the most appropriate analysis considers the level of the confounding variable (for example, duration) measured only until the time of exposure of interest occurs (for example, cessation of unopposed estrogen therapy). Examples are given to illustrate that the specific question being addressed dictates the handling of covariates of this type. PMID:9647909

  1. New Approaches for Biomonitoring Exposure to the Human Carcinogen Aristolochic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Byeong Hwa; Sidorenko, Viktoriya S.; Rosenquist, Thomas A.; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Grollman, Arthur P.; Turesky, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Aristolochic acids (AA) are found in all Aristolochia herbaceous plants, many of which have been used worldwide for medicinal purposes for centuries. AA are causal agents of the chronic kidney disease entity termed aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and potent upper urinary tract carcinogens in humans. AAN and upper urinary tract cancers are endemic in rural areas of Croatia and other Balkan countries where exposure to AA occurs through the ingestion of home-baked bread contaminated with Aristolochia seeds. In Asia, exposure to AA occurs through usage of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs containing Aristolochia. Despite warnings from regulatory agencies, traditional Chinese herbs containing AA continue to be used world-wide. In this review, we highlight novel approaches to quantify exposure to AA, by analysis of aristolactam (AL) DNA adducts, employing ultraperformance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization/multistage mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MSn). DNA adducts are a measure of internal exposure to AA and serve as an important end point for cross-species extrapolation of toxicity data and human risk assessment. The level of sensitivity of UPLC-ESI/MSn surpasses the limits of detection of AL-DNA adducts obtained by 32P-postlabeling techniques, the most widely employed methods for detecting putative DNA adducts in humans. AL-DNA adducts can be measured by UPLC-ESI/MS3, not only in fresh frozen renal tissue, but also in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, an underutilized biospecimen for assessing chemical exposures, and in exfoliated urinary cells, a non-invasive approach. The frequent detection of AL DNA adducts in renal tissues, combined with the characteristic mutational spectrum induced by AA in TP53 and other genes provides compelling data for a role of AA in upper urothelial tract cancer. PMID:26366284

  2. Comparative responses of freshwater organisms to exposures of a commercial naphthenic acid.

    PubMed

    Kinley, Ciera M; McQueen, Andrew D; Rodgers, John H

    2016-06-01

    Comparative toxicity studies using unconfounded exposures can prioritize the selection of sensitive sentinel test species and refine methods for evaluating ecological risks of complex mixtures like naphthenic acids (NAs), a group of organic acids associated with crude oils and energy-derived waters that have been a source of aquatic toxicity. The objectives of this study were to compare responses of freshwater aquatic organisms (vertebrate, invertebrates, and a macrophyte; in terms of acute toxicity) to Fluka commercial NAs and to compare measured toxicity data with peer-reviewed toxicity data for other commercial NA sources and energy-derived NA sources. Exposures were confirmed using high performance liquid chromatography. Responses (7-d LC50s/EC50) ranged from 1.9 mg L(-1) for Pimephales promelas to 56.2 mg L(-1) for Typha latifolia. Following P. promelas in order of decreasing sensitivity were Ceriodaphnia dubia (7-d LC50 = 2.8 mg L(-1)), Hyalella azteca (7-d LC50 = 4.1 mg L(-1)), Chironomus dilutus (7-d LC50 = 6.5 mg L(-1)), and T. latifolia (7-d EC50 = 56.2 mg L(-1)), indicating that in terms of sensitivities, fish > invertebrates > plant for Fluka NAs in this study. Factors that affect exposures and measurements of exposures differ among commercial and energy-derived NAs and constrain comparisons. Despite differences in exposures, fish and invertebrates were relatively sensitive to both commercial and energy-derived NA sources (based on laboratory measurements and peer-reviewed data) and could be appropriate sentinel species for risk evaluations. PMID:27016812

  3. Water age, exposure time, and local flushing time in semi-enclosed, tidal basins with negligible freshwater inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; Defina, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of tidally flushed, semi-enclosed basins with negligible freshwater inflow, and under steady periodic flow conditions, three frequently used local transport time scales to quantify the efficiency of water renewal, namely water age, exposure time, and local flushing time are studied and compared to each other. In these environments, water renewal is strongly controlled by diffusion, and it is significantly affected by the return flow (i.e., the fraction of effluent water that returns into the basin on each flood tide). The definition of water age is here modified to account for the return flow, in analogy with exposure time and local flushing time. We consider approximate time scales, whose accuracy is analyzed, in order to overcome problems related to the size of the computational domain and to reduce the computational effort. A new approximate procedure is introduced to estimate water age, which is based on the water aging rate. Also, the concept of local flushing time as a relevant time scale is introduced. Under steady periodic conditions, we demonstrate that the local flushing time quantitatively corresponds to water age, and well approximates exposure time when the flow is dominated by diffusion. Since the effort required to compute water age and exposure time is greater than that required to compute the local flushing time, the present results can also have a practical interest in the assessment of water renewal efficiency of semi-enclosed water basins. The results of a modeling study, in which the lagoon of Venice is used as a benchmark, confirm the substantial quantitative equivalence between these three transport time scales in highly diffusive environments.

  4. Retrospective Exposure Estimation and Predicted versus Observed Serum Perfluorooctanoic Acid Concentrations for Participants in the C8 Health Project

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Verónica M.; Ryan, P. Barry; Steenland, Kyle; Bartell, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: People living or working in eastern Ohio and western West Virginia have been exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) released by DuPont Washington Works facilities. Objectives: Our objective was to estimate historical PFOA exposures and serum concentrations experienced by 45,276 non-occupationally exposed participants in the C8 Health Project who consented to share their residential histories and a 2005–2006 serum PFOA measurement. Methods: We estimated annual PFOA exposure rates for each individual based on predicted calibrated water concentrations and predicted air concentrations using an environmental fate and transport model, individual residential histories, and maps of public water supply networks. We coupled individual exposure estimates with a one-compartment absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) model to estimate time-dependent serum concentrations. Results: For all participants (n = 45,276), predicted and observed median serum concentrations in 2005–2006 are 14.2 and 24.3 ppb, respectively [Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (rs) = 0.67]. For participants who provided daily public well water consumption rate and who had the same residence and workplace in one of six municipal water districts for 5 years before the serum sample (n = 1,074), predicted and observed median serum concentrations in 2005–2006 are 32.2 and 40.0 ppb, respectively (rs = 0.82). Conclusions: Serum PFOA concentrations predicted by linked exposure and ADME models correlated well with observed 2005–2006 human serum concentrations for C8 Health Project participants. These individualized retrospective exposure and serum estimates are being used in a variety of epidemiologic studies being conducted in this region. PMID:21813367

  5. Latent carcinogenicity of early-life exposure to dichloroacetic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, Charles E; Hester, Susan D; Chorley, Brian N; Carswell, Gleta; George, Michael H; Ward, William; Vallanat, Beena; Ren, Hongzu; Fisher, Anna; Lake, April D; Okerberg, Carlin V; Gaillard, Elias T; Moore, Tanya M; Deangelo, Anthony B

    2015-07-01

    Environmental exposures occurring early in life may have an important influence on cancer risk later in life. Here, we investigated carryover effects of dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a small molecule analog of pyruvate with metabolic programming properties, on age-related incidence of liver cancer. The study followed a stop-exposure/promotion design in which 4-week-old male and female B6C3F1 mice received the following treatments: deionized water alone (dH2O, control); dH2O with 0.06% phenobarbital (PB), a mouse liver tumor promoter; or DCA (1.0, 2.0 or 3.5g/l) for 10 weeks followed by dH2O or PB (n = 20-30/group/sex). Pathology and molecular assessments were performed at 98 weeks of age. In the absence of PB, early-life exposure to DCA increased the incidence and number of hepatocellular tumors in male and female mice compared with controls. Significant dose trends were observed in both sexes. At the high dose level, 10 weeks of prior DCA treatment induced comparable effects (≥85% tumor incidence and number) to those seen after continuous lifetime exposure. Prior DCA treatment did not enhance or inhibit the carcinogenic effects of PB, induce persistent liver cytotoxicity or preneoplastic changes on histopathology or alter DNA sequence variant profiles within liver tumors compared with controls. Distinct changes in liver messenger RNA and micro RNA profiles associated with prior DCA treatment were not apparent at 98 weeks. Our findings demonstrate that early-life exposure to DCA may be as carcinogenic as life-long exposures, potentially via epigenetic-mediated effects related to cellular metabolism. PMID:25913432

  6. Growth response of Pinus ponderosa seedlings and mature tree branches to acid rain and ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.D.; Houpis, J.L.J.; Helms, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Forests of the central and southern Sierra Nevada in California have been subjected to chronic damage by ozone and other atmospheric pollutants for the past several decades. Until recently, pollutant exposure of northern Sierra Nevada forests has been mild but increasing population and changes in land use throughout the Sacramento Valley and Sierra Nevada foothills may lead to increased pollutant damage in these forests. Although, better documented in other regions of the United States, little is known regarding the potential for acidic precipitation damage to Sierra Nevada forests. Only recently have studies directed towards understanding the potential interactive effects of ozone and acidic precipitation been undertaken. A key issue in resolving potential regional impacts of pollutants on forests is the extent to which research results can be scaled across genotypes and life-stages. Most of the pollution research to date has been performed using seedlings with varying degrees of genetic control. It is important to determine if the results obtained in such studies can be extrapolated to mature trees and to different genetic sources. In this paper, we present results from a one-year study examining the interactive effects of foliar exposure to acidic rain and ozone on the growth of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), a conifer known to be sensitive to ozone. The response to pollutants is characterized for both seedlings and mature tree branches of three genotypes grown in a common environment.

  7. Estimates of the occupational exposure to tenorm in the phosphoric acid production plant in Iran.

    PubMed

    Fathabadi, N; Vasheghani Farahani, M; Moradi, M; Hadadi, B

    2012-09-01

    Phosphate rock is used world wide for manufacturing phosphoric acid and several chemical fertilisers. It is known that the phosphate rock contains various concentrations of uranium, thorium, radium and their daughters. The subject of this study is the evaluation of the radiation exposure to workers in the phosphoric acid production plant due to technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials that can result from the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials in phosphate ores used in the manufacturing of phosphoric acid. Radiation exposure due to direct gamma radiation, dust inhalation and radon gas has been investigated and external and internal doses of exposed workers have been calculated. Natural radioactivity due to (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th have been measured in phosphate rock, phosphogypsum, chemical fertilisers and other samples by gamma spectrometry system with a high-purity germanium. The average concentrations of (226)Ra and (40)K observed in the phosphate rock are 760 and 80 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Annual effective dose from external radiation had a mean value of ∼0.673 mSv y(-1). Dust sampling revealed greatest values in the storage area. The annual average effective dose from inhalation of long-lived airborne was 0.113 mSv y(-1). Radon gas concentrations in the processing plant and storage area were found to be of the same value as the background. In this study the estimated annual effective doses to workers were below 1 mSv y(-1). PMID:22361352

  8. Aristolochic acid exposure in Romania and implications for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Turesky, Robert J; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Brennan, Paul; Mates, Dana; Jinga, Viorel; Harnden, Patricia; Banks, Rosamonde E; Blanche, Helene; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Chopard, Priscilia; Letourneau, Louis; Lathrop, G Mark; Scelo, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aristolochic acid (AA) is a nephrotoxicant associated with AA nephropathy (AAN) and upper urothelial tract cancer (UUTC). Whole-genome sequences of 14 Romanian cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) recently exhibited mutational signatures consistent with AA exposure, although RCC had not been previously linked with AAN and AA exposure was previously reported only in localised rural areas. Methods: We performed mass spectrometric measurements of the aristolactam (AL) DNA adduct 7-(deoxyadenosin-N6-yl) aristolactam I (dA-AL-I) in nontumour renal tissues of the 14 Romanian RCC cases and 15 cases from 3 other countries. Results: We detected dA-AL-I in the 14 Romanian cases at levels ranging from 0.7 to 27 adducts per 108 DNA bases, in line with levels reported in Asian and Balkan populations exposed through herbal remedies or food contamination. The 15 cases from other countries were negative. Interpretation: Although the source of exposure is uncertain and likely different in AAN regions than elsewhere, our results demonstrate that AA exposure in Romania exists outside localised AAN regions and provide further evidence implicating AA in RCC. PMID:26657656

  9. Prenatal valproic acid exposure disrupts tonotopic c-Fos expression in the rat brainstem.

    PubMed

    Dubiel, A; Kulesza, R J

    2016-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by difficulties in communication and social interactions, restricted, repetitive behaviors and sensory abnormalities. Notably, the vast majority of individuals with ASD experience some degree of auditory dysfunction and we have recently reported consistent hypoplasia and dysmorphology in auditory brainstem centers in individuals with ASD. Prenatal exposure to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) is associated with an increased risk of ASD. In rodents, prenatal exposure to VPA is employed as an animal model of ASD and is associated with a number of anatomical, physiological and behavioral deficits, including hypoplasia and dysmorphology of auditory brainstem centers. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that such dysmorphology in VPA-exposed animals would translate into abnormal neuronal activity in brainstem circuits and irregular tonotopic maps. Herein, we have subjected control and VPA-exposed animals to 4- or 16-kHz tones and examined neuronal activation with immunohistochemistry for c-Fos. After these exposures, we identified significantly more c-Fos-positive neurons in the auditory brainstem of VPA-exposed animals. Additionally, we observed a larger dispersion of c-Fos-positive neurons and shifted tonotopic bands in VPA-exposed rats. We interpret these findings to suggest hyper-responsiveness to sounds and disrupted mapping of sound frequencies after prenatal VPA exposure. Based on these findings, we suggest that such abnormal patterns of activation may play a role in auditory processing deficits in ASD. PMID:27094734

  10. Prenatal valproic acid exposure disrupts tonotopic c-Fos expression in the rat brainstem.

    PubMed

    Dubiel, A; Kulesza, R J

    2015-12-17

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by difficulties with communication and social interactions, restricted, repetitive behaviors and sensory abnormalities. Additionally, the vast majority of subjects with ASD suffer some degree of auditory dysfunction and we have previously identified significant hypoplasia and dysmorphology in auditory brainstem centers in individuals with ASD. Prenatal exposure to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) is associated with an increased risk of ASD. In rodents, prenatal exposure to VPA is utilized as an animal model of ASD and is associated with a number of anatomical, physiological and behavioral deficits, including hypoplasia and dysmorphology in the auditory brainstem. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that such dysmorphology in VPA-exposed animals would translate into abnormal activity in brainstem circuits and irregular tonotopic maps. Herein, we have subjected control and VPA-exposed animals to 4 or 16 kHz tones and examined neuronal activation with immunohistochemistry for c-Fos. After these sound exposures, we found significantly more c-Fos-positive neurons in the auditory brainstem of VPA-exposed animals. Further, we found a larger dispersion of c-Fos-positive neurons and shifted tonotopic bands in VPA-exposed rats. We interpret these findings to suggest hyper-responsiveness to sounds and disrupted mapping of sound frequencies after prenatal VPA exposure. Based on these findings, we suggest that such abnormal patterns of activation may play a role in auditory processing deficits in ASD. PMID:26518464

  11. EXPOSURE OF FLORIDA AIRBOAT AQUATIC WEED APPLICATORS TO 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID (2,4-D)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Florida airboat handgun applicators were monitored for exposure to 2,4-Dichloro-phenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Four applicators were monitored with air samples, alpha cellulose patches, and 24 hr urine samples on 10 separate days. Estimated total body exposure averaged 15 + or - 2 m...

  12. Chronic caffeine or theophylline exposure reduces gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor site interactions.

    PubMed

    Roca, D J; Schiller, G D; Farb, D H

    1988-05-01

    Methylxanthines, such as caffeine and theophylline, are adenosine receptor antagonists that exert dramatic effects upon the behavior of vertebrate animals by increasing attentiveness, anxiety, and convulsive activity. Benzodiazepines, such as flunitrazepam, generally exert behavioral effects that are opposite to those of methylxanthines. We report the finding that chronic exposure of embryonic brain neurons to caffeine or theophylline reduces the ability of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to potentiate the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor. This theophylline-induced "uncoupling" of GABA- and benzodiazepine-binding site allosteric interactions is blocked by chloroadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, indicating that the chronic effects of theophylline are mediated by a site that resembles an adenosine receptor. We speculate that adverse central nervous system effects of long-term exposure to methylxanthines such as in caffeine-containing beverages or theophylline-containing medications may be exerted by a cell-mediated modification of the GABAA receptor. PMID:2835648

  13. Assessing human exposure to phthalic acid and phthalate esters from mineral water stored in polyethylene terephthalate and glass bottles.

    PubMed

    Montuori, P; Jover, E; Morgantini, M; Bayona, J M; Triassi, M

    2008-04-01

    Phthalic acid and phthalate esters are of growing interest due to their significant usage and potential toxicity. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and glass are both widely used materials for bottled drinking water. In this study, phthalic acid (PhA), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), diisobutyl phthalate (DiisoBP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) were analysed in a large number of Italian bottled water samples. These samples showed different concentrations of phthalates are nearly 20 times higher in samples bottled in PET than those from glass bottles with total levels of phthalates of 3.52 and 0.19 microg l(-1), respectively. However, the observed levels do not represent a significant exposure pathway when considering the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) reference dose (an estimate of a daily oral exposure to the human population, including sensitive subgroups, that is likely to be without an appreciable risk of deleterious effects during a lifetime). In addition, no significant correlation was found between the phthalate concentrations and the physicochemical properties of the different water samples, apart from the still/sparkling water parameter for the PET samples. In this instance, slightly higher concentrations were observed for the PET bottled still water samples than for the sparkling water samples, although no explanation has been found yet. PMID:18348049

  14. Time reducing exposure containing 18 fluorine flourodeoxyglucose master vial dispensing in hot lab: Omega technique.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vatturi Venkata Satya Prabhakar; Manthri, Ranadheer; Hemalatha, Pottumuthu; Kumar, Vuyyuru Navin; Azhar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Hot lab dispensing of large doses of 18 fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose in master vials supplied from the cyclotrons requires high degrees of skill to handle high doses. Presently practiced conventional method of fractionating from the inverted tiltable vial pig mounted on a metal frame has its own limitations such as increasing isotope handling times and exposure to the technologist. Innovative technique devised markedly improves the fractionating efficiency along with speed, precision, and reduced dose exposure. PMID:27095872

  15. Time reducing exposure containing 18 fluorine flourodeoxyglucose master vial dispensing in hot lab: Omega technique

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vatturi Venkata Satya Prabhakar; Manthri, Ranadheer; Hemalatha, Pottumuthu; Kumar, Vuyyuru Navin; Azhar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Hot lab dispensing of large doses of 18 fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose in master vials supplied from the cyclotrons requires high degrees of skill to handle high doses. Presently practiced conventional method of fractionating from the inverted tiltable vial pig mounted on a metal frame has its own limitations such as increasing isotope handling times and exposure to the technologist. Innovative technique devised markedly improves the fractionating efficiency along with speed, precision, and reduced dose exposure. PMID:27095872

  16. Research plan for establishing the effects of time varying noise exposures on community annoyance and acceptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsky, P. N.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a community noise survey to determine the effects of time varying noise exposures in residential communities is presented. Complex physical and human variables involved in the health and welfare effects of environmental noise and the number-level tradeoffs and time of day penalties are among the factors considered. Emphasis is placed on community reactions where noise exposures are equal in day or evening but differ in the night time, and the effects of ambient noise on more intense aircraft noise exposures. Thirteen different times of day and types of operation situations with exposed populations up to 8-10 miles from the airport are identified. A detailed personal interview questionnaire as well as specific instructions to interviewers are included.

  17. Long term exposure to respirable volcanic ash on Montserrat: a time series simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincks, T. K.; Aspinall, W. P.; Baxter, P. J.; Searl, A.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Woo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Frequent ash fallout from long-lived eruptions (with active phases greater than 5 years) may lead to local populations experiencing unacceptably high cumulative exposures to respirable particulate matter. Ash from Montserrat has been shown to contain significant levels of cristobalite and other reactive agents that are associated with an increased risk of developing pneumoconiosis (including silicosis) and other long-term health problems. There are a number of difficulties associated with estimating risks in populations due to uncertain and wide ranging individual exposures, change in behaviour with time and the natural variation in individual response. Present estimates of risk in workers and other population groups are simplifications based on a limited number of exposure measurements taken on Montserrat (1996-1999), and exposure-response curves from epidemiological studies of coal workers exposed to siliceous dust. In this paper we present a method for calculating the long-term cumulative exposure to cristobalite from volcanic ash by Monte Carlo simulation. Code has been written to generate synthetic time series for volcanic activity, rainfall, ash deposition and erosion to give daily ash deposit values and cristobalite fraction at a range of locations. The daily mean personal exposure for PM10 and cristobalite is obtained by sampling from a probability distribution, with distribution parameters dependent on occupation, ground deposit depth and daily weather conditions. Output from multiple runs is processed to calculate the exceedance probability for cumulative exposure over a range of occupation types, locations and exposure periods. Results are interpreted in terms of current occupational standards, and epidemiological exposure-response functions for silicosis are applied to quantify the long-term health risk. Assuming continuing volcanic activity, median risk of silicosis (profusion 1/0 or higher) for an average adult after 20 years continuous exposure is

  18. Investigating the American Time Use Survey from an Exposure Modeling Perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an evaluation of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' American Time Use Survey (ATUS) for potential use in modeling human exposures to environmental pollutants. The ATUS is a large, on-going, cross-sectional survey of where Americans spend time and what activ...

  19. Statistical Properties of Longitudinal Time-Activity Data for Use in Human Exposure Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the longitudinal properties of the time spent in different locations and activities is important in characterizing human exposure to pollutants. The results of a four-season longitudinal time-activity diary study in eight working adults are presented, with the goal ...

  20. Radiofrequency exposure in the French general population: band, time, location and activity variability.

    PubMed

    Viel, Jean-François; Cardis, Elisabeth; Moissonnier, Monika; de Seze, René; Hours, Martine

    2009-11-01

    Information on the exposure of individual persons to radiofrequency (RF) fields is scarce, although such data are crucial in order to develop a suitable exposure assessment method, and frame the hypothesis and design of future epidemiological studies. The main goal of this survey is to assess individual RF exposure on a population basis, while clarifying the relative contribution of different sources to the total exposure. A total of 377 randomly selected people were analyzed. Each participant was supplied with a personal exposure meter for 24-hour measurements (weekday), and kept a time-location-activity diary. Electric field strengths were recorded in 12 different RF bands every 13s. Summary statistics were calculated with the robust regression on order statistics method. Most of the time, recorded field strengths were not detectable with the exposure meter. Total field, cordless phones, WiFi-microwave, and FM transmitters stood apart with a proportion above the detection threshold of 46.6%, 17.2%, 14.1%, and 11.0%, respectively. The total field mean value was 0.201V/m, higher in urban areas, during daytime, among adults, and when moving. When focusing on specific channels, the highest mean exposure resulted from FM sources (0.044V/m), followed by WiFi-microwaves (0.038V/m), cordless phones (0.037V/m), and mobile phones (UMTS: 0.036V/m, UMTS: 0.037V/m). Various factors, however, contributed to a high variability in RF exposure assessment. These population-based estimates should therefore be confirmed by further surveys to better characterize the exposure situation in different microenvironments. PMID:19656570

  1. Dietary essential fatty acids change the fatty acid profile of rat neural mitochondria over time.

    PubMed

    Dyer, J R; Greenwood, C E

    1991-10-01

    This experiment examined the time course over which the amount of dietary essential fatty acids (EFA) affects brain mitochondrial fatty acids. Weanling rats were fed 20% (wt/wt) fat diets that contained either 4 or 15% (wt/wt of diet) EFA for 1, 2, 3 or 6 wk or a 10% EFA diet for 3 or 6 wk. The EFA ratio [18:2(n-6)/18:3(n-3)] of all diets was approximately 30. Fatty acid analysis of brain mitochondrial phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin revealed that the largest dietary effect was on 18:2(n-6), which was 30% higher in rats fed the 15 vs. 4% EFA diets after 1 wk. This difference increased to twofold by 3 wk and was still twofold after 6 wk. These results demonstrate several facts: 1) the response of 18:2(n-6) in cardiolipin to dietary EFA is very fast and large, relative to changes in other quantitatively major fatty acids observed in weanling rats; 2) the 18:2(n-6) level in neural cardiolipin stabilizes after 3 wk of feeding at a level dependent upon the amount of dietary EFA; and 3) at least one neural fatty acid, 18:2(n-6), is very sensitive to amounts of dietary EFA that are well above the animal's EFA requirement. PMID:1765818

  2. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure and Cancer Outcomes in a Contaminated Community: A Geographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kate; Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Weinberg, Janice M.; Webster, Thomas F.; Fletcher, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Background: Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been linked to cancer in occupational mortality studies and animal toxicologic research. Objective: We investigated the relationship between PFOA exposure and cancer among residents living near the DuPont Teflon-manufacturing plant in Parkersburg, West Virginia (WV). Methods: Our analyses included incident cases of 18 cancers diagnosed from 1996 through 2005 in five Ohio (OH) counties and eight WV counties. For analyses of each cancer outcome, controls comprised all other cancers in the study data set except kidney, pancreatic, testicular, and liver cancers, which have been associated with PFOA in animal or human studies. We applied logistic regression models to individual-level data to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and confidence intervals (CIs). For the combined analysis of OH and WV data, the exposure of interest was resident water district. Within OH, geocoded addresses were integrated with a PFOA exposure model to examine the relationship between cancer odds and categories of estimated PFOA serum. Results: Our final data set included 7,869 OH cases and 17,238 WV cases. There was a positive association between kidney cancer and the very high and high serum exposure categories [AOR = 2.0 (95% CI: 1.0, 3.9) n = 9 and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.3, 3.2) n = 22, respectively] and a null association with the other exposure categories compared with the unexposed. The largest AOR was for testicular cancer with the very high exposure category [2.8 (95% CI: 0.8, 9.2) n = 6], but there was an inverse association with the lower exposure groups, and all estimates were imprecise because of small case numbers. Conclusions: Our results suggest that higher PFOA serum levels may be associated with testicular, kidney, prostate, and ovarian cancers and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Strengths of this study include near-complete case ascertainment for state residents and well-characterized contrasts in predicted PFOA serum levels from six

  3. A comparison of acid aerosol and ozone exposure patterns in a summertime study of metropolitan Philadelphia

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, J.M.; Liang, C.S.K.; Koutrakis, P.; Suh, H.; Allen, G.; Burton, R.; Wilson, W.E.

    1994-12-31

    A study of acid aerosol and ozone exposure patterns was conducted for metropolitan Philadelphia between June and August 1992. Included in the study design were daily monitoring of particulate strong acidity (PSA), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}) and hourly ozone data (O{sub 3}) at a citywide network. A continuous sulfate thermal speciation analyzer at one site collected hourly concentration data for SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} aerosol. The current paper presents temporal patterns of continuous measurements for O{sub 3} and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} aerosol. Both pollutants had similar daily peak periods in the mid-afternoon, although the range for O{sub 3} was much greater than for SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} aerosol. The daily peak values were also correlated for the two species during the study period. It seems that many of the same meteorological factors affect the spatial and temporal patterns for these lung irritants. Hence, the similarity in exposure patterns for O{sub 3} and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} aerosol is reason for concern, regarding possible synergism from coincident doses.

  4. Highly time-variable exposure to chemicals--toward an assessment strategy.

    PubMed

    Ashauer, Roman; Brown, Colin D

    2013-07-01

    Organisms in the environment experience fluctuating, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to pollutants. Accounting for effects of such exposures is an important challenge for environmental risk assessment, particularly given the simplified design of standard ecotoxicity tests. Dynamic simulation using toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic (TK-TD) models describes the processes that link exposure with effects in an organism and provides a basis for extrapolation to a range of exposure scenarios. In so doing, TK-TD modeling makes the risk assessment more robust and aids use and interpretation of experimental data. Toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models are well-developed for predicting survival of individual organisms and are increasingly applied to sublethal endpoints. In the latter case particularly, linkage to individual-based models (IBMs) allows extrapolation to population level as well as accounting for differences in effects of toxicant exposure at different stages in the life cycle. Extrapolation between species remains an important constraint because there is currently no systematic understanding of species traits that cause differences in the relevant processes. Toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models allow interrogation of exposure profiles to determine intrinsic toxicity potential rather than using absolute maximum concentrations or time-weighted averages as surrogates. A decision scheme is proposed to guide selection of risk assessment approaches using dose extrapolation based on Haber's Law, TK-TD models, and/or IBMs depending on the nature of toxic effect and timing in relation to life history. PMID:23564608

  5. Estimates of exposure rates and fallout arrival times near the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.B. )

    1990-11-01

    One of the tasks of the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project (ORERP) was to estimate doses to individuals resulting from exposure to fallout from nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Dose estimates are based on estimates of the exposure rate 12 h post-detonation (H + 12) and the time of fallout arrival from events producing discernible fallout at locations off the NTS. These estimates are derived from both published fallout patterns and survey meter readings taken by monitors in the field. Each fallout pattern is digitized, and kriging is used to interpolate estimates of exposure rate and arrival time onto a 10-km grid covering the contours of the pattern. These grid values are then used to calculate estimates at any location of interest within the pattern. Exposure rate is also estimated from the survey meter readings for a particular nuclear event by decay-correcting the measurements near a selected location to H + 12 and then aggregating them into one estimate. Estimates of discernible exposure rate and time of fallout arrival from 74 nuclear events at the NTS are contained in the Town Data Base. Estimates are given for 352 locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah. Each record in the data base contains estimates for a specified event and location. The distribution of exposure rate is represented by a geometric mean and standard deviation; the distribution of fallout arrival time is represented by an arithmetic mean and standard deviation. A more extensive description and a listing of the Town Data Base are included in a separate report.

  6. Distinct neurobehavioral dysfunction based on the timing of developmental binge-like alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Sadrian, B; Lopez-Guzman, M; Wilson, D A; Saito, M

    2014-11-01

    Gestational exposure to alcohol can result in long-lasting behavioral deficiencies generally described as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). FASD-modeled rodent studies of acute ethanol exposure typically select one developmental window to simulate a specific context equivalent of human embryogenesis, and study consequences of ethanol exposure within that particular developmental epoch. Exposure timing is likely a large determinant in the neurobehavioral consequence of early ethanol exposure, as each brain region is variably susceptible to ethanol cytotoxicity and has unique sensitive periods in their development. We made a parallel comparison of the long-term effects of single-day binge ethanol at either embryonic day 8 (E8) or postnatal day 7 (P7) in male and female mice, and here demonstrate the differential long-term impacts on neuroanatomy, behavior and in vivo electrophysiology of two systems with very different developmental trajectories. The significant long-term differences in odor-evoked activity, local circuit inhibition, and spontaneous coherence between brain regions in the olfacto-hippocampal pathway that were found as a result of developmental ethanol exposure, varied based on insult timing. Long-term effects on cell proliferation and interneuron cell density were also found to vary by insult timing as well as by region. Finally, spatial memory performance and object exploration were affected in P7-exposed mice, but not E8-exposed mice. Our physiology and behavioral results are conceptually coherent with the neuroanatomical data attained from these same mice. Our results recognize both variable and shared effects of ethanol exposure timing on long-term circuit function and their supported behavior. PMID:25241068

  7. A study of the effect of nonrandom sampling on the estimation of exposure variability using exposure-time series from the OSHA IMIS health inspection database

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, L.T.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nonrandom sampling over time may have on the estimation of variability, namely the geometric standard deviation, using time series of personal exposure data.

  8. Domoic acid: neurobehavioral consequences of exposure to a prevalent marine biotoxin.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kimberly S; Burbacher, Thomas M; Faustman, Elaine M; Gratttan, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Domoic acid (DA), the cause of Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning, is a naturally occurring marine biotoxin that is usually produced by the microscopic algae Pseudo-nitzschia. As is the case for other types of toxic algae, Pseudo-nitzschia outbreaks are becoming more frequent. Acute high-dose symptomology in humans includes vomiting, cramping, coma and death as well as neurological effects such as hallucinations, confusion and memory loss. Experimental studies and medical reports have collectively shown that DA exposure primarily affects the hippocampal regions of the brain and is associated with seizures and the disruption of cognitive processes. The neurobehavioral signature of DA is unique in that it includes transient and permanent changes in memory function that resemble human antegrade amnesia. Experimental studies with adult nonhuman primates have established that DA is a dose-dependent emetic that produces clinical and neuropathological changes consistent with excitotoxicity. Behavioral evaluations of treated rodents have shown that hyperactivity and stereotypical scratching are the first functional markers of toxicity. Mid-dose treatment is associated with memory impairment and behavioral hyperreactivity, suggesting changes in arousal and/or emotionality. At higher doses, DA treatment results in frank neurotoxicity that is characterized by seizures, status epilepticus and death in treated animals. The route of DA exposure is important and influences the severity of effects; intraperitoneal and intravenous treatments produce classic signs of poisoning at significantly lower doses than oral exposure. While developmental studies are few, DA readily crosses the placenta and enters the fetal brain. Domoic acid is not associated with congenital dysmorphia but is linked to persistent changes in motor behavior and cognition in exposed offspring. Comparative research suggests that functional losses associated with DA can be persistent and injuries to the CNS can be

  9. Maternal exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids measured in whole blood and birth outcomes in offspring.

    PubMed

    Callan, A C; Rotander, A; Thompson, K; Heyworth, J; Mueller, J F; Odland, J Ø; Hinwood, A L

    2016-11-01

    Perfluoralkyl and polyfluoralkyl substances have been measured in plasma and serum of pregnant women as a measure of prenatal exposure. Increased concentrations of individual perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), (typically perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluoroctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been reported to be associated with reductions in birth weight and other birth outcomes. We undertook a study of 14 PFAAs in whole blood (including PFOS, PFHxS, PFHpA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA and PFUnDA) from 98 pregnant women in Western Australia from 2008 to 2011. Median concentrations (in μg/L) were: PFOS 1.99; PFHxS 0.33; PFOA 0.86; PFNA 0.30; PFDA 0.12 and PFUnDA 0.08. Infants born to women with the highest tertile of PFHxS exposure had an increased odds of being <95% of their optimal birth weight (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.1-11.5). Conversely, maternal blood concentrations of PFUnDA were associated with non-significant increases in average birth weight (+102g, 95% CI -41, 245) and significant increases in proportion of optimal birth weight (+4.7%, 95% CI 0.7, 8.8) per ln-unit change. This study has reported a range of PFAAs in the whole blood of pregnant women and suggests that PFHxS and PFUnDA may influence foetal growth and warrant further attention. Additional studies are required to identify the sources of PFAA exposure with a view to prevention, in addition to further studies investigating the long term health effects of these ubiquitous chemicals. PMID:27387804

  10. Influence of concentration, time and method of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in root conditioning

    PubMed Central

    CAVASSIM, Rodrigo; LEITE, Fábio Renato Manzolli; ZANDIM, Daniela Leal; DANTAS, Andrea Abi Rached; RACHED, Ricardo Samih Georges Abi; SAMPAIO, José Eduardo Cezar

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to establish the parameters of concentration, time and mode of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in relation to root conditioning. Material and Methods A total of 495 samples were obtained and equally distributed among 11 groups (5 for testing different concentrations of citric acid, 5 for testing different concentrations of sodium citrate and 1 control group). After laboratorial processing, the samples were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. A previously calibrated and blind examiner evaluated micrographs of the samples. Non-parametric statistical analysis was performed to analyze the data obtained. Results Brushing 25% citric acid for 3 min, promoted greater exposure of collagen fibers in comparison with the brushing of 1% citric acid for 1 minute and its topical application at 1% for 3 min. Sodium citrate exposed collagen fibers in a few number of samples. Conclusion Despite the lack of statistical significance, better results for collagen exposure were obtained with brushing application of 25% citric acid for 3 min than with other application parameter. Sodium citrate produced a few number of samples with collagen exposure, so it is not indicated for root conditioning. PMID:22858707

  11. Chronic Ethanol Exposure Produces Time- and Brain Region-Dependent Changes in Gene Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    Osterndorff-Kahanek, Elizabeth A.; Becker, Howard C.; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Farris, Sean P.; Tiwari, Gayatri R.; Nunez, Yury O.; Harris, R. Adron; Mayfield, R. Dayne

    2015-01-01

    Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY), nucleus accumbens (NAC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000) at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600). Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%). All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global ‘rewiring‘ of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes. PMID:25803291

  12. Analysis of real-time mixture cytotoxicity data following repeated exposure using BK/TD models.

    PubMed

    Teng, S; Tebby, C; Barcellini-Couget, S; De Sousa, G; Brochot, C; Rahmani, R; Pery, A R R

    2016-08-15

    Cosmetic products generally consist of multiple ingredients. Thus, cosmetic risk assessment has to deal with mixture toxicity on a long-term scale which means it has to be assessed in the context of repeated exposure. Given that animal testing has been banned for cosmetics risk assessment, in vitro assays allowing long-term repeated exposure and adapted for in vitro - in vivo extrapolation need to be developed. However, most in vitro tests only assess short-term effects and consider static endpoints which hinder extrapolation to realistic human exposure scenarios where concentration in target organs is varies over time. Thanks to impedance metrics, real-time cell viability monitoring for repeated exposure has become possible. We recently constructed biokinetic/toxicodynamic models (BK/TD) to analyze such data (Teng et al., 2015) for three hepatotoxic cosmetic ingredients: coumarin, isoeugenol and benzophenone-2. In the present study, we aim to apply these models to analyze the dynamics of mixture impedance data using the concepts of concentration addition and independent action. Metabolic interactions between the mixture components were investigated, characterized and implemented in the models, as they impacted the actual cellular exposure. Indeed, cellular metabolism following mixture exposure induced a quick disappearance of the compounds from the exposure system. We showed that isoeugenol substantially decreased the metabolism of benzophenone-2, reducing the disappearance of this compound and enhancing its in vitro toxicity. Apart from this metabolic interaction, no mixtures showed any interaction, and all binary mixtures were successfully modeled by at least one model based on exposure to the individual compounds. PMID:27317371

  13. Effects of endotoxin exposure on cationic amino acid transporter function in ovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, Megan F; Reade, Michael C; Boyd, C A R; Young, J Duncan

    2003-03-01

    Rodent models of sepsis differ from clinical human disease in that humans make substantially less whole-body nitric oxide and have different cellular responses to endotoxin. Sheep, when exposed to endotoxin, behave in a manner more similar to humans. Many studies of rodent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to endotoxin demonstrate increased cationic amino acid transporter function (particularly through the y+ transporter) to supply arginine substrate to upregulated nitric oxide synthase. Whether this is true in sheep is not known. We have studied cationic amino acid transport in sheep PBMCs stimulated with endotoxin, using labelled lysine. PBMCs stimulated both in vitro and in vivo show an initial reduction in total and y+ lysine transport (after 1-2 h exposure to endotoxin): a previously undescribed effect of endotoxin. In in vitro activated cells, the reduction in y+ transport was prevented by the lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaretic acid (NDGA), and the phospholipase inhibitor 4-bromophenacyl bromide (4-BPAB), but not cyclohexamide or a number of other inhibitors of intracellular second-messenger pathways. In contrast after 14 h incubation, the expected increase in total and y+ lysine transport was seen. The increase in y+ transport could be prevented by cyclohexamide, dexamethasone, ibuprofen, the protein kinase C inhibitor sphingosine, NDGA and 4-BPAB. These results suggest that in response to endotoxin exposure there is an initial decrease in y+ activity mediated by a lipoxygenase product, followed by a substantial increase in y+ activity mediated by the products of either cyclo-oxygenase or lipoxygenase. Cyclo-oxygenase and/or lipoxygenase inhibition might be useful in reducing arginine transport, and hence nitric oxide production, in these cells. PMID:12621525

  14. Effect of fluoride exposure on serum glycoprotein pattern and sialic acid level in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Gulay; Cenesiz, Sena; Yarim, Gul Fatma; Nisbet, Ozlem; Nisbet, Cevat; Cenesiz, Metin; Guvenc, Dilek

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the effects of fluoride exposure on the protein profile, glycoprotein pattern, and total sialic acid concentration of serum in rabbits. For this aim; 20 healthy New Zealand rabbits were used. The rabbits were divided into two equal groups each with ten animals according to their weighing: control group and experimental group. The rabbits in control group were given drinking tap water containing 0.29 mg/l sodium fluoride and experimental group received the same tap water to which was added 40 mg/l sodium fluoride for 70 days. Blood samples were taken from each rabbit on day 70. Serum fluoride concentrations were measured by a fluoride-specific ion electrode in serum. The fluoride levels in the serum were found as 18.4 (+/-1.58) microg/L in control and 301.3 (+/-52.18) microg/L in fluoride exposed rabbits. The sialic acid levels were found as 69.2 (+/-0.32) mg/dL in control and 43.4 (+/-0.13) mg/dL in fluoride exposed group. The electrophoretic patterns of serum proteins, glycoproteins, and total sialic acid concentration were determined. Fifteen different protein fractions with molecular weights ranging from 22 to 249 kDa were displayed in the serum protein electrophoretic gel of both groups. The raw concentrations of the protein fractions decreased in fluoride exposed rabbits as compared with the control rabbits. The serum glycoprotein pattern revealed seven major protein bands from 47 to 167 kDa in experimental and control groups. The slight decrease of raw concentration of the protein bands in glycoprotein pattern of serum was observed in fluoride toxication comparing to control. The results suggest that serum TSA determination and serum protein electrophoresis can be used to evaluate prognosis of fluoride exposure as a supplementary laboratory test in combination with clinical and other laboratory findings of fluorosis. PMID:19904501

  15. Effects of sodium arsenate exposure on liver fatty acid profiles and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Wafa; Dhibi, Madiha; Haouas, Zohra; Chreif, Imed; Neffati, Fadoua; Hammami, Mohamed; Sakly, Rachid

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of arsenic on liver fatty acids (FA) composition, hepatotoxicity and oxidative status markers in rats. Male rats were randomly devised to six groups (n=10 per group) and exposed to sodium arsenate at a dose of 1 and 10 mg/l for 45 and 90 days. Arsenate exposure is associated with significant changes in the FA composition in liver. A significant increase of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in all treated groups (p<0.01) and trans unsaturated fatty acids (trans UFA) in rats exposed both for short term for 10 mg/l (p<0.05) and long term for 1 and 10 mg/l (p<0.001) was observed. However, the cis UFA were significantly decreased in these groups (p<0.05). A markedly increase of indicator in cell membrane viscosity expressed as SFA/UFA was reported in the treated groups (p<0.001). A significant increase in the level of malondialdehyde by 38.3 % after 90 days of exposure at 10 mg/l was observed. Compared to control rats, significant liver damage was observed at 10 mg/l of arsenate by increasing plasma marker enzymes after 90 days. It is through the histological investigations in hepatic tissues of exposed rats that these damage effects of arsenate were confirmed. The antioxidant perturbations were observed to be more important at groups treated by the high dose (p<0.05). An increase in the level of protein carbonyls was observed in all treated groups (p<0.05). The present study provides evidence for a direct effect of arsenite on FA composition disturbance causing an increase of SFA and TFAs isomers, liver dysfunction and oxidative stress. Therefore, arsenate can lead to hepatic damage and propensity towards liver cancer. PMID:23949113

  16. Time Evolution of the Wettability of Supported Graphene under Ambient Air Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The wettability of graphene is both fundamental and crucial for interfacing in most applications, but a detailed understanding of its time evolution remains elusive. Here we systematically investigate the wettability of metal-supported, chemical vapor deposited graphene films as a function of ambient air exposure time using water and various other test liquids with widely different surface tensions. The wettability of graphene is not constant, but varies with substrate interactions and air exposure time. The substrate interactions affect the initial graphene wettability, where, for instance, water contact angles of ∼85 and ∼61° were measured for Ni and Cu supported graphene, respectively, after just minutes of air exposure. Analysis of the surface free energy components indicates that the substrate interactions strongly influence the Lewis acid–base component of supported graphene, which is considerably weaker for Ni supported graphene than for Cu supported graphene, suggesting that the classical van der Waals interaction theory alone is insufficient to describe the wettability of graphene. For prolonged air exposure, the effect of physisorption of airborne contaminants becomes increasingly dominant, resulting in an increase of water contact angle that follows a universal linear-logarithmic relationship with exposure time, until saturating at a maximum value of 92–98°. The adsorbed contaminants render all supported graphene samples increasingly nonpolar, although their total surface free energy decreases only by 10–16% to about 37–41 mJ/m2. Our finding shows that failure to account for the air exposure time may lead to widely different wettability values and contradicting arguments about the wetting transparency of graphene. PMID:26900413

  17. Time-Based Measurement of Personal Mite Allergen Bioaerosol Exposure over 24 Hour Periods.

    PubMed

    Tovey, Euan R; Liu-Brennan, Damien; Garden, Frances L; Oliver, Brian G; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Marks, Guy B

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis are common in many countries. Globally the most common allergen associated with symptoms is produced by house dust mites. Although the bed has often been cited as the main site of exposure to mite allergens, surprisingly this has not yet been directly established by measurement due to a lack of suitable methods. Here we report on the development of novel methods to determine the pattern of personal exposure to mite allergen bioaerosols over 24-hour periods and applied this in a small field study using 10 normal adults. Air was sampled using a miniature time-based air-sampler of in-house design located close to the breathing zone of the participants, co-located with a miniature time-lapse camera. Airborne particles, drawn into the sampler at 2L/min via a narrow slot, were impacted onto the peripheral surface of a disk mounted on the hour-hand of either a 12 or 24 hour clock motor. The impaction surface was either an electret cloth, or an adhesive film; both novel for these purposes. Following a review of the time-lapse images, disks were post-hoc cut into subsamples corresponding to eight predetermined categories of indoor or outdoor location, extracted and analysed for mite allergen Der p 1 by an amplified ELISA. Allergen was detected in 57.2% of the total of 353 subsamples collected during 20 days of sampling. Exposure patterns varied over time. Higher concentrations of airborne mite allergen were typically measured in samples collected from domestic locations in the day and evening. Indoor domestic Der p 1 exposures accounted for 59.5% of total exposure, whereas total in-bed-asleep exposure, which varied 80 fold between individuals, accounted overall for 9.85% of total exposure, suggesting beds are not often the main site of exposure. This study establishes the feasibility of novel methods for determining the time-geography of personal exposure to many bioaerosols and identifies new areas for future technical

  18. Time-Based Measurement of Personal Mite Allergen Bioaerosol Exposure over 24 Hour Periods

    PubMed Central

    Tovey, Euan R.; Liu-Brennan, Damien; Garden, Frances L.; Oliver, Brian G.; Perzanowski, Matthew S.; Marks, Guy B.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis are common in many countries. Globally the most common allergen associated with symptoms is produced by house dust mites. Although the bed has often been cited as the main site of exposure to mite allergens, surprisingly this has not yet been directly established by measurement due to a lack of suitable methods. Here we report on the development of novel methods to determine the pattern of personal exposure to mite allergen bioaerosols over 24-hour periods and applied this in a small field study using 10 normal adults. Air was sampled using a miniature time-based air-sampler of in-house design located close to the breathing zone of the participants, co-located with a miniature time-lapse camera. Airborne particles, drawn into the sampler at 2L/min via a narrow slot, were impacted onto the peripheral surface of a disk mounted on the hour-hand of either a 12 or 24 hour clock motor. The impaction surface was either an electret cloth, or an adhesive film; both novel for these purposes. Following a review of the time-lapse images, disks were post-hoc cut into subsamples corresponding to eight predetermined categories of indoor or outdoor location, extracted and analysed for mite allergen Der p 1 by an amplified ELISA. Allergen was detected in 57.2% of the total of 353 subsamples collected during 20 days of sampling. Exposure patterns varied over time. Higher concentrations of airborne mite allergen were typically measured in samples collected from domestic locations in the day and evening. Indoor domestic Der p 1 exposures accounted for 59.5% of total exposure, whereas total in-bed-asleep exposure, which varied 80 fold between individuals, accounted overall for 9.85% of total exposure, suggesting beds are not often the main site of exposure. This study establishes the feasibility of novel methods for determining the time-geography of personal exposure to many bioaerosols and identifies new areas for future technical

  19. Lead exposure in the lead-acid storage battery manufacturing and PVC compounding industries.

    PubMed

    Ho, S F; Sam, C T; Embi, G B

    1998-09-01

    This study was conducted as part of the Human Exposure Assessment Location (HEAL) Project which comes under the United Nations Environment Programme/World Health Organisation (UNEP/WHO) Global environmental Monitoring System (GEMS). The objective of the study was to evaluate workers' exposure to lead in industries with the highest exposure. All subjects were interviewed about their occupational and smoking histories, the use of personal protective equipment and personal hygiene. The contribution of a dietary source of lead intake from specified foods known to contain lead locally and personal air sampling for lead were assessed. A total of 61 workers from two PVC compounding and 50 workers from two lead acid battery manufacturing plants were studied together with 111 matched controls. In the PVC compounding plants the mean lead-in-air level was 0.0357 mg/m3, with the highest levels occurring during the pouring and mixing operations. This was lower than the mean lead-in-air level of 0.0886 mg/m3 in the lead battery manufacturing plants where the highest exposure was in the loading of lead ingots into milling machines. Workers in lead battery manufacturing had significantly higher mean blood lead than the PVC workers (means, 32.51 and 23.91 mcg/100 ml respectively), but there was poor correlation with lead-in-air levels. Among the lead workers, the Malays had significantly higher blood lead levels than the Chinese (mean blood levels were 33.03 and 25.35 mcg/100 ml respectively) although there was no significant difference between the two ethnic groups in the control group. There were no significant differences between the exposed and control group in terms of dietary intake of specified local foods known to contain lead. However, Malays consumed significantly more fish than the Chinese did. There were no ethnic differences in the hours of overtime work, number of years of exposure, usage of gloves and respirators and smoking habits. Among the Malays, 94.3% eat with

  20. Effects of exposure time, material type, and granular pesticide on glove contamination.

    PubMed

    Guo, C; Stone, J; Stahr, H M; Shelley, M

    2001-11-01

    Chemical-resistant gloves are recommended for pesticide applicators to reduce their exposure to agricultural chemicals. In this research, three chemical-resistant glove materials-nitrile, neoprene, and barrier laminate-were studied in relation to contamination with granular terbufos and tefluthrin. Surfaces of specimens backed with alpha cellulose were contaminated with 300 mg of either granular terbufos or tefluthrin for 1-, 2-, 4-, 8-, 16-, and 24-h time periods in petri dishes in the laboratory. Residues were extracted using ethyl acetate for terbufos and iso-octane for tefluthrin in test tubes for 24 h. Analysis of extracts by gas chromatograph and statistical analysis of the data showed that contamination levels varied with the time of exposure, material type, and pesticide used. Pesticide was not detected in the alpha cellulose even after 24 h contamination time. A linear relationship was found between contamination level and exposure time for terbufos in the three materials, with longer exposure times causing higher contamination levels. Contamination of nitrile was significantly less than neoprene or barrier laminate. Exposed glove materials contained higher levels of contamination of terbufos than tefluthrin. PMID:11598792

  1. Fatty acid composition of spruce needle lipids after exposure to air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfenden, J.; Wellburn, A.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Alterations in the fatty acid composition of membrane lipids have been observed in long-term experiments using realistic exposures of air pollutants. Monogalactosyl diglyceride (MGDG), from red spruce, showed a 12% reduction in linolenic acid (18:3) compared with controls, after a 21 week winter fumigation with SO{sub 2} NO{sub 2} (20 ppb each). The composition of phosphatidyl choline from the same trees was unaffected. In Norway spruce exposed to 70 ppb O{sub 3} for 3 consecutive summers there was no treatment effect on 18:3 content of MGDG, which ranged from 70 to 80%, with highest values in November. The percentage of octadecatetranoic acid (18:4) also varied seasonally. Compared with controls, polluted plants had proportionally less 18:4 during autumn, perhaps indicating some effect of O{sub 3} on the winter hardening process. Our observations emphasize the need for long-term experiments to investigate subtle disturbances to seasonal metabolic cycles.

  2. Physiological responses of dogs on exposure to hot, arid conditions. Acid-base status.

    PubMed

    Krausz, S; Marder, J

    1977-09-16

    Acid-base parameters were determined in chronically cannulated dogs exposed to ambient temperatures increasing from 25-47 degrees C (with relative humidity below 30%). pH increased from 7.409 +/- 0.004 (S.E.M.) to 7.538 +/- 0.017, PaCO2 decreased from 33.0 +/- 0.5 to 20.9 +/- 1.2 torr, and [HCO3-] decreased from 20.9 +/- 0.3 to 17.2 +/- 0.4 mEq/l. Minimal base excess change, together with a rapid return to normal parameters upon recooling to 25 degrees C, suggests that the stress is almost exclusively respiratory, with little metabolic involvement. Analysis of serial exposures shows no acclimatization effect in acid-base status. This suggests the possible existence of natural acclimation to heat in dogs maintained in a warm climate, permitting excellent tolerance of hot, arid conditions with limited acid-base disturbance. PMID:563058

  3. Considerations for human exposure standards for fast-rise-time high-peak-power electromagnetic pulses.

    PubMed

    Merritt, J H; Kiel, J L; Hurt, W D

    1995-06-01

    Development of new emitter systems capable of producing high-peak-power electromagnetic pulses with very fast rise times and narrow pulse widths is continuing. Such directed energy weapons systems will be used in the future to defeat electronically vulnerable targets. Human exposures to these pulses can be expected during testing and operations. Development of these technologies for radar and communications purposes has the potential for wider environmental exposure, as well. Current IEEE C95.1-1991 human exposure guidelines do not specifically address these types of pulses, though limits are stated for pulsed emissions. The process for developing standards includes an evaluation of the relevant bioeffects data base. A recommendation has been made that human exposure to ultrashort electromagnetic pulses that engender electromagnetic transients, called precursor waves, should be avoided. Studies that purport to show the potential for tissue damage induced by such pulses were described. The studies cited in support of the recommendation were not relevant to the issues of tissue damage by propagated pulses. A number of investigations are cited in this review that directly address the biological effects of electromagnetic pulses. These studies have not shown evidence of tissue damage as a result of exposure to high-peak-power pulsed microwaves. It is our opinion that the current guidelines are sufficiently protective for human exposure to these pulses. PMID:7646411

  4. Early Adolescent Boys' Exposure to Internet Pornography: Relationships to Pubertal Timing, Sensation Seeking, and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyens, Ine; Vandenbosch, Laura; Eggermont, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that adolescents regularly use Internet pornography. This two-wave panel study aimed to test an integrative model in early adolescent boys (M[subscript age] = 14.10; N = 325) that (a) explains their exposure to Internet pornography by looking at relationships with pubertal timing and sensation seeking, and (b) explores…

  5. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  6. Measures of patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography: Beyond fluoroscopy time

    PubMed Central

    Kachaamy, Toufic; Harrison, Edwyn; Pannala, Rahul; Pavlicek, William; Crowell, Michael D; Faigel, Douglas O

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether fluoroscope time is a good predictor of patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study of consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a tertiary care setting. Data related to radiation exposure were collected. The following measures were obtained: Fluoroscopy time (FT), dose area product (DAP) and dose at reference point (DOSERP). Coefficients of determination were calculated to analyze the correlation between FT, DAP and DOSRP. Agreement between FT and DAP/DOSRP was assessed using Bland Altman plots. RESULTS: Four hundred sixty-three data sets were obtained. Fluoroscopy time average was 7.3 min. Fluoroscopy related radiation accounted for 86% of the total DAP while acquisition films related radiation accounted for 14% of the DAP. For any given FT there are wide ranges of DAP and DOSERP and the variability in both increases as fluoroscopy time increases. The coefficient of determination (R2) on the non transformed data for DAP and DOSERP versus FT were respectively 0.416 and 0.554. While fluoroscopy use was the largest contributor to patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP), there is a wide variability in DAP and DOSERP that is not accounted for by FT. DAP and DOSERP increase in variability as FT increases. This translates into poor accuracy of FT in predicting DAP and DOSERP at higher radiation doses. CONCLUSION: DAP and DOSERP in addition to FT should be adopted as new ERCP quality measures to estimate patient radiation exposure. PMID:25684958

  7. DPOAEs in infants developmentally exposed to PCBs show two differently time spaced exposure sensitive windows.

    PubMed

    Koštiaková, Vladimíra; Moleti, Arturo; Wimmerová, Soňa; Jusko, Todd A; Palkovičová Murínová, Ľubica; Sisto, Renata; Richterová, Denisa; Kováč, Ján; Čonka, Kamil; Patayová, Henrieta; Tihányi, Juraj; Trnovec, Tomáš

    2016-10-01

    The study aim was to identify the timing of sensitive windows for ototoxicity related to perinatal exposure to PCBs. A total of 351 and 214 children from a birth cohort in eastern Slovakia underwent otoacoustic testing at 45 and 72 months, respectively, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) at 11 frequencies were recorded. Cord and child 6-, 16-, 45-, and 72- month blood samples were analyzed for PCB 153 concentration. The PCB 153 concentration-time profiles were approximated with a system model to calculate area under the PCB*time curves (AUCs) for specific time intervals (3 and 6 months for 45 and 72 months data, respectively). DPOAE amplitudes were correlated (Spearman) with cord serum PCB and AUCs, markers of prenatal and postnatal exposure, respectively. Two exposure critical windows were identified in infants, the first related to prenatal and early postnatal and the second to postnatal exposure to PCBs. Our data have shown tonotopicity, sexual dimorphism, and asymmetry in ototoxicity of PCBs. PMID:27470944

  8. Quantification of naphthoquinone mercapturic acids in urine as biomarkers of naphthalene exposure.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Katrin; Angerer, Jürgen

    2016-02-15

    Naphthalene shows carcinogenic properties in animal experiments. As the substance is ubiquitary present in the environment and has a possibly high exposure at industrial workplaces, the determination of naphthalene metabolites in humans is of environmental-medical as well as occupational-medical importance. Here, biomarkers of 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, as possibly carcinogenic metabolites in the naphthalene metabolism, are of outstanding significance. We developed and validated a liquid chromatography-tandem mass-spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of the naphthoquinone mercapturic acids of 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone in human urine samples as a sum of naphthoquinone- and dihydroxynaphthalene-mercapturic acid. Except for enzymatic hydrolysis and acidification, no further sample preparation is necessary. For sample clean-up, a column switching procedure is applied. The mercapturic acids are extracted from the urinary matrix on a restricted access material (RAM RP 18) and separated on a reversed phase column (Synergi Polar RP C18). The metabolites were quantified by tandem mass spectrometry using labelled D5-1,4-NQMA as internal standard. The limits of detection are 3μg/l for 1,2-NQMA and 1μg/l for 1,4-NQMA. Intraday- and interday precision for pooled urine (spiked with 10μg/l and 30μg/l of the analytes) ranges from 5.9 to 15.1% for 1,2-NQMA and from 2.0 to 10.8% for 1,4-NQMA. The developed method is suited for the sensitive and specific determination of the mercapturic acids of naphthoquinones in human urine. A good precision and low limits of detection were achieved. Application of those new biomarkers in biomonitoring studies may give deeper insights into the mechanisms of the human naphthalene metabolism. PMID:26812176

  9. Temporal variation of optimal UV exposure time over Korea: risks and benefits of surface UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. G.; Koo, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Solar UV radiation in a wavelength range between 280 to 400 nm has both positive and negative influences on human body. Surface UV radiation is the main natural source of vitamin D, providing the promotion of bone and musculoskeletal health and reducing the risk of a number of cancers and other medical conditions. However, overexposure to surface UV radiation is significantly related with the majority of skin cancer, in addition other negative health effects such as sunburn, skin aging, and some forms of eye cataracts. Therefore, it is important to estimate the optimal UV exposure time, representing a balance between reducing negative health effects and maximizing sufficient vitamin D production. Previous studies calculated erythemal UV and vitamin-D UV from the measured and modelled spectral irradiances, respectively, by weighting CIE Erythema and Vitamin D3 generation functions (Kazantzidis et al., 2009; Fioletov et al., 2010). In particular, McKenzie et al. (2009) suggested the algorithm to estimate vitamin-D production UV from erythemal UV (or UV index) and determined the optimum conditions of UV exposure based on skin type Ⅱ according to the Fitzpatrick (1988). Recently, there are various demands for risks and benefits of surface UV radiation on public health over Korea, thus it is necessary to estimate optimal UV exposure time suitable to skin type of East Asians. This study examined the relationship between erythemally weighted UV (UVEry) and vitamin D weighted UV (UVVitD) over Korea during 2004-2012. The temporal variations of the ratio (UVVitD/UVEry) were also analyzed and the ratio as a function of UV index was applied in estimating the optimal UV exposure time. In summer with high surface UV radiation, short exposure time leaded to sufficient vitamin D and erythema and vice versa in winter. Thus, the balancing time in winter was enough to maximize UV benefits and minimize UV risks.

  10. The ameliorative effect of ascorbic acid and Ginkgo biloba on learning and memory deficits associated with fluoride exposure

    PubMed Central

    Raghuveer, Vasudeva C.; Rao, Mallikarjuna C.; Somayaji, Nagabhooshana S.; Babu, Prakash B.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to fluoride causes dental and skeletal fluorosis. Fluoride exposure is also detrimental to soft tissues and organs. The present study aimed at evaluation of the effect of Ginkgo biloba and ascorbic acid on learning and memory deficits caused by fluoride exposure. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n=6). Group 1 control. Groups 2 to 5 received 100 ppm of sodium fluoride over 30 days. Groups 3, 4 and 5 were further treated for 15 days receiving respectively 1% gum acacia solution, 100 mg/kg body weight ascorbic acid, and 100mg/kg body weight Ginkgo biloba extract. After 45 days, all animals were subjected to behavioural tests. The results showed that fluoride affected learning and memory. Fluoride causes oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, thereby affecting learning and memory. Ascorbic acid and Ginkgo biloba were found to augment the reversal of learning and memory deficits caused by fluoride ingestion. PMID:24678261

  11. Pelargonic acid weed control: Concentrations, adjuvants, and application timing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonic acid is a fatty acid naturally occurring in many plants, animals, and foods. Pelargonic acid has potential as a broad-spectrum post-emergence or burn-down herbicide for organic crop production. Field research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Lane, OK, Atoka County) to determine the ...

  12. Choosing optimal exposure times for XRF core-scanning: Suggestions based on the analysis of geological reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jyh-Jaan; Löwemark, Ludvig; Chang, Queenie; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chen, Huei-Fen; Song, Sheng-Rong; Wei, Kuo-Yen

    2016-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core-scanning is a fast and nondestructive technique to assess elemental variations of unprocessed sediments. However, although the exposure time of XRF-scanning directly affects the scanning counts and total measurement time, only a few studies have considered the influence of exposure time during the scan. How to select an optimal exposure time to achieve reliable results and reduce the total measurement time is an important issue. To address this question, six geological reference materials from the Geological Survey of Japan (JLK-1, JMS-1, JMS-2, JSD-1, JSD-2, and JSD-3) were scanned by the Itrax-XRF core scanner using the Mo- and the Cr-tube with different exposure times to allow a comparison of scanning counts with absolute concentrations. The regression lines and correlation coefficients of elements that are generally used in paleoenvironmental studies were examined for the different exposure times and X-ray tubes. The results show that for those elements with relatively high concentrations or high detectability, the correlation coefficients are higher than 0.90 for all exposure times. In contrast, for the low detectability or low concentration elements, the correlation coefficients are relatively low, and improve little with increased exposure time. Therefore, we suggest that the influence of different exposure times is insignificant for the accuracy of the measurements. Thus, caution must be taken when interpreting the results of elements with low detectability, even when the exposure times are long and scanning counts are reasonably high.

  13. Atrazine exposure affects longevity, development time and body size in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Sarah R; Fiumera, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    Atrazine is the one of the most widely used herbicides in the United States and non-target organisms may encounter it in the environment. Atrazine is known to affect male reproduction in both vertebrates and invertebrates but less is known about its effects on other fitness traits. Here we assessed the effects of five different chronic exposure levels on a variety of fitness traits in Drosophila melanogaster. We measured male and female longevity, development time, proportion pupated, proportion emerged, body size, female mating rate, fertility and fecundity. Atrazine exposure decreased the proportion pupated, the proportion emerged and adult survival. Development time was also affected by atrazine and exposed flies pupated and emerged earlier than controls. Although development time was accelerated, body size was actually larger in some of the exposures. Atrazine exposure had no effect on female mating rate and the effects on female fertility and fecundity were only observed in one of the two independent experimental blocks. Many of the traits showed non-monotonic dose response curves, where the intermediate concentrations showed the largest effects. Overall this study shows that atrazine influences a variety of life history traits in the model genetic system, D. melanogaster, and future studies should aim to identify the molecular mechanisms of toxicity. PMID:27317622

  14. Investigation of the formation of physical damage on automotive finishes due to acidic reagent exposure

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.F.; Fornes, R.E.; Gilbert, R.D.; Speer, J.A. )

    1993-10-15

    Automotive paints with clear-coat surfaces can be physically damaged by exposure to acidic reagents produced in a smog chamber designed to reproduce real environmental conditions. Visual and reflectance microscopy observations show that deposition of material formed from the reaction of the clear coat and the reagent drop occurs on the paint surface after the drop evaporates to a critical size, with the greatest deposition occurring at the edge of the drop. This type of deposition suggests a free-energy minimization process favoring the formation of stable nuclei at the reagent drop edge. With heating after the drop evaporation to stimulate exposure to the sun, a damaged area containing sulfur that is in the shape of a circular ring is observed at the location of the deposits. The majority of the visual damage appears to result from an interaction between the deposit and the paint at elevated temperatures. Results from profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and reflectance microscopy show that the damaged areas are ring-shaped cracked blisters on the surface resulting from the clear coat separating into layers.

  15. Gene expression profiles in zebrafish (Danio rerio) liver after acute exposure to okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nai-sheng; Li, Hong-ye; Liu, Jie-sheng; Yang, Wei-dong

    2014-03-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), a main component of diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins, is a strong and specific inhibitor of the serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A. However, not all of the OA-induced effects can be explained by this phosphatase inhibition, and controversial results on OA are increasing. To provide clues on potential mechanisms of OA other than phosphatase inhibition, here, acute toxicity of OA was evaluated in zebrafish, and changes in gene expression in zebrafish liver tissues upon exposure to OA were observed by microarray. The i.p. ED50 (6 h) of OA on zebrafish was 1.54 μg OA/g body weight (bw). Among the genes analyzed on the zebrafish array, 55 genes were significantly up-regulated and 36 down-regulated in the fish liver tissue upon exposure to 0.176 μg OA/g bw (low-dose group, LD) compared with the low ethanol control (LE). However, there were no obvious functional clusters for them. On the contrary, fish exposure to 1.760 μg OA/g bw (high-dose group, HD) yielded a great number of differential expressed genes (700 up and 285 down) compared with high ethanol control (HE), which clustered in several functional terms such as p53 signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, glutathione metabolism and protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, etc. These genes were involved in protein phosphatase activity, translation factor activity, heat shock protein binding, as well as transmembrane transporter activity. Our findings may give some useful information on the pathways of OA-induced injury in fish. PMID:24637248

  16. Full-color holographic diffuser using time-scheduled iterative exposure.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei-Lan; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Kang, Hoon-Jong; Lee, Kwon-Yeon; Kim, Nam

    2015-06-01

    A compact wavelength multiplexing technique is proposed and experimentally investigated to improve the efficiency of a full-color holographic diffuser using photopolymer. The exposure responses of a monochromatic hologram and a three wavelength multiplexed hologram recorded in photopolymer film are presented. The time-scheduled exposure energies at wavelengths of 633, 532, and 473 nm were chosen to optimize the uniform diffraction efficiency of the wavelength multiplexed hologram. These three wavelength iterative sequences of exposures are applied to achieve a specific color balance for a multicolor holographic diffuser. The experimental results confirm that the fabrication method is well suited to the manufacture of holographic diffusers for full-color display applications. PMID:26192691

  17. Exposure to Salt and Organic Acids Increases the Ability of Listeria monocytogenes To Invade Caco-2 Cells but Decreases Its Ability To Survive Gastric Stress†

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Matthew R.; James, Karen E.; Callahan, Michelle C.; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of environmental stress exposure on Listeria monocytogenes growth and virulence-associated characteristics were investigated. Specifically, we measured the effects of temperature (7 or 37°C), pH (5.5 or 7.4), the presence of salt and organic acids (375 mM NaCl, 8.45 mM sodium diacetate [SD], 275 mM sodium lactate [SL], or a combination of NaCl, SD, and SL), and deletion of sigB, which encodes a key stress response regulator, on the ability of L. monocytogenes to grow, invade Caco-2 cells, and survive exposure to synthetic gastric fluid (pH 2.5 or 4.5). Our results indicate that (i) L. monocytogenes log-phase generation times and maximum cell numbers are not dependent on the alternative sigma factor σB in the presence of NaCl and organic acids at concentrations typically found in foods; (ii) growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes through the addition of organic acids is pH dependent; (iii) the ability of L. monocytogenes to invade Caco-2 cells is affected by growth phase, temperature, and the presence of salt and organic acids, with the highest relative invasion capabilities observed for cells grown with SL or NaCl at 37°C and pH 7.4; (iv) growth of L. monocytogenes in the presence of NaCl, SD, or SL reduces its ability to survive exposure to gastric fluid; and (v) exposure of L. monocytogenes to gastric fluid reduces the enhanced invasiveness caused by growth in the presence of NaCl or SL. These findings suggest that virulence-associated characteristics that determine the L. monocytogenes infectious dose are likely to be affected by food-specific properties (e.g., pH or the presence of salt or organic acid). PMID:16885290

  18. Exposure to salt and organic acids increases the ability of Listeria monocytogenes to invade Caco-2 cells but decreases its ability to survive gastric stress.

    PubMed

    Garner, Matthew R; James, Karen E; Callahan, Michelle C; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2006-08-01

    The effects of environmental stress exposure on Listeria monocytogenes growth and virulence-associated characteristics were investigated. Specifically, we measured the effects of temperature (7 or 37 degrees C), pH (5.5 or 7.4), the presence of salt and organic acids (375 mM NaCl, 8.45 mM sodium diacetate [SD], 275 mM sodium lactate [SL], or a combination of NaCl, SD, and SL), and deletion of sigB, which encodes a key stress response regulator, on the ability of L. monocytogenes to grow, invade Caco-2 cells, and survive exposure to synthetic gastric fluid (pH 2.5 or 4.5). Our results indicate that (i) L. monocytogenes log-phase generation times and maximum cell numbers are not dependent on the alternative sigma factor sigmaB in the presence of NaCl and organic acids at concentrations typically found in foods; (ii) growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes through the addition of organic acids is pH dependent; (iii) the ability of L. monocytogenes to invade Caco-2 cells is affected by growth phase, temperature, and the presence of salt and organic acids, with the highest relative invasion capabilities observed for cells grown with SL or NaCl at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4; (iv) growth of L. monocytogenes in the presence of NaCl, SD, or SL reduces its ability to survive exposure to gastric fluid; and (v) exposure of L. monocytogenes to gastric fluid reduces the enhanced invasiveness caused by growth in the presence of NaCl or SL. These findings suggest that virulence-associated characteristics that determine the L. monocytogenes infectious dose are likely to be affected by food-specific properties (e.g., pH or the presence of salt or organic acid). PMID:16885290

  19. Developmental timing of sodium perchlorate exposure alters angiogenesis, thyroid follicle proliferation and sexual maturation in stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Postlethwait, John H.; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate, a common aquatic contaminant, is well known to disrupt homeostasis of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. This study utilizes the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) fish to determine if perchlorate exposure during certain windows of development has morphological effects on thyroid and gonads. Fish were moved from untreated water to perchlorate-contaminated water (30 and 100 mg/L) starting at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 and 305 days post fertilization until approximately one year old. A reciprocal treatment (fish in contaminated water switched to untreated water) was conducted on the same schedule. Perchlorate exposure increased angiogenesis and follicle proliferation in thyroid tissue, delayed gonadal maturity, and skewed sex ratios towards males; effects depended on concentration and timing of exposure. This study demonstrates that perchlorate exposure beginning during the first 42 days of development has profound effects on stickleback reproductive and thyroid tissues, and by implication can impact population dynamics. Long-term exposure studies that assess contaminant effects at various stages of development provide novel information to characterize risk to aquatic organisms, to facilitate management of resources, and to determine sensitive developmental windows for further study of underlying mechanisms. PMID:25865142

  20. Assessment of the occupational exposure in real time during interventional cardiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Baptista, M; Figueira, C; Teles, P; Cardoso, G; Zankl, M; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    Interventional cardiology (IC) procedures can be complex, requiring the operators to work near the patient, during long exposure times. Owing to scattered radiation in the patient and the fluoroscopic equipment, the medical staff are exposed to a non-uniform radiation field and can receive high radiation doses. In this study, it is proposed to analyse staff doses obtained in real time, during IC procedures. A system for occupational dosimetry in real time was used. In order to identify some parameters that may affect the staff doses, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, using MCNPX v.2.7.0 code and voxel phantoms, were performed. The data obtained from measurements, together with MC simulations, allowed the identification of actions and behaviours of the medical staff that could be considered a risk under routine working conditions. The implementation of this monitoring system for exposure of personnel may have a positive effect on optimisation of radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures. PMID:25848113

  1. Time location analysis for exposure assessment studies of indoor workers based on active RFID technology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Chuan; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Chao, Huan-Ping; Wang, Peng-Yau

    2010-02-01

    In this article, we describe the development of a radio frequency identification exposure monitoring system (RFEMS) suitable for tracking and identifying workers' locations in indoor workplaces. Five workers in southern Taiwan wore the RFEMS integrated into their equipment vests. Location and exposure data were transferred to data analysis software for visualization and tabular analysis in real-time. Data were grouped into seven task activity location categories to determine the time spent and percentage reception in each location. The RFEMS could also synchronously indicate the surrounding conditions using various sensors. Additional experiments were focused on locating of boundaries and determining the instrument stability, power sustainability, and reception efficiency in typical environments. The RFEMS instruments provided adequate range for locating (typically ca. 6-45 m in each zone), allowing us to locate subjects within distinct microenvironments and to distinguish between the activities of a variety of workers, the average time activity pattern (TAP) recording deviation for both human observations and RFEMS was ca. 0.21-1.57%. Power consumption experiments revealed that the system could be sustained for more than 124 h. A pilot field test indicated that the RFEMS offers a new level of accuracy for direct quantification of time activity patterns in exposure assessments of indoor workers over long periods of time. PMID:20145895

  2. Verification of lewisite exposure: Quantification of chlorovinylarsonous acid in biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, E.M.; Smith, J.R.; Logan, T.P.; Wiltshire, N.; Woodward, C.L.

    1993-05-13

    Lewisite (dichloro-2-chlorovinylarsine) is a chemical warfare vesicant which causes immediate pain and systemic arsenic poisoning. Under alkaline conditions, lewisite is rapidly converted to acetylene, chloride ion, and arsenic trioxide. These products can be monitored but are not necessarily specific for lewisite. In our opinion, a better marker of exposure can be found in lewisits acidic hydrolysis products which are chlorovinyl arsonous acid (CVAA) and HC1. CVAA preserves most of lewisite's structure and retains vesicant properties. There are major analytical problems with direct CVAA analysis because of its limited volatility and aqueous solubility. However, CVAA can be made volatile by derivatizing with 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT). The derivative, 2-(2-chlorovinyl)-1,3,2-dithiarsenoline, is rapidly formed using a three-fold molar excess of EDT and is relatively stable. Results indicated that CVAA can be derivatized directly in spiked urine or serum. Urine and serum samples spiked with CVAA and extracted with toluene were analyzed by gas chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode using phenylarsine oxide as the internal standard. Results indicated a linear relationship between the peak area ratio and concentration from 4000 to 20 ng/mL.

  3. Effects of radiant heat exposure on pacing pattern during a 15-km cycling time trial.

    PubMed

    Levels, Koen; de Koning, Jos; Broekhuijzen, Iris; Zwaan, Tamara; Foster, Carl; Daanen, Hein

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of different durations of skin temperature manipulation on pacing patterns and performance during a 15-km cycling time trial. Nineteen well-trained men completed three 15-km cycling time trials in 18 °C and 50% relative humidity with 4.5-km (short-heat), 9.0-km (long-heat) or without (control) radiant heat exposure applied by infrared heaters after 1.5 km in the time trial. During the time trials, power output, mean skin temperature, rectal temperature, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were assessed. The radiant heat exposure resulted in higher mean skin temperature during the time trial for short-heat (35.0 ± 0.6 °C) and long-heat (35.3 ± 0.5 °C) than for control (32.5 ± 1.0 °C; P < 0.001), whereas rectal temperature was similar (P = 0.55). The mean power output was less for short-heat (273 ± 8 W; P = 0.001) and long-heat (271 ± 9 W; P = 0.02) than for control (287 ± 7 W), but pacing patterns did not differ (P = 0.55). Heart rate was greatest in control (177 ± 9 beats · min(-1); P < 0.001), whereas the rating of perceived exertion remained similar. We concluded that a radiant heat exposure and associated higher skin temperature reduced overall performance, but did not modify pacing pattern during a 15-km cycling time trial, regardless of the duration of the exposure. PMID:24405217

  4. Phase-shifting human circadian rhythms: influence of sleep timing, social contact and light exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. Both the timing of behavioural events (activity, sleep and social interactions) and the environmental light-dark cycle have been reported to contribute to entrainment of human circadian rhythms to the 24 h day. Yet, the relative contribution of those putative behavioural synchronizers to that of light exposure remains unclear. 2. To investigate this, we inverted the schedule of rest, sedentary activity and social contact of thirty-two young men either with or without exposure to bright light. 3. On this inverted schedule, the endogenous component of the core temperature rhythm of subjects who were exposed to bright light showed a significant phase shift, demonstrating that they were adapting to the new schedule. In contrast, the core temperature rhythm of subjects who were not exposed to bright light moved on average 0.2 h later per day and after 10 days had not significantly adapted to the new schedule. 4. The direction of phase shift in the groups exposed to bright light was dependent on the time of bright light exposure, while control subjects drifted to a later hour regardless of the timing of their schedule of sleep timing, social contact and meals. 5. These results support the concept that the light-dark cycle is the most important synchronizer of the human circadian system. They suggest that inversion of the sleep-wake, rest-activity and social contact cycles provides relatively minimal drive for resetting the human circadian pacemaker. 6. These data indicate that interventions designed to phase shift human circadian rhythms for adjustment to time zone changes or altered work schedules should focus on properly timed light exposure.

  5. Measurement of fluid properties using rapid-double-exposure and time-average holographic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, A.J.

    1984-06-01

    The holographic recording of the time history of a flow feature in three dimensions is discussed. The use of diffuse illumination holographic interferometry or the three dimensional visualization of flow features such as shock waves and turbulent eddies is described. The double-exposure and time-average methods are compared using the characteristic function and the results from a flow simulator. A time history requires a large hologram recording rate. Results of holographic cinematography of the shock waves in a flutter cascade are presented as an example. Future directions of this effort, including the availability and development of suitable lasers, are discussed.

  6. Effective denitrification at the groundwater surface-water interface: exposure rather than residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, Stefan; Frei, Sven

    2014-05-01

    Effective processing of material in aquatic systems, e. g. removal of nitrate upon denitrification, requires sufficient reaction time. This statement sounds trivial albeit its implication for biogeochemistry seems to be not fully recognized. The time teff required for effective processing of nitrate is controlled by the underlying biogeochemical rate law. In the simplest case of a 1st order reaction, teff is often calculated as the time when 63% of the initial concentration is consumed setting teff as 1/kreaction. It may, however, be more appropriate to derive teff,90%or teff,99% from the respective rate law. Hence a minimum time t > teff is required that exposes a specific biogeochemical process to conditions favourable for this process, which is anoxia in case of denitrification. This exposure time τexp is not necessarily identical to the residence time τ of water in the particular system or flow path. Rather, the exposure time can be much shorter and may even fluctuate with time. As a consequence, Damköhler numbers (Da = τexp/teff) for denitrification < 1 may be the consequence even though the age of water may be comparatively high. We therefore argue that the key for understanding denitrification efficiency at the groundwater surface-water interface (or in groundwater systems in general) is the quantification of the exposure time. This contribution therefore aims i) to estimate exposure times required for effective denitrification based on an analysis of rate constants for denitrification, ii) to relate these time scales to typical residence time distributions found at the groundwater surface-water interface and iii) to discuss implications for denitrification efficiencies. References: Oldham, C; Farrow, DE; Peiffer, S (2013): A generalized Damköhler number for classifying material processing in hydrological systems, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 17, 1133-1148 Frei, S; Knorr, KH; Peiffer, S; Fleckenstein, J (2012): Surface micro-topography causes

  7. Measurement of fluid properties using rapid-double-exposure and time-average holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The holographic recording of the time history of a flow feature in three dimensions is discussed. The use of diffuse illumination holographic interferometry or the three dimensional visualization of flow features such as shock waves and turbulent eddies is described. The double-exposure and time-average methods are compared using the characteristic function and the results from a flow simulator. A time history requires a large hologram recording rate. Results of holographic cinematography of the shock waves in a flutter cascade are presented as an example. Future directions of this effort, including the availability and development of suitable lasers, are discussed.

  8. Measurement of fluid properties using rapid-double-exposure and time-average holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The holographic recording of the time history of a flow feature in three dimensions is discussed. The use of diffuse illumination holographic interferometry or the three-dimensional visualization of flow features such as shock waves and turbulent eddies is described. The double-exposure and time-average methods are compared using the characteristic function and the results from a flow simulator. A time history requires a large hologram recording rate. Results of holographic cinematography of the shock waves in a flutter cascade are presented as an example. Future directions of this effort, including the availability and development of suitable lasers, are discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N84-21849

  9. In-situ real time measurements of net erosion rates of copper during hydrogen plasma exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Leigh; Wright, Graham; Peterson, Ethan; Whyte, Dennis

    2013-10-01

    In order to properly understand the dynamics of net erosion/deposition in fusion reactors, such as tokamaks, a diagnostic measuring the real time rates of net erosion/deposition during plasma exposure is necessary. The DIONISOS experiment produces real time measurements of net erosion/deposition by using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) ion beam analysis simultaneously with plasma exposure from a helicon plasma source. This in-situ method improves on ex-situ weight loss measurements by allowing measurement of possible synergistic effects of high ion implantation rates and net erosion rate and by giving a real time response to changes in plasma parameters. Previous work has validated this new technique for measuring copper (Cu) erosion from helium (He) plasma ion bombardment. This technique is now extended to measure copper erosion due to deuterium and hydrogen plasma ion exposure. Targets used were a 1.5 μm Cu layer on an aluminum substrate. Cu layer thickness is tracked in real time using 1.2 MeV proton RBS. Measured erosion rates will be compared to results from literature and He erosion rates. Supported by US DoE award DE-SC00-02060.

  10. Breast cancer risk after occupational solvent exposure: the influence of timing and setting

    PubMed Central

    Ekenga, Christine C; Parks, Christine G.; D’Aloisio, Aimee A.; DeRoo, Lisa A.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2014-01-01

    Organic solvents are ubiquitous in occupational settings where they may contribute to risks for carcinogenesis. However, there is limited information on organic solvents as human breast carcinogens. We examined the relationship between occupational exposure to solvents and breast cancer in a prospective study of 47,661 women with an occupational history in the Sister Study cohort. Occupational solvent exposure was categorized using self-reported job-specific solvent use collected at baseline. Multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to assess breast cancer risk, adjusting for established breast cancer risk factors. A total of 1,798 women were diagnosed with breast cancer during follow-up, including 1,255 invasive cases. Overall, the risk of invasive breast cancer was not associated with lifetime exposure to solvents (HR: 1.04; 95% CI = 0.88–1.24). Parous women who worked with solvents prior to their first full-term birth had an increased risk of estrogen receptor-positive invasive breast cancer compared to women who never worked with solvents (HR: 1.39; 95% CI = 1.03–1.86). A significantly elevated risk for estrogen receptor-positive invasive breast cancer was associated with solvent exposure among clinical laboratory technologists and technicians (HR: 2.00; 95%CI: 1.07–3.73). Occupational exposure to solvents prior to first birth, a critical period of breast tissue differentiation, may result in increased vulnerability for breast cancer. Our findings suggest a need for future studies in this area to focus on exposure time windows and solvent types in different occupational settings. PMID:24879566

  11. Influence of the degree of exposure to lead on relations between alcohol consumption and the biological indices of lead exposure: epidemiological study in a lead acid battery factory.

    PubMed

    Cezard, C; Demarquilly, C; Boniface, M; Haguenoer, J M

    1992-09-01

    Alcohol has been shown to interact with lead to influence haem biosynthesis. The aim of this study was to define the dependence of this interaction on the degree of exposure to lead. Exposure to alcohol was estimated by measurement of alcohol concentrations in a sample of urine collected during the morning (AlcUM) (0.82 (SD 4.36) mmol/l) and in a sample collected during the afternoon (AlcUA) (1.15 (SD 3.49) mmol/l). The biological monitoring of exposure to lead included measurements of blood lead (Pb-B) (1.82 (SD 0.72) mumol/l), urinary delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALAU) (35.33 (SD 28.00) mumol/l; d = 1.015), and erythrocyte zinc-protoporphyrin (ZPP) (112.90 (SD 83.71) nmol/mmol Hb) concentrations. The study of the influence of the degree of occupational exposure to lead on relations between alcohol consumption and effects of the exposure to lead led to the consideration of two different groups--namely, mildly and strongly exposed subjects. In the first group, individual biological susceptibility seemed to play a preponderant part. In the second, the pool of lead present in the body seemed to be sufficiently important to mask the effects of individual susceptibility. PMID:1390270

  12. Sequestering CO(2) by mineral carbonation: stability against acid rain exposure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel J; Brent, Geoff F

    2010-04-01

    Mineral carbonation is a potentially attractive alternative to storage of compressed CO(2) in underground repositories, known as geosequestration. Processes for the conversion of basic ores, such as magnesium silicates, to carbonates have been proposed by various researchers, with storage of the carbonate as backfill in the original mine representing a solid carbon sink. The stability of such carbon sinks against acid rain and other sources of strong acids is examined here. It is acknowledged that in the presence of strong acid, carbonates will dissolve and release carbon dioxide. A sensitivity analysis covering annual average rainfall and pH that may be encountered in industrialized areas of the United States, China, Europe, and Australia was conducted to determine maximum CO(2) rerelease rates from mineral carbonation carbon sinks. This analysis is based on a worst-case premise that is equivalent to assuming infinitely rapid kinetics of dissolution of the carbonate. The analysis shows that under any likely conditions of pH and rainfall, leakage rates of stored CO(2) are negligible. This is illustrated in a hypothetical case study under Australian conditions. It is thus proposed that sequestration by mineral carbonation can be considered to be permanent on practical human time scales. Other possible sources of acid have also been considered. PMID:20199068

  13. Motor Response Programming and Movement Time in Children with Heavy Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Roger W.; Thomas, Jennifer D.; Levy, Susan S.; Riley, Edward P.

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment assessed motor response programming and movement time in children with histories of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcohol-exposed children between the ages of 7 and 17 years were classified into two groups: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS: n = 9) and children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PEA: n = 19) but who did not have the defining characteristics of FAS. The FAS and PEA children were compared to non-alcohol exposed children (NC: n = 23) when completing two tasks: a simple reaction time task (RT alone condition) and a reaction plus movement task (RT + Move condition). The movement involved responding to an imperative stimulus signal and depressing three target buttons in a set sequence. Participants completed 24 trials each for the RT alone and RT + Move response conditions. Results indicated no significant differences in performance among FAS, PEA and NC groups during the RT alone condition. However, during the RT + Move condition, the FAS group produced significantly longer and more variable reaction times than either the PEA and NC groups, which produced comparable reaction times. The FAS group also produced significantly slower movement times when moving to all three targets, whereas movement time variability did not significantly differ as a function of group. The observed results indicate children with FAS experience deficits in response programming and movement time production. PMID:20598488

  14. Lysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by high-intensity focused ultrasound as a function of exposure time.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Timothy A; Xu, Jin; Stessman, Dan J; Yao, Linxing; Spalding, Martin H; Wang, Tong

    2014-05-01

    Efficient lysis of microalgae for lipid extraction is an important concern when processing biofuels. Historically, ultrasound frequencies in the range of 10-40 kHz have been utilized for this task. However, greater efficiencies might be achievable if higher frequencies could be used. In our study, we evaluated the potential of using 1.1 MHz ultrasound to lyse microalgae for biofuel production while using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism. The ultrasound was generated using a spherically focused transducer with a focal length of 6.34 cm and an active diameter of 6.36 cm driven by 20 cycle sine-wave tone bursts at a pulse repetition frequency of 2 kHz (3.6% duty cycle). The time-average acoustic power output was 26.2 W while the spatial-peak-pulse-average intensity (ISPPA) for each tone burst was 41 kW/cm(2). The peak compressional and rarefactional pressures at the focus were 102 and 17 MPa, respectively. The exposure time was varied for the different cases in the experiments from 5s to 9 min and cell lysis was assessed by quantifying the percentage of protein and chlorophyll release into the supernate as well as the lipid extractability. Free radical generation and lipid oxidation for the different ultrasound exposures were also determined. We found that there was a statistically significant increase in lipid extractability for all of the exposures compared to the control. The longer exposures also completely fragmented the cells releasing almost all of the protein and chlorophyll into the supernate. The cavitation activity did not significantly increase lipid oxidation while there was a minor trend of increased free radical production with increased ultrasound exposure. PMID:24355286

  15. Time course of heart rate variability decline following particulate matter exposures in an occupational cohort.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Jennifer M; Fang, Shona C; Eisen, Ellen A; Schwartz, Joel; Hauser, Russ; Herrick, Robert F; Christiani, David C

    2008-02-01

    Although research suggests that particles influence cardiac autonomic response as evidenced by decreases in heart rate variability (HRV), the time course of the response remains unclear. Using a crossover panel study, we monitored 36 male boilermaker welders, occupationally exposed to metal-rich particulate matter (PM) to investigate the temporal trend of hourly HRV subsequent to PM exposure. Ambulatory electrocardiograms were collected over work (exposure) and non-work (control) periods and the mean of the standard deviations of all normal-to-normal intervals for all 5-min segments (SDNN(i)) was calculated hourly for up to 14-hrs post-work. The exposure-response relationship was examined with linear mixed effects regression models to account for participants monitored over multiple occasions. Models were adjusted for non-work HRV to control for diurnal fluctuations and individual predictors of HRV. The mean (SD) work PM(2. 5) concentration was 1.12 (0.76) mg/m(3). Hourly SDNN(i) was consistently lower post-work as compared to the same time period on a non-work day. HRV was inversely associated with work PM(2. 5) exposures in each of the 14-hrs post-work. The hourly associations suggested an early and later phase response, with the largest regression coefficients observed 2-3 hrs (beta = -6.86 (95% CI: -11.91, -1.81) msec/1 mg/m(3) at 3-hrs), and then 9-13 hrs (beta = -8.60 (95% CI: -17.45, 0.24) msec/1 mg/m(3) at 11-hrs), after adjusting for non-work HRV, smoking status, and age. This investigation demonstrates declines in HRV for up to 14 hours following PM exposure and a multiphase cardiovascular autonomic response with immediate (2 hrs) and delayed (9-13 hrs) responses. PMID:18302049

  16. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V. V.; Kuznetsov, Yu L.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2013-07-01

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions.

  17. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchenko, V V; Kuznetsov, Yu L; Meglinski, I V

    2013-07-31

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions. (laser applications in biology and medicine)

  18. Associations of in Utero Exposure to Perfluorinated Alkyl Acids with Human Semen Quality and Reproductive Hormones in Adult Men

    PubMed Central

    Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Olsen, Sjurdur Frodi; Bonde, Jens Peter; Kristensen, Susanne Lund; Halldorsson, Thorhallur Ingi; Becher, Georg; Haug, Line Småstuen; Ernst, Emil Hagen; Toft, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs), persistent chemicals with unique water-, dirt-, and oil-repellent properties, are suspected of having endocrine-disrupting activity. The PFAA compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are found globally in humans; because they readily cross the placental barrier, in utero exposure may be a cause for concern. Objectives: We investigated whether in utero exposure to PFOA and PFOS affects semen quality, testicular volume, and reproductive hormone levels. Methods: We recruited 169 male offspring (19–21 years of age) from a pregnancy cohort established in Aarhus, Denmark, in 1988–1989, corresponding to 37.6% of the eligible sons. Each man provided a semen sample and a blood sample. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, total sperm count, motility, and morphology, and blood samples were used to measure reproductive hormones. As a proxy for in utero exposure, PFOA and PFOS were measured in maternal blood samples from pregnancy week 30. Results: Multivariable linear regression analysis suggested that in utero exposure to PFOA was associated with lower adjusted sperm concentration (ptrend = 0.01) and total sperm count (ptrend = 0.001) and with higher adjusted levels of luteinizing hormone (ptrend = 0.03) and follicle-stimulating hormone (ptrend = 0.01). PFOS did not appear to be associated with any of the outcomes assessed, before or after adjustment. Conclusions: The results suggest that in utero exposure to PFOA may affect adult human male semen quality and reproductive hormone levels. PMID:23360585

  19. Exposure to chemical cocktails before or after conception – The effect of timing on ovarian development☆

    PubMed Central

    Bellingham, Michelle; Amezaga, Maria R.; Mandon-Pepin, Beatrice; Speers, Christopher J.B.; Kyle, Carol E.; Evans, Neil P.; Sharpe, Richard M.; Cotinot, Corinne; Rhind, Stewart M.; Fowler, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of female fetuses to environmental chemicals (ECs) during pregnancy results in a disturbed ovarian adult phenotype. We investigated the influence of pre- and/or post-conception exposure to low-level mixtures of ECs on the structure and function of the fetal ovine ovary. We examined ovarian morphology, expression of oocyte and granulosa cell-specific genes and proteome. Female fetuses were collected at day 110 of gestation, from dams exposed continuously until, and after mating, by grazing in pastures treated with sewage sludge as a fertiliser (TT) or in control fields treated with inorganic fertiliser (CC). In addition, in a cross-over design, fetal ovaries were collected from dams maintained on sludge pastures up to the time of mating but then transferred to control pastures (TC) and, reciprocally, those transferred from control to treated pastures at mating (CT). On examination, the proportion of type 1a follicles (activating primordial follicles) was significantly lower in animals from the CT groups compared with CC and TT groups (P < 0.05). Of the 23 ovarian gene transcripts studied, 14 were altered in the ovaries of exposed fetuses (CT, TC, and TT) relative to controls, with the largest number of changes observed in cross-exposure pattern groups (CT or TC). Continuous EC exposure (TT) produced fewer transcript alterations and only two genes (INHBA and GSN) presented differential profiles between CC and TT. Fetal ovarian proteome analysis (2-DE gels) showed, across all exposure groups, 86 differentially expressed protein spots compared to controls. Animals in the CT group exhibited the highest number (53) while TC and TT presented the same number of affected protein spots (42). Fetal ovarian proteins with altered expression included MVP (major vault protein) and several members of the heat-shock family (HSPA4L, HSP90AA1 and HSF1). The present findings indicate that continuous maternal EC exposure before and during gestation, are less deleterious for

  20. a Solution to Low Rfm Fitting Precision of Planetary Orbiter Images Caused by Exposure Time Changing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Xu, B.; Di, K.; Jia, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a new solution to the low RFM fitting precision caused by exposure time changing using sensor correction. First, we establish a new rigorous geometric model, with the same ephemerides, attitudes and sensor design parameters of Chang'E-2 and HRSC images, using an equal exposure time of each scan line. The original rigorous geometric model is also established. With a given height, we can establish the correspondence between the two rigorous models. Then we generate a sensor corrected image by resampling the original image using an average elevation or a digital elevation model. We found that the sensor corrected images can be used for topographic mapping which maintains almost the same precision of the original images under certain conditions. And RFM can fit rigorous geometric model of the sensor corrected image very well. Preliminary experimental results show that the RMS residual error of the RFM fitting can reach to 1/100 pixel level too. Using the proposed solution, sensors with changing exposure time can be precisely modelled by the generic RFM.

  1. Stellar scintillation in the short exposure regime and atmospheric coherence time evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: Accurately measuring the atmospheric coherence time is still a significant problem despite a variety of applicable methods. The Multi-Aperture Scintillation Sensor (MASS) designed for the vertical profiling of optical turbulence also provides a measurements of coherence time, but its results were found to be biased. Hence there is a need for a more robust method to determine τ0. Methods: The effect of smoothing the stellar scintillation by a finite exposure of the detector is considered. The short exposure regime is described and its limits are defined. The re-analysis of previous measurements with the MASS is performed to test the applicability of this approach in real data processing. It is shown that most of the actual measurements satisfy the criteria of short exposures. Results: The expressions for the mean wind speeds bar V_2 in the free atmosphere from the measurement of the scintillation indices are derived for this regime. These values provide an estimate of the atmospheric coherence time τ0 without the need of empirical calibration. The verification of the method based on real measurements of the resulting τ0 agree well with independent methods.

  2. The Effect of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate, Exposure Time, and Chemical Mixtures on Methanogenic Community Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Patrick J; LaPara, Timothy M; Novak, Paige J

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of organic micropollutant mixtures are found in untreated municipal wastewater. Anaerobic digesters receive large loadings of hydrophobic micropollutants that sorb to wastewater biosolids. Despite micropollutants being pervasive as mixtures, little research is available to explain the impact that mixtures of compounds, as well as exposure time, have on microbial communities in anaerobic digesters. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was added to anaerobic enrichment cultures in both short-term (14 days) and long-term (140 days) studies to determine the impact of exposure time. Additionally, triclosan was added during the experiments to investigate the impact of mixtures on community structure and function. PFOS did not alter methane production in short-term studies, but in long-term studies, methane production increased, consistent with our hypothesis that PFOS may act as a metabolic uncoupler. The impact of triclosan on methane production was exacerbated when PFOS was already present in the anaerobic enrichment cultures. Triclosan also had greater impacts on microbial community structures in the bottles that had been exposed to PFOS long-term. These results demonstrate that both chemical mixtures and exposure time are important parameters to address when trying to define the impacts of micropollutants on anaerobic microbial communities. PMID:26462249

  3. The Effect of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate, Exposure Time, and Chemical Mixtures on Methanogenic Community Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Patrick J; LaPara, Timothy M; Novak, Paige J

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of organic micropollutant mixtures are found in untreated municipal wastewater. Anaerobic digesters receive large loadings of hydrophobic micropollutants that sorb to wastewater biosolids. Despite micropollutants being pervasive as mixtures, little research is available to explain the impact that mixtures of compounds, as well as exposure time, have on microbial communities in anaerobic digesters. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was added to anaerobic enrichment cultures in both short-term (14 days) and long-term (140 days) studies to determine the impact of exposure time. Additionally, triclosan was added during the experiments to investigate the impact of mixtures on community structure and function. PFOS did not alter methane production in short-term studies, but in long-term studies, methane production increased, consistent with our hypothesis that PFOS may act as a metabolic uncoupler. The impact of triclosan on methane production was exacerbated when PFOS was already present in the anaerobic enrichment cultures. Triclosan also had greater impacts on microbial community structures in the bottles that had been exposed to PFOS long-term. These results demonstrate that both chemical mixtures and exposure time are important parameters to address when trying to define the impacts of micropollutants on anaerobic microbial communities. PMID:26462249

  4. Real-time measurement of dust in the workplace using video exposure monitoring: Farming to pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, P. T.; Forth, A. R.; Clark, R. D. R.; Dowker, K. P.; Thorpe, A.

    2009-02-01

    Real-time, photometric, portable dust monitors have been employed for video exposure monitoring (VEM) to measure and highlight dust levels generated by work activities, illustrate dust control techniques, and demonstrate good practice. Two workplaces, presenting different challenges for measurement, were used to illustrate the capabilities of VEM: (a) poultry farming activities and (b) powder transfer operations in a pharmaceutical company. For the poultry farm work, the real-time monitors were calibrated with respect to the respirable and inhalable dust concentrations using cyclone and IOM reference samplers respectively. Different rankings of exposure for typical activities were found on the small farm studied here compared to previous exposure measurements at larger poultry farms: these were mainly attributed to the different scales of operation. Large variations in the ratios of respirable, inhalable and real-time monitor TWA concentrations of poultry farm dust for various activities were found. This has implications for the calibration of light-scattering dust monitors with respect to inhalable dust concentration. In the pharmaceutical application, the effectiveness of a curtain barrier for dust control when dispensing powder in a downflow booth was rapidly demonstrated.

  5. Effect of deployment time on endotoxin and allergen exposure assessment using electrostatic dust collectors.

    PubMed

    Kilburg-Basnyat, Brita; Metwali, Nervana; Thorne, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatic dust collector (EDC) is a passive dust sampling device for exposure assessment of airborne endotoxin and possibly allergens. EDCs consist of a non-conducting plastic folder holding two or four electrostatic cloths of defined area. The sampling time needed to achieve detectable and reproducible loading for bioaerosols has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, in 15 Iowa farm homes EDCs were deployed for 7-, 14-, and 28-day sampling periods to determine if endotoxin and allergens could be quantified and if loading rates were uniform over time, i.e. if loads doubled from 7 to 14 days or 14 to 28 days and quadrupled from 7 to 28 days. Loadings between left and right paired EDC cloths were not significantly different and were highly correlated for endotoxin, total protein, and cat (Fel d1), dog (Can f1), and mouse (Mus m1) allergens (P < 0.001). EDCs performed especially well for endotoxin sampling with close agreement between paired samples (Pearson r = 0.96, P < 0.001). Endotoxin loading of the EDCs doubled from 7- to 14-day deployments as hypothesized although the loading rate decreased from 14 to 28 days of sampling with only a 1.38-fold increase. Allergen exposure assessment using EDCs was overall less satisfactory. Although there was reasonable agreement between paired samples, only exposures to cat, dog, and mouse allergens were reliable and these only at the longer deployment times. PMID:25187036

  6. Tumors and Proliferative Lesions in Adult Offspring After Maternal Exposure to Methylarsonous Acid During Gestation in CD1 Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental exposure to inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and mice, and adult offspring of mice exposed to inorganic arsenic can develop tumors of the lung, liver, adrenal, uterus, and ovary. It has been suggested that methylarsonous acid (MMA3+), a product of the bi...

  7. PULMONARY FUNCTION AND BRONCHIAL REACTIVITY IN HUMAN SUBJECTS WITH EXPOSURE TO OZONE AND RESPIRABLE SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-year research study was conducted investigating the effects of individual and sequential exposures to ozone and sulfuric acid aerosol on pulmonary function and bronchial reactivity in human subjects. PHASE I: In healthy smokers and nonsmokers exposed for 4 hours to 98 mic...

  8. Impact of boric acid exposure at different concentrations on testicular DNA and male rats fertility.

    PubMed

    El-Dakdoky, Mai H; Abd El-Wahab, Hanan M F

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of exposure to three levels of boric acid (BA) on male rats reproduction, fertility and progeny outcome, with emphasis on testicular DNA level and quality. Adult male rats (12 weeks old) were treated orally with 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg bwt/d of BA for 60 d. The results indicated that BA administration at 125 mg/kg bwt had no adverse effects on fertility, sperm characteristics or prenatal development of the impregnated females. However, at dose 250 mg, BA treatment significantly increased serum nitric oxide, testosterone, estradiol levels and testicular boron and calcium levels and also significantly reduced serum arginase activity, sperm quality and testicular DNA content with minor DNA fragmentation. The impact of BA exposure at dose 250 mg on male rats fertility was translated into increases in pre-implantation loss with a resulting decrease in the number of live fetuses/litter. In addition to the significant alteration of biochemical measurements, observed at dose 250 mg, administration of BA at 500 mg caused testicular atrophy, severe damage of spermatogenesis, spermiation failure and significant reduction of Mg and Zn testicular levels. None of the male rats, treated with 500 mg/kg bwt, could impregnate untreated females, suggesting the occurrence of definitive loss of fertility. In conclusion, BA impaired fertility, in a dose-dependant manner, by targeting the highly proliferative cells, the germ cells, through decreasing DNA synthetic rate rather than the induction of DNA damage. PMID:23301826

  9. Effects of acid aerosol exposure on the surface properties of airway mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.M.; Schuerch, S.; Roth, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    It was hypothesized that the mucous layer lining the tracheas of rats and guinea pigs contains surfactant material capable of lowering the air/mucus surface tension, {gamma}, and that exposure to an irritant aerosol would raise the {gamma}. The {gamma} of the surface film was measured directly by a spreading droplet technique and indirectly by displacement of polymethyl methacrylate particles into the aqueous layer. The morphology of the mucous film was examined by electron microscopy after nonaqueous fixation. {gamma} was 33.3 {plus_minus} 0.70 (SE) mN/m and 32.3 {plus_minus} 0.68 (SE) mN/m for the normal rat and guinea pig trachea, respectively. Exposure for 4 h to aerosols of sulfuric acid (94.1 {plus_minus} 18.68 (SD) and 43.3 {plus_minus} 4.57 (SD) mg/m{sup 3}) caused a several-fold increase in thickness of the mucous layer with exudation of protein-like material. The osmiophilic surfactant film at the air/mucus interface became irregularly thickened and multilayered. Despite these morphological changes {gamma} remained low, 33.2 {plus_minus} 0.43 (SE) mN/m and 32.6 {plus_minus} 0.60 (SE) mN/m for rats and guinea pigs, respectively, and displacement of particles into the subphase was not compromised. The results indicate that rodent tracheas are able to maintain a low surface tension in the presence of injury. 24 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Trichloroacetic acid cycling in Sitka spruce saplings and effects on sapling health following long term exposure.

    PubMed

    Dickey, C A; Heal, K V; Stidson, R T; Koren, R; Schröder, P; Cape, J N; Heal, M R

    2004-07-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA, CCl(3)COOH) has been associated with forest damage but the source of TCA to trees is poorly characterised. To investigate the routes and effects of TCA uptake in conifers, 120 Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr) saplings were exposed to control, 10 or 100 microg l(-1) solutions of TCA applied twice weekly to foliage only or soil only over two consecutive 5-month growing seasons. At the end of each growing season similar elevated TCA concentrations (approximate range 200-300 ng g(-1) dwt) were detected in both foliage and soil-dosed saplings exposed to 100 microg l(-1) TCA solutions showing that TCA uptake can occur from both exposure routes. Higher TCA concentrations in branchwood of foliage-dosed saplings suggest that atmospheric TCA in solution is taken up indirectly into conifer needles via branch and stemwood. TCA concentrations in needles declined slowly by only 25-30% over 6 months of winter without dosing. No effect of TCA exposure on sapling growth was measured during the experiment. However at the end of the first growing season needles of saplings exposed to 10 or 100 microg l(-1) foliage-applied TCA showed significantly more visible damage, higher activities of some detoxifying enzymes, lower protein contents and poorer water control than needles of saplings dosed with the same TCA concentrations to the soil. At the end of each growing season the combined TCA storage in needles, stemwood, branchwood and soil of each sapling was <6% of TCA applied. Even with an estimated half-life of tens of days for within-sapling elimination of TCA during the growing season, this indicates that TCA is eliminated rapidly before uptake or accumulates in another compartment. Although TCA stored in sapling needles accounted for only a small proportion of TCA stored in the sapling/soil system it appears to significantly affect some measures of sapling health. PMID:15158031

  11. The effect of short-time microwave exposures on Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto chicken meat portions

    PubMed Central

    Zeinali, Tayebeh; Jamshidi, Abdollah; Khanzadi, Saeid; Azizzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be found throughout the environment and in many foods. It is associated primarily with meat and animal products. Listeria monocytogenes has become increasingly important as a food-borne pathogen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of microwave (MW) treatment of chicken meat samples which were inoculated with L. monocytogenes. Drumettes of broiler carcasses were soaked in fully growth of L. monocytogenes in Brain-Heart Infusion broth. The swab samples were taken from the inoculated samples, after various times of radiation (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 sec), using a domestic MW oven at full power. Following exposures, viable counts and surface temperature measurements were performed. The bacterial counts were performed on Oxford agar. The results indicated that equal or longer than 60 sec exposures of chicken portions to MW heating which enhances the median surface temperature more than 74 ˚C could eliminate the superficial contamination of chicken meat with L. monocytogenes. Statistical analysis showed samples with equal or longer than 60 sec exposures to MW heating had significant decrease in population of inoculated bacteria compared with positive control group (p < 0.05). Pearson correlation showed a significant correlation between the bacterial population and temperature of samples due to MW exposure (p < 0.001, r = – 0.879 and r2 = 0.773). PMID:26261715

  12. Complexities of sibling analysis when exposures and outcomes change with time and birth order.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Madhuri; Kheifets, Leeka I; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Divan, Hozefa A; Olsen, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the complexities of performing a sibling analysis with a re-examination of associations between cell phone exposures and behavioral problems observed previously in the Danish National Birth Cohort. Children (52,680; including 5441 siblings) followed up to age 7 were included. We examined differences in exposures and behavioral problems between siblings and non-siblings and by birth order and birth year. We estimated associations between cell phone exposures and behavioral problems while accounting for the random family effect among siblings. The association of behavioral problems with both prenatal and postnatal exposure differed between siblings (odds ratio (OR): 1.07; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69-1.66) and non-siblings (OR: 1.54; 95% CI: 1.36-1.74) and within siblings by birth order; the association was strongest for first-born siblings (OR: 1.72; 95% CI: 0.86-3.42) and negative for later-born siblings (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.31-1.25), which may be because of increases in cell phone use with later birth year. Sibling analysis can be a powerful tool for (partially) accounting for confounding by invariant unmeasured within-family factors, but it cannot account for uncontrolled confounding by varying family-level factors, such as those that vary with time and birth order. PMID:24064530

  13. In vitro ozone exposure increases release of arachidonic acid products from a human bronchial epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, K.P.; Madden, M.C.; Noah, T.L.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1993-02-01

    Eicosanoids released after ozone exposure of a human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-S6, were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of supernatants from exposed cells prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid. BEAS cells released thromboxane B2 (TxB2), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene C4 (LTC4), LTD4, LTE4, and 12-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) after exposure to ozone at concentrations of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 ppm. The eicosanoids were identified by coelution with authentic standards. The largest product from ozone-exposed BEAS cells was the most polar peak, designated Peak 1. Release of cyclooxygenase products such as TxB2, PGE2, and HHT was inhibited by acetylsalicylic acid. Peaks that migrated with authentic standards for LTB4, LTC4, and LTD4 were inhibited by the lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid. The leukotrienes LTB4 and LTC4/D4 could also be detected by immunoassay of concentrated peak fractions. Thus BEAS cells released eicosanoids from cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism following exposure to ozone. Airway epithelial cells may be an important source of eicosanoids following ozone stimulation in humans.

  14. Effect of acute copper sulfate exposure on olfactory responses to amino acids and pheromones in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Kolmakov, Nikolay N; Hubbard, Peter C; Lopes, Orlando; Canario, Adelino V M

    2009-11-01

    Exposure of olfactory epithelium to environmentally relevant concentrations of copper disrupts olfaction in fish. To examine the dynamics of recovery at both functional and morphological levels after acute copper exposure, unilateral exposure of goldfish olfactory epithelia to 100 microM CuSO(4) (10 min) was followed by electro-olfactogram (EOG) recording and scanning electron microscopy. Sensitivity to amino acids (l-arginine and l-serine), generally considered food-related odorants, recovered most rapidly (three days), followed by that to catecholamines (3-O-methoxytyramine), bile acids (taurolithocholic acid) and the steroid pheromone, 17,20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one 20-sulfate, which took 28 days to reach full recovery. Sensitivity to the postovulatory pheromone prostaglandin F(2alpha) had not fully recovered even at 28 days. These changes in sensitivity were correlated with changes in the recovery of ciliated and microvillous receptor cell types. Microvillous cells appeared largely unaffected by CuSO(4) treatment. Cilia in ciliated receptor neurones, however, appeared damaged one day post-treatment and were virtually absent after three days but had begun to recover after 14 days. Together, these results support the hypothesis that microvillous receptor neurones detect amino acids whereas ciliated receptor neurones were not functional and are responsible for detection of social stimuli (bile acids and pheromones). Furthermore, differences in sensitivity to copper may be due to different transduction pathways in the different cell types. PMID:19924975

  15. Influence of the exposure time in the area monitors at radiodiagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyton, F.; Ferreira, M. J.; Macedo, E. M.; Navarro, V. C. C.; Garcia, I. F. M.; Pereira, L. L. S.; Navarro, M. V. T.

    2016-07-01

    Area monitoring ensures radiation exposure at an acceptable level, which must be lower than the legal limit. Experimental measurements were taken in an ionizing radiation calibration laboratory. The specified reference radiation to radiation protection N80 was used. Five area monitors were used. The ranges of dose rate inaccuracy measured in rate mode for times ≤ 2 and ≥ 3s were from 10 to 48% and from 1 to 15%, respectively. The inaccuracy ranges measured in integrated mode for times ≤ 2 and ≥ 3s were from 4 to 8% and from 0 to 22%, respectively.

  16. Incidence of mesothelioma in Lombardy, Italy: exposure to asbestos, time patterns and future projections

    PubMed Central

    Mensi, Carolina; De Matteis, Sara; Dallari, Barbara; Riboldi, Luciano; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Consonni, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In Italy, asbestos has been extensively used from 1945 to 1992. We evaluated the impact of exposure to asbestos on occurrence of malignant mesothelioma (MM) in the Lombardy Region, Northwest Italy, the most populated and industrialised Italian region. Methods From the Lombardy Mesothelioma Registry, we selected all incident cases of MM diagnosed between 2000 and 2012. We described sources of exposure to asbestos and examined time trends of MM rates. Using Poisson age-cohort models, we derived projections of burden of MM in the Lombardy population for the period 2013–2029. Results In 2000–2012, we recorded 4442 cases of MM (2850 men, 1592 women). Occupational exposure to asbestos was more frequent in men (73.6%) than in women (38.2%). Non-occupational exposure was found for 13.6% of women and 3.6% of men. The average number of cases of MM per year was still increasing (+3.6% in men, +3.3% in women). Incidence rates were still increasing in individuals aged 65+ years and declining in younger people. A maximum of 417 cases of MM (267 men, 150 women) are expected in 2019. We forecast there will be 6832 more cases (4397 in men, 2435 in women) in the period 2013–2029, for a total of 11 274 cases of MM (7247 in men, 4027 in women) in 30 years. Conclusions This study documented a high burden of MM in both genders in the Lombardy Region, reflecting extensive occupational (mainly in men) and non-occupational (mainly in women) exposure to asbestos in the past. Incidence rates are still increasing; a downturn in occurrence of MM is expected to occur after 2019. PMID:27312399

  17. Effect Modification of the Association of Cumulative Exposure and Cancer Risk by Intensity of Exposure and Time Since Exposure Cessation: A Flexible Method Applied to Cigarette Smoking and Lung Cancer in the SYNERGY Study

    PubMed Central

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; Portengen, Lützen; Schüz, Joachim; Olsson, Ann; Pesch, Beate; Kendzia, Benjamin; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Consonni, Dario; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Gustavsson, Per; Plato, Nils; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Tardón, Adonina; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Stanescu Dumitru, Rodica; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Boffetta, Paolo; Forastiere, Francesco; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peters, Susan; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans; Straif, Kurt; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of the cumulative exposure metric (the product of intensity and duration of exposure) might bias reported associations between exposure to hazardous agents and cancer risk. To assess the independent effects of duration and intensity of exposure on cancer risk, we explored effect modification of the association of cumulative exposure and cancer risk by intensity of exposure. We applied a flexible excess odds ratio model that is linear in cumulative exposure but potentially nonlinear in intensity of exposure to 15 case-control studies of cigarette smoking and lung cancer (1985–2009). Our model accommodated modification of the excess odds ratio per pack-year of cigarette smoking by time since smoking cessation among former smokers. We observed negative effect modification of the association of pack-years of cigarette smoking and lung cancer by intensity of cigarette smoke for persons who smoked more than 20–30 cigarettes per day. Patterns of effect modification were similar across individual studies and across major lung cancer subtypes. We observed strong negative effect modification by time since smoking cessation. Application of our method in this example of cigarette smoking and lung cancer demonstrated that reducing a complex exposure history to a metric such as cumulative exposure is too restrictive. PMID:24355332

  18. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles: Two-level statistical modeling of background exposure and time-activity patterns during three seasons.

    PubMed

    Deffner, Veronika; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Maier, Verena; Pitz, Mike; Cyrys, Josef; Breitner, Susanne; Schneider, Alexandra; Gu, Jianwei; Geruschkat, Uta; Peters, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Personal exposure to air pollution is associated with time- and location-specific factors including indoor and outdoor air pollution, meteorology and time activities. Our investigation aims at the description and identification of factors determining personal exposure to particle number concentration (PNC) in everyday situations. Ten volunteers recorded their personal exposure to PNC and kept an activity diary in three different seasons besides stationary measurements of ambient air pollution and meteorology. Background exposure to PNC was modelled using the most predictive variables. In a second step, the effects of the activities were calculated adjusted for the background exposure. The average personal PNC level was highest in winter and was three times higher than the mean stationary PNC level while staying indoors and two times higher while staying outdoors. Personal indoor PNC levels were significantly increased during the use of candles, cooking and the occurrence of smell of food. High stationary outdoor PNC levels and low dew point temperatures were associated with increased personal outdoor PNC levels. Times spent in public transport were associated with lower personal PNC levels than other times spent in transportation. Personal PNC levels in everyday situations exhibited a large variability because of seasonal, microenvironment-specific and activity-specific influences. PMID:25407347

  19. Simvastatin Hydroxy Acid Fails to Attain Sufficient Central Nervous System Tumor Exposure to Achieve a Cytotoxic Effect: Results of a Preclinical Cerebral Microdialysis Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh T; Jacus, Megan O; Davis, Abigail D; Boulos, Nidal; Turner, David C; Vuppala, Pradeep K; Freeman, Burgess B; Gilbertson, Richard J; Stewart, Clinton F

    2016-04-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors were potent hits against a mouse ependymoma cell line, but their effectiveness against central nervous system tumors will depend on their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and attain a sufficient exposure at the tumor. Among 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors that had activity in vitro, we prioritized simvastatin (SV) as the lead compound for preclinical pharmacokinetic studies based on its potential for central nervous system penetration as determined from in silico models. Furthermore, we performed systemic plasma disposition and cerebral microdialysis studies of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in a murine model of ependymoma to characterize plasma and tumor extracellular fluid (tECF) pharmacokinetic properties. The murine dosage of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was equivalent to the maximum tolerated dose in patients (7.5 mg/kg, p.o.) based on equivalent plasma exposure of simvastatin acid (SVA) between the two species. SV is rapidly metabolized in murine plasma with 15 times lower exposure compared with human plasma. SVA exposure in tECF was <33.8 ± 11.9 µg/l per hour, whereas the tumor to plasma partition coefficient of SVA was <0.084 ± 0.008. Compared with in vitro washout IC50 values, we did not achieve sufficient exposure of SVA in tECF to suggest tumor growth inhibition; therefore, SV was not carried forward in subsequent preclinical efficacy studies. PMID:26802130

  20. Physiological changes in skin barrier function in relation to occlusion level, exposure time and climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, P; Bewick-Sonntag, C; Capri, M G; Berardesca, E

    2002-01-01

    Skin occlusion is a condition encountered with various articles as part of everyday life and resulting changes in skin barrier physiology often remain unnoticed. In the present study we aimed to understand the impact of absorbent feminine hygiene articles, one vapor-permeable and one vapor-impermeable, on skin hydration in response to exposure time and different environmental climatic conditions. Using a forearm model, volunteers were patched with moistened vapor-permeable and -impermeable articles in parallel for 1, 3, and 6 h and under different climatic conditions (i.e. 20 degrees C/30% relative humidity, 25 degrees C/50% relative humidity, 30 degrees C/ 75% relative humidity). The physiological changes in the skin barrier function were measured via skin hydration, evaporation of superficial water (skin surface water loss, SSWL) and relative humidity in the microclimate between skin and occlusive article (RH(mc)). The results show that skin hydration, SSWL, and RH(mc) under a vapor-permeable article are reduced versus the vapor-impermeable article for all exposure times at 25 degrees C and 50% relative humidity. SSWL and RH(mc) decrease from their 1-hour peak values with increasing exposure time, while skin hydration decreases only after 3 h of exposure. Lower environmental temperature (20 degrees C) and lower relative humidity (30%) have little impact on the reduction of SSWL and RH(mc,) but more so on the reduction of skin hydration. Higher temperature (30 degrees C) and higher relative humidity (75%) increase RH(mc) and skin hydration under both vapor-permeable and -impermeable articles while SSWL is reduced under the vapor-impermeable article under these conditions. In conclusion, vapor-permeability is the key factor for physiological changes in the barrier function of the skin under occlusion, exposure time and climatic conditions being modulating factors. These findings have been integrated into a model of skin hydration under occlusion in the context of

  1. Demonstration of real-time monitoring of a photolithographic exposure process using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, C.D.

    1998-02-01

    Silicon wafers are coated with photoresist and exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light in a laboratory to simulate typical conditions expected in an actual semiconductor manufacturing process tool. Air is drawn through the exposure chamber and analyzed using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI/MS). Species that evaporate or outgas from the wafer are thus detected. The purpose of such analyses is to determine the potential of CI/MS as a real-time process monitoring tool. Results demonstrate that CI/MS can remotely detect the products evolved before, during, and after wafer UV exposure; and that the quantity and type of products vary with the photoresist coated on the wafer. Such monitoring could provide semiconductor manufacturers benefits in quality control and process analysis. Tool and photoresist manufacturers could also realize benefits from this measurement technique with respect to new tool, method, or photoresist development. The benefits realized can lead to improved device yields and reduced product and development costs.

  2. Influence of exposure time on the biotransformation rate of benzo(a)anthracene in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Maagd, P.G.J. de; Poorte, J. de; Sijm, D.T.H.M.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-12-31

    Biotransformation of PAH can yield in the formation of carcinogenic metabolites, therefore, determining the rate at which metabolites are formed is of importance to risk assessment. Biotransformation rates can be affected by inducing agents, hormonal status, temperature etc. To determine if biotransformation rates of PAH are influenced by auto-induction, juvenile fathead minnows were exposed to benzo(a)anthracene in water for various exposure times. After exposure for 5, 10, 24, 72, 168 or 336 hours no significant differences between biotransformation rates were found. The variation within each biotransformation rate was less than 20%. From these findings it is concluded that auto-induction by benzo(a)anthracene does not occur in fathead minnow.

  3. The effects of sequential exposure to acidic fog and ozone on pulmonary function in exercising subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Aris, R.; Christian, D.; Sheppard, D.; Balmes, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    In Southern California coastal regions, morning fog is often acidified by the presence of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). Peak exposure to ozone (O{sub 3}) usually occurs in the afternoon and evening, after the fog has dissipated. To determine whether fog containing HNO{sub 3} might enhance pulmonary responses to O{sub 3}, we studied a group of healthy, athletic subjects selected for lung function sensitivity to O{sub 3}. On 3 separate days, the subjects exercised for 2 h in atmospheres containing HNO{sub 3} fog (0.5 mg/ml), H{sub 2}O fog, or clean, filtered air. After a 1-h break, they exercised for an additional 3 h in an atmosphere containing 0.20 ppm O{sub 3}. Surprisingly, the mean O{sub 3}-induced decrements in FEV1 and FVC were smaller after exercise in each fog-containing atmosphere than they were after exercise in clean, filtered air. The mean (+/- SEM) O{sub 3}-induced decrements in FEV1 were 26.4 +/- 5.3% after air, 17.1 +/- 3.7% after H{sub 2}O fog, and 18.0 +/- 4.3% after HNO{sub 3} fog, and in FVC they were 19.9 +/- 4.7% after air, 13.6 +/- 2.8% after H{sub 2}O fog, and 13.6 +/- 4.2% after HNO{sub 3} fog.

  4. Human Exposure and Elimination Kinetics of Chlorinated Polyfluoroalkyl Ether Sulfonic Acids (Cl-PFESAs).

    PubMed

    Shi, Yali; Vestergren, Robin; Xu, Lin; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Chuangxiu; Liang, Yong; Cai, Yaqi

    2016-03-01

    The incomplete mass-balance of organic fluorine in human serum indicates the existence of unknown per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) with persistent and bioaccumulative properties. Here we characterized human exposure and elimination kinetics of chlorinated polyfluoroalkyl ether sulfonic acids (Cl-PFESAs) in metal plating workers (n = 19), high fish consumers (n = 45), and background controls (n = 8). Cl-PFESAs were detected in >98% of the sampled individuals with serum concentrations ranging <0.019-5040 ng/mL. Statistically higher median serum levels were observed in high fish consumers (93.7 ng/mL) and metal plating workers (51.5 ng/mL) compared to the background control group (4.78 ng/mL) (Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test, p < 0.01). Cl-PFESAs could account for 0.269 to 93.3% of ∑PFASs in human serum indicating that this compound class may explain a substantial fraction of previously unidentified organic fluorine in the Chinese population. Estimated half-lives for renal clearance (median 280 years; range 7.1-4230 years) and total elimination (median 15.3 years; range 10.1-56.4 years) for the eight carbon Cl-PFESA suggest that this is the most biopersistent PFAS in humans reported to date. The apparent ubiquitous distribution and slow elimination kinetics in humans underscore the need for more research and regulatory actions on Cl-PFESAs and PFAS alternatives with similar chemical structures. PMID:26866980

  5. Prenatal domoic acid exposure disrupts mouse pro-social behavior and functional connectivity MRI.

    PubMed

    Mills, Brian D; Pearce, Hadley L; Khan, Omar; Jarrett, Ben R; Fair, Damien A; Lahvis, Garet P

    2016-07-15

    Domoic acid (DA) is a toxin produced by marine algae and known primarily for its role in isolated outbreaks of Amnestic Shellfish Poisoning and for the damage it inflicts on marine mammals, particularly California sea lions. Lethal effects of DA are often preceded by seizures and coma. Exposure to DA during development can result in subtle and highly persistent effects on brain development and include behavioral changes that resemble diagnostic features of schizophrenia and anomalies in social behavior we believe are relevant to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To more fully examine this hypothesis, we chose to examine adolescent mice exposed in utero to DA for endpoints relevant to ASD, specifically changes in social behavior and network structure, the latter measured by resting state functional connectivity (rs-fcMRI). We found that male offspring exposed in utero to DA expressed reproducible declines in social interaction and atypical patterns of functional connectivity in the anterior cingulate, a region of the default mode network that is critical for social functioning. We also found disruptions in global topology in regions involved in the processing of reward, social, and sensory experiences. Finally, we found that DA exposed males expressed a pattern of local over-connectivity. These anomalies in brain connectivity bear resemblance to connectivity patterns in ASD and help validate DA-exposed mice as a model of this mental disability. PMID:27050322

  6. Prenatal ethanol exposure reduces the effects of excitatory amino acids in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion during pregnancy can lead to the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a disorder marked by learning disabilities. A rat model of FAS was used by introducing pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to a liquid diet containing 35% ethanol-derived calories (E), while a second group was pair-fed an isocaloric liquid diet without ethanol (P). A third group of pregnant dams received ad libitum lab chow (C). At parturition, pups from the E and P groups were cross fostered by C mothers and all groups received lab chow. During adulthood, male offspring were sacrificed and hippocampal and prefrontal cortical slices were prelabeled with (3H)inositol. Phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis was determined by measuring the accumulation of (3H)inositol phosphates in the presence of LiCl in response to activation of various excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors. In hippocampal slices, ibotenate- and quisqualate-induced PI hydrolysis was reduced in E compared to P and C animals. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on carbachol-induced PI hydrolysis, evident in P and C animals, was completely abolished in the hippocampus of E animals. In contrast, in the prefrontal cerebral cortex, this inhibitory effect of NMDA prevailed even in the E animals. The evidence suggests that prenatal ethanol exposure alters the activity of EAA receptors in the hippocampal generation of 2nd messengers.

  7. Timing of prenatal phthalate exposure in relation to genital endpoints in male newborns.

    PubMed

    Martino-Andrade, A J; Liu, F; Sathyanarayana, S; Barrett, E S; Redmon, J B; Nguyen, R H N; Levine, H; Swan, S H

    2016-07-01

    Prior studies report that penile size and male anogenital distance (AGD), sensitive markers of androgen action in utero, may be shortened by prenatal exposure to certain phthalates, including diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), but no human study has investigated the importance of exposure timing in these associations. The aim of this study was to examine the significance of exposure timing on the action of prenatal phthalates in particular DEHP, on male infant penile size and AGD. In The Infant Development and the Environment Study (TIDES) we measured penile width (PW) as well as anoscrotal distance (AGDAS ) and anopenile distance (AGPAP ) in newborn males. We modeled these endpoints in relation to phthalate metabolite concentrations in maternal urine samples collected in each trimester (T1, T2, and T3) in a subset of TIDES mothers (N = 168). PW was inversely associated with T2 oxidized DEHP metabolites, mono-2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl (MEOHP, β=-0.48; 95% confidence interval, -0.93, -0.02), MEHHP (-0.48; -0.92, -0.05), mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl (MECPP, -0.51; -1.01, -0.004), although no appreciable associations were seen between PW and T1 and T3 DEHP metabolite concentrations in this subset. Concentrations of DEHP metabolites in T1 urine samples were inversely related to male AGD. For example, in T1 samples in this subset of women mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl (MEHHP) was inversely associated with male AGDAP (β = -1.73; 95% confidence interval, -3.45, 0.0004). However, no appreciable associations were seen between AGD measures and any DEHP metabolite in T2 and T3 samples. These data suggest that DEHP exposure is inversely associated with AGD and PW, with PW primarily associated with T2 exposure and AGD associations seen only for T1 exposure, but no associations were found between T3 DEHP metabolites and any of these genital endpoints. These findings are consistent with data on critical windows in rodent studies, supporting the biological plausibility of these

  8. Wearable real-time direct reading naphthalene and VOC personal exposure monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hug, W. F.; Bhartia, R.; Reid, R. D.; Reid, M. R.; Oswal, P.; Lane, A. L.; Sijapati, K.; Sullivan, K.; Hulla, J. E.; Snawder, J.; Proctor, S. P.

    2012-06-01

    Naphthalene has been identified by the National Research Council as a serious health hazard for personnel working with jet fuels and oil-based sealants containing naphthalene. We are developing a family of miniature, self-contained, direct reading personal exposure monitors (PEMs) to detect, differentiate, quantify, and log naphthalene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the breathing zone of the wearer or in the hands of an industrial hygienist with limits of detection in the low parts per billion (ppb) range. The VOC Dosimeter (VOCDos) described here is a PEM that provides real-time detection and data logging of exposure as well as accumulated dose, with alarms addressing long term and immediate exposure limits. We will describe the sensor, which employs optical methods with a unique excitation source and rapidly refreshable vapor concentrator. This paper addresses the rapidly increasing awareness of the health risks of inhaling jet fuel vapors by Department of Defense (DOD) personnel engaged in or around jet fueling operations. Naphthalene is a one to three percent component of the 5 billion gallons of jet fuels used annually by DOD. Naphthalene is also a component of many other petroleum products such as asphalt and other oil-based sealants. The DOD is the single largest user of petroleum fuels in the United States (20% of all petroleum fuel used). The VOCDos wearable sensor provides real-time detection and data logging of exposure as well as accumulated dose. We will describe the sensor, which employs endogenous fluorescence from VOCs accumulated on a unique, rapidly refreshable, patent-pending concentrator, excited by a unique deep ultraviolet excitation source.

  9. Real-Time Aircraft Cosmic Ray Radiation Exposure Predictions from the NAIRAS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C. J.; Tobiska, W.; Kress, B. T.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a prototype operational model for predicting commercial aircraft radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays. NAIRAS predictions are currently streaming live from the project's public website, and the exposure rate nowcast is also available on the SpaceWx smartphone app for iPhone, IPad, and Android. Cosmic rays are the primary source of human exposure to high linear energy transfer radiation at aircraft altitudes, which increases the risk of cancer and other adverse health effects. Thus, the NAIRAS model addresses an important national need with broad societal, public health and economic benefits. There is also interest in extending NAIRAS to the LEO environment to address radiation hazard issues for the emerging commercial spaceflight industry. The processes responsible for the variability in the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particle spectrum, and the dynamical response of the magnetosphere to these space environment inputs, strongly influence the composition and energy distribution of the atmospheric ionizing radiation field. Real-time observations are required at a variety of locations within the geospace environment. The NAIRAS model is driven by real-time input data from ground-, atmospheric-, and space-based platforms. During the development of the NAIRAS model, new science questions and observational data gaps were identified that must be addressed in order to obtain a more reliable and robust operational model of atmospheric radiation exposure. The focus of this talk is to present the current capabilities of the NAIRAS model, discuss future developments in aviation radiation modeling and instrumentation, and propose strategies and methodologies of bridging known gaps in current modeling and observational capabilities.

  10. Ameloglyphics: A possible forensic tool for person identification following high temperature and acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Manjushree; Juneja, Saurabh; Rakesh, Nagaraju; Bhoomareddy Kantharaj, Yashoda Devi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Forensic odontology is a branch that is evolving over time and has opened newer avenues that may help in the identification of individuals. Tooth prints are the enamel rod end patterns on tooth surface and they are considered as a hard tissue analog to fingerprints. Teeth have the highest resistance to most environmental effects like fire, desiccation, and decomposition, and may be used as a forensic evidence. Aims and Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate if the tooth prints could be used for an individual's identification and reproducibility and permanency of these tooth prints after exposing the teeth to acid and various degrees of temperature. Materials and Methods: 90 tooth prints from 20 freshly extracted maxillary premolar teeth were obtained. Cellophane tape technique was used to record enamel rod end patterns on tooth surface. Ten teeth (one from each patient) were immersed in 36.46% hydrochloric acid and the tooth prints were obtained at various intervals (5 min, 10 min, and 20 min). The other 10 teeth (one from each patient) were incinerated and impression was made at various intervals (80° C, 400° C, 600° C, and 750° C). Tooth prints obtained from different teeth (total of 90 tooth prints) were analyzed using Verifinger® standard SDK version 5.0 software. Results: All the 20 original tooth prints were distinct from each other and no inter-individual or intra-individual similarity was found. The tooth prints from the same tooth after it was exposed to acid or heat were reproducible and showed high to very high similarity with the original tooth print of that particular tooth stored in the database. Conclusion: Tooth prints may be used as an effective aid in person identification even in adverse conditions such as burn and acid attack injuries. PMID:27051220

  11. Evaluating multi-exposure speckle imaging estimates of absolute autocorrelation times.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, S M Shams; Wu, Rebecca K; Dunn, Andrew K

    2015-08-01

    Multi-exposure speckle imaging (MESI) is a camera-based flow-imaging technique for quantitative blood-flow monitoring by mapping the speckle-contrast dependence on camera exposure duration. The ability of laser speckle contrast imaging to measure the temporal dynamics of backscattered and interfering coherent fields, in terms of the accuracy of autocorrelation measurements, is a major unresolved issue in quantitative speckle flowmetry. MESI fits for a number of parameters including an estimate of the electric field autocorrelation decay time from the imaged speckles. We compare the MESI-determined correlation times in vitro and in vivo with accepted true values from direct temporal measurements acquired with a photon-counting photon-multiplier tube and an autocorrelator board. The correlation times estimated by MESI in vivo remain on average within 14±11% of those obtained from direct temporal autocorrelation measurements, demonstrating that MESI yields highly comparable statistics of the time-varying fields that can be useful for applications seeking not only quantitative blood flow dynamics but also absolute perfusion. PMID:26258378

  12. Acute exposure to 2G phase shifts the rat circadian timing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Murakami, D. M.; Tandon, T.; Fuller, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    The circadian timing system (CTS) provides internal and external temporal coordination of an animal's physiology and behavior. In mammals, the generation and coordination of these circadian rhythms is controlled by a neural pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), located within the hypothalamus. The pacemaker is synchronized to the 24 hour day by time cures (zeitgebers) such as the light/dark cycle. When an animal is exposed to an environment without time cues, the circadian rhythms maintain internal temporal coordination, but exhibit a 'free-running' condition in which the period length is determined by the internal pacemaker. Maintenance of internal and external temporal coordination are critical for normal physiological and psychological function in human and non-human primates. Exposure to altered gravitational environments has been shown to affect the amplitude, mean, and timing of circadian rhythms in species ranging from unicellular organisms to man. However, it has not been determined whether altered gravitational fields have a direct effect on the neural pacemaker, or affect peripheral parameters. In previous studies, the ability of a stimulus to phase shift circadian rhythms was used to determine whether a stimulus has a direct effect on the neural pacemaker. The present experiment was performed in order to determine whether acute exposure to a hyperdynamic field could phase shift circadian rhythms.

  13. Dietary Fatty Acids: Is it Time to Change the Recommendations?

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Joyce A; Lovegrove, Julie A; Mensink, Ronald P; Schwab, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Limiting the saturated fatty acid (SAFA) consumption forms the basis of dietary fat recommendations for heart health, despite several meta-analyses demonstrating no link between dietary SAFA and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Three experts on dietary fat and health discussed the evidence of reducing SAFA intake at a symposium of the Federation of European Nutrition Societies in Berlin, Germany, October 23, 2015. Ronald P. Mensink, Maastricht University, the Netherlands, discussed the evidence linking dietary fatty acids and CVD risk. He emphasized the importance of the replacement nutrient(s) when SAFA intake is reduced. Julie Lovegrove, University of Reading, UK, addressed the question of whether higher intakes of unsaturated fatty acids are beneficial. She discussed the replacement of SAFA by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), noting the reduction in CVD risk with PUFA replacement and in CVD risk markers with MUFA replacement of SAFA. Ursula Schwab, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland, discussed the importance of dietary patterns in achieving reduced risk of CVD, observing that several dietary patterns following the principles of a health-promoting diet and adapted to local customs, food preferences and seasonality are effective in reducing the risk of CVD, type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. This paper summarizes the symposium presentations. PMID:27251664

  14. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure alters polyunsaturated fatty acid composition, induces oxidative stress and activates the AKT/AMPK pathway in mouse epididymis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Pan, Yitao; Sheng, Nan; Zhao, Allan Z; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a degradation-resistant compound with a carbon-fluorine bond. Although PFOA emissions have been reduced since 2000, it remains persistent in the environment. Several studies on laboratory animals indicate that PFOA exposure can impact male fertility. Here, adult male mice received either PFOA (1.25, 5 or 20 mg/kg/d) or an equal volume of water for 28 d consecutively. PFOA accumulated in the epididymis in a dose-dependent manner and resulted in reduced epididymis weight, lower levels of triglycerides (TG), cholesterol (CHO), and free fatty acids (FFA), and activated AKT/AMPK signaling in the epididymis. Altered polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) compositions, such as a higher arachidonic acid:linoleic acid (AA:LA) ratio, concomitant with excessive oxidative stress, as demonstrated by increased malonaldehyde (MDA) and decreased glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in the epididymis, were observed in epididymis tissue following treatment with PFOA. These results indicate that the epididymis is a potential target of PFOA. Oxidative stress and PUFA alteration might help explain the sperm injury and male reproductive dysfunction induced by PFOA exposure. PMID:27262104

  15. Evaluation of the protective effectiveness of gloves from occupational exposure to 2-methoxyethanol using the biomarkers of 2-methoxyacetic acid levels in the urine and plasma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H; Lin, C; Shih, T; Chan, H; Chou, J; Huang, Y

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the protective effectiveness of gloves from occupational exposure to 2-methoxyethanol (2-ME); and to examine the association of 2-methoxyacetic acid (MAA) in urine and plasma collected simultaneously from low 2-ME exposure and high 2-ME exposure workers in a semiconductor copper laminate circuit board manufacturing plant. Methods: Eight hour time weighted breathing zone monitoring was performed to verify the 2-ME exposure classification between workers in regular and special operations. Urine and plasma samples were simultaneously collected from 74 exposed and 80 non-exposed workers. MAA concentrations in the urine (UMAA) and plasma (PMAA) were measured using previously published methods. Three types of gloves worn by workers (cotton, rubber, and no gloves) were recorded by direct observations in the workplace and validated by person-to-person interview. Protective effectiveness indices (PEI) were used to evaluate the glove effectiveness. Results: There was no detectable 2-ME/MAA in the air, or in urine and plasma samples in non-exposed workers. The average UMAA and PMAA in special operations were 72.63 mg/g Cr. and 29.72 mg/l, significantly higher than values in regular operations (5.44 mg/g Cr. and 2.58 mg/l, respectively). PMAA showed satisfactory correlation to UMAA in all participants from both regular and special operations. The rubber gloves provided significant reduction in 2-ME uptake, whereas cotton gloves provided little protection with fluctuating effectiveness, based on PEI estimates. Conclusions: PMAA, similar to UMAA, could serve as a specific biomarker for 2-ME exposure. Wearing impermeable rubber gloves during high risk tasks can reduce major 2-ME exposure. Other improvements, including engineering control, should be provided to diminish worker exposure to 2-ME in occupational environments. PMID:15258277

  16. Exposure to folic acid antagonists during the first trimester of pregnancy and the risk of major malformations

    PubMed Central

    Matok, Ilan; Gorodischer, Rafael; Koren, Gideon; Landau, Daniella; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Levy, Amalia

    2009-01-01

    AIM To investigate the safety of folic acid antagonists during the first trimester of pregnancy in a large cohort. METHODS Computerized databases for medications dispensed from 1998 to 2007 to women registered in ‘Clalit’ HMO, Israel southern district, was linked with maternal and infant hospitalization records, and to therapeutics abortions data. The risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes of folic acid antagonists exposure was assessed by adjusting for known confounders. RESULTS Eighty-four thousand, eight hundred and twenty-three infants were born and 998 therapeutic abortions took place; 571 fetuses and infants were exposed to one or more folic acid antagonists in the first trimester of pregnancy. Exposure was associated with an overall increased risk of congenital malformations [odds ratio (OR) 2.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.92, 3.08], due mainly to increased risk for neural tube (adjusted OR 6.5, 95% CI 4.34, 9.15) and cardiovascular defects (OR 1.76, CI 1.05, 2.95). CONCLUSION First-trimester exposure to folic acid antagonists is associated with increased risk of congenital malformations. PMID:20002091

  17. Fatty acid profiles as a potential lipidomic biomarker of exposure to brevetoxin for endangered Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Dana L; Reynolds, John E; Sprinkel, Jay M; Schwacke, Lori; Mercurio, Philip; Rommel, Sentiel A

    2010-11-15

    Fatty acid signature analysis (FASA) is an important tool by which marine mammal scientists gain insight into foraging ecology. Fatty acid profiles (resulting from FASA) represent a potential biomarker to assess exposure to natural and anthropogenic stressors. Florida manatees are well studied, and an excellent necropsy program provides a basis against which to assess this budding tool. Results using samples from 54 manatees assigned to four cause-of-death categories indicated that those animals exposed to or that died due to brevetoxin exposure (red tide, or RT samples) demonstrate a distinctive hepatic fatty acid profile. Discriminant function analysis indicated that hepatic fatty acids could be used to classify RT versus non-RT liver samples with reasonable certainty. A discriminant function was derived based on 8 fatty acids which correctly classified 100% of samples from a training dataset (10 RT and 25 non-RT) and 85% of samples in a cross-validation dataset (5 RT and 13 non-RT). Of the latter dataset, all RT samples were correctly classified, but two of thirteen non-RT samples were incorrectly classified. However, the "incorrect" samples came from manatees that died due to other causes during documented red tide outbreaks; thus although the proximal cause of death was due to watercraft collisions, exposure to brevetoxin may have affected these individuals in ways that increased their vulnerability. This use of FASA could: a) provide an additional forensic tool to help scientists and managers to understand cause of death or debilitation due to exposure to red tide in manatees; b) serve as a model that could be applied to studies to improve assessments of cause of death in other marine mammals; and c) be used, as in humans, to help diagnose metabolic disorders or disease states in manatees and other species. PMID:20880571

  18. Radiation Exposure and Health Effects - is it Time to Reassess the Real Consequences?

    PubMed

    Thomas, G A; Symonds, P

    2016-04-01

    Our acceptance of exposure to radiation is somewhat schizophrenic. We accept that the use of high doses of radiation is still one of the most valuable weapons in our fight against cancer, and believe that bathing in radioactive spas is beneficial. On the other hand, as a species, we are fearful of exposure to man-made radiation as a result of accidents related to power generation, even though we understand that the doses are orders of magnitude lower than those we use everyday in medicine. The 70th anniversary of the detonation of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was marked in 2015. The 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident will be marked in April 2016. March 2016 also sees the fifth anniversary of the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Perhaps now is an opportune time to assess whether we are right to be fearful of the effects of low doses of radiation, or whether actions taken because of our fear of radiation actually cause a greater detriment to health than the direct effect of radiation exposure. PMID:26880062

  19. Effects of varying argon ion laser intensity and exposure time on the ablation of atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Strikwerda, S; Bott-Silverman, C; Ratliff, N B; Goormastic, M; Cothren, R M; Costello, B; Kittrell, C; Feld, M S; Kramer, J R

    1988-01-01

    Using continuous wave (CW) argon ion laser light, a total of 253 laser exposures of varying power (1.5, 3, 5, 8 or 10 W) and duration (20-1,333 ms) were delivered to four segments of human atheromatous aorta obtained at autopsy. Exposure conditions were controlled by using an optically shielded laser catheter that provided a 500 micron spot of light of known power. Two thresholds for consistently reproducible ablation could be defined-an intensity threshold at 25.5 W/mm2 and a fluence threshold at 3.2 J/mm2. Above threshold, a fluence of 5.1 J/mm2 was found to produce the most efficient ablation, ie, removed the greatest volume (mm3) per energy delivered (J) compared to other fluence levels employed (p less than 0.0001). Between aortic segments, however, considerable variability in efficiency (mm3/J) was observed, possibly owing to different optical properties and/or plaque composition. Low-intensity laser radiation produced inconsistent ablation and extensive coagulation effects to surrounding tissue. When a fluence of 5.1 J/mm2 was constructed with a high-intensity laser beam and a short exposure time, consistent and efficient tissue removal resulted without histologic evidence of coagulation necrosis. PMID:2965289

  20. Gender differences in road traffic injury rate using time travelled as a measure of exposure.

    PubMed

    Santamariña-Rubio, Elena; Pérez, Katherine; Olabarria, Marta; Novoa, Ana M

    2014-04-01

    There is no consensus on whether the risk of road traffic injury is higher among men or among women. Comparison between studies is difficult mainly due to the different exposure measures used to estimate the risk. The measures of exposure to the risk of road traffic injury should be people's mobility measures, but frequently authors use other measures such population or vehicles mobility. We compare road traffic injury risk in men and women, by age, mode of transport and severity, using the time people spend travelling as the exposure measure, in Catalonia for the period 2004-2008. This is a cross-sectional study including all residents aged over 3 years. The road traffic injury rate was calculated using the number of people injured, from the Register of Accidents and Victims of the National Traffic Authority as numerator, and the person-hours travelled, from the 2006 Daily Mobility Survey carried out by the Catalan regional government, as denominator. Sex and age specific rates by mode of transport and severity were calculated, and Poisson regression models were fitted. Among child pedestrians and young drivers, males present higher risk of slight and severe injury, and in the oldest groups women present higher risk. The death rate is always higher in men. There exists interaction between sex and age in road traffic injury risk. Therefore, injury risk is higher among men in some age groups, and among women in other groups, but these age groups vary depending on mode of transport and severity. PMID:24384384

  1. Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Acids and Markers of Kidney Function among Children and Adolescents Living near a Chemical Plant

    PubMed Central

    Josson, Jyoti; Elston, Beth; Bartell, Scott M.; Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Vieira, Veronica M.; Savitz, David A.; Fletcher, Tony; Wellenius, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Serum levels of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) have been associated with decreased renal function in cross-sectional analyses, but the direction of the association is unclear. Objectives: We examined the association of measured and model-predicted serum PFOA concentrations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a marker of kidney function, in a highly exposed population (median serum PFOA, 28.3 ng/mL). Methods: We measured serum creatinine, PFOA, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) and calculated eGFR in 9,660 children 1 to < 18 years of age at study enrollment. We predicted concurrent and historical serum PFOA concentrations using a validated environmental, exposure, and pharmacokinetic model based on individual residential histories, and used linear regression to estimate the association between eGFR and measured and predicted serum PFOA concentrations. We hypothesized that predicted serum PFOA levels would be less susceptible to reverse causation than measured levels. Results: An interquartile range increase in measured serum PFOA concentrations [IQR ln(PFOA) = 1.63] was associated with a decrease in eGFR of 0.75 mL/min/1.73 m2 (95% CI: –1.41, –0.10; p = 0.02). Measured serum levels of PFOS, PFNA, and PFHxS were also cross-sectionally associated with decreased eGFR. In contrast, predicted serum PFOA concentrations at the time of enrollment were not associated with eGFR (–0.10; 95% CI: –0.80, 0.60; p = 0.78). Additionally, predicted serum PFOA levels at birth and during the first ten years of life were not related to eGFR. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the cross-sectional association between eGFR and serum PFOA observed in this and prior studies may be a consequence of, rather than a cause of, decreased kidney function. PMID:23482063

  2. Juvenile Green Frog (Rana clamitans) Predatory Ability not Affected by Exposure to Carbaryl at Different Times During Larval Development

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melanie J.; Kleinhenz, Peter; Boone, Michelle D.

    2011-01-01

    Larval exposure to pesticides can occur at different times during development, and can negatively impact amphibian fitness. We examined the effects of larval green frog (Rana clamitans) exposure to carbaryl at 2, 4, 8, or 16 weeks of development on juvenile predatory ability. We did not find evidence that predatory ability was affected by exposure to carbaryl, which suggests that carbaryl does not have latent effects on the predatory performance of green frogs in subsequent life stages. PMID:21462236

  3. Space Weathering Effects in Lunar Soils: The Roles of Surface Exposure Time and Bulk Chemical Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shouliang; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering effects on lunar soil grains result from both radiation-damaged and deposited layers on grain surfaces. Typically, solar wind irradiation forms an amorphous layer on regolith silicate grains, and induces the formation of surficial metallic Fe in Fe-bearing minerals [1,2]. Impacts into the lunar regolith generate high temperature melts and vapor. The vapor component is largely deposited on the surfaces of lunar soil grains [3] as is a fraction of the melt [4, this work]. Both the vapor-deposits and the deposited melt typically contain nanophase Fe metal particles (npFe0) as abundant inclusions. The development of these rims and the abundance of the npFe0 in lunar regolith, and thus the optical properties, vary with the soil mineralogy and the length of time the soil grains have been exposed to space weathering effects [5]. In this study, we used the density of solar flare particle tracks in soil grains to estimate exposure times for individual grains and then perform nanometer-scale characterization of the rims using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The work involved study of lunar soil samples with different mineralogy (mare vs. highland) and different exposure times (mature vs. immature).

  4. Gene expression-based dosimetry by dose and time in mice following acute radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James D; Divine, George W; Grever, William E; Thomas, Robert A; Joiner, Michael C; Smolinski, Joseph M; Auner, Gregory W

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable methods for performing biological dosimetry are of paramount importance in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Traditional dosimetry approaches lack the requisite rapid assessment capability, ease of use, portability and low cost, which are factors needed for triaging a large number of victims. Here we describe the results of experiments in which mice were acutely exposed to (60)Co gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. Blood was obtained from irradiated mice 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. mRNA expression levels of 106 selected genes were obtained by reverse-transcription real time PCR. Stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels provided optimal dosimetry at each time point. The results indicate that only 4-7 different gene transcripts are needed to explain ≥ 0.69 of the variance (R(2)), and that receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of ≥ 0.93 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. These models provide an excellent description of the relationship between the actual and predicted doses up to 6 Gy. At doses of 8 and 10 Gy there appears to be saturation of the radiation-response signals with a corresponding diminution of accuracy. These results suggest that similar analyses in humans may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations. PMID:24358280

  5. Development of a neural teratogenicity test based on human embryonic stem cells: response to retinoic acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Colleoni, Silvia; Galli, Cesare; Gaspar, John Antony; Meganathan, Kesavan; Jagtap, Smita; Hescheler, Jurgen; Sachinidis, Agapios; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was the development of an alternative testing method based on human embryonic stem cells for prenatal developmental toxicity with particular emphasis on early neural development. To this purpose, we designed an in vitro protocol based on the generation of neural rosettes, representing the in vitro counterpart of the developing neural plate and neural tube, and we challenged this complex cell model with retinoic acid (RA), a well-known teratogenic agent. The cells were exposed to different concentrations of RA during the process of rosettes formation. Morphological and molecular parameters were evaluated in treated as compared with untreated cells to detect both cytotoxicity and specific neural toxicity. Transcriptomic analysis was performed with microarray Affymetrix platform and validated by quantitative real-time PCR for genes relevant to early neural development such as HoxA1, HoxA3, HoxB1, HoxB4, FoxA2, FoxC1, Otx2, and Pax7. The results obtained demonstrated that neural rosette forming cells respond to RA with clear concentration-dependent morphological, and gene expression changes remarkably similar to those induced in vivo, in the developing neural tube, by RA exposure. This strict correspondence indicates that the neural rosette protocol described is capable of detecting specific teratogenic mechanisms causing perturbations of early neural development and therefore represents a promising alternative test for human prenatal developmental toxicity. PMID:21934132

  6. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumia, Sid Ahmed; Messali, Zoubeida; Ouahabi, Abdeldjalil; Trepout, Sylvain; Messaoudi, Cedric; Marco, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the

  7. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    SciTech Connect

    Soumia, Sid Ahmed; Messali, Zoubeida; Ouahabi, Abdeldjalil; Trepout, Sylvain E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr Messaoudi, Cedric E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr Marco, Sergio E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr

    2015-01-13

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the

  8. Exploratory study on a statistical method to analyse time resolved data obtained during nanomaterial exposure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, F.; Njiki-Menga, G.-H.; Witschger, O.

    2013-04-01

    Most of the measurement strategies that are suggested at the international level to assess workplace exposure to nanomaterials rely on devices measuring, in real time, airborne particles concentrations (according different metrics). Since none of the instruments to measure aerosols can distinguish a particle of interest to the background aerosol, the statistical analysis of time resolved data requires special attention. So far, very few approaches have been used for statistical analysis in the literature. This ranges from simple qualitative analysis of graphs to the implementation of more complex statistical models. To date, there is still no consensus on a particular approach and the current period is always looking for an appropriate and robust method. In this context, this exploratory study investigates a statistical method to analyse time resolved data based on a Bayesian probabilistic approach. To investigate and illustrate the use of the this statistical method, particle number concentration data from a workplace study that investigated the potential for exposure via inhalation from cleanout operations by sandpapering of a reactor producing nanocomposite thin films have been used. In this workplace study, the background issue has been addressed through the near-field and far-field approaches and several size integrated and time resolved devices have been used. The analysis of the results presented here focuses only on data obtained with two handheld condensation particle counters. While one was measuring at the source of the released particles, the other one was measuring in parallel far-field. The Bayesian probabilistic approach allows a probabilistic modelling of data series, and the observed task is modelled in the form of probability distributions. The probability distributions issuing from time resolved data obtained at the source can be compared with the probability distributions issuing from the time resolved data obtained far-field, leading in a

  9. Influence of paternal exposure to oil and oil products on time to pregnancy and spontaneous abortions.

    PubMed

    Bull, N; Riise, T; Moen, B E

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of exposure to oil and oil products among men on the time taken for their wives to conceive and on the incidence of spontaneous abortion among them. A cross-sectional study was performed by posting questionnaires to 1,269 men employed as offshore mechanics, offshore operators, offshore drilling personnel, car mechanics (the 'exposed' occupations) and carpenters ('unexposed'). The married men were asked to give a separate questionnaire to their wives for details about their pregnancies. The time elapsed between the beginning of coitus without contraception and the wife becoming pregnant (time to pregnancy) was analyzed with Cox regression analysis by calculating fecundability ratios for the pregnancies for the men exposed to oil and oil products as compared with the men who were not exposed. Spontaneous abortions were analyzed with logistic regression by calculating odds ratios for the pregnancies in which the men were exposed vs. not exposed. A total of 741 (58%) men returned the questionnaires. A total of 301 pregnancies were analyzed for time taken to conceive and 580 for spontaneous abortion. The results were adjusted for variables that could significantly influence conception time (previous infections of the reproductive system and coffee drinking) or the incidence of spontaneous abortion (mother's age, parity and smoking). The outcomes between the exposed and unexposed pregnancies showed no significant differences. Car mechanics had a lower fecundability ratio before 1992 than after 1992. Paternal exposure to hydrocarbons in the occupations studied did not seem to have had a major influence on time to conception or the incidence of spontaneous abortion among the wives of the men exposed to oil products. PMID:10628044

  10. Failure of urinary trans,trans-muconic acid as a biomarker for indoor environmental benzene exposure at PPB levels.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, G; Accorsi, A; Barbieri, A; Raffi, G B; Violante, F S

    2001-08-24

    Benzene is a widespread pollutant whose main source in the environment is automotive emission. There is increasing interest in the exposure of the population to this pollutant as benzene is present also in the indoor environment due to cigarette smoke, drinking water, and food. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in an adult nonsmoking population not occupationally exposed to benzene, whether it is possible to detect differences in the urinary concentration of trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) between low and high environmental exposure to benzene. A study sample of 31 employees working in pharmacies in a large town in Italy with low environmental exposure to benzene (4.8 microg/m3) was compared to a high (8.1 microg/m3) benzene exposure group. Analysis of urinary t,t-MA was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC; photodiode array detector); analysis of environmental benzene samples was by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). The statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in urinary levels of t,t-MA of subjects with high (mean concentration: 157.9 microg/g creatinine) versus low exposure (mean concentration: 114.2 microg/g creatinine). Data show that it is difficult to correlate urinary t,t-MA with benzene exposure at parts per billion levels. PMID:11549119

  11. Design considerations for ozone and acid aerosol exposure and health investigations: the Fairview Lake summer camp - photochemical smog case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.; Spektor, D.; Thurston, G.; Citak, K.; Lippmann, M.; Bock, N.; Speizer, F.E.; Hayes, C.

    1987-01-01

    The health effects associated with ozone and acidic particulate sulfate exposures to active children have been and are being addressed in field epidemiological studies at summer camps in rural areas of the Northeastern US. The rationale and study design for studies, which have been conducted in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, are developed and reviewed. As background, results are summarized for human clinical and epidemiological studies and animal studies. These provided the basis for selection of health outcomes measured results from chemical characterization and transport studies are reviewed to define the criteria used for selection of a site which is effected by high ozone and acid species during photochemical smog episodes. The integration of the study design is discussed in detail by reviewing its application to the 1984 - Fairview Lake Camp Study (July 8 to August 4). The features of the camp study are reviewed, including the study population, pulmonary function procedures and analyses, air pollution monitoring instrumentation, and the site characteristics. The pollution exposure data are presented, for ozone and acidic sulfates and examined for the range and distribution concentration. Further information is provided on the intensity and duration of episodes encountered over the course of the study. Episodes occurred which had ozone and acid sulfates, ozone alone, and acid sulfates alone. 56 references, 9 figures.

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids prevent early-life antibiotic exposure-induced gut microbiota dysbiosis and later-life obesity.

    PubMed

    Kaliannan, K; Wang, B; Li, X-Y; Bhan, A K; Kang, J X

    2016-06-01

    Early-life antibiotic exposure can disrupt the founding intestinal microbial community and lead to obesity later in life. Recent studies show that omega-3 fatty acids can reduce body weight gain and chronic inflammation through modulation of the gut microbiota. We hypothesize that increased tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids may prevent antibiotic-induced alteration of gut microbiota and obesity later in life. Here, we utilize the fat-1 transgenic mouse model, which can endogenously produce omega-3 fatty acids and thereby eliminates confounding factors of diet, to show that elevated tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids significantly reduce body weight gain and the severity of insulin resistance, fatty liver and dyslipidemia resulting from early-life exposure to azithromycin. These effects were associated with a reversal of antibiotic-induced dysbiosis of gut microbiota in fat-1 mice. These results demonstrate the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids on antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis and obesity, and suggest the potential utility of omega-3 supplementation as a safe and effective means for the prevention of obesity in children who are exposed to antibiotics. PMID:26876435

  13. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome: occurrence after exposure to a refractory ceramic fiber-phosphoric acid binder mixture.

    PubMed

    Forrester, B G

    1997-04-01

    A previously healthy, 47-year-old millwright was exposed to high airborne levels of a refractory ceramic fiber-phosphoric acid binder mixture; after acute bronchospasm, he required hospitalization. During the next 4 years, he had recurrent acute bronchospasm requiring emergency department visits and three hospitalizations. Review of the patient's medical and occupational history and extensive clinical investigation failed to provide alternate explanations for this hyperresponsive airways disease. This is believed to be the first reported case of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) after exposure to a refractory ceramic fiber-phosphoric acid binder mixture. Physicians should be aware of this possibility when examining patients exposed to such materials. PMID:9114842

  14. The effect of nitric acid exposure on Galileo spacecraft titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng; O'Donnell, Tim; Yavrouian, Andre

    1990-01-01

    The Ti-6Al-4V-constructed retropropulsion-module tanks of the Galileo spacecraft were purged with nitrogen tetroxide in order to wait out a major launch rescheduling; nitric acid is among the residual products of such an operation. A test program was conducted on representative samples to ascertain the fracture toughness and stress corrosion threshold of the tanks' material, in view of Space Shuttle safety and mission-reliability requirements. It was found that the tanks' structural integrity was not degraded by nitric acid exposure.

  15. The Impact of the Developmental Timing of Trauma Exposure on PTSD Symptoms and Psychosocial Functioning among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogle, Christin M.; Rubin, David C.; Siegler, Ilene C.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of the developmental timing of trauma exposure on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and psychosocial functioning in a large sample of community-dwelling older adults (N = 1,995). Specifically, we investigated whether the negative consequences of exposure to traumatic events were greater for traumas…

  16. REAL-TIME MODELING AND MEASUREMENT OF MOBILE SOURCE POLLUTANT CONCENTRATIONS FOR ESTIMATING HUMAN EXPOSURES IN COMMUNITIES NEAR ROADWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is pursuing a project to improve the methodology for real-time site specific modeling of human exposure to pollutants from motor vehicles. The overall project goal is to deve...

  17. Serum uric acid and AKI: is it time?

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Manish; Choo, Jason Chon Jun

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-recognized complication in hospitalized patients, with associated mortality and morbidity. Studies that aim to prevent or reverse AKI using pharmacological and interventional therapies in clinical practice have been disappointing. Work is continuing to identify potentially modifiable risk factors for AKI. Early identification and modification of these risk factors may help prevent or favorably influence the outcome of AKI. The role of uric acid as a potential risk factor is being revisited in chronic kidney disease and AKI. Apart from the established crystal precipitation with profound hyperuricemia, various non-crystal mechanisms have also been proposed in the pathogenesis of AKI. The association of serum uric acid levels with the development of AKI has been reported in various clinical settings. Together, the results of these studies highlight hyperuricemia as a potential risk factor of AKI and the need for further work on this subject. PMID:26798460

  18. Real-Time In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Cell Apoptosis after Laser Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Guo, Li; Maass, Annelie; Cheung, William; Vugler, Anthony; Moss, Stephen E.; Munro, Peter M. G.; Fitzke, Frederick W.; Cordeiro, M. Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether the detection of apoptosing retinal cells (DARC) could detect cells undergoing apoptosis in a laser model of retinal damage. Methods Laser lesions were placed, with the use of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser, on the retina in 34 eyes of anesthetized Dark Agouti rats. Lesion size and laser-induced retinal elevation were analyzed using in vivo reflectance imaging. Development of retinal cell apoptosis was assessed using intravitreal fluorescence-labeled annexin 5 in vivo with DARC technology from baseline until 90 minutes after laser application. Histologic analysis of retinal flat mounts and cross-sections was performed. Results The lateral and anteroposterior depth extension of the zone of laser damage was significantly larger for higher exposure settings. A strong diffuse signal, concentrated at the outer retina, was seen with DARC for low exposures (<300 ms and <300 mW). In comparison, higher exposures (>300 ms and >300 mW) resulted in detectable hyperfluorescent spots, mainly at the level of the inner retinal layers. Dose-dependent effects on spot density and positive correlation of spot density between lesion size (P < 0.0001) and retinal elevation (P < 0.0001) were demonstrated. Histology confirmed the presence of apoptosing retinal cells in the inner nuclear and the ganglion cell layers. Conclusions This is the first time that DARC has been used to determine apoptotic effects in the inner nuclear layer. The ability to monitor changes spatially and temporally in vivo promises to be a major advance in the real-time assessment of retinal diseases and treatment effects. PMID:18281610

  19. Applicability of Travel- and Exposure-Time Concepts to Nonlinear Bioreactive Transport in Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arie Cirpka, Olaf; Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Loschko, Matthias; Finkel, Michael; Lu, Chuanhe

    2016-04-01

    Travel-time based concepts of modeling subsurface transport have been established as computationally efficient alternatives to spatially explicit simulation methods. The spatial coordinates are replaced by travel time, resulting in one-dimensional transport with a constant „velocity" of unity. The concept is straight forward in linear transport applications, and under these conditions the results are exact provided that the coefficients of linear transport don't vary in space. In nonlinear transport, mixing can jeopardize the validity of the approach. This holds particularly true for transverse mixing, exchanging solute mass between streamtubes. We have performed systematic analyses of nonlinear bioreactive transport, involving oxygen, nitrate, organic carbon, as well as aerobic and denitrifying bacteria to analyzed under which conditions the errors introduced by travel-time and similar formulations are negligible. In steady-state flows with uniform reactive parameters, an excellent agreement between multi-dimensional reactive transport results, affected by transverse dispersion and flow heterogeneity, and one-dimensional travel-time results could be achieved by mapping the reactive-species concentrations to the multi-dimensional domain according to the local mean groundwater age. Aliasing of local transverse dispersion to macroscopically longitudinal mixing can be addressed by using a distance-dependent longitudinal dispersion coefficient. The approach also works for transient flows as long as the direction of flow remains constant and only the magnitude varies. Under these conditions, the groundwater age for the time-averaged velocity field is an adequate mapping variable, provided that flow transients are accounted for in the one- and multi-dimensional simulations. If the reaction takes place only in specific regions, the time of exposure to the according conditions is a better predictor of reactive transport than the overall travel time. Spatially variable

  20. Preliminary investigation of effects of sublethal acid exposure on maternal behavior in the Crayfish Orconectes virilis

    SciTech Connect

    France, R.L.

    1985-11-01

    The occurrence of crayfish inhabiting the littoral regions of many oligotrophic acid sensitive lakes makes these organisms vulnerable to spring pH decreases. Egg extrusion in Orconectes spp. found in south-central Ontario is generally synchronous and occurs during or slightly after ice melting in late April, a time at which these lakes receive between 36-77% of the year's export of H from their watersheds. To understand how a toxicant affects crayfish reproduction it is necessary that the maternal and embryonic responses to experimental perturbation be separated. In an acidified lake in the Experimental Lakes Area, northwestern Ontario, 6.9-16.9% of the egg-bearing females experienced partial mortality of their broods at pH 5.4-5.6. An ancillary experiment was undertaken here to determine if this egg mortality could be a result of low pH-induced behavioral modification of the maternal female, rather than direct acid toxicity to the developing eggs.

  1. Prototype adaptive bow-tie filter based on spatial exposure time modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badal, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the development of dynamic bow-tie filters that are able to provide patient-specific x-ray beam shaping. We introduce the first physical prototype of a new adaptive bow-tie filter design based on the concept of "spatial exposure time modulation." While most existing bow-tie filters operate by attenuating the radiation beam differently in different locations using partially attenuating objects, the presented filter shapes the radiation field using two movable completely radio-opaque collimators. The aperture and speed of the collimators is modulated in synchrony with the x-ray exposure to selectively block the radiation emitted to different parts of the object. This mode of operation does not allow the reproduction of every possible attenuation profile, but it can reproduce the profile of any object with an attenuation profile monotonically decreasing from the center to the periphery, such as an object with an elliptical cross section. Therefore, the new adaptive filter provides the same advantages as the currently existing static bow-tie filters, which are typically designed to work for a pre-determined cylindrical object at a fixed distance from the source, and provides the additional capability to adapt its performance at image acquisition time to better compensate for the actual diameter and location of the imaged object. A detailed description of the prototype filter, the implemented control methods, and a preliminary experimental validation of its performance are presented.

  2. Time Averaged Transmitter Power and Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Mobile Phone Base Stations

    PubMed Central

    Bürgi, Alfred; Scanferla, Damiano; Lehmann, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Models for exposure assessment of high frequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations need the technical data of the base stations as input. One of these parameters, the Equivalent Radiated Power (ERP), is a time-varying quantity, depending on communication traffic. In order to determine temporal averages of the exposure, corresponding averages of the ERP have to be available. These can be determined as duty factors, the ratios of the time-averaged power to the maximum output power according to the transmitter setting. We determine duty factors for UMTS from the data of 37 base stations in the Swisscom network. The UMTS base stations sample contains sites from different regions of Switzerland and also different site types (rural/suburban/urban/hotspot). Averaged over all regions and site types, a UMTS duty factor F ≈ 0.32 ± 0.08 for the 24 h-average is obtained, i.e., the average output power corresponds to about a third of the maximum power. We also give duty factors for GSM based on simple approximations and a lower limit for LTE estimated from the base load on the signalling channels. PMID:25105551

  3. In vitro protoscolicidal effects of various concentrations of Ziziphora tenuior L. extract at different exposure times

    PubMed Central

    Shahnazi, Mojtaba; Azadmehr, Abbas; Latifi, Robabeh; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Saraei, Mehrzad; Alipour, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Hydatidosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases and surgery is still the main treatment for this problem. One of the side effects of hydatid cyst surgery is recurrence, thus, searching and assessment of some new agents such as medicinal plant extracts are very important. In the present study, the scolicidal effect of ethanolic extract of Ziziphora tenuior (Z. tenuior) was investigated. Materials and Methods: Protoscolices were aseptically collected from sheep livers containing hydatid cyst and used in the experiments. Z. tenuior extract was used at concentration of 3-100 mg/ml for 10-60 min. Viability of protoscolices was determined by 0.1% eosin staining. Results: Based on our results, Z. tenuior extract at concentration of 10 mg/ml killed all protoscolices after 20 min. However, this medicinal plant at concentration of 25 mg/ml destroyed all protoscolices in a shorter exposure time (10 min). Therefore, the scolicidal activity of the extract at 10 and 25 mg/ml concentrations was considerably effective in lower concentrations and shorter exposure times. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that the ethanolic extract of Z. tenuior produces high scolicidal activity; it may be used as an appropriate and effective scolicidal agent in hydatidosis surgery. This is the first report on the protoscolicidal activity of Z. tenuior. PMID:27516978

  4. Docosahexaenoic Acid Rescues Synaptogenesis Impairment and Long-Term Memory Deficits Caused by Postnatal Multiple Sevoflurane Exposures.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guorong; Luo, Yan; Xue, Qingsheng; Li, Guohui; Tan, Yongchang; Xiao, Jinglei; Yu, Buwei

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane exposures were demonstrated to induce neurotoxicity in the developing brain in both human and animal studies. However, there is no effective approach to reverse it. The present study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to prevent sevoflurane-induced neurotoxicity. P6 (postnatal 6 days) mice were administrated DHA after exposure to 3% sevoflurane for two hours daily in three consecutive days. Molecular expressions of synaptic makers (PSD95, synaptophysin) and synaptic morphological changes were investigated by Western blot analysis and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Meanwhile, Morris water maze test was used to assess spatial memory of mice at P31 (postnatal 31 days). DHA restored sevoflurane-induced decreased level of PSD95 and synaptophysin expressions and increased PSD areas and also improved long-term spatial memory. These results suggest that DHA could rescue synaptogenesis impairment and long-term memory deficits in postnatal caused by multiple sevoflurane exposures. PMID:27597963

  5. Docosahexaenoic Acid Rescues Synaptogenesis Impairment and Long-Term Memory Deficits Caused by Postnatal Multiple Sevoflurane Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Guorong; Luo, Yan; Xue, Qingsheng; Li, Guohui; Tan, Yongchang

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane exposures were demonstrated to induce neurotoxicity in the developing brain in both human and animal studies. However, there is no effective approach to reverse it. The present study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to prevent sevoflurane-induced neurotoxicity. P6 (postnatal 6 days) mice were administrated DHA after exposure to 3% sevoflurane for two hours daily in three consecutive days. Molecular expressions of synaptic makers (PSD95, synaptophysin) and synaptic morphological changes were investigated by Western blot analysis and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Meanwhile, Morris water maze test was used to assess spatial memory of mice at P31 (postnatal 31 days). DHA restored sevoflurane-induced decreased level of PSD95 and synaptophysin expressions and increased PSD areas and also improved long-term spatial memory. These results suggest that DHA could rescue synaptogenesis impairment and long-term memory deficits in postnatal caused by multiple sevoflurane exposures. PMID:27597963

  6. Simultaneous recordings of oesophageal acid exposure with conventional pH monitoring and a wireless system (Bravo)

    PubMed Central

    des Varannes, S Bruley; Mion, F; Ducrotté, P; Zerbib, F; Denis, P; Ponchon, T; Thibault, R; Galmiche, J P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Oesophageal pH monitoring is a useful test for the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) but has some limitations related to the nasopharyngeal electrode. Recently, a telemetric catheter free system (CFS) (Bravo; Medtronic) was developed. The aim of this study was to determine the concordance of data between the conventional pH measurement system (CPHMS) and the CFS Bravo. Methods: Forty patients with symptoms suggestive of GORD underwent 24 hour oesophageal pH monitoring using the CPHMS with a nasopharyngeal electrode and the Bravo CFS simultaneously. The sensitive tips of both electrodes were positioned at the same level under fluoroscopy. In addition to automatic analysis, each reflux episode was checked visually and characterised. Results: There was a significant correlation (r = 0.87, p<0.0001) between the 24 hour oesophageal acid exposures recorded by the CPHMS and the CFS. Twenty four hour oesophageal acid exposure was significantly lower with the CFS than with the CPHMS (2.4 (0.4–8.7) v 3.6 (0.7–8.6); p< 0.0001). Consequently, with the CFS, the cut off level for the diagnosis of GORD, as calculated from the regression equation, was 2.9% (for the 4.2% cut off determined in controls with the CPHMS). After this adjustment, concordance of the diagnosis of GORD was 88% (kappa 0.760). Diagnosis of GORD was established in more patients with the CFS 48 hour results than with the 24 hour results. Conclusions: Despite strong correlations between oesophageal acid exposure recorded with the two devices, the Bravo CFS significantly under recorded acid exposure compared with the CPHMS. Provided some correcting factors are used, the Bravo CFS can improve the sensitivity of pHmetry for the diagnosis of GORD by allowing more prolonged recordings. PMID:15843417

  7. Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Acids and Serum Testosterone Concentrations at 15 Years of Age in Female ALSPAC Study Participants

    PubMed Central

    Calafat, Antonia M.; Marcus, Michele; Jaakkola, Jouni J.K.; Lashen, Hany

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) or to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increases mouse and human peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor alpha (PPARα) subtype activity, which influences lipid metabolism. Because cholesterol is the substrate from which testosterone is synthesized, exposure to these substances has the potential to alter testosterone concentrations. Objectives We explored associations of total testosterone and sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations at age 15 years with prenatal exposures to PFOS, PFOA, perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), and perfluoronanoic acid (PFNA) in females. Methods Prenatal concentrations of the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) were measured in serum collected from pregnant mothers at enrollment (1991–1992) in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). The median gestational age when the maternal blood sample was obtained was 16 weeks (interquartile range, 11–28 weeks). Total testosterone and SHBG concentrations were measured in serum obtained from their daughters at 15 years of age. Associations between prenatal PFAAs concentrations and reproductive outcomes were estimated using linear regression models (n = 72). Results Adjusted total testosterone concentrations were on average 0.18-nmol/L (95% CI: 0.01, 0.35) higher in daughters with prenatal PFOS in the upper concentration tertile compared with daughters with prenatal PFOS in the lower tertile. Adjusted total testosterone concentrations were also higher in daughters with prenatal concentrations of PFOA (β = 0.24; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.43) and PFHxS (β = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.00, 0.35) in the upper tertile compared with daughters with concentrations in the lower tertile. We did not find evidence of associations between PFNA and total testosterone or between any of the PFAAs and SHBG. Conclusions Our findings were based on a small study sample and should be interpreted with caution. However, they suggest that prenatal

  8. Application of alternative spatiotemporal metrics of ambient air pollution exposure in a time-series epidemiological study in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Mulholland, James; Isakov, Vlad; Özkaynak, Halûk; Chang, Howard H; Klein, Mitchel; Tolbert, Paige E

    2013-01-01

    Exposure error in studies of ambient air pollution and health that use city-wide measures of exposure may be substantial for pollutants that exhibit spatiotemporal variability. Alternative spatiotemporal metrics of exposure for traffic-related and regional pollutants were applied in a time-series study of ambient air pollution and cardiorespiratory emergency department visits in Atlanta, GA, USA. Exposure metrics included daily central site monitoring for particles and gases; daily spatially refined ambient concentrations obtained from regional background monitors, local-scale dispersion, and hybrid air quality models; and spatially refined ambient exposures from population exposure models. Health risk estimates from Poisson models using the different exposure metrics were compared. We observed stronger associations, particularly for traffic-related pollutants, when using spatially refined ambient concentrations compared with a conventional central site exposure assignment approach. For some relationships, estimates of spatially refined ambient population exposures showed slightly stronger associations than corresponding spatially refined ambient concentrations. Using spatially refined pollutant metrics, we identified socioeconomic disparities in concentration-response functions that were not observed when using central site data. In some cases, spatially refined pollutant metrics identified associations with health that were not observed using measurements from the central site. Complexity and challenges in incorporating modeled pollutant estimates in time-series studies are discussed. PMID:23963512

  9. Solar Ion Processing of Itokawa Grains: Constraints on Surface Exposure Times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical TEM observations obtained to date reveal that a significant sub-population of grains returned from the surface of asteroid Itokawa have had their outer 30-100 nm processed by space weathering effects. Although the effects include some surface deposition of condensed impact vapor and isolated impact melt splashes, much of the width of the space weathered outer margins or "rims" on grains is derived from solar wind processing of the original host grain. Similar to what has long been reported for some lunar grains, the ion-processed rims on Itokawa grains exhibit varing degrees and depths of penetration of atomic-displacement ion damage, resulting in complete amorphization for some rims (particularly in plagioclase), or formation of highly defective but still crystalline structures in others (particularly in pyroxene and olivine). Possibly different from lunar grains, however, is the presence of isolated internal cavities or voids in Itokawa grain rims, which may be implantation "bubbles" due to accumulating implanted solar wind H and/or He. For a given mineral exposed at a particular set of long term solar wind conditions, the level of ion damage in a given grain rim, the depth of damage penetration represented by the rim width, and the formation or lack of formation of implantation bubbles can all be linked to the time spent by the grain in an uncovered state on the topmost, space-exposed, regolith surface. For the lunar case, we have previously shown that with reasonable assumptions about solar wind characteristics over time, a model can be developed to estimate this exposure time based on the width of amorphous rims on lunar grains. Here we report on an expansion of the model to cover exposure time information contained in the array of solar ion-induced features in Itokawa grains.

  10. Controlling silver nanoparticle exposure in algal toxicity testing – A matter of timing

    PubMed Central

    Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic ecotoxicity testing of nanoparticles is complicated by unstable exposure conditions resulting from various transformation processes of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions. In this study, we investigated the influence of exposure timing on the algal test response to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), by reducing the incubation time and by aging the AgNPs in algal medium prior to testing. The freshwater green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were exposed to AgNO3, NM-300 K (a representative AgNP) and citrate stabilized AgNPs from two different manufacturers (AgNP1 and AgNP2) in a standard algal growth inhibition test (ISO 8692:2004) for 48 h and a short-term (2 h) 14C-assimilation test. For AgNO3, similar responses were obtained in the two tests, whereas freshly prepared suspensions of citrate stabilized AgNPs were less toxic in the 2-h tests compared to the 48-h tests. The 2-h test was found applicable for dissolved silver, but yielded non-monotonous concentration–response relationships and poor reproducibility for freshly prepared AgNP suspensions. However, when aging AgNPs in algal medium 24 h prior to testing, clear concentration–response patterns emerged and reproducibility increased. Prolonged aging to 48 h increased toxicity in the 2-h tests whereas aging beyond 48 h reduced toxicity. Our results demonstrate that the outcome of algal toxicity testing of AgNPs is highly influenced not only by the test duration, but also by the time passed from the moment AgNPs are added to the test medium. This time-dependency should be considered when nanomaterial dispersion protocols for ecotoxicity testing are developed. PMID:24842597

  11. Controlling silver nanoparticle exposure in algal toxicity testing--a matter of timing.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Baun, Anders

    2015-03-01

    The aquatic ecotoxicity testing of nanoparticles is complicated by unstable exposure conditions resulting from various transformation processes of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions. In this study, we investigated the influence of exposure timing on the algal test response to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), by reducing the incubation time and by aging the AgNPs in algal medium prior to testing. The freshwater green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were exposed to AgNO3, NM-300 K (a representative AgNP) and citrate stabilized AgNPs from two different manufacturers (AgNP1 and AgNP2) in a standard algal growth inhibition test (ISO 8692:2004) for 48 h and a short-term (2 h) (14)C-assimilation test. For AgNO3, similar responses were obtained in the two tests, whereas freshly prepared suspensions of citrate stabilized AgNPs were less toxic in the 2-h tests compared to the 48-h tests. The 2-h test was found applicable for dissolved silver, but yielded non-monotonous concentration-response relationships and poor reproducibility for freshly prepared AgNP suspensions. However, when aging AgNPs in algal medium 24 h prior to testing, clear concentration-response patterns emerged and reproducibility increased. Prolonged aging to 48 h increased toxicity in the 2-h tests whereas aging beyond 48 h reduced toxicity. Our results demonstrate that the outcome of algal toxicity testing of AgNPs is highly influenced not only by the test duration, but also by the time passed from the moment AgNPs are added to the test medium. This time-dependency should be considered when nanomaterial dispersion protocols for ecotoxicity testing are developed. PMID:24842597

  12. Effects of Low Level Lead Exposure on Associative Learning and Memory in the Rat: Influences of Sex and Developmental Timing Of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D.W.; Mettil, W.; Schneider, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure during development impairs a variety of cognitive, behavioral and neurochemical processes resulting in deficits in learning, memory, attention, impulsivity and executive function. Numerous studies have attempted to model this effect of Pb in rodents, with the majority of studies focusing on hippocampus-associated spatial learning and memory processes. Using a different paradigm, trace fear conditioning, a process requiring coordinated integration of both the medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, we have assessed the effects of Pb exposure on associative learning and memory. The present study examined both female and male Long Evans rats exposed to three environmentally relevant levels of Pb (150 ppm, 375 ppm and 750 ppm) during different developmental periods: perinatal (PERI; gestation – postnatal day 21), early postnatal (EPN; postnatal days 1–21) and late postnatal (LPN; postnatal days 1–55). Testing began at postnatal day 55 and consisted of a single day of acquisition training, and three post training time points (1, 2 and 10 days) to assess memory consolidation and recall. All animals, regardless of sex, developmental window or level of Pb-exposure, successfully acquired conditioned-unconditioned stimulus association during training. However, there were significant effects of Pb-exposure on consolidation and memory recall at days 1–10 post training. In females, EPN and LPN exposure to 150 ppm Pb (but not PERI exposure) significantly impaired recall. In contrast, only PERI 150 ppm and 750 ppm-exposed males had significant recall deficits. These data suggest a complex interaction between sex, developmental window of exposure and Pb-exposure level on consolidation and recall of associative memories. PMID:26812500

  13. Effects of low level lead exposure on associative learning and memory in the rat: Influences of sex and developmental timing of exposure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D W; Mettil, W; Schneider, J S

    2016-03-30

    Lead (Pb) exposure during development impairs a variety of cognitive, behavioral and neurochemical processes resulting in deficits in learning, memory, attention, impulsivity and executive function. Numerous studies have attempted to model this effect of Pb in rodents, with the majority of studies focusing on hippocampus-associated spatial learning and memory processes. Using a different paradigm, trace fear conditioning, a process requiring coordinated integration of both the medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, we have assessed the effects of Pb exposure on associative learning and memory. The present study examined both female and male long evans rats exposed to three environmentally relevant levels of Pb (150 ppm, 375 ppm and 750 ppm) during different developmental periods: perinatal (PERI; gestation-postnatal day 21), early postnatal (EPN; postnatal days 1-21) and late postnatal (LPN; postnatal days 1-55). Testing began at postnatal day 55 and consisted of a single day of acquisition training, and three post training time points (1, 2 and 10 days) to assess memory consolidation and recall. All animals, regardless of sex, developmental window or level of Pb-exposure, successfully acquired conditioned-unconditioned stimulus association during training. However, there were significant effects of Pb-exposure on consolidation and memory recall at days 1-10 post training. In females, EPN and LPN exposure to 150 ppm Pb (but not PERI exposure) significantly impaired recall. In contrast, only PERI 150 ppm and 750 ppm-exposed males had significant recall deficits. These data suggest a complex interaction between sex, developmental window of exposure and Pb-exposure level on consolidation and recall of associative memories. PMID:26812500

  14. Change of exposure response over time and long-term risk of silicosis among a cohort of Chinese pottery workers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Bochmann, Frank; Morfeld, Peter; Ulm, Kurt; Liu, Yuewei; Wang, Heijiao; Yang, Lei; Chen, Weihong

    2011-07-01

    An analysis was conducted on a cohort of Chinese pottery workers to estimate the exposure-response relationship between respirable crystalline silica dust exposure and the incidence of radiographically diagnosed silicosis, and to estimate the long-term risk of developing silicosis until the age of 65. The cohort comprised 3,250 employees with a median follow-up duration of around 37 years. Incident cases of silicosis were identified via silicosis registries (Chinese X-ray stage I, similar to International Labor Organisation classification scheme profusion category 1/1). Individual exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust was estimated based on over 100,000 historical dust measurements. The association between dust exposure, incidence and long-time risk of silicosis was quantified by Poisson regression analysis adjusted for age and smoking. The risk of silicosis depended not only on the cumulative respirable crystalline silica dust exposures, but also on the time-dependent respirable crystalline silica dust exposure pattern (long-term average concentration, highest annual concentration ever experienced and time since first exposure). A long-term "excess" risk of silicosis of approximately 1.5/1,000 was estimated among workers with all annual respirable crystalline silica dust concentration estimates less than 0.1 mg/m(3), using the German measurement strategy. This study indicates the importance of proper consideration of exposure information in risk quantification in epidemiological studies. PMID:21845166

  15. Exposure to Perfluorononanoic acid during pregnancy: Evaluations of rat and mice model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is a persistent environmental contaminant. Although its levels in the environment are lower than those of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), its presence in humans is rising and is of concern. Previous studies have in...

  16. Effects of Perfluorinated Phosphonic Acid Exposure during pregnancy in the mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated phosphonic acids (PFPAs) are a member of the perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) family, and are structurally similar to the perfluoroalkyl sulfonates and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates. These chemicals have recently been detected in the environment, particularly in surface wa...

  17. Acute exposure to realistic acid fog: Effects on respiratory function and airway responsiveness in asthmatics

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D.; De Vuyst, P.; Yernault, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    The biological effects of acid fog composed primarily of ammonium ions and sulfate are described. Subjects with asthma were exposed for one hour to sulfuric acid aerosol. Significant changes were not observed. Other asthma subjects were exposed to acid fog containing sulfate and ammonium ions. Again, pulmonary and bronchial function were not modified after inhalation.

  18. An Evaluation of Gestational Exposure to Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA): Effects on Body Composition and Physiological Factors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to environmental pollutants can be a factor for induction of metabolic disorders. This study examined if exposure to PFOA during development could alter body composition and other physiological outcomes. Study 1: Pregnant CD-1 mice were gavaged with PFOA at 0,0.001,0.01,...

  19. Failure of Real-time Passive Notification about Radiation Exposure to Influence Physician Ordering Behavior.

    PubMed

    Polen, Lauren A; Rossi, Jennifer K; Berg, Cameron K; Balise, Raymond R; Herfkens, Robert J; Auerbach, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives  To determine whether real-time passive notification of patient radiation exposure via a computerized physician order entry system would alter the number of computed tomography scans ordered by physicians in the Emergency Department (ED) setting. Methods  When a practitioner ordered a computed tomography scan, a passive notification was immediately and prominently displayed via the computerized physician order entry system. The notification stated the following: the amount of estimated radiation in millisieverts (mSv), the equivalent number of single-view chest radiographs, and equivalent days of average environmental background radiation to which a patient during a specific computed tomography scan would be exposed. The primary outcome was changed in the number of computed tomography scans ordered when comparing data collected before and after the addition of the notification. Results  Before the dosimetry notification ("intervention") was instituted, 1,747 computed tomography scans were performed on patients during 11,709 Emergency Department visits (14.9% computed tomography scan rate). After the intervention had been instituted, 1,827 computed tomography scans were performed on patients during 11,582 Emergency Department patient visits (15.8% computed tomography scan rate). No statistically significant difference was found for all chief complaints combined (p = 0.17), or for any individual chief complaint, between the number of computed tomography scans performed on Emergency Department patients before versus after the intervention. Conclusions  Passive real-time notification of patient radiation exposure displayed in a computerized physician order entry system at the time of computed tomography scan ordering in the Emergency Department did not significantly change the number of ordered scans. PMID:27570716

  20. Failure of Real-time Passive Notification about Radiation Exposure to Influence Physician Ordering Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Polen, Lauren A; Rossi, Jennifer K; Berg, Cameron K; Balise, Raymond R; Herfkens, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives  To determine whether real-time passive notification of patient radiation exposure via a computerized physician order entry system would alter the number of computed tomography scans ordered by physicians in the Emergency Department (ED) setting. Methods  When a practitioner ordered a computed tomography scan, a passive notification was immediately and prominently displayed via the computerized physician order entry system. The notification stated the following: the amount of estimated radiation in millisieverts (mSv), the equivalent number of single-view chest radiographs, and equivalent days of average environmental background radiation to which a patient during a specific computed tomography scan would be exposed. The primary outcome was changed in the number of computed tomography scans ordered when comparing data collected before and after the addition of the notification. Results  Before the dosimetry notification (“intervention”) was instituted, 1,747 computed tomography scans were performed on patients during 11,709 Emergency Department visits (14.9% computed tomography scan rate). After the intervention had been instituted, 1,827 computed tomography scans were performed on patients during 11,582 Emergency Department patient visits (15.8% computed tomography scan rate). No statistically significant difference was found for all chief complaints combined (p = 0.17), or for any individual chief complaint, between the number of computed tomography scans performed on Emergency Department patients before versus after the intervention. Conclusions  Passive real-time notification of patient radiation exposure displayed in a computerized physician order entry system at the time of computed tomography scan ordering in the Emergency Department did not significantly change the number of ordered scans.  PMID:27570716

  1. Evaluation of Renal Toxicity by Combination Exposure to Melamine and Cyanuric Acid in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Son, Ji Yeon; Kang, Yoon Jong; Kim, Kyeong Seok; Kim, Tae Hyung; Lim, Sung Kwang; Lim, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Choi, Dal Woong; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Lee, Byung Mu

    2014-01-01

    Melamine-induced nephrotoxicity is closely associated with crystal formation in the kidney caused by combined exposure to melamine (Mel) and cyanuric acid (CA). However, there are few dosage-finding studies for toxicological evaluation of chronic co-exposure to Mel and CA. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible mechanism by which a Mel and CA mixture lead to renal toxicity in rats. Mel and CA were co-administered to rats via oral gavage for 50 days. Nephrotoxicity was determined by measuring blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (sCr) levels. Relative kidney weights were significantly increased in rats after co-exposure to Mel+CA (63/6.3 or 630/6.3 mg/kg) mixtures. BUN and sCr levels were significantly increased after Mel and CA co-exposure. Taken together, significant increase in KIM-1, NGAL, and calbindin levels were observed in the urine of rats exposed to Mel+CA (63/6.3 or 630/6.3 mg/kg) compared with the corresponding control group. Histological analysis revealed epithelial degeneration and necrotic cell death in the proximal tubules of the kidney after co-exposure to Mel+CA (63/6.3 or 630/6.3 mg/kg). Our data suggest that Mel-mediated renal toxicity may be influenced by CA concentrations in Mel-contaminated milk or foods. PMID:25071919

  2. Unexpected phenotypes of malformations induced in Xenopus tropicalis embryos by combined exposure to triphenyltin and 9-cis-retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingmin; Yu, Lin; Wu, Lijiao; Hu, Lingling; Shi, Huahong

    2014-03-01

    Xenopus tropicalis embryos were exposed for 48 hr to the mixtures of 5 μg Sn/L triphenyltin (TPT), which is a well-known endocrine disruptor, and 0.25-5 μg/L 9-cis retinoic acid (9c-RA), which is the natural ligand of retinoid X receptor. The phenotypes induced by combined exposure were more variable than those resulting from single exposure to either TPT or 9c-RA. The prominent phenotypes included underdeveloped head structures, abnormal eyes, narrow fins, enlarged proctodaeum, etc. Especially, combined exposure induced unexpected notochord malformations, which ranged from small swellings of the surface of the tails to the extension and extrusion of notochord out of the posterior tails. Compared with the 5 μg Sn/L TPT-treated group, the index of fin deficiency was not affected, and the index of axis deficiency was significantly increased with increasing RA concentrations in the mixtures. Our results suggest that combined exposure to TPT and 9c-RA induced not only more variable phenotypes of malformations than exposure to single compound but also some new and unexpected phenotypes. PMID:25079278

  3. Induction of Salivary Proteins Modifies Measures of Both Orosensory and Postingestive Feedback during Exposure to a Tannic Acid Diet

    PubMed Central

    Torregrossa, Ann-Marie; Nikonova, Larissa; Bales, Michelle B.; Villalobos Leal, Maria; Smith, James C.; Contreras, Robert J.; Eckel, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    There are hundreds of proteins in saliva. Although it has long been hypothesized that these proteins modulate taste by interacting with taste receptors or taste stimuli, the functional impact of these proteins on feeding remains relatively unexplored. We have developed a new technique for saliva collection that does not interfere with daily behavioral testing and allows us to explore the relationship between feeding behavior and salivary protein expression. First, we monitored the alterations in salivary protein expression while simultaneously monitoring the animals' feeding behavior and meal patterns on a custom control diet or on the same diet mixed with 3% tannic acid. We demonstrated that six protein bands increased in density with dietary tannic acid exposure. Several of these bands were significantly correlated with behaviors thought to represent both orosensory and postingestive signaling. In a follow-up experiment, unconditioned licking to 0.01–3% tannic acid solutions was measured during a brief-access taste test before and after exposure to the tannic acid diet. In this experiment, rats with salivary proteins upregulated found the tannin solution less aversive (i.e., licked more) than those in the control condition. These data suggest a role for salivary proteins in mediating changes in both orosensory and postingestive feedback. PMID:25162297

  4. Nonspecific bronchial responsiveness assessed in vitro following acute inhalation exposure to ozone and ozone/sulfuric acid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    El-Fawal, H.A.N.; McGovern, T.; Schlesinger, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Air pollution may play some role in the recent increase in severity and prevalence of asthma, but the specific chemical components with the ambient pollutant mix that may be responsible have not been delineated. Since ambient exposures involve mixtures, it is essential to examine airway responses to realistic pollutant mixtures. This study examined the ability of single (3-h) inhalation exposures to ozone and to mixtures of ozone plus sulfuric acid to induce nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness in healthy rabbits. Airway responsiveness was assessed using an in vitro assay involving administration of increasing doses of acetylcholine to bronchial rings obtained from animals exposed to 0.1-0.6 ppm ozone or to mixtures of ozone and 50-125 {mu}g/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid aerosol; results were compared to those reported previously for sulfuric acid alone. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in healthy animals and suggest that interaction with sulfuric acid may reduce the effectiveness of both pollutants. 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. A preliminary estimate of the EUVE cumulative distribution of exposure time on the unit sphere. [Extreme Ultra-Violet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, C. C. H.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary study of an all-sky coverage of the EUVE mission is given. Algorithms are provided to compute the exposure of the celestial sphere under the spinning telescopes, taking into account that during part of the exposure time the telescopes are blocked by the earth. The algorithms are used to give an estimate of exposure time at different ecliptic latitudes as a function of the angle of field of view of the telescope. Sample coverage patterns are also given for a 6-month mission.

  6. In-situ hydrogen in metal determination using a minimum neutron source strength and exposure time.

    PubMed

    Hatem, M; Agamy, S; Khalil, M Y

    2013-08-01

    Water is frequently present in the environment and is a source of hydrogen that can interact with many materials. Because of its small atomic size, a hydrogen atom can easily diffuse into a host metal, and though the metal may appear unchanged for a time, the metal will eventually abruptly lose its strength and ductility. Thus, measuring the hydrogen content in metals is important in many fields, such as in the nuclear industry, in automotive and aircraft fabrication, and particularly, in offshore oil and gas fields. It has been demonstrated that the use of nuclear methods to measure the hydrogen content in metals can achieve sensitivity levels on the order of parts per million. However, the use of nuclear methods in the field has not been conducted for two reasons. The first reason is due to exposure limitations. The second reason is due to the hi-tech instruments required for better accuracy. In this work, a new method using a low-strength portable neutron source is explored in conjunction with detectors based on plastic nuclear detection films. The following are the in-situ requirements: simplicity in setup, high reliability, minimal exposure dose, and acceptable accuracy at an acceptable cost. A computer model of the experimental setup is used to reproduce the results of a proof-of-concept experiment and to predict the sensitivity levels under optimised experimental conditions. PMID:23708832

  7. A homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for phosphatidylserine exposure on apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Jean-Philippe; Hehl, Michaela; Millward, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    A simple, "mix-and-measure" microplate assay for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of apoptotic cells is described. The assay exploits the fact that annexin V, a protein with high affinity and specificity for PtdSer, forms trimers and higher order oligomers on binding to membranes containing PtdSer. The transition from soluble monomer to cell-bound oligomer is detected using time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer from europium chelate-labeled annexin V to Cy5-labeled annexin V. PtdSer detection is achieved by a single addition of a reagent mix containing labeled annexins and calcium ions directly to cell cultures in a 96-well plate, followed by a brief incubation before fluorescence measurement. The assay can be used to quantify PtdSer exposure on both suspension cells and adherent cells in situ. This method is simpler and faster than existing annexin V binding assays based on flow cytometry or microscopy, and it yields precise data with Z' values of 0.6-0.7. PMID:18835236

  8. Neuroinflammation and Neurodegeneration in Adult Rat Brain from Binge Ethanol Exposure: Abrogation by Docosahexaenoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tajuddin, Nuzhath; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Marshall, S. Alex; Nixon, Kimberly; Neafsey, Edward J.; Kim, Hee-Yong; Collins, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence that brain edema and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels have roles in experimental binge ethanol-induced neurodegeneration has stimulated interest in swelling/edema-linked neuroinflammatory pathways leading to oxidative stress. We report here that neurotoxic binge ethanol exposure produces comparable significant effects in vivo and in vitro on adult rat brain levels of AQP4 as well as neuroinflammation-linked enzymes: key phospholipase A2 (PLA2) family members and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). In adult male rats, repetitive ethanol intoxication (3 gavages/d for 4 d, ∼9 g/kg/d, achieving blood ethanol levels ∼375 mg/dl; “Majchrowicz” model) significantly increased AQP4, Ca+2-dependent PLA2 GIVA (cPLA2), phospho-cPLA2 GIVA (p-cPLA2), secretory PLA2 GIIA (sPLA2) and PARP-1 in regions incurring extensive neurodegeneration in this model—hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and olfactory bulb—but not in two regions typically lacking neurodamage, frontal cortex and cerebellum. Also, ethanol reduced hippocampal Ca+2-independent PLA2 GVIA (iPLA2) levels and increased brain “oxidative stress footprints” (4-hydroxynonenal-adducted proteins). For in vitro studies, organotypic cultures of rat hippocampal-entorhinocortical slices of adult age (∼60 d) were ethanol-binged (100 mM or ∼450 mg/dl) for 4 d, which augments AQP4 and causes neurodegeneration (Collins et al. 2013). Reproducing the in vivo results, cPLA2, p-cPLA2, sPLA2 and PARP-1 were significantly elevated while iPLA2 was decreased. Furthermore, supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), known to quell AQP4 and neurodegeneration in ethanol-treated slices, blocked PARP-1 and PLA2 changes while counteracting endogenous DHA reduction and increases in oxidative stress footprints (3-nitrotyrosinated proteins). Notably, the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ-34 suppressed binge ethanol-dependent neurodegeneration, indicating PARP upstream involvement. The results with corresponding models

  9. Real-time emission factor measurements of isocyanic acid from light duty gasoline vehicles.

    PubMed

    Brady, James M; Crisp, Timia A; Collier, Sonya; Kuwayama, Toshihiro; Forestieri, Sara D; Perraud, Véronique; Zhang, Qi; Kleeman, Michael J; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to gas-phase isocyanic acid (HNCO) has been previously shown to be associated with the development of atherosclerosis, cataracts and rheumatoid arthritis. As such, accurate emission inventories for HNCO are critical for modeling the spatial and temporal distribution of HNCO on a regional and global scale. To date, HNCO emission rates from light duty gasoline vehicles, operated under driving conditions, have not been determined. Here, we present the first measurements of real-time emission factors of isocyanic acid from a fleet of eight light duty gasoline-powered vehicles (LDGVs) tested on a chassis dynamometer using the Unified Driving Cycle (UC) at the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Haagen-Smit test facility, all of which were equipped with three-way catalytic converters. HNCO emissions were observed from all vehicles, in contrast to the idealized laboratory measurements. We report the tested fleet averaged HNCO emission factors, which depend strongly on the phase of the drive cycle; ranging from 0.46 ± 0.13 mg kg fuel(-1) during engine start to 1.70 ± 1.77 mg kg fuel(-1) during hard acceleration after the engine and catalytic converter were warm. The tested eight-car fleet average fuel based HNCO emission factor was 0.91 ± 0.58 mg kg fuel(-1), within the range previously estimated for light duty diesel-powered vehicles (0.21-3.96 mg kg fuel(-1)). Our results suggest that HNCO emissions from LDGVs represent a significant emission source in urban areas that should be accounted for in global and regional models. PMID:25198906

  10. Effects of Light Curing Method and Exposure Time on Mechanical Properties of Resin Based Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Alpöz, A. Riza; Ertuḡrul, Fahinur; Cogulu, Dilsah; Ak, Asli Topaloḡlu; Tanoḡlu, Metin; Kaya, Elçin

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate microhardness and compressive strength of composite resin (Tetric-Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent), compomer (Compoglass, Ivoclar, Vivadent), and resin modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, GC Corp) polymerized using halogen light (Optilux 501, Demetron, Kerr) and LED (Bluephase C5, Ivoclar Vivadent) for different curing times. Methods Samples were placed in disc shaped plastic molds with uniform size of 5 mm diameter and 2 mm in thickness for surface microhardness test and placed in a diameter of 4 mm and a length of 2 mm teflon cylinders for compressive strength test. For each subgroup, 20 samples for microhardness (n=180) and 5 samples for compressive strength were prepared (n=45). In group 1, samples were polymerized using halogen light source for 40 seconds; in group 2 and 3 samples were polymerized using LED light source for 20 seconds and 40 seconds respectively. All data were analyzed by two way analysis of ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc tests. Results Same exposure time of 40 seconds with a low intensity LED was found similar or more efficient than a high intensity halogen light unit (P>.05), however application of LED for 20 seconds was found less efficient than 40 seconds curing time (P=.03). Conclusions It is important to increase the light curing time and use appropriate light curing devices to polymerize resin composite in deep cavities to maximize the hardness and compressive strength of restorative materials. PMID:19212507

  11. Reconciling Scratch Space Consumption, Exposure, and Volatility to Achieve Timely Staging of Job Input Data

    SciTech Connect

    Monti, Henri; Butt, Ali R; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2010-04-01

    Innovative scientific applications and emerging dense data sources are creating a data deluge for high-end computing systems. Processing such large input data typically involves copying (or staging) onto the supercomputer's specialized high-speed storage, scratch space, for sustained high I/O throughput. The current practice of conservatively staging data as early as possible makes the data vulnerable to storage failures, which may entail re-staging and consequently reduced job throughput. To address this, we present a timely staging framework that uses a combination of job startup time predictions, user-specified intermediate nodes, and decentralized data delivery to coincide input data staging with job start-up. By delaying staging to when it is necessary, the exposure to failures and its effects can be reduced. Evaluation using both PlanetLab and simulations based on three years of Jaguar (No. 1 in Top500) job logs show as much as 85.9% reduction in staging times compared to direct transfers, 75.2% reduction in wait time on scratch, and 2.4% reduction in usage/hour.

  12. Anacardic Acids from Cashew Nuts Ameliorate Lung Damage Induced by Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Owen, Robert W.; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50 μg of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100 μL of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs. PMID:23533495

  13. Anacardic acids from cashew nuts ameliorate lung damage induced by exposure to diesel exhaust particles in mice.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Owen, Robert W; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50  μ g of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100  μ L of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs. PMID:23533495

  14. Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1/GPR40) signaling affects insulin secretion by enhancing mitochondrial respiration during palmitate exposure.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Hjalti; Bergsten, Peter; Sargsyan, Ernest

    2015-12-01

    Fatty acids affect insulin secretion via metabolism and FFAR1-mediated signaling. Recent reports indicate that these two pathways act synergistically. Still it remains unclear how they interrelate. Taking into account the key role of mitochondria in insulin secretion, we attempted to dissect the metabolic and FFAR1-mediated effects of fatty acids on mitochondrial function. One-hour culture of MIN6 cells with palmitate significantly enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Antagonism or silencing of FFAR1 prevented the palmitate-induced rise in respiration. On the other hand, in the absence of extracellular palmitate FFAR1 agonists caused a modest increase in respiration. Using an agonist of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and PKC inhibitor we found that in the presence of the fatty acid mitochondrial respiration is regulated via Gαq protein-coupled receptor signaling. The increase in respiration in palmitate-treated cells was largely due to increased glucose utilization and oxidation. However, glucose utilization was not dependent on FFAR1 signaling. Collectively, these results indicate that mitochondrial respiration in palmitate-treated cells is enhanced via combined action of intracellular metabolism of the fatty acid and the Gαq-coupled FFAR1 signaling. Long-term palmitate exposure reduced ATP-coupling efficiency of mitochondria and deteriorated insulin secretion. The presence of the FFAR1 antagonist during culture did not improve ATP-coupling efficiency, however, it resulted in enhanced mitochondrial respiration and improved insulin secretion after culture. Taken together, our study demonstrates that during palmitate exposure, integrated actions of fatty acid metabolism and fatty acid-induced FFAR1 signaling on mitochondrial respiration underlie the synergistic action of the two pathways on insulin secretion. PMID:26408932

  15. The impact of nonlinear exposure-risk relationships on seasonal time-series data: modelling Danish neonatal birth anthropometric data

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, John; Barnett, Adrian; Eyles, Darryl; Burne, Thomas; Pedersen, Carsten B; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2007-01-01

    Background Birth weight and length have seasonal fluctuations. Previous analyses of birth weight by latitude effects identified seemingly contradictory results, showing both 6 and 12 monthly periodicities in weight. The aims of this paper are twofold: (a) to explore seasonal patterns in a large, Danish Medical Birth Register, and (b) to explore models based on seasonal exposures and a non-linear exposure-risk relationship. Methods Birth weight and birth lengths on over 1.5 million Danish singleton, live births were examined for seasonality. We modelled seasonal patterns based on linear, U- and J-shaped exposure-risk relationships. We then added an extra layer of complexity by modelling weighted population-based exposure patterns. Results The Danish data showed clear seasonal fluctuations for both birth weight and birth length. A bimodal model best fits the data, however the amplitude of the 6 and 12 month peaks changed over time. In the modelling exercises, U- and J-shaped exposure-risk relationships generate time series with both 6 and 12 month periodicities. Changing the weightings of the population exposure risks result in unexpected properties. A J-shaped exposure-risk relationship with a diminishing population exposure over time fitted the observed seasonal pattern in the Danish birth weight data. Conclusion In keeping with many other studies, Danish birth anthropometric data show complex and shifting seasonal patterns. We speculate that annual periodicities with non-linear exposure-risk models may underlie these findings. Understanding the nature of seasonal fluctuations can help generate candidate exposures. PMID:17937794

  16. Immunomodulatory effects upon in vitro exposure of California sea lion and southern sea otter peripheral blood leukocytes to domoic acid.

    PubMed

    Levin, Milton; Joshi, Dhanashree; Draghi, Andrew; Gulland, Frances M; Jessup, David; De Guise, Sylvain

    2010-04-01

    During red tide bloom events, the marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia produces the toxin domoic acid (DA), which has been associated with stranding and mortality events involving California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris). In addition to these well-documented DA-induced neurotoxic events, there is increasing concern that DA may exert chronic effects, such as immunomodulation, which may potentially increase an individual's susceptibility to a number of opportunistic infections following nonlethal exposure. We investigated the effects of DA on innate (phagocytosis and respiratory burst) and adaptive (mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation) immune functions with the use of peripheral blood leukocytes collected from healthy California sea lions and southern sea otters upon in vitro exposure to 0 (unexposed control), 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10, and 100 microM DA. Domoic acid did not significantly modulate phagocytosis or respiratory burst in either species. For California sea lions, DA significantly increased ConA-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation upon exposure to DA concentrations ranging from 0.0001 to 10 microM, resulting in a nonlinear dose-response curve. There was no effect on lymphocyte proliferation at the highest concentration of DA tested. No effects on lymphocyte proliferation were observed in southern sea otters. Importantly, the in vitro DA concentrations affecting T-cell proliferation were within or below the range of DA in serum measured in free-ranging California sea lions following natural exposure, suggesting a risk for immunomodulation in free-ranging animals. Understanding the risk for immunomodulation upon DA exposure will contribute in the health assessment and management of California sea lions and southern sea otters, as well as guide veterinarians and wildlife rehabilitators in caring for and treating afflicted animals. PMID:20688647

  17. Use of urinary trichloroacetic acid as an exposure biomarker of disinfection by-products in cancer studies.

    PubMed

    Salas, Lucas A; Gracia-Lavedan, Esther; Goñi, Fernando; Moreno, Victor; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2014-11-01

    Urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) has been proposed as a valid exposure biomarker for ingested disinfection by-products (DBP) for reproductive studies. However, it has never been used in epidemiologic studies on cancer. We investigate the performance of urinary TCAA as a biomarker of DBP exposure in the framework of an epidemiologic study on cancer. We conducted home visits to collect tap water, first morning void urine, and a 48h fluid intake diary among 120 controls from a case-control study of colorectal cancer in Barcelona, Spain. We measured urine TCAA and creatinine, and 9 haloacetic acids and 4 trihalomethanes (THM) in tap water. Lifetime THM exposure was estimated based on residential history since age 18 plus routine monitoring data. Robust linear regressions were used to estimate mean change in urinary TCAA adjusted by covariates. Among the studied group, mean age was 74 years (range 63-85) and 41 (34%) were females. Mean total tap water consumption was 2.2l/48h (standard error, 0.1l/48h). Geometric mean urine TCAA excretion rate was 17.3pmol/min [95%CI: 14.0-21.3], which increased 2% for a 10% increase in TCAA ingestion and decreased with total tap water consumption (-17%/l), water intake outside home (-32%), plasmatic volume (-64%/l), in smokers (-79%), and in users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (-50%). Urinary TCAA levels were not associated with lifetime THM exposure. In conclusion, our findings support that urine TCAA is not a valid biomarker in case-control studies of adult cancer given that advanced age, comorbidites and medication use are prevalent and are determinants of urine TCAA levels, apart from ingested TCAA levels. In addition, low TCAA concentrations in drinking water limit the validity of urine TCAA as an exposure biomarker. PMID:25462676

  18. Ear swelling test by using laser speckle imaging with a long exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Preise, Dina; Meglinski, Igor; Harmelin, Alon

    2014-06-01

    Laser speckle imaging with long exposure time has been applied noninvasively to visualize the immediate reaction of cutaneous vessels in mice in response to a known primary irritant and potential allergen-methyl salicylate. The compound has been used topically on the surface of the pinna and the reaction of the vascular network was examined. We demonstrate that irritant-induced acute vascular reaction can be effectively and accurately detected by laser speckle imaging technique. The current approach holds a great promise for application in routine screening of the cutaneous vascular response induced by contact agents, screenings of mouse ear swelling test, and testing the allergenic potential of new synthetic materials and healthcare pharmaceutical products.

  19. A decision support system for real-time stress detection during virtual reality exposure.

    PubMed

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Cipresso, Pietro; Serino, Silvia; Pioggia, Giovanni; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Baldus, Giovanni; Corda, Daniele; Ferro, Marcello; Carbonaro, Nicola; Tognetti, Alessandro; De Rossi, Danilo; Giakoumis, Dimitris; Tzovaras, Dimitrios; Riera, Alejandro; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is increasingly being used in combination with psycho-physiological measures to improve assessment of distress in mental health research and therapy. However, the analysis and interpretation of multiple physiological measures is time consuming and requires specific skills, which are not available to most clinicians. To address this issue, we designed and developed a Decision Support System (DSS) for automatic classification of stress levels during exposure to VR environments. The DSS integrates different biosensor data (ECG, breathing rate, EEG) and behavioral data (body gestures correlated with stress), following a training process in which self-rated and clinical-rated stress levels are used as ground truth. Detected stress events for each VR session are reported to the therapist as an aggregated value (ranging from 0 to 1) and graphically displayed on a diagram accessible by the therapist through a web-based interface. PMID:24732491

  20. Noise exposure level while operating electronic arcade games as a leisure time activity.

    PubMed

    Mirbod, S M; Inaba, R; Yoshida, H; Nagata, C; Komura, Y; Iwata, H

    1992-01-01

    In order to study noise levels associated with electronic arcade games, noise measurements were made in 3 selected game centers and 192 samples were taken in each location. The background noise was recorded at a level of 61 dB(A) and 64 dB(C). When the electronic games were performed these levels of noise reached to 88 approximately 90 dB(A). The 1/3 octave bands analyzing sound pressure levels showed that more intense noise levels arose in a frequency range between 0.5 and 2.0 kHz. The computed values for noise pollution levels (LNP) and L90 (fast response A-weighted sound level exceeded 90% of the measurement time) ranged from 93.3 to 96.6 and from 85.1 to 87.3 dB(A), respectively. Concerning our results and according to Melnic (1979), it was estimated that these levels of noise might cause 4-8 dB temporary threshold shift (TTS) at 4.0 kHz in an individual with less than one hour of exposure to such a level of noise. As for the employees of the 3 game centers, the 8-hr equivalent continuous sound levels (Leq,8) were in the range of 80.3 approximately 87.5 dB(A), although their exposure time could not be exactly determined. It was suggested that: 1) The maximum levels should be limited to a reasonable level, either by the manufacturers or by the game center owners; 2) Education programs in industry should inform the employees about other factors outside the work that may affect their hearing; and 3) For policy-making on hearing conservation, recreational warning and standards should be established. PMID:1490870

  1. Prevalence and risk factors of non-carious cervical lesions related to occupational exposure to acid mists.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, Rafael Aiello; Crosato, Edgard; Mazzilli, Luiz Eugênio Nigro; Frias, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the prevalence and risk factors of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) in a Brazilian population of workers exposed and non-exposed to acid mists and chemical products. One hundred workers (46 exposed and 54 non-exposed) were evaluated in a Centro de Referência em Saúde do Trabalhador - CEREST (Worker's Health Reference Center). The workers responded to questionnaires regarding their personal information and about alcohol consumption and tobacco use. A clinical examination was conducted to evaluate the presence of NCCLs, according to WHO parameters. Statistical analyses were performed by unconditional logistic regression and multiple linear regression, with the critical level of p < 0.05. NCCLs were significantly associated with age groups (18-34, 35-44, 45-68 years). The unconditional logistic regression showed that the presence of NCCLs was better explained by age group (OR = 4.04; CI 95% 1.77-9.22) and occupational exposure to acid mists and chemical products (OR = 3.84; CI 95% 1.10-13.49), whereas the linear multiple regression revealed that NCCLs were better explained by years of smoking (p = 0.01) and age group (p = 0.04). The prevalence of NCCLs in the study population was particularly high (76.84%), and the risk factors for NCCLs were age, exposure to acid mists and smoking habit. Controlling risk factors through preventive and educative measures, allied to the use of personal protective equipment to prevent the occupational exposure to acid mists, may contribute to minimizing the prevalence of NCCLs. PMID:26154372

  2. GPS-based Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) Model to Estimate Time-Location of Individuals for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments: Model Evaluation in Central North Carolina

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessment is the estimation of the time spent by individuals in various microenvironments (ME). Accounting for the time spent in different ME with different pollutant concentrations can reduce exposure misclassifications, while failure...

  3. Utility of biological membranes as indicators for radiation exposure: alterations in membrane structure and function over time.

    PubMed

    Dainiak, N; Tan, B J

    1995-05-01

    In addition to interacting with genomic DNA, ionizing radiation may directly and indirectly alter the structure and function of components of the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. Water radiolysis generates reactive species, including superoxide, hypochlorous acid and chloride radicals that may in turn react with biological membranes, as well as with cellular DNA. Reaction of plasma membrane lipids with molecular oxygen results in lipid peroxidation of both reconstituted membranes and biological membranes, an effect that increases with decreasing dose rate. Both ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light alter functions of membrane-anchored molecules, including adhesion molecules, histocompatibility complex antigens and membrane-bound growth factors. The latter growth factors represent a repertoire of growth and differentiation signals that are expressed in a nondiffusible fashion at the cell surface, and in soluble forms appearing after cleavage of their extracellular domain. The importance of cell-cell signaling via the membrane-anchored form of growth factors is becoming increasingly recognized. Expression of membrane-bound hematopoietic cytokines by eukaryotic cells is impaired after exposure to ultraviolet light, a defect in cell-cell signaling that may lead to impaired hematopoiesis. While studies suggest that permanent changes in membrane structure and function may result from radiation-induced injury to the plasma membrane and reconstituted "pure" membranes, reversibility of these defects over time requires additional study. PMID:7488940

  4. Short-chain fatty acids: ready for prime time?

    PubMed

    Roy, Claude C; Kien, C Lawrence; Bouthillier, Lise; Levy, Emile

    2006-08-01

    The concept of colonic health has become a major target for the development of functional foods such as probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics. These bioactive agents have a profound effect on the composition of the microflora, as well as on the physiology of the colon, and display distinct health benefits. Dietary carbohydrates escaping digestion/absorption in the small bowel and prebiotics undergo fermentation in the colon and give rise to short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). As the main anions of the colon and the major source of energy for colonocytes, SCFA are rapidly absorbed by nonionic diffusion mostly but also by active transport mediated by a sodium-coupled transporter, thereby fostering the absorption of sodium and water. SCFA in general and butyrate in particular enhance the growth of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and play a central role on the physiology and metabolism of the colon. The effect of prebiotics on cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, mucin production, immune function, mineral absorption, lipid metabolism, and gastrointestinal (GI) peptides has been well documented experimentally. These effects seem to be largely mediated by SCFA, but evidence from human studies remains inconsistent. The food industry is making a leap of faith in their efforts to commercialize prebiotics and exploit potential health benefits. The future lies with the design of studies to further explore basic mechanisms, and gene expression in particular, but emphasis should be placed on human intervention trials. PMID:16870803

  5. Evaluation of exposure to organophosphate, carbamate, phenoxy acid, and chlorophenol pesticides in pregnant women from 10 Caribbean countries.

    PubMed

    Forde, Martin S; Robertson, Lyndon; Laouan Sidi, Elhadji A; Côté, Suzanne; Gaudreau, Eric; Drescher, Olivia; Ayotte, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pesticides are commonly used in tropical regions such as the Caribbean for both household and agricultural purposes. Of particular concern is exposure during pregnancy, as these compounds can cross the placental barrier and interfere with fetal development. The objective of this study was to evaluate exposure of pregnant women residing in 10 Caribbean countries to the following commonly used classes of pesticides in the Caribbean: organophosphates (OPs), carbamates, phenoxy acids, and chlorophenols. Out of 438 urine samples collected, 15 samples were randomly selected from each Caribbean country giving a total of 150 samples. Samples were analyzed for the following metabolites: six OP dialkylphosphate metabolites [dimethylphosphate (DMP), dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP), dimethyldithiophosphate (DMDTP), diethylphosphate (DEP), diethylthiophosphate (DETP) and diethyldithiophosphate (DEDTP)]; two carbamate metabolites [2-isopropoxyphenol (2-IPP) and carbofuranphenol]; one phenoxy acid 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D); and five chlorophenols [2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), 2,5-dichlorophenol (2,5-DCP), 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP)]. OP metabolites were consistently detected in ≥60% of the samples from Antigua and Barbuda, Bermuda, and Jamaica. Of the carbamate metabolites, 2-IPP was detected in seven of the 10 Caribbean countries with a detection frequency around 30%, whereas carbofuranphenol was detected in only one sample. The detection frequency for the phenoxy acid 2,4-D ranged from 20% in Grenada to a maximum of 67% in Belize. Evidence of exposure to chlorophenol pesticides was also established with 2,4-DCP by geometric means ranging from 0.52 μg L(-1) in St Lucia to a maximum of 1.68 μg L(-1) in Bermuda. Several extreme concentrations of 2,5-DCP were detected in four Caribbean countries-Belize (1100 μg L(-1)), Bermuda (870 μg L(-1)), Jamaica (1300 μg L(-1)), and St Kitts and Nevis (1400 μg L(-1

  6. Private Drinking Water Wells as a Source of Exposure to Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Communities Surrounding a Fluoropolymer Production Facility

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kate; Webster, Thomas F.; Bartell, Scott M.; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Fletcher, Tony; Vieira, Verónica M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The C8 Health Project was established in 2005 to collect data on perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, or C8) and human health in Ohio and West Virginia communities contaminated by a fluoropolymer production facility. Objective We assessed PFOA exposure via contaminated drinking water in a subset of C8 Health Project participants who drank water from private wells. Methods Participants provided demographic information and residential, occupational, and medical histories. Laboratory analyses were conducted to determine serum-PFOA concentrations. PFOA data were collected from 2001 through 2005 from 62 private drinking water wells. We examined the relationship between drinking water and PFOA levels in serum using robust regression methods. As a comparison with regression models, we used a first-order, single-compartment pharmacokinetic model to estimate the serum:drinking-water concentration ratio at steady state. Results The median serum PFOA concentration in 108 study participants who used private wells was 75.7 μg/L, approximately 20 times greater than the levels in the U.S. general population but similar to those of local residents who drank public water. Each 1 μg/L increase in PFOA levels in drinking water was associated with an increase in serum concentrations of 141.5 μg/L (95% confidence interval, 134.9–148.1). The serum:drinking-water concentration ratio for the steady-state pharmacokinetic model was 114. Conclusions PFOA-contaminated drinking water is a significant contributor to PFOA levels in serum in the study population. Regression methods and pharmacokinetic modeling produced similar estimates of the relationship. PMID:20920951

  7. Exposures to Synthetic Estrogens at Different Times During the Life, and Their Effect on Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Sonia; Warri, Anni

    2013-01-01

    Women are using estrogens for many purposes, such as to prevent pregnancy or miscarriage, or to treat menopausal symptoms. Estrogens also have been used to treat breast cancer which seems puzzling, since there is convincing evidence to support a link between high lifetime estrogen exposure and increased breast cancer risk. In this review, we discuss the findings that maternal exposure to the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol during pregnancy increases breast cancer risk in both exposed mothers and their daughters. In addition, we review data regarding the use of estrogens in oral contraceptives and as postmenopausal hormone therapy and discuss the opposing effects on breast cancer risk based upon timing of exposure. We place particular emphasis on studies investigating how maternal estrogenic exposures during pregnancy increase breast cancer risk among daughters. New data suggest that these exposures induce epigenetic modifications in the mammary gland and germ cells, thereby causing an inheritable increase in breast cancer risk for multiple generations. PMID:23392570

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Consumption and Prostate Cancer: A Review of Exposure Measures and Results of Epidemiological Studies.

    PubMed

    Dinwiddie, Michael T; Terry, Paul D; Whelan, Jay; Patzer, Rachel E

    2016-07-01

    Animal studies have shown that dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3) may play a role in the development of prostate cancer, but the results of epidemiologic studies have been equivocal. Associations in humans may vary depending on study design, measurement methodology of fatty acid intake, intake ranges, and stage of cancer development. To address this, we identified 36 published studies through PubMed (Medline) from 1993 through 2013 on long-chain n-3s and prostate cancer. Exposure measurements included dietary assessment and biomarker levels. Associations for total, early, and late stage prostate cancer were examined by subgroup of study design and exposure measure type and by using forest plots to illustrate the relative strength of associations within each subgroup. We also tested for potential threshold effects by considering studies that included measurement cut-points that met intake levels recommended by the American Heart Association. We found no consistent evidence supporting a role of n-3s in either the causation or prevention of prostate cancer at any stage or grade. Results did not vary appreciably by study design, exposure measurement, intake level, or stage of cancer development. PMID:26595854

  9. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao; Ren, Yiping

    2015-09-24

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1-0.3 ng/mL and 0.4-1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%-105.4%, 98.2%-114.0% and 92.2%-108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD<7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive profiling of

  10. FIELD EXPOSURE STUDY FOR DETERMINING THE EFFECTS OF ACID DEPOSITION ON THE CORROSION AND DETERIORATION OF MATERIALS: DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Materials exposure sites, fully instrumented to characterize environmental parameters related to air quality, meteorology, and rain chemistry, have been established at four locations in the eastern and northeastern United States to study the effects of acid precipitation on atmos...

  11. Time- and state-dependent effects of methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium (MTSEA) exposure differ between heart and skeletal muscle voltage-gated Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, John P; Shockett, Penny E

    2012-03-01

    The substituted-cysteine scanning method (SCAM) is used to study conformational changes in proteins. Experiments using SCAM involve site-directed mutagenesis to replace native amino acids with cysteine and subsequent exposure to a methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagent such as methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium (MTSEA). These reagents react with substituted-cysteines and can provide functional information about relative positions of amino acids within a protein. In the human heart voltage-gated Na(+) channel hNav1.5 there is a native cysteine at position C373 that reacts rapidly with MTS reagents resulting in a large reduction in whole-cell Na(+) current (I(Na)). Therefore, in order to use SCAM in studies in this isoform, this native cysteine is mutated to a non-reactive residue, e.g., tyrosine. This mutant, hNav1.5-C373Y, is resistant to the MTS-mediated decrease in I(Na). Here we show that this resistance is time- and state-dependent. With relatively short exposure times to MTSEA (<4min), there is little effect on I(Na). However, with longer exposures (4-8min), there is a large decrease in I(Na), but this effect is only found when hNav1.5-C373Y is inactivated (fast or slow) - MTSEA has little effect in the closed state. Additionally, this long-term, state-dependent effect is not seen in human skeletal muscle Na(+) channel isoform hNav1.4, which has a native tyrosine at the homologous site C407. We conclude that differences in molecular determinants of inactivation between hNav1.4 and hNav1.5 underlie the difference in response to MTSEA exposure. PMID:22155680

  12. Responses of the murine esophageal microcirculation to acute exposure to alkali, acid, or hypochlorite

    PubMed Central

    Osman, M.; Russell, J.; Shukla, D.; Moghadamfalahi, M.; Granger, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Purpose Although ingestion of alkali- and/or hypochlorite-based household cleaners as well as strong acids remain a major cause of esophageal wall injury, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the injury response to these toxic agents. This study examined the roles of vascular dysfunction and inflammation to the esophageal injury response to different caustic substances in mice. Methods The esophageal responses to NaOH (10%, 5% & 2.5%), KOH (10%, 5%, & 2.5%), NaOCl (5.25%), and HCl (10%, pH=2) were evaluated by intravital videomicroscopy, and histopathology. Intravital microscopy was used to monitor changes in the diameter of arterioles and venules, the adhesion and movement of leukocytes in venules, and time of cessation of arteriolar blood flow in mouse esophagus. The esophageal mucosa was exposed to caustic substances for 0–60 minutes prior to evaluation. Results The higher concentrations of NaOH and KOH elicited rapid stasis in both arterioles and venules, which was accompanied by arteriolar constriction and thrombosis. An accumulation of adherent leukocytes in venules was not observed with any agent. Histopathologic evaluation revealed marked cellular and interstitial edema in the mucosa with alkali, while HCl and NaOCl decreased the thickness epithelial layer. Conclusion These findings suggest that ischemia and thrombosis are dominant processes, while inflammation is less important, in the pathogenesis of acute corrosive injury to the esophageal mucosa. PMID:18779005

  13. Fibroblasts behavior after N-acetylcysteine and amino acids exposure: extracellular matrix gene expression.

    PubMed

    Avantaggiato, Anna; Palmieri, Annalisa; Bertuzzi, Gianluigi; Carinci, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are chemically reactive molecules with impaired electrons that make them unstable and able to react easily with a great variety of molecules. The main targets of ROS are DNA, proteins, and membrane phospholipids. In the skin, ROS are able to affect the production of collagen and elastin, the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). This action contributes to the skin's aging. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) is an acetylated cysteine residue with excellent anti-oxidant activity that boosts glutathione (GSH) levels. This study evaluates the effect of a solution of NAC and amino acids, which is used in aesthetic medicine as an intra-dermal injective treatment, on fibroblast behavior. To this aim, the expression levels of some ECM-related genes (HAS1, HYAL1 ELN, ELANE, MMP2, MMP3, MMP13, COL1A1, COL3A1) were analyzed on cultured dermal fibroblasts using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). All but two collagen genes were up-regulated after 24 hr of treatment. PMID:24438160

  14. Urinary t,t-muconic acid as an indicator of exposure to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, O; Seiji, K; Nakatsuka, H; Watanabe, T; Yin, S N; Li, G L; Cai, S X; Jin, C; Ikeda, M

    1989-01-01

    A method for rapidly determining t,t-muconic acid (MA) by high performance liquid chromatography was developed and successfully applied to urine samples from 152 workers exposed to benzene (64 men, 88 women) and 213 non-exposed controls (113 men, 100 women). The MA concentrations in urine correlated linearly with time weighted average benzene concentrations in the breath zone air of workers. A cross sectional balance study showed that about 2% of benzene inhaled is excreted into the urine as MA. The MA concentrations in the urine of the non-exposed was below the detection limit (less than 0.1 mg/l) in most cases, and the 95% lower confidence limit of MA for those exposed to benzene at 5 ppm (5.0 mg/l as a non-corrected value) was higher than the 97.5%-tile values for the non-exposed (1.4 mg/l). In practice, it was possible to separate those exposed to 6-7 ppm benzene from the non-exposed by means of urine analysis for MA. The urinary MA concentration was suppressed by coexposure to toluene. PMID:2923822

  15. How accurate and precise are limited sampling strategies in estimating exposure to mycophenolic acid in people with autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Abd Rahman, Azrin N; Tett, Susan E; Staatz, Christine E

    2014-03-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is a potent immunosuppressant agent, which is increasingly being used in the treatment of patients with various autoimmune diseases. Dosing to achieve a specific target MPA area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h post-dose (AUC12) is likely to lead to better treatment outcomes in patients with autoimmune disease than a standard fixed-dose strategy. This review summarizes the available published data around concentration monitoring strategies for MPA in patients with autoimmune disease and examines the accuracy and precision of methods reported to date using limited concentration-time points to estimate MPA AUC12. A total of 13 studies were identified that assessed the correlation between single time points and MPA AUC12 and/or examined the predictive performance of limited sampling strategies in estimating MPA AUC12. The majority of studies investigated mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) rather than the enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) formulation of MPA. Correlations between MPA trough concentrations and MPA AUC12 estimated by full concentration-time profiling ranged from 0.13 to 0.94 across ten studies, with the highest associations (r (2) = 0.90-0.94) observed in lupus nephritis patients. Correlations were generally higher in autoimmune disease patients compared with renal allograft recipients and higher after MMF compared with EC-MPS intake. Four studies investigated use of a limited sampling strategy to predict MPA AUC12 determined by full concentration-time profiling. Three studies used a limited sampling strategy consisting of a maximum combination of three sampling time points with the latest sample drawn 3-6 h after MMF intake, whereas the remaining study tested all combinations of sampling times. MPA AUC12 was best predicted when three samples were taken at pre-dose and at 1 and 3 h post-dose with a mean bias and imprecision of 0.8 and 22.6 % for multiple linear regression analysis and of -5.5 and 23.0 % for

  16. Tissue specific uptake and elimination of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in adult rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Falk, Sandy; Failing, Klaus; Georgii, Sebastian; Brunn, Hubertus; Stahl, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Tissue specific uptake and elimination of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) were studied in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Adult trout were exposed to perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) via food over a time period of 28d. In the following 28-d depuration period the fish were fed PFAA-free food. At defined sampling times four animals were removed from the experimental tank, euthanized and dissected. Muscle, liver, kidneys, gills, blood, skin and carcass were examined individually. At the end of the accumulation phase between 0.63% (PFOA) and 15.5% (PFOS) of the absolute, applied quantity of PFAAs was recovered in the whole fish. The main target organ was the liver with recovery rates between 0.11% (PFBS) and 4.01% (PFOS) of the total amount of ingested PFAAs. Perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids were taken up more readily and had longer estimated elimination half-lives than perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids of the same chain length. The longest estimated elimination half-lives were found to be for PFOS between 8.4d in muscle tissue and 20.4d in the liver and for PFNA between 8.2d in the blood and 11.6d in the liver. PMID:25022474

  17. Comparative assessment of the environmental hazards of and exposure to perfluoroalkyl phosphonic and phosphinic acids (PFPAs and PFPiAs): Current knowledge, gaps, challenges and research needs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanyun; Cousins, Ian T; Berger, Urs; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Scheringer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl phosphonic and phosphinic acids (PFPAs and PFPiAs) are sub-groups of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) that have been commercialized since the 1970s, particularly as defoamers in pesticide formulations and wetting agents in consumer products. Recently, C4/C4 PFPiA and its derivatives have been presented as alternatives to long-chain PFASs in certain applications. In this study, we systematically assess the publicly available information on the hazardous properties, occurrence, and exposure routes of PFPAs and PFPiAs, and make comparisons to the corresponding properties of their better-known carboxylic and sulfonic acid analogs (i.e. PFCAs and PFSAs). This comparative assessment indicates that [i] PFPAs likely have high persistence and long-range transport potential; [ii] PFPiAs may transform to PFPAs (and possibly PFCAs) in the environment and biota; [iii] certain PFPAs and PFPiAs can only be slowly eliminated from rainbow trout and rats, similarly to long-chain PFCAs and PFSAs; [iv] PFPAs and PFPiAs have modes-of-action that are both similar to, and different from, those of PFCAs and PFSAs; and [v] the measured levels of PFPAs/PFPiAs in the global environment and biota appear to be low in comparison to PFCAs and PFSAs, suggesting, for the time being, low risks from PFPAs and PFPiAs alone. Although risks from individual PFPAs/PFPiAs are currently low, their ongoing production and use and high persistence will lead to increasing exposure and risks over time. Furthermore, simultaneous exposure to PFPAs, PFPiAs and other PFASs may result in additive effects necessitating cumulative risk assessments. To facilitate effective future research, we highlight possible strategies to overcome sampling and analytical challenges. PMID:26922149

  18. Relative survivability of human osteoblasts is enhanced by 39 °C and ascorbic acid after exposure to photopolymerization ingredients.

    PubMed

    Dua, Rupak; Ramaswamy, Sharan

    2013-08-01

    Photopolymerizable hydrogels offer great potential in cartilage tissue engineering due to their ability to conform to irregular defect shapes and be applied in a potentially minimally invasive manner. An important process requirement in the use of photopolymerizable hydrogels is the ability of the suspended cells to withstand low intensity ultraviolet light (UV) exposure (4-5 mW/cm(2)) and photoinitiator concentrations. For cartilage integration with underlying subchondral bone tissue, robust localized osteoblast activity is necessary. Yet, while it is known that osteoblasts do not respond well to UV light, limited work has been conducted to improve their survivability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular cytotoxicity of five different human cell sources at different UV exposure times, with and without a commercially used photoinitiator. We were able to confirm that human osteoblasts were the least tolerant to varying UV exposure times in comparison to bone marrow stem cell, periodontal ligament cell, smooth muscle and endothelial cell lineages. Moreover osteoblasts cultured at 39 °C did not deteriorate in terms of alkaline phosphatase expression or calcium deposition within the extracellular matrix (ECM), but did reduce cell proliferation. We believe however that the lower proliferation diminished osteoblast sensitivity to UV and the photoinitiator. In fact, the relative survivability of osteoblasts was found to be augmented by the combination of a biochemical factor and an elevated incubation temperature; specifically, the use of 50 mg/l of the anti-oxidant, ascorbic acid significantly (P < 0.05) increased the survivability of osteoblasts when cultured at 39 °C. We conclude that ascorbic acid at an incubation temperature of 39 °C can be included in in vitro protocols used to assess cartilage integration with bone ECM. Such inclusion will enhance conditions of the engineered tissue model system in recapitulating in vivo osteoblast activity. PMID

  19. Effects of short-term acid and aluminum exposure on the parr-smolt transformation in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): Disruption of seawater tolerance and endocrine status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monette, M.Y.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur; McCormick, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    Episodic acidification resulting in increased acidity and inorganic aluminum (Ali) is known to interfere with the parr-smolt transformation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and has been implicated as a possible cause of population decline. To determine the extent and mechanism(s) by which short-term acid/Al exposure compromises smolt development, Atlantic salmon smolts were exposed to either control (pH 6.7-6.9) or acid/Al (pH 5.4-6.3, 28-64 ??g l-1 Ali) conditions for 2 and 5 days, and impacts on freshwater (FW) ion regulation, seawater (SW) tolerance, plasma hormone levels and stress response were examined. Gill Al concentrations were elevated in all smolts exposed to acid/Al relative to controls confirming exposure to increased Ali. There was no effect of acid/Al on plasma ion concentrations in FW however, smolts exposed to acid/Al followed by a 24 h SW challenge exhibited greater plasma Cl- levels than controls, indicating reduced SW tolerance. Loss of SW tolerance was accompanied by reductions in gill Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) activity and Na+,K+,2Cl- (NKCC) cotransporter protein abundance. Acid/Al exposure resulted in decreased plasma insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and 3,3???,5???-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) levels, whereas no effect of treatment was seen on plasma cortisol, growth hormone (GH), or thyroxine (T4) levels. Acid/Al exposure resulted in increased hematocrit and plasma glucose levels in FW, but both returned to control levels after 24 h in SW. The results indicate that smolt development and SW tolerance are compromised by short-term exposure to acid/Al in the absence of detectable impacts on FW ion regulation. Loss of SW tolerance during short-term acid/Al exposure likely results from reductions in gill NKA and NKCC, possibly mediated by decreases in plasma IGF-I and T3. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  20. Cartilage and bone malformations in the head of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos following exposure to disulfiram and acetic acid hydrazide

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Ruben; Weigt, Stefan; Braunbeck, Thomas

    2013-04-15

    In order to investigate teratogenic effects, especially on cartilage and bone formation, zebrafish embryos were exposed for 144 h to the dithiocarbamate pesticide disulfiram (20–320 μg/L) and acetic acid hydrazide (0.375–12 g/L), a degradation product of isoniazid. After fixation and full-mount staining, disulfiram could be shown to induce strong cartilage malformations after exposure to ≥ 80 μg/L, whereas acetic acid hydrazide caused cartilage alterations only from 1.5 g/L. Undulating notochords occurred after exposure to disulfiram even at the lowest test concentration of 20 μg/L, whereas at the two lowest concentrations of acetic acid hydrazide (0.375 and 0.75 g/L) mainly fractures of the notochord were observed. Concentrations of acetic acid hydrazide ≥ 1.5 g/L resulted in undulated notochords similar to disulfiram. Cartilages and ossifications of the cranium, including the cleithrum, were individually analyzed assessing the severity of malformation and the degree of ossification in a semi-quantitative approach. Cartilages of the neurocranium such as the ethmoid plate proved to be more stable than cartilages of the pharyngeal skeleton such as Meckel's cartilage. Hence, ossification proved significantly more susceptible than cartilage. The alterations induced in the notochord as well as in the cranium might well be of ecological relevance, since notochord malformation is likely to result in impaired swimming and cranial malformation might compromise regular food uptake. - Highlights: ► Disulfiram and acetic acid hydrazide as notochord, cartilage and bone teratogens ► Zebrafish embryos to model effects on single cartilages and bones in the head ► LC50 calculation and head length measurements after six days post-fertilization ► Lethality, head length and teratogenic effects are dose-dependent. ► Cartilages of the neurocranium are the most stable elements in the head.

  1. Estimating the Time Interval Between Exposure to the World Trade Center Disaster and Incident Diagnoses of Obstructive Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Michelle S.; Webber, Mayris P.; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W.; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Kelly, Kerry J.; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D.; Prezant, David J.; Hall, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13–24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk. PMID:24980522

  2. Estimating the time interval between exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and incident diagnoses of obstructive airway disease.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Michelle S; Webber, Mayris P; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kelly, Kerry J; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D; Prezant, David J; Hall, Charles B

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13-24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk. PMID:24980522

  3. Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in indoor and outdoor dusts around a mega fluorochemical industrial park in China: Implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Su, Hongqiao; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Pei; Shi, Yajuan; Li, Qifeng; Zhou, Yunqiao; Johnson, Andrew C

    2016-09-01

    The manufacture of fluorochemicals can lead to high levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) contaminating the surrounding environment and consequently elevated exposure to the local residents. In this study, measurements of PFAAs associated with indoor and outdoor dusts around a mega fluorochemical industrial park (FIP) were made. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and short-chain perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (C4-C7 PFCAs) were the predominant forms in all samples. The signature of the PFAAs in dusts in the local area matched that found within the FIP complex. The contamination plume in the local area could be linked to the prevailing wind direction starting from the FIP. The dust concentrations decreased exponentially with distance from the FIP (noticeably in the first 5km). PFAAs contamination could be detected at the furthest location, 20km away from the FIP. The concentrations of PFAAs were higher in indoor dust (73-13,500ng/g, median: 979ng/g) than those in outdoor dust (5-9495ng/g, median: 62ng/g) at every location. The highest estimated daily intake of PFOA via dust ingestion (26.0ng/kg·bw/day) was for toddlers (2-5years) living 2km away from the FIP, which is posing human health risk, though exposure remains within the provisional tolerable daily intake values. PMID:27393120

  4. [Recent findings on the epidemiological and experimental aspects of the measurement of serum bile acids in occupational exposure to xenobiotics].

    PubMed

    Franco, G; Fonte, R; Lorena, M

    1989-11-01

    The functional activity of the liver and the variety of its responses to injury makes the choice of appropriate tests a difficult task. However, because of the highly efficient uptake of bile acids by the normal hepatocyte, the determination of serum bile acids (SBA) concentration has been proposed as a test to detect early changes of liver function not associated to cytotoxicity. Several studies of biomonitoring subjects occupationally exposed to hepatotoxic substances have been carried out by evaluating total SBA or primary SBA, as indicators of early liver dysfunction. Even though these studies are not completely comparable because of the different protocols adopted, most of them reveal a significant increase of SBA concentrations among the exposed subjects in respect of unexposed controls. Furthermore, higher prevalences of subjects exposed to organic solvents mixture with abnormal SBA concentrations in respect of controls have been observed. Increased serum bile acids concentrations among the subjects exposed to a variety of xenobiotics have been explained as a change in hepatocyte function, particularly in one of the steps involved in bile acids transport. However, the lack of any relationship between the indices of doses and SBA concentrations remains an important point to clarify. This fact could be interpreted as a consequence of the delayed biological effect responsible for increased serum bile acids during the exposure. As regards the nature of the mechanisms involved in the increase of SBA concentrations, recent observations pointed out that some chlorinated aliphatics were able to inhibit cell membrane ATPases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2562752

  5. Effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time, and seed particles on secondary organic aerosol chemical composition and yield

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lambe, A. T.; Chhabra, P. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Brune, W. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.; Cummings, M. J.; Brogan, J. F.; Parmar, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; et al

    2015-03-18

    We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0 × 108 to 2.2 × 1010 molec cm-3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2 × 106 to 2 × 107 molec cm-3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in themore » chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. In most cases, for a specific SOA type the most-oxidized chamber SOA and the least-oxidized flow reactor SOA have similar mass spectra, oxygen-to-carbon and hydrogen-to-carbon ratios, and carbon oxidation states at integrated OH exposures between approximately 1 × 1011 and 2 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, or about 1–2 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. This observation suggests that in the range of available OH exposure overlap for the flow reactor and chambers, SOA elemental composition as measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer is similar whether the precursor is exposed to low OH concentrations over long exposure times or high OH concentrations over short exposure times. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of

  6. PREGNANCY LOSS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a member of the perfluoroalkyl acids that have unique surfactant properties and are widely used in industrial and consumer products. These chemicals are stable and persistent in the environment; recent bio-monitoring studies have indicated wide-sp...

  7. EFFECT OF ACUTE EXPOSURE TO BORIC ACID ON THE MALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM OF THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult male rats were dosed with 0 or 2000 mg/kg of boric acid and killed at 2, 14, 28, or 57 d posttreatment, or dosed with 0, 250, 500, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg of boric acid and killed at 14 d posttreatment. At d 14, structures which appeared to be enlarged atypical cytoplasmic lobe...

  8. Acid-based balance and blood gas changes in the fresh water field crab, Barytelphusa guerini, on exposure to organic and inorganic lead

    SciTech Connect

    Tulasi, S.J.; Rao, J.V.R.

    1988-02-01

    The acid-base status of crustacean haemolymph depends on various environmental and physiological factors. Acid base status of the haemolymph is known to be influenced by temperature, salinity, strenuous activity and moulting. The studies on the acid-base regulation of the fresh water crabs are meager. The acid-base changes in fishes during environmental stress conditions like acid stress and zinc toxicity had been reported. But the effect of environmental pollutants like the heavy metals on the acid-base regulation of the fresh water crabs have not been previously reported. The haemolymph of the fresh water crab was found to accumulate high amounts of lead on exposure to organic and inorganic lead. Hence the present investigation has been undertaken to study the haemolymph acid-base status on exposure to subtoxic levels of organic and inorganic lead.

  9. Work-Time Exposure and Acute Injuries in Inshore Lobstermen of the Northeast United States.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, Scott; Buchholz, Bryan; Jenkins, Paul; Scribani, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to inform efforts to reduce risk for musculoskeletal disorders among commercial lobstermen by characterizing and quantifying injuries that occur to people while harvesting lobsters commercially in the Northeast United States. This study aimed to estimate a denominator of exposure to lobstering in full-time equivalents (FTE), to estimate a fatality rate, and to calculate incidence rates for acute injuries within the sample population. Captains were randomly selected from those licensed to fish in Maine and Massachusetts. Data on work exposure and injuries with rapid onset that occurred on the boat ("acute injuries") were collected using a survey, which was administered quarterly via phone or face-to-face interview with the captain. The quarterly survey assessed the number of weeks worked during the quarter, average crew size, number of trips per week, and average trip length in hours. In addition, this survey captured relevant information (body segment affected, type of injury, and whether treatment was received) on all acute injuries occurring during the quarter. FTE were estimated using fishermen days and fishermen hours. The annual FTE estimated using days was 2,557 and using hours was 2,855. As expected, the summer months (3rd quarter) had the highest FTE and the winter (1st quarter) the lowest FTE. Fall (4th quarter) and spring (2nd quarter) ranked second and third, respectively. The incidence rates for all injuries (49.7/100 FTE) and injuries requiring treatment (15.0/100 FTE) were much higher than those reported in other studies of fishing that used Coast Guard data. PMID:26788780

  10. Time Course of Heart Rate Variability Response to PM2.5 Exposure from Secondhand Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Jennifer L.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Zhang, Jinming; Christiani, David C.; Cavallari, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) has been associated with decreased heart rate variability (HRV). However, the time course of this association is unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the association between 15–240 minute SHS-related fine particulate matter (PM2.5) moving averages and indices of HRV. Methods: With a panel study design, we used personal monitors to continuously measure PM2.5 and HRV of 35 participants who were exposed to SHS for approximately 6 hours. Results: We observed negative, significant associations between 5-minute HRV indices and 15 minute PM2.5 moving averages and 240 minute PM2.5 moving averages: there was a significant (p<0.01) 7.5% decrease in the 5-minute square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal heart beats associated with (RMSSD), and a significant (p<0.01) 14.7% decrease in the 5-minute high frequency (HF) power associated with the 15 minute PM2.5 moving averages; there was also a significant (p<0.01) 46.9% decrease in the 5-minute RMSSD, and a significant (p<0.01) 77.7% decrease in the 5-minute high frequency (HF) power associated with the 240 minute PM2.5 moving averages. Conclusions: Our findings that exposure to SHS related PM2.5 was associated with HRV support the hypothesis that SHS can affect the cardiovascular system. The negative associations reported between short and longer term PM2.5 and HRV indicate adverse effects of SHS on the cardiovascular system. PMID:27223894

  11. Constraining the Timing of Neoglaciation: Moraine Exposure Ages from Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, S. E.; Miller, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    A long-term Neoglacial cooling trend, beginning ~6 ka, is well documented across the Arctic and correlates with a monotonic decline in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. However, paleoclimate proxy records point to decadal- to millennial-scale variability superimposed on overall cooling. This climate variability is reflected in the fluctuations of Arctic glaciers over the course of several millennia. The most recent Neoglacial advance, the Little Ice Age (LIA; ~1275-1850 AD), was generally more extensive than pre-LIA advances and thus destroyed most evidence of previous advances. As such, the timing and extent of earlier Neoglacial advances are not well constrained. However, several extant glaciers on Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island, are fronted by nested ice-cored moraine sequences in which multiple pre-LIA moraines are preserved. We have generated absolute ages on moraine sequences for Snow Creek and Throne Glaciers using 10Be in moraine boulders. Nine 10Be ages from the two most distal moraine crests at Snow Creek Glacier range from ~1.8 ka to ~5.7 ka, and twelve ages from the two most distal moraine crests at Throne Glacier range from ~1.1 ka to ~4.6 ka. The wide spread of exposure ages in these settings is likely due to the degradation of moraine ice cores and the disturbance of older moraines by younger readvances. Because these processes result in the exposure of new clasts on the moraine post-emplacement, the oldest ages in these datasets likely provide the best estimates for the earliest Neoglacial advances. These data also indicate that in some settings, early Neoglacial alpine glacier advances reached similar extents as their LIA maxima, possibly due to large ice-cored moraines impeding LIA advances. Glacier modeling efforts and complementary lacustrine sediment records will help to unravel the complex Neoglacial history in this region.

  12. Textural characterization of finished and polished composites over time of intraoral exposure.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Rodrigues, Antonio Luiz; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2006-02-01

    This in situ study sought to evaluate the surface roughness evolution of resin composites finished and polished by different methods. A total of 108 rectangular-shaped specimens of a microfilled and a hybrid composite were cured against a Mylar matrix strip and left unpolished or instrumented with diamond burs, Al2O3-coated disks, Al2O3-impregnated UDMA disk, or with diamond burs followed by either one of the disks. After specimens had been profiled for the average surface roughness (Ra, microm), 18 volunteers wore a removable palatal appliance, which accommodated one specimen of each one of the 12 groups investigated. Surface roughness for up to 28 days of intraoral exposure was then measured at 1- or 7-day intervals. A split-plot ANOVA (alpha = 0.05) revealed a significant interaction between group and time. Tukey's test and regression analyses ascertained that initially finishing with burs only provided the roughest surface to both composites. Unpolished surfaces and those specimens polished with Al2O3-coated disks, regardless of previous use of diamond burs, attained smoother surface. The Al2O3-impregnated UDMA disk was capable of smoothening the surface of the hybrid material previously finished with diamond burs. The roughness achieved after finishing and polishing composites may be either smoothened or roughened after intraoral exposure. On the basis of the roughness range, it is advisable to use Al2O3-coated disks, regardless of whether diamond burs were previously used. Al2O3-impregnated UDMA disks (with or without previous application of diamond burs) may be also suitable for instrumenting hybrid restoratives. PMID:16206257

  13. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF MOUSE SKIN AND PAPILLOMAS FOLLOWING CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO MONOMETHYLARSONOUS ACID IN K6/ODC TRANSGENIC MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylarsonous acid [MMA(III)], a common metabolite of inorganic arsenic metabolism, increases tumor frequency in the skin of K6/ODC transgenic mice following a chronic exposure. To characterize gene expression profiles predictive of MMA(III) exposure and mode of action of carcin...

  14. Positive Adaptive State: Microarray Evaluation of Gene Expression in Salmonella Enterica Typhimurium Upon Exposure to Sub-Therapeutic Levels of Nalidixic Acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to evaluate changes in gene expression that occur upon exposure to sub-therapeutic levels of a quinolones antibioitic, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium ATCC# 14028 was exposed to 1.6 ug/L of nalidixic acid (NA). Microarray analysis of the expression profile during exposure to NA was compared...

  15. Free amino acid pool of a sea anemone: exposure and recovery after an oil spill. [Sea Anemones

    SciTech Connect

    Kasschau, M.R.; Howard, C.L.

    1984-07-01

    A number of laboratory studies on marine invertebrates have shown changes in free amino acid (FAA) pools in response to various pollutants. During a nineteen-month field study to determine the effects of natural environmental parameters on the FAA pools to the Gulf Coast sea anemone, Bunodosoma cavernata, an oil tanker collision occurred about 8 miles off Galveston Island. The initial spill from the tanker Burma Agate occurred on November 1, 1979 with large leakages continuing for several weeks. There was no visible sign of oil on the first collection date 13 days after the spill, but 11 days later the anemones were covered with an oil sheen. As a result of this natural exposure to the oil, the authors decided to monitor the sea anemones for changes in the FAA pool during the oil exposure and recovery period.

  16. Influence of developmental nicotine exposure on spike-timing precision and reliability in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Powell, Gregory L; Levine, Richard B; Frazier, Amanda M; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2015-03-15

    Smoothly graded muscle contractions depend in part on the precision and reliability of motoneuron action potential generation. Whether or not a motoneuron generates spikes precisely and reliably depends on both its intrinsic membrane properties and the nature of the synaptic input that it receives. Factors that perturb neuronal intrinsic properties and/or synaptic drive may compromise the temporal precision and the reliability of action potential generation. We have previously shown that developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) alters intrinsic properties and synaptic transmission in hypoglossal motoneurons (XIIMNs). Here we show that the effects of DNE also include alterations in spike-timing precision and reliability, and spike-frequency adaptation, in response to sinusoidal current injection. Current-clamp experiments in brainstem slices from neonatal rats show that DNE lowers the threshold for spike generation but increases the variability of spike-timing mechanisms. DNE is also associated with an increase in spike-frequency adaptation and reductions in both peak and steady-state firing rate in response to brief, square wave current injections. Taken together, our data indicate that DNE causes significant alterations in the input-output efficiency of XIIMNs. These alterations may play a role in the increased frequency of obstructive apneas and altered suckling strength and coordination observed in nicotine-exposed neonatal humans. PMID:25552642

  17. Near Real-Time Earthquake Exposure and Damage Assessment: An Example from Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamer, Yavor; Çomoǧlu, Mustafa; Erdik, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    Confined by infamous strike-slip North Anatolian Fault from the north and by the Hellenic subduction trench from the south Turkey is one of the most seismically active countries in Europe. Due this increased exposure and the fragility of the building stock Turkey is among the top countries exposed to earthquake hazard in terms of mortality and economic losses. In this study we focus recent and ongoing efforts to mitigate the earthquake risk in near real-time. We present actual results of recent earthquakes, such as the M6 event off-shore Antalya which occurred on 28 December 2013. Starting at the moment of detection, we obtain a preliminary ground motion intensity distribution based on epicenter and magnitude. Our real-time application is further enhanced by the integration of the SeisComp3 ground motion parameter estimation tool with the Earthquake Loss Estimation Routine (ELER). SeisComp3 provides the online station parameters which are then automatically incorporated into the ShakeMaps produced by ELER. The resulting ground motion distributions are used together with the building inventory to calculate expected number of buildings in various damage states. All these analysis are conducted in an automated fashion and are communicated within a few minutes of a triggering event. In our efforts to disseminate earthquake information to the general public we make extensive use of social networks such as Tweeter and collaborate with mobile phone operators.

  18. Evaluating methods for estimating space-time paths of individuals in calculating long-term personal exposure to air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Oliver; Soenario, Ivan; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Strak, Maciek; Hoek, Gerard; Brunekreef, Bert; Dijst, Martin; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution is one of the major concerns for human health. Associations between air pollution and health are often calculated using long-term (i.e. years to decades) information on personal exposure for each individual in a cohort. Personal exposure is the air pollution aggregated along the space-time path visited by an individual. As air pollution may vary considerably in space and time, for instance due to motorised traffic, the estimation of the spatio-temporal location of a persons' space-time path is important to identify the personal exposure. However, long term exposure is mostly calculated using the air pollution concentration at the x, y location of someone's home which does not consider that individuals are mobile (commuting, recreation, relocation). This assumption is often made as it is a major challenge to estimate space-time paths for all individuals in large cohorts, mostly because limited information on mobility of individuals is available. We address this issue by evaluating multiple approaches for the calculation of space-time paths, thereby estimating the personal exposure along these space-time paths with hyper resolution air pollution maps at national scale. This allows us to evaluate the effect of the space-time path and resulting personal exposure. Air pollution (e.g. NO2, PM10) was mapped for the entire Netherlands at a resolution of 5×5 m2 using the land use regression models developed in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE, http://escapeproject.eu/) and the open source software PCRaster (http://www.pcraster.eu). The models use predictor variables like population density, land use, and traffic related data sets, and are able to model spatial variation and within-city variability of annual average concentration values. We approximated space-time paths for all individuals in a cohort using various aggregations, including those representing space-time paths as the outline of a persons' home or associated parcel

  19. Refined Assessment of Human PM2.5 Exposure in Chinese city by Incorporating Time-activity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Wang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Since urban residents tend to spend a majority of time indoors throughout a day, it has been widely discussed in recent years, whether fixed-site monitoring PM2.5 ambient concentration is feasible as a surrogate of human PM2.5 exposure. Comprehensive understanding of residents' daily time-activity patterns (TAP) and possible indoor behavior are urgently needed to perform a more accurate estimate of human PM2.5exposure, especially in China, where is experiencing rapid urbanization.Field surveys of TAP were carried out in a Chinese city of Suzhou from 2014 to 2015 to evaluate PM2.5 exposure in various micro-environments (ME, e.g., residence, outdoors and in-transit). We gathered and analyzed urban residents' seasonal time-activity data using 24h retrospective time-location diaries, as well as diversified exposure-related indoor information (e.g. ventilation, environment tobacco smoke and cooking). PM2.5exposure is calculated through the incorporation of ambient concentration data, modified indoor/outdoor empirical functions and TAP. The spatial distributions of TAP-based exposure and static-population based exposure are also compared.Residents in Suzhou urban area spend over 65% of time at home and 90% indoors. There are significant temporal (season, day type) and socioeconomic differences (gender, age, education, living alone, having children at home, employment status, etc.) of time-activity distributions, which makes the sum of PM2.5 ME exposure differs notably from static-population based ambient exposure. People prefer to spend more time at home both in winter (P<0.05) and on weekends (P<0.001), less time outdoors in winter but more on weekends (P<0.001). Gender, education and living alone are negative associated with time spent home, while age, children at home and employment status are positively related. On the other hand, due to lack of monitoring stations in unban Suzhou, the inverse distance squared weighting method is not ideally performed and may be less

  20. delta-Aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, urinary delta-aminolevulinic acid concentration and zinc protoporphyrin level among people with low level of lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Zhao, Huan-hu; Chen, Jian-wei; Hao, Qiao-ling; Gu, Kang-ding; Zhu, Ye-xiang; Zhou, Yi-kai; Ye, Lin-xiang

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity, urinary delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALAU) level and blood zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentration to low blood lead (PbB) levels, these biomarkers were determined for all subjects enrolled from a rural area of southeast China where people had low levels of exposure to lead. The mean values of PbB, ALAD, ALAU and ZPP were 67.11 microg/L (SD: 1.654, range: 10.90-514.04), 339.66 nmol ml(-1)h(-1) (1.419, 78.33-793.13), 20.64 microg/L (1.603, 2.00-326.00), and 0.14 micromol/L (3.437, 0.01-2.26), respectively. ALAD was inversely associated with low levels of PbB. ZPP was inversely related to low levels of PbB but positively related to relatively higher levels of PbB. Alcohol drinking contributed to low ALAD in men. Women had higher ZPP than men. ALAU had no significant association with PbB. In conclusion, ALAD possibly has a non-linear relation with low to moderate levels of PbB. At moderate levels of PbB, ZPP increases with increasing levels of PbB. ALAU is not suitable as an indicator for low levels of lead exposure. PMID:19733117

  1. Plasticity of photoreceptor-generating retinal progenitors revealed by prolonged retinoic acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retinoic acid (RA) is important for vertebrate eye morphogenesis and is a regulator of photoreceptor development in the retina. In the zebrafish, RA treatment of postmitotic photoreceptor precursors has been shown to promote the differentiation of rods and red-sensitive cones while inhibiting the differentiation of blue- and UV-sensitive cones. The roles played by RA and its receptors in modifying photoreceptor fate remain to be determined. Results Treatment of zebrafish embryos with RA, beginning at the time of retinal progenitor cell proliferation and prior to photoreceptor terminal mitosis, resulted in a significant alteration of rod and cone mosaic patterns, suggesting an increase in the production of rods at the expense of red cones. Quantitative pattern analyses documented increased density of rod photoreceptors and reduced local spacing between rod cells, suggesting rods were appearing in locations normally occupied by cone photoreceptors. Cone densities were correspondingly reduced and cone photoreceptor mosaics displayed expanded and less regular spacing. These results were consistent with replacement of approximately 25% of positions normally occupied by red-sensitive cones, with additional rods. Analysis of embryos from a RA-signaling reporter line determined that multiple retinal cell types, including mitotic cells and differentiating rods and cones, are capable of directly responding to RA. The RA receptors RXRγ and RARαb are expressed in patterns consistent with mediating the effects of RA on photoreceptors. Selective knockdown of RARαb expression resulted in a reduction in endogenous RA signaling in the retina. Knockdown of RARαb also caused a reduced production of rods that was not restored by simultaneous treatments with RA. Conclusions These data suggest that developing retinal cells have a dynamic sensitivity to RA during retinal neurogenesis. In zebrafish RA may influence the rod vs. cone cell fate decision. The RARαb receptor

  2. Effects of developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on long bone morphology and bone cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Koskela, A; Finnilä, M A; Korkalainen, M; Spulber, S; Koponen, J; Håkansson, H; Tuukkanen, J; Viluksela, M

    2016-06-15

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a ubiquitous and persistent environmental chemical, which has been used extensively due to its stability and surface tension-lowering properties. Toxicological effects include induction of neonatal mortality and reproductive toxicity. In this study, pregnant C57BL/6 mice were exposed orally to 0.3mg PFOA/kg/day throughout pregnancy, and female offspring were studied at the age of 13 or 17months. Morphometrical and biomechanical properties of femurs and tibias were analyzed with micro-computed tomography and 3-point bending, and bone PFOA concentrations were determined by mass spectrometry. The effects of PFOA on bone cell differentiation were studied in osteoclasts from C57BL/6 mice and in the MC3T3 pre-osteoblast cell line. PFOA exposed mice showed increased femoral periosteal area as well as decreased mineral density of tibias. Biomechanical properties of these bones were not affected. Bone PFOA concentrations were clearly elevated even at the age of 17months. In osteoblasts, low concentrations of PFOA increased osteocalcin (OCN) expression and calcium secretion, but at PFOA concentrations of 100μM and above osteocalcin (OCN) expression and calcium secretion were decreased. The number of osteoclasts was increased at all PFOA concentrations tested and resorption activity dose-dependently increased from 0.1-1.0μM, but decreased at higher concentrations. The results show that PFOA accumulates in bone and is present in bones until the old age. PFOA has the potential to influence bone turnover over a long period of time. Therefore bone is a target tissue for PFOA, and altered bone geometry and mineral density seem to persist throughout the life of the animal. PMID:27068293

  3. Urinary Tetrabromobenzoic Acid (TBBA) as a Biomarker of Exposure to the Flame Retardant Mixture Firemaster® 550

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kate; Fang, Mingliang; Horman, Brian; Patisaul, Heather B.; Garantziotis, Stavros; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Firemaster® 550 (FM550) is commonly added to residential furniture to reduce its flammability. Recent toxicological evidence suggests that FM550 may be endocrine disrupting and obesogenic. Objectives: Our objectives were to develop methods to assess exposure to FM550 in human populations and to identify potential routes of exposure. Methods: Using mass spectrometry methods, we developed a method to measure 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA), a urinary metabolite of the major brominated FM550 component 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB). The method was applied to a cohort of adult volunteers (n = 64). Participants completed questionnaires, provided urine and handwipe samples, and collected dust samples from their homes. We measured TBB and the other major brominated FM550 component, bis(2-ethylhexyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), in paired dust and handwipe samples. Results: TBBA was detected in 72.4% of urine samples. Although TBBA is a rapidly formed metabolite, analyses indicated moderate temporal reliability (interclass correlation coefficient = 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.46, 0.66). TBB and TBPH were detected frequently in dust samples [geometric mean (GM) = 315.1 and 364.7 ng/g, respectively] and in handwipes (GM = 31.4 and 23.4 ng, respectively). Levels of TBB and TBPH in dust were positively correlated with levels in handwipes. In addition, levels of TBB in handwipes were positively correlated with urinary TBBA. Results suggest frequent hand washing may reduce the mass of TBB on participants’ hands and reduce urinary TBBA levels. Conclusions: Cumulatively, our data indicate that exposures to FM550 are widespread and that the home environment may be an important source of exposure. Urinary TBBA provides a potentially useful biomarker of FM550 exposure for epidemiologic studies. Citation: Hoffman K, Fang M, Horman B, Patisaul HB, Garantziotis S, Birnbaum LS, Stapleton HM. 2014. Urinary tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) as a

  4. [Detection of N-acetylneuraminic acid with long-time application of hormonal contraceptives (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Kunstmann, F W; Stelzner, A

    1981-01-01

    The total level of N-acetylneuraminic acid in serum was found to be affected by long-time application of hormonal contraceptives. That effect appeared to depend on oestrogen. The problem of reversibility is discussed. PMID:7053175

  5. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Pilot, T.F.; Meany, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

  6. Balancing the benefits of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risks of methylmercury exposure from fish consumption

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffey, Kathryn R; Sunderland, Elsie M; Chan, Hing Man; Choi, Anna L; Grandjean, Philippe; Mariën, Koenraad; Oken, Emily; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Schoeny, Rita; Weihe, Pál; Yan, Chong-Huai; Yasutake, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Fish and shellfish are widely available foods that provide important nutrients, particularly n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), to many populations globally. These nutrients, especially docosahexaenoic acid, confer benefits to brain and visual system development in infants and reduce risks of certain forms of heart disease in adults. However, fish and shellfish can also be a major source of methylmercury (MeHg), a known neurotoxicant that is particularly harmful to fetal brain development. This review documents the latest knowledge on the risks and benefits of seafood consumption for perinatal development of infants. It is possible to choose fish species that are both high in n-3 PUFAs and low in MeHg. A framework for providing dietary advice for women of childbearing age on how to maximize the dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs while minimizing MeHg exposures is suggested. PMID:21884130

  7. Plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid after oral ingestion of plain and buffered acetylsalicylic acid in relation to bleeding time and thrombocyte function.

    PubMed

    Proost, J H; Van Imhoff, G W; Wesseling, H

    1983-02-25

    Buffered acetylsalicylic acid (Alka Seltzer, B-ASA) and plain aspirin (P-ASA) tablets were compared as to their effects on bleeding time and platelet function in eight healthy male volunteers. Two doses (500 and 1000 mg) of each preparation were investigated in a cross-over design, each volunteer being his own control in each dose group (n=4). Both preparations disturbed platelet aggregation to the same extent. Bleeding time increased after both preparations, though significantly more after the buffered preparation than after plain acetylsalicylic acid, irrespective of the dosage. The 1000 mg dose prolonged bleeding time significantly more than the 500 mg dose, irrespective of the preparation. Kinetic analysis showed that B-ASA gave higher peak plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and accordingly salicylic acid peak levels were also higher after the buffered preparation. It is concluded that B-ASA in equi-analgesic doses prolongs bleeding time more than the plain preparation. Since it is less agressive on the gastro-intestinal mucosa, its use may be advantageous in situations where acetylsalicylic acid induced loss of platelet aggregation is desired. However, the risk of prolonged bleeding--e.g. after tooth extractions--is probably higher after the buffered preparation. PMID:6844122

  8. Oleic acid exposure of cultured endothelial cells alters lipid mediator production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel, biodiesel, and other combustion sources contain free fatty acid (FFA) components capable of entering the body through particulate inhalation. FFA can also be endogenously released into circulation in response to stress. When in circulation, bioactive FFA may interact with...

  9. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID (PFOA) AFTER CROSS FOSTER AND RESTRICTED GESTATIONAL EXPOSURES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a compound which persists and is found ubiquitously in the environment, wildlife and humans. PFOA affects growth, development and viability of offspring of mice exposed during pregnancy. This study segregates the contributions of gestational and...

  10. Effect of citric acid concentration and hydrolysis time on physicochemical properties of sweet potato starches.

    PubMed

    Surendra Babu, Ayenampudi; Parimalavalli, Ramanathan; Rudra, Shalini Gaur

    2015-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of citric acid treated sweet potato starches were investigated in the present study. Sweet potato starch was hydrolyzed using citric acid with different concentrations (1 and 5%) and time periods (1 and 11 h) at 45 °C and was denoted as citric acid treated starch (CTS1 to CTS4) based on their experimental conditions. The recovery yield of acid treated starches was above 85%. The CTS4 sample displayed the highest amylose (around 31%) and water holding capacity its melting temperature was 47.66 °C. The digestibility rate was slightly increased for 78.58% for the CTS3 and CTS4. The gel strength of acid modified starches ranged from 0.27 kg to 1.11 kg. RVA results of acid thinned starches confirmed a low viscosity profile. CTS3 starch illustrated lower enthalpy compared to all other modified starches. All starch samples exhibited a shear-thinning behavior. SEM analysis revealed that the extent of visible degradation was increased at higher hydrolysis time and acid concentration. The CTS3 satisfied the criteria required for starch to act as a fat mimetic. Overall results conveyed that the citric acid treatment of sweet potato starch with 5% acid concentration and 11h period was an ideal condition for the preparation of a fat replacer. PMID:26188303

  11. Effects of environmental hypercapnia and metal (Cd and Cu) exposure on acid-base and metal homeostasis of marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Ivanina, Anna V; Hawkins, Chelsea; Beniash, Elia; Sokolova, Inna M

    2015-01-01

    Elevated CO2 levels reduce seawater pH and may affect bioavailability of trace metals in estuaries. We studied the interactive effects of common metal pollutants (50 μg l(-1) Cd or Cu) and PCO2 (~395, 800 and 2000 μatm) on metal levels, intracellular pH, expression of metal binding proteins and stress biomarkers in estuarine bivalves Crassostrea virginica (oysters) and Mercenaria mercenaria (hard clams). Cd (but not Cu or hypercapnia) exposure affected the acid-base balance of hemocytes resulting in elevated intracellular pH. Cd and Cu exposure led to the increase in the tissue metal burdens, and metal accumulation was reduced by elevated PCO2 in the mantle but not hemocytes. No change was found in the intracellular free Cd(2+), Cu(2+) or Fe(2+) during Cu or Cd exposure indicating that these metals are bound to intracellular ligands. Free Zn(2+) content in oyster hemocytes was suppressed by Cd and Cu exposure and below the detection limits in clam hemocytes, which went hand-in-hand with the elevated mRNA expression of metallothioneins and ferritin in Cd- and Cu-exposed bivalves, enhanced by hypercapnia. The metal-binding and antioxidant mechanisms of oysters and clams were sufficient to effectively maintain intracellular redox status, even though metal exposure combined with moderate hypercapnia (~800 μatm PCO2) led to the elevated production of reactive oxygen species in hemocytes. Overall, while hypercapnia modulates metal accumulation, binding capacity and oxidative stress in estuarine bivalves, the physiological effects of elevated CO2 are mild compared to the effects of other common stressors. PMID:26008775

  12. The acute and sub-chronic exposures of goldfish to naphthenic acids induce different host defense responses.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Mariel O; Garcia-Garcia, Erick; Oladiran, Ayoola; Karpman, Matthew; Mitchell, Scott; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal; Martin, Jonathan W; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2012-03-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are believed to be the major toxic component in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) produced by the oil sands mining industry in Northern Alberta, Canada. We recently reported that oral exposure to NAs alters mammalian immune responses, but the effect of OSPW or NAs on the immune mechanisms of aquatic organisms has not been fully elucidated. We analyzed the effects of acute and sub-chronic NAs exposures on goldfish immune responses by measuring the expression of three pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, antimicrobial functions of macrophages, and host defense after challenge with a protozoan pathogen (Trypanosoma carassii). One week after NAs exposure, fish exhibited increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, IL-1β1, TNF-α2) in the gills, kidney and spleen. Primary macrophages from fish exposed to NAs for one week, exhibited increased production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates. Goldfish exposed for one week to 20 mg/L NAs were more resistant to infection by T. carassii. In contrast, sub-chronic exposure of goldfish (12 weeks) to NAs resulted in decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the gills, kidney and spleen. The sub-chronic exposure to NAs reduced the ability of goldfish to control the T. carassii infection, exemplified by a drastic increase in fish mortality and increased blood parasite loads. This is the first report analyzing the effects of OSPW contaminants on the immune system of aquatic vertebrates. We believe that the bioassays depicted in this work will be valuable tools for analyzing the efficacy of OSPW remediation techniques and assessment of diverse environmental pollutants. PMID:22227375

  13. Valproic acid exposure decreases Cbp/p300 protein expression and histone acetyltransferase activity in P19 cells.

    PubMed

    Lamparter, Christina L; Winn, Louise M

    2016-09-01

    The teratogenicity of the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) is well established and its inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDAC) is proposed as an initiating factor. Recently, VPA-mediated HDAC inhibition was demonstrated to involve transcriptional downregulation of histone acetyltransferases (HATs), which was proposed to compensate for the increased acetylation resulting from HDAC inhibition. Cbp and p300 are HATs required for embryonic development and deficiencies in either are associated with congenital malformations and embryolethality. The objective of the present study was to characterize Cbp/p300 following VPA exposure in P19 cells. Consistent with previous studies, exposure to 5mM VPA over 24h induced a moderate decrease in Cbp/p300 mRNA, which preceded a strong decrease in total cellular protein mediated by ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. Nuclear Cbp/p300 protein was also decreased following VPA exposure, although to a lesser extent. Total cellular and nuclear p300 HAT activity was reduced proportionately to p300 protein levels, however while total cellular HAT activity also decreased, nuclear HAT activity was unaffected. Using the Cbp/p300 HAT inhibitor C646, we demonstrated that HAT inhibition similarly affected many of the same endpoints as VPA, including increased reactive oxygen species and caspase-3 cleavage, the latter of which could be attenuated by pre-treatment with the antioxidant catalase. C646 exposure also decreased NF-κB/p65 protein, which was not due to reduced mRNA and was not attenuated with catalase pre-treatment. This study provides support for an adaptive HAT response following VPA exposure and suggests that reduced Cbp/p300 HAT activity could contribute to VPA-mediated alterations. PMID:27381264

  14. Continuous Taurocholic Acid Exposure Promotes Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression Due to Reduced Cell Loss Resulting from Enhanced Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Sho; Yamamoto, Hiroto; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Saito, Shota; Hattori, Takanori; Yamamoto, Gaku; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Refluxogenic effects of smoking and alcohol abuse may be related to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The present study attempts to clarify the effects of continuous taurocholic acid (TCA) exposure, which is neither mutagenic nor genotoxic, on ESCC progression. Methods A squamous carcinoma cell line (ESCC-DR) was established from a tumor induced in a rat model of gastroduodenal reflux. ESCC-DR cells were incubated with 2 mM TCA for ≥2 months. The effects of continuous TCA exposure were evaluated in vitro on cell morphology, growth, and invasion and in vivo on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, the mean level of secreted transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins in cell culture supernatants and mRNA synthesis of TGF-β1 and VEGF-A of ESCC cells were measured. The angiogenic potential was further examined by a migration assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results Continuous TCA exposure induced marked formation of filopodia in vitro. Expression levels of angiogenic factors were significantly higher in the cells treated with TCA than in control cells. Tumor xenografts derived from cells pre-exposed to TCA were larger and more vascularized than those derived from control cells. In addition, TCA exposure increased HUVEC migration. Conclusion Continuous TCA exposure enhanced ESCC progression due to reduced cell loss in vivo. Cell loss was inhibited by TCA-induced vascular endothelial cell migration, which was mediated by TGF-β1 and VEGF-A released from ESCC cells. PMID:24551170

  15. Perturbations in polar lipids, starvation survival and reproduction following exposure to unsaturated fatty acids or environmental toxicants in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Namrata; Gerard, Patrick D; Baldwin, William S

    2016-02-01

    Acclimating to toxicant stress is energy expensive. In laboratory toxicology tests dietary conditions are ideal, but not in natural environments where nutrient resources vary in quality and quantity. We compared the effects of additional lipid resources, docosahexaenoic acid (n-3; DHA) or linoleic acid (n-6; LA), or the effects of the toxicants, atrazine or triclosan on post-treatment starvation survival, reproduction, and lipid profiles. Chemical exposure prior to starvation had chemical-specific effects as DHA showed moderately beneficial effects on starvation survival and all of the other chemicals showed adverse effects on either survival or reproduction. Surprisingly, pre-exposure to triclosan inhibits adult maturation and in turn completely blocks reproduction during the starvation phase. The two HR96 activators tested, atrazine and LA adversely reduce post-reproduction survival 70% during starvation and in turn show poor fecundity. DHA and LA show distinctly different lipid profiles as DHA primarily increases the percentage of large (>37 carbon) phosphatidylcholine (PC) species and LA primarily increases the percentage of smaller (<37 carbon) PC species. The toxicants atrazine and triclosan moderately perturb a large number of different phospholipids including several phosphatidylethanolamine species. Some of these polar lipid species may be biomarkers for diets rich in specific fatty acids or toxicant classes. Overall our data demonstrates that toxicants can perturb lipid utilization and storage in daphnids in a chemical specific manner, and different chemicals can produce distinct polar lipid profiles. In summary, biological effects caused by fatty acids and toxicants are associated with changes in the production and use of lipids. PMID:26606184

  16. PROBLEMS IN THE ESTIMATION OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO COMPONENTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION PRECURSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problems associated with estimation of human exposures to ambient air pollution are discussed. Ideally the authors would prefer to have some indication of actual dose. For most pollutants this is not presently feasible. Specific problems discussed are adequacy of outdoor monitors...

  17. Real time non invasive imaging of fatty acid uptake in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Henkin, Amy H.; Cohen, Allison S.; Dubikovskaya, Elena A.; Park, Hyo Min; Nikitin, Gennady F.; Auzias, Mathieu G.; Kazantzis, Melissa; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Stahl, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Detection and quantification of fatty acid fluxes in animal model systems following physiological, pathological, or pharmacological challenges is key to our understanding of complex metabolic networks as these macronutrients also activate transcription factors and modulate signaling cascades including insulin-sensitivity. To enable non-invasive, real-time, spatiotemporal quantitative imaging of fatty acid fluxes in animals, we created a bioactivatable molecular imaging probe based on long-chain fatty acids conjugated to a reporter molecule (luciferin). We show that this probe faithfully recapitulates cellular fatty acid uptake and can be used in animal systems as a valuable tool to localize and quantitate in real-time lipid fluxes such as intestinal fatty acid absorption and brown adipose tissue activation. This imaging approach should further our understanding of basic metabolic processes and pathological alterations in multiple disease models. PMID:22928772

  18. Assessing the survival of MRC5 and a549 cell lines upon exposure to pyruvic Acid, sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Farah, Ibrahim O; Lewis, Veshell L; Ayensu, Wellington K; Cameron, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is among the most prevalent and deadly cancers in United States. In general, cancer cells are known to exhibit higher rates of glycolysis in comparison to normal cells. In attempting to exploit this unique cancer-dependent ATP generation phenomenon, it was our hypothesis that upon exposure to organic inhibitors of glycolysis, cancer cells would not survive normally and that their growth and viability would be vastly decreased; essential glycolytic ATP production will be exhausted to the point of collapsing energy utilization. Furthermore, we hypothesize that no negative effect would be seen with exposures to organic inhibitors for normal lung cells. The human lung fibroblast MRC-5 and the human A549 alveolar epithelial cell lines were used as in vitro models of normal lung and lung cancers respectively. Using standard methods, both cell lines were maintained and exposed to pyruvic acid, sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate reagents at concentration levels ranging from 31.3-2,000 µg/ml in 96 well plates in quadruplets and experiments repeated at least three times using MTT, and cell counting (T4 Cellometer) assays as well as phase-contrast photo-imaging for parallel morphological displays of any changes in the course of their vitality and metabolic activities. Our results indicate that exposure of both cell lines to these organics resulted in concentration dependent cell destruction/cell survival depending on the cell line exposed. Pyruvic acid, sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate showed statistically significant (p<0.05) differential negative effects on the A549 cell line in comparison to its unexposed control as well as to their effects on the MRC-5 cell line, presenting a potential promise for their use as cancer biotherapeutics. PMID:23686189

  19. The effects of nitric acid and silane surface treatments on carbon fibers and carbon/vinyl ester composites before and after seawater exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, Tye A.

    in dry transverse tensile strength over the untreated fibers, but the oxidized fiber composites lost strength as the acid treatment time was extended, due to poor wetting. The acid/silane treated composites lost some transverse tensile strength after seawater exposure, but the nitric acid oxidized fiber composites appeared to be more seawater durable.

  20. Exposure-time based modeling of nonlinear reactive transport in porous media subject to physical and geochemical heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Amos, Richard T; Finkel, Michael; Blowes, David W; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2016-09-01

    Transport of reactive solutes in groundwater is affected by physical and chemical heterogeneity of the porous medium, leading to complex spatio-temporal patterns of concentrations and reaction rates. For certain cases of bioreactive transport, it could be shown that the concentrations of reactive constituents in multi-dimensional domains are approximately aligned with isochrones, that is, lines of identical travel time, provided that the chemical properties of the matrix are uniform. We extend this concept to combined physical and chemical heterogeneity by additionally considering the time that a water parcel has been exposed to reactive materials, the so-called exposure time. We simulate bioreactive transport in a one-dimensional domain as function of time and exposure time, rather than space. Subsequently, we map the concentrations to multi-dimensional heterogeneous domains by means of the mean exposure time at each location in the multi-dimensional domain. Differences in travel and exposure time at a given location are accounted for as time difference. This approximation simplifies reactive-transport simulations significantly under conditions of steady-state flow when reactions are restricted to specific locations. It is not expected to be exact in realistic applications because the underlying assumption, such as neglecting transverse mixing altogether, may not hold. We quantify the error introduced by the approximation for the hypothetical case of a two-dimensional, binary aquifer made of highly-permeable, non-reactive and low-permeable, reactive materials releasing dissolved organic matter acting as electron donor for aerobic respiration and denitrification. The kinetically controlled reactions are catalyzed by two non-competitive bacteria populations, enabling microbial growth. Even though the initial biomass concentrations were uniform, the interplay between transport, non-uniform electron-donor supply, and bio-reactions led to distinct spatial patterns of

  1. Exposure-time based modeling of nonlinear reactive transport in porous media subject to physical and geochemical heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Amos, Richard T.; Finkel, Michael; Blowes, David W.; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2016-09-01

    Transport of reactive solutes in groundwater is affected by physical and chemical heterogeneity of the porous medium, leading to complex spatio-temporal patterns of concentrations and reaction rates. For certain cases of bioreactive transport, it could be shown that the concentrations of reactive constituents in multi-dimensional domains are approximately aligned with isochrones, that is, lines of identical travel time, provided that the chemical properties of the matrix are uniform. We extend this concept to combined physical and chemical heterogeneity by additionally considering the time that a water parcel has been exposed to reactive materials, the so-called exposure time. We simulate bioreactive transport in a one-dimensional domain as function of time and exposure time, rather than space. Subsequently, we map the concentrations to multi-dimensional heterogeneous domains by means of the mean exposure time at each location in the multi-dimensional domain. Differences in travel and exposure time at a given location are accounted for as time difference. This approximation simplifies reactive-transport simulations significantly under conditions of steady-state flow when reactions are restricted to specific locations. It is not expected to be exact in realistic applications because the underlying assumption, such as neglecting transverse mixing altogether, may not hold. We quantify the error introduced by the approximation for the hypothetical case of a two-dimensional, binary aquifer made of highly-permeable, non-reactive and low-permeable, reactive materials releasing dissolved organic matter acting as electron donor for aerobic respiration and denitrification. The kinetically controlled reactions are catalyzed by two non-competitive bacteria populations, enabling microbial growth. Even though the initial biomass concentrations were uniform, the interplay between transport, non-uniform electron-donor supply, and bio-reactions led to distinct spatial patterns of

  2. Alteration of brain levels of neurotransmitters and amino acids in male F344 rats induced by three-week repeated inhalation exposure to 1-bromopropane.

    PubMed

    Suda, Megumi; Honma, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Muneyuki; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of 1-bromopropane (1BP) on brain neuroactive substances of rats to determine the extent of its toxicity to the central nervous system (CNS). We measured the changes in neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, catecholamine, serotonin and amino acids) and their metabolites or precursors in eight brain regions after inhalation exposure to 1BP at 50 to 1,000 ppm for 8 h per day for 7 d per week for 3 wk. Rats were sacrificed at 2 h (Case 1), or at 19 h (Case 2) after the end of exposure. In Case 1, the level of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) was lowered in some brain regions by 1BP exposure. The decrease of 5HIAA in the frontal cortex was statistically significant at 50 ppm 1BP exposure. In Case 2, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) and taurine were decreased in many brain regions of exposed rats, and a significant decrease of taurine in the midbrain occurred at 50 ppm 1BP exposure. In both cases of 2-h and 19-h intervals from the end of exposure to sacrifice, aspartate and glutamine levels were elevated in many brain regions, but the acetylcholine level did not change in any brain region. Three-week repeated exposure to 1BP produced significantly changes in amino acid contents of rat brains, particularly at 1,000 ppm. PMID:18716383

  3. High-time resolution and size-segregated elemental composition in high-intensity pyrotechnic exposures.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F; Lucarelli, Franco; Nava, Silvia; Chiari, Massimo; Calzolai, Giulia

    2012-11-30

    Typical of festivals in Eastern Spain, mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events where thousands of firecrackers are burnt in an intense, rapid episode that generates short-lived heavy aerosol clouds. High temporal resolution and size distribution characterisation of aerosol components were performed to evaluate the effects of the brief (<30 min) and acute exposure on the spectators present. Very high concentrations of firework specific elements, especially in the fine fraction, were reached during mascletàs, with values of about 500 μg/m(3) for K and 300 μg/m(3) for Cl. Sr, Al, Mg, Ba, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb concentration increase factors of more than 100 (1000 for Sr and Ba) were observed in the fine fraction with respect to background levels. Crustal origin elements, like Ca, Fe, Si, Ti, also showed an important concentration rise (~10 times above background levels) but this is due to dust resuspension by pyrotechnic explosions. The crustal components are mainly in the coarse mode (>90% elemental mass), between 2 and 3 μm. Most firework related metals are concentrated in the submicrometric region (>80%) with a trimodal size distribution. This may be interesting to epidemiologists given the toxic effects that such fine, metal-rich particles can have on human health. PMID:23026448

  4. Efficient space-time sampling with pixel-wise coded exposure for high-speed imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dengyu; Gu, Jinwei; Hitomi, Yasunobu; Gupta, Mohit; Mitsunaga, Tomoo; Nayar, Shree K

    2014-02-01

    Cameras face a fundamental trade-off between spatial and temporal resolution. Digital still cameras can capture images with high spatial resolution, but most high-speed video cameras have relatively low spatial resolution. It is hard to overcome this trade-off without incurring a significant increase in hardware costs. In this paper, we propose techniques for sampling, representing, and reconstructing the space-time volume to overcome this trade-off. Our approach has two important distinctions compared to previous works: 1) We achieve sparse representation of videos by learning an overcomplete dictionary on video patches, and 2) we adhere to practical hardware constraints on sampling schemes imposed by architectures of current image sensors, which means that our sampling function can be implemented on CMOS image sensors with modified control units in the future. We evaluate components of our approach, sampling function and sparse representation, by comparing them to several existing approaches. We also implement a prototype imaging system with pixel-wise coded exposure control using a liquid crystal on silicon device. System characteristics such as field of view and modulation transfer function are evaluated for our imaging system. Both simulations and experiments on a wide range of scenes show that our method can effectively reconstruct a video from a single coded image while maintaining high spatial resolution. PMID:24356347

  5. Performance of a 512 x 512 Gated CMOS Imager with a 250 ps Exposure Time

    SciTech Connect

    Teruya, A T; Moody, J D; Hsing, W W; Brown, C G; Griffin, M; Mead, A S; Tran, V

    2012-10-01

    We describe the performance of a 512x512 gated CMOS read out integrated circuit (ROIC) with a 250 ps exposure time. A low-skew, H-tree trigger distribution system is used to locally generate individual pixel gates in each 8x8 neighborhood of the ROIC. The temporal width of the gate is voltage controlled and user selectable via a precision potentiometer. The gating implementation was first validated in optical tests of a 64x64 pixel prototype ROIC developed as a proof-of-concept during the early phases of the development program. The layout of the H-Tree addresses each quadrant of the ROIC independently and admits operation of the ROIC in two modes. If “common mode” triggering is used, the camera provides a single 512x512 image. If independent triggers are used, the camera can provide up to four 256x256 images with a frame separation set by the trigger intervals. The ROIC design includes small (sub-pixel) optical photodiode structures to allow test and characterization of the ROIC using optical sources prior to bump bonding. Reported test results were obtained using short pulse, second harmonic Ti:Sapphire laser systems operating at λ~ 400 nm at sub-ps pulse widths.

  6. Performance of a 512 x 512 gated CMOS imager with a 250 ps exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teruya, Alan T.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Moody, James D.; Hsing, Warren W.; Brown, Christopher G.; Griffin, Matthew; Mead, Andrew S.; Tran, Vu

    2012-10-01

    We describe the performance of a 512x512 gated CMOS read out integrated circuit (ROIC) with a 250 ps exposure time. A low-skew, H-tree trigger distribution system is used to locally generate individual pixel gates in each 8x8 neighborhood of the ROIC. The temporal width of the gate is voltage controlled and user selectable via a precision potentiometer. The gating implementation was first validated in optical tests of a 64x64 pixel prototype ROIC developed as a proof-of-concept during the early phases of the development program. The layout of the H-Tree addresses each quadrant of the ROIC independently and admits operation of the ROIC in two modes. If "common mode" triggering is used, the camera provides a single 512x512 image. If independent triggers are used, the camera can provide up to four 256x256 images with a frame separation set by the trigger intervals. The ROIC design includes small (sub-pixel) optical photodiode structures to allow test and characterization of the ROIC using optical sources prior to bump bonding. Reported test results were obtained using short pulse, second harmonic Ti:Sapphire laser systems operating at λ~ 400 nm at sub-ps pulse widths.

  7. Application of MOSFET detectors for dosimetry in small animal radiography using short exposure times.

    PubMed

    De Lin, Ming; Toncheva, Greta; Nguyen, Giao; Kim, Sangroh; Anderson-Evans, Colin; Johnson, G Allan; Yoshizumi, Terry T

    2008-08-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) X-ray imaging for small animals can be used for functional phenotyping given its ability to capture rapid physiological changes at high spatial and temporal resolution. The higher temporal and spatial requirements for small-animal imaging drive the need for short, high-flux X-ray pulses. However, high doses of ionizing radiation can affect the physiology. The purpose of this study was to verify and apply metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology to dosimetry for small-animal diagnostic imaging. A tungsten anode X-ray source was used to expose a tissue-equivalent mouse phantom. Dose measurements were made on the phantom surface and interior. The MOSFETs were verified with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the MOSFET results agreed with the TLD results (bias, 0.0625). Using typical small animal DSA scan parameters, the dose ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 cGy. Application of the MOSFETs in the small animal environment provided two main benefits: (1) the availability of results in near real-time instead of the hours needed for TLD processes and (2) the ability to support multiple exposures with different X-ray techniques (various of kVp, mA and ms) using the same MOSFET. This MOSFET technology has proven to be a fast, reliable small animal dosimetry method for DSA imaging and is a good system for dose monitoring for serial and gene expression studies. PMID:18666818

  8. Application of MOSFET Detectors for Dosimetry in Small Animal Radiography Using Short Exposure Times

    PubMed Central

    De Lin, Ming; Toncheva, Greta; Nguyen, Giao; Kim, Sangroh; Anderson-Evans, Colin; Johnson, G. Allan; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2008-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) X-ray imaging for small animals can be used for functional phenotyping given its ability to capture rapid physiological changes at high spatial and temporal resolution. The higher temporal and spatial requirements for small-animal imaging drive the need for short, high-flux X-ray pulses. However, high doses of ionizing radiation can affect the physiology. The purpose of this study was to verify and apply metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology to dosimetry for small-animal diagnostic imaging. A tungsten anode X-ray source was used to expose a tissue-equivalent mouse phantom. Dose measurements were made on the phantom surface and interior. The MOSFETs were verified with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the MOSFET results agreed with the TLD results (bias, 0.0625). Using typical small animal DSA scan parameters, the dose ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 cGy. Application of the MOSFETs in the small animal environment provided two main benefits: (1) the availability of results in near real-time instead of the hours needed for TLD processes and (2) the ability to support multiple exposures with different X-ray techniques (various of kVp, mA and ms) using the same MOSFET. This MOSFET technology has proven to be a fast, reliable small animal dosimetry method for DSA imaging and is a good system for dose monitoring for serial and gene expression studies. PMID:18666818

  9. Variability of Sorafenib Toxicity and Exposure over Time: A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ropert, Stanislas; Mir, Olivier; Coriat, Romain; Billemont, Bertrand; Tod, Michel; Cabanes, Laure; Franck, Nathalie; Blanchet, Benoit; Goldwasser, François

    2012-01-01

    Background. Sorafenib displays major interpatient pharmacokinetic variability. It is unknown whether the pharmacokinetics of sorafenib influence its toxicity. Methods. We analyzed the severity and kinetics of sorafenib-induced toxicities in unselected consecutive patients with cancer, as well as their relationship with biological, clinical, and pharmacokinetic parameters. Toxicity was recorded bimonthly. Sorafenib plasma concentrations were assessed by liquid chromatography. Results. For 83 patients (median age, 62 years; range, 21–84 years), median sorafenib 12-hour area under the curve (AUC0–12) was 52.8 mg · h/L (range: 11.8–199.6). A total of 51 patients (61%) experienced grade 3–4 toxicities, including hand-foot skin reactions (23%), asthenia (18%), and diarrhea (11%). Sorafenib AUC0–12 preceding grade 3–4 toxicities was significantly higher than that observed in the remaining population (61.9 mg · h/L vs. 53 mg · h/L). In 25 patients treated with fixed doses of sorafenib for the first 4 months, median dose-normalized AUC0–12 on day 120 was significantly lower than on day 15 (63 vs. 102 mg · h/L). The incidence of hypertension and hand-foot skin reactions significantly decreased over time. Conclusion. Sorafenib AUC0–12 decreases over time, similarly to the incidence of hypertension and hand-foot skin reactions. Monitoring of sorafenib plasma concentrations may help to prevent acute severe toxicities and detect patients with suboptimal exposure at disease progression. PMID:22752067

  10. Exposure Time to Lethal Temperatures for Meloidogyne incognita Suppression and Its Implication for Soil Solarization.

    PubMed

    Wang, K-H; McSorley, R

    2008-03-01

    Meloidogyne incognita eggs or J2 were incubated in test tubes containing sand:peat mix and immersed in a water bath heated to 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44 and 45 degrees C for a series of time intervals. Controls were maintained at 22 degrees C. Nematodes surviving or hatching were collected from Baermann trays after three weeks of incubation. Regression analyses between percent survival or egg hatch and hours of heat treatment were performed for each temperature. Complete suppression of egg hatch required 389.8, 164.5, 32.9, 19.7 and 13.1 hours at 38, 39, 40, 41 and 42 degrees C, respectively. Complete killing of J2 required 47.9, 46.2, 17.5 and 13.8 hours at 39, 40, 41 and 42 degrees C, respectively. J2 were not completely killed at 38 degrees C within 40 hours of treatment, but were killed within one hour at 44 and 45 degrees C. Effect of temperature on nematode killing is not determined by heat units. Oscillating temperature between cool and warm did not interfere with the nematode suppressive effect by the heat treatment. Six-week solarization in the field during the summers of 2003 and 2004 in Florida accumulated heat exposure times in the top 15 cm of soil that surpassed levels required to kill M. incognita as determined in the water bath experiments. Although near zero M. incognita were detected right after solarization, the nematode population densities increased after a cycle of a susceptible pepper crop. Therefore, future research should address failure of solarization to kill nematodes in the deeper soil layers. PMID:19259512

  11. Exposure Time to Lethal Temperatures for Meloidogyne incognita Suppression and Its Implication for Soil Solarization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K.-H.; McSorley, R.

    2008-01-01

    Meloidogyne incognita eggs or J2 were incubated in test tubes containing sand:peat mix and immersed in a water bath heated to 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44 and 45°C for a series of time intervals. Controls were maintained at 22°C. Nematodes surviving or hatching were collected from Baermann trays after three weeks of incubation. Regression analyses between percent survival or egg hatch and hours of heat treatment were performed for each temperature. Complete suppression of egg hatch required 389.8, 164.5, 32.9, 19.7 and 13.1 hours at 38, 39, 40, 41 and 42°C, respectively. Complete killing of J2 required 47.9, 46.2, 17.5 and 13.8 hours at 39, 40, 41 and 42°C, respectively. J2 were not completely killed at 38°C within 40 hours of treatment, but were killed within one hour at 44 and 45°C. Effect of temperature on nematode killing is not determined by heat units. Oscillating temperature between cool and warm did not interfere with the nematode suppressive effect by the heat treatment. Six-week solarization in the field during the summers of 2003 and 2004 in Florida accumulated heat exposure times in the top 15 cm of soil that surpassed levels required to kill M. incognita as determined in the water bath experiments. Although near zero M. incognita were detected right after solarization, the nematode population densities increased after a cycle of a susceptible pepper crop. Therefore, future research should address failure of solarization to kill nematodes in the deeper soil layers. PMID:19259512

  12. A Cohort study evaluation of maternal PCB exposure related to time to pregnancy in daughters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) remain ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Developmental exposures are suspected to impact reproduction. Analysis of mixtures of PCBs may be problematic as components have a complex correlation structure, and along with limited sample sizes, standard regression strategies are problematic. We compared the results of a novel, empirical method to those based on categorization of PCB compounds by (1) hypothesized biological activity previously proposed and widely applied, and (2) degree of ortho- substitution (mono, di, tri), in a study of the relation of maternal serum PCBs and daughter’s time to pregnancy. Methods We measured PCBs in maternal serum samples collected in the early postpartum in 289 daughters in the Child Health and Development Studies birth cohort. We queried time to pregnancy in these daughters 28–31 years later. We applied a novel weighted quantile sum approach to find the bad-actor compounds in the PCB mixture found in maternal serum. The approach includes empirical estimation of the weights through a bootstrap step which accounts for the variation in the estimated weights. Results Bootstrap analyses indicated the dominant functionality groups associated with longer TTP were the dioxin-like, anti-estrogenic group (average weight, 22%) and PCBs not previously classified by biological activity (54%). In contrast, the unclassified PCBs were not important in the association with shorter TTP, where the anti-estrogenic groups and the PB-inducers group played a more important role (60% and 23%, respectively). The highly chlorinated PCBs (average weight, 89%) were mostly associated with longer TTP; in contrast, the degree of chlorination was less discriminating for shorter TTP. Finally, PCB 56 was associated with the strongest relationship with TTP with a weight of 47%. Conclusions Our empirical approach found some associations previously identified by two classification schemes, but also identified other

  13. The timing of embryonic exposure to elevated temperature alters stress endocrinology in domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Wilsterman, Kathryn; Mast, Andrew D; Luu, Thuyvan H; Haussmann, Mark F

    2015-02-01

    Patterns of glucocorticoid (GC) release in response to stimuli vary both among individuals and within individuals across their lifetime. While much work has focused on how the prenatal steroid environment can affect GC release, relatively little is known about how environmental parameters, such as incubation temperature affect GCs. We tested the hypothesis that variation and timing of elevated incubation temperature within the thermoneutral zone can alter the pattern of GC release. We incubated domestic chicken eggs (Gallus domesticus) at the optimal incubation temperature (37.5 °C) or at a slightly higher temperature (+1.1 °C) either early, late, or throughout incubation. At three weeks post-hatch, all birds were (i) exposed to a capture-restraint stress to measure stress-induced GC release (naïve). Three days following the naïve stressor, birds were (ii) exposed to a heat challenge, which was followed the next day by a second capture-restraint stress (post-heat challenge). Regardless of treatment, birds had similar patterns of GC release following the naïve stress series. However, during the post-heat challenge stress series, birds incubated at optimal temperatures increased their peak GC release. In contrast, birds exposed to slightly elevated temperatures for any period of development failed to increase peak GC release, and their specific response varied with timing of exposure to the elevated incubation temperature. Our results demonstrate that subtle variation in the embryonic environment, such as elevated incubation temperature within the thermoneutral zone, can impact the pattern of GC release of offspring. Further work is needed to understand the mechanisms underlying these changes and the relationship between fitness and environmentally-altered phenotypes. PMID:25623149

  14. Nephroprotective effect of date fruit extract against dichloroacetic acid exposure in adult rats.

    PubMed

    El Arem, Amira; Thouri, Amira; Zekri, Mouna; Saafi, Emna Behija; Ghrairi, Fatma; Zakhama, Abdelfattah; Achour, Lotfi

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of aqueous date extract (ADE) on dichloroacetic acid (DCA)-induced nephrotoxicity. In vitro, total phenolic content estimated in the ADE were 417.71mg gallic acid equivalents/100g fresh weights (FW), while total flavonoid and tannins contents were 285.23 and 73.65mg catechin equivalents/100g FW, respectively. The ADE has strong scavenging activity. Ferulic, caffeic and p-coumaric acids are the major's compounds. Nephrotoxicity was induced in male Wistar rats by the administration of 0.5 and 2g/L DCA as drinking water. Some of these rats received also by gavage ADE (4mL/kg) before the administration of DCA. After two months of experiment, DCA administration caused elevated levels of renal MDA, significant depletion of GSH levels, altered the antioxidant enzyme activities and deteriorated the renal functions as assessed by the increased plasma urea, uric acid and creatinine levels compared to control rats. The treatment with the ADE significantly normalized the increased plasma levels of creatinine, urea and uric acid, reduced the elevated MDA levels, significantly normalized the antioxidant enzyme activities and GSH level and restored the altered kidney histology in rats treated with DCA. Therefore, it was speculated that ADE protects rats from kidney damage through its antioxidant capacity. PMID:24394489

  15. Preliminary study on near-infrared spectroscopic measurement of urine hippuric acid for the screening of biological exposure index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamakoshi, Yasuhiro; Motoi, Kosuke; Yamakoshi, Takehiro; Yamakoshi, Ken-Ichi

    2008-10-01

    Biological Exposure Indices (BEIs) are reference for a chemical or its metabolite in the biological specimen. BEIs give guidelines for the evaluation of potential health hazards or for diagnosis of occupational illnesses. Among them, urine hippuric acid (HA) that is a metabolites of toluene is considered as the BEIs of toluene exposure for human and measured from workers using toluene. In this study, we attempted to develop a brief measurement of urine HA by using near-infrared spectroscopy. As the first step, water solutions of hippuric acid of several concentrations (0-250mg/dl) are measured. Afterward, artificial urines conditioned by adding glucose and urine to HA solutions were measured and analyzed. The solvents are optically measured within near infrared region (750-2500nm) obtaining optical absorption. Then, differential absorbance were calculated by subtraction of analyte absorbance from ion-exchange water absorbance and analyzed. As a result, for HA solutions, a calibration equation from absorbance in two wavelengths can be obtained by using multiple regression (R2=0.935). However, this calibration cannot provide a good estimation for artificial urines. Secondary, another calibration from three wavelengths was obtained and providing a good regression (R2=0.934). This result suggests that a brief urine constituents measurement using near-infrared spectroscopy can be developed.

  16. An ecological risk assessment of the exposure and effects of 2,4-D acid to rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Feltz, K.P.; Allert, A.L.; Sappington, L.C.; Nelson, K.J.; Valle, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous state and federal agencies are increasingly concerned with the rapid expansion of invasive, noxious weeds across the United States. Herbicides are frequently applied as weed control measures in forest and rangeland ecosystems that frequently overlap with critical habitats of threatened and endangered fish species. However, there is little published chronic toxicity data for herbicides and fish that can be used to assess ecological risk of herbicides in aquatic environments. We conducted 96-h flowthrough acute and 30-day chronic toxicity studies with swim-up larvae and juvenile rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss) exposed to the free acid form of 2,4-D. Juvenile rainbow trout were acutely sensitive to 2,4-D acid equivalent at 494 mg/L (95% confidence interval [CI] 334-668 mg/L; 96-h ALC50). Accelerated life-testing procedures, used to estimate chronic mortality from acute data, predicted that a 30-day exposure of juvenile rainbow trout to 2,4-D would result in 1% and 10% mortality at 260 and 343 mg/L, respectively. Swim-up larvae were chronically more sensitive than juveniles using growth as the measurement end point. The 30-day lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) of 2,4-D on growth of swim-up larvae was 108 mg/L, whereas the 30-day no observable effect concentration (NOEC) was 54 mg/L. The 30-day maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) of 2,4-D for rainbow trout, determined as the geometric mean of the NOEC and the LOEC, was 76 mg/L. The acute:chronic ratio was 6.5 (i.e., 494/76). We observed no chronic effects on growth of juvenile rainbow trout at the highest concentration tested (108 mg/L). Worst-case aquatic exposures to 2,4-D (4 mg/L) occur when the herbicide is directly applied to aquatic ecosystems for aquatic weed control and resulted in a 30-day safety factor of 19 based on the MATC for growth (i.e., 76/4). Highest nontarget aquatic exposures to 2,4-D applied following terrestrial use is calculated at 0.136 mg/L and resulted in a

  17. An ecological risk assessment of the exposure and effects of 2,4-D acid to rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Fairchild, J F; Feltz, K P; Allert, A L; Sappington, L C; Nelson, K J; Valle, J A

    2009-05-01

    Numerous state and federal agencies are increasingly concerned with the rapid expansion of invasive, noxious weeds across the United States. Herbicides are frequently applied as weed control measures in forest and rangeland ecosystems that frequently overlap with critical habitats of threatened and endangered fish species. However, there is little published chronic toxicity data for herbicides and fish that can be used to assess ecological risk of herbicides in aquatic environments. We conducted 96-h flowthrough acute and 30-day chronic toxicity studies with swim-up larvae and juvenile rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss) exposed to the free acid form of 2,4-D. Juvenile rainbow trout were acutely sensitive to 2,4-D acid equivalent at 494 mg/L (95% confidence interval [CI] 334-668 mg/L; 96-h ALC(50)). Accelerated life-testing procedures, used to estimate chronic mortality from acute data, predicted that a 30-day exposure of juvenile rainbow trout to 2,4-D would result in 1% and 10% mortality at 260 and 343 mg/L, respectively. Swim-up larvae were chronically more sensitive than juveniles using growth as the measurement end point. The 30-day lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) of 2,4-D on growth of swim-up larvae was 108 mg/L, whereas the 30-day no observable effect concentration (NOEC) was 54 mg/L. The 30-day maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) of 2,4-D for rainbow trout, determined as the geometric mean of the NOEC and the LOEC, was 76 mg/L. The acute:chronic ratio was 6.5 (i.e., 494/76). We observed no chronic effects on growth of juvenile rainbow trout at the highest concentration tested (108 mg/L). Worst-case aquatic exposures to 2,4-D (4 mg/L) occur when the herbicide is directly applied to aquatic ecosystems for aquatic weed control and resulted in a 30-day safety factor of 19 based on the MATC for growth (i.e., 76/4). Highest nontarget aquatic exposures to 2,4-D applied following terrestrial use is calculated at 0.136 mg/L and resulted in

  18. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)-induced liver lesions in two strains of mice following developmental exposures: PPARα is not required

    PubMed Central

    Filgo, Adam J.; Quist, Erin M.; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Brix, Amy E.; Kissling, Grace E.; Fenton, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoate acid (PFOA) is a ubiquitous pollutant that causes liver toxicity in rodents, a process believed to be dependent on peroxisome proliferation activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activation. Differences between humans and rodents have made the human relevance of some health effects caused by PFOA controversial. We analyzed liver toxicity at 18 months following gestational PFOA exposure in CD-1 and 129/Sv strains of mice and compared PFOA-induced effects between strains and in wild type (WT) and PPARα-knockout (KO) 129/Sv mice. Pregnant mice were exposed daily to doses (0.01–5mg/kg/BW) of PFOA from gestation days 1–17. The female offspring were necropsied at 18 months and liver sections underwent a full pathology review. Hepatocellular adenomas formed in PFOA-exposed PPARα-KO 129/Sv and CD-1 mice, and were absent in untreated controls from those groups and WT 129/Sv. Hepatocellular hypertrophy was significantly increased by PFOA exposure in CD-1 and an increased severity was found in WT 129/Sv mice. PFOA significantly increased non-neoplastic liver lesions in PPARα-KO mice (hepatocyte hypertrophy, bile duct hyperplasia and hematopoietic cell proliferation). Low dose gestational exposures to PFOA induced latent PPARα independent liver toxicity that was observed in aged mice. Evidence of liver toxicity in PPARα-KO mice warrants further investigation into PPARα independent pathways. PMID:25398757

  19. Human exposure assessment of silver and copper migrating from an antimicrobial nanocoated packaging material into an acidic food simulant.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Joseph Christopher; Kerry, Joseph P; Cruz-Romero, Malco; Azlin-Hasim, Shafrina; Morris, Michael; Cummins, Enda

    2016-09-01

    To examine the human exposure to a novel silver and copper nanoparticle (AgNP and CuNP)/polystyrene-polyethylene oxide block copolymer (PS-b-PEO) food packaging coating, the migration of Ag and Cu into 3% acetic acid (3% HAc) food simulant was assessed at 60 °C for 10 days. Significantly lower migration was observed for Ag (0.46 mg/kg food) compared to Cu (0.82 mg/kg food) measured by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In addition, no distinct population of AgNPs or CuNPs were observed in 3% HAc by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The predicted human exposure to Ag and Cu was used to calculate a margin of exposure (MOE) for ionic species of Ag and Cu, which indicated the safe use of the food packaging in a hypothetical scenario (e.g. as fruit juice packaging). While migration exceeded regulatory limits, the calculated MOE suggests current migration limits may be conservative for specific nano-packaging applications. PMID:27402098

  20. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  1. The efficacy of protoporphyrin as a predictive biomarker for lead exposure in canvasback ducks: effect of sample storage time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hohman, W.L.; Moore, J.L.; Smith, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    We used 363 blood samples collected from wild canvasback ducks (Aythya valisineria) at Catahoula Lake, Louisiana, U.S.A. to evaluate the effect of sample storage time on the efficacy of erythrocytic protoporphyrin as an indicator of lead exposure. The protoporphyrin concentration of each sample was determined by hematofluorometry within 5 min of blood collection and after refrigeration at 4 °C for 24 and 48 h. All samples were analyzed for lead by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Based on a blood lead concentration of ≥0.2 ppm wet weight as positive evidence for lead exposure, the protoporphyrin technique resulted in overall error rates of 29%, 20%, and 19% and false negative error rates of 47%, 29% and 25% when hematofluorometric determinations were made on blood at 5 min, 24 h, and 48 h, respectively. False positive error rates were less than 10% for all three measurement times. The accuracy of the 24-h erythrocytic protoporphyrin classification of blood samples as positive or negative for lead exposure was significantly greater than the 5-min classification, but no improvement in accuracy was gained when samples were tested at 48 h. The false negative errors were probably due, at least in part, to the lag time between lead exposure and the increase of blood protoporphyrin concentrations. False negatives resulted in an underestimation of the true number of canvasbacks exposed to lead, indicating that hematofluorometry provides a conservative estimate of lead exposure.

  2. Long-term exposure to nicotine markedly reduces kynurenic acid in rat brain - In vitro and ex vivo evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinska, Elzbieta; Kuc, Damian; Zgrajka, Wojciech; Turski, Waldemar A.; Dekundy, Andrzej

    2009-10-15

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a recognized broad-spectrum antagonist of excitatory amino acid receptors with a particularly high affinity for the glycine co-agonist site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex. KYNA is also a putative endogenous neuroprotectant. Recent studies show that KYNA strongly blocks {alpha}7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The present studies were aimed at assessing effects of acute and chronic nicotine exposure on KYNA production in rat brain slices in vitro and ex vivo. In brain slices, nicotine significantly increased KYNA formation at 10 mM but not at 1 or 5 mM. Different nAChR antagonists (dihydro-{beta}-erythroidine, methyllycaconitine and mecamylamine) failed to block the influence exerted by nicotine on KYNA synthesis in cortical slices in vitro. Effects of acute (1 mg/kg, i.p.), subchronic (10-day) and chronic (30-day) administration of nicotine in drinking water (100 {mu}g/ml) on KYNA brain content were evaluated ex vivo. Acute treatment with nicotine (1 mg/kg i.p.) did not affect KYNA level in rat brain. The subchronic exposure to nicotine in drinking water significantly increased KYNA by 43%, while chronic exposure to nicotine resulted in a reduction in KYNA by 47%. Co-administration of mecamylamine with nicotine in drinking water for 30 days reversed the effect exerted by nicotine on KYNA concentration in the cerebral cortex. The present results provide evidence for the hypothesis of reciprocal interaction between the nicotinic cholinergic system and the kynurenine pathway in the brain.

  3. Neonatal and fetal exposure to trans-fatty acid retards early growth and adiposity while adversely affecting glucose in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Kylie; Sajadian, Soraya; Jenkins, Kurt A.; Wilson, Martha D.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Wagner, Janice D.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2010-01-01

    Industrially produced trans fatty acids (TFAs) consumed in western diets are incorporated into maternal and fetal tissues, and are passed linearly to offspring via breast milk. We hypothesized that TFA exposure in utero and during lactation in infants would promote obesity and poor glycemic control as compared to unmodified fatty acids. We further hypothesized that in utero exposure alone may program for these outcomes in adulthood. To test this hypothesis we fed female C57/BL6 mice identical western diets that differed only in cis- or trans-isomers of C18:1 and then aimed to determine whether maternal transfer of TFAs through pregnancy and lactation alters growth, body composition and glucose metabolism. Mice were unexposed, exposed during pregnancy, during lactation, or throughout pregnancy and lactation to TFA. Body weight and composition (by computed tomography), and glucose metabolism we assessed at weaning and adulthood. TFA exposure through breast milk caused significant early growth retardation (p<0.001) and higher fasting glucose (p=0.01) but insulin sensitivity was not different. Elevated plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 in mice consuming TFA-enriched milk (p=0.02) may contribute to later catch-up growth, leanness and preserved peripheral insulin sensitivity observed in these mice. Mice exposed to TFA in utero underwent rapid early neonatal growth with TFA-free breast milk and had significantly impaired insulin sensitivity (p<0.05) and greater abdominal fat (p=0.01). We conclude that very early catch-up growth resulted in impaired peripheral insulin sensitivity in this model of diet-related fetal and neonatal programming. TFA surprisingly retarded growth and adiposity while still adversely affecting glucose metabolism. PMID:20650350

  4. Specific time of exposure during tadpole development influences biological effects of the insecticide carbaryl in green frogs (Lithobates clamitans).

    PubMed

    Boone, Michelle D; Hammond, S Austin; Veldhoen, Nik; Youngquist, Melissa; Helbing, Caren C

    2013-04-15

    The orchestration of anuran metamorphosis is initiated and integrated by thyroid hormones, which change dynamically during larval development and which may represent a target of disruption by environmental contaminants. Studies have found that some anurans experience increased rates of development when exposed to the insecticide carbaryl later in larval development, suggesting that this insecticide could affect thyroid hormone-associated biological pathways. However, the time in development when tadpoles are sensitive to insecticide exposure has not been clearly defined nor has the mechanism been tested. In two separate studies, we exposed recently hatched green frog (Lithobates clamitans) tadpoles to a single, three day carbaryl exposure in the laboratory at either 2, 4, 8, or 16 weeks post-hatching. We examined the impact of carbaryl exposure on mRNA abundance patterns in the brains of frogs following metamorphosis months after a single three day exposure (experiment 1) and in tadpole tails three days after exposure (experiment 2) using cDNA microarrays and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analyses. For tadpoles reared through metamorphosis, we measured tadpole growth and development, as well as time to, mass at, and survival to metamorphosis. Although carbaryl did not significantly impact tadpole development, metamorphosis, or survival, clear exposure-related alterations in both tail and brain transcript levels were evident when tadpoles were exposed to carbaryl, particularly in tadpoles exposed at weeks 8 and 16 post-hatching, indicating both short-term and long-term alterations in mRNA expression. These results indicate that carbaryl can have long-lasting effects on brain development when exposure occurs at sensitive developmental stages, which may have implications for animal fitness and function later in the life cycle. PMID:23399446

  5. PROSTATE CANCER: IS IT TIME TO EXPAND THE RESEARCH FOCUS TO EARLY-LIFE EXPOSURES?

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Colditz, Graham A.

    2013-01-01

    Preface Although the contribution of lifestyle and environment (non-genetic factors) to prostate carcinogenesis is indicated by international variation in prostate cancer occurrence and migration studies, no conclusive modifiable risk factors have been identified to date. One possible reason for this may be the dearth of epidemiological research on exposures experienced early-in-life when the immature prostate may be more susceptible to carcinogenic exposures. Herein, we motivate the study of early-life exposures, describe the small body of early-life research and its associated challenges, and point towards solutions for future research. PMID:23363989

  6. Health risk assessment of various metal(loid)s via multiple exposure pathways on children living near a typical lead-acid battery plant, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Suzhen; Duan, Xiaoli; Zhao, Xiuge; Wang, Beibei; Ma, Jin; Fan, Delong; Sun, Chengye; He, Bin; Wei, Fusheng; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-05-01

    Manufacture of lead-acid batteries is of widespread interest because of its emissions of heavy metals and metalloids into environment, harming environmental quality and consequently causing detrimental effects on human health. In this study, exposure pathways and health risks of children to heavy metal(loid)s (Pb, Cd, As, etc) were investigated based on field sampling and questionnaire. Pb was one of the most abundant elements in children's blood, with an elevated blood lead level of 12.45 μg dL(-1). Soil/dust and food were heavily polluted by targeted metal(loid)s. Food ingestion accounted for more than 80% of the total exposure for most metal(loid)s. The non-cancer risks to children were 3-10 times higher than the acceptable level of 1, while the cancer risks were 5-200 times higher than the maximum acceptable level of 1.0 × 10(-4). The study emphasized the significance of effective environmental management, particularly to ensure food security near battery facilities. PMID:25686884

  7. Mobilization of soil-borne arsenic by three common organic acids: Dosage and time effects.

    PubMed

    Onireti, Olaronke O; Lin, Chuxia

    2016-03-01

    A batch experiment was conducted to investigate the mobilization of soil-borne arsenic by three common low-molecular-weight organic acids with a focus on dosage and time effects. The results show that oxalic acid behaved differently from citric acid and malic acid in terms of mobilizing As that was bound to iron compounds. At an equivalent molar concentration, reactions between oxalic acid and soil-borne Fe were kinetically more favourable, as compared to those between either citric acid or malic acid and the soil-borne Fe. It was found that reductive dissolution of soil-borne Fe played a more important role in liberating As, as compared to non-reductive reactions. Prior to the 7th day of the experiment, As mobility increased with increasing dose of oxalic acid while there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in mobilized As among the treatments with different doses of citric acid or malic acid. The dosage effect on soil-borne As mobilization in the citric acid and malic acid treatments became clear only after the 7th day of the experiment. Soluble Ca present in the soils could cause re-immobilization of As by competing with solution-borne Fe for available organic ligands to form practically insoluble organic compounds of calcium (i.e. calcium oxalate). This resulted in transformation of highly soluble organic complexes of iron (i.e. iron oxalate complexes) into slightly soluble organic compounds of iron (i.e. iron oxalate) or free ferric ion, which then reacted with the solution-borne arsenate ions to form practically insoluble iron arsenates in the latter part of the experiment. PMID:26774299

  8. High Systemic Exposure of Pyrazinoic Acid Has Limited Antituberculosis Activity in Murine and Rabbit Models of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Tasneen, Rokeya; O'Brien, Paul; Sarathy, Jansy; Safi, Hassan; Pinn, Michael; Alland, David; Dartois, Véronique; Nuermberger, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is a prodrug requiring conversion to pyrazinoic acid (POA) by an amidase encoded by pncA for in vitro activity. Mutation of pncA is the most common cause of PZA resistance in clinical isolates. To determine whether the systemic delivery of POA or host-mediated conversion of PZA to POA could circumvent such resistance, we evaluated the efficacy of orally administered and host-derived POA in vivo Dose-ranging plasma and intrapulmonary POA pharmacokinetics and the efficacy of oral POA or PZA treatment against PZA-susceptible tuberculosis were determined in BALB/c and C3HeB/FeJ mice. The activity of host-derived POA was assessed in rabbits infected with a pncA-null mutant and treated with PZA. Median plasma POA values for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC0-∞) were 139 to 222 μg·h/ml and 178 to 287 μg·h/ml after doses of PZA and POA of 150 mg/kg of body weight, respectively, in mice. Epithelial lining fluid POA concentrations in infected mice were comparable after POA and PZA administration. In chronically infected BALB/c mice, PZA at 150 mg/kg reduced lung CFU counts by >2 log10 after 4 weeks. POA was effective only at 450 mg/kg, which reduced lung CFU counts by ∼0.7 log10 POA had no demonstrable bactericidal activity in C3HeB/FeJ mice, nor did PZA administered to rabbits infected with a PZA-resistant mutant. Oral POA administration and host-mediated conversion of PZA to POA producing plasma POA exposures comparable to PZA administration was significantly less effective than PZA. These results suggest that the intrabacillary delivery of POA and that producing higher POA concentrations at the site of infection will be more effective strategies for maximizing POA efficacy. PMID:27139472

  9. PRELIMINARY EXPOSURE STUDY TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF ACID DEPOSITION ON COATED STEEL SUBSTRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the progress that has been made within the Coatings Effect Research Program that the Environmental Protection Agency conducts for Task Group VII within the National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program. his project involves the evaluation of the effects o...

  10. PHYSICAL DAMAGE FORMATION ON AUTOMOTIVE FINISHES DUE TO ACIDIC REAGENT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several types of automotive finishes with clear coatings were exposed to drops of acidic reagents at 54 degrees C. urface damage was examined using visual observations, reflection optical microscopy, SEM, EDS, and profilometry. eflection microscopy was the most useful technique f...

  11. {Delta}-Aminolevulinic acid dehydratase: A sensitive indicator of lead exposure in broiler chicks: (Gallus domesticus)

    SciTech Connect

    Bakalli, R.I.; Pesti, G.M.; Konjufca, V.

    1995-12-01

    Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, EC 4.2.1.24 (ALAD) is one of the enzymes participating in heme synthesis. The study reported in this paper was designed to determine the activity of erythrocyte ALAD anbd the relationship between this enzyme and tissue lead levels in chickens, during Pb intake and after withdrawing Bv from the feed. 20 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani, Sahar Isgor, O. Burkan Ormeci, Banu

    2013-11-15

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  13. Efflux Pump Gene Expression in Erwinia Chrysanthemi is Induced by Exposure to Phenolic Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important signaling molecule in local and systemic plant resistance. Following infection by microbial pathogens and the initial oxidative burst in plants, SA accumulation functions in the amplification of defense gene expression. Production of pathogenesisrelated proteins a...

  14. PREGNANCY LOSS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnancy loss in the mouse due to perfluorooctanoic acids (PFOA) was investigated in this present study. Daily administration of PFOA (20 or 40 mg/kg) by oral gavage to pregnant CD-1 mice from GD 1-17 led to 75% and 100% incidence respectively, of total resorption at term with c...

  15. MORPHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PROLONGED EXPOSURE TO OZONE AND SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL ON THE RAT LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pulmonary effects of a combination of ozone (0.5 ppm) and sulfuric acid aerosol (1 mg/cu. m.) and to assess the possibility of interactive effects. Groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were continously exposed to the pollutants, either indi...

  16. PRENATAL AND POSTNATAL EFFECTS IN RATS OF PERFLUORONONANOIC ACID EXPOSURE IN UTERO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, our understanding of the developmental toxicity of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) has focused on the C8 compounds. Ubiquitous environmental contaminants, PFAA’s are utilized as surfactants in a variety of industrial applications. Although several PFAAs have been ex...

  17. Transcriptome Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis Gene Expressionfollowing Exposure to Acidic and Alkaline pH

    SciTech Connect

    Leaphart, Adam B.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Huang, Katherine; Alm,Eric; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Arkin, Adam P.; Brown, Steven D.; Wu, Liyou; Yan,Tingfen; Liu, Xueduan; Wickham, Gene S.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-04-02

    The molecular response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 tovariations in extracellular pH was investigated based on genomewide geneexpression profiling. Microarray analysis revealed that cells elicitedboth general and specific transcriptome responses when challenged withenvironmental acid (pH 4) or base (pH 10) conditions over a 60-minperiod. Global responses included the differential expression of genesfunctionally linked to amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulationand signal transduction, transport, cell membrane structure, andoxidative stress protection. Response to acid stress included theelevated expression of genes encoding glycogen biosynthetic enzymes,phosphate transporters, and the RNA polymerase sigma-38 factor (rpoS),whereas the molecular response to alkaline pH was characterized byupregulation of nhaA and nhaR, which are predicted to encode an Na+/H+antiporter and transcriptional activator, respectively, as well assulfate transport and sulfur metabolism genes. Collectively, theseresults suggest that S. oneidensis modulates multiple transporters, cellenvelope components, and pathways of amino acid consumption and centralintermediary metabolism as part of its transcriptome response to changingexternal pH conditions.

  18. Evaluation of continuous 4 day exposure to peracetic acid as a treatment for Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The parasitic ciliate Ichthyophthirius multifiliis infests all species of freshwater fish and can cause severe economic losses in fish breeding. The most effective treatment, malachite green, has been banned in Europe and North America for use in food-fish production. Peracetic acid (PAA) was foun...

  19. Exposure to time varying magnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging reduces fentanyl-induced analgesia in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Teskey, G.C.; Prato, F.S.; Ossenkopp, K.P.; Kavaliers, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of exposure to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on analgesia induced by the mu opiate agonist, fentanyl, was examined in mice. During the dark period, adult male mice were exposed for 23.2 min to the time-varying (0.6 T/sec) magnetic field (TVMF) component of the MRI procedure. Following this exposure, the analgesic potency of fentanyl citrate (0.1 mg/kg) was determined at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-injection, using a thermal test stimulus (hot-plate 50 degrees C). Exposure to the magnetic-field gradients attenuated the fentanyl-induced analgesia in a manner comparable to that previously observed with morphine. These results indicate that the time-varying magnetic fields associated with MRI have significant inhibitory effects on the analgesic effects of specific mu-opiate-directed ligands.

  20. Characterization of new eye drops with choline salicylate and assessment of their irritancy by in vitro short time exposure tests.

    PubMed

    Wroblewska, Katarzyna; Kucinska, Małgorzata; Murias, Marek; Lulek, Janina

    2015-09-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the irritation potential of new eye drops containing 2% choline salicylate (CS) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and various polymers increasing eye drop viscosity (hydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinylpyrrolidone). The standard method for assessing the potential of irritating substances has been the Draize rabbit eye test. However the European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods and the Coordinating Committee for Validation of Alternative Methods recommend, short time exposure (STE) in vitro tests as an alternative method for assessing eye irritation. The eye irritation potential was determined using cytotoxicity test methods for rabbit corneal cell line (SIRC) after 5 min exposure. The viability of cells was determined using two cytotoxicity assays: MTT and Neutral Red Uptake. According to the irritation rankings for the short time exposure test, all tested eye drops are classified as non-irritating (cell viability >70%). PMID:27134543

  1. Characterization of new eye drops with choline salicylate and assessment of their irritancy by in vitro short time exposure tests

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewska, Katarzyna; Kucinska, Małgorzata; Murias, Marek; Lulek, Janina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the irritation potential of new eye drops containing 2% choline salicylate (CS) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and various polymers increasing eye drop viscosity (hydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinylpyrrolidone). The standard method for assessing the potential of irritating substances has been the Draize rabbit eye test. However the European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods and the Coordinating Committee for Validation of Alternative Methods recommend, short time exposure (STE) in vitro tests as an alternative method for assessing eye irritation. The eye irritation potential was determined using cytotoxicity test methods for rabbit corneal cell line (SIRC) after 5 min exposure. The viability of cells was determined using two cytotoxicity assays: MTT and Neutral Red Uptake. According to the irritation rankings for the short time exposure test, all tested eye drops are classified as non-irritating (cell viability >70%). PMID:27134543

  2. BLOOD AND BRAIN CONCENTRATIONS OF BIFENTHRIN CORRELATE WITH DECREASED MOTOR ACTIVITY INDEPENDENT OF TIME OF EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids are neurotoxic insecticides used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Due to the phase-out of organophosphate pesticides, the use of pyrethroids has increased. The potential for human exposure to pyrethroids has prompted pharmacodynamic and pharmac...

  3. Estrogens in the wrong place at the wrong time: fetal BPA exposure and mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Tessie; Speroni, Lucia; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) induced alterations of the genital tract and predisposed individuals to develop clear cell carcinoma of the vagina as well as breast cancer later in life. Gestational exposure of rodents to a related compound, the xenoestrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) increases the propensity to develop mammary cancer during adulthood, long after cessation of exposure. Exposure to BPA during gestation induces morphological alterations in both the stroma and the epithelium of the fetal mammary gland at 18 days of age. We postulate that the primary target of BPA is the fetal stroma, the only mammary tissue expressing estrogen receptors during fetal life. BPA would then alter the reciprocal stroma-epithelial interactions that mediate mammogenesis. In addition to this direct effect on the mammary gland, BPA is postulated to affect the hypothalamus and thus in turn affect the regulation of mammotropic hormones at puberty and beyond. PMID:25277313

  4. Lack of sensitivity of urinary trans,trans-muconic acid in determining low-level (ppb) benzene exposure in children.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Anna; Accorsi, Antonio; Raffi, Giovanni Battista; Nicoli, Luciana; Violante, Francesco Saverio

    2002-01-01

    Benzene is a widespread pollutant of which the main source in the outside environment is automotive traffic. Benzene is also present in cigarette smoke, and small quantities exist in drinking water and food; all of these sources contribute to pollution of indoor environments. Benzene exposure may be studied with biologic indicators. In the present study, the authors evaluated whether differences in urinary concentrations of trans,transmuconic acid (t,t-MA) were detectable in a sample of 150 children and if the chemical was correlated with environmental exposures to low levels of benzene. The children attended primary schools that had significantly different-but low-environmental benzene levels. Analysis of urinary t,t-MA was achieved with high-performance liquid chromatography (photodiode array detector), and analysis of passive air samplers for benzene was performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Statistical analysis (Kruskal-Wallis test) indicated that differences in urinary levels of t,t-MA in children from urban and rural areas were not statistically significant (p = .07), nor were there significant differences between children with and without relatives who smoked (p = .69). As has been shown in other studies of children and adults, results of our study evidenced (1) the difficulty of correlating concentrations of urinary biomarkers with environmental exposure to benzene at a parts-per-billion level (i.e., traffic and environmental tobacco smoke) and, consequently, (2) the lack of specificity of t,t-MA as a biological indicator for the study of a population's exposure. PMID:12507175

  5. Quantitative Metabolomic Analysis of Urinary Citrulline and Calcitroic Acid in Mice after Exposure to Various Types of Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Maryam; Chauthe, Siddheshwar; Strawn, Steven J.; Weber, Waylon M.; Brenner, David J.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2016-01-01

    With the safety of existing nuclear power plants being brought into question after the Fukushima disaster and the increased level of concern over terrorism-sponsored use of improvised nuclear devices, it is more crucial to develop well-defined radiation injury markers in easily accessible biofluids to help emergency-responders with injury assessment during patient triage. Here, we focused on utilizing ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) to identify and quantitate the unique changes in the urinary excretion of two metabolite markers, calcitroic acid and citrulline, in mice induced by different forms of irradiation; X-ray irradiation at a low dose rate (LDR) of 3.0 mGy/min and a high dose rate (HDR) of 1.1 Gy/min, and internal exposure to Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Strontium-90 (90Sr). The multiple reaction monitoring analysis showed that, while exposure to 137Cs and 90Sr induced a statistically significant and persistent decrease, similar doses of X-ray beam at the HDR had the opposite effect, and the LDR had no effect on the urinary levels of these two metabolites. This suggests that the source of exposure and the dose rate strongly modulate the in vivo metabolomic injury responses, which may have utility in clinical biodosimetry assays for the assessment of exposure in an affected population. This study complements our previous investigations into the metabolomic profile of urine from mice internally exposed to 90Sr and 137Cs and to X-ray beam radiation. PMID:27213362

  6. Evaluation of preventive and control measures for lead exposure in a South African lead-acid battery recycling smelter.

    PubMed

    Dyosi, Sindiswa

    2007-10-01

    In South Africa, new lead regulations released in February 2002 served as motivation for a cross-sectional study investigating the effectiveness of preventive and control measures implemented in a lead smelter that recycles lead-acid batteries. Twenty-two workers were observed and interviewed. Structured questionnaires were used to gather workers' personal information, perception about their work environment, health risks, and work practices. Retrospective data from air monitoring and medical surveillance programs were obtained from the plant's records. The smelter implemented a number of control measures for lead exposure, including engineering controls, administrative controls, and, as a last resort, personal protective equipment. Engineering controls were rated the best control measure and included local exhaust ventilation systems and wet methods. Positive pressure systems were used in the offices and laboratory. The local exhaust ventilation system was rated the best engineering control measure. Although control measures were used, areas such as smelting and refinery had average lead in air levels above 0.15 mg/m(3), the occupational exposure limit for lead. This was a concern especially with regard to the smelting area because those workers had the second highest mean blood lead levels; workers in the battery breaking area had the highest. Regular use of personal protective equipment by some workers in the "lead exposure zones" was not observed. Although the mean blood lead levels had been below 40 micro g/dL for more than 90% of the workers since 2001, more than 70% of workers reported concerns about their health while working in the smelter. Even though control measures were implemented, they were not adequate because in some areas lead in air exceeded the occupational exposure limit. Therefore, improvement of existing measures and regular monitoring of personal protective equipment use were included in the recommendations given to the smelter. PMID

  7. Influence of in ovo mercury exposure, lake acidity, and other factors on common loon egg and chick quality in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenow, Kevin P.; Meyer, Michael W.; Rossmann, Ronald; Gray, Brian R.; Arts, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted in Wisconsin (USA) to characterize in ovo mercury (Hg) exposure in common loons (Gavia immer). Total Hg mass fractions ranged from 0.17 mg/g to 1.23mg/g wet weight in eggs collected from nests on lakes representing a wide range of pH (5.0–8.1) and were modeled as a function of maternal loon Hg exposure and egg laying order. Blood total Hg mass fractions in a sample of loon chicks ranged from 0.84ug/g to 3.86 ug/g wet weight at hatch. Factors other than mercury exposure that may have persistent consequences on development of chicks from eggs collected on low-pH lakes (i.e., egg selenium, calcium, and fatty acid mass fractions) do not seem to be contributing to reported differences in loon chick quality as a function of lake pH. However, it was observed that adult male loons holding territories on neutral-pH lakes were larger on average than those occupying territories on low-pH lakes. Differences in adult body size of common loons holding territories on neutral-versus low-pH lakes may have genetic implications for differences in lake-source-related quality (i.e., size) in chicks. The tendency for high in ovo Hg exposure and smaller adult male size to co-occur in low-pH lakes complicates the interpretation of the relative contributions of each to resulting chick quality.

  8. Quantitative Metabolomic Analysis of Urinary Citrulline and Calcitroic Acid in Mice after Exposure to Various Types of Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Maryam; Chauthe, Siddheshwar; Strawn, Steven J; Weber, Waylon M; Brenner, David J; Fornace, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    With the safety of existing nuclear power plants being brought into question after the Fukushima disaster and the increased level of concern over terrorism-sponsored use of improvised nuclear devices, it is more crucial to develop well-defined radiation injury markers in easily accessible biofluids to help emergency-responders with injury assessment during patient triage. Here, we focused on utilizing ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) to identify and quantitate the unique changes in the urinary excretion of two metabolite markers, calcitroic acid and citrulline, in mice induced by different forms of irradiation; external γ irradiation at a low dose rate (LDR) of 3.0 mGy/min and a high dose rate (HDR) of 1.1 Gy/min, and internal exposure to Cesium-137 ((137)Cs) and Strontium-90 ((90)Sr). The multiple reaction monitoring analysis showed that, while exposure to (137)Cs and (90)Sr induced a statistically significant and persistent decrease, similar doses of external γ beam at the HDR had the opposite effect, and the LDR had no effect on the urinary levels of these two metabolites. This suggests that the source of exposure and the dose rate strongly modulate the in vivo metabolomic injury responses, which may have utility in clinical biodosimetry assays for the assessment of exposure in an affected population. This study complements our previous investigations into the metabolomic profile of urine from mice internally exposed to (90)Sr and (137)Cs and to external γ beam radiation. PMID:27213362

  9. Influence of in ovo mercury exposure, lake acidity, and other factors on common loon egg and chick quality in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Kenow, Kevin P; Meyer, Michael W; Rossmann, Ronald; Gray, Brian R; Arts, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    A field study was conducted in Wisconsin (USA) to characterize in ovo mercury (Hg) exposure in common loons (Gavia immer). Total Hg mass fractions ranged from 0.17 µg/g to 1.23 µg/g wet weight in eggs collected from nests on lakes representing a wide range of pH (5.0-8.1) and were modeled as a function of maternal loon Hg exposure and egg laying order. Blood total Hg mass fractions in a sample of loon chicks ranged from 0.84 µg/g to 3.86 µg/g wet weight at hatch. Factors other than mercury exposure that may have persistent consequences on development of chicks from eggs collected on low-pH lakes (i.e., egg selenium, calcium, and fatty acid mass fractions) do not seem to be contributing to reported differences in loon chick quality as a function of lake pH. However, it was observed that adult male loons holding territories on neutral-pH lakes were larger on average than those occupying territories on low-pH lakes. Differences in adult body size of common loons holding territories on neutral-versus low-pH lakes may have genetic implications for differences in lake-source-related quality (i.e., size) in chicks. The tendency for high in ovo Hg exposure and smaller adult male size to co-occur in low-pH lakes complicates the interpretation of the relative contributions of each to resulting chick quality. PMID:26096773

  10. Acute prenatal exposure to a moderate dose of valproic acid increases social behavior and alters gene expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ori S; Varlinskaya, Elena I; Wilson, Carey A; Glatt, Stephen J; Mooney, Sandra M

    2013-12-01

    Prenatal exposure to moderate doses of valproic acid (VPA) produces brainstem abnormalities, while higher doses of this teratogen elicit social deficits in the rat. In this pilot study, we examined effects of prenatal exposure to a moderate dose of VPA on behavior and on transcriptomic expression in three brain regions that mediate social behavior. Pregnant Long Evans rats were injected with 350 mg/kg VPA or saline on gestational day 13. A modified social interaction test was used to assess social behavior and social preference/avoidance during early and late adolescence and in adulthood. VPA-exposed animals demonstrated more social investigation and play fighting than control animals. Social investigation, play fighting, and contact behavior also differed as a function of age; the frequency of these behaviors increased in late adolescence. Social preference and locomotor activity under social circumstances were unaffected by treatment or age. Thus, a moderate prenatal dose of VPA produces behavioral alterations that are substantially different from the outcomes that occur following exposure to a higher dose. At adulthood, VPA-exposed subjects exhibited transcriptomic abnormalities in three brain regions: anterior amygdala, cerebellar vermis, and orbitofrontal cortex. A common feature among the proteins encoded by the dysregulated genes was their ability to be modulated by acetylation. Analysis of the expression of individual exons also revealed that genes involved in post-translational modification and epigenetic regulation had particular isoforms that were ubiquitously dysregulated across brain regions. The vulnerability of these genes to the epigenetic effects of VPA may highlight potential mechanisms by which prenatal VPA exposure alters the development of social behavior. PMID:24055786

  11. Advancing Environmental Noise Pollution Analysis in Urban Areas by Considering the Variation of Population Exposure in Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, S.; Gomes, N.

    2013-05-01

    Ambient noise is a subtle form of pollution in large urban areas, degrading human health and well-being. In Europe, directives require that urban environmental noise be measured and mapped for the main periods of the daily cycle. Subsequent analyses of human exposure to noise in those periods is usually conducted using resident (i.e., nighttime) population from the census and assuming constant densities within the enumeration units. However, population distribution and densities vary considerably from night to day in metropolitan areas, and disregard for that process results in gross misestimation of exposure to ambient noise in the daytime period. This study considers the spatio-temporal variation of population distribution in assessing exposure to ambient noise in a major urban area, the city of Lisbon, Portugal. Detailed and compatible day- and nighttime population distribution maps were used, developed by means of "intelligent dasymetric mapping". After categorizing noise levels in existing maps in each period, classified according to current legislation, human exposure to ambient noise was assessed with temporally matching population surfaces. Population exposure to noise in 2000 and 2009 was compared and further analyzed in regards to main source of noise, i.e. road traffic vs. aircraft.. Results show that human exposure to noise shifts substantially in time and space, with a significant increase in exposed population from the nighttime to daytime period, especially in the higher noise levels. This is due to the combined effects of the daily variation of noise patterns and population distribution.

  12. Hepatic mitochondrial alteration in CD1 mice associated with prenatal exposures to low doses of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Erin M.; Filgo, Adam J.; Cummings, Connie A.; Kissling, Grace E.; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Fenton, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a perfluoroalkyl acid primarily used as an industrial surfactant. It persists in the environment and has been linked to potentially toxic and/or carcinogenic effects in animals and people. As a known activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), PFOA exposure can induce defects in fatty acid oxidation, lipid transport, and inflammation. Here, pregnant CD-1 mice were orally gavaged with 0, 0.01, 0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg of PFOA from gestation days (GD) 1 through 17. On postnatal day (PND) 21, histopathologic changes in the livers of offspring included hepatocellular hypertrophy and periportal inflammation that increased in severity by PND 91 in an apparent dose-dependent response. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of selected liver sections from PND 91 mice revealed PFOA-induced cellular damage and mitochondrial abnormalities with no evidence of peroxisome proliferation. Within hypertrophied hepatocytes, mitochondria were not only increased in number, but also exhibited altered morphologies suggestive of increased and/or uncontrolled fission and fusion reactions. These findings suggest that peroxisome proliferation is not a component of PFOA-induced hepatic toxicity in animals that are prenatally exposed to low doses of PFOA. PMID:25326589

  13. Resilience and recovery: the effect of triclosan exposure timing during development, on the structure and function of river biofilm communities.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J R; Topp, E; Waiser, M J; Tumber, V; Roy, J; Swerhone, G D W; Leavitt, P; Paule, A; Korber, D R

    2015-04-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a ubiquitous antibacterial agent found in soaps, scrubs, and consumer products. There is limited information on hazardous effects of TCS in the environment. Here, rotating annular reactors were used to cultivate river biofilm communities exposed to 1.8 μg l(-1) TCS with the timing and duration of exposure and recovery during development varied. Two major treatment regimens were employed: (i) biofilm development for 2, 4 or 6 weeks prior to TCS exposure and (ii) exposure of biofilms to TCS for 2, 4 or 6 weeks followed by recovery. Biofilms not exposed to TCS were used as a reference condition. Communities cultivated without and then exposed to TCS all exhibited reductions in algal biomass and significant (p<0.05) reductions in cyanobacterial biomass. No significant effects were observed on bacterial biomass. CLSM imaging of biofilms at 8 weeks revealed unique endpoints in terms of community architecture. Community composition was altered by any exposure to TCS, as indicated by significant shifts in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and exopolymer composition relative to the reference. Bacterial, algal and cyanobacterial components initially exposed to TCS were significantly different from those TCS-free at time zero. Pigment analyses suggested that significant changes in composition of algal and cyanobacterial populations occurred with TCS exposure. Bacterial thymidine incorporation rates were reduced by TCS exposure and carbon utilization spectra shifted in terms substrate metabolism. Direct counts of protozoans indicated that TCS was suppressive, whereas micrometazoan populations were, in some instances, stimulated. These results indicate that even a relatively brief exposure of a river biofilm community to relatively low levels of TCS alters both the trajectory and final community structure. Although some evidence of recovery was observed, removal of TCS did not result in a return to the unexposed reference condition. PMID

  14. Preliminary spectra of the primary cosmic ray nuclei from the first year of the NUCLEON experiment exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The NUCLEON cosmic ray observatory is designed to measure high energy cosmic ray composition and energy distribution. Methods of identification of charge and energy measurement for primary cosmic ray nuclei are considered. C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, Fe energy spectra are presented and discussed. The results are obtained from the first year of the planned exposure time.

  15. Preliminary cosmic ray proton and helium spectra from the first year of the NUCLEON experiment exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Igor

    2016-07-01

    The NUCLEON cosmic ray observatory is designed to measure high energy cosmic ray composition and energy distribution. Methods of identification of charge and energy measurement are presented. Preliminary proton and helium spectra and proton to helium ratio are presented. The results are obtained from the first year of the planned exposure time.

  16. Preliminary cosmic ray all-particle spectrum from the first year of the NUCLEON experiment exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podorozhny, Dmitry

    2016-07-01

    The NUCLEON cosmic ray observatory is designed to measure high energy cosmic ray composition and energy distributions. Methods of identification of charge and energy reconstruction and a preliminary cosmic ray all-particle spectrum are presented and discussed. The results are obtained from the first year of the planned exposure time.

  17. Preschool Children's Exposure to Media, Technology, and Screen Time: Perspectives of Caregivers from Three Early Childcare Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharkins, Kimberly A.; Newton, Allison B.; Albaiz, Najla Essa A.; Ernest, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Young children are being increasingly exposed to media, technology, and screen time (MeTS) at home and in instructional settings. Little is known about the long-term effects of MeTS and there is a lack of research concerning caregivers' opinions regarding young children's exposure to and utilization of MeTS. Therefore, this study explored the…

  18. Influence of calcium oxide level and time of exposure to sugarcane on in vitro and in situ digestion kinetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate, using in vitro and in situ techniques, the effects of three inclusion levels of calcium oxide (0, 5, and 10 g/kg of sugarcane fresh matter) and four exposure times (0, 24, 48, and 72 h) of sugarcane to calcium oxide on the chemical composition and digestive ...

  19. The Timing of Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Cortisol and Psychosocial Stress Is Associated with Human Infant Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia P.; Sandman, Curt A.

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of prenatal maternal stress for development were examined in 125 full-term infants at 3, 6, and 12 months of age. Maternal cortisol and psychological state were evaluated 5 times during pregnancy. Exposure to elevated concentrations of cortisol early in gestation was associated with a slower rate of development over the 1st year…

  20. TIME-DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT SEMINAL VESICLE DEVELOPMENTALLY ALTERED BY IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    TIME-DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT SEMINAL VESICLE DEVELOPMENTALLY ALTERED BY IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO TCDD. V M Richardson', J T Hamm2, and L S Birnbaum1. 'USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, 'Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, ...

  1. The time effect of chronic ethanol feeding on phospholipid fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M.T.; Tang, A.B.; Halsted, C.H.; Phinney, S.D. )

    1992-02-26

    The authors have previously shown that chronic ethanol feeding reduces arachidonic acid (AA) and other products of {delta}6 and {delta}5 desaturases in various tissues including muscle, the largest phospholipid (PL) pool. In this study they investigated the time-course effect of ethanol feeding on tissue fatty acid (FA) profiles. Five Yucatan micropigs were fed 89 kcal/kg body wt of diet containing ethanol and fat as 40 and 34% of energy, respectively. Five control pigs were pairfed corn starch instead of ethanol. Corn oil, 61% linoleic acid (LA), supplied most of dietary fat. PL fatty acids were quantitated by thin layer and gas chromatography. Below are FA profiles of control/ethanol groups by wt%. Underlined values differ p<0.05. In liver PL, ethanol resulted in increased LA but decreased palmitic acid, AA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) at 2 months. These changes remained constant for 12 months, whereas alpha-linolenic acid and DHA showed a progressive decline. For muscle, however, significant differences were not seen until 12 months. These results indicate time differences in ethanol effect on w6 and w3 FA composition, and that liver and muscle differ in their rates of response to ethanol. Their findings suggest that ethanol affects both desaturase activity and the precursor pool, and thus may alter membrane function.

  2. Chronic xerostomia increases esophageal acid exposure and is associated with esophageal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Korsten, M.A.; Rosman, A.S.; Fishbein, S.; Shlein, R.D.; Goldberg, H.E.; Biener, A. )

    1991-06-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chronic xerostomia on parameters of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis. DESIGN: Observational study of a cohort of male patients with xerostomia and age-matched control subjects. SETTING: Tertiary-care Veterans Affairs Medical Center. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male patients with chronic xerostomia secondary to radiation for head and neck cancers or medications. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects with comparable alcohol and smoking histories. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Esophageal motility was similar in patients with xerostomia and controls. Clearance of acid from the esophagus and 24-hour intraesophageal pH were markedly abnormal in patients with xerostomia. Symptoms and signs of esophagitis were significantly more frequent in subjects with xerostomia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic xerostomia may predispose to esophageal injury, at least in part, by decreasing the clearance of acid from the esophagus and altering 24-hour intraesophageal pH. Esophageal injury is a previously unreported complication of long-term salivary deficiency.

  3. Acute lung function responses to ambient acid aerosol exposures in children

    SciTech Connect

    Raizenne, M.E.; Burnett, R.T.; Stern, B.; Franklin, C.A.; Spengler, J.D.

    1989-02-01

    We examined the relationship between lung function changes and ambient acid aerosol episodes in children attending a residential summer camp. Young females (112) performed daily spirometry, and 96 were assessed on one occasion for airway hyperresponsiveness using a methacholine bronchoprovocation test. Air quality measurements were performed on site and four distinct acid aerosol episodes were observed during the 41-day study. The maximum values observed during the 41-day study were: O/sub 3/ at 143 ppb; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 47.7 micrograms/m/sup 3/; and (H+) at 550 nmole/m/sup 3/. Maximum decrements of 3.5 and 7% for FEV1 and PEF, respectively, were observed to be associated with the air pollution episodes. There was some evidence of a differential lung function response to the episodes where children with a positive response to a methacholine challenge had larger decrements compared to their nonresponsive counterparts.

  4. Protein reactivity with singlet oxygen: Influence of the solvent exposure of the reactive amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Béatrice; Foley, Sarah; Staicu, Angela; Pascu, Alexandru; Pascu, Mihail; Enescu, Mironel

    2016-06-01

    The singlet oxygen quenching rate constants were measured for three model proteins, bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme. The results were analyzed by comparing them with the corresponding singlet oxygen quenching rate constants for a series of tripeptides with the basic formula GlyAAGly where the central amino acid (AA) was the oxidizable amino acid, tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and histidine. It was found that the reaction rate constant in proteins can be satisfactorily modelled by the sum of the individual contributions of the oxidizable AA residues corrected for the solvent accessible surface area (SASA) effects. The best results were obtained when the SASA of the AA residues were determined by averaging over molecular dynamics simulated trajectories of the proteins. The limits of this geometrical correction of the AA residue reactivity are also discussed. PMID:27045278

  5. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure.

    PubMed

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T; Perera, Surangi N; Svoboda, Kurt R

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15-30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. PMID:25668718

  6. Decreased exposure of simvastatin and simvastatin acid in a rat model of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dan; Li, Feng; Zhang, Mian; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Can; Hu, Meng-yue; Zhong, Ze-yu; Jia, Ling-ling; Wang, Da-wei; Wu, Jie; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Simvastatin is frequently administered to diabetic patients with hypercholesterolemia. The aim of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of simvastatin and its hydrolysate simvastatin acid in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Methods: Diabetes was induced in 4-week-old rats by a treatment of high-fat diet combined with streptozotocin. After the rats received a single dose of simvastatin (20 mg/kg, po, or 2 mg/kg, iv), the plasma concentrations of simvastatin and simvastatin acid were determined. Simvastatin metabolism and cytochrome P4503A (Cyp3a) activity were assessed in hepatic microsomes, and its uptake was studied in freshly isolated hepatocytes. The expression of Cyp3a1, organic anion transporting polypeptide 2 (Oatp2), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) in livers was measured using qRT-PCR. Results: After oral or intravenous administration, the plasma concentrations and areas under concentrations of simvastatin and simvastatin acid were markedly decreased in diabetic rats. Both simvastatin metabolism and Cyp3a activity were markedly increased in hepatocytes of diabetic rats, accompanied by increased expression of hepatic Cyp3a1 mRNA. Furthermore, the uptake of simvastatin by hepatocytes of diabetic rats was markedly increased, which was associated with increased expression of the influx transporter Oatp2, and decreased expression of the efflux transporters Mrp2 and Bcrp. Conclusion: Diabetes enhances the metabolism of simvastatin and simvastatin acid in rats via up-regulating hepatic Cyp3a activity and expression and increasing hepatic uptake. PMID:25152023

  7. Effects of prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids on prevalence ofallergic diseases among 4-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Houman; Miyashita, Chihiro; Okada, Emiko; Kashino, Ikuko; Kobayashi, Sumitaka; Chen, Chi-Jen; Ito, Sachiko; Araki, Atsuko; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Ito, Yoichi M; Kishi, Reiko

    2016-09-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are ubiquitous chemicals extremely resistant and widespread throughout the environment, frequently being detected in human blood samples. Animal studies have revealed that exposure to PFAAs results in immunotoxicity. However, the association between PFAAs, especially long-chain PFAAs, and allergies in humans is not well established. We examined whether prenatal exposure to PFAAs is associated with allergic diseases among 4-year-old children in a large-scale prospective birth cohort in Hokkaido, Japan. In total, 1558 mother-child pairs were included in this study and prenatal levels of eleven PFAAs were measured in maternal plasma samples obtained between 28 and 32weeks of pregnancy by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Participant demographic and characteristic information were obtained from self-administered pre- and postnatal questionnaires and medical birth records. Infant allergies were assessed using the Japanese version of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase Three questionnaire, which was administered 4years post-delivery. Symptoms included eczema, wheezing and rhinoconjunctivitis with a prevalence of 19.0%, 18.7%, and 5.4%, respectively. Associations of PFAA quartiles with allergic outcomes were examined using logistic models. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) in the 4th quartile vs. 1st quartile (Q4 vs. Q1) for total allergic diseases (including at least one allergic outcome) significantly decreased for perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoDa) (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 0.621; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.454, 0.847) and perfluorotridecanoic acid (PFTrDA) (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 0.712; 95% CI: 0.524, 0.966) in all children. We obtained similar results when examining the association between PFAAs and eczema. The adjusted OR (Q4 vs. Q1) for wheezing in relation to higher maternal PFHxS levels was 0.728 (95% CI: 0.497, 1.06) in all children. In conclusion, prenatal exposure to long

  8. Real-time monitoring of matrix acidizing including the effects of diverting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, A.D.; Zhu, D.

    1996-05-01

    Real-time monitoring of the injection rate and pressure during matrix acidizing provides operators with a way to determine the changing skin factor as stimulation proceeds. Current methods are based either on the assumption of steady-state flow in the region around the wellbore affected by acid injection or on computer solution of the transient flow equations describing the unsteady reservoir flow process occurring during acidizing. In this paper, a new method for real-time monitoring of matrix acidizing, the inverse injectivity vs. superposition time function plot, is presented. This new method can be applied with a spreadsheet computer program or a programmable calculator and accounts for the transient flow effects occurring during matrix acidizing at multiple rates and injection pressures. The evolving skin factor during a matrix treatment is readily obtained from the diagnostic plot. Hypothetical examples show how the inverse injectivity plot can be used to assess the efficiency of stimulation and diversion. Comparisons with previously presented field cases show the new method to be a simple and accurate means of monitoring the evolving skin factor during matrix acidizing.

  9. Development of the town data base: Estimates of exposure rates and times of fallout arrival near the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.B.; McArthur, R.D.; Hutchinson, S.W.

    1994-09-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Off-Site Rad